Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol activation efficiency

  1. Aerosol mixing state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2013-05-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic hygroscopicity parameter, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions (forg) are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which predictions of the hygroscopicity parameter are compared against κ*. Strong diurnal changes in aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN at 0.51% ± 0.06% supersaturation can surpass by more than a factor of two the corresponding concentrations of 100 nm particles. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 LT throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as "internally mixed". Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour" and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing state and the presence of refractory material not measured

  2. CCN activation and efficiency of nucleation and impaction removal process of biomass burning aerosols in Brazil: preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gácita, Madeleine; Longo, Karla M.; Freitas, Saulo R.; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-04-01

    The biomass burning activity constitutes an important source of aerosols and trace gases to the atmosphere globally. In South America, during the dry season, aerosols prevenient from biomass burning are typically transported to long distances from its sources before being removed though contributing significantly to the aerosol budget on a continental scale. The uncertainties in the magnitude of the impacts on the hydrological cycle, the radiation budget and the biogeochemical cycles on a continental scale are still noteworthy. The still unknowns on the efficiency of biomass burning aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the effectiveness of the nucleation and impaction scavenging mechanisms in removing them from the atmosphere contribute to such uncertainties. In the present work, the explicit modelling of the early stages of cloud development using a parcel model for the typical conditions of the dry season and dry-to-wet transition periods in Amazonia allowed an estimation of the efficiency of nucleation scavenging process and the ability of South American biomass burning aerosol to act as CCN. Additionally, the impaction scavenging was simulated for the same aerosol population following a method based on the widely used concept of the efficiency of collision between a raindrop and an aerosol particle. DMPS and H-TDMA data available in the literature for biomass burning aerosol population in the region indicated the presence of a nearly hydrophobic fraction (on average, with specific hygroscopic parameter κ=0.04, and relative abundance of 73 %) and nearly hygroscopic fraction (κ=0.13, 27 %), externally mixed. The hygroscopic parameters and relative abundances of each hygroscopic group, as well as the weighted average specific hygroscopic parameter for the entire population κ=0.06, were used in calculations of aerosol activation and population mass and number concentration scavenged by nucleation. Results from both groups of simulations are

  3. Aerosol mixing-state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2012-06-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTDMA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, forg, are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which κAMS is inferred and compared against κ*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% ± 0.06%. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as internally-mixed. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour", and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the AMS

  4. Aerosol mixingstate, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Sara; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenberg, Mark; McMurry, Peter; Smith, James N.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2013-05-15

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. K¨ohler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, k*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, (forg), are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which kAMS is inferred and compared against k*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased k* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% +/- 0.06%. We also find that at 0600-0800 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as “internally-mixed”. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning “rush hour”, and the entire campaign. We show that k* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for k* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the

  5. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  6. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  7. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  8. A Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Aerosol Phase Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient thermodynamic module that is repeatedly used to compute internal aerosol phase state equilibrium. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient numerical solver called MESA (Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols). The unique formulation of MESA allows iteration of all the equilibrium equations simultaneously while maintaining overall mass conservation and electroneutrality in both the solid and liquid phases. MESA is unconditionally stable, shows robust convergence, and typically requires only 10 to 20 single-level iterations (where all activity coefficients and aerosol water content are updated) per internal aerosol phase equilibrium calculation. Accuracy of MESA is comparable to that of the highly accurate Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which uses a rigorous Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Performance evaluation will be presented for a number of complex multicomponent mixtures commonly found in urban and marine tropospheric aerosols.

  9. Experimental studies of silver iodide pyrotechnic aerosol ice forming efficiency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilin, A. G.; Drofa, A. S.; Ivanov, V. N.; Savchenko, A. V.; Shilin, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    The study concerns the problems connected with the temporal variability of aerosol ice forming activity at introduction into the sub-cloud layer and the comparison of aerosol efficiency of produced pyrotechnic mixtures with different silver contents.

  10. Risk in the mist? Deriving data to quantify microbial health risks associated with aerosol generation by water-efficient devices during typical domestic water-using activities.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, J; Keywood, M; Sinclair, M; Leder, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address existing data gaps and to determine the size distribution of aerosols associated with water-efficient devices during typical domestic activities. This information is important to assist in understanding infection spread during water-using activities and in designing water regulations. Three water-using scenarios were evaluated: i) showering using a water-efficient showerhead; ii) use of a high pressure spray unit for cleaning cars and iii) toilet flushing using a dual flush low volume flush device. For each scenario a control condition (conventional lower efficiency device) was selected for benchmarking purposes. Shower module results highlighted the complexity of particle generation and removal processes and showed that more than 90% of total particle mass in the breathing zone was attributed to particle diameters greater than 6 mum. Conversely, results for car washing experiments showed that particle diameters up to 6 mum constituted the major part of the total mass generated by both water-efficient and conventional devices. Even under worse case scenario conditions for toilet flushing, particle measurements were at or below the level of detection of the measuring instrumentation. The data provide information that assists in health risk assessment and in determining future research directions, including methodological aspects. PMID:19934513

  11. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  12. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Focusing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  13. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  14. Efficiency of aerosol collection on wires exposed in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, H. Y.; Farlow, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of inertial impaction is briefly presented. Stratospheric aerosol research experiments were performed duplicating Wong et al. experiments. The use of the curve of inertial parameters vs particle collection efficiency, derived from Wong et al., was found to be justified. The results show that stratospheric aerosol particles of all sizes are collectible by wire impaction technique. Curves and tables are presented and used to correct particle counts for collection efficiencies less than 100%.

  15. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  16. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  17. A Computationally Efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.

    2005-12-23

    This paper describes the development and application of a new multicomponent equilibrium solver for aerosol-phase (MESA) to predict the complex solid-liquid partitioning in atmospheric particles containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+, SO4=, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The algorithm of MESA involves integrating the set of ordinary differential equations describing the transient precipitation and dissolution reactions for each salt until the system satisfies the equilibrium or mass convergence criteria. Arbitrary values are chosen for the dissolution and precipitation rate constants such that their ratio is equal to the equilibrium constant. Numerically, this approach is equivalent to iterating all the equilibrium reactions simultaneously with a single iteration loop. Because CaSO4 is sparingly soluble, it is assumed to exist as a solid over the entire RH range to simplify the algorithm for calcium containing particles. Temperature-dependent mutual deliquescence relative humidity polynomials (valid from 240 to 310 K) for all the possible salt mixtures were constructed using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) activity coefficient model at 298.15 K and temperature-dependent equilibrium constants in MESA. Performance of MESA is evaluated for 16 representative mixed-electrolyte systems commonly found in tropospheric aerosols using PSC and two other multicomponent activity coefficient methods – Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Method (MTEM) of Zaveri et al. [2004], and the widely-used Kusik and Meissner method (KM), and the results are compared against the predictions of the Web-based AIM Model III or available experimental data. Excellent agreement was found between AIM, MESA-PSC, and MESA-MTEM predictions of the multistage deliquescence growth as a function of RH. On the other hand, MESA-KM displayed up to 20% deviations in the mass growth factors for common salt mixtures in the sulfate-poor cases while significant discrepancies were found in the predicted multistage

  18. High efficiency CIP 10-I personal inhalable aerosol sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görner, P.; Wrobel, R.; Simon, X.

    2009-02-01

    The CIP 10 personal aerosol sampler was first developed by Courbon for sampling the respirable fraction of mining dust. This respirable aerosol sampler was further improved by Fabries, then selectors for sampling thoracic and inhalable aerosols were designed. Kenny et al. evaluated the particle-size dependent sampling efficiency of the inhalable version in a large-scale wind tunnel using a life-size dummy. The authors found that the overall sampling efficiency decreases more rapidly than the CEN-ISO-ACGIH target efficiency curve. Görner and Witschger measured the aspiration efficiency of the CIP 10 omni-directional inlet. They found that the aspiration efficiency was high enough for inhalable aerosol sampling. This result led to the conclusion that the low sampling efficiency is due to some internal losses of the aspirated particles before they reach the final sampling stage, namely the CIP 10 rotating filter. Based on the assumption that the inhalable particles are selected at selector aspiration level, an experimental research project was conducted to improve particle transmission to the collection stage of the sampler. Two different inhalable selectors were designed by Görner and tested in a laboratory wind tunnel. The transmission efficiency of both models was measured by Roger following an experimental protocol described by Witschger. The T-shaped air flow circuit was finally adopted to draw the aspirated particles into the final collection stage of the CIP 10. Actually, in this selector, the almost horizontally aspirated particles should be conducted vertically to the rotating cup. In two previous prototypes, particles could be deposited in certain places by inertia (where the aerosol was forced to deviate drastically) or by sedimentation (where the aerosol decelerated). The aerodynamic behaviour of the adopted solution causes the particles to accelerate radially between two horizontal plates before they enter a vertical tube. This acceleration avoids the

  19. Amphiphobic Polytetrafluoroethylene Membranes for Efficient Organic Aerosol Removal.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shasha; Zhong, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yong; Xing, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane is an extensively used air filter, but its oleophilicity leads to severe fouling of the membrane surface due to organic aerosol deposition. Herein, we report the fabrication of a new amphiphobic 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFDAE)-grafted ZnO@PTFE membrane with enhanced antifouling functionality and high removal efficiency. We use atomic-layer deposition (ALD) to uniformly coat a layer of nanosized ZnO particles onto porous PTFE matrix to increase surface area and then subsequently graft PFDAE with plasma. Consequently, the membrane surface showed both superhydrophobicity and oleophobicity with a water contact angle (WCA) and an oil contact angle (OCA) of 150° and 125°, respectively. The membrane air permeation rate of 513 (m(3) m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)) was lower than the pristine membrane rate of 550 (m(3) m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)), which indicates the surface modification slightly decreased the membrane air permeation. Significantly, the filtration resistance of this amphiphobic membrane to the oil aerosol system was much lower than the initial one. Moreover, the filter exhibited exceptional organic aerosol removal efficiencies that were greater than 99.5%. These results make the amphiphobic PTFE membranes very promising for organic aerosol-laden air-filtration applications. PMID:27002786

  20. Large radiative forcing efficiency of atmospheric aerosols over the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarra, Daniele; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Di Biagio, Claudia; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Pietro Verza, Gian; Vuillermoz, Elisa

    2014-05-01

    , it becomes relatively large during elevated aerosol cases. The radiative forcing efficiency (radiative effect produced by a unit aerosol optical depth) is significantly larger than at other sites worldwide, reaching values above 360 W/m2 at about 50° solar zenith angle. The maximum radiative effect is about -90±18 Wm-2 (for τ=0.25), corresponding to a reduction by more than 10% of the solar radiation at the surface. During these elevated aerosol events high concentrations of pollutants were measured: PM10 and PM 2.5 showed concentrations higher than 50 ng m-3, while the black carbon concentration reached 3000 ng m-3. The backtrajectory analysis for the elevated aerosol cases shows that the polluted airmasses observed at NCO-P come from Indo-Gangetic plain and Punjab, regions characterized by the highest industrial and demographic concentration of the Indian subcontinent.

  1. The ice nucleation activity of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, H.; Pummer, B.; Bauer, H.; Bernardi, J.

    2012-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen may be important for several atmospheric processes. Particularly, the ice nucleation caused by PBAPs is a topic of growing interest, since their impact on ice cloud formation and thus on radiative forcing, an important parameter in global climate is not yet fully understood. In laboratory model studies we investigated the ice nucleation activity of selected PBAPs. We studied the immersion mode freezing using water-oil emulsion, which we observed by optical microscopy. We particularly focused on pollen. We show that pollen of different species strongly differ in their ice nucleation behavior. The average freezing temperatures in laboratory experiments range from 240 K to 255 K. As the most efficient nuclei (silver birch, Scots pine and common juniper pollen) have a distribution area up to the Northern timberline, their ice nucleation activity might be a cryoprotective mechanism. For comparison the ice nucleation activity of Snomax, fungal spores, and mushrooms will be discussed as well. In the past, pollen have been rejected as important atmospheric IN, as they are not as abundant in the atmosphere as bacteria or mineral dust and are too heavy to reach higher altitudes. However, in our experiments (Pummer et al. 2011) it turned out that water, which had been in contact with pollen and then been separated from the bodies, nucleates as good as the pollen grains themselves. So the ice nuclei have to be easily-suspendable macromolecules (100-300 kDa) located on the pollen. Once extracted, they can be distributed further through the atmosphere than the heavy pollen grains and so augment the impact of pollen on ice cloud formation even in the upper troposphere. It is widely known, that material from the pollen, like allergens and sugars, can indeed leave the pollen body and be distributed independently. The most probable mechanism is the pollen grain bursting by rain, which releases

  2. Compact Efficient Lidar Receiver for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gili, Christopher; De Young, Russell

    2006-01-01

    A small, light weight, and efficient aerosol lidar receiver was constructed and tested. Weight and space savings were realized by using rigid optic tubes and mounting cubes to package the steering optics and detectors in a compact assembly. The receiver had a 1064nm channel using an APD detector. The 532nm channel was split (90/10) into an analog channel (90%) and a photon counting channel (10%). The efficiency of the 1064nm channel with optical filter was 44.0%. The efficiency of the analog 532nm channel was 61.4% with the optical filter, and the efficiency of the 532nm photon counting channel was 7.6% with the optical filter. The results of the atmospheric tests show that the detectors were able to consistently return accurate results. The lidar receiver was able to detect distinct cloud layers, and the lidar returns also agreed across the different detectors. The use of a light weight fiber-coupled telescope reduced weight and allowed great latitude in detector assembly positioning due to the flexibility enabled by the use of fiber optics. The receiver is now ready to be deployed for aircraft or ground based aerosol lidar measurements.

  3. Design of Aerosol Particle Coating: Thickness, Texture and Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the performance (e.g. magnetic, plasmonic or opacifying) of a core material while modifying its surface with a shell that facilitates (e.g. by blocking its reactivity) their incorporation into a host liquid or polymer matrix. Here coating of titania (core) aerosol particles with thin silica shells (films or layers) is investigated at non-isothermal conditions by a trimodal aerosol dynamics model, accounting for SiO2 generation by gas phase and surface oxidation of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapor, coagulation and sintering. After TiO2 particles have reached their final primary particle size (e.g. upon completion of sintering during their flame synthesis), coating starts by uniformly mixing them with HMDSO vapor that is oxidized either in the gas phase or on the particles’ surface resulting in SiO2 aerosols or deposits, respectively. Sintering of SiO2 deposited onto the core TiO2 particles takes place transforming rough into smooth coating shells depending on process conditions. The core-shell characteristics (thickness, texture and efficiency) are calculated for two limiting cases of coating shells: perfectly smooth (e.g. hermetic) and fractal-like. At constant TiO2 core particle production rate, the influence of coating weight fraction, surface oxidation and core particle size on coating shell characteristics is investigated and compared to pertinent experimental data through coating diagrams. With an optimal temperature profile for complete precursor conversion, the TiO2 aerosol and SiO2-precursor (HMDSO) vapor concentrations have the strongest influence on product coating shell characteristics. PMID:23729833

  4. Efficiency tests of samplers for microbiological aerosols, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, E.; Faengmark, I.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain comparable results from studies using a variety of samplers of microbiological aerosols with different collection performances for various particle sizes, methods reported in the literature were surveyed, evaluated, and tabulated for testing the efficiency of the samplers. It is concluded that these samplers were not thoroughly tested, using reliable methods. Tests were conducted in static air chambers and in various outdoor and work environments. Results are not reliable as it is difficult to achieve stable and reproducible conditions in these test systems. Testing in a wind tunnel is recommended.

  5. Leaks in nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    Nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters, also known as high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, are commonly used in air cleaning systems for removal of hazardous aerosols. Performance of the filter units is important in assuring health and environmental protection. The filter units are constructed from pleated packs of fiberglass filter media sealed into rigid frames. Results of previous studies on such filter units indicate that their performance may not be completely predicted by ideal performance of the fibrous filter media. In this study, departure from ideal performance is linked to leaks existing in filter units and overall filter unit performance is derived from independent performance of the individual filter unit components. The performance of 14 nuclear grade HEPA filter units (size 1, 25 cfm) with plywood frames was evaluated with a test system that permitted independent determination of penetration as a function of particle size for the whole filter unit, the filter unit frame, and the filter media pack. Tests were performed using a polydisperse aerosol of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate with a count median diameter of 0.2 {mu}m and geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Flow rate and differential pressure were controlled from 1% to 100% of design values. Particle counts were made upstream and downstream of the filter unit with an optical particle counter (OPC). The OPC provided count information in 28 size channels over the particle diameter range from 0.1 to 0.7 {mu}m. Results provide evidence for a two component leak model of filler unit performance with: (1) external leaks through filter unit frames, and (2) internal leaks through defects in the media and through the seal between the media pack and frame. For the filter units evaluated, these leaks dominate overall filter unit performance over much of the flow rate and particle size ranges tested.

  6. Aerosol transport and deposition efficiency in the respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Laura; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of aerosol deposition in the respiratory system is important for improving the efficiency of inhaled drug delivery and for assessing the toxicity of airborne pollutants. Particle deposition in the airways is typically described as a function of the Stokes number based on a reference flow timescale. This choice leads to significant scatter in deposition data since the velocity and length scales experienced by the particles as they are advected through the flow deviate considerably from the reference values in many sections of the airways. Therefore, the use of an instantaneous Stokes number based on the local properties of the flow field is proposed instead. We define the effective Stokes number as the time-average of the instantaneous value. Our results demonstrate that this average, or effective, Stokes number can deviate significantly from the reference value particularly in the intermediate Stokes number range. In addition, the effective Stokes number shows a very clear correlation with deposition efficiency, and is therefore a more appropriate parameter to describe aerosol transport.

  7. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 μm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  8. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  9. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  10. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  11. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  12. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  13. A simple method for estimation of coagulation efficiency in mixed aerosols. [environmental pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Boyd, A.; Wolochow, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aerosols of KBr and AgNO3 were mixed, exposed to light in a glass tube and collected in the dark. About 15% of the collected material was reduced to silver upon development. Thus, two aerosols of particles that react to form a photo-reducible compound can be used to measure coagulation efficiency.

  14. High-Efficiency Generation and Delivery of Aerosols Through Nasal Cannula During Noninvasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Walenga, Ross L.; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated the delivery of pharmaceutical aerosols through nasal cannula and the feasibility of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) with a nasal interface. The objectives of this study were to develop a device for generating submicrometer aerosols with minimal depositional loss in the formation process and to improve aerosol delivery efficiencies through nasal cannulas. Methods A combination of in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that used the strengths of each method was applied. Aerosols were formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer, mixed with ventilation gas, and heated to produce submicrometer sizes. An improved version of the mixer and heater unit was developed based on CFD simulations, and performance was verified with experiments. Aerosol delivery was considered through a commercial large-bore adult cannula, a divided (D) design for use with ECG, and a divided and streamlined (DS) design. Results The improved mixer design reduced the total deposition fraction (DF) of drug within the mixer by a factor of 3 compared with an initial version, had a total DF of approximately 10%, and produced submicrometer aerosols at flow rates of 10 and 15 L/min. Compared with the commercial and D designs for submicrometer aerosols, the DS cannula reduced depositional losses by a factor of 2–3 and retained only approximately 5% or less of the nebulized dose at all flow rates considered. For conventional-sized aerosols (3.9 and 4.7 μm), the DS device provided delivery efficiencies of approximately 80% and above at flow rates of 2–15 L/min. Conclusions Submicrometer aerosols can be formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer and delivered through a nasal cannula with total delivery efficiencies of 80–90%. Streamlining the nasal cannula significantly improved the delivery efficiency of both submicrometer and micrometer aerosols; however, use of submicrometer particles with ECG delivery

  15. Parameterization of the influence of organic surfactants on aerosol activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Ghan, Steven J.

    2004-02-01

    Surface-active organic compounds, or surfactants, can affect aerosol activation by two mechanisms: lowering surface tension and altering the bulk hygroscopicity of the particles. A numerical model has been developed to predict the activation of aerosol particles consisting of an internally uniform chemical mixture of organic surfactants and inorganic salts in a parcel of air rising adiabatically at constant speed. Equations reflecting water balance of the air parcel were used together with a modified form of Köhler theory to model droplet nucleation while considering surface effects. We also extend a parametric representation of aerosol activation to the case of a mixture of inorganic salts and organic surfactants by modifying the Raoult term in Köhler theory (assuming additive behavior) and using a simplified relationship between surface tension and surfactant molar concentration to account for surface effects at the critical radius for activation. The close agreement (to within 10% for most and 20% for almost all conditions) between numerical and parametric results validates our modifications. Moreover, the form of the relationship is identical to an empirical relationship between surface tension and organic carbon concentration. Thus the modified form of the parameterization provides a framework that can account for the influence of observed organics on the activation of other salts. The modified form of the parameterization is tested successfully with the Po Valley model both for single aerosol size distribution and three-mode size distributions for marine, rural, and urban aerosols. Further measurements are required to extend the parameterization to other organic surfactants.

  16. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-07-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; conditionally activating organic-inorganic interactions; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 31.4 from benchmark under the rural conditions with 2 ppb isoprene and by factors of 10 71 under various test conditions with 2 10 ppb isoprene and >40% relative humidity while maintaining ±15% deviation. These speed-up methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  17. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sonya; Zhou, Shan; Onasch, Timothy B; Jaffe, Daniel A; Kleinman, Lawrence; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Briggs, Nicole L; Hee, Jonathan; Fortner, Edward; Shilling, John E; Worsnop, Douglas; Yokelson, Robert J; Parworth, Caroline; Ge, Xinlei; Xu, Jianzhong; Butterfield, Zachary; Chand, Duli; Dubey, Manvendra K; Pekour, Mikhail S; Springston, Stephen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-16

    Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, the regional and nearfield influences of wildfire emissions on ambient aerosol concentration and chemical properties in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were studied using real-time measurements from a fixed ground site located in Central Oregon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (∼2700 m a.s.l.) as well as near their sources using an aircraft. The regional characteristics of biomass burning aerosols were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), an index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE and plume aging. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresh emissions (∼1 h old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6-45 h), suggesting that biomass burning organic aerosol concentration and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate. PMID:27398804

  18. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-04-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; turning on organic-inorganic interactions only when the water content associated with organic compounds is significant; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 29.7 with ±15% deviation from benchmark results. These speedup methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  19. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed 'collection' or 'coagulation'. Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing at temperatures below 0 C. Theoretical studies have shown that for aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 micrometers, Brownian motion is important, and for particles with diameters larger than 1 micrometer, inertial force dominates. There is a collection efficiency minimum for particles between 0.1-2 micrometers, called the 'Greenfield Gap'. Experimental efforts, however, have been limited to very large drizzle and rain drops until recently, and constrained parameters necessary to describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets have not been available. One reason is that laboratory setups that allow for coagulation to be observed on a single-particle basis have been lacking. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for studying and assessing contact ice nucleation. Contact ice nucleation is currently the least understood ice nucleation mechanism and can be potentially important for mixed-phase cloud formation. The significance of experimentally assessing collection efficiency is therefore two-fold: to first understand the frequency of contacts and to then understand the fraction that lead to ice nucleation. We have constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets and contact freezing. A stream of 30-micron cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles. The outflow

  20. Lightning activity and aerosols in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of this study, the effect of aerosols on lightning activity has been investigated for the first time over the broader Mediterranean Sea. Atmospheric optical depth data retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite and cloud to ground lightning activity data provided by ZEUS network operated by the National Observatory of Athens were analyzed for a time period spanning from 01/01/2005 up to 31/12/2013. The results indicate the importance of aerosols in lightning modulation. The mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) values of the days with lightning activity were found to be higher than the mean seasonal AOD in 90% of the under study domain. Furthermore, the increasing rate of lightning activity with increasing aerosol loading was found to be more pronounced during summertime and for AOD values up to 0.4. Additionally, the spatial analysis showed that the percentage of days with lightning activity during summertime is increasing with increasing AOD. Finally, time series showed similar temporal behavior between AOD seasonal anomalies and days with lightning activity differences. Both the spatial and temporal analysis showed that lightning activity is correlated to AOD, a characteristic consistent for all seasons.

  1. CCN activation of fumed silica aerosols mixed with soluble pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalirian, M.; Keskinen, H.; Ahlm, L.; Ylisirniö, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Virtanen, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-09-01

    Particle-water interactions of completely soluble or insoluble particles are fairly well understood but less is known of aerosols consisting of mixtures of soluble and insoluble components. In this study, laboratory measurements were performed to investigate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of silica particles coated with ammonium sulphate (a salt), sucrose (a sugar) and bovine serum albumin known as BSA (a protein). In addition, the agglomerated structure of the silica particles was investigated by estimating the surface equivalent diameter based on measurements with a Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) and an Aerosol Particle Mass Analyzer (APM). By using the surface equivalent diameter the non-sphericity of the particles containing silica was accounted for when estimating CCN activation. Furthermore, characterizing critical supersaturations of particles consisting of pure soluble on insoluble compounds using existing frameworks showed that the CCN activation of single component particles was in good agreement with Köhler and adsorption theory based models when the agglomerated structure was accounted for. For mixed particles the CCN activation was governed by the soluble components, and the soluble fraction varied considerably with particle size for our wet-generated aerosols. Our results confirm the hypothesis that knowing the soluble fraction is the key parameter needed for describing the CCN activation of mixed aerosols, and highlight the importance of controlled coating techniques for acquiring a detailed understanding of the CCN activation of atmospheric insoluble particles mixed with soluble pollutants.

  2. CCN activation of fumed silica aerosols mixed with soluble pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalirian, M.; Keskinen, H.; Ahlm, L.; Ylisirniö, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Laaksonen, A.; Virtanen, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2015-04-01

    Particle-water interactions of completely soluble or insoluble particles are fairly well understood but less is known of aerosols consisting of mixtures of soluble and insoluble components. In this study, laboratory measurements were performed to investigate cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of silica particles mixed with ammonium sulfate (a salt), sucrose (a sugar) and bovine serum albumin known as BSA (a protein). The agglomerated structure of the silica particles was investigated using measurements with a differential mobility analyser (DMA) and an aerosol particle mass analyser (APM). Based on these data, the particles were assumed to be compact agglomerates when studying their CCN activation capabilities. Furthermore, the critical supersaturations of particles consisting of pure and mixed soluble and insoluble compounds were explored using existing theoretical frameworks. These results showed that the CCN activation of single-component particles was in good agreement with Köhler- and adsorption theory based models when the agglomerated structure was accounted for. For mixed particles the CCN activation was governed by the soluble components, and the soluble fraction varied considerably with particle size for our wet-generated aerosols. Our results confirm the hypothesis that knowing the soluble fraction is the key parameter needed for describing the CCN activation of mixed aerosols, and highlight the importance of controlled coating techniques for acquiring a detailed understanding of the CCN activation of atmospheric insoluble particles mixed with soluble pollutants.

  3. Calculating Capstone depleted uranium aerosol concentrations from beta activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Szrom, Frances; Falo, Gerald A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Whicker, Jeffrey J; Alberth, David P

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the DU source term for the subsequent Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Values for the equilibrium fraction ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92. This paper describes the process used and adjustments necessary to calculate uranium mass from proportional counting measurements. PMID:19204483

  4. Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

    2009-03-01

    Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

  5. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  6. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  7. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Oo, K.; Brown, M. D.; Dhaniyala, S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets. The collection efficiency study is a prelude to studying contact nucleation, which is a potentially important ice nucleation mode that is not well-understood. This laboratory setup is a step closer to experimentally assessing the importance of contact nucleation. Water droplets with 20 micron diameter and submicron aerosol particles are brought into contact in an injector situated inside a chilled glass flow tube. The water droplets that collect aerosol particles are allowed to pass through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), which accepts large droplets and rejects aerosol particles that have not coagulated with the water droplets. The collected droplets are sent into the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument which performs in situ chemical analysis of a single particle. The number of aerosol particles collected by the single water droplet is quantified by calibrating the PALMS with known concentrations of aerosol particles. The water droplets contain a known amount of ammonium sulfate for identification purpose in the mass spectrometry. Preliminary results from the experiment will be discussed and compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  8. Quantifying the Relationship between Organic Aerosol Composition and Hygroscopicity/CCN Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Petters, Markus D.

    2013-06-30

    The overall objective for this project was to provide the data and underlying process level understanding necessary to facilitate the dynamic treatment of organic aerosol CCN activity in future climate models. The specific objectives were as follows: (1) employ novel approaches to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity, (2) evaluate the effects of temperature and relative humidity on organic aerosol CCN activity, and (3) develop parameterizations to link organic aerosol composition and CCN activity.

  9. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2011-12-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the top (TOA) and at the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. In this study we have considered six main types of atmospheric aerosols: desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere. The ΔF averages obtained vary from -148 ± 44 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in Central Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.86 ± 0.51) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system, contributing to the greenhouse gas effect.

  10. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the Top (TOA) and at the Bottom Of Atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. Six main types of atmospheric aerosols have been compared (desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere) in similar observational conditions (i.e., for solar zenith angles between 55° and 65°) in order to compare the nearly same solar geometry. The instantaneous ΔF averages obtained vary from -122 ± 37 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in West Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.9 ± 0.5) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system.

  11. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  12. Anticandidal activity of pomegranate peel extract aerosol as an applicable sanitizing method.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Ahmed A; El-Tras, Wael F

    2010-03-01

    Pomegranate is a wonderful fruit from the paradise which contains a wide variety of precious phytochemical compounds applicable in the fields of therapeutics and health care. Candida albicans is the most common etiological agent for many clinical mycoses which could lead to human and animal death. Determination of the anticandidal activity of pomegranate peel extracts (PPE), and application of PPE aerosol as sanitizer agent against C. albicans contamination were investigated. Agar diffusion assay and broth microdilution susceptibility test were applied for qualitative and quantitative determining the PPE anticandidal activity, respectively, versus commonly used fungicides. Aerosolization of PPE using an experimentally designed sanitizer room was applied for examining C. albicans sanitation potentiality of extract. PPE exhibited potent anticandidal activity against C. albicans strains comparing with standard fungicides in both used susceptibility techniques. Methanol, ethanol and water extracts were the most effective for inhibiting C. albicans growth. PPE aerosol was an efficient method for complete sanitizing of semi-closed places against C. albicans growth. Application of PPE aerosol is a proper sanitizing method for preventing C. albicans contamination and growth in suspected places. PMID:19207830

  13. Biological aerosol detection with combined passive-active infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Agustin I.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ben-David, Avishai

    2004-12-01

    A data collection experiment was performed in November of 2003 to measure aerosol signatures using multiple sensors, all operating in the long-wave infrared. The purpose of this data collection experiment was to determine whether combining passive hyperspectral and LIDAR measurements can substantially improve biological aerosol detection performance. Controlled releases of dry aerosols, including road dust, egg albumin and two strains of Bacillus Subtilis var. Niger (BG) spores were performed using the ECBC/ARTEMIS open-path aerosol test chamber located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD. The chamber provides a ~ 20' path without optical windows. Ground truth devices included 3 aerodynamic particle sizers, an optical particle size spectrometer, 6 nephelometers and a high-volume particle sampler. Two sensors were used to make measurements during the test: the AIRIS long-wave infrared imaging spectrometer and the FAL CO2 LIDAR. The AIRIS and FAL data sets were analyzed for detection performance relative to the ground truth. In this paper we present experimental results from the individual sensors as well as results from passive-active sensor fusion. The sensor performance is presented in the form of receiver operating characteristic curves.

  14. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed "collection" or "coagulation". Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing. There is a theoretical collection efficiency minimum of particles with diameter between 0.1-2 µm, called the "Greenfield Gap". Experimental effort, however, was limited to drizzle and rain drops until recently, and has not constrained parameters that describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for assessing contact freezing, the least known ice nucleation mechanism today. Experimentally assessing collection efficiency can prove the existence of the "Greenfield Gap" and lay the foundation for studying contact freezing. We recently constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study coagulation experimentally. A stream of 40 µm cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles with known size and concentration. The outflow goes through a series of dryers before entering the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures of both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will

  15. [Investigation of Aerosol Mixed State and CCN Activity in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Li, Shi-zheng; Wang, Li-peng

    2016-04-15

    During 11-18 September 2014, the size-resolved aerosol Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activity and mixing state were measured using Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC), Aerosol Particle Mass (APM) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The results showed that aerosols mainly existed as an internal mixture. For 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, black carbon (BC) accounted for 5.4%, 10%, l0.7% and 6.7% of the particle mass, but as high as 51%, 57%, 70% and 59% of the particle number concentrations, respectively, suggesting that BC was a type of important condensation nuclei in the atmosphere and made significant contributions to particle numbers. The occasionally observed external mixtures were mainly present in 111 and 138 nm particles. The critical supersaturation was 0.25%, 0.13%, 0.06% and 0.015% for 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, respectively. Precipitation and haze had significant effects on the particle CCN activity. The hygroscopicity parameter K was 0.37, 0.29 and 0.39 in rainy, clear and hazy days, respectively. Particle density and CCN activity were impacted by chemical compositions. Compared with clear days, higher contents of inorganic salts and lower contents of organics were found on hazy days, accompanied by lower particle density and higher CCN activity. PMID:27548938

  16. Aerosol radiative forcing efficiency in the UV-B region over central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Lanzaco, Bethania L.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2016-07-01

    AEROSOL Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and global UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiance measurements and calculations were combined to investigate the effects of aerosol loading on the ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) reaching the surface under cloudless conditions in Córdoba, Argentina. The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and the aerosol forcing efficiency (ARFE) were calculated for an extended period of time (2000-2013) at a ground-based monitoring site affected by different types and loading of aerosols. The ARFE was evaluated by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 340 nm retrieved by AERONET at the Cordoba CETT site. The individual and combined effects of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the ARFE were also analyzed. In addition, and for comparison purposes, the MODIS AOD at 550 nm was used as input in a machine learning method to better characterize the aerosol load at 340 nm and evaluate the ARFE retrieved from AOD satellite measurements. The ARFE at the surface calculated using AOD data from AERONET ranged from (-0.11 ± 0.01) to (-1.76 ± 0.20) Wm-2 with an average of -0.61 Wm-2; however, when using AOD data from MODIS (TERRA/AQUA satellites), it ranged from (-0.22 ± 0.03) to (-0.65 ± 0.07) Wm-2 with an average value of -0.43 Wm-2. At the same SZA and SSA, the maximum difference between ground and satellite-based was 0.22 Wm-2.

  17. Efficient Nose-to-Lung (N2L) Aerosol Delivery with a Dry Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Golshahi, Laleh; Behara, Srinivas R.B.; Tian, Geng; Farkas, Dale R.; Hindle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Delivering aerosols to the lungs through the nasal route has a number of advantages, but its use has been limited by high depositional loss in the extrathoracic airways. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nose-to-lung (N2L) delivery of excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation aerosols generated with a new inline dry powder inhaler (DPI). The device was also adapted to enable aerosol delivery to a patient simultaneously receiving respiratory support from high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. Methods: The inhaler delivered the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which was formulated as submicrometer combination particles containing a hygroscopic excipient prepared by spray-drying. Nose-to-lung delivery was assessed using in vitro and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in an airway model that continued through the upper tracheobronchial region. Results: The best performing device contained a 2.3 mm flow control orifice and a 3D rod array with a 3-4-3 rod pattern. Based on in vitro experiments, the emitted dose from the streamlined nasal cannula had a fine particle fraction <5 μm of 95.9% and mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.4 μm, which was considered ideal for nose-to-lung EEG delivery. With the 2.3-343 device, condensational growth in the airways increased the aerosol size to 2.5–2.7 μm and extrathoracic deposition was <10%. CFD results closely matched the in vitro experiments and predicted that nasal deposition was <2%. Conclusions: The developed DPI produced high efficiency aerosolization with significant size increase of the aerosol within the airways that can be used to enable nose-to-lung delivery and aerosol administration during HFNC therapy. PMID:25192072

  18. Photochemical Activation of Chlorine by Iron and Iron Oxide Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The photochemical activation of chlorine by dissolved iron in sea-salt aerosol droplets and by highly dispersed Fe2O3 aerosol particles (mainly hematite, specific surface > 100 m2/g), exposed to gaseous HCl, was investigated in humidified air in a Teflon simulation chamber. Employing the radical-clock technique, we quantified the production of gaseous atomic Cl. When the artificial sea salt aerosols contained suspended Fe2O3 alone at pH 6, no significant Cl production could be observed, even if the dissolution of iron was forced by "weathering" (repeatedly freezing and thawing for five times). Adjusting the pH in the stock suspension to 2.6, 2.2, and 1.9 and equilibrating for one week resulted in a quantifiable amount of dissolved iron (0.03, 0.2, and 0.6 mmol/L, respectively) and in gaseous Cl production rates of ~1.6, 6, and 8 × 1021 atoms cm-2 h-1, respectively. Exposing the pure Fe2O3 aerosol in the absence of salt to various gaseous HCl concentrations resulted in rates ranging from 8 × 1020 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~4 ppb HCl) to 5 × 1022 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~350 ppb HCl) and confirmed the uptake and conversion of HCl to atomic Cl (at HCl to Cl conversion yields of 2-5 % mol/mol, depending on the relative humidity). The relevance for environmental processes in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  19. Observational Evidence of Aerosol Enhancement of Lightning Activity and Convective Invigoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Tianle; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Yu, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Lightning activity over the West Pacific Ocean east of the Philippines is usually much less frequent than over the nearby maritime continents. However, in 2005 the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) aboard the TRMM satellite observed anomalously high lightning activity in that area. In the same year the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measured anomalously high aerosol loading. The high aerosol loading was traced to volcanic activity, and not to any factor linked to meteorology, disentangling the usual convolution between aerosols and meteorology. We show that in general lightning activity is tightly correlated with aerosol loadings at both inter-annual and biweekly time scales. We estimate that a approximately 60% increase in aerosol loading leads to more than 150% increase in lightning flashes. Aerosols increase lightning activity through modification of cloud microphysics. Cloud ice particle sizes are reduced and cloud glaciation is delayed to colder temperature when aerosol loading is increased. TRMM precipitation radar measurements indicate that anomalously high aerosol loading is associated with enhanced cloud mixed phase activity and invigorated convection over the maritime ocean. These observed associations between aerosols, cloud microphysics, morphology and lightning activity are not related to meteorological variables or ENSO events. The results have important implications for understanding the variability of lightning and resulting aerosol-chemistry interactions.

  20. Inactivation efficiency to Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacterial aerosols of spraying neutral electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shinhao; Chang, Ming-Yih; Huang, Hsiao-Chien; Luo, Chin-Hsiang; Hung, Po-Chen; Fang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to apply neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) spraying to inactivate bioaerosols. We evaluated the inactivation efficiency of NEW applied to inactivate two airborne bacterial Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis aerosols inside an environmental-controlled chamber in the study. Generated with electrolyzing 6.15 M sodium chloride brine, the NEW with free available chlorine (FAC) concentration 50, 100, and 200 ppm was pumped with an air pressure of 70 kg/cm2 through nozzle into the chamber to inactive E. coli and B. subtilis aerosols precontaminated air (initial counts of 3 x 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU]/m3). Bacterial aerosols were collected and cultured from chamber before and after NEW spray. The air exchange rate (ACH, hr(-1)) of the chamber was set to simulate fresh air ventilating dilution of indoor environment. First-order concentration decaying coefficients (Ka, min(-1)) of both bacterial aerosols were measured as an index of NEW inactivation efficiency. The result shows that higher FAC concentration of NEW spray caused better inactivation efficiency. The Ka values under ACH 1.0 hr(-1) were 0.537 and 0.598 for E. coli of FAC 50 and 100 ppm spraying, respectively. The Ka values of FAC 100 ppm and 200 ppm spraying for B. subtilis were 0.063 and 0.085 under ACH 1.0 hr(-1), respectively. The results indicated that NEW spray is likely to be effective in inactivation of bacterial airborne contamination. Moreover, it is observed in the study that the increase of ventilation rate and the use of a larger orifice-size nozzle may facilitate the inactivation efficiency. PMID:24558707

  1. A New Method for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients of Electrolytes in Aqueous Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2005-01-21

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients of various electrolytes in multicomponent aqueous solutions. This paper describes the development and application of a new mixing rule for calculating activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H+, NH4+, Na+, Ca2+ SO42-, HSO4-, NO3-, and Cl- ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte in a multicomponent solution based on its values in binary solutions of all the electrolytes present in the mixture at the solution water activity aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. The aerosol water content is calculated using the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson method. For self-consistency, most of the MTEM and Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson parameters are derived using the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model at 298.15 K. MTEM is evaluated for several multicomponent systems representing various continental and marine aerosols, and is contrasted against the mixing rule of Kusik and Meissner and the newer approach of Metzger et al. [2002]. Predictions of MTEM are found to be generally within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg model, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than predictions of the other two methods. MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems – a major computational advantage over other iterative methods. CPU time requirements of MTEM relative to other methods for sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems are also discussed.

  2. Solid versus Liquid Particle Sampling Efficiency of Three Personal Aerosol Samplers when Facing the Wind

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Anthony, T. Renee; Van Dyke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the facing-the-wind sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers as a function of particle phase (solid versus liquid). Samplers examined were the IOM, Button, and a prototype personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH). The prototype PHISH was designed to interface with the 37-mm closed-face cassette and provide an inhalable sample at 10 l min−1 of flow. Increased flow rate increases the amount of mass collected during a typical work shift and helps to ensure that limits of detection are met, particularly for well-controlled but highly toxic species. Two PHISH prototypes were tested: one with a screened inlet and one with a single-pore open-face inlet. Personal aerosol samplers were tested on a bluff-body disc that was rotated along the facing-the-wind axis to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. When compared to published data for facing-wind aspiration efficiency for a mouth-breathing mannequin, the IOM oversampled relative to mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency for all sizes and particle types (solid and liquid). The sampling efficiency of the Button sampler was closer to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency than the IOM for solid particles, but the screened inlet removed most liquid particles, resulting in a large underestimation compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. The open-face PHISH results showed overestimation for solid particles and underestimation for liquid particles when compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. Substantial (and statistically significant) differences in sampling efficiency were observed between liquid and solid particles, particularly for the Button and screened-PHISH, with a majority of aerosol mass depositing on the screened inlets of these samplers. Our results suggest that large droplets have low penetration efficiencies

  3. Water Activity Limits the Hygroscopic Growth Factor of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. I.; Cabrera, J. A.; Golden, D.; Tabazadeh, A.

    2007-12-01

    In this work we study the hygroscopic behavior of organic aerosols, which has important implications for Earth's climate. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) is defined as the ratio of the diameter of a spherical particle when it is exposed to dry conditions to that at humid conditions. We present a new formulation to express the HGF of an aerosol particle as a function of water activity (aw) in the aqueous phase. This new formulation matches reported HGFs for common inorganic salts and water-miscible organic particles that are known to deliquesce into aqueous drops at high relative humidities (RH). Many studies use tandem differential mobility analyzers (TDMA) to determine the HGF of organic aerosols. For example, Brooks et al. used a TDMA to measure a HGF of 1.2 for 2 μm phthalic acid (PA) particles at 90% RH (aw= 0.9). However, water activity limits the growth of a particle that can be attributed to water uptake. We have assembled a vapor pressure apparatus to measure aw of aqueous solutions at room temperature. Measured water activities for PA, used in our growth formulation, yield a HGF of ~ 1.0005 for 2 μm PA particles at 90% RH. Comparing our results against Brooks et al. suggests that TDMA experiments may grossly overestimate the HGF of PA particles since water activity limits this growth to below 1.0005. Alternatively, we suggest that the adsorption of a negligible mass of water by a highly porous PA particle can lead to an apparent growth in particle size by changing its morphology. Other studies also use TDMAs to measure HGFs of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). HGFs reported for SOAs are very similar to PA, suggesting that the observed growth may be due to morphological changes in particle size rather than water uptake as commonly assumed. We built a smog chamber where an organic precursor, such as d-limonene, reacts with nitrogen oxides under UV radiation to produce SOAs. We compare the HGFs for SOAs obtained with our method to those obtained with

  4. A Fast and Efficient Version of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) Global Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yunha; Adams, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops more computationally efficient versions of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithms, collectively called Fast TOMAS. Several methods for speeding up the algorithm were attempted, but only reducing the number of size sections was adopted. Fast TOMAS models, coupled to the GISS GCM II-prime, require a new coagulation algorithm with less restrictive size resolution assumptions but only minor changes in other processes. Fast TOMAS models have been evaluated in a box model against analytical solutions of coagulation and condensation and in a 3-D model against the original TOMAS (TOMAS-30) model. Condensation and coagulation in the Fast TOMAS models agree well with the analytical solution but show slightly more bias than the TOMAS-30 box model. In the 3-D model, errors resulting from decreased size resolution in each process (i.e., emissions, cloud processing wet deposition, microphysics) are quantified in a series of model sensitivity simulations. Errors resulting from lower size resolution in condensation and coagulation, defined as the microphysics error, affect number and mass concentrations by only a few percent. The microphysics error in CN70CN100 (number concentrations of particles larger than 70100 nm diameter), proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, range from 5 to 5 in most regions. The largest errors are associated with decreasing the size resolution in the cloud processing wet deposition calculations, defined as cloud-processing error, and range from 20 to 15 in most regions for CN70CN100 concentrations. Overall, the Fast TOMAS models increase the computational speed by 2 to 3 times with only small numerical errors stemming from condensation and coagulation calculations when compared to TOMAS-30. The faster versions of the TOMAS model allow for the longer, multi-year simulations required to assess aerosol effects on cloud lifetime and precipitation.

  5. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  6. The dynamic surface tension of atmospheric aerosol surfactants reveals new aspects of cloud activation

    PubMed Central

    Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The activation of aerosol particles into cloud droplets in the Earth’s atmosphere is both a key process for the climate budget and a main source of uncertainty. Its investigation is facing major experimental challenges, as no technique can measure the main driving parameters, the Raoult’s term and surface tension, σ, for sub-micron atmospheric particles. In addition, the surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols could not be isolated until recently. Here we present the first dynamic investigation of the total surfactant fraction of atmospheric aerosols, evidencing adsorption barriers that limit their gradient (partitioning) in particles and should enhance their cloud-forming efficiency compared with current models. The results also show that the equilibration time of surfactants in sub-micron atmospheric particles should be beyond the detection of most on-line instruments. Such instrumental and theoretical shortcomings would be consistent with atmospheric and laboratory observations and could have limited the understanding of cloud activation until now. PMID:24566451

  7. Mathematical Model for Determinating the Efficiency of Separation of Aerosols in Dry and Sprayed Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Iskhakov, A. R.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent fl ow of aerosols in a cylindrical channel has been investigated. Differential equations of transfer of dispersed particles have been considered, and a two-dimensional equation with a mass source has been solved. Different numerical experiments have been conducted on the basis of the model proposed. Air with water droplets was used as a gas-liquid mixture in the calculations. The influence of the spraying of the channel, the fl ow velocity, the diameter of dispersed particles, and the water concentration on the separation efficiency of an aerosol have been studied. Agreement with experimental data has been shown. A mathematical model has been developed that can be used in designing gas-cleaning apparatuses for enterprises of various industries.

