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Sample records for aerosol aqueous phase

  1. Aqueous phase processing of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Monod, A.; Tritscher, T.; Praplan, A. P.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Quivet, E.; Marchand, N.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.

    2012-07-01

    Transport of reactive air masses into humid and wet areas is highly frequent in the atmosphere, making the study of aqueous phase processing of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) very relevant. We have investigated the aqueous phase processing of SOA generated from gas-phase photooxidation of isoprene using a smog chamber. The SOA collected on filters was extracted by water and subsequently oxidized in the aqueous phase either by H2O2 under dark conditions or by OH radicals in the presence of light, using a photochemical reactor. Online and offline analytical techniques including SMPS, HR-AMS, H-TDMA, TD-API-AMS, were employed for physical and chemical characterization of the chamber SOA and nebulized filter extracts. After aqueous phase processing, the particles were significantly more hygroscopic, and HR-AMS data showed higher signal intensity at m/z 44 and a lower signal intensity at m/z 43, thus showing the impact of aqueous phase processing on SOA aging, in good agreement with a few previous studies. Additional offline measurement techniques (IC-MS, APCI-MS2 and HPLC-APCI-MS) permitted the identification and quantification of sixteen individual chemical compounds before and after aqueous phase processing. Among these compounds, small organic acids (including formic, glyoxylic, glycolic, butyric, oxalic and 2,3-dihydroxymethacrylic acid (i.e. 2-methylglyceric acid)) were detected, and their concentrations significantly increased after aqueous phase processing. In particular, the aqueous phase formation of 2-methylglyceric acid and trihydroxy-3-methylbutanal was correlated with the consumption of 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methyl-propanal, and 2-methylbutane-1,2,3,4-tetrol, respectively, and an aqueous phase mechanism was proposed accordingly. Overall, the aging effect observed here was rather small compared to previous studies, and this limited effect could possibly be explained by the lower liquid phase OH concentrations employed here, and/or the development of oligomers

  2. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx  ≡  NO + NO2) over the southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of total fine organic aerosol (OA) and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). Isoprene SOA production is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observati

  3. simpleGAMMA - a reduced model of secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous aerosol phase (aaSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. L.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the uptake and aqueous processing of water-soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by wet aerosols or cloud droplets is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We recently developed GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a zero-dimensional kinetic model that couples gas-phase and detailed aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry for speciated prediction of SOA and organosulfate formation in cloudwater or aqueous aerosols. Results from GAMMA simulations of SOA formation in aerosol water (McNeill et al., 2012) indicate that it is dominated by two pathways: isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) uptake followed by ring-opening chemistry (under low-NOx conditions) and glyoxal uptake. This suggested that it is possible to model the majority of aqueous aerosol phase SOA mass using a highly simplified reaction scheme. We have therefore developed a reduced version of GAMMA, simpleGAMMA. Close agreement in predicted aaSOA mass is observed between simpleGAMMA and GAMMA under all conditions tested (between pH 1-4 and RH 40-80%) after 12 h of simulation. simpleGAMMA is computationally efficient and suitable for coupling with larger-scale atmospheric chemistry models.

  4. Importance of Aqueous-phase Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatics in an Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, H. M.; Carlton, A. G.; Vizuete, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, Y.; Chen, E.; Kamens, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Two new secondary organic