  8. Aerosol activation properties and CCN closure during TCAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Shilling, J. E.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J.; Berg, L. K.; Schmid, B.

    2013-12-01

    The indirect effects of atmospheric aerosols currently remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period (IPCC, 2007). This large uncertainty is partially due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of particles to form cloud droplets under atmospherically relevant supersaturation. In addition, there is a large uncertainty in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) simulated by climate models near the North American coast and a wide variety in the types of clouds are observed over this region. The goal of the US Department of Energy Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) is to understand the processes responsible for producing and maintaining aerosol distributions and associated radiative and cloud forcing off the coast of North America. During the TCAP study, aerosol total number concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were in-situ measured from the DOE Gulfstream 1 (G-1) research aircraft during two Intensive Operations Periods (IOPs), one conducted in July 2012 and the other in February 2013. An overall aerosol size distribution was achieved by merging the observations from several instruments, including Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A, DMT), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-200, DMT), and Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS, DMT). Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.) and single particle mass spectrometer, mini-SPLAT. Based on the aerosol size distribution, CCN number concentration (characterized by a DMT dual column CCN counter with a range from 0.1% to 0.4%), and chemical composition, a CCN closure was obtained. The sensitivity of CCN closure to organic hygroscopicity was investigated. The differences in aerosol/CCN properties between two columns, and between two phases, will be discussed.

  9. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4

  10. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Juenemann, P J; Tom, H; Boudreau, R J; Chandler, R P; Loken, M K

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using [99mTc]DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, we have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of [99mTc]DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. Use of higher concentration of ethanol to the nebulizer solution did not further improve delivery efficiency. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of [99mTc]DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution. PMID:3889235

  11. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  12. Estimation of aerosol mass scattering efficiencies under high mass loading: case study for the megacity of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Chen, Changhong; Gao, Jian; Wang, Shuxiao; Watson, John G; Wang, Hongli; Deng, Jianguo; Wang, Buying; Zhou, Min; Chow, Judith C; Pitchford, Marc L; Hao, Jiming

    2015-01-20

    Aerosol mass scattering efficiency (MSE), used for the scattering coefficient apportionment of aerosol species, is often studied under the condition of low aerosol mass loading in developed countries. Severe pollution episodes with high particle concentration frequently happened in eastern urban China in recent years. Based on synchronous measurement of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties at the megacity of Shanghai for two months during autumn 2012, we studied MSE characteristics at high aerosol mass loading. Their relationships with mass concentrations and size distributions were examined. It was found that MSE values from the original US IMPROVE algorithm could not represent the actual aerosol characteristics in eastern China. It results in an underestimation of the measured ambient scattering coefficient by 36%. MSE values in Shanghai were estimated to be 3.5 ± 0.55 m(2)/g for ammonia sulfate, 4.3 ± 0.63 m(2)/g for ammonia nitrate, and 4.5 ± 0.73 m(2)/g for organic matter, respectively. MSEs for three components increased rapidly with increasing mass concentration in low aerosol mass loading, then kept at a stable level after a threshold mass concentration of 12–24 μg/m(3). During severe pollution episodes, particle growth from an initial peak diameter of 200–300 nm to a peak diameter of 500–600 nm accounts for the rapid increase in MSEs at high aerosol mass loading, that is, particle diameter becomes closer to the wavelength of visible lights. This study provides insights of aerosol scattering properties at high aerosol concentrations and implies the necessity of MSE localization for extinction apportionment, especially for the polluted regions. PMID:25495050

  13. The Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on the Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veroustraete, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol pollution attracts a growing interest from atmospheric scientists with regard to their impact on health, the global climate and vegetation stress. A hypothesis, less investigated, is whether atmospheric aerosol interactions in the solar radiation field affect the amount of radiation absorbed by vegetation canopies and hence terrestrial vegetation productivity. Typically, aerosols affect vegetation canopy radiation absorption efficiency by altering the physical characteristics of solar radiation incoming on for example a forest canopy. It has been illustrated, that increasing mixing ratio's of atmospheric particulate matter lead to a higher fraction of diffuse sunlight as opposed to direct sunlight. It can be demonstrated, based on the application of atmospheric (MODTRAN) and leaf/canopy radiative transfer (LIBERTY/SPRINT) models, that radiation absorption efficiency in the PAR band of Picea like forests increases with increasing levels of diffuse radiation. It can be documented - on a theoretical basis - as well, that increasing aerosol loads in the atmosphere, induce and increased canopy PAR absorption efficiency. In this paper it is suggested, that atmospheric aerosols have to be taken into account when estimating vegetation gross primary productivity (GPP). The results suggest that Northern hemisphere vegetation CO2 uptake magnitude may increase with increasing atmospheric aerosol loads. Many climate impact scenario's related to vegetation productivity estimates, do not take this phenomenon into account. Boldly speaking, the results suggest a larger sink function for terrestrial vegetation than generally accepted. Keywords: Aerosols, vegetation, fAPAR, CO2 uptake, diffuse radiation.

  14. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Aerosol Breathing Zone Concentrations During Common Outdoor Activities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research has been conducted on aerosol emission rates during various activities as well as aerosol transport into the breathing zone under idealized conditions. However, there has been little effort to link the two into a model for predicting a person’s breathing zone concentrat...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF AN RH -DENUDED MIE ACTIVE SAMPLING SYSTEM AND TARGETED AEROSOL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MIE pDR 1200 nephelometer provides time resolved aerosol concentrations during personal and fixed-site sampling. Active (pumped) operation allows defining an upper PM2.5 particle size, however, this dramatically increases the aerosol mass passing through the phot...

  16. Cloud condensation nuclei activity of aliphatic amine secondary aerosol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aliphatic amines can form secondary aerosol via oxidation with atmospheric radicals (e.g. hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical). The resulting particle composition can contain both secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and inorganic salts. The fraction of organic to inorganic materials in the particulate ...

  17. Competing effects of viscosity and surface-tension depression on the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Shiraiwa, M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J.; Schilling, K.; Berkemeier, T.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of oligomers in biomass burning aerosol, as well as secondary organic aerosol derived from other sources, influences particle viscosity and can introduce kinetic limitations to water uptake. This, in turn, impacts aerosol optical properties and the efficiency with which these particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). To explore the influence of organic-component viscosity on aerosol hygroscopicity, the water-uptake behavior of aerosol systems comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and mixtures of PEG and ammonium sulfate (AS) was measured under sub- and supersaturated relative humidity (RH) conditions. Experiments were conducted with systems containing PEG with average molecular weights ranging from 200 to 10,000 g/mol, corresponding to a range in viscosity of 0.004 - 4.5 Pa s under dry conditions. While evidence suggests that viscous aerosol components can suppress water uptake at RH < 90%, under supersaturated conditions (with respect to RH), an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular weight was observed. We attribute this to an increase in the efficiency with which PEG serves as a surfactant with increasing molecular weight. This effect is most pronounced for PEG-AS mixtures and, in fact, a modest increase in CCN activity is observed for the PEG 10,000-AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 4% reduction in critical activation diameter. Experimental results are compared with calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients model and the potential influence of kinetic limitations to observed water uptake is further explored with the Kinetic Multi-Layer Model of Gas-Particle Interactions. Results suggest the competing effects of organic-component viscosity and surface-tension depression may lead to RH-dependent differences in hygroscopicity for oligomers and other surface-active compounds present in atmospheric

  18. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sirr, S.A.; Juenemann, P.J.; Tom, H.; Boudreau, R.J.; Chandler, R.P.; Loken, M.K.

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, the authors have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution.

  19. Cloud — Aerosol interaction during lightning activity over land and ocean: Precipitation pattern assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jayanti; Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Chowdhury, Arumita Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Tanuka

    2016-06-01

    The present study attempts to identify the land - ocean contrast in cloud - aerosol relation during lightning and non-lightning days and its effect on subsequent precipitation pattern. The thermal hypothesis in view of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) behind the land - ocean contrast is observed to be insignificant in the present study region. The result shows that the lightning activities are significantly and positively correlated with aerosols over both land and ocean in case of low aerosol loading whereas for high aerosol loading the correlation is significant but, only over land. The study attempts to comprehend the mechanism through which the aerosol and lightning interact using the concept of aerosol indirect effect that includes the study of cloud effective radius, cloud fraction and precipitation rate. The result shows that the increase in lightning activity over ocean might have been caused due to the first aerosol indirect effect, while over land the aerosol indirect effect might have been suppressed due to lightning. Thus, depending on the region and relation between cloud parameters it is observed that the precipitation rate decreases (increases) over ocean during lightning (non-lightning) days. On the other hand during non-lightning days, the precipitation rate decreases over land.

  20. Understanding the Role of Riming in Deep Convection Through Variability in Collection Efficiencies and Aerosol Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; van den Heever, S. C.; Marinescu, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.; Tao, W. K.; Matsui, T.; Wu, D.

    2015-12-01

    In many mixed-phase cloud systems, the riming of cloud droplets is a key microphysical process in the growth of precipitation-sized hydrometeors. The relative importance of riming compared to other hydrometeor growth mechanisms depends on the type of cloud system and the mass, size, and number concentration of cloud droplets and ice species. In a perturbed climate state, the nature of deep convection may be altered through changes in the environmental conditions and aerosol concentrations. Such climate-induced variability can modify the dominant microphysical processes that generate precipitation through changes in hydrometeor size spectra. Such changes could either increase or decrease precipitation production and efficiency as well as impact associated morphology of clouds and convection. If the efficiency of the riming process is modified through these climate changes, it can alter the accumulated precipitation, precipitation intensity, spatial and temporal distribution of cloud and ice water, and the radiation budget through the modification of ice spectra and areal coverage of upper-level anvil clouds. The impacts of variability in aerosol concentration and collision efficiencies on the riming process in deep convection is explored through the use of high-resolution cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line that occurred May 20, 2011 over the U.S. central plains during the MC3E field project. Results thus far have demonstrated that changes in the riming rates strongly impact the intensity and partitioning of squall line precipitation between convective and stratiform, the lofting of condensate to upper levels, the vertical distribution of latent heating, and the area and optical thickness of stratiform anvil clouds. Analyses from direct tests of microphysical processes have revealed that a reduction in riming rates leads to less precipitation, greater amounts of lofted cloud water, and greater ice mass in cirrus anvils. Further, an increase in aerosol

  1. Sources and evolution of cloud-active aerosol in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Noblitt, S.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Cahill, J. F.; Prather, K. A.; Collett, J. L.; Henry, C.

    2011-12-01

    To assess the sources of cloud-active aerosol and their influence on the hydrological cycle in California, the CalWater Experiment took place in winter 2011 in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. During this experiment, we coupled the capabilities of demonstrated miniaturized instrumentation - cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), water condensation nuclei (WCN) and microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) - to provide direct chemical measurements of cloud active aerosols. Ion concentrations of CCN droplets attribute the anthropogenic, marine and secondary organic contributions to cloud-active aerosols. Detailed spectra from an Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer provide additional information on the sources of aerosol. Storm fronts and changes in atmospheric boundary layer brought aerosol and anions associated with Central Valley pollution to the field site with CCN concentrations reaching several thousand cm-3. Hygroscopicity parameters indicate aging of the organic fraction during aerosol transport from the Central Valley to the mountains. Otherwise, CCN concentrations were low when high pressure systems prevented boundary layer development and intrusion of the Central Valley pollution to the site. MCE results show that nitrates and sulfates comprise most of the fraction of the aerosol anion mass (PM1). During the passage of storm fronts, which transported pollution from the Central Valley upslope, nitrate concentrations peaked at several μ g m-3. Low supersaturation CCN concentrations coincide with increases in aerosol nitrate, which suggests that nitrate has a role in cloud formation of giant CCN and, furthermore, in precipitation processes in the Sierra Nevada. CCN spectra show large variations depending on the aerosol sources and sometimes exhibit bi-modal distributions with minima at 0.3% Sc -- similar to the so-called 'Hoppel minima' associated to number size distributions. During these bi-modal events, sulfate also increases supporting the

  2. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Oritz, Carlos A.; Marlow, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  3. NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF INERTIAL ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased sampling of airborne particulate from a flowing stream requires that the size distribution and concentration of aerosol collected be identical to that of the aerosol in the free stream. ampling errors occur during aspiration of the aerosol from the free stream to he face...

  4. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Hallar, Anna G.; McCubbin, Ian; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-09

    We present measurements of CCN concentrations and associated aerosol composition and size properties at a high-elevation research site in March 2011. CCN closure and aerosol hygroscopicity were assessed using simplified assumptions of bulk aerosol properties as well as a new method utilizing single particle composition and size to assess the importance of particle mixing state in CCN activation. Free troposphere analysis found no significant difference between the CCN activity of free tropospheric aerosol and boundary layer aerosol at this location. Closure results indicate that using only size and number information leads to adequate prediction, in the majority of cases within 50%, of CCN concentrations, while incorporating the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual aerosol components measured by single particle mass spectrometry adds to the agreement, in most cases within 20%, between predicted and measured CCN concentrations. For high-elevation continental sites, with largely aged aerosol and low amounts of local area emissions, a lack of chemical knowledge and hygroscopicity may not hinder models in predicting CCN concentrations. At sites influenced by fresh emissions or more heterogeneous particle types, single particle composition information may be more useful in predicting CCN concentrations and understanding the importance of particle mixing state on CCN activation.

  5. Impacts of organic aerosols and its oxidation level on CCN activity from measurement at a suburban site in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Yanan; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zhenzhu; Li, Ping; Sun, Li; Wang, Pucai; Cribb, Maureen; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Fan, Tianyi; Yang, Xin; Wang, Qingqing

    2016-05-01

    This study is concerned with the impacts of organic aerosols on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity based on field measurements made at a suburban site in Northern China. The sensitivity of the estimated CCN number concentration (NCCN) to both volume fraction of organic material (xorg) and aerosol oxidation level (using f44, the fraction of m/z 44 in aerosol organic material) are examined. A strong dependence of CCN number concentration (NCCN) on the xorg and f44 was noted. The sensitivity of NCCN to volume fraction of organics increased with increasing xorg. The impacts of the aerosol particles oxidization or aging level on estimating NCCN were also very significant. When the particles were mostly composed of organics (xorg > 60 %), the NCCN at the supersaturation of 0.075 and 0.13 % was underestimated by 46 and 44 %, respectively, if aerosol particles were freshly emitted with primary organics (f44 < 11 %); the underestimation decreased to 32 and 23 % at the corresponding supersaturations, however, if the particles were with more hygroscopic secondary organics (f44 > 15 %). The NCCN at the supersaturation of 0.76 % was underestimated by 11 and 4 %, respectively, at f44 < 11 and f44 > 15 %. However, for the particles composed of low organics (e.g., xorg < 40 %), the effect caused by the f44 was quite insignificant both at high and low supersaturations. This is because the overall hygroscopicity of the particles is dominated by inorganics such as sulfate and nitrate, which are more hygroscopic than organic compounds. Our results indicated that it would decrease the uncertainties in estimating NCCN and lead to a more accurate estimation of NCCN to increase the proportion of secondary organics, especially when the composition of the aerosols is dominated by organics. The applicability of the CCN activation spectrum obtained at Xinzhou to the Xianghe site, about 400 km to the northeast of Xinzhou, was investigated, with the aim of further examining the

  6. High-solids paint overspray aerosols in a spray painting booth: particle size analysis and scrubber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.L.; D'arcy, J.B.; Schreck, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Particle size distributions of high-solids acrylic-enamel paint overspray aerosols were determined isokinetically in a typical downdraft spray painting booth in which a 7-stage cascade impactor was used. Three different industrial paint atomizers were used, and the paint aerosols were characterized before and after a paint both scrubber. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of a metallic basecoat and an acrylic clearcoat paint aerosol from air-atomized spray guns ranged from 4-12 ..mu..m and was dependent on atomization pressure. When the paint booth was operated under controlled conditions simulating those in a plant, the collection efficiency of paint overspray aerosols by a paint scrubber was found to be size dependent and decreased sharply for particles smaller than 2 ..mu..m to as low as 64% for clearcoat paint particles of 0.6 ..mu..m. Improvement in the overall particulate removal efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the spray painting operations so as to produce the least amount of fine overspray paint aerosols less than 2 ..mu..m. Maintaining a higher static pressure drop across the paint both scrubber also will improve scrubber performance.

  7. AEROSOL DEPOSITION EFFICIENCIES AND UPSTREAM RELEASE POSITIONS FOR DIFFERENT INHALATION MODES IN AN UPPER BRONCHIAL AIRWAY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol Deposition Efficiencies and Upstream Release Positions for Different Inhalation Modes in an Upper Bronchial Airway Model

    Zhe Zhang, Clement Kleinstreuer, and Chong S. Kim

    Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Ch...

  8. Aerosol identification using a hybrid active/passive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Francis M.; Moon, Raphael P.; Davidson, Charles E.

    2005-08-01

    Recent experimental work has shown that passive systems such as hyperspectral FTIR and frequency-tunable IR cameras have application in detection of biological aerosols. This provided the motivation for a new detection technique, which we call Aerosol Ranging Spectroscopy (ARS), whereby a scattering LIDAR is used to augment passive spectrometer data to determine the location and optical depth of the aerosol plume. When the two systems are co-aligned or boresighted, the hybrid data product provides valuable enhancements for signal exploitation of the passive spectral data. This paper presents the motivation and theoretical basis for the ARS technique. A prototype implementation of an ARS system will also be described, along with preliminary results from recent outdoor field experiments.

  9. The effects of loaded carrier mass and formulation mass on aerosolization efficiency in dry powder inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Jesslynn; Gill, Charlotte; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that particle-particle impaction may influence aerosolization properties in carrier-based dry powder inhalers, through transfer of kinetic energy from large carriers to surface-deposited active drug. The importance of particle-particle collision has yet to be compared against other mechanisms that could lead to drug liberation, such as particle-wall impaction and turbulence. In particular, particle-particle collisions are difficult to model in silico due to computational restrictions. This study investigated the effects of dry powder inhaler particle-particle collisions in vitro using an established carrier-drug model dry powder inhalation formulation. Spherical polystyrene beads of median size 82.80 μm were chosen as a model carrier as they were of uniform size, shape, surface area, density, porosity and hardness and thus eliminated potential variables that would have conflicted with the study. This model carrier was geometrically blended with micronized salbutamol sulphate (loaded blend). The correlation between the mass of loaded blend (5-40 mg) in the Rotahaler® DPI device and resulting fine particle fraction (FPF) was examined at a constant flow rate of 60 L.min(-1). In a second experiment, the mass of loaded blend was kept constant and a variable amount of blank carrier particles were added to the Rotahaler® device to ascertain if additional "blank" carrier particles affected the final FPF. The efficiency of aerosolization remained constant with varying amounts of blank carrier particles as determined by the fine particle fraction of the emitted dose (FPFED) and fine particle fraction of the loaded dose (FPFLD). No statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD values were observed for increasing masses of blank carrier. In addition, no statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD between the two experiments was obtained. These observations suggest that particle-particle collisions are not a driving mechanism responsible for

  10. Influence of Surface Seawater and Atmospheric Conditions on the Ccn Activity of Ocean-Derived Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Russell, L. M.; Frossard, A. A.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Hakala, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean-derived aerosols are produced from direct injection into the atmosphere (primary production) and gas-to-particle conversion in the atmosphere (secondary production). These different production mechanisms result in a broad range of particle sizes that has implications for the impact of ocean-derived aerosol on climate. The chemical composition of ocean-derived aerosols is a result of a complex mixture of inorganic sea salt and organic matter including polysaccharides, proteins, amino acids, microorganisms and their fragments, and secondary oxidation products. Both production mechanisms and biological processes in the surface ocean impact the ability of ocean-derived aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In addition, CCN activity can be impacted by atmospheric processing that modifies particle size and composition after the aerosol is emitted from the ocean. To understand relationships between production mechanism, surface ocean biology, and atmospheric processing, measurements were made of surface ocean chlorophyll and dissolved organic matter; nascent sea spray aerosol freshly emitted from the ocean surface; and ambient marine aerosol. These measurements were made along the coast of California and in the North Atlantic between the northeast US and Bermuda. These regions include both eutrophic and oligotraphic waters and, thus, provide for observations over a wide range of ocean conditions.

  11. Reduction of photosynthetically active radiation under extreme stratospheric aerosol loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstl, S.A.W.; Zardecki, A.

    1981-08-01

    The recently published hypothesis that the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions might be caused by an obstruction of sunlight is tested by model calculations. First we compute the total mass of stratospheric aerosols under normal atmospheric conditions for four different (measured) aerosol size distributions and vertical profiles. For comparison, the stratospheric dust masses after four volcanic eruptions are also evaluated. Detailed solar radiative transfer calculations are then performed for artificially increased aerosol amounts until the postulated darkness scenario is obtained. Thus we find that a total stratospheric aerosol mass between 1 and 4 times 10/sup 1/ g is sufficient to reduce photosynthesis to 10/sup -3/ of normal. We also infer from this result tha the impact of a 0.4- to 3-km-diameter asteroid or a close encounter with a Halley-size comet may deposit that amount of particulates into the stratosphere. The darkness scenario of Alvarez et al. is thus shown to be a possible extinction mechanism, even with smaller size asteroids of comets than previously estimated.

  12. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  13. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single-droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with an average radius of 21.6 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere particles of known sizes and concentrations. Two relative humidity (RH) conditions, 15 ± 3 % and 88 ± 3 %, hereafter termed "low" and "high", respectively, were varied with different particles sizes and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single-droplet basis. "Coagulated droplets" (droplets that collected aerosols) had mass spectra that contained signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 2.0 × 10-1 to 1.6 for the low-RH case and from 1.5 × 10-2 to 9.0 × 10-2 for the high-RH case. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this study were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first collection experiment performed on a single-droplet basis with atmospherically relevant conditions such as droplet sizes, droplet charges and flow.

  14. Regional Biases in Droplet Activation Parameterizations: Strong Influence on Aerosol Second Indirect Effect in the Community Atmosphere Model v5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate change estimates. The magnitude of these interactions as represented in climate models strongly depends on the process of aerosol activation. This process is the most direct physical link between aerosols and cloud microphysical properties. Calculation of droplet number in GCMs requires the computation of new droplet formation (i.e., droplet activation), through physically based activation parameterizations. Considerable effort has been placed in ensuring that droplet activation parameterizations have a physically consistent response to changes in aerosol number concentration. However, recent analyses using an adjoint sensitivity approach showed that parameterizations can exhibit considerable biases in their response to other aerosol properties, such as aerosol modal diameter or to the aerosol chemical composition. This is a potentially important factor in estimating aerosol indirect effects since changes in aerosol properties from pre-industrial times to present day exhibit a very strong regional signature. In this work we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) to show that the regional imprint of the changes in aerosol properties during the last century interacts with the droplet activation parameterization in a way that these biases are amplified over climatically relevant regions. Two commonly used activation routines, the CAM5 default, Abdul-Razzak and Ghan parameterization, as well as the Fountoukis and Nenes parameterization are used in this study. We further explored the impacts of Nd parameterization biases in the first and second aerosol indirect effects separately, by performing simulations were droplet number was not allowed to intervene in the precipitation initiation process. The simulations performed show that an unphysical response to changes in the diameter of accumulation mode aerosol translates into extremely high Nd concentrations over South

  15. Calibration correction of an active scattering spectrometer probe to account for refractive index of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Overbeck, V. R.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Russell, P. B.; Ferry, G. V.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the active scattering spectrometer probe (ASAS-X) to measure sulfuric acid aerosols on U-2 and ER-2 research aircraft has yielded results that are at times ambiguous due to the dependence of particles' optical signatures on refractive index as well as physical dimensions. The calibration correction of the ASAS-X optical spectrometer probe for stratospheric aerosol studies is validated through an independent and simultaneous sampling of the particles with impactors; sizing and counting of particles on SEM images yields total particle areas and volumes. Upon correction of calibration in light of these data, spectrometer results averaged over four size distributions are found to agree with similarly averaged impactor results to within a few percent: indicating that the optical properties or chemical composition of the sample aerosol must be known in order to achieve accurate optical aerosol spectrometer size analysis.

  16. Microfluidic Electrochemical Sensor for On-line Monitoring of Aerosol Oxidative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Koehler, Kirsten; Shapiro, Jeff; Boonsong, Kanokporn; Sun, Yele; Collett, Jeffrey; Volckens, John; Henry, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution has a significant impact on human morbidity and mortality; however, the mechanisms of PM-induced toxicity are poorly defined. A leading hypothesis states that airborne PM induces harm by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in and around human tissues, leading to oxidative stress. We report here, a system employing a microfluidic electrochemical sensor coupled directly to a Particle-into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS) system to measure aerosol oxidative activity in an on-line format. The oxidative activity measurement is based on the dithiothreitol assay (DTT assay) where after oxidized by PM, the remaining reduced DTT was analyzed by the microfluidic sensor. The sensor consists of an array of working, reference, and auxiliary electrodes fabricated in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic device. Cobalt (II) phthalocyanine (CoPC)-modified carbon paste was used as the working electrode material allowing selective detection of reduced DTT. The electrochemical sensor was validated off-line against the traditional DTT assay using filter samples taken from urban environments and biomass burning events. After off-line characterization, the sensor was coupled to a PILS to enable on-line sampling/analysis of aerosol oxidative activity. Urban dust and industrial incinerator ash samples were aerosolized in an aerosol chamber and analyzed for their oxidative activity. The on-line sensor reported DTT consumption rates (oxidative activity) in good correlation with aerosol concentration (R2 from 0.86–.97) with a time-resolution of approximately 3 minutes. PMID:22651886

  17. Parameterization of the Cloud Nucleating Activity of Fresh, Aged, and Internally-Mixed Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreidenweis, S.; Petters, M.; Demott, P.; Prenni, A.; Ziemann, P.

    2006-12-01

    Carbonaceous particle types affect global climate, visibility, and human health, but their primary and secondary sources, sinks, and tropospheric lifetimes are highly uncertain. The size and hygroscopicity of particles, and in particular their activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), plays a large role in determining their atmospheric impacts and lifetimes. However, hygroscopicity is difficult to parameterize for many organic species for which no thermodynamic data exist, and for complex, multicomponent aerosols of undefined composition. We propose a simple method to describe the relationship between dry particle diameter and CCN activity using a single hygroscopicity parameter, κ. We derive values of κ from fitting of experimental CCN-activity data from the literature and from recent experiments, including oxidation-aged organic particles and secondary organic aerosols. Values of κ are between 0.5 and 2 for highly-CCN- active salts such as sodium chloride, between 0.01 and 0.5 for slightly to very hygroscopic organic aerosols such as those produced in biomass burning and as secondary organic aerosols, and 0 for nonhygroscopic components. The hygroscopicity of internal mixtures can be calculated as a volume fraction weighted average of the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual species comprising the mixture. Aging of aerosol, understood as changes in hygroscopicity due to condensation of hydrophilic species, coagulation of aerosol populations, or heterogeneous chemical reactions, are described conveniently by changes in κ. Our studies show that oxidative aging that proceeds by addition of functional groups to the CHx carbon backbone leads to only small changes in κ, and thus the process alone is inefficient at rendering small, initially- hydrophobic primary organic particles capable of being scavenged by cloud-drop nucleation. Other processes, such as coagulation and condensation, control the rate of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion of primary

  18. Experimental study of elementary collection efficiency of aerosols by spray: Design of the experimental device

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Vendel, J.; Garrec. S.L.

    1995-02-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant containment building, in which pressure and temperature could increase because of a overheating reactor accident, can be achieved by spraying water drops. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam on cold water drops. The more stringent thermodynamic conditions are a pressure of 5.10{sup 5} Pa (due to steam emission) and a temperature of 413 K. Moreover its energy dissipation function, the spray leads to the washout of fission product particles emitted in the reactor building atmosphere. The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. The aim of this work is to develop experiments in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols by a single drop. To do this, the experimental device has to be designed with fundamental criteria:-Thermodynamic conditions have to be representative of post-accident atmosphere. Thermodynamic equilibrium has to be attained between the water drops and the gaseous phase. Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and mechanical effects have to be studied independently. Operating conditions have to be homogenous and constant during each experiment. This paper presents the design of the experimental device. In practice, the consequences on the design of each of the criteria given previously and the necessity of being representative of the real conditions will be described.

  19. Thermal characteristics and mass absorption efficiency of carbonaceous aerosol measured during a post-harvest burning period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batmunkh, T.; Kim, Y. J.; Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to better understand the characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol time-resolved OC, EC, and BC were measured by a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and an Aethalometer, respectively, during a post-harvest burning period from November 22 to December 20, 2011 at a sub-urban site in Gwangju, Korea. OC and EC were analyzed by the thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method with NIOSH temperature protocol. The spectral light absorption coefficient (babs) was determined based on the Aethalometer data. Overall average OC and EC concentrations were found to be 5.0±2.4 ugC/ m3 and 1.5±0.9 ugC/ m3, respectively for the sampling period. On average, babs at seven Aethalometer wavelengths was found to be 38.4±27.8 Mm-1, 24.3±17.8 Mm-1, 20.8±15.4 Mm-1, 17.9±13.3 Mm-1, 14.9±11.1 Mm-1, 9.9±7.4 Mm-1, and 8.8±6.6 Mm-1 at 370 nm, 470 nm, 520 nm, 590 nm, 660 nm, 880 nm, and 950 nm, respectively. Clear diurnal variations with morning (7:00 AM~9:00 AM) and evening (7:00 PM~11:00 PM) peaks were observed for OC, EC, and babs mostly due to local burning activities. Based on the 4-day back-trajectory analyses conducted using the HYSPLIT model. Event cases were classified into four categories, based on the 4-day air mass back trajectories, as Clean(C), Stagnant(ST), Continental(CC), and Local Burning(LB) events. In order to better investigate the characteristics of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol, thermal evolution patterns of carbonaceous aerosol measured by the Sunset analyzer were characterized as OC1, OC2, and EC, which were detected in temperature steps of 600 C, 840 C in an non-oxidizing atmosphere, and 870 C in an oxidizing atmosphere, respectively. High ratio of OC2/OC1; 1.39~1.41 was observed in the evening 9:00~11:00 PM due to local burning event. Concentration of OC2 was higher up to 1.4 times than that of OC1 for the LB cases, showing that higher molecular weight fraction of organic aerosol was dominant for the time. As expected, higher correlation was found between EC and

  20. Activity size distribution and residence time of 7Be aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Paatero, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    The activity size distributions of the natural radionuclide tracer 7Be in different size range fractions (<0.39 μm, 0.39-0.69 μm, 0.69-1.3 μm, 1.3-2.1 μm, 2.1-4.2 μm, 4.2-10.2 μm and >10.2 μm) were determined in the boreal atmosphere in the Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) at Sodankylä, Finland (67°22‧ N, 26°38‧ E, 180 m asl). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) ranged from 0.54 μm to 1.05 μm (average 0.83 μm). A residence time of about 8 days applies to aerosols of 0.83 μm diameter, representing the residence of aerosol particles in arctic environment. The observed positive correlation between AMAD values and RH% can be explained by the fact that condensation during high relative humidity conditions becomes more intense, resulting in increased particle sizes of atmospheric aerosols. However, greater aerosol particle sizes means higher wet scavenging rate of aerosols and as a result lower activity concentration of 7Be in the atmosphere, explaining the anti-correlation between the AMAD values and activity concentrations of 7Be. But this associated with possibly higher scavenging rates of aerosols does not necessarily alone explain the anti-correlation between the AMAD and the 7Be activities. The air mass origin associated with synoptic scale weather phenomena may contribute to that too. The Flextra model was used to assess the transport pattern and to explain the deviation in radionuclide activity concentrations and AMAD values observed in the site of investigation.

  1. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions.

    PubMed

    Che, H C; Zhang, X Y; Wang, Y Q; Zhang, L; Shen, X J; Zhang, Y M; Ma, Q L; Sun, J Y; Zhang, Y W; Wang, T T

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate. PMID:27075947

  2. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Ma, Q. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. T.

    2016-04-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate.

  3. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions

    PubMed Central

    Che, H. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Ma, Q. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate. PMID:27075947

  4. Efficiency of five chemical protective clothing materials against nano and submicron aerosols when submitted to mechanical deformations.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Mehdi; Hallé, Stéphane; Tuduri, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Due to their potential toxicity, the use of nanoparticles in the workplace is a growing concern. Some studies indicate that nanoparticles can penetrate the skin and lead to adverse health effects. Since chemical protective clothing is the last barrier to protect the skin, this study aims to better understand nanoparticle penetration behaviour in dermal protective clothing under mechanical deformation. For this purpose, five of the most common types of fabrics used in protective clothing, one woven and four nonwoven, were chosen and submitted to different simulated exposure conditions. They were tested against polydispersed NaCl aerosols having an electrical-mobility diameter between 14 and 400 nm. A bench-scale exposure setup and a sampling protocol was developed to measure the level of penetration of the aerosols through the material samples of disposable coveralls and lab coat, while subjecting them to mechanical deformations to simulate the conditions of usage in the workplace. Particle size distribution of the aerosol was determined upstream and downstream using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The measured efficiencies demonstrated that the performances of nonwoven materials were similar. Three nonwovens had efficiencies above 99%, while the woven fabric was by far, the least effective. Moreover, the results established that mechanical deformations, as simulated for this study, did not have a significant effect on the fabrics' efficiencies. PMID:26786065

  5. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  6. Relationship between volatility, hygroscopicity, and CCN activity of winter aerosols: Kanpur, Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, Sachchida

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol volatility is one of the key property in deciding their lifetime and fate. The volatile species have the potential to affect SOA estimation, so their characterization and establishment of relationship with mass loading, chemical composition, hygroscopicity and CCN activity is required. A 42 days long winter campaign was conducted in an anthropogenically polluted location (Kanpur, India) where CCN activity of both ambient and thermally treated aerosols was characterized. Enhanced partitioning of semi-volatile molecules into particle phase at higher loading conditions was observed. Unexpectedly, the most oxidized organic factor was observed both least volatile and hygroscopic in nature. Lower

  7. Comparison of the cloud activation potential of open ocean and coastal aerosol in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidaurre, G.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.

    2010-12-01

    Continuous measurements of aerosol concentration, particle size distribution, and cloud activation potential between 0.15 and 1.2% supersaturation were performed for open ocean and coastal air during the Halocarbon Air Sea Transect - Pacific (HalocAST) campaign. The nearly 7000 mile transect, aboard the R/V Thomas G. Thompson, started in Punta Arenas, Chile and ended in Seattle, Washington. Air mass source regions were identified on the basis of air mass back trajectories. For air masses in the southern hemisphere, aerosols sampled over the open ocean acted as cloud condensation nuclei at supersaturations between 0.5 and 1%, while coastal aerosols required higher supersaturations. In the pristine open ocean, observed aerosol concentrations were very low, typically below 200 cm-3, with an average particle diameter of approximately 0.4 μm. On the other hand, coastal aerosol concentrations were above 1000 cm-3 with an average particle diameter of 0.7 μm. Air masses originating in the northern hemisphere had much higher aerosol loads, between 500 and 2000 cm-3 over the ocean and above 4000 cm-3 at the coast. In both cases, the average particle diameters were approximately 0.5 μm. Measurements suggest that the northern hemisphere, substantially more polluted than the southern hemisphere, is characterized by alternating regions of high and medium aerosol number concentration. In addition, measurements of microorganism and organic matter concentration in the surface layer of the ocean water were conducted along the cruise track, to test the hypothesis that biogenic aerosol containing marine organic matter contribute to cloud activation potential. There was a significant correlation between mean aerosol diameter and prokaryote concentration in surface waters (r = 0.585, p < 0.01, n = 24), and between critical supersaturation and prokaryote concentration in surface waters (r = 0.538, p < 0.01, n = 24). This correlation indicates that larger aerosols occurred over water

  8. Dry powder aerosols of polyethylenimine (PEI)-based gene vectors mediate efficient gene delivery to the lung.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Corinna; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Uezguen, Senta; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Reinhardt, Dietrich; Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Marc; Claus, Sarah; Friess, Wolfgang; Rudolph, Carsten

    2011-08-25

    Aerosol gene delivery holds great therapeutical potential for many inherited and acquired pulmonary diseases. The physical instability of aqueous suspensions of non-viral vector complexes is a major limitation for their successful application. In this study, we investigated dry powder aerosols as novel gene vector formulations for gene transfer in vitro and murine lungs in vivo. Lyophilization was used to produce dry powder cakes followed by powderization to produce dry powder aerosols. Different sugars, namely lactose, sucrose and trehalose, were tested as lyoprotectants for gene delivery complexes consisting of branched polyethylenimine 25 kDa and plasmid DNA. Biophysical particle characterization demonstrated that lyophilization and powderization in the presence of lyoprotectants were well tolerated. In vitro transfection efficiency remained unaffected by the choice of lyoprotectant and subsequent lyophilization and/or powderization. In vivo screening of powderized samples, by applying the powder with an insufflator, resulted in highest gene expression with lactose as lyoprotectant. Delivering a plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin together with lactose as lyoprotectant resulted in increased blood hematocrit values post application thereby demonstrating the potential of dry powder aerosol as a promising method for pulmonary gene delivery. PMID:21600251

  9. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the Collection Efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Water droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with a radius of ~20 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer Polystyrene Latex Sphere (PSL) particles of variable size and concentrations. Two RH conditions, ~15 and ~88%, hereafter termed "Low" and "High", respectively, were varied with different particles size and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single particle basis. Coagulated droplets had mass spectra that contain signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 5.7 × 10-3 to 4.6 × 10-2 for the Low RH and from 6.4 × 10-3 to 2.2 × 10-2 for the High RH cases. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this work were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first coagulation experiment performed on a single droplet basis.

  10. Tying Biological Activity to Changes in Sea Spray Aerosol Chemical Composition via Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Collins, D. B.; Axson, J. L.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    In remote marine environments, sea spray aerosols (SSA) often represent the greatest aerosol burden, thus having significant impacts on direct radiative interactions and cloud processes. Previous studies have shown that SSA is a complex mixture of inorganic salts and an array of dissolved and particulate organic components. Enrichment of SSA organic content is often correlated to seawater chlorophyll concentrations, a measure of oceanic biological activity. As the physical and chemical properties of aerosols control their radiative effects, recent studies conducted by the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment have endeavored to further elucidate the ties between marine biological activity and primary SSA chemical composition using highly time resolved single particle analyses. A series of experiments performed in the recently developed Marine Aerosol Reference Tank evaluated the effect of changing marine microbial populations on SSA chemical composition, which was monitored via an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a variety of offline spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Each experiment was initiated using unfiltered and untreated seawater, thus maintaining a high level of biogeochemical complexity. This study is the first of its kind to capture daily changes in the primary SSA mixing state over the growth and death of a natural phytoplankton bloom. Increases in organic aerosol types (0.4-3 μm), internally and externally mixed with sea salt, could not be correlated to chlorophyll concentrations. Maximum production of these populations occurred two to four days after the in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence peaked in intensity. This work is in contrast to the current paradigm of correlating SSA organic content to seawater chlorophyll concentration.

  11. Surface-active and Light-absorbing Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, V. F.; Sareen, N.; Schwier, A. N.; Shapiro, E. L.

    2009-12-01

    We have observed the formation of light-absorbing, high-molecular-weight, and surface-active organics from methylgyloxal interacting with ammonium salts in aqueous aerosol mimics. Mixtures of methylglyoxal and glyoxal also form light-absorbing products and exhibit surface tension depression with a Langmuir-like dependence on initial methylglyoxal concentration. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS) to characterize the product species. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These observations have potentially significant implications for our understanding of the effects of SOA on climate, since a) SOA are typically treated as non-absorbing in climate models, and b) surface tension depression in aqueous aerosols by SOA material may result in increased cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Furthermore, surface film formation could affect aerosol heterogeneous chemistry. We will also discuss aerosol flow tube O3 oxidation experiments designed to determine the atmospheric lifetimes of the observed product compounds.

  12. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  13. Recovery Efficiency and Limit of Detection of Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from Environmental Surface Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A.; Beard, Jeremy K.; Hein, Misty J.; Larsen, Lloyd D.; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Deye, Gregory J.; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm2). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm2) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm2) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm2) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  14. Synthesis of Spherical Carbon Nitride-Based Polymer Composites by Continuous Aerosol-Photopolymerization with Efficient Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Poostforooshan, Jalal; Badiei, Alireza; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Weber, Alfred P

    2016-08-24

    Here we report a novel, facile, and sustainable approach for the preparation of spherical submicrometer carbon nitride-based polymer composites by a continuous aerosol-photopolymerization process. In this regard, spherical mesoporous carbon nitride (SMCN) nanoparticles were initially prepared via a nanocasting approach using spray-drying synthesized spherical mesoporous silica (SMS) nanoparticles as hard templates. In addition to experimental characterization, the effect of porosity on the light absorption enhancement and consequently the generation rate of electron-hole pairs inside the SMCN was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. To produce the carbon nitride-based polymer composite, SMCN nanoparticles exhibit excellent performance in photopolymerization of butyl acrylate (PBuA) monomer in the presence of n-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a co-initiator in a continuous aerosol-based process. In this one-pot synthesis, SMCN nanoparticles act not only as photoinitiators but at the same time as fillers and templates. The average aerosol residence time in the photoreactor is about 90 s. The presented aerosol-photopolymerization process avoids the need for solvent and surfactant, operates at room temperature, and, more importantly, is suitable to produce the spherical composite with hydrophobic polymers. Furthermore, we simulated the condition of SMCN nanoparticles during illumination in the gas phase process, which can freely rotate. The results demonstrated that the hole (h(+)) density is almost equally distributed in the whole part of the SMCN nanoparticles due to their rotation, leading to efficient light harvesting and more homogeneous photoreaction. The combination of the outstanding features of environmentally friendly SMCN, photopolymerization, and aerosol processing might open new avenues, especially in green chemistry, to produce novel polymer composites with multifunctional properties. PMID:27483090

  15. Pollution transport efficiency toward the Arctic: Sensitivity to aerosol scavenging and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Bey, Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    The processes driving current changes in Arctic atmospheric composition and climate are still uncertain. In particular the relative contributions of major source regions from the midlatitudes remain a matter of debate in the literature. The objectives of this study are to better quantify the relative contributions of different processes governing the transport of pollution from the midlatitudes to the Arctic and the relative contributions of different geopolitical source regions. We use a suite of observational data sets (including the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaigns and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instrument) to constrain a global aerosol simulation from the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model. Preliminary comparison of model results with vertical profiles of sulfate and black carbon (BC) collected during the ARCTAS campaigns and with aerosol extinction time series retrieved from CALIOP indicates that the model underestimates export of aerosols from the planetary boundary layer to the free troposphere in the midlatitudes and long-range transport of aerosols from the midlatitudes toward the Arctic. In contrast, observed CO profiles are relatively well simulated, which points to a possible problem with wet scavenging. Decreasing the prescribed aerosol scavenging coefficients within the range of experimental data available in the literature significantly improves the agreement with observations. Sulfate and BC burdens in the Arctic increase by a factor 5-6. Annual global lifetimes of sulfate and BC increase from 3.1 to 4.6 days and from 4.4 to 5.9 days, respectively. Using the improved simulation, we find that 59% of sulfate in the Arctic troposphere comes from the oxidation of SO2 emitted in Siberia (19%), Europe (18%), Asia (13%), and North America (9%). Anthropogenic and biomass burning BC emitted in Siberia, Asia, Europe, and North America contributes 29, 27, 25, and

  16. Assessing Modeled CO2 Retention and Rebreathing of a Facemask Designed for Efficient Delivery of Aerosols to Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Christian; Sventitskiy, Alexander; Cehelsky, Jeffrey E.; Patters, Andrea B.; Tservistas, Markus; Hahn, Michael C.; Juhl, Gerd; DeVincenzo, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. New aerosol drugs for infants may require more efficient delivery systems, including face masks. Maximizing delivery efficiency requires tight-fitting masks with minimal internal mask volumes, which could cause carbon dioxide (CO2) retention. An RNA-interference-based antiviral for treatment of respiratory syncytial virus in populations that may include young children is designed for aerosol administration. CO2 accumulation within inhalation face masks has not been evaluated. Methods. We simulated airflow and CO2 concentrations accumulating over time within a new facemask designed for infants and young children (PARI SMARTMASK® Baby). A one-dimensional model was first examined, followed by 3-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics analyses. Normal infant breathing patterns and respiratory distress were simulated. Results. The maximum average modeled CO2 concentration within the mask reached steady state (3.2% and 3% for normal and distressed breathing patterns resp.) after approximately the 5th respiratory cycle. After steady state, the mean CO2 concentration inspired into the nostril was 2.24% and 2.26% for normal and distressed breathing patterns, respectively. Conclusion. The mask is predicted to cause minimal CO2 retention and rebreathing. Infants with normal and distressed breathing should tolerate the mask intermittently delivering aerosols over brief time frames. PMID:22792479

  17. The influence of nitrogen oxides on the activation of bromide and chloride in salt aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleicher, S.; Buxmann, J. C.; Sander, R.; Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Platt, U.; Zetzsch, C.

    2014-04-01

    Experiments on salt aerosol with different salt contents were performed in a Teflon chamber under tropospheric light conditions with various initial contents of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2). A strong activation of halogens was found at high NOx mixing ratios, even in samples with lower bromide contents such as road salts. The ozone depletion by reactive halogen species released from the aerosol, was found to be a function of the initial NOx mixing ratio. Besides bromine, large amounts of chlorine have been released in our smog chamber. Time profiles of the halogen species Cl2, Br2, ClNO2, BrNO2 and BrO, ClO, OClO and Cl atoms were simultaneously measured by various techniques (chemical ionization mass spectrometry, differential optical absorption spectrometry coupled with a multi-reflection cell and gas chromatography of hydrocarbon tracers for Cl and OH, employing cryogenic preconcentration and flame ionization detection). Measurements are compared to calculations by the CAABA/MECCA 0-D box model, which was adapted to the chamber conditions and took the aerosol liquid water content and composition into account. The model results agree reasonably with the observations and provide important information about the prerequisites for halogen release, such as the time profiles of the aerosol bromide and chloride contents as well as the aerosol pH.

  18. Common inorganic ions are efficient catalysts for organic reactions in atmospheric aerosols and other natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, B.; Dziedzic, P.; Córdova, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, inorganic ammonium ions, NH4+, and carbonate ions, CO32-, are reported for the first time as catalysts for organic reactions in atmospheric aerosols and other natural environments at the Earth's surface. These reactions include the formation of C-C and C-O bonds by aldol condensation and acetal formation, and reveal a new aspect of the interactions between organic and inorganic materials in natural environments. The catalytic properties of inorganic ammonium ions, in particular, were not previously known in chemistry. The reactions were found to be as fast in tropospheric ammonium sulfate composition as in concentrated sulfuric acid. The ubiquitous presence and large concentrations of ammonium ions in tropospheric aerosols would make of ammonium catalysis a main consumption pathway for organic compounds in these aerosols, while acid catalysis would have a minor contribution. In particular, ammonium catalysis would account quantitatively for the aging of carbonyl compounds into secondary ''fulvic'' compounds in tropospheric aerosols, a transformation affecting the optical properties of these aerosols. In general, ammonium catalysis is likely to be responsible for many observations previously attributed to acid catalysis in the troposphere.

  19. Comparison of model results of collection efficiency of aerosol particles by individual water droplets and ice crystals in a subsaturated atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K.; Lin, H.

    The aerosol collection efficiencies of water droplets and ice crystals are compared based on the concept of equivalent geometrical kernel K ∗ which is the geometrical sweep-out volume per unit time by the collector. It is thought that the comparison based on this quantity reveals the real difference of the aerosol collecting abilities of different collectors and sheds lights on the precipitation scavenging mechanisms. The collection efficiencies are taken from theoretical model results computed by us previously at relative humidities of 95% for water droplets, columnar and hexagonal plate ice crystals. It is shown that the efficiencies are rather insensitive to collector shape for aerosol particles smaller than 0.01 μm. The shape factor becomes more important for larger aerosol particles, especially in the Greenfield-Gap size range.

  20. Reactive Uptake of Dinitrogen Pentoxide on Aqueous Ammonium Nitrate Aerosols: Dependence on the Nitrate Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahner, A.; Folkers, M.; Mentel, T. F.; Sebald, H.; ten Brink, H. M.; Jongejan, P. A.

    2001-12-01

    The heterogeneous conversion of N2O_5 to HNO3 is an important step in the removal of nitrogen oxides from the atmosphere. In the planetary boundary layer this heterogeneous process occurs on the surfaces of aqueous aerosols. The fraction of NH4NO_3 in secondary inorganic aerosols in western Europe and in the United States is increasing, due to decreasing SO2 emissions at nearly constant NOX source strength. This may become of importance, since increasing nitrate concentrations in aerosols can reduce the reaction probability γ N2O5 by up to an order of magnitude ("nitrate effect" [1,2]). We measured γ N2O5 on NH4NO_3, (NH4)_2SO_4 and NH4HSO_4 aerosols in the large aerosol chamber at the FZ-Jülich. The decrease of N2O_5 and the formation of gas-phase HNO3 was monitored by high resolution FTIR spectroscopy. Simultaneously, the aerosol composition was determined on-line by Steam Jet Aerosol Collection/Ion Chromatography. The aerosol surface area was calculated from measured size distributions in the range of 20 nm to 5 μ m. The γ N2O5 of 0.02(+/- 0.003) on (NH4)_2SO_4 and NH4HSO_4 droplets are independent of the relative humidity (RH), like for the corresponding sodium salts at similar conditions. The γ N2O5 on NH4NO_3 aerosol is decreasing from 0.02 at 80% RH to 0.007 at 60% RH with decreasing relative humidity, thus increasing nitrate concentration. The functional dependence of γ N2O5 on the RH or on the ionic strength is different for NH4NO_3 and NaNO3. However it can be unified by supposing direct dependence of γ N2O5 on the mean nitrate activity. [1] A. Wahner, Th. F. Mentel, M. Sohn, J. Stier , J. Geophys. Res., 103 (1999), 31,103 [2] Th. F. Mentel, M. Sohn, A. Wahner , Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 1 (1999), 5451

  1. Evolution of the Physicochemical and Activation Properties of Aerosols within Smoke Plumes during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Wang, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Hubbe, J. M.; Pekour, M. S.; Shilling, J. E.; Fortner, E.; Chand, D.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Kleinman, L. I.; Senum, G.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning from wildfires and controlled agricultural burns are known to be a major source of fine particles and organic aerosols at northern temperate latitudes during the summer months. However, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol during transport and the potential impact of this evolution on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity has rarely been studied for these events. During the DOE-sponsored Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) conducted in the summer and fall of 2013, over 30 research flights sampled biomass burning plumes from wildfires in the Northwestern United States and agricultural burns in the Mid-South region of the United States. A large suite of instruments aboard the DOE G-1 (Gulfstream-1) measured the chemical, physical, and optical properties of biomass burning aerosol with an emphasis on black carbon. A Fast Integrated Mobility Spectrometer (FIMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer - Airborne (UHSAS-A), and Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP) were used to measure the aerosol size distribution from 15 - 3,000 nm at 1-Hz. A dual column CCN counter measured the CCN number concentration at supersaturations of 0.25% and 0.50% at a time resolution of 1-Hz and the aerosol chemical composition was measured using a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS, Aerodyne, Inc). The SP-AMS was operated in two modes: (i) as a traditional high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS, Aerodyne Inc.), which measured chemical composition of non-refractory aerosols and (ii) as the SP-AMS which measured chemical composition of the refractory black carbon-containing (rBC) particle coating and rBC aerosol mass. Utilizing the aforementioned measurements, a CCN closure study is used to investigate the emitted aerosol hygroscopicity, the evolution of the physicochemical properties of the aerosol, and the potential impacts on cloud microphysics from the different fuel sources.

  2. The antimicrobial efficiency of silver activated sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đolić, Maja B.; Rajaković-Ognjanović, Vladana N.; Štrbac, Svetlana B.; Rakočević, Zlatko Lj.; Veljović, Đorđe N.; Dimitrijević, Suzana I.; Rajaković, Ljubinka V.

    2015-12-01

    This study is focused on the surface modifications of the materials that are used for antimicrobial water treatment. Sorbents of different origin were activated by Ag+-ions. The selection of the most appropriate materials and the most effective activation agents was done according to the results of the sorption and desorption kinetic studies. Sorption capacities of selected sorbents: granulated activated carbon (GAC), zeolite (Z), and titanium dioxide (T), activated by Ag+-ions were following: 42.06, 13.51 and 17.53 mg/g, respectively. The antimicrobial activity of Ag/Z, Ag/GAC and Ag/T sorbents were tested against Gram-negative bacteria E. coli, Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and yeast C. albicans. After 15 min of exposure period, the highest cell removal was obtained using Ag/Z against S. aureus and E. coli, 98.8 and 93.5%, respectively. Yeast cell inactivation was unsatisfactory for all three activated sorbents. The antimicrobial pathway of the activated sorbents has been examined by two separate tests - Ag+-ions desorbed from the activated surface to the aqueous phase and microbial cell removal caused by the Ag+-ions from the solid phase (activated surface sites). The results indicated that disinfection process significantly depended on the microbial-activated sites interactions on the modified surface. The chemical state of the activating agent had crucial impact to the inhibition rate. The characterization of the native and modified sorbents was performed by X-ray diffraction technique, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope. The concentration of adsorbed and released ions was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial efficiency of activated sorbents was related not only to the concentration of the activating agent, but moreover on the surface characteristics of the material, which affects the distribution and the accessibility of the activating agent.

  3. The effect of phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds on the measured CCN activity of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the CCN activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles before activation in the CCN counter? (2) How much the CCN activity can be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? The results show that, to increase the CCN activity of aerosol particles, a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) is needed. We used nitric acid as a test compound. A concentration of several ppb or higher is needed for measurable effect. In the case of particle evaporation, we used ammonium nitrate as a test compound and found that it partially evaporates before maximum supersaturation is reached in the CCN counter, thus causing an underestimation of CCN activity. The effect of evaporation is clearly visible in all supersaturations, leading to an underestimation of the critical dry diameter by 10 to 15 nanometres in the case of ammonium nitrate particles in different supersaturations. This result was also confirmed by measurements in supersaturations between 0.1 and 0.7%.

  4. Aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes of cloud droplet formation: influence of particle number, size and hygroscopicity on the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, P.; Su, H.; Trentmann, J.; Simmel, M.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S. S.; Wernli, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets under pyro-convective conditions using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral microphysics and with the κ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles. Assuming a typical biomass burning aerosol size distribution (accumulation mode centred at 120 nm), we have calculated initial cloud droplet number concentrations (NCD) for a wide range of updraft velocities (w=0.25-20 m s-1) and aerosol particle number concentrations (NCN=200-105 cm-3) at the cloud base. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration (w/NCN), we found three distinctly different regimes of CCN activation and cloud droplet formation: (1) An aerosol-limited regime that is characterized by high w/NCN ratios (>≈10-3 m s-1 cm3), high maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax>≈0.5%), and high activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCN/NCN>≈90%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to NCN and practically independent of w. (2) An updraft-limited regime that is characterized by low w/NCN ratios (<≈10-4 m s-1 cm3), low maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax<≈0.2%), and low activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCD/NCN<≈20%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to w and practically independent of NCN. (3) An aerosol- and updraft-sensitive regime (transitional regime), which is characterized by parameter values in between the two other regimes and covers most of the conditions relevant for pyro-convection. In this regime NCD depends non-linearly on both NCN and w. In sensitivity studies we have tested the influence of aerosol particle size distribution and hygroscopicity on NCD. Within the range of effective hygroscopicity parameters that is characteristic for continental atmospheric aerosols (κ≈0.05-0.6), we found that NCD depends rather weakly on the actual value of κ

  5. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  6. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was

  7. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Shallow Cumuli and Turbulent Activities Under Various Meteorological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    To determine conditions over the Indian Ocean for which cloud fields are most susceptible to modification from aerosols and to study how turbulent activities and shallow cumuli vary for different meteorological scenarios, the National Center for Atmospheric Research Eulerian-semi-Lagrangian (EULAG) three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model was initialized using data collected during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). Radiosonde data were used to construct 6 soundings encompassing the range of temperature and humidity observed in the trade-wind boundary layer. By then adding the characteristics (height, depth and strength) of either a typical transition layer (TL), a strong inversion layer (IL) or no stable layer a total of 18 meteorological scenarios were produced. Separate simulations were conducted using EULAG assuming pristine and polluted conditions (i.e., cloud droplet number concentrations, aerosol extinction profiles and single-scattering albedos) using INDOEX observations. For the range of meteorological conditions observed during INDOEX, sensitivity studies showed that the semi- direct effect always dominated indirect effects, producing a positive daytime mean net indirect forcing varying between 0.2 and 4.5 W m-2. The simulations showed that changes in the environmental relative humidity (RH) and the presence of the TL had critical impacts on the cloud properties, turbulence and lateral detrainment rates, and on how aerosols affect these quantities. The net indirect forcing was larger when the RH was higher and in the absence of any dry and stable layers. It was reduced to less than 1.2 W m-2 when the TL was present. The impact of the IL was dependent on convective strength which increases with increasing RH. In fact, changes in meteorological factors had larger impacts on the simulated cloud properties than did the presence of anthropogenic aerosols, indicating large uncertainties can be introduced when solely using observations of aerosols and

  8. Incorporating an advanced aerosol activation parameterization into WRF-CAM5: Model evaluation and parameterization intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; He, Jian; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Fan, Jiwen; Nenes, Athanasios

    2015-07-22

    Aerosol activation into cloud droplets is an important process that governs aerosol indirect effects. The advanced treatment of aerosol activation by Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) and its recent updates, collectively called the FN series, have been incorporated into a newly developed regional coupled climate-air quality model based on the Weather Research and Forecasting model with the physics package of the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (WRF-CAM5) to simulate aerosol-cloud interactions in both resolved and convective clouds. The model is applied to East Asia for two full years of 2005 and 2010. A comprehensive model evaluation is performed for model predictions of meteorological, radiative, and cloud variables, chemical concentrations, and column mass abundances against satellite data and surface observations from air quality monitoring sites across East Asia. The model performs overall well for major meteorological variables including near-surface temperature, specific humidity, wind speed, precipitation, cloud fraction, precipitable water, downward shortwave and longwave radiation, and column mass abundances of CO, SO2, NO2, HCHO, and O3 in terms of both magnitudes and spatial distributions. Larger biases exist in the predictions of surface concentrations of CO and NOx at all sites and SO2, O3, PM2.5, and PM10 concentrations at some sites, aerosol optical depth, cloud condensation nuclei over ocean, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), cloud liquid and ice water path, and cloud optical thickness. Compared with the default Abdul-Razzack Ghan (2000) parameterization, simulations with the FN series produce ~107–113% higher CDNC, with half of the difference attributable to the higher aerosol activation fraction by the FN series and the remaining half due to feedbacks in subsequent cloud microphysical processes. With the higher CDNC, the FN series are more skillful in simulating cloud water path, cloud optical thickness, downward shortwave radiation

  9. A Computationally Efficient Model for Multicomponent Activity Coefficients in Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient parameterization of activity coefficients, which are repeatedly updated in aerosol phase equilibrium and gas-aerosol partitioning calculations. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a new mixing rule for estimating multicomponent activity coefficients of electrolytes typically found in atmospheric aerosol systems containing H(+), NH4(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), SO4(2-), HSO4(-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) ions. The new mixing rule, called MTEM (Multicomponent Taylor Expansion Model), estimates the mean activity coefficient of an electrolyte A in a multicomponent solution from a linear combination of its values in ternary solutions of A-A-H2O, A-B-H2O, A-C-H2O, etc., as the amount of A approaches zero in the mixture at the solution water activity, aw, assuming aw is equal to the ambient relative humidity. Predictions from MTEM are found to be within a factor of 0.8 to 1.25 of the comprehensive Pitzer-Simonson-Clegg (PSC) model over a wide range of water activities, and are shown to be significantly more accurate than the widely used Kusik and Meissner (KM) mixing rule, especially for electrolytes in sulfate-rich aerosol systems and for relatively minor but important aerosol components such as HNO3 and HCl acids. Because the ternary activity coefficient polynomials are parameterized as a function of aw, they have to be computed only once at every grid point at the beginning of every 3-D model time step as opposed to repeated evaluations of the ionic strength dependent binary activity coefficient polynomials in the KM method. Additionally, MTEM also yields a non-iterative solution of the bisulfate ion dissociation in sulfate-rich systems, which is a major computational advantage over other iterative methods as will be shown by a comparison of the CPU time requirements of MTEM for both sulfate-poor and sulfate-rich systems relative to other methods.

  10. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, P.; Joly, M.; Schaupp, C.; Attard, E.; Möhler, O.; Morris, C. E.; Brunet, Y.; Delort, A.-M.

    2015-06-01

    The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by a lack of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN) activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens) when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany). Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h). In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~ 33 min m-2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  11. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, P.; Joly, M.; Schaupp, C.; Attard, E.; Möhler, O.; Morris, C. E.; Brunet, Y..; Delort, A.-M.

    2015-02-01

    The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by lacks of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN) activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens) when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany). Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h). In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 = cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~33 min per m2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  12. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  13. Anti-tumor activity of CpG-ODN aerosol in mouse lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Sfondrini, Lucia; Sommariva, Michele; Tortoreto, Monica; Meini, Alessandra; Piconese, Silvia; Calvaruso, Marco; Van Rooijen, Nick; Bonecchi, Raffaella; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Colombo, Mario P; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea

    2013-07-15

    Studies in preclinical models have demonstrated the superior anti-tumor effect of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) when administered at the tumor site rather than systemically. We evaluated the effect of aerosolized CpG-ODN on lung metastases in mice injected with immunogenic N202.1A mammary carcinoma cells or weakly immunogenic B16 melanoma cells. Upon reaching the bronchoalveolar space, aerosolized CpG-ODN activated a local immune response, as indicated by production of IL-12p40, IFN-γ and IL-1β and by recruitment and maturation of DC cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice. Treatment with aerosolized CpG-ODN induced an expansion of CD4+ cells in lung and was more efficacious than systemic i.p. administration against experimental lung metastases of immunogenic N202.1A mammary carcinoma cells, whereas only i.p. delivery of CpG-ODN provided anti-tumor activity, which correlated with NK cell expansion in the lung, against lung metastases of the poorly immunogenic B16 melanoma. The inefficacy of aerosol therapy to induce NK expansion was related to the presence of immunosuppressive macrophages in B16 tumor-bearing lungs, as mice depleted of these cells by clodronate treatment responded to aerosol CpG-ODN through expansion of the NK cell population and significantly reduced numbers of lung metastases. Our results indicate that tumor immunogenicity and the tumor-induced immunosuppressive environment are critical factors to the success of CpG therapy in the lung, and point to the value of routine sampling of the lung immune environment in defining an optimal immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:23319306

  14. Active and passive smoking - New insights on the molecular composition of different cigarette smoke aerosols by LDI-FTICRMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Scheffler, Jean-Luc; Aubriet, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The aerosol generated when a cigarette is smoked is a significant indoor contaminant. Both smokers and non-smokers can be exposed to this class of pollutants. Nevertheless, they are not exposed to the same kind of smoke. The active smoker breathes in the mainstream smoke (MSS) during a puff, whereas the passive smoker inhales not only the smoke generated by the lit cigarette between two puffs (SSS) but also the smoke exhaled by active smokers (EXS). The aerosol fraction of EXS has until now been poorly documented; its composition is expected to be different from MSS. This study aims to investigate the complex composition of aerosol from EXS to better understand the difference in exposure between active and passive smokers. To address this, the in-situ laser desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (LDI-FTICRMS) was used to characterise the aerosol composition of EXS from two different smokers. Results clearly indicated many similarities between EXS samples but also significant differences with MSS and SSS aerosol. The comparison of MSS and EXS aerosol allowed the chemicals retained by the active smoker's lungs to be identified, whereas the convolution of the EXS and SSS aerosol compositions were considered relevant to the exposition of a passive smoker. As a consequence, active smokers are thought to be mainly exposed to polar and poorly unsaturated oxygenated and nitrogenated organics, compared with poorly oxygenated but highly unsaturated compounds in passive smokers.

  15. Efficient Formation of Stratospheric Aerosol for Climate Engineering by Emission of Condensible Vapor from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Heckendorn, Patricia; Peter. Thomas; Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent analysis suggests that the effectiveness of stratospheric aerosol climate engineering through emission of non-condensable vapors such as SO2 is limited because the slow conversion to H2SO4 tends to produce aerosol particles that are too large; SO2 injection may be so inefficient that it is difficult to counteract the radiative forcing due to a CO2 doubling. Here we describe an alternate method in which aerosol is formed rapidly in the plume following injection of H2SO4, a condensable vapor, from an aircraft. This method gives better control of particle size and can produce larger radiative forcing with lower sulfur loadings than SO2 injection. Relative to SO2 injection, it may reduce some of the adverse effects of geoengineering such as radiative heating of the lower stratosphere. This method does not, however, alter the fact that such a geoengineered radiative forcing can, at best, only partially compensate for the climate changes produced by CO2.

  16. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activity during the AC3Exp campaign: Implications for CCN parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Yanan; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles acting as CCN are pivotal elements of the hydrological cycle and climate change. In this study, we measured and characterized NCCN in relatively clean and polluted air during the AC3Exp campaign conducted at Xianghe, China during summer 2013. The aim was to examine CCN activation properties under high aerosol loading conditions in a polluted region and to assess the impacts of particle size and chemical composition on the CCN AR which acts as a proxy of the total number of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A gradual increase in size-resolved AR with particle diameter suggests that aerosol particles have different hygroscopicities. For particles in the accumulation mode, values of κapa range from 0.31-0.38 under background conditions, which is about 20% higher than that derived under polluted conditions. For particles in the nucleation or Aitken mode, κ range from 0.20-0.34 under both background and polluted conditions. Larger particles were on average more hygroscopic than smaller particles. However, the case is more complex for particles originating from heavy pollution due to the diversity in particle composition and mixing state. The low R2 for the NPO CCN closure test suggests a 30%-40% uncertainty in total NCCN estimation. Using bulk chemical composition data from ACSM measurements, the relationship between bulk AR and the physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols is investigated. Based on a case study, it has been concluded that one cannot use a parameterized formula using only total NCN to estimate total NCCN. Our results showed a possibility of using bulk κchem and f44 in combination with bulk NCN > 100 nm to parameterize CCN number concentrations.

  17. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  18. Temporal variations of 7Be and 210Pb activity in aerosols at Xiamen, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Dekun

    2016-04-01

    The radionuclides serve as powerful tracers to identify and quantify several atmospheric processes, such as source, transport and mixing of air masses, air masses exchanging between various atmospheric layers, residence times of atmospheric gasses and pollutants. 7Be and 210Pb activities in aerosols were measurement from October, 2013 to September, 2015 at Xiamen (24°26'7.44″N, 118°5'31.30″N) in South China. The activity of 7Be and 210Pb in aerosols from 2013 to 2015 in Xiamen ranged from 0.26 to 9.05 (mean:4.15) mBq m-3 and from 0.14 to 2.64 (mean:1.05) mBq m-3, respectively. The mean activity of 7Be was comparable with the activities of other places in the same latitude, while the mean activity of 210Pb was lower than the activity of the locations at high altitudes. The possible reason is that Xiamen is a coastal city located on southwest Pacific. The activities of 7Be and 210Pb had a commonly low value in summer (July-September) and a high value in autumn (October-December), it may be controlled by the rainfall. There is significant relationship between the monthly 210Pb activities and the concentration of PM 2.5 and PM 10. In contrast, monthly 7Be activities only show significant correlation with the concentration of PM 10, which implies that 7Be and 210Pb can be used to trace the different sources of the aerosols. And the dry 7Be depositional fluxes increased with latitude along the coast of China (R2=0.92, n=8).

  19. Atmospheric Aerosols: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Activity of Selected Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenorn, T.; Henning, S.; Hartz, K. H.; Kiss, G.; Pandis, S.; Bilde, M.

    2005-12-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of vapors in the atmosphere plays a major role in both climate through micro meteorology and in the physical and chemical processes of a single particle. This work has focused on the cloud droplet activation of a number of pure and mixed compounds. The means used to investigate these processes have been the University of Copenhagen cloud condensation nucleus counter setup and the Carnegie Mellon University CCNC setup. The importance of correct water activity modeling has been addressed and it has been pointed out that the molecular mass is an important parameter to consider when choosing model compounds for cloud activation models. It was shown that both traditional Kohler theory and Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility reproduce measurements of soluble compounds well. For less soluble compounds it is necessary to use Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility. It was also shown that this works for mixtures of compounds containing both inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids. It has also been shown that particle phase and humidity history is important for activation behavior of particles consisting of two slightly soluble organic substances (succinic and adipic acid) and a soluble salt (NaCl). Model parameters for terpene oxidation product cloud activation have been derived. These are based on two sets of average parameters covering monoterpene oxidation products and sesquiterpene oxidation products. All parameters except the solubility were estimated and an effective solubility was calculated as the fitting parameter. The average solubility of the model compound found for mono terpene oxidation products is similar to those of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate; however the higher molecular weight leads to a slightly higher activation diameter at fixed supersaturation. On a molar basis the monoterpene oxidation products show a 1.5 times higher effective solubility than the sesquiterpene oxidation products.

  20. Influence of functional groups on organic aerosol cloud condensation nucleus activity.

    PubMed

    Suda, Sarah R; Petters, Markus D; Yeh, Geoffrey K; Strollo, Christen; Matsunaga, Aiko; Faulhaber, Annelise; Ziemann, Paul J; Prenni, Anthony J; Carrico, Christian M; Sullivan, Ryan C; Kreidenweis, Sonia M

    2014-09-01

    Organic aerosols in the atmosphere are composed of a wide variety of species, reflecting the multitude of sources and growth processes of these particles. Especially challenging is predicting how these particles act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Previous studies have characterized the CCN efficiency for organic compounds in terms of a hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Here we extend these studies by systematically testing the influence of the number and location of molecular functional groups on the hygroscopicity of organic aerosols. Organic compounds synthesized via gas-phase and liquid-phase reactions were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with scanning flow CCN analysis and thermal desorption particle beam mass spectrometry. These experiments quantified changes in κ with the addition of one or more functional groups to otherwise similar molecules. The increase in κ per group decreased in the following order: hydroxyl ≫ carboxyl > hydroperoxide > nitrate ≫ methylene (where nitrate and methylene produced negative effects, and hydroperoxide and nitrate groups produced the smallest absolute effects). Our results contribute to a mechanistic understanding of chemical aging and will help guide input and parametrization choices in models relying on simplified treatments such as the atomic oxygen:carbon ratio to predict the evolution of organic aerosol hygroscopicity. PMID:25118824

  1. Spermine-alt-poly(ethylene glycol) polyspermine as a safe and efficient aerosol gene carrier for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2014-07-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy critically depends upon the safety and efficiency of delivery system used. Although polyethylenimine (PEI) has been commonly used as an efficient cationic polymeric gene carrier due to its high transfection efficiency, its cytotoxicity and nondegradability limit the polymer's therapeutic applications in clinical trials. In this study, biocompatible polyspermine based on spermine (SPE) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate (SPE-alt-PEG) was synthesized using a Michael-type addition reaction, and its ability as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy was evaluated. SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine was complexed with plasmid DNA, and the resulting complexes were characterized by particle size and surface charge by dynamic light scattering, complex formation and DNA protection ability by gel retardation, and complex shape by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. The SPE-alt-PEG copolymer showed low cytotoxicity, and SPE-alt-PEG/DNA complexes showed efficacious transfection efficiency compared with 25 kDa PEI (PEI 25K). Also SPE-alt-PEG/GFP complexes were efficiently transferred into the lungs after aerosol administration without toxicity, and delivery of Pdcd4 gene as a therapeutic gene with SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine greatly reduced tumor size as well as tumor numbers in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice compared relative to the effect observed for PEI 25K. These results suggest that SPE-alt-PEG has potential as a gene carrier for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:23929634

  2. Aerosols, climate, and the hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, V; Crutzen, P J; Kiehl, J T; Rosenfeld, D

    2001-12-01

    Human activities are releasing tiny particles (aerosols) into the atmosphere. These human-made aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation. They also produce brighter clouds that are less efficient at releasing precipitation. These in turn lead to large reductions in the amount of solar irradiance reaching Earth's surface, a corresponding increase in solar heating of the atmosphere, changes in the atmospheric temperature structure, suppression of rainfall, and less efficient removal of pollutants. These aerosol effects can lead to a weaker hydrological cycle, which connects directly to availability and quality of fresh water, a major environmental issue of the 21st century. PMID:11739947

  3. The influence of marine microbial activities on aerosol production: A laboratory mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Bothe, Dylan W.; Radway, JoAnn C.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    The oceans cover most of the Earth's surface, contain nearly half the total global primary biomass productivity, and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. Here we experimentally investigate links between biological activity in seawater and sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, a relationship of potential significance for organic aerosol loading and cloud formation over the oceans and thus for climate globally. Bubbles were generated in laboratory mesocosm experiments either by recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Experiments were conducted with Atlantic Ocean seawater collected off the eastern end of Long Island, NY, and with artificial seawater containing cultures of bacteria and phytoplankton Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Changes in SSA size distributions occurred during all phases of bacterial and phytoplankton growth, as characterized by cell concentrations, dissolved organic carbon, total particulate carbon, and transparent exopolymer particles (gel-forming polysaccharides representing a major component of biogenic exudate material). Over a 2 week growth period, SSA particle concentrations increased by a factor of less than 2 when only bacteria were present and by a factor of about 3 when bacteria and phytoplankton were present. Production of jet-generated SSA particles of diameter less than 200 nm increased with time, while production of all particle diameters increased with time when frits were used. The implications of a marine biological activity dependent SSA flux are discussed.

  4. Differences between the activity size distributions of the different natural radionuclide aerosols in outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründel, M.; Porstendörfer, J.

    The results of the activity size distribution of the short-lived ( 218Po, 214Bi/ 214Po) and long-lived ( 210Pb, 210Po) radon decay product aerosols, the thoron decay product aerosols ( 212Pb, 212Po) and 7Be of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. The results were obtained from measurements averaged over an extended period (4 weeks) and were carried out with a low-pressure On-Line Alpha Cascade Impactor (OLACI). The size distributions of the radionuclides were obtained from the same measurement run with the OLACI, so that the size classification technique and the atmospheric and weather conditions for all radionuclides were identical. This measurement technique made it possible to measure the correct differences between the size distributions of the different natural radionuclides in the environmental air. The differences between the activity size distributions of the long- and short-lived radionuclides could be explained by coagulation with aerosol particles of the atmosphere as for instance 210Pb was shown.

  5. Sun-Sky Radiometer Synthesis of Interplay Between Aerosols and Monsoon Activity Over Pune, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devara, P. C. S.; Kumar, Sumit; Vijayakumar, K.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-09-01

    Besides several thematic campaigns, utilizing a variety of platforms including satellites, ground-based networks have been established to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in the changing monsoon climate. Two such widely known networks over the globe are `SKYNET' and `AERONET' with sun-sky radiometers as the principal equipment that characterizes aerosols and gases over different geographical locations under varied air mass conditions. Pune (18°43'N, 73°51'E, 559 m above mean sea level), a fast growing low-latitude, urban city in India, is one of the sites where Prede (POM-01L, SKYNET) and Cimel (CE-318, AERONET) Sun-sky radiometers have been in operation since 2004. These radiometers have been extensively used in several studies related to stand-alone and coupled aerosol-cloud-climate processes. The Prede instrument at this site is being augmented for the network of the Global Atmospheric Watch program of the World Meteorological Organization to facilitate data coordination through the World Data Center for Aerosols. The present study envisages understanding the response of atmospheric constituents, through simultaneous operation of the radiometers amongst others, for the rainfall activity over Pune during two contrasting monsoon years of 2008 (active, 98 % of long period average (LPA) rainfall over the whole country) and 2009 (weak, 78 % of LPA). The synthesis of data indicates that, apart from excellent agreement between the direct Sun observations, both radiometers capture well the monsoon features within the instrument density and efficacy of data retrieval algorithms involved. The meteorological fields from the ECMWF re-analysis and NOAA-HYSPLIT air-mass back-trajectory analysis during the study period have been utilized to explain the variations observed in the radiometer products.

  6. Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, William; de Gouw, Joost; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-11

    Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California, from 15 May to 4 June 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (κCCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of κCCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on κCCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (κorg) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived κorg generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in κorg could be explained by the variation of the organic O : C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded κorg = (0.83 ± 0.06) × (O:C) + (-0.19 ± 0.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, κorg derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O : C atomic ratio and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O : C greater than 0.5.

  7. Hygroscopicity and CCN activity of atmospheric aerosol particles and their relation to organics: Characteristics of urban aerosols in Nagoya, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-04-01

    The size-resolved distributions of hygroscopic growth factor g and the ratios of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to condensation nuclei of atmospheric aerosols were investigated in Nagoya, Japan. The average of the distributions of g at 85% relative humidity was bimodal. The size-resolved mean κ derived from g showed an increasing trend with diameter: 0.17-0.33 at 24-359 nm. The κ values calculated from CCN activation curves were 37% higher than those derived from g. Only 9% of the 37% difference is explained by the difference in the κ of inorganics under subsaturated and supersaturated conditions, suggesting a contribution of organics to the remaining 28% difference. The size-averaged κ of organics (κorg) was calculated as 0.14 and 0.19 by two different methods. The number fractions of CCN predicted from the hygroscopicity data over the range of 24-359 nm are loosely consistent with those observed if the size- and time-averaged g is applied to all particles (differences: -30% to +10%). This consistency improves if size- and time-resolved g and g distribution are used (differences: -19% to -3%). Whereas the number fractions of CCN predicted from the composition data are greatly underestimated if organics are assumed to be insoluble (differences: -64% to -45%), they are more consistent if κorg of 0.14 or 0.19 is applied (differences: -10% to +14%). The results demonstrate the importance of the dependence of the g of particles on time and particle size and the hygroscopicity of organics for CCN number concentrations in the urban atmosphere.

  8. A Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Device (μPAD) for Aerosol Oxidative Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Panymeesamer, Pantila; Supalakorn, Natcha; Koehler, Kirsten; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S.; Volckens, John

    2013-01-01

    Human exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution has been linked with respiratory, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, in addition to various cancers. Consistent among all of these associations is the hypothesis that PM induces inflammation and oxidative stress in the affected tissue. Consequently, a variety of assays have been developed to quantify the oxidative activity of PM as a means to characterize its ability to induced oxidative stress. The vast majority of these assays rely on high-volume, fixed-location sampling methods due to limitations in assay sensitivity and detection limit. As a result, our understanding of how personal exposure contributes to the intake of oxidative air pollution is limited. To further this understanding, we present a microfluidic paper-based analytical device (μPAD) for measuring PM oxidative activity on filters collected by personal sampling. The μPAD is inexpensive to fabricate and provides fast and sensitive analysis of aerosol oxidative activity. The oxidative activity measurement is based on the dithiothreitol assay (DTT assay), uses colorimetric detection, and can be completed in the field within 30 min following sample collection. The μPAD assay was validated against the traditional DTT assay using 13 extracted aerosol samples including urban aerosols, biomass burning PM, cigarette smoke and incense smoke. The results showed no significant differences in DTT consumption rate measured by the two methods. To demonstrate the utility of the approach, personal samples were collected to estimate human exposures to PM from indoor air, outdoor air on a clean day, and outdoor air on a wildfire-impacted day in Fort Collins, CO. Filter samples collected on the wildfire day gave the highest oxidative activity on a mass normalized basis, whereas typical ambient background air showed the lowest oxidative activity. PMID:23227907

  9. Delivery of Highly Active Noble-Metal Nanoparticles into Microspherical Supports by an Aerosol-Spray Method.

    PubMed

    Kan, Erjie; Kuai, Long; Wang, Wenhai; Geng, Baoyou

    2015-09-14

    Noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) with 1-5 nm diameter obtained from NaHB4 reduction possess high catalytic activity. However, they are rarely used directly. This work presents a facile, versatile, and efficient aerosol-spray approach to deliver noble-metal NPs into metal oxide supports, while maintaining the size of the NPs and the ability to easily adjust the loading amount. In comparison with the conventional spray approach, the size of the loaded noble-metal nanoparticles can be significantly decreased. An investigation of the 4-nitrophenol hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by these materials suggests that the NPs/oxides catalysts have high activity and good endurance. For 1 % Au/CeO2 and Pd/Al2 O3 catalysts, the rate constants reach 2.03 and 1.46 min(-1) , which is much higher than many other reports with the same noble-metal loading scale. Besides, the thermal stability of catalysts can be significantly enhanced by modifying the supports. Therefore, this work contributes an efficient method as well as some guidance on how to produce highly active and stable supported noble-metal catalysts. PMID:26234910

  10. On the Water Uptake and CCN Activation of Tropospheric Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastak, Narges; Pajunoja, Aki; Acosta Navarro, Juan-Camilo; Leong, Yu Jun; Cerully, Kate M.; Nenes, Athanasios; Kirkevåg, Alf; Topping, David; Virtanen, Annele; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles introduce high uncertainties to radiative climate forcing. If exposed to a given relative humidity (RH), aerosol particles containing soluble material can absorb water and grow in size (hygroscopic growth). If RH is increased further beyond supersaturation (RH >100%) the particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aerosol particles interactions with water vapour determine to a large extent their influence on climate. Organic aerosols (OA) contribute a large fraction (20-90%) of atmospheric submicron particulate mass, on the other hand they often consist of thousands of compounds with different properties. One of these properties is solubility, which affects the hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation of the organic particles. We investigate the hygroscopic behaviour of complex organic aerosols accounting for the distribution of solubilities present in these mixtures. We use the SPARC method to estimate the solubility distributions of isoprene (IP) and monoterpene (MT) SOA based on their chemical composition, as predicted by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Combining these solubility distributions with the adsorption theory along with the non-ideal behaviour of organic mixtures, we predict the expected hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs), CCN activation behaviour and the related hygroscopicity parameters kappa for these mixtures. The predictions are compared to laboratory measurements as well as field data from MT- and IP-dominated measurement sites. The predicted solubility distributions do a good job in explaining the water uptake of these two mixture types at high relative humidities (RH around 90%), as well as their CCN activation - including the potential differences between the kappa values derived from HGF vs. CCN data. At lower relative humidities, however, the observed water uptake is higher than predicted on solubility alone, particularly for the MT-derived SOA. The data from the low RHs are further

  11. A highly sensitive technique for detecting catalytically active nanoparticles against a background of general workplace aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, N.; Weis, F.; Binder, A.; Seipenbusch, M.; Kasper, G.

    2011-07-01

    A new measurement technique was studied using catalysis to specifically detect airborne nanoparticles in presence of background particles in the workplace air. Catalytically active nanoparticles produced by spark discharge were used as aerosol catalysts. According to these particles suitable catalytic test reactions were chosen and investigated by two different approaches: catalysis on airborne nanoparticles and catalysis on deposited nanoparticles. The results indicate that catalysis is applicable for the specific measurement of nanoparticles in the workplace air. Catalysis on airborne particles is suitable for the specific detection of very active nanoparticles, e.g. platinum or nickel, at high concentrations of about 107 #/cm3. The approach of catalysis on deposited particles is better suited for nanoparticle aerosols at low concentrations, for slow catalytic reactions or less active nanoparticles like iron oxide (Fe2O3). On the basis of the experimental results detection limits in the range of μg or even ng were calculated which assure the good potential of catalysis for the specific detection of nanoparticles in the workplace air based on their catalytic activity.

  12. Hygroscopic growth and activation of HULIS particles: experimental data and a new iterative parameterization scheme for complex aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziese, M.; Wex, H.; Nilsson, E.; Salma, I.; Ocskay, R.; Hennig, T.; Massling, A.; Stratmann, F.

    2007-09-01

    The hygroscopic growth and activation of two HULIS and one Aerosol-Water-Extract sample, prepared from urban-type aerosol, were investigated. All samples were extracted from filters, redissolved in water and atomized for the investigations presented here. The hygroscopic growth measurements were done using LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) together with a HH-TDMA (High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer). Hygroscopic growth was determined for relative humidities up to 99.75%. The critical diameters for activation were measured using LACIS for supersaturations between 2 and 10 per mill. All three samples showed a similar hygroscopic growth behaviour, and the two HULIS samples also were similar in their activation behavior, while the Aerosol-Water-Extract turned out to be more CCN active than the HULIS samples. The experimental data was used to derive parameterizations for the hygroscopic growth and activation of HULIS particles. The concept of ρion (Wex et al., 2007a) and the Szyszkowski-equation (Szyszkowski, 1908; Facchini et al., 1999) were used for parameterizing the Raoult and the Kelvin (surface tension) terms of the Köhler equation, respectively. This concept proved to be very successful for the HULIS samples in the saturation range from relative humidities larger than 98% up to activation. However it failed for the Aerosol-Water extract.

  13. Heterodyne efficiency for a coherent laser radar with diffuse or aerosol targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a Coherent Laser Radar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The heterodyne efficiency is an excellent indication of performance because it is an absolute measure of beam alignment and is independent of the transmitter power, the target backscatter coefficient, the atmospheric attenuation, and the detector quantum efficiency and gain. The theoretical calculation of heterodyne efficiency for an optimal monostatic lidar with a circular aperture and Gaussian transmit laser is presented including beam misalignment in the far-field and near-field regimes. The statistical behavior of estimates of the heterodyne efficiency using a calibration hard target are considered. For space based applications, a biased estimate of heterodyne efficiency is proposed that removes the variability due to the random surface return but retains the sensitivity to misalignment. Physical insight is provided by simulation of the fields on the detector surface. The required detector calibration is also discussed.

  14. CCN activation and hygroscopic growth measurements of secondary organic aerosols from tree emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Angela; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Spindler, Christian; Tillmann, Ralf; Kleist, Einhard; Wildt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Plant emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major precursor of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), an important constituent of atmospheric aerosols. We used the Juelich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC) at the Research Center Juelich to investigate the microphysical properties of aerosols. SOA particles were produced from the ozonolysis and reaction of OH radicals with the complex VOC mixture emitted from trees typical for the boreal forest. Hygroscopic growth factors (GF) were determined with a humidity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) for different particle sizes at RH = 2 - 97%. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation was measured with a continuous flow CCN counter (DMT). Additionally, the chemical composition, size distribution and number concentration of the particles were measured. The gas phase was monitored with GC-MS and PTR-MS. Changing the emission pattern of the trees changed the measured GF and the diameter of the dry particles that were activated (Dcrit). However, below 80% RH the GF changes are within the range of the measurement error. The GF (RH = 95%) are between 1.11 and 1.19 and the Dcrit(SS = 0.4%) in a range of 93 - 100nm. Koehler theory was applied to achieve closure between CCN activation and GF measurements. The κ parameter according to Petters and Kreidenweis (2007) was calculated for all SS (κ(CCN)) and RH (κ(GF)). The κ(GF) decrease with increasing RH but levels off at RH > 95%. Assuming the surface tension of pure water, κ(GF, RH>95%) would be by a factor of 2 lower than κ(CCN). Closure between the HTDMA and CCN measurement requires the use of either a lower surface tension or a limited solubility of the organic material. Reference: Petters, M. D. and Kreidenweis, S. M. (2007). Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 1961-1971.

  15. Circular Polarimetry: Diagnostic of Magnetic Fields, Atmospheric Aerosols and Biologic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    The overarching goals for the remote sensing and robotic exploration of planetary systems are: (1) understanding the formation of planetary systems and their diversity; and (2) search for habitability. Our solar system is a dynamic laboratory with unique linear and circular polarimetric signatures of planets, satellites, comets, asteroids, dust, etc.. The study of both linear and circular polarization of a given system, therefore, provides insight into its origin and physical properties. Specifically, linear and circular polarimetric signatures of the object arise from different physical processes. Additionally, spectral dependence of polarization is important to separate the macroscopic (bulk) properties of the scattering medium from the microscopic (particulate) properties of the scattering medium. Linear polarization of reflected light by various solar system objects provides insight into the scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and hazes; and surficial properties of atmosphereless bodies. Measurements of linear limb polarization characterizes the variation of aerosol properties across the planetary disk. Many optically active materials are anisotropic and so their scattering properties differ with the object's principal axes (such as dichroic or birefringent materials) and are crystalline in structure instead of amorphous, eg., the presence of olivines and silicates in cometary dust and circumstellar disks; Titan, etc.). Ices (water and other species) are abundant in the system indicated in their near-infrared spectra. Gas giants form outside the frost line (where ices condense), and their satellites and ring systems exhibit signature of water ice; clathrates, non-ices (Si, C, Fe) in their NIR spectra and spectral dependence of linear polarization. Circular polarization is diagnostic of magnetic fields, atmospheric aerosols and biologic activity. Aurorae occur in response to changing local magnetic fields (Earth, Jupiter, Ganymede, etc.). Biologic

  16. Marine organic aerosol and oceanic biological activity: what we know and what we need (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.

    2009-12-01

    Observations carried out in the North Atlantic as well as in other marine locations evidenced a seasonal dependence of sub micron particle chemical composition on biological oceanic activity and a potentially important marine aerosol organic component from primary and/or secondary formation processes associated to marine vegetation and its seasonal cycle. Primary organics generated by bubble bursting in high biological activity periods are almost entirely water insoluble (WIOM up to 96 ± 2 % )and are constituted by aggregation of lipopolysaccharides exuded by phytoplankton with dominant surface tension character. In many marine environments the secondary organic fraction is dominated by MSA and by several oxygenated species (mainly carboxylic acids). New measurements also show the potential importance of secondary organic N species (biogenic amine salts ). However a large fraction of the secondary organic fraction (SOA) is still not characterized and the precursors are not identified. For modeling marine organics, besides reducing the uncertainty in the knowledge of the chemical composition and new precursors, it is of crucial importance to link marine aerosol organic composition to satellite products that could be better proxy for marine biological activity and of its decomposition products than chlorophyll-a.

  17. CCN activity and volatility of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Bilde, M.; Nenes, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Jurányi, Z.; Dommen, J.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-08-01

    In a series of smog chamber experiments, the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activity of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene was characterized by determining the CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, from experimental data. Two types of CCN counters, operating at different temperatures, were used. The effect of semi-volatile organic compounds on the CCN activity of SOA was studied using a thermodenuder. Overall, SOA was only slightly CCN active (with κCCN in the range 0.001-0.16), and in dark experiments with no OH scavenger present, κCCN decreased when particles were sent through the thermodenuder (with a temperature up to 50 °C). SOA was generated under different experimental conditions: in some experiments, an OH scavenger (2-butanol) was added. SOA from these experiments was less CCN active than SOA produced in experiments without an OH scavenger (i.e. where OH was produced during ozonolysis). In other experiments, lights were turned on, either without or with the addition of HONO (OH source). This led to the formation of more CCN active SOA. SOA was aged up to 30 h through exposure to ozone and (in experiments with no OH scavenger present) to OH. In all experiments, the derived κCCN consistently increased with time after initial injection of β-caryophyllene, showing that chemical ageing increases the CCN activity of β-caryophyllene SOA. κCCN was also observed to depend on supersaturation, which was explained either as an evaporation artifact from semi-volatile SOA (only observed in experiments lacking light exposure) or, alternatively, by effects related to chemical composition depending on dry particle size. Using the method of Threshold Droplet Growth Analysis it was also concluded that the activation kinetics of the SOA do not differ significantly from calibration ammonium sulphate aerosol.

  18. CCN activity and volatility of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, M.; Bilde, M.; Nenes, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Jurányi, Z.; Dommen, J.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Baltensperger, U.

    2013-02-01

    In a series of smog chamber experiments, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from ozonolysis of β-caryophyllene was characterized by determining the CCN derived hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, from experimental data. Two types of CCN counters, operating at different temperatures, were used. The effect of semi-volatile organic compounds on the CCN activity of SOA was studied using a thermodenuder. Overall, SOA was only slightly CCN active (with κCCN in the range 0.001-0.16), and in dark experiments with no OH scavenger present, κCCN decreased when particles were sent through the thermodenuder (with a temperature up to 50 °C). SOA was generated under different experimental conditions: In some experiments, an OH scavenger (2-butanol) was added. SOA from these experiments was less CCN active than SOA produced in experiments without an OH scavenger (i.e. where OH was produced during ozonolysis). In other experiments, lights were turned on, either without or with the addition of HONO (OH source). This led to the formation of more CCN active SOA. SOA was aged up to 30 h through exposure to ozone and (in experiments with no OH scavenger present) to OH. In all experiments, the derived κCCN consistently increased with time after initial injection of β-caryophyllene, showing that chemical ageing increases the CCN activity of β-caryophyllene SOA. κCCN was also observed to depend on supersaturation, which was explained either as an evaporation artifact from semi-volatile SOA (only observed in experiments lacking light exposure) or, alternatively, by effects related to chemical composition depending on dry particle size. Using the method of Threshold Droplet Growth Analysis it was also concluded that the activation kinetics of the SOA do not differ significantly from calibration ammonium sulphate aerosol for particles aged for several hours.

  19. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-01-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. The numerical framework of organic PD-FiTE is not based on empirical observations of activity coefficient variation, rather a simple application of a Taylor Series expansion. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99%, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8%. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20% of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40% and as high as +70% were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are up to a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  20. Evaluation of Ag nanoparticle coated air filter against aerosolized virus: Anti-viral efficiency with dust loading.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yun Haeng; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the effect of dust loading on the anti-viral ability of an anti-viral air filter was investigated. Silver nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in diameter were synthesized via a spark discharge generation system and were used as anti-viral agents coated onto a medium air filter. The pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and anti-viral ability of the filter against aerosolized bacteriophage MS2 virus particles were tested with dust loading. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop increased with dust loading, while the anti-viral ability decreased. Theoretical analysis of anti-viral ability with dust loading was carried out using a mathematical model based on that presented by Joe et al. (J. Hazard. Mater.; 280: 356-363, 2014). Our model can be used to compare anti-viral abilities of various anti-viral agents, determine appropriate coating areal density of anti-viral agent on a filter, and predict the life cycle of an anti-viral filter. PMID:26434534

  1. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  2. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  3. Soot Aerosol Particles as Cloud Condensation Nuclei: from Ice Nucleation Activity to Ice Crystal Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Isamel Kenneth; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of solid-state particles (soot) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion is considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [1]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation, as they would promote ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. Soot particles are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust because they activate nucleation at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing than ratios usually expected for homogeneous nucleation [2]. In fact, there are still numerous opened questions as to whether and how soot's physico-chemical properties (structure, morphology and chemical composition) can influence their nucleation ability. Therefore, systematic investigations of soot aerosol nucleation activity via one specific nucleation mode, here deposition nucleation, combined with thorough structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' activity and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, since the morphology of the ice crystals can influence their radiative properties [3], we investigated their morphology as they grow over both soot and pristine substrates at different temperatures and humidity ratios. In the present work, Combustion Aerosol STandart soot samples were produced from propane using various experimental conditions. Their nucleation activity was studied in deposition mode (from water vapor), and monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a microscope coupled to a Raman spectrometer. Vibrational signatures of hydroxyls (O-H) emerge when the particle becomes hydrated and are used to characterize ice

  4. Discernible signals of aerosol effects on the diurnal, weekly and decadal variations in thunderstorm activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol can affect atmospheric convection, cloud and precipitation in a variety of means by altering energy balance at the surface and in the atmospheric column, and by altering cloud micro- and macro-physical properties. The effects are often contingent upon meteorological variables and aerosol properties. By reducing surface energy budget, aerosol tends to suppress convection, but aerosol-induced heating in the lower atmosphere can destabilize the upper atmosphere and strengthen convection. Aerosol-induced altering cloud microphysics may also suppress or invigorate cloud development pending on various factors. In this talk, I will illustrate how aerosols likely contribute to the thunderstorm variability on three distinct time scales from diurnal, weekly to decadal and how different types of aerosols and varying meteorological conditions may affect with the observed trends. I will first demonstrate the opposite effects of conservative scattering and hygroscopic aerosols versus absorbing and hydrophobic aerosol on the long-term trends of thunderstorms. I will then illustrate that aerosol can have a discernible effect on the weekly cycle of thunderstorms and there is the dependence of the phase of the weekly cycle on aerosol types. Last, I will show how aerosol delays the occurrence of thunderstorms. Of course, the plausible connections are subject to various uncertainties that should be tackled with more rigorous modeling and extensive observation studies.

  5. NUMERICAL CALCULATION: ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspiration efficiency of particles from a flowing airstream into a thin-walled sampling inlet is accurately predicted using a numerical model. he model combines the Boundary Integral Equation Method for predicting the velocity field into the inlet with an analytical solution to t...

  6. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2011-08-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99 %, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8 %. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20 % of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40 % and as high as +70 % were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are upto a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  7. CCN Activity of Organic Aerosols Observed Downwind of Urban Emissions during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Fan; Setyan, Ari; Zhang, Qi; Wang, J. X.

    2013-12-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), activation fraction of size-resolved aerosol particles and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at the T1 site (~60 km downwind of Sacramento, California) from 10 June to 28 June 2010. The hygroscopicity of CCN-active particles (KCCN) with diameter from 100 to 170 nm, derived from the size-resolved activated fraction, varied from 0.10 to 0.21, with an average of 0.15, which was substantially lower than that proposed for continental sites in earlier studies. The low KCCN value was due to the high organic volume fraction, averaged over 80% at the T1 site. The derived KCCN exhibited little diurnal variation, consistent with the relatively constant organic volume fraction observed. At any time, over 90% of the size selected particles with diameter between 100 and 171nm were CCN active, suggesting most particles within this size range were aged background particles. Due to the large organic volume fraction, organic hygroscopicity (Korg) strongly impacted particle hygroscopicity and therefore calculated CCN concentration. For vast majority of the cases, an increase of Korg from 0.03 to 0.18, which are within the typical range, doubled the calculated CCN concentration. Organic hygroscopicity was derived from KCCN and aerosol chemical composition, and its variations with the fraction of total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 (f44) and O:C were compared to results from previous studies. Overall, the relationships between Korg and f44 are quite consistent for organic aerosol (OA) observed during field studies and those formed in smog chamber. Compared to the relationship between Korg and f44, the relationship between Korg and O:C exhibits more significant differences among different studies, suggesting korg may be better parameterized using f44. A

  8. Effect of aerosols on solar UV irradiances during the Photochemical Activity and Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylling, A.; Bais, A. F.; Blumthaler, M.; Schreder, J.; Zerefos, C. S.; Kosmidis, E.

    1998-10-01

    Surface UV irradiances were measured at two different sites in Greece during June 1996 under noncloudy conditions. The measured UV irradiances are simulated by a radiative transfer model using measured ozone density and aerosol optical depth profiles. The absolute difference between model and measurements ranges between -5% and +5% with little dependence on wavelength. The temporal and solar zenith angle dependence in the difference between model and measurement suggests that part of this difference may be explained by assumptions made about the aerosol single-scattering albedo and phase function. Simulated spectra including aerosols are compared with calculated spectra excluding aerosols. It is found that for otherwise similar atmospheric conditions the UVB irradiance is reduced with respect to aerosol free conditions by 5% to 35% depending on the aerosol optical depth and single-scattering albedo. For the campaign period, changes in the aerosol loading gave larger variations in the surface UV irradiances than the changes seen in the ozone column.

  9. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm‑1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations.

  10. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR.

    PubMed

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25-3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47-2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R(2) = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880-1150 cm(-1) and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R(2) = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  11. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  12. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  13. Use of active and passive ground based remote sensors to explore cloud droplet modifications in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw Thet

    We explore the potential aerosol impact on cloud optical properties which is a strong modifier of climate forcing. Previous studies have shown that increased aerosol loading can affect the cloud optical properties such as cloud optical depth and cloud droplet effective radius in rural areas, particularly at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Southern Great Plain site. In this study, we attempt to observe and quantify aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City, using a combination of passive and active radiometric sensors. In particular, we look for signatures of the Twomey indirect effect which states that the droplet size of water phase clouds will decrease with increasing aerosols. We find that under certain conditions, a strong signature is found between the cloud drop effective radius and extinction and this effect is in part due to vertical wind uptake. In demonstrating the Aerosol Cloud Interaction, we use multiple approaches. For example, we derive the integrated liquid water path using both a multiband neural network and dual channel approach and show general agreement between two methods while the DC approach seems more robust. We also find that these measurements are difficult and sensitive to the position of the aerosols relative to the cloud base. As a corollary, we explore whether near surface aerosol loading can effecting the cloud by using particulate matter (PM2.5) and find that the effects are too variable to be given any statistical weight. Finally, we explore the potential of modifying our approach to remove the noisy and difficult measurement of Raman LIDAR derived extinction with calibrated LIDAR backscatter. The results seem to show a general improvement in correlation and offer the possibility of increasing the number of cases observed.

  14. Aerosol chamber and modelling studies on the reaction of soot aerosols with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Moehler, O.; Naumann, K.H.; Saathoff, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heterogeneous processes in atmospheric aerosols are known to play important roles in the chemical transformation of air pollutants. Especially irregularly shaped aerosol particles like soot have large surface areas to interact with trace gases. The overall efficiency of those processes depends on various parameters like the particle shape, the chemical surface conditions, the surface reaction mechanisms and the gas transport processes to and from the surface. The shape and surface of soot particles are transformed due to their heterogeneous chemical activity. Therefore, the surface reaction efficiency of atmospheric soot particles also depends on their age and history. The scope of this work is to investigate the ozone depletion potential of soot particles at typical atmospheric conditions. The experiments are carried out in a cylindrical aerosol vessel with a volume of 3.7 m{sup 3}. The soot aerosol is produced with a sparc generator and introduced into the aerosol vessel together with the ozone. The variation of the number concentration, the mass concentration and the size distribution of the soot aerosol within the aerosol vessel is measured and electron micrographs are taken to obtain information on the particle morphology. The ozone concentration is continuously monitored by UV-absorption. The experimental data are compared with model results to analyze the physical and chemical processes in the aerosol system in more detail. The aerosol model developed at our institute is based on the concept of fractal geometry and calculates the dynamic behaviour of irregularly shaped aerosols. More recently, the model was extended to describe the interaction of the aerosol particles with gases. This paper summarizes first results of the experimental and modelling work. The possible impact on tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  15. Active controls technology to maximize structural efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoy, J. M.; Arnold, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The implication of the dependence on active controls technology during the design phase of transport structures is considered. Critical loading conditions are discussed along with probable ways of alleviating these loads. Why fatigue requirements may be critical and can only be partially alleviated is explained. The significance of certain flutter suppression system criteria is examined.

  16. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  17. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  18. EFFECT OF AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT ON AMBIENT AIR DENSITIES OF AEROSOLS CONTAINING BACTERIA AND VIRUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria and virus-containing aerosols were studied during late summer and fall in a U.S. midwestern suburb before and during the start up and operation of an unenclosed activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The air in this suburban area contained low-level densities of in...

  19. Hygroscopic growth and activation of HULIS particles: experimental data and a new iterative parameterization scheme for complex aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziese, M.; Wex, H.; Nilsson, E.; Salma, I.; Ocskay, R.; Hennig, T.; Massling, A.; Stratmann, F.

    2008-03-01

    The hygroscopic growth and activation of two HULIS (HUmic LIke Substance) and one Aerosol-Water-Extract sample, prepared from urban-type aerosol, were investigated. All samples were extracted from filters, redissolved in water and atomized for the investigations presented here. The hygroscopic growth measurements were done using LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) together with a HH-TDMA (High Humidity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer). Hygroscopic growth was determined for relative humidities (RHs) up to 99.75%. The critical diameters for activation were measured for supersaturations between 0.2 and 1%. All three samples showed a similar hygroscopic growth behavior, and the two HULIS samples also were similar in their activation behavior, while the Aerosol-Water-Extract turned out to be more CCN active than the HULIS samples. The experimental data was used to derive parameterizations for the hygroscopic growth and activation of HULIS particles. The concept of ρion (Wex et al., 2007a) and the Szyszkowski-equation (Szyszkowski, 1908; Facchini, 1999) were used for parameterizing the Raoult and the Kelvin (surface tension) terms of the Köhler equation, respectively. This concept proved to be very successful for the HULIS samples in the saturation range from RHs larger than 98% up to activation. It was also shown to work well with data on HULIS taken from literature. Here, different atmospheric life-times and/or different sources for the different samples showed up in different coefficients for the parameterization. However, the parameterization did not work out well for the Aerosol-Water-Extract.

  20. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  1. Long-term study of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna

    PubMed Central

    Burkart, J.; Steiner, G.; Reischl, G.; Hitzenberger, R.

    2011-01-01

    During a total of 11 months, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at super-saturation S 0.5%) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations were measured in the urban background aerosol of Vienna, Austria. For several months, number size distributions between 13.22 nm and 929 nm were also measured with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS). Activation ratios (i.e. CCN/CN ratios) were calculated and apparent activation diameters obtained by integrating the SMPS size distributions. Variations in all CCN parameters (concentration, activation ratio, apparent activation diameter) are quite large on timescales of days to weeks. Passages of fronts influenced CCN parameters. Concentrations decreased with the passage of a front. No significant differences were found for fronts from different sectors (for Vienna mainly north to west and south to east). CCN concentrations at 0.5% S ranged from 160 cm−3 to 3600 cm−3 with a campaign average of 820 cm−3. Activation ratios were quite low (0.02–0.47, average: 0.13) and comparable to activation ratios found in other polluted regions (e.g. Cubison et al., 2008). Apparent activation diameters were found to be much larger (campaign average: 169 nm, range: (69–370) nm) than activation diameters for single-salt particles (around 50 nm depending on the salt). Contrary to CN concentrations, which are influenced by source patterns, CCN concentrations did not exhibit distinct diurnal patterns. Activation ratios showed diurnal variations counter-current to the variations of CN concentrations. PMID:21977003

  2. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  3. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  4. Determination of Aerosol Oxidative Activity using Silver Nanoparticle Aggregation on Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Dungchai, Wijitar; Sameenoi, Yupaporn; Chailapakul, Orawon; Volckens, John; Henry, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) pollution significantly impacts human health, but the cellular mechanisms of PM-induced toxicity remain poorly understood. A leading hypothesis on the effects of inhaled PM involves the generation of cellular oxidative stress. To investigate PM-induced oxidative stress, analytical methods have been developed to study the chemical oxidation of dithiothreitol (DTT) in the presence of PM. Although DTT readily reacts with several forms of reactive oxygen species, this molecule is not endogenously produced in biological systems. Glutathione (GSH), on the other hand, is an endogenous antioxidant that is produced throughout the body and is directly involved in combating oxidative stress in the lungs and other tissues. We report here a new method for measuring aerosol oxidative activity that uses silver nanoparticle (AgNP) aggregation coupled to glutathione (GSH) oxidation in a paper-based analytical device. In this assay, the residual reduced GSH from the oxidation of reduced GSH to its disulfide induces the aggregation of AgNPs on a paper-based analytical device, which produces a reddish-brown product. Two methods for aerosol oxidative reactivity are presented: one based on change in color intensity using a traditional paper-based techniques and one based on the length of the color product formed using a distance-based device. These methods were validated against traditional spectroscopic assays for DTT and GSH that employ Elman’s reagent. No significant difference was found between the levels measured by all three GSH methods (our two paper-based devices and the traditional method) at the 95% confidence level. PM reactivity towards GSH was less than towards DTT most likely due to the difference in the oxidation potential between the two molecules. PMID:24067623

  5. Detection and quantification of water-based aerosols using active open-path FTIR

    PubMed Central

    Kira, Oz; Linker, Raphael; Dubowski, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have a leading role in many eco-systems and knowledge of their properties is critical for many applications. This study suggests using active Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy for quantifying water droplets and solutes load in the atmosphere. The OP-FTIR was used to measure water droplets, with and without solutes, in a 20 m spray tunnel. Three sets of spraying experiments generated different hydrosols clouds: (1) tap water only, (2) aqueous ammonium sulfate (0.25–3.6%wt) and (3) aqueous ethylene glycol (0.47–2.38%wt). Experiment (1) yielded a linear relationship between the shift of the extinction spectrum baseline and the water load in the line-of-sight (LOS) (R2 = 0.984). Experiment (2) also yielded a linear relationship between the integrated extinction in the range of 880–1150 cm−1 and the ammonium sulfate load in the LOS (R2 = 0.972). For the semi-volatile ethylene glycol (experiment 3), present in the gas and condense phases, quantification was much more complex and two spectral approaches were developed: (1) according to the linear relationship from the first experiment (determination error of 8%), and (2) inverse modeling (determination error of 57%). This work demonstrates the potential of the OP-FTIR for detecting clouds of water-based aerosols and for quantifying water droplets and solutes at relatively low concentrations. PMID:27121498

  6. Elastolytic activity in the lungs of rats exposed to cadmium aerosolization

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.V.; Gudapaty, S.R.; Liener, I.E.; Hoidal, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    Rats were exposed for 1 hr per day for up to 35 days to an aerosol of 0.1% cadmium chloride. At periodic intervals, animals were sacrificed and their lungs lavaged. The lung lavage fluid was examined for polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and alveolar macrophages (AM). A portion of the cells of the lavage fluid was lysed, and the remainder of the cells were cultured. The lavage fluids, cell lysates, and conditioned media were assayed for elastolytic activity in the presence and absence of a peptide chloromethyl ketone and EDTA. Exposure to cadmium evoked a biphasic cellular response characterized by an initial influx (1-3 days) of PMN followed by a gradual increase in AM. This biphasic cellular response was accompanied by a shift in the type of elastolytic activity which was present in the lung lavage and its cellular components. The initial PMN phase was accompanied by the enhanced production of an elastase inhibited only by the peptide chloromethyl ketone, while the subsequent AM phase was associated with an elastase activity which was inhibited only by EDTA. The possible implication of these results with respect to the pathogenesis of emphysema is considered.

  7. Spectroscopic investigations of organic aerosol and its reaction with halogens, released by sea-salt activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2009-04-01

    The release of reactive halogen species from sea-salt aerosol offers a class of reactants for heterogeneous reactions of utmost importance. These heterogeneous reactions have been overlooked so far, although they may occur with internal and external mixtures of sea-salt aerosol and organic aerosol or organic matter. Such reactions might constitute sources of gaseous organohalogen compounds or halogenated organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer. Infrared and UV/VIS spectroscopy provide an insight into chemical processes at reactive sites of the organic phase on a molecular level. Model studies of heterogeneous reactions of halogens with different kinds of (secondary) organic aerosols and organic matter were performed using a 700L smog chamber with a solar simulator. The model compounds alpha-pinene, catechol and humic acid have been chosen as precursors/material for the condensed, organic phase of the aerosol. After formation of the secondary organic aerosol or preparation of the organic material and the sea-salt solution the reaction was carried out using molecular chlorine and bromine in the presence of simulated sunlight. Chemical transformation of the organic material was studied using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) on a ZnSe crystal and diffuse reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. An electrostatic precipitator was developed to deposit the aerosol particles on the ATR crystal as a thin film. On the other hand, longpath-FTIR spectroscopy with a 40m White-cell allows us to monitor both the condensed and gas phase of the aerosol in situ in the smog chamber directly. These spectroscopic techniques enable us to characterize different organic aerosol particles and their functional groups at reactive sites on these particles as well as to study aerosol formation and transformation directly. The heterogeneous reaction of reactive halogen species with organic material at atmospheric conditions leads to small reactive

  8. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  9. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  10. Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleidman, Richard; Kaufman, Yoram; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The newly established Center for Aerosol Research (AEROCENTER) located at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt MD is dedicated to fostering interdisciplinary research in all aspects of aerosol science. AEROCENTER will be an incubator for innovative new analysis of existing data and ideas for new space missions. The plan is to tap and harvest ideas from a broad international and interdisciplinary science community and to incorporate these ideas into NASA's aerosol research effort for understanding and predicting the aerosol effect on climate and the environment. In order to achieve this goal the center aims to host several established and developing scientists for a period of 3-6 months each year. AEROCENTER will also develop a new technical infrastructure that will integrate the present aerosol research activities and data resources of GSFC/Greenbelt and GSFC/GISS, increase efficiency in the use of NASA remote sensing data, and increase the involvement of a larger national and international scientific community. The center aims to institutionalize and extend the present knowledge base within NASA into a national resource for the education and research communities.

  11. Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Future Suborbital Activities to Address Knowledge Gaps in Satellite and Model Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Piketh, S.; Formenti, P.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Schmidt, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Luna, B.; Abel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and may mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. Our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions in the SE Atlantic is hindered both by the lack of knowledge on aerosol and cloud properties, as well as the lack of knowledge about detailed physical processes involved. Most notably, we are missing knowledge on the absorptive and cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, including their vertical distribution relative to clouds, on the locations and degree of aerosol mixing into clouds, on the processes that govern cloud property adjustments, and on the importance of aerosol effects on clouds relative to co-varying synoptic scale meteorology. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling. Recent efforts to make full use of A-Train aerosol sensor synergies will be highlighted. We describe planned field campaigns in the region to address the existing knowledge gaps. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the five synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing some of the key aerosol and cloud properties and a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: NASA

  12. Fabrication of a metal membrane on a perforated polymer substrate by palladium aerosol activation and subsequent electroless plating.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-02-01

    Fabrication of a metal membrane on a perforated flexible poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) substrate was developed by employing spark-generated palladium (Pd) aerosol activation and the subsequent electroless plating of Pd. After aerosol activation, Pd agglomerates of spark-generated primary particles (approximately 2.6 nm in diameter) with a face-centered-cubic structure were deposited uniformly on the PTFE substrate. Homogeneous Pd particles with an average size of 188 nm were tightly packed together to form a Pd membrane after Pd plating. The average plating rate of Pd during 30 min of plating at an activation intensity of 25 microg/cm(2) was 14.2 microg/cm(2) x min. PMID:20353212

  13. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  14. An inexpensive active optical remote sensing instrument for assessing aerosol distributions.

    PubMed

    Barnes, John E; Sharma, Nimmi C P

    2012-02-01

    Air quality studies on a broad variety of topics from health impacts to source/sink analyses, require information on the distributions of atmospheric aerosols over both altitude and time. An inexpensive, simple to implement, ground-based optical remote sensing technique has been developed to assess aerosol distributions. The technique, called CLidar (Charge Coupled Device Camera Light Detection and Ranging), provides aerosol altitude profiles over time. In the CLidar technique a relatively low-power laser transmits light vertically into the atmosphere. The transmitted laser light scatters off of air molecules, clouds, and aerosols. The entire beam from ground to zenith is imaged using a CCD camera and wide-angle (100 degree) optics which are a few hundred meters from the laser. The CLidar technique is optimized for low altitude (boundary layer and lower troposphere) measurements where most aerosols are found and where many other profiling techniques face difficulties. Currently the technique is limited to nighttime measurements. Using the CLidar technique aerosols may be mapped over both altitude and time. The instrumentation required is portable and can easily be moved to locations of interest (e.g. downwind from factories or power plants, near highways). This paper describes the CLidar technique, implementation and data analysis and offers specifics for users wishing to apply the technique for aerosol profiles. PMID:22442935

  15. Aerosol Gemcitabine: Preclinical Safety and In Vivo Antitumor Activity in Osteosarcoma-Bearing Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Crabbs, Torrie A.; Wilson, Dennis W.; Cannan, Virginia A.; Skorupski, Katherine A.; Gordon, Nancy; Koshkina, Nadya; Kleinerman, Eugenie; Anderson, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Osteosarcoma is the most common skeletal malignancy in the dog and in young humans. Although chemotherapy improves survival time, death continues to be attributed to metastases. Aerosol delivery can provide a strategy with which to improve the lung drug delivery while reducing systemic toxicity. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety of a regional aerosol approach to chemotherapy delivery in osteosarcoma-bearing dogs, and second, to evaluate the effect of gemcitabine on Fas expression in the pulmonary metastasis. Methods We examined the systemic and local effects of aerosol gemcitabine on lung and pulmonary metastasis in this relevant large-animal tumor model using serial laboratory and arterial blood gas analysis and histopathology and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results and Conclusions Six hundred seventy-two 1-h doses of aerosol gemcitabine were delivered. The treatment was well tolerated by these subjects with osteosarcoma (n = 20). Aerosol-treated subjects had metastatic foci that demonstrated extensive, predominately central, intratumoral necrosis. Fas expression was decreased in pulmonary metastases compared to the primary tumor (p = 0.008). After aerosol gemcitabine Fas expression in the metastatic foci was increased compared to lung metastases before treatment (p = 0.0075), and even was higher than the primary tumor (p = 0.025). Increased apoptosis (TUNEL) staining was also detected in aerosol gemcitabine treated metastasis compared to untreated controls (p = 0.028). The results from this pivotal translational study support the concept that aerosol gemcitabine may be useful against pulmonary metastases of osteosarcoma. Additional studies that evaluate the aerosol route of administration of gemcitabine in humans should be safe and are warranted. PMID:19803732

  16. Effect of an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant on ambient air densities of aerosols containing bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Fannin, K F; Vana, S C; Jakubowski, W

    1985-05-01

    Bacteria- and virus-containing aerosols were studied during the late summer and fall seasons in a midwestern suburb of the United States before and during the start-up and operation of an unenclosed activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The study showed that the air in this suburban area contained low-level densities of indicator microorganisms. After the plant began operating, the densities of total aerobic bacteria-containing particles, standard plate count bacteria, total coliforms, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci, and coliphages increased significantly in the air within the perimeter of the plant. Before plant operations, bacteria were detected from five genera, Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Salmonella, and Aeromonas. During plant operations, the number of genera identified increased to 11. In addition to those genera found before plant operations, Escherichia, Providencia, Citrobacter, Acinetobacter, Pasteurella, and Proteus, were also identified. Enteric viruses were detected in low densities from the air emissions of this plant. Only standard plate count bacteria remained at significantly higher than base-line densities beyond 250 m downwind from the center of the aeration tanks. Fecal streptococci and coliphages appeared to be more stable in aerosols than the other indicator microorganisms studied. In general, the densities of microorganism-containing aerosols were higher at night than during the day. The techniques used in this study may be employed to establish microorganism-containing aerosol exposure during epidemiological investigations. PMID:2988442

  17. Single-particle detection efficiencies of aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry during the North Atlantic marine boundary layer experiment.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M; Beddows, David C S; Freney, Evelyn J; Heal, Mathew R; Donovan, Robert J

    2006-08-15

    During the North Atlantic marine boundary layer experiment (NAMBLEX) sampling campaign at Mace Head, Ireland, both continental and maritime air masses were sampled. Aerosol was characterized both with a TSI 3800 time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and a MOUDI microorifice impactor, and particle number counts were measured independently with an aerodynamic particle sizer. The data have been analyzed in order to elucidate factors determining the particle detection efficiencies of the ATOFMS. These are broken down according to the efficiency of the inlet system, the hit efficiency on particles which enter the sensing zone of the instrument and the sensitivity of the measured ion signal to the chemical species. A substantial matrix effect depending on the chemical composition of the aerosol sampled at the time was found, which is reflected in variations in the hit efficiency of particles entering the sensing zone of the instrument with the main desorption-ionization laser. This is in addition to the strong inverse power-law dependence of inlet transmission efficiency on particle diameter. The variation in hit efficiency with particle type is likely attributable to differences in the energetics of laser energy absorption, ablation, and ion formation. However, once variations in both inlet transmission and hit efficiencies are taken into account, no additional matrix dependence of ATOFMS response is required to obtain a linear relationship between the ion signal and the concentration of a particular chemical species. The observations show that a constant mass of material is ionized from each particle, irrespective of size. Consequently the integrated ion signal for a given chemical component and particle size class needs to be increased by a factor related to the cube of particle diameter in order to correlate with the airborne mass of that component. PMID:16955903

  18. A COMPUTATIONALLY EFFICIENT HYBRID APPROACH FOR DYNAMIC GAS/AEROSOL TRANSFER IN AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic mass transfer methods have been developed to better describe the interaction of the aerosol population with semi-volatile species such as nitrate, ammonia, and chloride. Unfortunately, these dynamic methods are computationally expensive. Assumptions are often made to r...

  19. An Energetic Perspective on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Interactions with Atmospheric Wave Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols have the capability to alter regional-scale atmospheric circulations. A better understanding of the contribution of aerosols to multi-scale atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes is crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions using next generation climate models. In this study we address the following questions: (1) Is there a mechanistic relationship between variability of oceanic dust aerosol forcing and transient changes in the African easterly jet- African easterly wave (AEJ-AEW) system? (2) What are the long-term impacts of possible aerosol-wave interactions on climate dynamics of eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean and western African monsoon (WAM) region during boreal summer seasons? Our hypothesis is that aerosol radiative forcing may act as additional energy source to fuel the development of African easterly waves on the northern and southern sides of the AEJ. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is presented based on analysis of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of global aerosol distributions made with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). We propose that the impacts of Saharan aerosols on the regional climate dynamics occur through contributions to the eddy energy of waves with 2—7-day and 7—11-day variability.

  20. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: a study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Christopher R.; Webster, Clare S.; Rieder, Harald E.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hammer, Emanuel; Herrmann, Erik; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Weingartner, Ernest; Steinbacher, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-01-01

    A simple statistical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in warm clouds has been established, based on regression analysis of data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE) at the high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (JFJ). It is shown that 79 % of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential cloud condensation nuclei (defined as number of particles larger than 80 nm in diameter), while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the addition of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO, and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The statistical model has a similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (northwest and southeast). Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this statistical model is generally applicable to warm clouds under conditions where droplet formation is aerosol limited (i.e. at relatively high updraught velocities and/or relatively low aerosol number concentrations). A comparison between the statistical model and an established microphysical parametrization shows good agreement between the two and supports the conclusion that cloud droplet formation at the JFJ is predominantly controlled by the number concentration of aerosol particles.

  2. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: a study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Christopher R.; Webster, Clare S.; Rieder, Harald E.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hammer, Emanuel; Herrmann, Erik; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Weingartner, Ernest; Steinbacher, Martin; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-03-01

    A simple statistical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in warm clouds has been established, based on regression analysis of data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE) at the high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (JFJ). It is shown that 79 % of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential cloud condensation nuclei (defined as number of particles larger than 80 nm in diameter), while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the addition of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO, and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The statistical model has a similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (northwest and southeast). Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this statistical model is generally applicable to warm clouds under conditions where droplet formation is aerosol limited (i.e. at relatively high updraught velocities and/or relatively low aerosol number concentrations). A comparison between the statistical model and an established microphysical parametrization shows good agreement between the two and supports the conclusion that cloud droplet formation at the JFJ is predominantly controlled by the number concentration of aerosol particles.

  3. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: a study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoyle, Christopher R.; Webster, Clare S.; Rieder, Harald E.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hammer, Emanuel; Herrmann, Erik; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Weingartner, Ernest; Steinbacher, Martin; et al

    2016-03-29

    In this study, a simple statistical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in warm clouds has been established, based on regression analysis of data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE) at the high-altitude site Jungfraujoch (JFJ). It is shown that 79 % of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential cloud condensation nuclei (defined as number of particles larger than 80 nm in diameter), while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the additionmore » of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO, and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The statistical model has a similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (northwest and southeast). Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this statistical model is generally applicable to warm clouds under conditions where droplet formation is aerosol limited (i.e. at relatively high updraught velocities and/or relatively low aerosol number concentrations). Finally, a comparison between the statistical model and an established microphysical parametrization shows good agreement between the two and supports the conclusion that cloud droplet formation at the JFJ is predominantly controlled by the number concentration of aerosol particles.« less

  4. Impacts Of Radiatively-Active Aerosols On Mars’ Current Climate: Simulation Results With The NASA ARC Mars GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Herin, B.; Laamoumi, F.; Wilson, R. J.; Schaeffer, J.

    2010-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Mars general circulation model (GCM) include a fundamentally new and modernized radiative transfer package which permits radiative effects and interactions of suspended atmospheric aerosols (e.g., water ice clouds, water vapor, dust, and their mutual interactions) to influence the net diabatic heating rate within the atmosphere. Such aerosols are critically important in determining the nature of atmospheric thermal structure and hence the overall climate of the planet. Our Mars GCM simulations indicate that radiatively-active water ice clouds profoundly affect the seasonal and annual mean climate in a variety of ways. In particular, preliminary results suggest that the bulk thermal structure and resultant (i.e., balanced) circulation patterns are strongly modified near the surface and aloft. Generally speaking, we find a bulk warming of the atmosphere in upper layers, a cooling of the atmosphere in the lower and near-surface regions, and, increases in the mean pole-to-equator temperature contrasts (i.e., stronger mean polar vortices). A variety of results from our baseline and control simulations (i.e., where the radiative/physical effects are examined in isolation and when combined) will be presented. Comparisons with MGS/TES and MRO/MCS measurements indicate better agreement between the model's simulated climate compared to that observed. Using a state-of-the-art Mars GCM, these results highlight important effects radiatively-active aerosols have on physical and dynamical processes active in the current climate of Mars.

  5. Anionic, Cationic, and Nonionic Surfactants in Atmospheric Aerosols from the Baltic Coast at Askö, Sweden: Implications for Cloud Droplet Activation.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Violaine; Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine; Fine, Ludovic; Frossard, Amanda A; Cohen, Ronald C

    2016-03-15

    Recent analyses of atmospheric aerosols from different regions have demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of strong surfactants and evidenced surface tension values, σ, below 40 mN m(-1), suspected to enhance the cloud-forming potential of these aerosols. In this work, this approach was further improved and combined with absolute concentration measurements of aerosol surfactants by colorimetric titration. This analysis was applied to PM2.5 aerosols collected at the Baltic station of Askö, Sweden, from July to October 2010. Strong surfactants were found in all the sampled aerosols, with σ = (32-40) ± 1 mN m(-1) and concentrations of at least 27 ± 6 mM or 104 ± 21 pmol m(-3). The absolute surface tension curves and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) determined for these aerosol surfactants show that (1) surfactants are concentrated enough in atmospheric particles to strongly depress the surface tension until activation, and (2) the surface tension does not follow the Szyszkowski equation during activation but is nearly constant and minimal, which provides new insights on cloud droplet activation. In addition, both the CMCs determined and the correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.7) between aerosol surfactant concentrations and chlorophyll-a seawater concentrations suggest a marine and biological origin for these compounds. PMID:26895279

  6. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  7. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-09-14

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles exposed tomore » OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions

  8. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-03-06

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH andmore » O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical

  9. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate-particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water-solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water-solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate-particles exposed to OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH/O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~0.1, indicating that chemically-aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally-mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical aging

  10. Chemical aging of single and multicomponent biomass burning aerosol surrogate particles by OH: implications for cloud condensation nucleus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, J. H.; Thalman, R.; Wang, J.; Knopf, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    Multiphase OH and O3 oxidation reactions with atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) can influence particle physicochemical properties including composition, morphology, and lifetime. Chemical aging of initially insoluble or low-soluble single-component OA by OH and O3 can increase their water solubility and hygroscopicity, making them more active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and susceptible to wet deposition. However, an outstanding problem is whether the effects of chemical aging on their CCN activity are preserved when mixed with other organic or inorganic compounds exhibiting greater water solubility. In this work, the CCN activity of laboratory-generated biomass burning aerosol (BBA) surrogate particles exposed to OH and O3 is evaluated by determining the hygroscopicity parameter, κ, as a function of particle type, mixing state, and OH and O3 exposure applying a CCN counter (CCNc) coupled to an aerosol flow reactor (AFR). Levoglucosan (LEV), 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (MNC), and potassium sulfate (KS) serve as representative BBA compounds that exhibit different hygroscopicity, water solubility, chemical functionalities, and reactivity with OH radicals, and thus exemplify the complexity of mixed inorganic/organic aerosol in the atmosphere. The CCN activities of all of the particles were unaffected by O3 exposure. Following exposure to OH, κ of MNC was enhanced by an order of magnitude, from 0.009 to ~ 0.1, indicating that chemically aged MNC particles are better CCN and more prone to wet deposition than pure MNC particles. No significant enhancement in κ was observed for pure LEV particles following OH exposure. κ of the internally mixed particles was not affected by OH oxidation. Furthermore, the CCN activity of OH-exposed MNC-coated KS particles is similar to the OH unexposed atomized 1 : 1 by mass MNC : KS binary-component particles. Our results strongly suggest that when OA is dominated by water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) or inorganic ions, chemical

  11. Variability of CCN Activation Behaviour of Aerosol Particles in the Marine Boundary Layer of the Northern and Southern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Dieckmann, Katrin; Hartmann, Susan; Schäfer, Michael; Wu, Zhijun; Merkel, Maik; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2013-04-01

    The variability of cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activation behaviour and total CCN number concentrations was investigated during three ship cruises. Measurements were performed in a mobile laboratory on the German research vessel FS Polarstern cruising between Cape Town and Bremerhaven (April / May and October / November 2011) as well as between Punta Arenas and Bremerhaven (April / May 2012). CCN size distributions were measured for supersaturations between 0.1% and 0.4% using a Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (DMT, USA). Aerosol particle and CCN total number concentrations as well as the hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) were determined. Furthermore, size distribution data were collected. The hygroscopicity parameter κ featured a high variability during the cruises, with a median κ-value of 0.52 ± 0.26. The κ-values are depended on air mass origin; and are as expected mainly dominated by marine influences, but also long range transport of aerosol particles was detected. In the Celtic Sea, κ was found to be lower than that of clean marine aerosol particles (0.72 ± 0.24; Pringle et al., 2010) with κ-values ~0.2, possibly influenced by anthropogenic emissions from Europe. Close to the West African coast particle hygroscopicity was found to be influenced by the Saharan dust plume, resulting in low κ-values ~0.25. Petters, M.D. and S.M. Kreidenweis (2007), A single parameter representation of hygroscopic growth and cloud condensation nucleus activity, Atmos. Chem. and Phys., 7, 1961-1971. Pringle, K.J., H. Tost, A. Pozzer, U. Pöschl, and J. Lelieveld (2010), Global distribution of the effective aerosol hygroscopicity parameter for CCN activation, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 5241-5255.

  12. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  13. Identification of Oct4-activating compounds that enhance reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Wendong; Tian, E; Chen, Zhao-Xia; Sun, Guoqiang; Ye, Peng; Yang, Su; Lu, Dave; Xie, Jun; Ho, Thach-Vu; Tsark, Walter M; Wang, Charles; Horne, David A; Riggs, Arthur D; Yip, M L Richard; Shi, Yanhong

    2012-12-18

    One of the hurdles for practical application of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) is the low efficiency and slow process of reprogramming. Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) has been shown to be an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and key to the reprogramming process. To identify small molecules that enhance reprogramming efficiency, we performed a cell-based high-throughput screening of chemical libraries. One of the compounds, termed Oct4-activating compound 1 (OAC1), was found to activate both Oct4 and Nanog promoter-driven luciferase reporter genes. Furthermore, when added to the reprogramming mixture along with the quartet reprogramming factors (Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, and Klf4), OAC1 enhanced the iPSC reprogramming efficiency and accelerated the reprogramming process. Two structural analogs of OAC1 also activated Oct4 and Nanog promoters and enhanced iPSC formation. The iPSC colonies derived using the Oct4-activating compounds along with the quartet factors exhibited typical ESC morphology, gene-expression pattern, and developmental potential. OAC1 seems to enhance reprogramming efficiency in a unique manner, independent of either inhibition of the p53-p21 pathway or activation of the Wnt-β-catenin signaling. OAC1 increases transcription of the Oct4-Nanog-Sox2 triad and Tet1, a gene known to be involved in DNA demethylation. PMID:23213213

  14. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  15. Can we better use existing and emerging computing hardware to embed activity coefficient predictions in complex atmospheric aerosol models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Alibay, Irfan; Ruske, Simon; Hindriksen, Vincent; Noisternig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To predict the evolving concentration, chemical composition and ability of aerosol particles to act as cloud droplets, we rely on numerical modeling. Mechanistic models attempt to account for the movement of compounds between the gaseous and condensed phases at a molecular level. This 'bottom up' approach is designed to increase our fundamental understanding. However, such models rely on predicting the properties of molecules and subsequent mixtures. For partitioning between the gaseous and condensed phases this includes: saturation vapour pressures; Henrys law coefficients; activity coefficients; diffusion coefficients and reaction rates. Current gas phase chemical mechanisms predict the existence of potentially millions of individual species. Within a dynamic ensemble model, this can often be used as justification for neglecting computationally expensive process descriptions. Indeed, on whether we can quantify the true sensitivity to uncertainties in molecular properties, even at the single aerosol particle level it has been impossible to embed fully coupled representations of process level knowledge with all possible compounds, typically relying on heavily parameterised descriptions. Relying on emerging numerical frameworks, and designed for the changing landscape of high-performance computing (HPC), in this study we show that comprehensive microphysical models from single particle to larger scales can be developed to encompass a complete state-of-the-art knowledge of aerosol chemical and process diversity. We focus specifically on the ability to capture activity coefficients in liquid solutions using the UNIFAC method, profiling traditional coding strategies and those that exploit emerging hardware.

  16. Contact freezing efficiency of mineral dust aerosols studied in an electrodynamic balance: quantitative size and temperature dependence for illite particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Contact freezing has long been discussed as a candidate for cloud ice formation at temperatures warmer than about -25 degrees C, but until now the molecular mechanism underlying this process has remained obscure and little quantitative information about the size and temperature dependent contact freezing properties of the various aerosol species is available. In this contribution, we present the first quantitative measurements of the freezing probability of a supercooled droplet upon a single contact with a size selected illite mineral particle. It is found that this probability is a strong function of temperature and aerosol particle size. For the particles investigated and on the minute time scale of the experiment, contact freezing indeed dominates immersion freezing for all temperatures. PMID:24601013

  17. Assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions during southern African biomass burning activity, employing cloud parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiston, Modise; McFiggans, Gordon; Schultz, David

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we perform a simulation of the spatial distributions of particle and gas concentrations from a significantly large source of pollution event during a dry season in southern Africa and their interactions with cloud processes. Specific focus is on the extent to which cloud-aerosol interactions are affected by various inputs (i.e. emissions) and parameterizations and feedback mechanisms in a coupled mesoscale chemistry-meteorology model -herein Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). The southern African dry season (May-Sep) is characterised by biomass burning (BB) type of pollution. During this period, BB particles are frequently observed over the subcontinent, at the same time a persistent deck of stratocumulus covers the south West African coast, favouring long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean of aerosols above clouds. While anthropogenic pollutants tend to spread more over the entire domain, biomass pollutants are concentrated around the burning areas, especially the savannah and tropical rainforest of the Congo Basin. BB is linked to agricultural practice at latitudes south of 10° N. During an intense burning event, there is a clear signal of strong interactions of aerosols and cloud microphysics. These species interfere with the radiative budget, and directly affect the amount of solar radiation reflected and scattered back to space and partly absorbed by the atmosphere. Aerosols also affect cloud microphysics by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying precipitation pattern and the cloud albedo. Key area is to understand the role of pollution on convective cloud processes and its impacts on cloud dynamics. The hypothesis is that an environment of potentially high pollution enables the probability of interactions between co-located aerosols and cloud layers. To investigate this hypothesis, we outline an approach to integrate three elements: i) focusing on regime(s) where there are strong indications of

  18. Size-spectra of trace elements in urban aerosol particles by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Divita, F. Jr.; Suarez, A.

    1994-12-31

    Knowledge of composition and size of atmospheric aerosol particles is needed to elucidate their sources, atmospheric transformation processes, contributions to visibility reduction, and respiratory and environmental deposition. In a previous communication, we described size spectra and hygroscopic growth of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and zinc in College Park, Maryland, an urban, nonindustrial area located near Washington, D.C., wherein, concentrations of these elements are influenced largely by sulfate-containing aerosol transported from the Ohio River valley region, more than 200 km west of the area, and local coal utility plants and incinerators located 20 to 50 km from the sampling site. At College Park, mass median aerodynamic diameters (mmad) versus relative humidity (RH) data for these elements fell along different curves for samples influenced by local and distant aerosols; i.e., the curve for distant sources lay below the curve for local sources, at larger mmads for the same RH. In this paper we discuss size spectra, distribution parameters, and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles bearing trace elements in aerosol collected in Camden, New Jersey, a heavily industrial area in which major sources, including an antimony roaster and municipal incinerator, lie in close proximity (i.e., 5 to 15 km) to the site.

  19. Efficient and Effective Change Principles in Active Videogames

    PubMed Central

    Fenner, Ashley A.; Howie, Erin K.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Gray, Cindy M.; Lu, Amy Shirong; Mueller, Florian “Floyd”; Simons, Monique; Barnett, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Active videogames have the potential to enhance population levels of physical activity but have not been successful in achieving this aim to date. This article considers a range of principles that may be important to the design of effective and efficient active videogames from diverse discipline areas, including behavioral sciences (health behavior change, motor learning, and serious games), business production (marketing and sales), and technology engineering and design (human–computer interaction/ergonomics and flow). Both direct and indirect pathways to impact on population levels of habitual physical activity are proposed, along with the concept of a game use lifecycle. Examples of current active and sedentary electronic games are used to understand how such principles may be applied. Furthermore, limitations of the current usage of theoretical principles are discussed. A suggested list of principles for best practice in active videogame design is proposed along with suggested research ideas to inform practice to enhance physical activity. PMID:26181680

  20. Efficient and Effective Change Principles in Active Videogames.

    PubMed

    Straker, Leon M; Fenner, Ashley A; Howie, Erin K; Feltz, Deborah L; Gray, Cindy M; Lu, Amy Shirong; Mueller, Florian Floyd; Simons, Monique; Barnett, Lisa M

    2015-02-01

    Active videogames have the potential to enhance population levels of physical activity but have not been successful in achieving this aim to date. This article considers a range of principles that may be important to the design of effective and efficient active videogames from diverse discipline areas, including behavioral sciences (health behavior change, motor learning, and serious games), business production (marketing and sales), and technology engineering and design (human-computer interaction/ergonomics and flow). Both direct and indirect pathways to impact on population levels of habitual physical activity are proposed, along with the concept of a game use lifecycle. Examples of current active and sedentary electronic games are used to understand how such principles may be applied. Furthermore, limitations of the current usage of theoretical principles are discussed. A suggested list of principles for best practice in active videogame design is proposed along with suggested research ideas to inform practice to enhance physical activity. PMID:26181680

  1. A Bioluminescence Assay System for Imaging Metal Cationic Activities in Urban Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Bae; Naganawa, Ryuichi; Murata, Shingo; Nakayama, Takayoshi; Miller, Simon; Senda, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A bioluminescence-based assay system was fabricated for an efficient determination of the activities of air pollutants. The following four components were integrated into this assay system: (1) an 8-channel assay platform uniquely designed for simultaneously sensing multiple optical samples, (2) single-chain probes illuminating toxic chemicals or heavy metal cations from air pollutants, (3) a microfluidic system for circulating medium mimicking the human body, and (4) the software manimulating the above system. In the protocol, we briefly introduce how to integrate the components into the system and the application to the illumination of the metal cationic activities in air pollutants. PMID:27424913

  2. A review of research on human activity induced climate change I. Greenhouse gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingxing; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Xin

    2004-06-01

    Extensive research on the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, carbon cycle modeling, and the characterization of atmospheric aerosols has been carried out in China during the last 10 years or so. This paper presents the major achievements in the fields of emissions of greenhouse gases from agricultural lands, carbon cycle modeling, the characterization of Asian mineral dust, source identification of the precursors of the tropospheric ozone, and observations of the concentrations of atmospheric organic compounds. Special, more detailed information on the emissions of methane from rice fields and the physical and chemical characteristics of mineral aerosols are presented.

  3. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of boundary layer ozone depletion events in the Polar Regions [1] and in the mid-latitudes [2], two areas of very different temperature regimes, begs the question of temperature dependence of reactions responsible for these observations [3]. These ODEs have been attributed to ozone reacting with halides leading to reactive halogens (halogen activation) of which bromide is extensively studied, R1 - R3 [4, 5] (R1 is a multiphase reaction). O3 + Br‑→ O2 + OBr‑ (R1) OBr‑ + H+ ↔ HOBr (R2) HOBr + H+ + Br‑→ Br2 + H2O (R3) Despite extensive studies of ozone-bromide interactions, the temperature dependence of bromine activation is not clear [3]. This limits parameterization of the involved reactions and factors in atmospheric models [3, 6]. Viscosity changes in the matrix (such as organic aerosols) due to temperature have been shown to influence heterogeneous reaction rates and products beyond pure temperature effect [7]. With the application of coated wall flow-tubes, the aim of this study is therefore to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation by ozone interaction while attempting to characterize the contributions of the bulk and surface reactions to observed ozone uptake. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix whose viscosity changes with temperature and humidity. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. Comparison of measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake at different matrix compositions (and viscosities) indicate that bulk reactive uptake dominates, but there are other factors which still need further consideration in the model. References 1. Barrie, L.A., et al., Nature, 1988. 334: p. 138 - 141. 2. Hebestreit, K., et al., Science, 1999. 283: p. 55-57. 3. Simpson, W.R., et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2007. 7: p. 4375 - 4418. 4. Haag, R.W. and J. Hoigné, Environ Sci Technol, 1983. 17: p. 261-267. 5. Oum

  4. Aerosol disturbances of the stratosphere over Tomsk according to data of lidar observations in volcanic activity period 2006-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Andrey P.; Burlakov, Vladimir D.; Dolgii, Sergey I.; Nevzorov, Aleksey V.; Trifonov, Dimitar A.

    2012-11-01

    We summarize and analyze the lidar measurements (Tomsk: 56.5°N; 85.0°E) of the optical characteristics of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL) in the volcanic activity period 2006-2011. The background SAL state with minimal aerosol content, which was observed since 1997 under the conditions of long-term volcanically quiescent period, was interrupted in October 2006 by a series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of the Pacific Ring of Fire: Rabaul (October 2006, New Guinea); Okmok and Kasatochi (July-August 2008, Aleutian Islands); Redoubt (March-April 2009, Alaska); Sarychev Peak (June 2009, Kuril Islands), and Grimsvötn (May 2011, Iceland). A short-term and minor disturbance of the lower stratosphere was also observed in April 2010 after eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajokull. The developed regional empirical model of the vertical distribution of background SAL optical characteristics was used to identify the periods of elevated stratospheric aerosol content after each of the volcanic eruptions.

  5. Fragmentation efficiencies of peptide ions following low energy collisional activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Scott G.; Gaskell, Simon J.

    1997-11-01

    Low energy fragmentations of protonated peptides in the gas phase are generally attributed to charge-directed processes. The extent and location of peptide backbone fragmentation is accordingly influenced by the extent to which charge is sequestered on amino acid side-chains. We describe systematic studies of the efficiencies of decomposition of peptide ions to assess in particular the influence of the presence of basic amino acid residues and of the protonation state. In a set of analogues containing two arginine, two histidine or two lysine residues, the extent of fragmentation of [M + 2H]2+ ions decreases with increased basicity, reflecting decreased backbone protonation. The collisionally activated dissociation of multiply protonated melittin ions shows an increase in fragmentation efficiency with higher charge state (using activation conditions which are similar for each charge state). For a single charge state, acetylation of primary amine groups increases fragmentation efficiency, consistent with the reduction in basicity of lysine side-chains. Conversion of arginine residues to the less basic dimethylpyrimidylornithine, however, decreases fragmentation efficiency, suggesting more effective sequestering of ionizing protons; the effect may be attributable to a disfavouring of proton-bridged structures but this hypothesis requires further study. Preliminary data for the decompositions of [M- 2H]2- ions derived from peptides containing two acidic residues suggest that the sequestration of charge away from the backbone is again detrimental to efficient fragmentation. Apparently diagnostic cleavages adjacent to aspartic acid residues are observed.

  6. What's Up in the Atmosphere? Exploring How Aerosols Impact Sky Color Through Hands-on Activities with Elementary GLOBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damadeo, K.; Taylor, J.

    2015-12-01

    What color is the sky today? The GLOBE Kids - Anita, Simon, and Dennis want to know why the sky isn't always the same shade of blue and sometimes isn't even blue. Through the new Elementary GLOBE Aerosols Storybook and Learning Activities, the GLOBE Kids learn that there's a lot more than air in the atmosphere, which can affect the colors we see in the sky. There are four hands-on activities in this unit: 1) Sky Observers - Students make observations of the sky, record their findings and share their observation reports with their peers. The activity promotes active observation and recording skills to help students observe sky color, and recognize that sky color changes; 2) Why (Not) So Blue? - Students make predictions about how drops of milk will affect color and visibility in cups of water representing the atmosphere to help them understand that aerosols in the atmosphere have an effect on sky conditions, including sky color and visibility. The activity also introduces the classification categories for daytime sky color and visibility; 3) See the Light - Students use prisms and glue sticks to explore the properties of light. The activity demonstrates that white light is made up of seven colors that represent different wavelengths, and illustrates why the sky is blue during the day and red at sunset; 4) Up in the Air - Students work in groups to make an aerosol sampler, a simple adhesive tool that allows students to collect data and estimate the extent of aerosols present at their school, understanding that, in fact, there are particles in the air we breathe. NGSS Alignment includes: Disciplinary Core Ideas- ESS2.D: Weather and Climate, ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems, PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation, ESS3.A: Natural Resources; Science and Engineering Practices- Asking Questions and Defining Problems, Planning and Carrying Out an Investigation, Analyzing and Interpreting Data, Engaging in Argument from Evidence, Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating

  7. Cloud condensation nuclei activity, droplet growth kinetics, and hygroscopicity of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. F.; Buchholz, A.; Kortner, B.; Schlag, P.; Rubach, F.; Fuchs, H.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Watne, Å. K.; Hallquist, M.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.; Kristensen, K.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Glasius, M.; Kourtchev, I.; Kalberer, M.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2016-02-01

    Interaction of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with Anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) affects the physicochemical properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We investigated cloud droplet activation (CCN activity), droplet growth kinetics, and hygroscopicity of mixed anthropogenic and biogenic SOA (ABSOA) compared to pure biogenic SOA (BSOA) and pure anthropogenic SOA (ASOA). Selected monoterpenes and aromatics were used as representative precursors of BSOA and ASOA, respectively.

    We found that BSOA, ASOA, and ABSOA had similar CCN activity despite the higher oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) of ASOA compared to BSOA and ABSOA. For individual reaction systems, CCN activity increased with the degree of oxidation. Yet, when considering all different types of SOA together, the hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, did not correlate with O/C. Droplet growth kinetics of BSOA, ASOA, and ABSOA were comparable to that of (NH4)2SO4, which indicates that there was no delay in the water uptake for these SOA in supersaturated conditions.

    In contrast to CCN activity, the hygroscopicity parameter from a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) measurement, κHTDMA, of ASOA was distinctively higher (0.09-0.10) than that of BSOA (0.03-0.06), which was attributed to the higher degree of oxidation of ASOA. The ASOA components in mixed ABSOA enhanced aerosol hygroscopicity. Changing the ASOA fraction by adding biogenic VOC (BVOC) to ASOA or vice versa (AVOC to BSOA) changed the hygroscopicity of aerosol, in line with the change in the degree of oxidation of aerosol. However, the hygroscopicity of ABSOA cannot be described by a simple linear combination of pure BSOA and ASOA systems. This indicates that additional processes, possibly oligomerization, affected the hygroscopicity.

    Closure analysis of CCN and HTDMA data showed κHTDMA was lower than κCCN by 30-70 %. Better closure was achieved for ASOA compared to BSOA. This

  8. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  9. Highly efficient blue electroluminescence based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shuzo; Sakai, Yumi; Masui, Kensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Lee, Sae Youn; Nomura, Hiroko; Nakamura, Nozomi; Yasumatsu, Mao; Nakanotani, Hajime; Zhang, Qisheng; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-03-01

    Organic compounds that exhibit highly efficient, stable blue emission are required to realize inexpensive organic light-emitting diodes for future displays and lighting applications. Here, we define the design rules for increasing the electroluminescence efficiency of blue-emitting organic molecules that exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence. We show that a large delocalization of the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in these charge-transfer compounds enhances the rate of radiative decay considerably by inducing a large oscillator strength even when there is a small overlap between the two wavefunctions. A compound based on our design principles exhibited a high rate of fluorescence decay and efficient up-conversion of triplet excitons into singlet excited states, leading to both photoluminescence and internal electroluminescence quantum yields of nearly 100%. PMID:25485987

  10. Highly efficient blue electroluminescence based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Shuzo; Sakai, Yumi; Masui, Kensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Lee, Sae Youn; Nomura, Hiroko; Nakamura, Nozomi; Yasumatsu, Mao; Nakanotani, Hajime; Zhang, Qisheng; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-03-01

    Organic compounds that exhibit highly efficient, stable blue emission are required to realize inexpensive organic light-emitting diodes for future displays and lighting applications. Here, we define the design rules for increasing the electroluminescence efficiency of blue-emitting organic molecules that exhibit thermally activated delayed fluorescence. We show that a large delocalization of the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in these charge-transfer compounds enhances the rate of radiative decay considerably by inducing a large oscillator strength even when there is a small overlap between the two wavefunctions. A compound based on our design principles exhibited a high rate of fluorescence decay and efficient up-conversion of triplet excitons into singlet excited states, leading to both photoluminescence and internal electroluminescence quantum yields of nearly 100%.

  11. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  12. Contribution of harbour activities to atmospheric aerosol in the Brindisi area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Cesari, Daniela; Nocioni, Alessandra; Grasso, Fabio M.; Merico, Eva; Giua, Roberto; Contini, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    The port areas are economic centres and transport hubs, that bring together different transport modes (sea, road, railway transport) and also industrial activities. Ship emissions when docked and during port manoeuvring can have a substantial negative effect on local air quality. The Fagerli and Tarrason (2001) simulation results indicated that ship traffic emissions contribute to 5% and 10% of PM10 concentrations in large parts of Great Britain, Portugal and Italy; similarly to what was obtained by Dalsoren et al. (2009). At the beginning of 2012 it was started the research project CESAPO (Contribution of Emission Sources on the Air quality of the POrt-cities in Greece and Italy), funded within the framework of Interreg Italy-Greece (2007/2013), having as objective the quantification of the contribution to atmospheric particles of emission sources in two important Mediterranean port-cities, namely Patra (Greece) and Brindisi (Italy). In this work the first results of the CESAPO project will be presented giving more emphasis on the analysis of the maritime transport and the activities within the harbour of Brindisi that is characterized by several emission sources operating concurrently. In 2010 and 2011, in the port of Brindisi freight traffic and total goods movement accounted for more than 9.5 million tons, with over 520,000 passengers. To recognize the contribution of harbour activities to PM2.5 and to the total number concentration of particles with respect to other emission sources (urban traffic and industrial pollution) it has been performed an intensive observation period (IOP) of 5 months (June 1 to October 31, 2012). During the IOP the data of 10 fixed monitoring stations (of the regional network managed by ARPA Puglia) and those from two additional stations specifically installed during the project inside the harbour area. A station was used to characterize the chemical composition of PM2.5 and PAHs (in the gaseous and aerosol phases) and the other was

  13. Computation of ammonium bisulfate aerosol deposition in conducting airways

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Patel, M.

    1981-11-01

    Experimental measurements of the growth of monodisperse dry NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ aerosols by H/sub 2/O vapor condensation have been reported in the literature. These data are incorporated into an aerosol deposition model to study the behavior of inhaled NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ particles, which is of concern in relation to human health. The tracheobronchial tree is described by Weibel's model A morphology, and Landahl's formulas are used to compute particle deposition efficiencies. Enhanced losses in the trachea due to the action of the laryngeal jet are accounted for by using an empirical deposition efficiency equation. The effect of NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ aerosol growth is quantitated by comparisons of total and intrabronchial deposition probabilities with those of a nonhygroscopic aerosol of equal aerodynamic size. Computations indicate that hygroscopic growth effects are a function of the size of the particles inhaled. Total deposition efficiencies of NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O droplet aerosols are greater than those of nonhygroscopic aerosols only if the former originate from dry NH/sub 4/HSO/sub 4/ particles exceeding a critical geometric diameter of 0.3 ..mu..m. Growth effects are explained in terms of the relative efficiencies of the dominant deposition mechanisms active in the lung.

  14. Aerosol palladium activation for electroless copper deposition and heat treatment with NO injection to fabricate Cu oxide/carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Ryang Hwa; Hwang, Jungho

    2009-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel method for fabricating copper (Cu) oxide/activated carbon fibre (ACF) through the aerosol palladium (Pd) activation for use in electroless Cu deposition and heat treatment of Cu deposited ACF with nitric monoxide (NO) gas injection. Electroless Cu deposition was initiated by catalytically activating the ACF surface with spark generated Pd aerosol nanoparticles. The catalytically activated ACF was placed into a solution used for the electroless Cu deposition. Subjecting the Cu deposited ACF to a heat treatment in a NO/nitrogen (N2) gas injection (1000 ppm NO) resulted in changes to the morphology of the Cu particles. As the temperature increased from 100 to 500 °C, the relative mass fraction of oxygen in the Cu particles increased from 3.6% to 14.2% and the fraction of Cu decreased from 41.2% to 34.1%, which was caused by the formation of Cu oxides (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding surface area and pore volume of the ACF decreased from 1019 m2 g-1 to 401 m2 g-1 and from 0.40 cm3 g-1 to 0.18 cm3 g-1, respectively. The morphological evolution and decrease in porosity were attributed to volume expansion of Cu particles during oxidation.

  15. Meteorological and Aerosol Sensing with small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, J.; Möhler, O.; Haunold, W.; Schrod, J.; Brooks, I.; Norris, S.; Brooks, B.; Hill, M.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) facilitate the monitoring of several meteorological and aerosol parameters with high resolution in space and time. They are small, easy to operate, cost efficient and allow for flexible application during field campaigns. We present two experimental payloads for measurement of relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distribution and the collection of aerosol samples on board the small UAS SIRIUS II. The payload modules are light weight (<1kg) and can be easily switched between two flights. All sensors can be controlled from the ground and the measured data is recorded by the autopilot together with the position data. The first module contains a sensor package for measurement of relative humidity and temperature and the Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Prope (CLASP) for acquisition of aerosol size distributions. CLASP measures aerosol particles with diameters from 0.12μm to 9.25μm in up to 32 channels at a frequency of 10 Hz. The second module also contains a humidity and temperature sensor package and the aerosol sample collection device. The aerosol sampler collects air samples at 2 l/min onto a sample holder. After the flight the ice nuclei on the sample holder are activated in the lab and counted. In August 2012 the complete setup will be used during a measurement campaign at mount "Kleiner Feldberg" close to Frankfurt. Until then we will perform test flights and additional laboratory tests.

  16. Air mass origin and its influence on radionuclide activities ( 7Be and 210Pb) in aerosol particles at a coastal site in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueñas, C.; Orza, J. A. G.; Cabello, M.; Fernández, M. C.; Cañete, S.; Pérez, M.; Gordo, E.

    2011-07-01

    Studies of radionuclide activities in aerosol particles provide a means for evaluating the integrated effects of transport and meteorology on the atmospheric loadings of substances with different sources. Measurements of aerosol mass concentration and specific activities of 7Be and 210Pb in aerosols at Málaga (36° 43' 40″ N; 4° 28' 8″ W) for the period 2000-2006 were used to obtain the relationships between radionuclide activities and airflow patterns by comparing the data grouped by air mass trajectory clusters. The average concentration values of 7Be and 210Pb over the 7 year period have been found to be 4.6 and 0.58 mBq m -3, respectively, with mean aerosol mass concentration of 53.6 μg m -3. The identified air flow types arriving at Málaga reflect the transitional location of the Iberian Peninsula and show significant differences in radionuclide activities. Air concentrations of both nuclides and the aerosol mass concentration are controlled predominantly by the synoptic scenarios leading to the entrance of dust-laden continental flows from northern Africa and the arrival of polar maritime air masses, as implied by the strong correlations found between the monthly frequencies of the different air masses and the specific activities of both radionuclides. Correlations between activity concentrations and precipitation are significant though lower than with air masses.

  17. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  18. Active link selection for efficient semi-supervised community detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Jin, Di; Wang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Several semi-supervised community detection algorithms have been proposed recently to improve the performance of traditional topology-based methods. However, most of them focus on how to integrate supervised information with topology information; few of them pay attention to which information is critical for performance improvement. This leads to large amounts of demand for supervised information, which is expensive or difficult to obtain in most fields. For this problem we propose an active link selection framework, that is we actively select the most uncertain and informative links for human labeling for the efficient utilization of the supervised information. We also disconnect the most likely inter-community edges to further improve the efficiency. Our main idea is that, by connecting uncertain nodes to their community hubs and disconnecting the inter-community edges, one can sharpen the block structure of adjacency matrix more efficiently than randomly labeling links as the existing methods did. Experiments on both synthetic and real networks demonstrate that our new approach significantly outperforms the existing methods in terms of the efficiency of using supervised information. It needs ~13% of the supervised information to achieve a performance similar to that of the original semi-supervised approaches. PMID:25761385

  19. Efficiency of metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization

    SciTech Connect

    Duchacek, V.; Kuta, A.; Pribyl, P. )

    1993-01-20

    The effects of copper, mercury, nickel, zinc, cadmium, indium, magnesium, and calcium stearates on the course of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzthiazylsulphenamide-accelerated sulfur vulcanization of natural rubber have been investigated on the basis of curemeter measurements at 145 C. The differences in the efficiencies of these metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization have been discussed from the points of view of the electron configurations of the metals and their affinities to sulfur. The authors attempted to determine why zinc oxide is generally accepted as the best metal vulcanization activator.

  20. Chemical Aging and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity of Biomass Burning Aerosol Proxies in the Presence of OH Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Jonathan H., Jr.

    Biomass burning aerosol (BBA) can adversely impact regional and global air quality and represents a significant source of organic aerosol (OA) to the atmosphere that can affect climate. Aerosol particles can alter the transfer of radiation in earth's atmosphere directly by scattering and absorbing radiation or indirectly via cloud formation. Gas-to-particle, also termed heterogeneous, oxidation reactions can significantly alter the particle's physical and chemical properties. In turn, this can lead to the degradation of biomolecular markers for air quality-related aerosol source apportionment studies, the particles' lifetime, and modify the particles' abilities to serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). However, the rates, mechanisms, and conditions by which these multiphase oxidation reactions occur and influence the CCN activity of OA is not well understood. The work presented here aims to determine the reactivity and products from the interaction of BBA surrogate-particles and trace gas-phase oxidants and to link the effects of OA chemical aging on the particles' ability to nucleate clouds. The reactive uptake of OH by BBA surrogate-substrates and particles, including levoglucosan, nitroguaiacol, abietic acid, and methyl-nitrocatechol, was determined as a function of both OH concentration and relative humidity (RH) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry coupled to various flow reactors. OH reactive uptake decreased with increasing OH concentration, indicative of OH adsorption followed by reaction. OH oxidation led to significant volatilization, i.e. mass loss of the organic material, as determined by application of high resolution proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Volatilized reaction products were identified, providing mechanistic insight of the chemical pathways in the heterogeneous OH oxidation of BBA. The reactive uptake of OH by levoglucosan particles increased with RH due to enhanced OH and organic bulk diffusivity. In

  1. Potential indirect effects of aerosol on tropical cyclone intensity: convective fluxes and cold-pool activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krall, G. M.; Cottom, W. R.

    2012-01-01

    Observational and model evidence suggest that a 2008 Western Pacific typhoon (NURI) ingested elevated concentrations of aerosol as it neared the Chinese coast. This study uses a regional model with two-moment bin-emulating microphysics to simulate the typhoon as it enters the field of elevated aerosol concentrations. A clean maritime field of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) was prescribed as marine background CCN concentrations and then based on satellite and global aerosol model output, increased to pollution levels and further enhanced in sensitivity tests. The typhoon was simulated for 96 h beginning 17 August 2008. During the final 60 h CCN concentrations were enhanced as it neared the Philippines and coastal China. The model was initialized with both global reanalysis model data and irregularly spaced dropsonde data from the 2008 T-PARC observational campaign using an objective analysis routine. At 36 h, the internal nudging of the model was switched off and allowed to freely evolve on its own. As the typhoon encountered the elevated CCN in the sensitivity tests, a significant perturbation of windspeed, convective fluxes, and hydrometeor species behavior was simulated. Early during the ingestion of enhanced CCN, precipitation was reduced due to suppressed collision and coalescence, and storm winds increased in strength. Subsequently, owing to reduced fall speeds of the smaller drops, greater amounts of condensate were thrust into supercooled levels where the drops froze releasing greater amounts of latent heat of freezing. Convection thereby intensified which resulted in enhanced rainfall and more vigorous convectively-produced downdrafts. As the convection intensified in the outer rainbands the storm drifted over the developing cold-pools. The enhanced cold-pools blocked the inflow of warm, moist air into the core of the typhoon which led to a weakening of the typhoon with significantly reduced low level wind speeds. The very high amounts of pollution

  2. Efficient Management of Complex Striped Files in Active Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Piernas Canovas, Juan; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw

    2008-08-25

    Active Storage provides an opportunity for reducing the band- width requirements between the storage and compute elements of cur- rent supercomputing systems, and leveraging the processing power of the storage nodes used by some modern file systems. To achieve both objec- tives, Active Storage allows certain processing tasks to be performed directly on the storage nodes, near the data they manage. However, Active Storage must also support key requirements of scientific applications. In particular, Active Storage must be able to support striped files and files with complex formats (e.g., netCDF). In this paper, we describe how these important requirements can be addressed. The experimental results on a Lustre file system not only show that our proposal can re- duce the network traffic to near zero and scale the performance with the number of storage nodes, but also that it provides an efficient treatment of striped files and can manage files with complex data structures.

  3. Measurements of physical and chemical properties of urban aerosols and their CCN activities in Seoul during the KORUS-AQ pre-campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N.; Yum, S. S.; Park, M.; Shin, H. J.; Bae, G. N.; Kwak, K. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S. M.; Ahn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Interest in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) has been increasing for the last few decades due to their first order effects on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds. Particularly, scientific understanding of CCN from anthropogenic sources becomes important because it is now considered that large uncertainties in climate change predictions stem from insufficient understanding of CCN. CCN activity is influenced by size and chemical component of aerosols. The KORUS-AQ campaign, jointly organized by National Institute of Environmental Research (NIER) of Korea and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aims at understanding various aspects of air quality problem in Korea and will be held in spring, 2016. In preparation for this campaign, pre-campaign was held during May 18-June 13, 2015, in Seoul where numerous local anthropogenic sources exist and influence of Chinese continental outflow directly affects. Here we present some of the important results from the pre-campaign. Chemical properties of aerosols were measured with AMS. Aerosol and CCN number concentrations, aerosol size distribution and aerosol hygroscopic growth factor were measured by CPC, CCN counter, SMPS and H-TDMA, respectively. Average diurnal variation of aerosol number concentration showed three dominant peaks at around 0600_UTC and morning and evening rush hours. Each peak seemed to have different characteristics and therefore detailed analyses of physical and chemical properties of aerosols during the peaks as well as during some special events will be made. The hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, will be estimated by examining CCN activity, H-TDMA measured hygroscopic growth factor and mixing rule of aerosol chemical components, and the result will be compared as well.

  4. Aerosol Activity and Hygroscopicity Combined with Lidar Data in the Urban Atmosphere of Athens, Greece in the Frame of the HYGRA_CD Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Papayannis, Alexandros; Vratolis, Stergios; Argyrouli, Athina; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsagkaraki, Maria; Nenes, Athanasios; Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations between 0.2-1.0% supersaturation and aerosol size distribution were performed at an urban background site of Athens during HygrA-CD. The site is affected by local and long-range transported emissions as portrayed by the external mixing of the particles, as the larger ones appear to be more hygroscopic and more CCN-active than smaller ones. Activation fractions at all supersaturations exhibit a diurnal variability with minimum values around noon, which are considerably lower than unity. This reinforces the conclusion that the aerosol is mostly externally mixed between "fresher", less hygroscopic components with more aged, CCN active constituents.

  5. MBAS (Methylene Blue Active Substances) and LAS (Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonates) in Mediterranean coastal aerosols: Sources and transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, S.; Ghedini, C.; Peeters, S.; Rottiers, A.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Chiari, M.; Jalba, A.; Despiau, S.; Dayan, U.; Temara, A.

    2011-12-01

    Methylene Blue Active Substances (MBAS) and Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonates (LAS) concentrations, together with organic carbon and ions were measured in atmospheric coastal aerosols in the NW Mediterranean Basin. Previous studies have suggested that the presence of surfactants in coastal aerosols may result in vegetation damage without specifically detecting or quantifying these surfactants. Coastal aerosols were collected at a remote site (Porquerolles Island-Var, France) and at a more anthropised site (San Rossore National Park-Tuscany, Italy). The chemical data were interpreted according to a comprehensive local meteorological analysis aiming to decipher the airborne source and transport processes of these classes of compounds. The LAS concentration (anthropogenic surfactants) was measured in the samples using LC-MS/MS, a specific analytical method. The values were compared with the MBAS concentration, determined by a non-specific analytical method. At Porquerolles, the MBAS concentration (103 ± 93 ng m -3) in the summer samples was significantly higher than in the winter samples. In contrast, LAS concentrations were rarely greater than in the blank filters. At San Rossore, the mean annual MBAS concentration (887 ± 473 ng m -3 in PM10) contributed about 10% to the total atmospheric particulate organic matter. LAS mean concentration in these same aerosol samples was 11.5 ± 10.5 ng m -3. A similar MBAS (529 ± 454 ng m -3) - LAS (7.1 ± 4.1 ng m -3 LAS) ratio of ˜75 was measured in the fine (PM2.5) aerosol fraction. No linear correlation was found between MBAS and LAS concentrations. At San Rossore site the variation of LAS concentrations was studied on a daily basis over a year. The LAS concentrations in the coarse fraction (PM10-2.5) were higher during strong sea storm conditions, characterized by strong air flow coming from the sea sector. These events, occurring with more intensity in winter, promoted the formation of primary marine aerosols containing LAS

  6. Deriving aerosol hygroscopic mixing state from size-resolved CCN activity and HR-ToF-AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, Abhishek

    2016-10-01

    The ability of a particle to uptake water and form a cloud droplet depends on its hygroscopicity. To understand its impact on cloud properties and ultimately radiative forcing, knowledge of chemically-resolved mixing state information or the one based on hygroscopic growth is crucial. Typically, global models assume either pure internal or external mixing state which might not be true for all conditions and sampling locations. To investigate into this, the current study employed an indirect approach to infer the probable mixing state. The hygroscopic parameters derived from κ-Kohler theory using size-resolved CCN measurements (κCCN) and bulk/size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements (κAMS) were compared. The accumulation mode particles were found to be more hygroscopic (κCCN = 0.24) than Aitken mode (κCCN = 0.13), perhaps due to increased ratio of inorganic to organic mass fraction. The activation diameter calculated from size-resolved CCN activity measurements at 5 different supersaturation (SS) levels varied in the range of 115 nm-42 nm with κCCN = 0.13-0.23 (avg = 0.18 ± 0.10 (±1σ)). Further, κAMS>κCCN was observed possibly due to the fact that organic and inorganic mass present in the Aitken mode was not correctly represented by bulk chemical composition and size-resolved fractional contribution of oxidized OA was not accurately accounted. Better correlation of organic fraction (forg) and κCCN at lower SS explained this behaviour. The decrease in κCCN with the time of the day was more pronounced at lower SS because of the relative mass reduction of soluble inorganic species by ∼17%. Despite the large differences between κ measured from two approaches, less over-prediction (up to 18%) between measured and predicted CCN concentration suggested lower impact of chemical composition and mixing state at higher SS. However, at lower SS, presences of externally mixed CCN-inactive aerosols lead to CCN over-prediction reflecting the

  7. Sparse Contextual Activation for Efficient Visual Re-Ranking.

    PubMed

    Bai, Song; Bai, Xiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose an extremely efficient algorithm for visual re-ranking. By considering the original pairwise distance in the contextual space, we develop a feature vector called sparse contextual activation (SCA) that encodes the local distribution of an image. Hence, re-ranking task can be simply accomplished by vector comparison under the generalized Jaccard metric, which has its theoretical meaning in the fuzzy set theory. In order to improve the time efficiency of re-ranking procedure, inverted index is successfully introduced to speed up the computation of generalized Jaccard metric. As a result, the average time cost of re-ranking for a certain query can be controlled within 1 ms. Furthermore, inspired by query expansion, we also develop an additional method called local consistency enhancement on the proposed SCA to improve the retrieval performance in an unsupervised manner. On the other hand, the retrieval performance using a single feature may not be satisfactory enough, which inspires us to fuse multiple complementary features for accurate retrieval. Based on SCA, a robust feature fusion algorithm is exploited that also preserves the characteristic of high time efficiency. We assess our proposed method in various visual re-ranking tasks. Experimental results on Princeton shape benchmark (3D object), WM-SRHEC07 (3D competition), YAEL data set B (face), MPEG-7 data set (shape), and Ukbench data set (image) manifest the effectiveness and efficiency of SCA. PMID:26742133

  8. Organic Aerosol Formation in the Humid, Photochemically-Active Southeastern US: SOAS Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Lim, Y. B.; Carlton, A. G.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized low volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, health, and the environment. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols) leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify other precursors that are atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere at Brent, Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Four mist chambers in parallel collected ambient gases in a DI water medium at 20-25 LPM with a 4 hr collection time. Total organic carbon (TOC) values in daily composited samples were 64-180 μM. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments were conducted with these mixtures in a newly designed cuvette chamber to understand the formation of SOA through gas followed by aqueous chemistry. OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were formed in-situ in the chamber, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Precursors and products of these aqueous OH experiments were characterized using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. ESI-MS results from a June 12th, 2013 sample showed precursors to be primarily odd, positive mode ions, indicative of the presence of non-nitrogen containing alcohols, aldehydes, organic peroxides, or epoxides. Products were seen in the negative mode and included organic acid ions like pyruvate

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air and biomass burning smoke near the mega-city Guangzhou, China - Part 1: Size-resolved measurements and implications for the modeling of aerosol particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D.; Nowak, A.; Achtert, P.; Wiedensohler, A.; Hu, M.; Shao, M.; Zhang, Y.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles serving as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) are key elements of the hydrological cycle and climate. We measured and characterized CCN in polluted air and biomass burning smoke during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign from 1-30 July 2006 at a rural site ~60 km northwest of the mega-city Guangzhou in southeastern China. CCN efficiency spectra (activated fraction vs. dry particle diameter; 20-290 nm) were recorded at water vapor supersaturations (S) in the range of 0.068% to 1.27%. The corresponding effective hygroscopicity parameters describing the influence of particle composition on CCN activity were in the range of κ≍0.1-0.5. The campaign average value of κ=0.3 equals the average value of κ for other continental locations. During a strong local biomass burning event, the average value of κ dropped to 0.2, which can be considered as characteristic for freshly emitted smoke from the burning of agricultural waste. At low S (≤0.27%), the maximum activated fraction remained generally well below one, indicating substantial portions of externally mixed CCN-inactive particles with much lower hygroscopicity - most likely soot particles (up to ~60% at ~250 nm). The mean CCN number concentrations (NCCN,S) ranged from 1000 cm-3 at S=0.068% to 16 000 cm-3 at S=1.27%, which is about two orders of magnitude higher than in pristine air. Nevertheless, the ratios between CCN concentration and total aerosol particle concentration (integral CCN efficiencies) were similar to the ratios observed in pristine continental air (~6% to ~85% at S=0.068% to 1.27%). Based on the measurement data, we have tested different model approaches for the approximation/prediction of NCCN,S. Depending on S and on the model approach, the relative deviations between observed and predicted NCCN,S ranged from a few percent to several hundred percent. The largest deviations occurred at low S with a simple power law. With a Köhler model using variable κ values obtained from

  10. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  11. Enhanced High-Temperature Ice Nucleation Ability of Crystallized Aerosol Particles after Pre-Activation at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Moehler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The term pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation describes the observation that the ice nucleation ability of solid ice nuclei may improve after they have already been involved in ice crystal formation or have been exposed to a temperature lower than 235 K. This can be explained by the retention of small ice embryos in cavities or crevices at the particle surface or by the capillary condensation and freezing of supercooled water, respectively. In recent cloud chamber experiments with crystallized aqueous ammonium sulfate, oxalic acid, and succinic acid solution droplets, we have unraveled a further pre-activation mechanism under ice subsaturated conditions which does not require the preceding growth of ice on the seed aerosol particles (Wagner, R. et al., J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., 119, doi: 10.1002/2014JD021741). First cloud expansion experiments were performed at a high temperature (267 - 244 K) where the crystallized particles did not promote any heterogeneous ice nucleation. Ice nucleation at this temperature, however, could be triggered by temporarily cooling the crystallized particles to a lower temperature. This is because upon crystallization, residuals of the aqueous solution are trapped within the crystals. These captured liquids can freeze when cooled below their respective homogeneous or heterogeneous freezing temperature, leading to the formation of ice pockets in the crystalline particles. When warmed again to the higher temperature, ice formation by the pre-activated particles occurred via depositional and deliquescence-induced ice growth, with ice active fractions ranging from 1 to 4% and 4 to 20%, respectively. Pre-activation disappeared above the eutectic temperature, which for the organic acids are close to the melting point of ice. This mechanism could therefore contribute to the very small fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles that are still ice active well above 263 K.

  12. Complex vertical layering and mixing of aerosols over the eastern Mediterranean: active and passive remote sensing at the Cyprus University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R.-E.; Nisantzi, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.; Ansmann, A.; Schwarz, A.; Basart, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosols can have a complicated influence on climate conditions, directly as well as indirectly via cloud formation. The southeastern Mediterranean region can be characterized as a cross road of aerosols originating from European, Asian and African continents. Complex vertical aerosol distributions are frequently detected over Cyprus by means of active remote sensing. Observations of such complex aerosol layering and comparison of the measurements with aerosol products of regional and global atmospheric transport models are required to improve our understanding of life cycles of aerosol mixtures and their impact on climate as well as on satellite remote sensing products. In this study, a case of an intense desert dust outbreak from Syria and Saudi Arabia towards the eastern Mediterranean in September 2011 is presented. The observations used in this study were performed with a 532-nm polarization Lidar and a sun/sky AERONET photometer operated at 8 channels from 340 to 1640 nm wavelength. Both instruments belong to remote sensing station of the Cyprus Technical University at Limassol, Cyprus (34°N, 33°E). The lofted dust plume was doped with air masses that crossed sources of biomass burning smoke and anthropogenic pollution. In addition, the shallow marine boundary layer over the Mediterranean Sea and over Limassol became mixed with the anthropogenic haze by sea breeze circulations. The case study demonstrates the potential of combined lidar/photometer observations to deliver detailed vertically resolved information of the aerosol characteristics in terms of particle optical and microphysical properties, separately for the spherical particle fraction as well as for the non-spherical aerosol mode.

  13. What role do type I polar stratospheric cloud and aerosol parameterizations play in modelled lower stratospheric chlorine activation and ozone loss?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessler, J.; Good, P.; MacKenzie, A. R.; Pyle, J. A.

    1996-12-01

    The chlorine activation and subsequent ozone loss of the northern winter lower stratosphere have been modelled using different schemes for type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and sulphate aerosols. Type I PSCs were assumed to consist of either nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) at equilibrium, supercooled ternary solutions (STS) at equilibrium, or to follow a hysteresis cycle between frozen and liquid particles depending on the temperature history. The sulphate aerosol was assumed to be present as either liquid binary H2SO4/H2O aerosol (LBA) or as solid sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT). Our box model integrations show that NAT and STS, representing the upper and lower limits of lower stratospheric chlorine activation, respectively, appear to destroy ozone equally efficiently after a cold PSC event (Tmin ≤ 190K at 50 mbar). For higher minimum temperatures, up to the equilibrium NAT point, there is significantly more ozone loss in the NAT scheme than in the STS scheme. On NAT, chlorine is activated directly by ClONO2 + HCl → 2Cl + HNO3, whereas on STS, indirect activation by ClONO2 + H2O → HOCl + HNO3 followed by HOCl + HCl → 2Cl + H2O, dominates. During the processing period, the indirect activation on STS will produce a temporary peak in HOCl. Box model integrations also show that direct chlorine activation is faster on SAT than on LBA, yielding significantly more ozone loss in air parcels which remain below the SAT melting point (215-220 K). Our single-layer chemical transport model simulations (θ = 465K) of the lower stratospheric chlorine activation during Arctic winter 1994/1995 show that chlorine is activated more quickly on NAT than on STS. However, in mid December 1994, when temperatures are low enough for substantial STS particle growth, maximum active chlorine becomes similar in both schemes and remains similar until the end of January 1995. A model integration which includes SAT produces up to 200 parts per trillion by volume more ClOx, inside

  14. [Activity and growth efficiency of heterotrophic bacteria in Rybinsk Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, D B; Kosolapova, N G; Rumiantseva, E V

    2014-01-01

    The active fraction, production, and respiration of heterotrophic bacteria are determined to assess their growth efficiency and their role in the carbon cycle in the pelagic zone of Rybinsk Reservoir in summer. The greater part of organic substances assimilated by bacteria is mineralized to CO2. It has been established that the essential part of the constructive and energy metabolism of bacteria is supported by the input of allochthonous substances. Bacterioplankton, producing the biomass at their expense, performs functions similar to the functions of phytoplankton, and substantially supports the structural and functional organization of the planktonic food web in the reservoir. PMID:25735178

  15. Analysis of CCN activity of Arctic aerosol and Canadian biomass burning during summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathem, T. L.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Hecobian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Anderson, B. E.; Nenes, A.

    2013-03-01

    The NASA DC-8 aircraft characterized the aerosol properties, chemical composition, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations of the summertime Arctic during the 2008 NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaign. Air masses characteristic of fresh and aged biomass burning, boreal forest, Arctic background, and anthropogenic industrial pollution were sampled. Observations were spatially extensive (50-85° N and 40-130° W) and exhibit significant variability in aerosol and CCN concentrations. The chemical composition was dominated by highly oxidized organics (66-94% by volume), with a water-soluble mass fraction of more than 50%. The aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, κ, ranged between κ = 0.08-0.32 for all air mass types. Industrial pollution had the lowest κ of 0.08 ± 0.01, while the Arctic background had the highest and most variable κ of 0.32 ± 0.21, resulting from a lower and more variable organic fraction. Both fresh and aged (long-range transported) biomass burning air masses exhibited remarkably similar κ (0.18 ± 0.13), consistent with observed rapid chemical and physical aging of smoke emissions in the atmosphere, even in the vicinity of fresh fires. The organic hygroscopicity (κorg) was parameterized by the volume fraction of water-soluble organic matter (ɛWSOM), with a κ = 0.12, such that κorg = 0.12ɛWSOM. Assuming bulk (size-independent) composition and including the κorg parameterization enabled CCN predictions to within 30% accuracy for nearly all environments sampled. The only exception was for industrial pollution from Canadian oil sands exploration, where an external mixture and size-dependent composition was required. Aerosol mixing state assumptions (internal vs. external) in all other environments did not significantly affect CCN predictions; however, the external mixing assumption provided the best results, even though the available observations could not determine

  16. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.

  17. Efficient total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Anish; Iyer, Abhishek; Vincent, Charlotte S; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Prior, Stephen H; Madder, Annemieke; Taylor, Edward J; Singh, Ishwar

    2016-04-26

    The discovery of the new antibiotic teixobactin has been timely in the race for unearthing novel antibiotics wherein the emergence of drug resistant bacteria poses a serious threat worldwide. Herein, we present the total syntheses and biological activities of two teixobactin analogues. This approach is simple, efficient and has several advantages: it uses commercially available building blocks (except AllocHN-d-Thr-OH), has a single purification step and a good recovery (22%). By using this approach we have synthesised two teixobactin analogues and established that the d-amino acids are critical for the antimicrobial activity of these analogues. With continuing high expectations from teixobactin, this work can be regarded as a stepping stone towards an in depth study of teixobactin, its analogues and the quest for synthesising similar molecules. PMID:26984316

  18. The western Mediterranean basin as an aged aerosols reservoir. Insights from an old-fashioned but efficient radiotracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattich, E.; Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.; Orza, J. A. G.; Bolívar, J. P.; Tositti, L.

    2016-09-01

    The long-term contemporary 210Pb time series acquired during the period 2004-2011 at two distant sites of different altitude in the Mediterranean basin, El Arenosillo (40 m a.s.l. in southwestern Spain) and Mt. Cimone (2165 m a.s.l. in northern Italy), are analyzed and compared. Besides being considered a tracer of continental air masses, 210Pb radionuclide is also a proxy of fine stable aerosol. For this reason, the measurements of PM10 mass concentrations collected at the same time and the corresponding 210Pb/PM10 ratio at the two sites are considered to gain better insights into the origin and size of the particles. Three statistical trajectory methods are applied to identify and characterize the 210Pb source regions at the two sites. The three methods yield similar outcomes in the source identification, which strengthens the robustness of our results. In addition to the importance of the transport from areas of continental Europe, this study highlights the relevant role of the Mediterranean Sea as a major 210Pb reservoir layer associated to the aged air masses that accumulate in the western Mediterranean basin. The analysis of the sources points out the significant influence of northern Africa to 210Pb increases at both sites as well, even though the most intensive episodes are not of Saharan origin.

  19. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China, to investigate the role of fireworks (FW) and secondary aerosol in particulate pollution during the Chinese Spring Festival of 2013. Three FW events, exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5), were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW were shown to have a large impact on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in submicron aerosol (PM1), of which FW organics appeared to be emitted mainly in secondary, with its mass spectrum resembling that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated the total PM1 mass on average, accounting for 63-82% during nine PEs in this study. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. Primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction being in cooking organic aerosol (OA; 69%), in nitrogen monoxide (54%), and in coal combustion OA (28%). Secondary sulfate, however, remained only slightly changed, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. Our results have significant implications for controlling local primary source emissions during PEs, e.g., cooking and traffic activities. Controlling these factors might have a limited effect on improving air quality in the megacity of Beijing, due to the dominance of SPM from regional transport in aerosol particle composition.

  20. Chemical and physical influences on aerosol activation in liquid clouds: an empirical study based on observations from the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Webster, C. S.; Rieder, H. E.; Hammer, E.; Gysel, M.; Bukowiecki, N.; Weingartner, E.; Steinbacher, M.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-06-01

    A simple empirical model to predict the number of aerosols which activate to form cloud droplets in a warm, free tropospheric cloud has been established, based on data from four summertime Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE) campaigns at the Jungfraujoch (JFJ). It is shown that 76% of the observed variance in droplet numbers can be represented by a model accounting only for the number of potential CCN (defined as number of particles larger than 90 nm in diameter), while the mean errors in the model representation may be reduced by the addition of further explanatory variables, such as the mixing ratios of O3, CO and the height of the measurements above cloud base. The model has similar ability to represent the observed droplet numbers in each of the individual years, as well as for the two predominant local wind directions at the JFJ (north west and south east). Given the central European location of the JFJ, with air masses in summer being representative of the free troposphere with regular boundary layer in-mixing via convection, we expect that this model is applicable to warm, free tropospheric clouds over the European continent.

  1. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia. PMID:25124269

  2. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. J.; Makkonen, R.; Arola, A.; Mielonen, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kulmala, M.; Kokkola, H.

    2011-12-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics model SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by keeping the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution to the minimum. The aerosol size distribution is described using 20 size sections with 10 size sections in size space which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm divided to three subranges each having distinct optimised process and compound selection. The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparison against (1) measured continental and marine size distributions, (2) observed variability of continental modal number concentrations, (3) measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea salt mass concentrations, (4) observations of AOD and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5) global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6) model results using M7 which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM. The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well using the coarse resolution of 10 size sections in size space. The simulated global aerosol budgets are within the range of previous studies. Surface concentrations of sea salt, sulphate and carbonaceous species have an annual mean within a factor of five of the observations, while the simulated sea salt concentrations reproduce the observations less accurately and show high variability. Regionally, AOD is in relatively good agreement with the observations (within a factor of two). At mid-latitudes the observed AOD is captured well, while at high-latitudes as well as in some polluted and dust regions the modeled AOD is

  3. Externally pressurized porous cylinder for multiple surface aerosol generation and method of generation

    DOEpatents

    Apel, Charles T.; Layman, Lawrence R.; Gallimore, David L.

    1988-01-01

    A nebulizer for generating aerosol having small droplet sizes and high efficiency at low sample introduction rates. The nebulizer has a cylindrical gas permeable active surface. A sleeve is disposed around the cylinder and gas is provided from the sleeve to the interior of the cylinder formed by the active surface. In operation, a liquid is provided to the inside of the gas permeable surface. The gas contacts the wetted surface and forms small bubbles which burst to form an aerosol. Those bubbles which are large are carried by momentum to another part of the cylinder where they are renebulized. This process continues until the entire sample is nebulized into aerosol sized droplets.

  4. Wastewater Mediated Activation of Micromotors for Efficient Water Cleaning.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sarvesh Kumar; Guix, Maria; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-01-13

    We present wastewater-mediated activation of catalytic micromotors for the degradation of nitroaromatic pollutants in water. These next-generation hybrid micromotors are fabricated by growing catalytically active Pd particles over thin-metal films (Ti/Fe/Cr), which are then rolled-up into self-propelled tubular microjets. Coupling of catalytically active Pd particles inside the micromotor surface in the presence of a 4-nitrophenol pollutant (with NaBH4 as reductant) results in autonomous motion via the bubble-recoil propulsion mechanism such that the target pollutant mixture (wastewater) is consumed as a fuel, thereby generating nontoxic byproducts. This study also offers several distinct advantages over its predecessors including no pH/temperature manipulation, limited stringent process control and complete destruction of the target pollutant mixture. The improved intermixing ability of the micromotors caused faster degradation ca. 10 times higher as compared to its nonmotile counterpart. The high catalytic efficiency obtained via a wet-lab approach has promising potential in creating hybrid micromotors comprising of multicatalytic systems assembled into one entity for sustainable environmental remediation and theranostics. PMID:26674098

  5. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  6. Inactivation efficiencies of radical reactions with biologically active DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, M. V. M.; Retèl, J.; Loman, H.

    Dilute aqueous solutions of biologically active θX174 DNA may serve as a simplified model system of the cell. Damage to the DNA after irradiation with γ-rays, may be ascribed to reactions with .OH, .H and e -aq or secondary radicals, arising from reactions of water radicals with added scavengers. Conversion of primary (water) radicals into secondary (scavenger) radicals leads to a considerable protection of the DNA, which, however, would have been larger if these secondary radicals did not contribute to DNA inactivation. The inactivation yield due to isopropanol or formate (secondary) radicals depends on dose rate as well as DNA concentration. Furthermore the inactivation efficiencies of the reactions of both the primary and the secondary radicals with single-stranded DNA could be established.

  7. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  8. Cloud and aerosol studies using combined CPL and MAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Rodier, Sharon; Hu, Yongxiang; McGill, Matthew J.; Holz, Robert E.

    2004-11-01

    Current uncertainties in the role of aerosols and clouds in the Earth's climate system limit our abilities to model the climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties of adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. The A-train satellites (Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, PARASOL, and Aura) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. The various active and passive sensors of the A-train will use a variety of measurement techniques to provide comprehensive observations of the multi-dimensional properties of clouds and aerosols. However, to fully achieve the potential of this ensemble requires a robust data analysis framework to optimally and efficiently map these individual measurements into a comprehensive set of cloud and aerosol physical properties. In this work we introduce the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis and Synthesis (MIDAS) project, whose goal is to develop a suite of physically sound and computationally efficient algorithms that will combine active and passive remote sensing data in order to produce improved assessments of aerosol and cloud radiative and microphysical properties. These algorithms include (a) the development of an intelligent feature detection algorithm that combines inputs from both active and passive sensors, and (b) identifying recognizable multi-instrument signatures related to aerosol and cloud type derived from clusters of image pixels and the associated vertical profile information. Classification of these signatures will lead to the automated identification of aerosol and cloud types. Testing of these new algorithms is done using currently existing and readily available active and passive measurements from the Cloud Physics Lidar and the MODIS Airborne Simulator, which simulate, respectively, the CALIPSO and MODIS A-train instruments.

  9. Type-segregated aerosol effects on regional monsoon activity: A study using ground-based experiments and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Sonbawne, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Classification of observed aerosols into key types [e.g., clean-maritime (CM), desert-dust (DD), urban-industrial/biomass-burning (UI/BB), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) and mixed-type aerosols (MA)] would facilitate to infer aerosol sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms, not only to improve the accuracy of satellite retrievals but also to quantify the assessment of aerosol radiative impacts on climate. In this paper, we report the results of a study conducted in this direction, employing a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India during 2008 and 2009, which represent two successive contrasting monsoon years. The study provided an observational evidence to show that the local sources are subject to heavy loading of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), with strong seasonality closely linked to the monsoon annual rainfall cycle over Pune, a tropical urban station in India. The results revealed the absence of CM aerosols in the pre-monsoon as well as in the monsoon seasons of 2009 as opposed to 2008. Higher loading of dust aerosols is observed in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons of 2009; majority may be coated with fine BC aerosols from local emissions, leading to reduction in regional rainfall. Further, significant decrease in coarse-mode AOD and presence of carbonaceous aerosols, affecting the aerosol-cloud interaction and monsoon-rain processes via microphysics and dynamics, is considered responsible for the reduction in rainfall during 2009. Additionally, we discuss how optical depth, contributed by different types of aerosols, influences the distribution of monsoon rainfall over an urban region using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) aerosol reanalysis. Furthermore, predictions of the Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) simulations combined with HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) cluster model are also discussed in support of the

  10. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: A case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary C.; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, Manishkumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, Hugh; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, Glenn S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-01

    Wet scavenging of aerosols by continental deep convective clouds is studied for a supercell storm complex observed over Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry campaign. A new passive-tracer-based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize convective transport using vertical profiles of several passive trace gases. For this case, the analysis estimates that observed passive gas mixing ratios in the upper troposphere convective outflow consist of 47% low level (<3 km) inflow air, 32% entrained midtroposphere air, and 21% upper troposphere air. The new analysis framework is used to estimate aerosol wet scavenging efficiencies. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% for submicron aerosol mass. Organic, sulfate, and ammonium aerosols have similar wet scavenging efficiencies (80%-84%). The apparent scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol is much lower (57%), but the scavenging efficiency for nitrate aerosol plus nitric acid combined (84%) is close to the other species. Scavenging efficiencies for aerosol number are high for larger particles (84% for 0.15-2.5 µm diameter) but are lower for smaller particles (64% for 0.03-0.15 µm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Compared to the observation-based analysis, the standard model strongly underestimates aerosol scavenging efficiencies by 32% and 41% in absolute differences for submicron mass and number. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulated aerosol scavenging, producing wet scavenging efficiencies that are only 7% and 8% lower than observed efficiencies. This finding emphasizes the importance of secondary activation for aerosol wet removal in deep convective storms.

  11. Relationships between coordination, active drag and propelling efficiency in crawl.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Ludovic; Schnitzler, Christophe; Bideault, Gautier; Alberty, Morgan; Chollet, Didier; Toussaint, Huub Martin

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the relationships between the index of coordination (IdC) and active drag (D) assuming that at constant average speed, average drag equals average propulsion. The relationship between IdC and propulsive efficiency (ep) was also investigated at maximal speed. Twenty national swimmers completed two incremental speed tests swimming front crawl with arms only in free condition and using a measurement of active drag system. Each test was composed of eight 25-m bouts from 60% to 100% of maximal intensity whereby each lap was swum at constant speed. Different regression models were tested to analyse IdC-D relationship. Correlation between IdC and ep was calculated. IdC was linked to D by linear regression (IdC=0.246·D-27.06; R(2)=0.88, P<.05); swimmers switched from catch-up to superposition coordination mode at a speed of ∼1.55ms(-1) where average D is ∼110N. No correlation between IdC and ep at maximal speed was found. The intra-individual analysis revealed that coordination plays an important role in scaling propulsive forces with higher speed levels such that these are adapted to aquatic resistance. Inter-individual analysis showed that high IdC did not relate to a high ep suggesting an individual optimization of force and power generation is at play to reach high speeds. PMID:25461433

  12. Evaluation of the sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA implementation in ECHAM5-HAM aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. J.; Makkonen, R.; Arola, A.; Mielonen, T.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kulmala, M.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-06-01

    We present the implementation and evaluation of a sectional aerosol microphysics module SALSA within the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. This aerosol microphysics module has been designed to be flexible and computationally efficient so that it can be implemented in regional or global scale models. The computational efficiency has been achieved by minimising the number of variables needed to describe the size and composition distribution. The aerosol size distribution is described using 10 size classes with parallel sections which can have different chemical compositions. Thus in total, the module tracks 20 size sections which cover diameters ranging from 3 nm to 10 μm and are divided into three subranges, each with an optimised selection of processes and compounds. The implementation of SALSA into ECHAM5-HAM includes the main aerosol processes in the atmosphere: emissions, removal, radiative effects, liquid and gas phase sulphate chemistry, and the aerosol microphysics. The aerosol compounds treated in the module are sulphate, organic carbon, sea salt, black carbon, and mineral dust. In its default configuration, ECHAM5-HAM treats aerosol size distribution using the modal method. In this implementation, the aerosol processes were converted to be used in a sectional model framework. The ability of the module to describe the global aerosol properties was evaluated by comparing against (1) measured continental and marine size distributions, (2) observed variability of continental number concentrations, (3) measured sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon and sea-salt mass concentrations, (4) observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and other aerosol optical properties from satellites and AERONET network, (5) global aerosol budgets and concentrations from previous model studies, and (6) model results using M7, which is the default aerosol microphysics module in ECHAM5-HAM. The evaluation shows that the global aerosol properties can be reproduced reasonably well

  13. Activation of oligodendroglial Stat3 is required for efficient remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Steelman, Andrew J.; Zhou, Yun; Koit, Hisami; Kim, SunJa; Payne, H. Ross; Lu, Q. Richard; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most prevalent demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is histologically characterized by perivascular demyelination as well as neurodegeneration. While the degree of axonal damage is correlated with clinical disability, it is believed that remyelination can protect axons from degeneration and slow disease progression. Therefore, understanding the intricacies associated with myelination and remyelination may lead to therapeutics that can enhance the remyelination process and slow axon degeneration and loss of function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) family cytokines such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and interleukin11(IL-11) are known to promote oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination in experimental models of demyelination. Because CNTF family member binding to the gp 130 receptor results in activation of the JAK2/Stat3 pathway we investigated the necessity of oligodendroglial Stat3 in transducing the signal required for myelination and remyelination. We found that Stat3 activation in the CNS coincides with myelination during development. Stimulation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) with CNTF or LIF promoted OPC survival and final differentiation, which was completely abolished by pharmacologic blockade of Stat3 activation with JAK2 inhibitor. Similarly, genetic ablation of Stat3 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells prevented CNTF-induced OPC differentiation in culture. In vivo, while oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling appears to be dispensable for developmental CNS myelination, it is required for oligodendrocyte regeneration and efficient remyelination after toxin-induced focal demyelination in the adult brain. Our data suggest a critical function for oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling in myelin repair. PMID:27060559

  14. Activation of oligodendroglial Stat3 is required for efficient remyelination.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Andrew J; Zhou, Yun; Koito, Hisami; Kim, SunJa; Payne, H Ross; Lu, Q Richard; Li, Jianrong

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most prevalent demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is histologically characterized by perivascular demyelination as well as neurodegeneration. While the degree of axonal damage is correlated with clinical disability, it is believed that remyelination can protect axons from degeneration and slow disease progression. Therefore, understanding the intricacies associated with myelination and remyelination may lead to therapeutics that can enhance the remyelination process and slow axon degeneration and loss of function. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) family cytokines such as leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and interleukin 11 (IL-11) are known to promote oligodendrocyte maturation and remyelination in experimental models of demyelination. Because CNTF family member binding to the gp130 receptor results in activation of the JAK2/Stat3 pathway we investigated the necessity of oligodendroglial Stat3 in transducing the signal required for myelination and remyelination. We found that Stat3 activation in the CNS coincides with myelination during development. Stimulation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) with CNTF or LIF promoted OPC survival and final differentiation, which was completely abolished by pharmacologic blockade of Stat3 activation with JAK2 inhibitor. Similarly, genetic ablation of Stat3 in oligodendrocyte lineage cells prevented CNTF-induced OPC differentiation in culture. In vivo, while oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling appears to be dispensable for developmental CNS myelination, it is required for oligodendrocyte regeneration and efficient remyelination after toxin-induced focal demyelination in the adult brain. Our data suggest a critical function for oligodendroglial Stat3 signaling in myelin repair. PMID:27060559

  15. An aerosol absorption remote sensing algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, P.; Winker, D. M.; Hu, Y.; Trepte, C. R.; Lucker, P. L.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol absorption plays an important role in the climate by modulating atmospheric radiative forcing processes. Unfortunately aerosol absorption is very difficult to obtain via satellite remote sensing techniques. In this work we have built an algorithm to obtain aerosol absorption optical depth using both measurements from a passive O2 A-band spectrometer and an active lidar. The instrument protocols for these two satellite instruments are the O2 A-band spectrometer onboard the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) and the CALIOP onboard CALIPSO. The aerosol height and typing information is obtained from the CALIOP measurement. The aerosol extinction and absorption optical depths are then retrieved by fitting the forward model simulations to the O2 A-band spectrometer measurements. The forward model simulates the scattering and absorption of solar light at high spectral resolution in the O2 A-band region. The O2 and other gas absorption coefficients near 0.76 micron are calculated by either the line-by-line code (for instance, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator) or the OCO2 ABSCO Look-Up-Table. The line parameters used are from the HITRAN 2008 database (http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/hitran/). The multiple light scattering by molecules, aerosols, and clouds is handled by the radiative transfer model based on the successive order of scattering method (Zhai et al, JQSRT, Vol. 111, pp. 1025-1040, 2010). The code is parallelized with Message Passing Interface (MPI) for better efficiency. The aerosol model is based on Shettle and Fenn (AFGL-TR 790214, 1979) with variant relative humidity. The vertical distribution of the aerosols and clouds will be read in from the CALIPSO product (http://www-calipso.larc.nasa.gov). The surface albedo is estimated by the continuum of the three bands of OCO2 payloads. Sensitivity study shows that the Gaussian quadrature (stream) number should be at least 12 to ensure the reflectance error is within 0.5% at the top of the atmosphere

  16. Antibodies to Bordetella pertussis in human colostrum and their protective activity against aerosol infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, M; Cowell, J L; Burstyn, D G; Thaib, S; Manclark, C R

    1985-01-01

    Colostrum samples from Indonesian mothers were assayed for antibodies which agglutinate Bordetella pertussis and for antibodies to the filamentous hemagglutinin and the lymphocytosis-promoting factor of B. pertussis. Agglutinins were assayed by a microtiter method, and 36 of 58 samples tested (62%) had titers above 1:10 (range, less than 1:10 to 1:160). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detected anti-filamentous hemagglutinin in 39 of 60 samples (65%) and anti-lymphocytosis-promoting factor in 26 of 60 samples assayed (43%). A total of 52 samples (87%) were positive for at least one of these antibodies. Pooled colostrum samples were separated by affinity chromatography into fractions enriched secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) or IgG and examined for their ability to passively protect suckling mice from aerosol challenge with B. pertussis. Samples (160 micrograms of protein) were given intraperitoneally 90 min before challenge. Death, rate of gain in body weight, and leukocytosis were used as indicators of illness. Colostrum containing anti-lymphocytosis-promoting factor or agglutinins was protective, whereas colostrum lacking these but containing anti-filamentous hemagglutinin gave little protection. The sIgA-enriched and IgG-enriched fractions appeared to be equal in their ability to protect against respiratory challenge with B. pertussis. PMID:2857154

  17. Effect of aerosol immunization with RE 595 Salmonella minnesota on lung bactericidal activity against Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F M

    1977-08-01

    Intrapulmonary bactericidal activity was measured after mice were given 3 weekly aerosol exposures to acid-hydrolyzed Re 595 Salmonella minnesota. Ten days after their last immunization, mice were challenged with aerolized Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quantitative bacterial counts in ground lung were obtained immediately after exposure and again 4 hours later. Enhanced bactericidal activity against Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae was seen in immunized animals, whereas no difference with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noted. In separate studies, immunization with Serratia marcescens yielded a similar enhancement of lung bactericidal activity. Mucociliary transport, as measured by disappearance of aerosolized Serratia marcescens labeled with phosphorus-32, was identical for both immunized and control animals. Using a standardized in vitro mouse alveolar macrophage phagocytic system, lung washes from animals immunized with Re 595 Salmonella minnesota had significant opsonic activity for Serratia marcescens but not for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:407823

  18. Stratospheric ion and aerosol chemistry and possible links with cirrus cloud microphysics - A critical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, Volker A.

    1990-01-01

    Aspects of stratospheric ion chemistry and physics are assessed as they relate to aerosol formation and the transport of aerosols to upper tropospheric regions to create conditions favorable for cirrus cloud formation. It is found that ion-induced nucleation and other known phase transitions involving ions and sulfuric acid vapor are probably not efficient processes for stratospheric aerosol formation, and cannot compete with condensation of sulfuric acid on preexisting particles of volcanic or meteoritic origin which are larger than about 0.15 micron in radius. Thus, galactic cosmic rays cannot have a significant impact on stratospheric aerosol population. Changes in the stratospheric aerosol burden due to volcanos are up to two orders of magnitude larger than changes in ion densities. Thus, volcanic activity may modulate the radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  19. Global Distribution of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration, Autoconversion Rate, and Aerosol Indirect Effect Under Diabatic Droplet Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella; Nenes, Athanasios

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a global assessment of the sensitivity of droplet number to diabatic activation (i.e., including effects from entrainment of dry air) and its first-order tendency on indirect forcing and autoconversion. Simulations were carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) atmospheric and transport model using climatological metereorological fields derived from the former NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), the NASA Finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II (GISS) GCM. Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is calculated using a physically based prognostic parameterization that explicitly includes entrainment effects on droplet formation. Diabatic activation results in lower CDNC, compared to adiabatic treatment of the process. The largest decrease in CDNC (by up to 75 percent) was found in the tropics and in zones of moderate CCN concentration. This leads to a global mean effective radius increase between 0.2-0.5 micrometers (up to 3.5 micrometers over the tropics), a global mean autoconversion rate increase by a factor of 1.1 to 1.7 (up to a factor of 4 in the tropics), and a 0.2-0.4 W m(exp -2) decrease in indirect forcing. The spatial patterns of entrainment effects on droplet activation tend to reduce biases in effective radius (particularly in the tropics) when compared to satellite retrievals. Considering the diabatic nature of ambient clouds, entrainment effects on CDNC need to be considered in GCM studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

  20. On the efficient acceleration of clouds in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    In the broad line region of active galactic nuclei (AGN), acceleration occurs naturally when a cloud condenses out of the hot confining medium due to the increase in line opacity as the cloud cools. However, acceleration by radiation pressure is not very efficient when the flux is time-independent, unless the flow is 1D. Here, we explore how acceleration is affected by a time-varying flux, as AGN are known to be highly variable. If the period of flux oscillations is longer than the thermal time-scale, we expect the gas to cool during the low flux state, and therefore line opacity should quickly increase. The cloud will receive a small kick due to the increased radiation force. We perform hydrodynamical simulations using ATHENA to confirm this effect and quantify its importance. We find that despite the flow becoming turbulent in 2D due to hydrodynamic instabilities, a 20 per cent modulation of the flux leads to a net increase in acceleration - by more than a factor of 2 - in both 1D and 2D. We show that this acceleration is sufficient to produce the observed line widths, although we only consider optically thin clouds. We discuss the implications of our results for photoionization modelling and reverberation mapping.

  1. Hygroscopicity Behavior, Activation Properties and Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosol at a Background Site in the Megacity Region of Peking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Silvia; Nowak, Andreas; Mildenberger, Katrin; Göbel, Tina; Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut; Zhao, Chunsheng; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Stratmann, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Large areas of China suffer from heavy air pollution (both gaseous and particulate) caused by strong economic growth in the last two decades. However, knowledge concerning the physical and chemical properties of the resulting aerosol particles populations, and their effects on the optical properties of the atmosphere, is still sparse. In the framework of the investigations presented here, comprehensive measurements concerning aerosol particle hygroscopicity, CCN ability, composition, and optical properties were performed. The investigations are part of the DFG-funded project HaChi (Haze in China) and are conducted in collaboration with the Peking University. A conclusive parameterization of aerosol hygroscopicity and activation data is aimed for, which will then be implemented in a meso-scale model to investigate aerosol-cloud-radiation and precipitation interactions. During two intensive measurements campaigns (March 2009 and July/ August 2009), in-situ aerosol measurements have been performed in an air-conditioned mobile laboratory next to the Wuqing Meteorological Station (39°23'8.53"N, 117°1'25.88"E), which is located between Bejing and Tijanjin and is thereby an ideal background site in a megacity region. The particle number size distribution (TDMPS), the particle optical properties (MAAP and nephelometer) and their hygroscopic properties at high RH (HH-TDMA, LACIS-mobile) were characterized as well as their cloud nucleating properties above supersaturation (DMT-CCNC). 24 h PM1 particle samples were continuously collected over the two campaigns in winter and summer using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). Additionally two 6h size-resolved samples (daytime and night-time) were collected each day applying an 11-stage Berner impactor. The size-selection of HH-TDMA, LACIS and the CCNC was synchronized with the Berner stages. Opening analysis of the winter campaign data showed that the HH-TDMA usually detected a hydrophobic and a hygroscopic mode, i.e., the

  2. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  3. N(2)O(5) reaction on submicron sea salt aerosol: kinetics, products, and the effect of surface active organics.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Joel A; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2005-11-10

    The reaction of N(2)O(5) on sea salt aerosol is a sink for atmospheric nitrogen oxides and a source of the Cl radical. We present room-temperature measurements of the N(2)O(5) loss rate on submicron artificial seawater (ASW) aerosol, performed with an entrained aerosol flow tube coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, as a function of aerosol phase (aqueous or partially crystalline), liquid water content, and size. We also present an analysis of the product growth kinetics showing that ClNO(2) is produced at a rate equal to N(2)O(5) loss, with an estimated lower limit yield of 50% at 50% relative humidity (RH). The reaction probability for N(2)O(5), gamma(N(2)(O)(5)), depends strongly on the particle phase, being 0.005 +/- 0.004 on partially crystalline ASW aerosol at 30% RH and 0.03 +/- 0.008 on aqueous ASW aerosol at 65% RH. At 50% RH, N(2)O(5) loss is relatively insensitive to particle size for radii greater than 100 nm, and gamma(N(2)(O)(5)) displays a statistically insignificant increase from 0.022 to approximately 0.03 for aqueous ASW aerosol over the RH range of 43-70%. We find that the presence of millimolar levels of hexanoic acid in the aerosol bulk decreases the gamma(N(2)(O)(5)) at 70% RH by a factor of 3-4 from approximately 0.025 to 0.008 +/- 0.004. This reduction is likely due to the partitioning of hexanoic acid to the gas-aerosol interface at a surface coverage that we estimate to be equivalent to a monolayer. This result is the first evidence that a monolayer coating of aqueous organic surfactant can slow the reactive uptake of atmospheric trace gases to aerosol. PMID:16838918

  4. Modeling and Simulations of Olfactory Drug Delivery with Passive and Active Controls of Nasally Inhaled Pharmaceutical Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Si, Xiuhua A; Xi, Jinxiang

    2016-01-01

    There are many advantages of direct nose-to-brain drug delivery in the treatment of neurological disorders. However, its application is limited by the extremely low delivery efficiency (< 1%) to the olfactory mucosa that directly connects the brain. It is crucial to develop novel techniques to deliver neurological medications more effectively to the olfactory region. The objective of this study is to develop a numerical platform to simulate and improve intranasal olfactory drug delivery. A coupled image-CFD method was presented that synthetized the image-based model development, quality meshing, fluid simulation, and magnetic particle tracking. With this method, performances of three intranasal delivery protocols were numerically assessed and compared. Influences of breathing maneuvers, magnet layout, magnetic field strength, drug release position, and particle size on the olfactory dosage were also numerically studied. From the simulations, we found that clinically significant olfactory dosage (up to 45%) were feasible using the combination of magnet layout and selective drug release. A 64 -fold higher delivery of dosage was predicted in the case with magnetophoretic guidance compared to the case without it. However, precise guidance of nasally inhaled aerosols to the olfactory region remains challenging due to the unstable nature of magnetophoresis, as well as the high sensitivity of olfactory dosage to patient-, device-, and particle-related factors. PMID:27285852

  5. Direct Quantification of Ice Nucleation Active Bacteria in Aerosols and Precipitation: Their Potential Contribution as Ice Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Garcia, E.; Moffett, B. F.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Franc, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nucleation active (INA) bacteria are a potentially prodigious source of highly active (≥-12°C) atmospheric ice nuclei, especially from agricultural land. However, we know little about the conditions that promote their release (eg, daily or seasonal cycles, precipitation, harvesting or post-harvest decay of litter) or their typical contribution to the pool of boundary layer ice nucleating particles (INP). To initiate these investigations we developed a quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) test of the ina gene, the gene that codes for the ice nucleating protein, to directly count INA bacteria in environmental samples. The qPCR test amplifies most forms of the gene and is highly sensitive, able to detect perhaps a single gene copy (ie, a single bacterium) in DNA extracted from precipitation. Direct measurement of the INA bacteria is essential because environmental populations will be a mixture of living, viable-but-not culturable, moribund and dead cells, all of which may retain ice nucleating proteins. Using the qPCR test on leaf washings of plants from three farms in Wyoming, Colorado and Nebraska we found INA bacteria to be abundant on crops, especially on cereals. Mid-summer populations on wheat and barley were ~108/g fresh weigh of foliage. Broadleaf crops, such as corn, alfalfa, sugar beet and potato supported 105-107/g. Unexpectedly, however, in the absence of a significant physical disturbance, such as harvesting, we were unable to detect the ina gene in aerosols sampled above the crops. Likewise, in fresh snow samples taken over two winters, ina genes from a range of INA bacteria were detected in about half the samples but at abundances that equated to INA bacterial numbers that accounted for only a minor proportion of INP active at -10°C. By contrast, in a hail sample from a summer thunderstorm we found 0.3 INA bacteria per INP at -10°C and ~0.5 per hail stone. Although the role of the INA bacteria as warm-temperature INP in these samples

  6. Effect of organic compounds on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of sea spray aerosol produced by bubble bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Meagan J. K.; Furutani, Hiroshi; Roberts, Gregory C.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Palenik, Brian; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2011-12-01

    The ocean comprises over 70% of the surface of the earth and thus sea spray aerosols generated by wave processes represent a critical component of our climate system. The manner in which different complex oceanic mixtures of organic species and inorganic salts are distributed between individual particles in sea spray directly determines which particles will effectively form cloud nuclei. Controlled laboratory experiments were undertaken to better understand the full range of particle properties produced by bubbling solutions composed of simplistic model organic species, oleic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), mixed with NaCl to more complex artificial seawater mixed with complex organic mixtures produced by common oceanic microorganisms. Simple mixtures of NaCl and oleic acid or SDS had a significant effect on CCN activity, even in relatively small amounts. However, an artificial seawater (ASW) solution containing microorganisms, the common cyanobacteria ( Synechococcus) and DMS-producing green algae ( Ostreococcus), produced particles containing ˜34 times more carbon than the particles produced from pure ASW, yet no significant change was observed in the overall CCN activity. We hypothesize that these microorganisms produce diverse mixtures of organic species with a wide range of properties that produced offsetting effects, leading to no net change in the overall average measured hygroscopicity of the collection of sea spray particles. Based on these observations, changes in CCN activity due to "bloom" conditions would be predicted to lead to small changes in the average CCN activity, and thus have a negligible impact on cloud formation. However, each sea spray particle will contain a broad spectrum of different species, and thus further studies are needed of the CCN activity of individual sea spray particles and biological processes under a wide range of controllable conditions.

  7. Efficient Universal Computing Architectures for Decoding Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Turicchia, Lorenzo; Wattanapanitch, Woradorn; Davidson, Thomas J.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    The ability to decode neural activity into meaningful control signals for prosthetic devices is critical to the development of clinically useful brain– machine interfaces (BMIs). Such systems require input from tens to hundreds of brain-implanted recording electrodes in order to deliver robust and accurate performance; in serving that primary function they should also minimize power dissipation in order to avoid damaging neural tissue; and they should transmit data wirelessly in order to minimize the risk of infection associated with chronic, transcutaneous implants. Electronic architectures for brain– machine interfaces must therefore minimize size and power consumption, while maximizing the ability to compress data to be transmitted over limited-bandwidth wireless channels. Here we present a system of extremely low computational complexity, designed for real-time decoding of neural signals, and suited for highly scalable implantable systems. Our programmable architecture is an explicit implementation of a universal computing machine emulating the dynamics of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons; it requires no arithmetic operations except for counting, and decodes neural signals using only computationally inexpensive logic operations. The simplicity of this architecture does not compromise its ability to compress raw neural data by factors greater than . We describe a set of decoding algorithms based on this computational architecture, one designed to operate within an implanted system, minimizing its power consumption and data transmission bandwidth; and a complementary set of algorithms for learning, programming the decoder, and postprocessing the decoded output, designed to operate in an external, nonimplanted unit. The implementation of the implantable portion is estimated to require fewer than 5000 operations per second. A proof-of-concept, 32-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of this portion is consequently energy efficient

  8. Dynamic brain architectures in local brain activity and functional network efficiency associate with efficient reading in bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Feng, Gangyi; Chen, Hsuan-Chih; Zhu, Zude; He, Yong; Wang, Suiping

    2015-10-01

    The human brain is organized as a dynamic network, in which both regional brain activity and inter-regional connectivity support high-level cognitive processes, such as reading. However, it is still largely unknown how the functional brain network organizes to enable fast and effortless reading processing in the native language (L1) but not in a non-proficient second language (L2), and whether the mechanisms underlying local activity are associated with connectivity dynamics in large-scale brain networks. In the present study, we combined activation-based and multivariate graph-theory analysis with functional magnetic resonance imaging data to address these questions. Chinese-English unbalanced bilinguals read narratives for comprehension in Chinese (L1) and in English (L2). Compared with L2, reading in L1 evoked greater brain activation and recruited a more globally efficient but less clustered network organization. Regions with both increased network efficiency and enhanced brain activation in L1 reading were mostly located in the fronto-temporal reading-related network (RN), whereas regions with decreased global network efficiency, increased clustering, and more deactivation in L2 reading were identified in the default mode network (DMN). Moreover, functional network efficiency was closely associated with local brain activation, and such associations were also modulated by reading efficiency in the two languages. Our results demonstrate that an economical and integrative brain network topology is associated with efficient reading, and further reveal a dynamic association between network efficiency and local activation for both RN and DMN. These findings underscore the importance of considering interregional connectivity when interpreting local BOLD signal changes in bilingual reading. PMID:26095088

  9. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  10. Aerosols-Cloud-Microphysics Interactions in Tropical Cyclone Earl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Yaitza

    Aerosols-cloud-microphysical processes are largely unknown in their influence on tropical cyclone evolution and intensification; aerosols possess the largest uncertainty. For example: What is the link between aerosols and cloud microphysics quantities? How efficient are the aerosols (i.e. dust from the Saharan Air Layer -SAL) as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN)? Does aerosols affect the vertical velocity, precipitation rates, cloud structure and lifetime? What are the dominant factors and in which sectors of the tropical cyclone? To address some of the questions in-situ microphysics measurements from the NASA DC-8 aircraft were obtained during the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) 2010 field campaign. A total of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Mathew) were sampled. Earl presented the excellent opportunity to study aerosols-cloud-microphysics interactions because Saharan dust was present and it underwent rapid intensification. This thesis seeks to explore hurricane Earl to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the SAL aerosols and cloud microphysics evolution. To assist in the interpretation of the microphysics observations, high resolution numerical simulations of hurricane Earl were performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with the new Aerosol-Aware bulk microphysics scheme. This new version of Thompson scheme includes explicit activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from a major CCN source (i.e. sulfates and sea salt) and explicit ice nucleation (IN) from mineral dust. Three simulations are performed: (1) the Control case with the old Thompson scheme and initial conditions from GFS model, (2) the Aerosol-Aware first baseline case with GOCART aerosol module as an input conditions, and (3) the Aerosol-Aware increase case in which the GOCART aerosols concentrations were increased significantly. Overall, results of model simulations along with aircraft observations

  11. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kittaka, C.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.; Cook, A. L.; Haper, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol extinction profiles are derived from backscatter data by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), for example from coincident MODIS observations and without reliance on a priori assumptions about aerosol type or optical properties. The backscatter data were acquired with the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The HSRL also simultaneously measures extinction independently, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the constrained retrieval of extinction from backscatter. We will show constrained extinction retrievals using various sources of column AOT, and examine comparisons with the HSRL extinction measurements and with a similar retrieval using data from the CALIOP lidar on the CALIPSO satellite.

  12. Mass absorption efficiency of light absorbing organic aerosols from source region of paddy-residue burning emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.; Singh, A.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of light absorbing water-soluble organics, representing a significant fraction of brown carbon (BrC), has been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a source region (Patiala: 30.2 °N, 76.3 °E) of biomass burning emissions (BBEs) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The mass absorption coefficient of BrC at 365 nm (babs-365), assessed from absorption spectra of aqueous extracts, exhibits significant linear relationship with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for day (R2 = 0.37) and night time (R2 = 0.77) samples; and slope of regression lines provides a measure of MAE of BrC (daytime: ˜0.75 m2 g-1 and night time: 1.13 m2 g-1). A close similarity in the temporal variability of babs-365 (for BrC) and K+ in all samples suggests their common source from BBEs. The babs-365 of BrC follows a power law (babs-λ ≈ λ-α; where α = angstrom exponent) and averages around 5.2 ± 2.0 M m-1 (where M = 10-6). A significant decrease in the MAE of BrC from the source region (this study) to the downwind oceanic region (over Bay of Bengal, Srinivas and Sarin, 2013) could be attributed to relative increase in the contribution of non-absorbing WSOC and/or photo-bleaching of BrC during long-range atmospheric transport. The atmospheric radiative forcing due to BrC over the study site accounts for ˜40% of that from elemental carbon (EC).

  13. Investigating primary marine aerosol properties: CCN activity of sea salt and mixed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. M.; Butcher, A. C.; Rosenoern, T.; Coz, E.; Lieke, K. I.; de Leeuw, G.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2012-04-01

    Sea salt particles ejected as a result of bubbles bursting from artificial seawater in a closed stainless steel tank were sampled for size distribution, morphology, and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. The two-component artificial seawater consisted of salt, either NaCl or sea salt, and one organic compound in deionized water. Several organic molecules representative of oceanic organic matter were investigated. Bubbles were generated either by aeration through a porous diffuser or by water jet impingement on the surface of the artificial seawater. The effect of bubble lifetime, which was controlled by varying the depth of the diffuser in the water column, on particle size and CCN activity was investigated and was found to be insignificant for the organic compounds studied. The CCN activities of particles produced from diffuser-generated bubbles were generally governed by the high hygroscopicity of salt, such that activation was indistinguishable from that of salt, except in the case of very low mass ratio of salt to organic matter in the seawater solution. There was, however, a considerable decrease in CCN activity for particles produced from jet impingement on seawater that had a salinity of 10‰ and contained 0.45 mM of sodium laurate, an organic surfactant. The production of a thick foam layer from impingement may explain the difference in activation and supports hypotheses that particle production from the two methods of generating bubbles is not similar. Accurate conclusions from observed CCN activities of particles from artificial seawater containing organic matter require knowledge of the CCN activity of the inorganic component, especially as a small amount of the inorganic can heavily influence activation. Therefore, the CCN activity of both artificial sea salt and NaCl were measured and compared. Part of the discrepancy observed between the CCN activities of the two salts may be due to morphological differences, which were investigated using

  14. Aerosol residence times and changes in radioiodine-131I and radiocaesium-137 Cs activity over Central Poland after the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Długosz-Lisiecka, Magdalena; Bem, Henryk

    2012-05-01

    The first detectable activities of radioiodine (131)I, and radiocaesium (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the air over Central Poland were measured in dust samples collected by the ASS-500 station in the period of 21(st) to 24(th) of March, 2011. However, the highest activity of both fission products, (131)I and (137)Cs: 8.3 mBq m(-3) and 0.75 mBq m(-3), respectively, were obtained in the samples collected on 30(th) March, i.e.∼18 days after the beginning of the fission products' discharge from the damaged units of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The simultaneously determined corrected aerosol residence time for the same samples by (210)Pb/(210)Bi and (210)Pb/(210)Po methods was equal to 10 days. Additionally, on the basis of the activity ratio of two other natural cosmogenic radionuclides, (7)Be and (22)Na in these aerosol samples, it was possible to estimate the aerosol residence time at ∼150 days for the solid particles coming from the stratospheric fallout. These data, as well as the differences in the activity size distribution of (7)Be and (131)I in the air particulate matter, show, in contrast to the Chernobyl discharge, a negligible input of stratospheric transport of Fukushima-released fission products. PMID:22481111

  15. Improving upon Nature: Active site remodeling produces highly efficient aldolase activity towards hydrophobic electrophilic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Toone, Eric J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    Substrate specificity of enzymes is frequently narrow and constrained by multiple interactions, limiting the use of natural enzymes in biocatalytic applications. Aldolases have important synthetic applications, but the usefulness of these enzymes is hampered by their narrow reactivity profile with unnatural substrates. To explore the determinants of substrate selectivity and alter the specificity of E. coli 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate (KDPG) aldolase, we employed structure-based mutagenesis coupled with library screening of mutant enzymes localized to the bacterial periplasm. We identified two active site mutations (T161S/S184L) that work additively to enhance the substrate specificity of this aldolase to include catalysis of retro-aldol cleavage of (4S)-2-keto-4-hydroxy-4-(2′-pyridyl)butyrate (S-KHPB). These mutations improve the value of kcat/KMS-KHPB by >450-fold, resulting in a catalytic efficiency that is comparable to that of the wild-type enzyme with the natural substrate while retaining high stereoselectivity. Moreover, the value of kcatS-KHPB for this mutant enzyme, a parameter critical for biocatalytic applications, is 3-fold higher than the maximum value achieved by the natural aldolase with any substrate. This mutant also possesses high catalytic efficiency for the retro-aldol cleavage of the natural substrate, KDPG, and a >50-fold improved activity for cleavage of 2-keto-4-hydroxy-octonoate (KHO), a non-functionalized hydrophobic analog. These data suggest a substrate binding mode that illuminates the origin of facial selectivity in aldol addition reactions catalyzed by KDPG and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogalactonate (KDPGal) aldolases. Furthermore, targeting mutations to the active site provides marked improvement in substrate selectivity, demonstrating that structure-guided active site mutagenesis combined with selection techniques can efficiently identify proteins with characteristics that compare favorably to naturally occurring enzymes. PMID

  16. Aerosol effects on stratocumulus water paths in a PDF-based parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H.; Golaz, J.-C.; Donner, L. J.

    2011-09-01

    Successful simulation of aerosol indirect effects in climate models requires parameterizations that capture the full range of cloud-aerosol interactions, including positive and negative liquid water path (LWP) responses to increasing aerosol concentrations, as suggested by large eddy simulations (LESs). A parameterization based on multi-variate probability density functions with dynamics (MVD PDFs) has been incorporated into the single-column version of GFDL AM3, extended to treat aerosol activation, and coupled with a two-moment microphysics scheme. We use it to explore cloud-aerosol interactions. In agreement with LESs, our single-column simulations produce both positive and negative LWP responses to increasing aerosol concentrations, depending on precipitation and free atmosphere relative humidity. We have conducted sensitivity tests to vertical resolution and droplet sedimentation parameterization. The dependence of sedimentation on cloud droplet size is essential to capture the full LWP responses to aerosols. Further analyses reveal that the MVD PDFs are able to represent changes in buoyancy profiles induced by sedimentation as well as enhanced entrainment efficiency with aerosols comparable to LESs.

  17. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  18. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  19. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  20. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-03-01

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  1. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  2. CMAQ AEROSOL MODULE DEVELOPMENT RECENT ENHANCEMENTS & FUTURE PLANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent enhancements to the CMAQ aerosol module will be reviewed briefly. These include revision of the secondary organic aerosol subroutine to improve numerical efficiency and control the growth of the accumulation mode standard deviation, revision of the nucleation subroutine t...

  3. Investigating Primary Marine Aerosol Properties: CCN Activity of Sea Salt and Mixed Inorganic–Organic Particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sea spray particles ejected as a result of bubbles bursting from artificial seawater containing salt and organic matter in a stainless steel tank were sampled for size distribution, morphology, and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. Bubbles were generated either by aeration through a diffuser or by water jet impingement on the seawater surface. Three objectives were addressed in this study. First, CCN activities of NaCl and two types of artificial sea salt containing only inorganic components were measured to establish a baseline for further measurements of mixed organic–inorganic particles. Second, the effect of varying bubble residence time in the bulk seawater solution on particle size and CCN activity was investigated and was found to be insignificant for the organic compounds studied. Finally, CCN activities of particles produced from jet impingement were compared with those produced from diffuser aeration. Analyses indicate a considerable amount of organic enrichment in the jet-produced particles relative to the bulk seawater composition when sodium laurate, an organic surfactant, is present in the seawater. In this case, the production of a thick foam layer during impingement may explain the difference in activation and supports hypotheses that particle production from the two methods of generating bubbles is not equal. PMID:22809370

  4. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  5. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  6. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  7. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China to investigate the aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival, 2013. Three fireworks (FW) events exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5) were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW showed major impacts on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in PM1, of which the FW organics appeared to be mainly secondary with its mass spectrum resembling to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated PM1 accounting for 63-82% during the nine PEs observed. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than that during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. The primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction for cooking OA (69%), nitrogen monoxide (54%), and coal combustion OA (28%). The secondary sulfate, however, remained minor change, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. These results have significant implications that controlling local primary source emissions, e.g., cooking and traffic activities, might have limited effects on improving air quality during PEs when SPM that is formed over regional scales dominates aerosol particle composition.

  8. Increased Cloud Activation Potential of Secondary Organic Aerosol for Atmospheric Mass Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    King, Stephanie M.; Rosenoern, Thomas; Shilling, John E.; Chen, Qi; Martin, Scot T.

    2009-05-01

    The effect of organic particle mass loading from 1 to ≥100 μg m-3 on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties of mixed organic-sulfate particles was investigated in the Harvard Environmental Chamber. Mixed particles were produced by the condensation of organic molecules onto ammonium sulfate particles during the dark ozonolysis of α-pinene. A continuous-flow mode of the chamber provided stable conditions over long time periods, allowing for signal integration and hence increased measurement precision at low organic mass loadings representative of atmospheric conditions. CCN activity was measured at eight mass loadings for 80- and 100-nm particles grown on 50-nm sulfate seeds. A two-component (organic/sulfate) Köhler model, which included the particle heterogeneity arising from DMA size selection and from organic volume fraction for the selected 80- and 100-nm particles, was used to predict CCN activity. For organic mass loadings of 2.9 μg m-3 and greater, the observed activation curves were well predicted using a single set of physicochemical parameters for the organic component. For mass loadings of 1.74 μg m-3 and less, the observed CCN activity increased beyond predicted values using the same parameters, implying changed physicochemical properties of the organic component. Of possible changes in surface tension, effective molecular weight, and effective density, a sensitivity analysis implicated a decrease of up to 10% in surface tension at low mass loadings as the plausible dominant mechanism for the observed increase in CCN activity.

  9. Balancing Online Teaching Activities: Strategies for Optimizing Efficiency and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffo, Deana M.; Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Gardner, Justin G.; Fisher, Lawanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased demands in professional expectations have required online faculty to learn how to balance multiple roles in an open-ended, changing, and relatively unstructured job. In this paper, we argue that being strategic about one's balance of the various facets of online teaching will improve one's teaching efficiency and effectiveness. We…

  10. Characteristics of aerosolized ice forming marine biogenic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Peter A.

    Ice particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere existing as the sole constituents of glaciated cirrus clouds or coexisting with supercooled liquid droplets in mixed-phase clouds. Aerosol particles serving as heterogeneous ice nuclei for ice crystal formation impact the global radiative balance by modification of cloud radiative properties, and thus climate. Atmospheric ice formation is not a well understood process and represents great uncertainty for climate prediction. The oceans which cover the majority of the earth's surface host nearly half the total global primary productivity and contribute to the greatest aerosol production by mass. However, the effect of biological activity on particle aerosolization, particle composition, and ice nucleation is not well established. This dissertation investigates the link between marine biological activity, aerosol particle production, physical/chemical particle characteristics, and ice nucleation under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions of particles from bursting bubbles generated by plunging water jets and aeration through frits in a seawater mesocosm containing bacteria and/or phytoplankton cultures, were measured as a function of biological activity. Total particle production significantly increases primarily due to enhanced aerosolization of particles ≤100 nm in diameter attributable to the presence and growth of phytoplankton. Furthermore, hygroscopicity measurements indicate primary organic material associated with the sea salt particles, providing additional evidence for the importance of marine biological activity for ocean derived aerosol composition. Ice nucleation experiments show that these organic rich particles nucleate ice efficiently in the immersion and deposition modes, which underscores their importance in mixed-phase and cirrus cloud formation processes. In separate ice nucleation experiments employing pure cultures of Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nannochloris

  11. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  12. Contribution of fungi to primary biogenic aerosols in the atmosphere: active discharge of spores, carbohydrates, and inorganic ions by Asco- and Basidiomycota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbert, W.; Taylor, P. E.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2006-11-01

    Spores and related chemical compounds from actively spore-discharging Ascomycota (AAM) and actively spore-discharging Basidiomycota (ABM) are primary biogenic components of air particulate matter (characteristic size range 1-10 μm). Measurement results and budget calculations based on investigations in Amazonia (Balbina, Brazil, July 2001) indicate that the forcible discharge of fungal spores may account for a large proportion of coarse air particulate matter in tropical rainforest regions during the wet season. For the particle diameter range of 1-10 μm, the estimated proportions are ~25% during day-time, ~45% at night, and ~35% on average. For the sugar alcohol, mannitol, the budget calculations indicate that it is suitable for use as a molecular tracer for actively discharged basidiospores (ABS), and that the literature-derived emission ratio of about 5 pg per ABS may be taken as a representative average. ABM emissions may account for most of the atmospheric abundance of mannitol, and can explain the observed diurnal cycle (higher abundance at night). ABM emissions of hexose carbohydrates might also account for a significant proportion of glucose and fructose in air particulate matter, but the literature-derived ratios are not consistent with the observed diurnal cycle (lower abundance at night). AAM emissions appear to account for a large proportion of potassium in air particulate matter over tropical rainforest regions during the wet season, and they can also explain the observed diurnal cycle (higher abundance at night). The results of our investigations and budget calculations for tropical rainforest aerosols are consistent with measurements performed at other locations. Based on the average abundance of mannitol in particulate matter, which is consistent with the above emission ratio and the observed abundance of ABS, we have also calculated a value of ~17 Tg yr-1 as a first estimate for the global average emission rate of ABS over land surfaces

  13. Enhanced Bactericidal Activity of Silver Thin Films Deposited via Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition.

    PubMed

    Ponja, Sapna D; Sehmi, Sandeep K; Allan, Elaine; MacRobert, Alexander J; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2015-12-30

    Silver thin films were deposited on SiO2-barrier-coated float glass, fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass, Activ glass, and TiO2-coated float glass via AACVD using silver nitrate at 350 °C. The films were annealed at 600 °C and analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV/vis/near-IR spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. All the films were crystalline, and the silver was present in its elemental form and of nanometer dimension. The antibacterial activity of these samples was tested against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in the dark and under UV light (365 nm). All Ag-deposited films reduced the numbers of E. coli by 99.9% within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus by 99.9% within only 2 h. FTO/Ag reduced bacterial numbers of E. coli to below the detection limit after 60 min and caused a 99.9% reduction of S. aureus within only 15 min of UV irradiation. Activ/Ag reduced the numbers of S. aureus by 66.6% after 60 min and TiO2/Ag killed 99.9% of S. aureus within 60 min of UV exposure. More remarkably, we observed a 99.9% reduction in the numbers of E. coli within 6 h and the numbers of S. aureus within 4 h in the dark using our novel TiO2/Ag system. PMID:26632854

  14. Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence in Polymers: A New Route toward Highly Efficient Solution Processable OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Nikolaenko, Andrey E; Cass, Michael; Bourcet, Florence; Mohamad, David; Roberts, Matthew

    2015-11-25

    Efficient intermonomer thermally activated delayed fluorescence is demonstrated for the first time, opening a new route to achieving high-efficiency solution processable polymer light-emitting device materials. External quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 10% is achieved in a simple fully solution-processed device structure, and routes for further EQE improvement identified. PMID:26457683

  15. Design for efficient Suburban Activity Centers. Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-19

    The advent of Suburban Activity Centers has had a radical effect on the shape and function of regions throughout the country. These centers are typically made up of large concentrations of office space, retail uses, and more recently, light industrial and manufacturing facilities. Very few Suburban Activity Centers include significant residential components, much less parks, schools, and other civic buildings. While SACs come in many sizes and shapes, there appear to be a number of distinctive common characteristics. The overall purpose of the study is to identify methods for designing Activity Centers so that they minimize traffic congestion, improve pedestrian, bicycle, and transit model shares and contribute to healthy regions.

  16. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  17. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-01-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046–2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25–0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980–2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ~0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at mid-century. We calculate increases of 24–124% in area burned using regressions and 63–169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p<0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at mid-century. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46–70% and black carbon by 20–27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ~90% and BC by ~50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1

  18. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Kaplan, Jed O.

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ˜0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at midcentury. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p < 0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at midcentury. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84th percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ˜90% and BC by ˜50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in

  19. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xu; Mickley, Loretta J; Logan, Jennifer A; Kaplan, Jed O

    2013-10-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21(st) century (2046-2065), based on results from 15 climate models following the A1B scenario. We develop fire prediction models by regressing meteorological variables from the current and previous years together with fire indexes onto observed regional area burned. The regressions explain 0.25-0.60 of the variance in observed annual area burned during 1980-2004, depending on the ecoregion. We also parameterize daily area burned with temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. This approach explains ~0.5 of the variance in observed area burned over forest ecoregions but shows no predictive capability in the semi-arid regions of Nevada and California. By applying the meteorological fields from 15 climate models to our fire prediction models, we quantify the robustness of our wildfire projections at mid-century. We calculate increases of 24-124% in area burned using regressions and 63-169% with the parameterization. Our projections are most robust in the southwestern desert, where all GCMs predict significant (p<0.05) meteorological changes. For forested ecoregions, more GCMs predict significant increases in future area burned with the parameterization than with the regressions, because the latter approach is sensitive to hydrological variables that show large inter-model variability in the climate projections. The parameterization predicts that the fire season lengthens by 23 days in the warmer and drier climate at mid-century. Using a chemical transport model, we find that wildfire emissions will increase summertime surface organic carbon aerosol over the western United States by 46-70% and black carbon by 20-27% at midcentury, relative to the present day. The pollution is most enhanced during extreme episodes: above the 84(th) percentile of concentrations, OC increases by ~90% and BC by ~50%, while visibility decreases from 130 km to 100 km in 32 Federal Class 1 areas in

  20. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  1. Model Evaluation of Aerosol Wet Scavenging in Deep Convective Clouds Based on Observations Collected during the DC3 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Ghan, S. J.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barth, M. C.; Fan, J.; Morrison, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Bela, M. M.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective storms greatly influence the vertical distribution of aerosols by transporting aerosols from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and by removing aerosols through wet scavenging processes. Model representation of wet scavenging is a major uncertainty in simulating the vertical distribution of aerosols due partly to limited constraints by observations. The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep mid-latitude continental convective clouds is studied for a severe storm case in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains site on May 29, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign. A new budget analysis approach is developed to characterize the convective transport to the upper troposphere based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases (i.e., CO, acetone, and benzene). A similar budget framework is applied to aerosols combined with the known transport efficiency to estimate wet-scavenging efficiency. The chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) simulates the storm initiation timing and structure reasonably well when compared against radar observations from the NSSL national 3-D reflectivity Mosaic data. Simulated vertical profiles of humidity and temperature also closely agree with radiosonde measurements before and during the storm. High scavenging efficiencies (~80%) for aerosol number (Dp < 2.5μm) and mass (Dp < 1μm) are obtained from the observations. Both observation analyses and the simulation show that, between the two dominant aerosol species, organic aerosol shows a slightly higher scavenging efficiency than sulfate aerosol, and higher scavenging efficiency is found for larger particle sizes (0.15 - 2.5μm versus 0.03 - 0.15μm). However, the model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency (by up to 50%), in general, for both mass and number concentrations. The effect of neglecting secondary

  2. Highly Efficient, Simplified, Solution-Processed Thermally Activated Delayed-Fluorescence Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Wolf, Christoph; Cho, Himchan; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-27

    Highly efficient, simplified, solution-processed thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes can be realized by using pure-organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters and a multifunctional buffer hole-injection layer, in which high EQE (≈24%) and current efficiency (≈73 cd A(-1) ) are demonstrated. High-efficiency fluorescence red-emitting and blue-emitting devices can also be fabricated in this manner. PMID:26619309

  3. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  4. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-30

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  5. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Characterization of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The properties and distribution of aerosols over the broader Mediterranean region are complex since particles of different nature are either produced within its boundaries or transported from other regions. Thus, coarse dust aerosols are transported primarily from Sahara and secondarily from Middle East, while fine polluted aerosols are either produced locally from anthropogenic activities or they are transported from neighbouring or remote European areas. Also during summer biomass aerosols are transported towards the Mediterranean, originating from massive and extended fires occurring in northern Balkans and Eastern Europe and favoured by the prevailing synoptic conditions. In addition, sea-salt aerosols originate from the Mediterranean Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. Occasionally, aerosols are encountered at very high concentrations (aerosol episodes or events) significantly affecting atmospheric dynamics and climate as well as human health. Given the coexistence of different aerosols as internal and external mixtures characterizing and discriminating between the different types of aerosol episodes is a big challenge. A characterization and classification of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin (March 2000 - February 2007) is attempted in the present study. This is achieved by implementing an objective and dynamic algorithm which uses daily aerosol optical properties derived from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. The aerosol episodes are first classified into strong and extreme ones, according to their intensity, by means of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm). Subsequently, they are discriminated into the following aerosol types: (i) biomass/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) sea-salt like (SS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The classification is based on aerosol optical properties accounting for the particles' size (Ångström exponent, Effective radius), the

  7. CARER: Efficient Dynamic Sensing for Continuous Activity Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Au, Lawrence K.; Bui, Alex A.T.; Batalin, Maxim A.; Xu, Xiaoyu; Kaiser, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in wireless health sensor systems has triggered rapidly expanding research in continuous activity monitoring for chronic disease management or promotion and assessment of physical rehabilitation. Wireless motion sensing is increasingly important in treatments where remote collection of sensor measurements can provide an in-field objective evaluation of physical activity patterns. The well-known challenge of limited operating lifetime of energy-constrained wireless health sensor systems continues to present a primary limitation for these applications. This paper introduces CARER, a software system that supports a novel algorithm that exploits knowledge of context and dynamically schedules sensor measurement episodes within an energy consumption budget while ensuring classification accuracy. The sensor selection algorithm in the CARER system is based on Partially Observable Markov Decision Process (POMDP). The parameters for the POMDP algorithm can be obtained through standard maximum likelihood estimation. Sensor data are also collected from multiple locations of the subjects body, providing estimation of an individual's daily activity patterns. PMID:22254783

  8. Efficient discovery of bioactive scaffolds by activity-directed synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageorgis, George; Warriner, Stuart; Nelson, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The structures and biological activities of natural products have often provided inspiration in drug discovery. The functional benefits of natural products to the host organism steers the evolution of their biosynthetic pathways. Here, we describe a discovery approach—which we term activity-directed synthesis—in which reactions with alternative outcomes are steered towards functional products. Arrays of catalysed reactions of α-diazo amides, whose outcome was critically dependent on the specific conditions used, were performed. The products were assayed at increasingly low concentration, with the results informing the design of a subsequent reaction array. Finally, promising reactions were scaled up and, after purification, submicromolar ligands based on two scaffolds with no previous annotated activity against the androgen receptor were discovered. The approach enables the discovery, in tandem, of both bioactive small molecules and associated synthetic routes, analogous to the evolution of biosynthetic pathways to yield natural products.

  9. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  10. Effect of the secondary organic aerosol coatings on black carbon water uptake, cloud condensation nuclei activity, and particle collapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of black carbon aerosols to absorb water and act as a cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) directly controls their lifetime in the atmosphere as well as their impact on cloud formation, thus impacting the earth’s climate. Black carbon emitted from most combustion pro...

  11. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  12. Optimisation of GaN LEDs and the reduction of efficiency droop using active machine learning.

    PubMed

    Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Barros, Kipton; Lookman, Turab; Humphreys, Colin J

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the design of LEDs is to maximise electro-luminescence efficiency at high current densities. We simulate GaN-based LED structures that delay the onset of efficiency droop by spreading carrier concentrations evenly across the active region. Statistical analysis and machine learning effectively guide the selection of the next LED structure to be examined based upon its expected efficiency as well as model uncertainty. This active learning strategy rapidly constructs a model that predicts Poisson-Schrödinger simulations of devices, and that simultaneously produces structures with higher simulated efficiencies. PMID:27113018

  13. Optimisation of GaN LEDs and the reduction of efficiency droop using active machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Barros, Kipton; Lookman, Turab; Humphreys, Colin J.

    2016-04-01

    A fundamental challenge in the design of LEDs is to maximise electro-luminescence efficiency at high current densities. We simulate GaN-based LED structures that delay the onset of efficiency droop by spreading carrier concentrations evenly across the active region. Statistical analysis and machine learning effectively guide the selection of the next LED structure to be examined based upon its expected efficiency as well as model uncertainty. This active learning strategy rapidly constructs a model that predicts Poisson-Schrödinger simulations of devices, and that simultaneously produces structures with higher simulated efficiencies.

  14. Optimisation of GaN LEDs and the reduction of efficiency droop using active machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Rouet-Leduc, Bertrand; Barros, Kipton; Lookman, Turab; Humphreys, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in the design of LEDs is to maximise electro-luminescence efficiency at high current densities. We simulate GaN-based LED structures that delay the onset of efficiency droop by spreading carrier concentrations evenly across the active region. Statistical analysis and machine learning effectively guide the selection of the next LED structure to be examined based upon its expected efficiency as well as model uncertainty. This active learning strategy rapidly constructs a model that predicts Poisson-Schrödinger simulations of devices, and that simultaneously produces structures with higher simulated efficiencies. PMID:27113018

  15. Antioxidant activity and haemolysis prevention efficiency of polyaniline nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Somik; Saikia, Jyoti P.; Kumar, A.; Konwar, B. K.

    2010-01-01

    Polyaniline (PAni) nanofibers have been synthesized by interfacial polymerization using hydrochloric acid (HCl) and camphor sulfonic acid (CSA) as dopants. The powder x-ray diffraction pattern of bulk polyaniline reveals ES I structure and has been indexed in a pseudo-orthorhombic lattice. The broadening of (110) reflection in the nanofiber samples has been analysed in terms of domain length and strain using a convolution method employing a Voigt function. The increase in d spacing for the (110) reflection in HCl-doped PAni nanofibers have been assigned to the change in structural conformation due to the increase in the tilt angle of the polymer chain, which is also evident from microRaman spectra. UV-vis spectra of the PAni nanofibers exhibit a remarkable blueshift in the absorption bands attributed to π-π* and π-polaron band transitions indicating a reduction in particle size, which is also observed in TEM micrographs. The antioxidant activity of the polyaniline nanofiber samples has been investigated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging assay by employing UV-visible spectroscopy. It has also been observed that polyaniline nanofibers are able to protect the haemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) from cytotoxic agents, namely H2O2. The observed enhancement in the antioxidant and haemolysis prevention activity of the PAni nanofibers as compared to bulk has been attributed to the reduction in particle size and changes in structural conformation, as evident from TEM, XRD and microRaman spectroscopy.

  16. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    PubMed Central

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ −10 °C (INPs−10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  17. Two-temperature formalin fixation preserves activation states efficiently.

    PubMed

    Chafin, David

    2015-01-01

    Modern pathology is built around the principle of preserving tissues such that the in vivo molecular status is maintained at levels representative of the disease state. Tissues are immersed in a solution of fixative which slowly inactivates biological activities, thus preserving the sample. Further processing ultimately allows the tissue to be embedded into wax for thin sectioning and staining for interpretation microscopically. Every year, around 7 billion tissue samples are submitted for processing in the United States alone. With this huge workload, histology laboratories are looking for faster methods of performing fixation, which currently require from several hours to days to complete. Ideally, this procedure could be standardized and would be quicker with better preservation over a wide range of biologically relevant molecules. PMID:25636434

  18. Ensemble projections of wildfire activity and carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Mickley, L. J.; Logan, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate future wildfire activity over the western United States during the mid-21st century (2046-2065), based on ensemble results from 16 models following the IPCC A1B scenario. Regression models and a parameterization model of area burned (AB) are developed for the projection. The ecoregion-based regression models consider the meteorological impacts from both the current and previous years on the regional AB; the correlation coefficients between the predicted and observed annual AB range from 0.59 to 0.85 during 1981-2000 for six ecoregions. The parameterization model calculates the effects of temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity on daily AB; the predicted monthly total AB over the western US is highly correlated with observations with a normal (logarithmic) correlation coefficient of 0.73 (0.90) for 300 months (1980-2004). The meteorological fields under the A1B scenario from 15 IPCC models and a general circulation model (NASA/GISS GCM 3) are applied to the fire models to estimate AB during 2046-2065. We calculate that the annual AB will increase by 21~124% (regression models) and 40~198% (parameterization) over six ecoregions in the western US at midcentury relative to present day; the length of fire season will extend by 11.1% for the warmer and drier climate. We also examine the impact of the changing climate on the fuel load with a dynamic vegetation model LPJ driven by future meteorology from the GISS GCM 3; it shows that the fuel load over western US experiences small changes because of the short time period from 2000 to 2050. Based on the projected fuel load and the AB calculations, we estimate that the annual total biomass burning over western US will increase by 68% (regression models) or as much as 161% (parameterization). We further investigate the impact of the changing fire emission on the carbonaceous aerosol concentrations over the western United States in the mid-21st century using the chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem driven

  19. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  20. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  1. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  2. Artifact free denuder method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, P.; Vecera, Z.; Broškovicová, A.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past decade, a growing attention has been focused on the carbonaceous aerosols. Although they may account for 30--60% of the total fine aerosol mass, their concentration and formation mechanisms are not well understood, particularly in comparison with major fine particle inorganic species. The deficiency in knowledge of carbonaceous aerosols results from their complexity and because of problems associated with their collection. Conventional sampling techniques of the carbonaceous aerosols, which utilize filters/backup adsorbents suffer from sampling artefacts. Positive artifacts are mainly due to adsorption of gas-phase organic compounds by the filter material or by the already collected particles, whereas negative artifacts arise from the volatilisation of already collected organic compounds from the filter. Furthermore, in the course of the sampling, the composition of the collected organic compounds may be modified by oxidants (O_3, NO_2, PAN, peroxides) that are present in the air passing through the sampler. It is clear that new, artifact free, method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols is needed. A combination of a diffusion denuder and a filter in series is very promising in this respect. The denuder is expected to collect gaseous oxidants and gas-phase organic compounds from sample air stream prior to collection of aerosol particles on filters, and eliminate thus both positive and negative sampling artifacts for carbonaceous aerosols. This combination is subject of the presentation. Several designs of diffusion denuders (cylindrical, annular, parallel plate, multi-channel) in combination with various types of wall coatings (dry, liquid) were examined. Special attention was given to preservation of the long-term collection efficiency. Different adsorbents (activated charcoal, molecular sieve, porous polymers) and sorbents coated with various chemical reagents (KI, Na_2SO_3, MnO_2, ascorbic acid) or chromatographic stationary phases (silicon oils

  3. Prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for high-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ke; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Cai-Jun; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sing; Li, Fan; Ou, Xue-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Hong

    2015-04-01

    High-efficiency, thermally activated delayed-fluorescence organic light-emitting diodes based on exciplex emitters are demonstrated. The best device, based on a TAPC:DPTPCz emitter, shows a high external quantum efficiency of 15.4%. Strategies for predicting and designing efficient exciplex emitters are also provided. This approach allow prediction and design of efficient exciplex emitters for achieving high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes, for future use in displays and lighting applications. PMID:25712786

  4. The effect of aerosol on radiation fog life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, Sami; Maalick, Zubair; Tonttila, Juha; Kuhn, Thomas; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Radiation fog is formed during the night under clear skies when emission of long wave radiation cools the surface and air above it. After formation, the development of fog is further influenced by longwave cooling and turbulence entrainment-detrainment at the top of the fog layer, and microphysical processes through droplet activation and sedimentation. After sunrise, the fog is dissipated due heating of the surface and the air above it. Like in the case of clouds, atmospheric aerosol particles also affect the properties of fog and together with meteorological conditions determine their life cycle from formation to dissipation. To explore how aerosols are affecting radiation fog properties and lifetime, we have used a Large Eddy Model with explicit representation of aerosol particles and aerosol-fog droplet interactions. Our results show that the fog droplet concentration increases with increasing aerosol concentration. In the early stages of fog formation the radiative cooling at the top of the fog controls the maximum water supersaturation and droplet formation in a similar manner than the updraft velocity does at the base of a cloud. The liquid water content in the fog is mainly determined by the droplet concentration as large droplets are efficiently removed through sedimentation. Thus, with increasing aerosol particle concentration, the more numerous, but smaller fog droplets increase the fog's optical depth and thereby delay the fog dissipation after sunrise, because the surface warms more slowly. This effect is further enhanced if turbulence inside the fog leads to secondary activation of droplets. Overall, the radiation fog dissipation in polluted conditions can be delayed up to hours when compared to clean conditions.

  5. Microwave and Beam Activation of Nanostructured Catalysts for Environmentally Friendly, Energy Efficient Heavy Crude Oil Processing

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose goal is initial evaluation and development of energy efficient processes which take advantage of the benefits offered by nanostructured catalysts which can be activated by microwave, RF, or radiation beams.

  6. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  7. Aerosol Lidar and MODIS Satellite Comparisons for Future Aerosol Loading Forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell; Szykman, James; Severance, Kurt; Chu, D. Allen; Rosen, Rebecca; Al-Saadi, Jassim

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of the concentration and distribution of atmospheric aerosols using both airborne lidar and satellite instruments is a field of active research. An aircraft based aerosol lidar has been used to study the distribution of atmospheric aerosols in the California Central Valley and eastern US coast. Concurrently, satellite aerosol retrievals, from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, were take over the Central Valley. The MODIS Level 2 aerosol data product provides retrieved ambient aerosol optical properties (e.g., optical depth (AOD) and size distribution) globally over ocean and land at a spatial resolution of 10 km. The Central Valley topography was overlaid with MODIS AOD (5x5 sq km resolution) and the aerosol scattering vertical profiles from a lidar flight. Backward air parcel trajectories for the lidar data show that air from the Pacific and northern part of the Central Valley converge confining the aerosols to the lower valley region and below the mixed layer. Below an altitude of 1 km, the lidar aerosol and MODIS AOD exhibit good agreement. Both data sets indicate a high presence of aerosols near Bakersfield and the Tehachapi Mountains. These and other results to be presented indicate that the majority of the aerosols are below the mixed layer such that the MODIS AOD should correspond well with surface measurements. Lidar measurements will help interpret satellite AOD retrievals so that one day they can be used on a routine basis for prediction of boundary layer aerosol pollution events.

  8. Sensitivity of aerosol concentrations and cloud properties to nucleation and secondary organic distribution in ECHAM5-HAM global circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makkonen, R.; Asmi, A.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Järvenoja, S.; Räisänen, P.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laaksonen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Järvinen, H.; Lohmann, U.; Bennartz, R.; Feichter, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2009-03-01

    The global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM was modified to improve the representation of new particle formation in the boundary layer. Activation-type nucleation mechanism was introduced to produce observed nucleation rates in the lower troposphere. A simple and computationally efficient model for biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) formation was implemented. Here we study the sensitivity of the aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) to these additions. Activation-type nucleation significantly increases aerosol number concentrations in the boundary layer. Increased particle number concentrations have a significant effect also on cloud droplet number concentrations and therefore on cloud properties. We performed calculations with activation nucleation coefficient values of 2×10-7s-1, 2×10-6s-1 and 2×10-5s-1 to evaluate the sensitivity to this parameter. For BSOA we have used yields of 0.025, 0.07 and 0.15 to estimate the amount of monoterpene oxidation products available for condensation. The hybrid BSOA formation scheme induces large regional changes to size distribution of organic carbon, and therefore affects particle optical properties and cloud droplet number concentrations locally. Although activation-type nucleation improves modeled aerosol number concentrations in the boundary layer, the use of a global activation coefficient generally leads to overestimation of aerosol number. Overestimation can also arise from underestimation of primary emissions.

  9. Rod Visual Pigment Optimizes Active State to Achieve Efficient G Protein Activation as Compared with Cone Visual Pigments*

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Keiichi; Imamoto, Yasushi; Maeda, Ryo; Yamashita, Takahiro; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Most vertebrate retinas contain two types of photoreceptor cells, rods and cones, which show different photoresponses to mediate scotopic and photopic vision, respectively. These cells contain different types of visual pigments, rhodopsin and cone visual pigments, respectively, but little is known about the molecular properties of cone visual pigments under physiological conditions, making it difficult to link the molecular properties of rhodopsin and cone visual pigments with the differences in photoresponse between rods and cones. Here we prepared bovine and mouse rhodopsin (bvRh and mRh) and chicken and mouse green-sensitive cone visual pigments (cG and mG) embedded in nanodiscs and applied time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy to compare their Gt activation efficiencies. Rhodopsin exhibited greater Gt activation efficiencies than cone visual pigments. Especially, the Gt activation efficiency of mRh was about 2.5-fold greater than that of mG at 37 °C, which is consistent with our previous electrophysiological data of knock-in mice. Although the active state (Meta-II) was in equilibrium with inactive states (Meta-I and Meta-III), quantitative determination of Meta-II in the equilibrium showed that the Gt activation efficiency per Meta-II of bvRh was also greater than those of cG and mG. These results indicated that efficient Gt activation by rhodopsin, resulting from an optimized active state of rhodopsin, is one of the causes of the high amplification efficiency of rods. PMID:24375403

  10. Development of High Efficiency Ventilation Bag Actuated Dry Powder Inhalers

    PubMed Central

    Behara, Srinivas R.B.; Longest, P. Worth; Farkas, Dale R.; Hindle, Michael

    2014-01-01

    New active dry powder inhaler systems were developed and tested to efficiently aerosolize a carrier-free formulation. To assess inhaler performance, a challenging case study of aerosol lung delivery during high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was selected. The active delivery system consisted of a ventilation bag for actuating the device, the DPI containing a flow control orifice and 3D rod array, and streamlined nasal cannula with separate inlets for the aerosol and HFNC therapy gas. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess deposition in the device, emitted dose (ED) from the nasal cannula, and powder deaggregation. The best performing systems achieved EDs of 70–80% with fine particle fractions <5 μm of 65–85% and mass median aerodynamic diameters of 1.5 μm, which were target conditions for controlled condensational growth aerosol delivery. Decreasing the size of the flow control orifice from 3.6 to 2.3 mm reduced the flow rate through the system with manual bag actuations from an average of 35 to 15 LPM, while improving ED and aerosolization performance. The new devices can be applied to improve aerosol delivery during mechanical ventilation, nose-to-lung aerosol administration, and to assist patients that cannot reproducibly use passive DPIs. PMID:24508552

  11. Highly Efficient Orange and Red Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Low Roll-Off of Efficiency using a Novel Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Material as Host.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Meng, Lingqiang; Shen, Xingxing; Wei, Xiaofang; Zheng, Xiuli; Lv, Xiaopeng; Yi, Yuanping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-07-15

    MTXSFCz with thermally activated delayed fluorescence is synthesized. Orange and red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) with low efficiency roll-off exhibit external quantum efficiencies (EQE) up to 11.8% and 15.6%. The efficient upconversion from triplet to singlet of the host reduces the triplet density and thus affords a low efficiency roll-off of PHOLEDs. PMID:26033526

  12. Latitudinal distributions of activities in atmospheric aerosols, deposition fluxes, and soil inventories of ⁷Be in the East Asian monsoon zone.

    PubMed

    Gai, N; Pan, J; Yin, X C; Zhu, X H; Yu, H Q; Li, Y; Tan, K Y; Jiao, X C; Yang, Y L

    2015-10-01

    Activities of atmospheric aerosols, bulk deposition fluxes, and undisturbed soil inventories of (7)Be were investigated in China's East Asian monsoon zone at various latitudes ranging from 23.8°N to 43.5°N. The annual latitudinal distributions of (7)Be concentrations in aerosols follow a distribution pattern which looks similar to a normal distribution with the maxima occurring in the mid-latitude region. Simultaneous measurements of (7)Be at various latitudes suggest that atmospheric circulation may play an important role in the latitudinal distributions of (7)Be in surface air. Latitude and wet precipitation are the main factors controlling the bulk (7)Be depositional fluxes. Significant seasonal variations in (7)Be depositional fluxes in Beijing, a mid-latitude city, were observed with the highest flux in summer and the lowest in winter, whereas less seasonality were found in the high- and the low-latitude cities. The highest (7)Be inventory in undisturbed soils in summer also occurred at a mid-latitudinal area in the East Asian monsoon zone. Precipitation is the main factor controlling the (7)Be soil inventory in Qingdao with the highest values occurring in autumn followed by summer. PMID:26114808

  13. Satellite Remote Sensing: Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are solid or liquid particles suspended in the air, and those observed by satellite remote sensing are typically between about 0.05 and 10 microns in size. (Note that in traditional aerosol science, the term "aerosol" refers to both the particles and the medium in which they reside, whereas for remote sensing, the term commonly refers to the particles only. In this article, we adopt the remote-sensing definition.) They originate from a great diversity of sources, such as wildfires, volcanoes, soils and desert sands, breaking waves, natural biological activity, agricultural burning, cement production, and fossil fuel combustion. They typically remain in the atmosphere from several days to a week or more, and some travel great distances before returning to Earth's surface via gravitational settling or washout by precipitation. Many aerosol sources exhibit strong seasonal variability, and most experience inter-annual fluctuations. As such, the frequent, global coverage that space-based aerosol remote-sensing instruments can provide is making increasingly important contributions to regional and larger-scale aerosol studies.

  14. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  15. Triangular Relationship between Sleep Spindle Activity, General Cognitive Ability and the Efficiency of Declarative Learning

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Roland; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto

    2012-01-01

    EEG sleep spindle activity (SpA) during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep has been reported to be associated with measures of intelligence and overnight performance improvements. The reticular nucleus of the thalamus is generating sleep spindles in interaction with thalamocortical connections. The same system enables efficient encoding and processing during wakefulness. Thus, we examined if the triangular relationship between SpA, measures of intelligence and declarative learning reflect the efficiency of the thalamocortical system. As expected, SpA was associated with general cognitive ability, e.g. information processing speed. SpA was also associated with learning efficiency, however, not with overnight performance improvement in a declarative memory task. SpA might therefore reflect the efficiency of the thalamocortical network and can be seen as a marker for learning during encoding in wakefulness, i.e. learning efficiency. PMID:23185361

  16. High performance organic ultraviolet photodetector with efficient electroluminescence realized by a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Dianli; Huang, Jiang; Yu, Junsheng

    2015-07-01

    A high performance organic ultraviolet (UV) photodetector with efficient electroluminescence (EL) was obtained by using a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter of (4s,6s)-2,4,5,6-tetra(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (4CzIPN). An exciton adjusting layer (EAL) was delicately designed to construct an energy-level-aligned heterojunction with 4CzIPN. As a result, the bi-functional device exhibited a high detectivity of 1.4 × 1012 Jones under 350 nm UV light. Moreover, our device exhibited efficient EL emission utilizing the merit of reverse intersystem crossing process from triplet to singlet excitons of 4CzIPN, showing a maximum luminance, current efficiency, and power efficiency of 26370 cd/m2, 8.2 cd/A, and 4.9 lm/W, respectively. This work arouses widespread interest in constructing efficient bi-functional device based on TADF emitter and EAL structure.

  17. Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Polymers for Efficient Solution-Processed Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sae Youn; Yasuda, Takuma; Komiyama, Hideaki; Lee, Jiyoung; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-06-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) π-conjugated polymers are developed for solution-processed TADF-OLEDs. Benzophenone-based alternating donor-acceptor structures contribute to the small ∆EST , enabling efficient exciton-harvesting through TADF. Solution-processed OLEDs using the TADF polymers as emitters can achieve high maximum external electroluminescence efficiencies of up to 9.3%. PMID:27001891

  18. Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols from Indo-Gangetic Plain and Central Himalaya: impact of anthropogenic sources.

    PubMed

    Ram, Kirpa; Sarin, M M

    2015-01-15

    In the present-day scenario of growing anthropogenic activities, carbonaceous aerosols contribute significantly (∼20-70%) to the total atmospheric particulate matter mass and, thus, have immense potential to influence the Earth's radiation budget and climate on a regional to global scale. In addition, formation of secondary organic aerosols is being increasingly recognized as an important process in contributing to the air-pollution and poor visibility over urban regions. It is, thus, essential to study atmospheric concentrations of carbonaceous species (EC, OC and WSOC), their mixing state and absorption properties on a regional scale. This paper presents the comprehensive data on emission sources, chemical characteristics and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols from selected urban sites in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and from a high-altitude location in the central Himalaya. The mass concentrations of OC, EC and WSOC exhibit large spatio-temporal variability in the IGP. This is attributed to seasonally varying emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning, their source strength, boundary layer dynamics and secondary aerosol formation. The high concentrations of OC and SO4(2-), and their characteristic high mass scattering efficiency, contribute significantly to the aerosol optical depth and scattering coefficient. This has implications to the assessment of single scattering albedo and aerosol radiative forcing on a regional scale. PMID:25199599

  19. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  20. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Nakanotani, Hajime; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-01

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  1. Modeling immersion freezing with aerosol-dependent prognostic ice nuclei in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, M.; Hoose, C.

    2014-07-01

    While recent laboratory experiments have thoroughly quantified the ice nucleation efficiency of different aerosol species, the resulting ice nucleation parameterizations have not yet been extensively evaluated in models on different scales. Here the implementation of an immersion freezing parameterization based on laboratory measurements of the ice nucleation active surface site density of mineral dust and ice nucleation active bacteria, accounting for nucleation scavenging of ice nuclei, into a cloud-resolving model with two-moment cloud microphysics is presented. We simulated an Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during Flight 31 of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign near Barrow, Alaska. Through different feedback cycles, the persistence of the cloud strongly depends on the ice number concentration. It is attempted to bring the observed cloud properties, assumptions on aerosol concentration, and composition and ice formation parameterized as a function of these aerosol properties into agreement. Depending on the aerosol concentration and on the ice crystal properties, the simulated clouds are classified as growing, dissipating, and quasi-stable. In comparison to the default ice nucleation scheme, the new scheme requires higher aerosol concentrations to maintain a quasi-stable cloud. The simulations suggest that in the temperature range of this specific case, mineral dust can only contribute to a minor part of the ice formation. The importance of ice nucleation active bacteria and possibly other ice formation modes than immersion freezing remains poorly constrained in the considered case, since knowledge on local variations in the emissions of ice nucleation active organic aerosols in the Arctic is scarce.

  2. Externally pressurized porous cylinder for multiple surface aerosol generation and method of generation

    DOEpatents

    Apel, C.T.; Layman, L.R.; Gallimore, D.L.

    1988-05-10

    A nebulizer is described for generating aerosol having small droplet sizes and high efficiency at low sample introduction rates. The nebulizer has a cylindrical gas permeable active surface. A sleeve is disposed around the cylinder and gas is provided from the sleeve to the interior of the cylinder formed by the active surface. In operation, a liquid is provided to the inside of the gas permeable surface. The gas contacts the wetted surface and forms small bubbles which burst to form an aerosol. Those bubbles which are large are carried by momentum to another part of the cylinder where they are renebulized. This process continues until the entire sample is nebulized into aerosol sized droplets. 2 figs.

  3. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-06-01

    Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to consistently include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - merely based on solute solubilities - to explicitly account for the water mass consumed by hydration. As a result, in chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH) suffices to determine the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and directly links the aerosol hygroscopic growth to fog, haze and cloud formation. We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3) for use in regional and global chemistry-transport and climate models. Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stoichiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by computing aerosol properties such as

  4. Reformulating atmospheric aerosol thermodynamics and hygroscopic growth into haze and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-01-01

    Modeling atmospheric aerosol and cloud microphysics is rather complex, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that the thermodynamics can be considerably simplified by reformulating equilibrium to include water, and transform laboratory-based concepts to atmospheric conditions. We generalize the thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - merely based on solute solubilities. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium the relative humidity (RH) determines the saturation molality, including solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), since the water content is fixed by RH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning can be solved analytically and non-iteratively. Our new concept enables an efficient and accurate calculation of the aerosol water mass and to directly link the aerosol hygroscopic growth to haze and cloud formation. We apply our new concept in the 3rd Equilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM3). Its input is limited to the species' solubilities from which a newly introduced stoichiometric coefficient for water is derived. Analogously, we introduce effective stochiometric coefficients for the solutes to account for complete or incomplete dissociation. We show that these coefficients can be assumed constant over the entire activity range and calculated for various inorganic, organic and non-electrolyte compounds, including alcohols, sugars and dissolved gases. EQSAM3 calculates the aerosol composition and gas/liquid/solid partitioning of mixed inorganic/organic multicomponent solutions and the associated water uptake for almost 100 major compounds. It explicitly accounts for particle hygroscopic growth by computing aerosol properties such as single solute molalities, molal based activities, including activity coefficients for volatile compounds, and deliquescence relative humidities of mixed solutes. Various

  5. Contributions of Organic Vapors to Aerosol Aging and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, L.; Khalizov, A.

    2009-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols impair visibility and human health, interfere with radiative transfer, and alter cloud formation. The major contributors include sulfate and organic aerosols from anthropogenic and biogenic activities, which are produced through a multitude of complex multiphase atmospheric processes by photochemical oxidation of emitted sulfur dioxide and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into less volatile forms and gas-to-particle conversion. Condensation of organic vapors onto the pre-existing atmospheric aerosols, followed by chemical reactions within the particles medium, is believed to be one of the major pathways that contribute to particle growth. Recent research has focused on the total mass increase on pre- existing seed particles, but the chemistry that determines the efficiency of organic uptake remains to be elucidated. This talk will focus on the growth of nano- to sub-micron sulfuric acid droplets exposed organic vapors. Experiments performed at different relative humidity and using different organic vapors (i.e., small alpha-dicarbonyls and large aldehydes) will be presented. The chemical mechanisms and size dependence of the particle growth will be demonstrated. Implications of the present results to aging and growth of aerosols under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  6. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  7. Processes controlling the annual cycle of Arctic aerosol number and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Tunved, Peter; Breider, Thomas J.; D'Andrea, Stephen D.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements at high-Arctic sites (Alert, Nunavut, and Mt. Zeppelin, Svalbard) during the years 2011 to 2013 show a strong and similar annual cycle in aerosol number and size distributions. Each year at both sites, the number of aerosols with diameters larger than 20 nm exhibits a minimum in October and two maxima, one in spring associated with a dominant accumulation mode (particles 100 to 500 nm in diameter) and a second in summer associated with a dominant Aitken mode (particles 20 to 100 nm in diameter). Seasonal-mean aerosol effective diameter from measurements ranges from about 180 in summer to 260 nm in winter. This study interprets these annual cycles with the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. Important roles are documented for several processes (new-particle formation, coagulation scavenging in clouds, scavenging by precipitation, and transport) in controlling the annual cycle in Arctic aerosol number and size. Our simulations suggest that coagulation scavenging of interstitial aerosols in clouds by aerosols that have activated to form cloud droplets strongly limits the total number of particles with diameters less than 200 nm throughout the year. We find that the minimum in total particle number in October can be explained by diminishing new-particle formation within the Arctic, limited transport of pollution from lower latitudes, and efficient wet removal. Our simulations indicate that the summertime-dominant Aitken mode is associated with efficient wet removal of accumulation-mode aerosols, which limits the condensation sink for condensable vapours. This in turn promotes new-particle formation and growth. The dominant accumulation mode during spring is associated with build up of transported pollution from outside the Arctic coupled with less-efficient wet-removal processes at colder temperatures. We recommend further attention to the key processes of new-particle formation, interstitial coagulation, and wet removal and their delicate

  8. Global and regional evolution of short-lived radiatively-active gases and aerosols in the Representative Concentration Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Kyle, G. Page; Meinshausen, Malte; Riahi, Keywan; Smith, Steven J.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis

    2011-08-05

    In this paper, we discuss the results of 2000-2100 simulations with a chemistry-climate model, focusing on the changes in atmospheric composition (troposphere and stratosphere) following the emissions associated with the Representative Concentration Pathways. We show that tropospheric ozone is projected to decrease (RCP3PD and RCP4.5) or increase (RCP8.5) between 2000 and 2100. Surface ozone in 2100 is projected to change little compared from 2000 conditions, a much-reduced impact from the projections based on the A2 scenario. Aerosols are projected to strongly decrease in the 21st century, a reflection of their projected decrease in emissions. Similarly, sulfate deposition is projected to strongly decrease. However, nitrogen deposition is projected to increase over certain regions because of the projected increase NH3 emissions.

  9. Combined effect of glycine and sea salt on aerosol cloud droplet activation predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Agren, Hans

    2013-10-17

    The present study illustrates the combined effect of organic and inorganic compounds on cloud droplet nucleation and activation processes representative for the marine environment. Amino acids and sea salt are common marine cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which act as a prerequisite for growth of cloud droplets. The chemical and physical properties of these CCN play a key role for interfacial properties such as surface tension, which is important for the optical properties of clouds and for heterogeneous reactions. However, there is a lack of detailed information and in situ measurements of surface tension of such nanosized droplets. Here we present a study of the combined effect of zwitterionic glycine (ZGLY) and sea salt in nanosized water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations, where particular emphasis is placed on the surface tension for the nanosized droplets. The critical supersaturation is estimated by the Köhler equation. It is found that dissolved sea salt interacts with ZGLY through a water bridge and weakens the hydrogen bonds among ZGLYs, which has a significant effect on both surface tension and water vapor supersaturation. Clusters of glycine mixed with sea salt deliquesce more efficiently and have higher growth factors. PMID:24063576

  10. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  11. Particle-resolved simulation of aerosol size, composition, mixing state, and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties in an evolving urban plume

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Easter, Richard C.; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2010-09-11

    The recently developed particle-resolved aerosol box model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to simulate the evolution of aerosol mixing state and the associated optical and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation properties in an idealized urban plume. The model explicitly resolved the size and composition of individual particles from a number of sources and tracked their evolution due to condensation/evaporation, coagulation, emission, and dilution. The ensemble black carbon (BC) specific absorption cross section increased by 40% over the course of two days as a result of BC aging by condensation and coagulation. Three- and four-fold enhancements in CCN/CN ratios were predicted to occur within 6 hours for 0.2% and 0.5% supersaturations (S), respectively. The particle-resolved results were used to evaluate the errors in the optical and CCN activation properties that would be predicted by a conventional sectional framework that assumes monodisperse, internally-mixed particles within each bin. This assumption artificially increased the ensemble BC specific absorption by 14-30% and decreased the single scattering albedo by 0.03-0.07 while the bin resolution had a negligible effect. In contrast, the errors in CCN/CN ratios were sensitive to the bin resolution, and they depended on the chosen supersaturation. For S = 0.2%, the CCN/CN ratio predicted using 100 internally-mixed bins was up to 25% higher than the particle-resolved results, while it was up to 125% higher using 10 internally-mixed bins. Errors introduced in the predicted optical and CCN properties by neglecting coagulation were also quantified.

  12. Seasonal and site-specific variation in vapour and aerosol phase PAHs over Flanders (Belgium) and their relation with anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Bencs, László; Wauters, Eric; de Hoog, Johan; Deutsch, Felix; Roekens, Edward; Bleux, Nico; Berghmans, Patrick; Van Grieken, René

    The concentrations of 16 US-EPA criteria polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored during various seasons at six different cities/locations in the northern part of Belgium. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was used for the fast recovery of PAHs from quartz fibre filters (QFFs) and polyurethane foams (PUFs) in less than 30 min with minimum solvent consumption prior to their analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentrations of PAHs varied significantly at the studied sites and showed relation to different anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular emission (diesel/gasoline), incinerator, petroleum/oil burning, coke production, and wood/coal combustion. The annual average PAH concentration ranged from 17 (at a rural site) to 114 ng m -3 (near a petroleum harbour and industry). Most of the human carcinogenic PAHs were found to be associated with suspended particulate matter, which forms around ˜55% of the total PAH levels in aerosols. Relatively higher concentrations of PAHs were detected in aerosol samples during winter compared with other seasons, whereas no clear seasonal trend was observed for the vapour phase PAHs. This fraction is likely to be more local in origin; hence, it can be used as a site-specific characteristic. The site-specific concentrations of individual PAHs were also used in diagnostic ratio evaluations and in principal component analysis to find their relation with various anthropogenic activities. These results show that the vehicular emission is a major source of PAHs in Flanders, although other anthropogenic sources, as above, have also an impact on the total PAH levels.

  13. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  14. Global aerosol effects on convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect cloud properties, and thereby the radiation balance of the planet and the water cycle. The influence of aerosols on clouds is dominated by increase of cloud droplet and ice crystal numbers (CDNC/ICNC) due to enhanced aerosols acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. In deep convective clouds this increase in CDNC/ICNC is hypothesised to increase precipitation because of cloud invigoration through enhanced freezing and associated increased latent heat release caused by delayed warm rain formation. Satellite studies robustly show an increase of cloud top height (CTH) and precipitation with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD, as proxy for aerosol amount). To represent aerosol effects and study their influence on convective clouds in the global climate aerosol model ECHAM-HAM, we substitute the standard convection parameterisation, which uses one mean convective cloud for each grid column, with the convective cloud field model (CCFM), which simulates a spectrum of convective clouds, each with distinct values of radius, mixing ratios, vertical velocity, height and en/detrainment. Aerosol activation and droplet nucleation in convective updrafts at cloud base is the primary driver for microphysical aerosol effects. To produce realistic estimates for vertical velocity at cloud base we use an entraining dry parcel sub cloud model which is triggered by perturbations of sensible and latent heat at the surface. Aerosol activation at cloud base is modelled with a mechanistic, Köhler theory based, scheme, which couples the aerosols to the convective microphysics. Comparison of relationships between CTH and AOD, and precipitation and AOD produced by this novel model and satellite based estimates show general agreement. Through model experiments and analysis of the model cloud processes we are able to investigate the main drivers for the relationship between CTH / precipitation and AOD.

  15. Highly efficient electroluminescence from a solution-processable thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Shosei; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Kaji, Hironori; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-11-02

    We developed a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter, 2,4,6-tris(4-(9,9-dimethylacridan-10-yl)phenyl)-1,3,5-triazine (3ACR-TRZ), suitable for use in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). When doped into 4,4′-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) host at 16 wt. %, 3ACR-TRZ showed a high photoluminescence quantum yield of 98%. Transient photoluminescence decay measurements of the 16 wt. % 3ACR-TRZ:CBP film confirmed that 3ACR-TRZ exhibits efficient TADF with a triplet-to-light conversion efficiency of 96%. This high conversion efficiency makes 3ACR-TRZ attractive as an emitting dopant in OLEDs. Using 3ACR-TRZ as an emitter, we fabricated a solution-processed OLED exhibiting a maximum external quantum efficiency of 18.6%.

  16. Highly efficient electroluminescence from a solution-processable thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yoshimasa; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Kubo, Shosei; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Kaji, Hironori

    2015-11-01

    We developed a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter, 2,4,6-tris(4-(9,9-dimethylacridan-10-yl)phenyl)-1,3,5-triazine (3ACR-TRZ), suitable for use in solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). When doped into 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) host at 16 wt. %, 3ACR-TRZ showed a high photoluminescence quantum yield of 98%. Transient photoluminescence decay measurements of the 16 wt. % 3ACR-TRZ:CBP film confirmed that 3ACR-TRZ exhibits efficient TADF with a triplet-to-light conversion efficiency of 96%. This high conversion efficiency makes 3ACR-TRZ attractive as an emitting dopant in OLEDs. Using 3ACR-TRZ as an emitter, we fabricated a solution-processed OLED exhibiting a maximum external quantum efficiency of 18.6%.

  17. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  18. Energy Efficiency in Gait, Activity, Participation, and Health Status in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Claire; Parkes, Jackie; Stevenson, Mike; Cosgrove, Aidan P.; McDowell, Brona C.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish if a relationship exists between the energy efficiency of gait, and measures of activity limitation, participation restriction, and health status in a representative sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP). Secondary aims were to investigate potential differences between clinical subtypes and gross motor…

  19. A Fundamental Study for Efficient Implementaion of Online Collaborative Activities in Large-Scale Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuba, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Yusei; Kubota, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We study tactics for writing skills development through cross-disciplinary learning in online large-scale classes, and particularly are interested in implementation of online collaborative activities such as peer reviewing of writing. The goal of our study is to carry out collaborative works efficiently via online effectively in large-scale…

  20. Design strategy for 25% external quantum efficiency in green and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Kim, Mounggon; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Lee, Chil Won; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-10-21

    Carbazole- and triazine-derived thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters, with three donor units and an even distribution of the highest occupied molecular orbital, achieve high external quantum efficiencies of above 25% in blue and green TADF devices. PMID:26308481

  1. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  2. Aerosol transport and wet scavenging in deep convective clouds: a case study and model evaluation using a multiple passive tracer analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Easter, Richard C.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Jimenez, Jose L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Hailong; Berg, Larry K.; Barth, Mary; Liu, Ying; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Singh, Balwinder; Morrison, H.; Fan, Jiwen; Ziegler, Conrad L.; Bela, Megan; Apel, Eric; Diskin, G. S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Wisthaler, Armin

    2015-08-20

    The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep, continental convective clouds in the mid-latitudes is studied for a severe storm case in Oklahoma during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field campaign. A new passive-tracer based transport analysis framework is developed to characterize the convective transport based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases. The passive gas concentration in the upper troposphere convective outflow results from a mixture of 47% from the lower level (0-3 km), 21% entrained from the upper troposphere, and 32% from mid-atmosphere based on observations. The transport analysis framework is applied to aerosols to estimate aerosol transport and wet-scavenging efficiency. Observations yield high overall scavenging efficiencies of 81% and 68% for aerosol mass (Dp < 1μm) and aerosol number (0.03< Dp < 2.5μm), respectively. Little chemical selectivity to wet scavenging is seen among observed submicron sulfate (84%), organic (82%), and ammonium (80%) aerosols, while nitrate has a much lower scavenging efficiency of 57% likely due to the uptake of nitric acid. Observed larger size particles (0.15 - 2.5μm) are scavenged more efficiently (84%) than smaller particles (64%; 0.03 - 0.15μm). The storm is simulated using the chemistry version of the WRF model. Compared to the observation based analysis, the standard model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency for both mass and number concentrations with low biases of 31% and 40%, respectively. Adding a new treatment of secondary activation significantly improves simulation results, so that the bias in scavenging efficiency in mass and number concentrations is reduced to <10%. This supports the hypothesis that secondary activation is an important process for wet removal of aerosols in deep convective storms.

  3. African Dust Aerosols as Atmospheric Ice Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Brooks, Sarah D.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Sassen, Kenneth; Poellot, Michael; Rogers, David C.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of the ice nucleating ability of aerosol particles in air masses over Florida having sources from North Africa support the potential importance of dust aerosols for indirectly affecting cloud properties and climate. The concentrations of ice nuclei within dust layers at particle sizes below 1 pn exceeded 1/cu cm; the highest ever reported with our device at temperatures warmer than homogeneous freezing conditions. These measurements add to previous direct and indirect evidence of the ice nucleation efficiency of desert dust aerosols, but also confirm their contribution to ice nuclei populations at great distances from source regions.

  4. Electrical aerosol spectrometer of Tartu University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Mirme, A.; Tamm, E.

    The electrical aerosol spectrometer (EAS) of the parallel measuring principle at Tartu University is an efficient instrument for rapid measurement of the unstable size spectrum of aerosol particles. The measuring range from 10 nm to 10 μm is achieved by simultaneously using a pair of differential mobility analyzers with two different particle chargers. The particle spectrum is calculated and measurement errors are estimated in real time by using a least-squares method. Experimental calibration ensures reliability of measurement. The instrument is well suited for continuous monitoring of atmospheric aerosol.

  5. Aerosol growth in Titan’s ionosphere

    PubMed Central

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J.; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J.; Snowden, Darci

    2013-01-01

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan’s upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  6. High efficiency pure blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masaki; Yasuda, Takuma; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-06-11

    Highly efficient blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules having 10H-phenoxaborin and acridan units were reported. Pure blue emission peaking at around 450 nm with a high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency of around 20% was demonstrated. PMID:25959457

  7. Efficient laboratory evolution of computationally designed enzymes with low starting activities using fluorescence-activated droplet sorting.

    PubMed

    Obexer, Richard; Pott, Moritz; Zeymer, Cathleen; Griffiths, Andrew D; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-09-01

    De novo biocatalysts with non-natural functionality are accessible by computational enzyme design. The catalytic activities obtained for the initial designs are usually low, but can be optimized significantly by directed evolution. Nevertheless, rate accelerations approaching the level of natural enzymes can only be achieved over many rounds of tedious and time-consuming laboratory evolution. In this work, we show that microfluidic-based screening using fluorescence-activated droplet sorting (FADS) is ideally suited for efficient optimization of designed enzymes with low starting activity, essentially straight out of the computer. We chose the designed retro-aldolase RA95.0, which had been previously evolved by conventional microtiter plate screening, as an example and reoptimized it using the microfluidic-based assay. Our results show that FADS is sufficiently sensitive to detect enzyme activities as low as kcat/Km = 0.5 M(-1)s(-1) The ultra-high throughput of this system makes screening of large mutant libraries possible in which clusters of up to five residues are randomized simultaneously. Thus, combinations of beneficial mutations can be identified directly, leading to large jumps in catalytic activity of up to 80-fold within a single round of evolution. By exploring several evolutionary trajectories in parallel, we identify alternative active site arrangements that exhibit comparably enhanced efficiency but opposite enantioselectivity. PMID:27542390

  8. On the Feasibility of Studying Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Dual-Wavelength Aerosol Backscatter Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Winker, David M.; McCormick, M. Patrick; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The current low confidence in the estimates of aerosol-induced perturbations of Earth's radiation balance is caused by the highly non-uniform compositional, spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric aerosols on a global scale owing to their heterogeneous sources and short lifetimes. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the inclusion of aerosol effects in climate model calculations can improve agreement with observed spatial and temporal temperature distributions. In light of the short lifetimes of aerosols, determination of their global distribution with space-borne sensors seems to be a necessary approach. Until recently, satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols have been approximate and did not provide the full set of information required to determine their radiative effects. With the advent of active aerosol remote sensing from space (e.g., PICASSO-CENA), the applicability fo lidar-derived aerosol 180 deg -backscatter data to radiative flux calculations and hence studies of aerosol effects on climate needs to be investigated.

  9. Electrically Driven Technologies for Radioactive Aerosol Abatement

    SciTech Connect

    David W. DePaoli; Ofodike A. Ezekoye; Costas Tsouris; Valmor F. de Almeida

    2003-01-28

    The purpose of this research project was to develop an improved understanding of how electriexecy driven processes, including electrocoalescence, acoustic agglomeration, and electric filtration, may be employed to efficiently treat problems caused by the formation of aerosols during DOE waste treatment operations. The production of aerosols during treatment and retrieval operations in radioactive waste tanks and during thermal treatment operations such as calcination presents a significant problem of cost, worker exposure, potential for release, and increased waste volume.

  10. Understanding the impact of saharan dust aerosols on tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeger, Aaron

    Genesis of Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in the main development region for Atlantic hurricanes is tied to convection initiated by African easterly waves (AEWs) during Northern hemisphere summer and fall seasons. The main development region is also impacted by dust aerosols transported from the Sahara. It has been hypothesized that dust aerosols can modulate the development of TCs through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interaction processes. In this study, we investigate the impact of dust aerosols on TC development using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem). We first develop a technique to constrain the WRF-Chem model with a realistic three-dimensional spatial distribution of dust aerosols. The horizontal distribution of dust is specified using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived aerosol products and output from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. The vertical distribution of dust is constrained using the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO). We validate our technique through in situ aircraft measurements where both showed aerosol number concentrations from 20-30 cm-3 in the atmosphere for Saharan dust moving over the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Then, we use the satellite data constraint technique to nudge the WRF-Chem aerosol fields throughout the simulation of TC Florence developing over the eastern Atlantic Ocean during September 2006. Three different experiments are conducted where the aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interaction processes are either activated or deactivated in the model while all other model options are identical between the experiments. By comparing the model experiment results, the impact of the aerosol interaction processes on TC development can be understood. The results indicate that dust aerosols can delay or prevent the development of a TC as the minimum sea level pressure of TC Florence was 13 h

  11. Enhanced extinction of visible radiation due to hydrated aerosols in mist and fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Dupont, J.-C.; Hammer, E.; Hoyle, C. R.; Haeffelin, M.; Burnet, F.; Jolivet, D.

    2015-06-01

    The study assesses the contribution of aerosols to the extinction of visible radiation in the mist-fog-mist cycle. Relative humidity is large in the mist-fog-mist cycle, and aerosols most efficient in interacting with visible radiation are hydrated and compose the accumulation mode. Measurements of the microphysical and optical properties of these hydrated aerosols with diameters larger than 0.4 μm were carried out near Paris, during November 2011, under ambient conditions. Eleven mist-fog-mist cycles were observed, with a cumulated fog duration of 96 h, and a cumulated mist-fog-mist cycle duration of 240 h. In mist, aerosols grew by taking up water at relative humidities larger than 93%, causing a visibility decrease below 5 km. While visibility decreased down from 5 to a few kilometres, the mean size of the hydrated aerosols increased, and their number concentration (Nha) increased from approximately 160 to approximately 600 cm-3. When fog formed, droplets became the strongest contributors to visible radiation extinction, and liquid water content (LWC) increased beyond 7 mg m-3. Hydrated aerosols of the accumulation mode co-existed with droplets, as interstitial non-activated aerosols. Their size continued to increase, and some aerosols achieved diameters larger than 2.5 μm. The mean transition diameter between the aerosol accumulation mode and the small droplet mode was 4.0 ± 1.1 μm. Nha also increased on average by 60 % after fog formation. Consequently, the mean contribution to extinction in fog was 20 ± 15% from hydrated aerosols smaller than 2.5 μm and 6 ± 7% from larger aerosols. The standard deviation was large because of the large variability of Nha in fog, which could be smaller than in mist or 3 times larger. The particle extinction coefficient in fog can be computed as the sum of a droplet component and an aerosol component, which can be approximated by 3.5 Nha (Nha in cm-3 and particle extinction coefficient in Mm-1. We observed an influence of

  12. Self-propelled activated carbon Janus micromotors for efficient water purification.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Sánchez, Beatriz; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Gao, Wei; Santos, Luis; Fedorak, Yuri; Singh, Virendra V; Orozco, Jahir; Galarnyk, Michael; Wang, Joseph

    2015-01-27

    Self-propelled activated carbon-based Janus particle micromotors that display efficient locomotion in environmental matrices and offer effective 'on-the-fly' removal of wide range of organic and inorganic pollutants are described. The new bubble-propelled activated carbon Janus micromotors rely on the asymmetric deposition of a catalytic Pt patch on the surface of activated carbon microspheres. The rough surface of the activated carbon microsphere substrate results in a microporous Pt structure to provide a highly catalytic layer, which leads to an effective bubble evolution and propulsion at remarkable speeds of over 500 μm/s. Such coupling of the high adsorption capacity of carbon nanoadsorbents with the rapid movement of these catalytic Janus micromotors, along with the corresponding fluid dynamics and mixing, results in a highly efficient moving adsorption platform and a greatly accelerated water purification. The adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms have been investigated. The remarkable decontamination efficiency of self-propelled activated carbon-based Janus micromotors is illustrated towards the rapid removal of heavy metals, nitroaromatic explosives, organophosphorous nerve agents and azo-dye compounds, indicating considerable promise for diverse environmental, defense, and public health applications. PMID:25207503

  13. Heterogeneous Chemistry of HONO on Liquid Sulfuric Acid: A New Mechanism of Chlorine Activation on Stratospheric Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of nitrous acid (HONO) on liquid sulfuric acid (H2SO4) Was investigated at conditions that prevail in the stratosphere. The measured uptake coefficient (gamma) of HONO on H2SO4 increased with increasing acid content, ranging from 0.03 for 65 wt % to about 0.1 for 74 wt %. In the aqueous phase, HONO underwent irreversible reaction with H2SO4 to form nitrosylsulfuric acid (NO(+)HSO4(-). At temperatures below 230 K, NO(+)HSO4(-) was observed to be stable and accumulated in concentrated solutions (less than 70 wt % H2SO4) but was unstable and quickly regenerated HONO in dilute solutions (less than 70 wt %). HCl reacted with HONO dissolved in sulfuric acid, releasing gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO). The reaction probability between HCl and HONO varied from 0.01 to 0.02 for 60-72 wt % H2SO4. In the stratosphere, ClNO photodissociates rapidly to yield atomic chlorine, which catalytically destroys ozone. Analysis of the laboratory data reveals that the reaction of HCl with HONO on sulfate aerosols can affect stratospheric ozone balance during elevated sulfuric acid loadings after volcanic eruptions or due to emissions from the projected high-speed civil transport (HSCT). The present results may have important implications on the assessment of environmental acceptability of HSCT.

  14. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  15. Inventory of U.S.-led International Activities on Building Energy Efficiency Initial Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2010-04-01

    Several U.S. Government agencies promote energy efficiency in buildings internationally. The types and scope of activities vary by agency. Those with the largest role include the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Both USAID and the Department of State have a substantial presence overseas, which may present some complementarities with the Department of Energy’s efforts to reach out to other countries. Generally speaking, USAID focuses on capacity building and policy issues; the Department of State focuses on broad diplomatic efforts and some targeted grants in support of these efforts, and EPA has more targeted roles linked to ENERGY STAR appliances and a few other activities. Several additional agencies are also involved in trade-related efforts to promote energy efficiency in buildings. These include the Department of Commerce, the Export-Import Bank, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation and the Trade and Development Agency (TDA). This initial synthesis report is designed to summarize broad trends and activities relating to international cooperation on energy efficiency in buildings, which can help the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in developing its own strategy in this area. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will develop a more complete synthesis report later in 2010 as it populates a database on international projects on building energy efficiency.

  16. A Survey of Airborne Observations of Biological Aerosol over the Continental United States during NASA SEAC4RS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Venkateswaran, K.; Froyd, K.; Dibb, J. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Hudgins, C.; Lin, J. J.; Moore, R.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in regulating Earth's climate. Biological aerosols exist in the atmosphere in many forms including bacteria, fungal spores, pollens, viruses, and plant detritus. While laboratory studies have illustrated the potential for biological aerosol to act as efficient ice nuclei, ambient observations do not clearly show the significance of this mechanism for ice formation. Particularly lacking for assessing the role of biological aerosol on cloud processes are observations of the vertical extent of biological aerosol, especially in conjunction with strong convection as a pathway for redistributing particles from surface sources to the free troposphere. An extensive suite of instrumentation measuring aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties was deployed aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the SEAC4RS campaign (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) in August/September of 2013. Flights were focused on characterizing emissions and transport of aerosols in the Southeast United States, a region characterized by strong biogenic activity. Additionally, convection associated with the North American Monsoon and Atlantic-basin hurricanes was targeted. Airborne biological aerosol was specifically measured during SEAC4RS with a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A, Droplet Measurement Technologies). WIBS-4A utilizes a single-particle laser-induced fluorescence technique at two excitation wavelengths (280nm and 370nm) to identify biological aerosol, in addition to simultaneous determination of optical size and asymmetry factor for particles with diameter greater than 800nm. Single-particle mass spectrometry coupled with filter-based chemical composition and bacterial speciation analyses will be used to assess relationships with co-emitted mineral dusts. Vertical profiles for the background atmosphere will be compared to profiles influenced by convective storms to assess

  17. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  18. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  19. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  20. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  1. Aerosol in the upper layer of earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozhenko, A. V.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Nevodovskii, P. V.

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol layers exist in the upper atmospheres of Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and the Earth. The reason for their existence may be meteorites, rings, and removal of particles of planetary origin. Observations from 1979 to 1992 showed that the optical thickness of aerosol over the Earth's polar regions changed from tau =0.0002 up to tau =.1 for lambda = 1000 nm. The greatest values of tau were in 1984 and 1992 and they were preceded by a strong volcanic activity of El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991). We show that the above-mentioned increase in the optical thickness of the stratosphere aerosol can lead to the ozone layer decrease detected in 1970. The stratospheric aerosol nature (real part of refractive index), effective particle size r and changing tau with latitude remain un solved. Among distance methods for the determination of nr and r efficient is the analysis of the phase dependence of the polarization degree. The observational values of the intensity and pol arization degree invisible light are due to optical properties of the surface and optical thickness of the atmosphere, the values of which vary with latitude, longitude and time. Therefore, it is impossible to identify accurately the stratospheric aerosol contribution. When observing in UV at lambda < 300 nm, the ozone layer cuts off the influence of the surface and the Earth's atmosphere to an altitude from 20 to 25 km. In this spectral region some negative factors can take place, namely, the emission of various gases playing depolarizing role, horizontal inhomogeneity of the effective optical thickness of ozone layer, and oriented particles (the polarization plane variation points to their presence).

  2. Atmospheric aerosol scavenging processes and the role of thermo- and diffusio-phoretic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santachiara, Gianni; Prodi, Franco; Belosi, Franco

    2013-07-01

    In-cloud and below-cloud scavenging due to snow crystals is reviewed, outlining the theoretical models, laboratory and field measurements which take into account also the role of phoretic forces in this process. In-cloud scavenging includes contributions from both nucleation and impaction, while below-cloud scavenging includes only impaction. Scavenging of aerosol particles by ice has been modelled only for simple shapes (planar and columnar ice crystals) and restricted size range, in view of the large variety of shapes and, consequently, the complicated flow patterns of air, water vapour and heat around the crystal. A significant feature of theoretical efficiency curves is the predominant minimum for aerosol particles of radius between 0.01 and 0.1 μm where phoretic forces are active, analogous to the particle scavenging behaviour of water drops. Experiments on aerosol particle scavenging by snow include field measurements, experiments where natural snow crystals are allowed to fall through laboratory generated aerosol, and experiments where both crystals and aerosol are generated in the laboratory. Contradictory results have been found in laboratory and field experiments concerning the role of phoretic forces. In particular, an important discrepancy arises relating to the roles of thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis in the scavenging of submicron particles by ice crystals growing in mixed-phase clouds, consisting of water vapour, supercooled liquid droplets and ice particles. A decrease in scavenging efficiency as a function of crystal diameter is reported both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing aerosol scavenging by drops and snow, most studies agree that, in terms of equal mass of precipitation, snow is more efficient at scavenging atmospheric particles than rain.

  3. Exploring efficiency of sea spray geo-engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, K.; Carslaw, K.; Fan, T.; Mann, G.; Hill, A.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.

    2012-04-01

    Artificially increasing the albedo of marine clouds by the mechanical emission of sea spray has been proposed as a possible geoengineering technique to slow the warming attributed to anthropogenic greenhouse gases. For the injected sea spray to cause a net cooling, the additional aerosol must result in an increase in cloud droplet number. In this study we use a physically based parameterisation of aerosol activation to quantify cloud drop number (CDN) changes over the entire parameter space of updraft speed and properties of the injected and background aerosol. We suggest criteria for when geoengineering may be an effective strategy and also identify conditions where additional aerosol will have a negligible effect or act to decrease CDN. Undesirable decreases in CDN occur when particles are injected into clouds in environments where the number concentration of background accumulation mode aerosol is > 200 cm-3. The effect is particularly strong when (i) the in-cloud updraft velocity is low (< 0.2 ms-1); and (ii) the number concentration of the additional aerosol is low (< 200 cm-3). A large increase in CDN is achieved when the converse it true. After using the box model data to identify optimum conditions, we then assess the potential of sea spray geo-engineering on a global scale. Global fields of aerosol number, natural and geo-engineered CDN (derived in an idealised framework) from three aerosol models are presented. We find that there is considerable diversity in the calculated efficiency of geo-engineering between the three models which arises from the diversity in the simulated background aerosol distribution.

  4. Sexually active bucks are efficient to stimulate female ovulatory activity during the anestrous season also under temperate latitudes.

    PubMed

    Chasles, Manon; Chesneau, Didier; Moussu, Chantal; Delgadillo, José Alberto; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2016-05-01

    Goats are seasonal breeders and photoperiod is the main cue controlling the onset and offset of the breeding season. Nevertheless introducing a sexually active buck in a group of females during anestrous can stimulate their reproductive function and induce ovulation. This "male-effect" is very efficient under subtropical latitudes, when using sexually active males previously stimulated by a photoperiodic treatment. However, there is less evidence of its feasibility under temperate latitudes where the more important variation in day length could be responsible for a stronger inhibition of female sexual activity. The aim of this study was therefore to determine whether intense sexual activity can be induced in alpine bucks during the non-breeding season by a long-day treatment under temperate latitude and if these males could be used to produce an efficient male-effect. Bucks (n=21) were divided in two groups, one submitted to a photoperiodic treatment from November 1st to January 15th and then switched to natural photoperiod, while the other group remained entirely under the natural photoperiod. The ones submitted to this light treatment exhibit higher testicular volume and testosterone level 6 weeks after the end of the treatment. At the end of March, bucks were used to stimulate anestrous does (n=41) continuously for 15 days. We showed that (a) light treatment was efficient to induce an increase of sexual activity in bucks and (b) that the introduction of stimulated bucks among females induced a significantly higher proportion of ovulation in anestrous does than control bucks (86% vs 5%). Our results indicate that under temperate latitudes induction of ovulation in females during the anestrous season is feasible using bucks treated with long-days during winter. PMID:27006331

  5. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  6. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  7. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    In recent assessments of climate forcing, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change lists aerosol as one o f the most important anthropogenic agents that influence climate. Atmospheric aerosols directly affect the radiative fluxes at the surface and top of the Earth's atmosphere by scattering and/or absorbing radiation. Further, aerosols indirectly change cloud microphysical properties (such as cloud drop effective radius) that also affect the radiative fluxes. However, the estimate of the magnitude of aerosol climatic effect varies widely, and aerosol/cloud interactions remain one of the most uncertain aspects of climate models today. The Atmospheric Sciences Division has formulated a plan to enhance and expand our modeling expertise in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions. Under previous LDRD support, we successfully developed a computationally efficient version of IMPACT to simulate aerosol climatology. This new version contains a compact chemical mechanism for the prediction of sulfate and also predicts the distributions of organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), dust, and sea salt. Furthermore, we implemented a radiation package into IMPACT to calculate the radiative forcing and heating/cooling rates by aerosols. This accomplishment built the foundation of our currently funded projects under the NASA Global Modeling and Analysis Program as well as the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Program. Despite the fact that our research is being recognized as an important effort to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate, the major shortcoming of our previous simulations on aerosol climatic effects is the over simplification of spatial and temporal variations of aerosol size distributions that are shaped by complicated nucleation, growth, transport and removal processes. Virtually all properties of atmospheric aerosols and clouds depend strongly on aerosol size distribution. Moreover, molecular processing on aerosol surfaces alters the hygroscopic

  8. Relation between the charge efficiency of activated carbon fiber and its desalination performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Ming; Wang, Lei; Kang, Feiyu

    2012-03-20

    Four types of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different specific surface areas (SSA) were used as electrode materials for water desalination using capacitive deionization (CDI). The carbon fibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and N(2) adsorption at 77 K, and the CDI process was investigated by studying the salt adsorption, charge transfer, and also the charge efficiency of the electric double layers that are formed within the micropores inside the carbon electrodes. It is found that the physical adsorption capacity of NaCl by the ACFs increases with increasing Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the fibers. However, the two ACF materials with the highest BET surface area have the lowest electrosorptive capability. Experiments indicate that the charge efficiency of the double layers is a key property of the ACF-based electrodes because the ACF material which has the maximum charge efficiency also shows the highest salt adsorption capacity for CDI. PMID:22372914

  9. Identifying Aerosol Type/Mixture from Aerosol Absorption Properties Using AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Slutsker, I.; Li, Z.; Tripathi, S. N.; Singh, R. P.; Zibordi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols are generated in the atmosphere through anthropogenic and natural mechanisms. These sources have signatures in the aerosol optical and microphysical properties that can be used to identify the aerosol type/mixture. Spectral aerosol absorption information (absorption Angstrom exponent; AAE) used in conjunction with the particle size parameterization (extinction Angstrom exponent; EAE) can only identify the dominant absorbing aerosol type in the sample volume (e.g., black carbon vs. iron oxides in dust). This AAE/EAE relationship can be expanded to also identify non-absorbing aerosol types/mixtures by applying an absorption weighting. This new relationship provides improved aerosol type distinction when the magnitude of absorption is not equal (e.g, black carbon vs. sulfates). The Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data provide spectral aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo - key parameters used to determine EAE and AAE. The proposed aerosol type/mixture relationship is demonstrated using the long-term data archive acquired at AERONET sites within various source regions. The preliminary analysis has found that dust, sulfate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosol types/mixtures can be determined from this AAE/EAE relationship when applying the absorption weighting for each available wavelength (Le., 440, 675, 870nm). Large, non-spherical dust particles absorb in the shorter wavelengths and the application of 440nm wavelength absorption weighting produced the best particle type definition. Sulfate particles scatter light efficiently and organic carbon particles are small near the source and aggregate over time to form larger less absorbing particles. Both sulfates and organic carbon showed generally better definition using the 870nm wavelength absorption weighting. Black carbon generation results from varying combustion rates from a number of sources including industrial processes and biomass burning. Cases with primarily black carbon showed

  10. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    were enhanced with time compared with larger sizes. In contrast, all particle sizes were equally enhanced when frits were used. Aerosolized particles were hygroscopic, a finding with significance for warm cloud formation and potential liquid-to-ice phase transformations. Aqueous and dry aerosolized particles from biologically active mesocosm water were found to efficiently nucleate ice exposed to supersaturated water vapor. The majority of particles, including those nucleating ice, consisted of a sea salt core coated with organic material dominated by the carboxyl functional group, and corresponded to a particle type commonly found in marine air. Our results provide improved estimates of marine aerosol production, chemical composition, and hygroscopicity, as well as an accurate physical and chemical representation of ice nucleation by marine biogenic aerosol particles for use in cloud and climate models.

  11. Cloud Forming Potential of Aminium Carboxylate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Hernandez, M. E.; McKeown, M.; Taylor, N.; Collins, D. R.; Lavi, A.; Rudich, Y.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect visibility, air quality, human health, climate, and in particular the aerosol direct and indirect forcings represent the largest uncertainty in climate projections. In this paper, we present laboratory measurements of the hygroscopic growth factors (HGf) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of a series of aminium carboxylate salt aerosols, utilizing a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and a CCN counter. HGf measurements were conducted for size-selected aerosols with diameters ranging from 46 nm to 151 nm and at relative humidity (RH%) values ranging from 10 to 90%. In addition, we have calculated the CCN activation diameters for the aminium carboxylate aerosols and derived the hygroscopicity parameter (k or kappa) values for all species using three methods, i.e., the mixing rule approximation, HGf, and CCN results. Our results show that variations in the ratio of acid to base directly affect the activation diameter, HGf, and (k) values of the aminium carboxylate aerosols. Atmospheric implications of the variations in the chemical composition of aminium carboxylate aerosols on their cloud forming potential will be discussed.

  12. Activity-based costing for clinical paths. An example to improve clinical cost & efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asadi, M J; Baltz, W A

    1996-01-01

    How much does this medical service or surgical procedure cost the hospital to provide? What is the most efficient clinical pathway that maximizes the quality of patient care while minimizing costs? More and more hospitals are discovering that they don't have solid answers to these critically important questions. In an age of managed care and capitation, however, it is imperative for management to know if the patient care services they provide are making or losing money-and by how much. This article discusses how a powerful new tool called activity-based costing (ABC) can be used to help hospitals accurately determine patient care costs. We show how to build a model that combines both clinical and financial data to measure how efficiently the operation allocates human, material and capital resources to provide its services. The modeling approach described in this article can be used to better analyze a wide range of important operational and financial issues, including: How to efficiently allocate resources, and what resources will be needed as patient demand changes-ideal for operational management and planning; How efficiently activities and processes are performed to meet patient needs-effective for measuring performance and improving quality; Determining clinical pathway profitability-essential for understanding where you're making or losing money; Cycle time, throughput and the impact of resource capacity constraints-critical for meeting patient demand; Costs of idle capacity-important for using resources more efficiently. We will illustrate with an example how this modeling technique can be used to develop and implement efficient clinical pathways. PMID:8982988

  13. Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A. )

    1994-04-22

    Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

  14. Overview of processing activities aimed at higher efficiencies and economical production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of processing activities aimed at higher efficiencies and economical production were presented. Present focus is on low-cost process technology for higher-efficiency cells of up to 18% or higher. Process development concerns center on the use of less than optimum silicon sheet, the control of production yields, and making uniformly efficient large-area cells. High-efficiency cell factors that require process development are bulk material perfection, very shallow junction formation, front-surface passivation, and finely detailed metallization. Better bulk properties of the silicon sheet and the keeping of those qualities throughout large areas during cell processing are required so that minority carrier lifetimes are maintained and cell performance is not degraded by high doping levels. When very shallow junctions are formed, the process must be sensitive to metallizatin punch-through, series resisitance in the cell, and control of dopant leaching during surface passivation. There is a need to determine the sensitivity to processing by mathematical modeling and experimental activities.

  15. High Efficiency Alternating Current Driven Organic Light Emitting Devices Employing Active Semiconducting Gate Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gregory; Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we describe the role of semiconductor-polymer interfaces in alternating current (AC) driven organic electroluminescent (EL) devices. We implement inorganic semiconducting materials between the external contact and the active layers in organic light EL devices. Precise control of capacitance and charge injection is required to realize bright and efficient large area AC driven devices. We show how this architecture results in active gating to the polymer layers, resulting in the novel ability to control the capacitance and charge injection characteristics. We propose a model based on band bending at the semiconductor-polymer interface. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of the semiconductor-polymer interface on the internally coupled magnetic field generated in an alternating current driven organic light emitting device configuration. Magnetic fields can alter the ratios of singlet and triplet populations, and we show that internal generation of a magnetic field can dramatically alter the efficiency of light emission in organic EL devices.

  16. Penrose photoproduction processes - A high efficiency energy mechanism for active galactic nuclei and quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, D.; Kafatos, M.

    1979-01-01

    Recent observations of NGC 4151 and 3C273 suggest that the nuclei of active galaxies have very high gamma ray efficiencies. In addition, optical studies of M87 have indicated the possibility of a massive black hole in its central region. The above facts have led to study of a new physical mechanism, Penrose Photoproduction Processes, in the ergospheres of massive Kerr black holes, as a way to account for the fluctuating, high efficiency, energy production associated with active galaxies and quasars. Observational signatures, associated with this mechanism, occur in the form of approximately 2 MeV and approximately 2 GeV gamma ray cutoffs which might be corroborated by the observed spectra of NGC 4151 and 3C273, respectively.

  17. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  18. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  19. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  20. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  1. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG. PMID:18344320

  2. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-11-01

    measurements: over southern Finland, where cluster activation proceeds efficiently, we find that charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water contributes on average less than 10% to ultrafine aerosol concentrations, in good agreement with observations.

  3. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-05-01

    measurements: over southern Finland, where cluster activation proceeds efficiently, we find that charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water contributes on average less than 10% to ultrafine aerosol concentrations, in good agreement with observations.

  4. Active Structural Control for Aircraft Efficiency with the X-56A Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouellette, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed is an experimental aircraft designed to study active control of flexible structures. The vehicle is easily reconfigured to allow for testing of different configurations. The vehicle is being used to study new sensor, actuator, modeling and controls technologies. These new technologies will allow for lighter vehicles and new configurations that exceed the efficiency currently achievable. A description of the vehicle and the current research efforts that it enables are presented.

  5. Performance evaluation of selected n95 respirators and surgical masks when challenged with aerosolized endospores and inert particles.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Craig S; Green, Christopher F; Gibbs, Shawn G; Schmid, Kendra K; Panlilio, Adelisa L; Jensen, Paul A; Scarpino, Pasquale V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess how the relative efficiency of N95 respirators and surgical masks might vary with different challenge aerosols, utilizing a standardized manikin head form as a surrogate to human participation. A Collision nebulizer aerosolized B. anthracis Sterne strain endospores and polystyrene latex (PSL) particles to evaluate 11 models of N95 respirators and surgical masks. An automated breathing simulator, calibrated to normal tidal volume and active breathing rate, mimicked human respiration. A manikin head form with N95 respirators or surgical masks, and manikin head form without N95 respirators or surgical masks were placed in the bioaerosol chamber. An AGI-30 sampler filled with phosphate buffered water was fitted behind the mouth of each manikin head form to collect endospore bioaerosol samples. PSL aerosols concentrations were quantified by an ARTI Hand Held Particle Counter. Geometric Mean (GM) relative efficiency of N95 respirators and surgical masks challenged with endospore bioaerosol ranged from 34-65%. In PSL aerosol experiments, GM relative efficiency ranged from 35-64% for 1.3 μm particles. GM filtration efficiency of all N95 and surgical N95 respirators filter media evaluated was ≥99% when challenged with particles ≥0.1 μm. GM filtration efficiency of surgical mask filter media ranged from 70-83% with particles ≥0.1 μm and 74-92% with 1.3 μm PSL particles. Relative efficiencies of N95 respirators and surgical masks challenged with aerosolized B. anthracis endospores and PSL were similar. Relative efficiency was similar between N95 respirators and surgical masks on a manikin head form despite clear differences in filtration efficiency. This study further highlights the importance of face seal leakage in the respiratory protection provided by N95 respirators, and demonstrates it on a human surrogate. PMID:23915331

  6. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  7. Dust in the Sky: Atmospheric Composition. Modeling of Aerosol Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Kinne, Stefan; Torres, Omar; Holben, Brent; Duncan, Bryan; Martin, Randall; Logan, Jennifer; Higurashi, Akiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol is any small particle of matter that rests suspended in the atmosphere. Natural sources, such as deserts, create some aerosols; consumption of fossil fuels and industrial activity create other aerosols. All the microscopic aerosol particles add up to a large amount of material floating in the atmosphere. You can see the particles in the haze that floats over polluted cities. Beyond this visible effect, aerosols can actually lower temperatures. They do this by blocking, or scattering, a portion of the sun's energy from reaching the surface. Because of this influence, scientists study the physical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Reliable numerical models for atmospheric aerosols play an important role in research.

  8. Efficient peroxydisulfate activation process not relying on sulfate radical generation for water pollutant degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yin; Wang, Yuru; Le Roux, Julien; Yang, Yang; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2014-05-20

    Peroxydisulfate (PDS) is an appealing oxidant for contaminated groundwater and toxic industrial wastewaters. Activation of PDS is necessary for application because of its low reactivity. Present activation processes always generate sulfate radicals as actual oxidants which unselectively oxidize organics and halide anions reducing oxidation capacity of PDS and producing toxic halogenated products. Here we report that copper oxide (CuO) can efficiently activate PDS under mild conditions without producing sulfate radicals. The PDS/CuO coupled process is most efficient at neutral pH for decomposing a model compound, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). In a continuous-flow reaction with an empty-bed contact time of 0.55 min, over 90% of 2,4-DCP (initially 20 μM) and 90% of adsorbable organic chlorine (AOCl) can be removed at the PDS/2,4-DCP molar ratio of 1 and 4, respectively. Based on kinetic study and surface characterization, PDS is proposed to be first activated by CuO through outer-sphere interaction, the rate-limiting step, followed by a rapid reaction with 2,4-DCP present in the solution. In the presence of ubiquitous chloride ions in groundwater/industrial wastewater, the PDS/CuO oxidation shows significant advantages over sulfate radical oxidation by achieving much higher 2,4-DCP degradation capacity and avoiding the formation of highly chlorinated degradation products. This work provides a new way of PDS activation for contaminant removal. PMID:24779765

  9. Aerosol Composition and Morphology during the 2005 Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle Study

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.

    2005-12-01

    The composition and morphology of aerosols activated within cloud droplets relative to the properties of aerosols not activated is of central importance to studies directed at improved parameterization of the treatment of aerosols in large-scale models. These models have many applications, including evaluations of the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. To further our understanding of these aerosol characteristics, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Science Program (ASP), joined forces with other participants of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) "Marine Stratus Radiation Aerosol and Drizzle Study" between July 4 and July 29, 2005, at Pt. Reyes, California. Observations from in situ aerosol instruments and from the ARM Mobile Facility will be combined in a first look at observations from this period. The in situ aerosol measurements included high time resolution data of size-resolved bulk composition (sulfate, nitrate, NH4, organics, etc.) and single particle analysis to determine elemental composition and morphology. A CCN counter was also deployed to measure the fraction of cloud droplet kernels that are CCN active over a range of super-saturations. Our presentation will partition measurements into periods of cloudy and cloud-free periods, and will also be partitioned between periods associated with northerly back trajectories that arrived at Pt. Reyes after passing along the Washington-Oregon coast, westerly oceanic trajectories and a very limited number of periods when the air flow appeared to be associated with urban areas to the south and southeast.

  10. A comparison of the efficiency of G protein activation by ligand-free and light-activated forms of rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Melia, T J; Cowan, C W; Angleson, J K; Wensel, T G

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the photoreceptor G protein transducin (Gt) by opsin, the ligand-free form of rhodopsin, was measured using rod outer segment membranes with densities of opsin and Gt similar to those found in rod cells. When GTPgammaS was used as the activating nucleotide, opsin catalyzed transducin activation with an exponential time course with a rate constant k(act) on the order of 2 x 10(-3)s(-1). Comparison under these conditions to activation by flash-generated metarhodopsin II (MII) revealed that opsin- and R*-catalyzed activation showed similar kinetics when MII was present at a surface density approximately 10(-6) lower than that of opsin. Thus, in contrast to some previous reports, we find that the catalytic potency of opsin is only approximately 10(-6) that of MII. In the presence of residual retinaldehyde-derived species present in membranes treated with hydroxylamine after bleaching, the apparent k(act) observed was much higher than that for opsin, suggesting a possible explanation for previous reports of more efficient activation by opsin. These results are important for considering the possible role of opsin in the diverse phenomena in which it has been suggested to play a key role, such as bleaching desensitization and retinal degeneration induced by continuous light or vitamin A deprivation. PMID:9414230

  11. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  12. Different toxic mechanisms are activated by emission PM depending on combustion efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uski, O.; Jalava, P. I.; Happo, M. S.; Leskinen, J.; Sippula, O.; Tissari, J.; Mäki-Paakkanen, J.; Jokiniemi, J.; Hirvonen, M.-R.

    2014-06-01

    Ambient air levels of fine particulate matter (PM ≤ 2.5 μm) are associated with mortality and morbidity. In addition to traffic, large quantities of fine and ultrafine particles (UFPs ≤ 100 nm) are emitted by residential wood combustion. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot-rich emissions from small scale heating appliances have been linked with a plethora of toxicological effects. Recently, new technology appliances have been introduced into use although there are several uncertainties related to the toxicological properties of those emissions. In this study, PM1 (PM ≤ 1 μm) emissions from three different biomass combustion situations were compared. PM samples were produced in a novel adjustable biomass combustion reactor to avoid the problems encountered if one uses different appliances to generate the desired combustion conditions. The combustion conditions represented efficient, intermediate and smoldering situations. The concentration related effects of the particles (15, 50,150 and 300 μg ml-1) were investigated in a RAW264.7 macrophage cell line after 24 h' exposure. We analyzed cellular metabolic activity, cell cycle, and indicators of genotoxicty, oxidative stress and proinflammatory responses. Interestingly, the particles collected from smoldering and intermediate combustion conditions decreased cellular metabolic activity less than those from efficient combustion (10-fold difference). However, the samples from intermediate and smoldering combustion evoked greater DNA damage in the comet assay (2.5-fold difference). In contrast, only the particulate samples from efficient combustion triggered G2-cell cycle arrest and oxidative stress in the macrophages. These results indicate that ash rich PM emissions from appliances with almost complete combustion may still exert health impacts. However, particulate emissions from efficient combustion were small when compared to the two other situations. Thus, even with their faults and the obvious

  13. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species.

  14. Efficient degradation of trichloroethylene in water using persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide-iron nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ayyaz; Gu, Xiaogang; Li, Li; Lv, Shuguang; Xu, Yisheng; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and nano-sized zero-valent iron-reduced graphene oxide (nZVI-rGO) composite were prepared. The GO and nZVI-rGO composite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Raman spectroscopy. The size of nZVI was about 6 nm as observed by TEM. The system of nZVI-rGO and persulfate (PS) was used for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water, and showed 26.5% more efficiency as compared to nZVI/PS system. The different parameters were studied to determine the efficiency of nZVI-rGO to activate the PS system for the TCE degradation. By increasing the PS amount, TCE removal was also improved while no obvious effect was observed by varying the catalyst loading. Degradation was decreased as the TCE initial concentration was increased from 20 to 100 mg/L. Moreover, when initial solution pH was increased, efficiency deteriorated to 80%. Bicarbonate showed more negative effect on TCE removal among the solution matrix. To better understand the effects of radical species in the system, the scavenger tests were performed. The •SO4(-) and •O2(-) were predominant species responsible for TCE removal. The nZVI-rGO-activated PS process shows potential applications in remediation of highly toxic organic contaminants such as TCE present in the groundwater. Graphical abstract Persulfate activated by reduced graphene oxide and nano-sized zero-valent iron composite can be used for efficient degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in water. PMID:26162447

  15. Impacts of aerosols on weather and regional climate over the Pearl River Delta megacity area in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wan, Q.; Meng, W.; Liao, F.; Tan, H.; Zhang, R.

    2011-08-01

    Seven-year measurements of precipitation, lightning flashes, and visibility from 2000 to 2006 have been analyzed in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, with a focus on the Guangzhou megacity area. Statistical analysis shows that the occurrence of heavy rainfall (>25 mm per day) and frequency of lightning strikes are reversely correlated to visibility during this period. To elucidate the effects of aerosols on cloud processes, precipitation, and lightning activity, a cloud resolving - Weather Research and Forecasting (CR-WRF) model with a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme is employed to simulate a mesoscale convective system occurring on 28 Match 2009 in the Guangzhou megacity area. The model predicted evolutions of composite radar reflectivity and accumulated precipitation are in agreement with measurements from S-band weather radars and automatic gauge stations. The calculated lightning potential index (LPI) exhibits temporal and spatial consistence with lightning flashes recorded by a local lightning detection network. Sensitivity experiments have been performed to reflect aerosol conditions representative of polluted and clean cases. The simulations suggest that precipitation and LPI are enhanced by about 16 % and 50 %, respectively, under the polluted aerosol condition. Our results suggest that elevated aerosol loading suppresses light and moderate precipitation (less than 25 mm per day), but enhances heavy precipitation. The responses of hydrometeors and latent heat release to different aerosol loadings reveal the physical mechanism for the precipitation and lightning enhancement in the Guangzhou megacity area, showing more efficient mixed phase processes and intensified convection under the polluted aerosol condition.

  16. Long-term impacts of aerosols on precipitation and lightning over the Pearl River Delta megacity area in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wan, Q.; Meng, W.; Liao, F.; Tan, H.; Zhang, R.

    2011-12-01

    Seven-year measurements of precipitation, lightning flashes, and visibility from 2000 to 2006 have been analyzed in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, with a focus on the Guangzhou megacity area. Statistical analysis shows that the occurrence of heavy rainfall (>25 mm per day) and frequency of lightning strikes are reversely correlated to visibility during this period. To elucidate the effects of aerosols on cloud processes, precipitation, and lightning activity, a cloud resolving - Weather Research and Forecasting (CR-WRF) model with a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme is employed to simulate a mesoscale convective system occurring on 28 Match 2009 in the Guangzhou megacity area. The model predicted evolutions of composite radar reflectivity and accumulated precipitation are in agreement with measurements from S-band weather radars and automatic gauge stations. The calculated lightning potential index (LPI) exhibits temporal and spatial consistence with lightning flashes recorded by a local lightning detection network. Sensitivity experiments have been performed to reflect aerosol conditions representative of polluted and clean cases. The simulations suggest that precipitation and LPI are enhanced by about 16% and 50%, respectively, under the polluted aerosol condition. Our results suggest that elevated aerosol loading suppresses light and moderate precipitation (less than 25 mm per day), but enhances heavy precipitation. The responses of hydrometeors and latent heat release to different aerosol loadings reveal the physical mechanism for the precipitation and lightning enhancement in the Guangzhou megacity area, showing more efficient mixed phase processes and intensified convection under the polluted aerosol condition.

  17. Evaluating Aerosol Process Modules within the Framework of the Aerosol Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Velu, V.; Gustafson, W. I.; Chapman, E.; Easter, R. C.; Shrivastava, M.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    Factors that influence predictions of aerosol direct and indirect forcing, such as aerosol mass, composition, size distribution, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, still contain large uncertainties in both regional and global models. New aerosol treatments are usually implemented into a 3-D atmospheric model and evaluated using a limited number of measurements from a specific case study. Under this modeling paradigm, the performance and computational efficiency of several treatments for a specific aerosol process cannot be adequately quantified because many other processes among various modeling studies (e.g. grid configuration, meteorology, emission rates) are different as well. The scientific community needs to know the advantages and disadvantages of specific aerosol treatments when the meteorology, chemistry, and other aerosol processes are identical in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with aerosols predictions. To address these issues, an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) has been developed that systematically and objectively evaluates new aerosol treatments for use in regional and global models. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) have also been ported to WRF so that they can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. Data from several campaigns, including the 2006

  18. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence sensitized phosphorescence: a strategy to break the trade-off between efficiency and efficiency roll-off.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Duan, Lian; Zhang, Dongdong; Qiu, Yong

    2015-07-22

    Materials with thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) realized 100% internal quantum efficiency (IQE) but suffered significant efficiency roll-off. Here, an exciton dynamics study reveals that materials with TADF may play opposite roles in affecting the efficiency roll-off: decreasing the triplet density due to the fast reverse intersystem crossing, on the one hand, and increasing the triplet density due to the weakened singlet radiation. We show theoretically and experimentally that TADF-sensitized phosphorescence can break this trade-off by exploiting the efficient Förster energy transfer and simultaneously achieve 100% IQE and low efficiency roll-off (with a critical current density of 460 mA cm(-2)). PMID:26158429

  19. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination. PMID:27253271

  20. Covalent Bond between Ligand and Receptor Required for Efficient Activation in Rhodopsin*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Take; Yamashita, Takahiro; Imai, Hiroo; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is an extensively studied member of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although rhodopsin shares many features with the other GPCRs, it exhibits unique features as a photoreceptor molecule. A hallmark in the molecular structure of rhodopsin is the covalently bound chromophore that regulates the activity of the receptor acting as an agonist or inverse agonist. Here we show the pivotal role of the covalent bond between the retinal chromophore and the lysine residue at position 296 in the activation pathway of bovine rhodopsin, by use of a rhodopsin mutant K296G reconstituted with retinylidene Schiff bases. Our results show that photoreceptive functions of rhodopsin, such as regiospecific photoisomerization of the ligand, and its quantum yield were not affected by the absence of the covalent bond, whereas the activation mechanism triggered by photoisomerization of the retinal was severely affected. Furthermore, our results show that an active state similar to the Meta-II intermediate of wild-type rhodopsin did not form in the bleaching process of this mutant, although it exhibited relatively weak G protein activity after light irradiation because of an increased basal activity of the receptor. We propose that the covalent bond is required for transmitting structural changes from the photoisomerized agonist to the receptor and that the covalent bond forcibly keeps the low affinity agonist in the receptor, resulting in a more efficient G protein activation. PMID:20042594

  1. The Synapse Project: Engagement in mentally challenging activities enhances neural efficiency

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Ian M.; Haber, Sara; Bischof, Gérard N.; Park, Denise C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Correlational and limited experimental evidence suggests that an engaged lifestyle is associated with the maintenance of cognitive vitality in old age. However, the mechanisms underlying these engagement effects are poorly understood. We hypothesized that mental effort underlies engagement effects and used fMRI to examine the impact of high-challenge activities (digital photography and quilting) compared with low-challenge activities (socializing or performing low-challenge cognitive tasks) on neural function at pretest, posttest, and one year after the engagement program. Methods: In the scanner, participants performed a semantic-classification task with two levels of difficulty to assess the modulation of brain activity in response to task demands. Results: The High-Challenge group, but not the Low-Challenge group, showed increased modulation of brain activity in medial frontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortex—regions associated with attention and semantic processing—some of which were maintained a year later. This increased modulation stemmed from decreases in brain activity during the easy condition for the High-Challenge group and was associated with time committed to the program, age, and cognition. Conclusions: Sustained engagement in cognitively demanding activities facilitated cognition by increasing neural efficiency. Mentally-challenging activities may be neuroprotective and an important element to maintaining a healthy brain into late adulthood. PMID:26484698

  2. Measuring Sodium Chloride Contents of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Amount of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles measured in real time by analyzer that includes mass spectrometer. Analyzer used to determine mass distributions of active agents in therapeutic or diagnostic aerosols derived from saline solutions and in analyzing ocean spray. Aerosol particles composed of sodium chloride introduced into oven, where individually vaporized on hot wall. Vapor molecules thermally dissociated, and some of resulting sodium atoms ionized on wall. Ions leave oven in burst and analyzed by spectrometer, which is set to monitor sodium-ion intensity.

  3. The Truth about Stratospheric Aerosols: Key Results from SPARC`s Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, L. W.; Peter, T.

    2005-12-01

    Given the critical role it plays in ozone chemistry, the Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP) has been carried out by the WCRP project on Stratospheric Process and their Role in Climate (SPARC). The objective of this report was to present a systematic analysis of the state of knowledge of stratospheric aerosols including their precursors. It includes an examination of precursor concentrations and trends, measurements of stratospheric aerosol properties, trends in those properties, and modeling their formation, transport, and distribution in both background and volcanic conditions. The assessment found that the dominant nonvolcanic stratospheric aerosol precursor gases are OCS, SO2, and tropospheric aerosol. Therefore, though SO2, human-related activities play a significant role in the observed background stratospheric aerosol. There is general agreement between measured OCS and modeling of its transformation to sulfate aerosol, and observed aerosols. However, there is a significant dearth of SO2 measurements, and the role of tropospheric SO2 in the stratospheric aerosol budget - while significant - remains a matter of some guesswork. The assessment also found that there is basic agreement between the various data sets and models particularly during periods of elevated loading. However, at background levels significant differences were found that indicate that substantial questions remain regarding the nature of stratospheric aerosol during these periods particularly in the lower stratosphere. For instance, during periods of very low aerosol loading significant differences exist between systems for key parameters including aerosol surface area density and extinction. At the same time, comparisons of models and satellite observations of aerosol extinction found good agreement at visible wavelengths above 20-25 km altitude region but are less satisfactory for infrared wavelengths. While there are some model short-comings relative to observations in

  4. Radiative impact of aerosols generated from biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1995-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play a vital role in the Earth's radiative energy budget. They exert a net cooling influence on climate by directly reflecting the solar radiation to space and by modifying the shortwave reflective properties of clouds. Each year, increasing amounts of aerosol particles are released into the atmosphere due to biomass burning, dust storms, forest fires, and volcanic activity. These particles significantly perturb the radiative balance on local, regional, and global scales. While the detection of aerosols over water is a well established procedure, the detection of aerosols over land is often difficult due to the poor contrast between the aerosols and the underlying terrain. In this study, we use textural measures in order to detect aerosols generated from biomass burning over South America, using AVHRR data. The regional radiative effects are then examined using ERBE data. Preliminary results show that the net radiative forcing of aerosols is about -36 W/sq m.

  5. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  6. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-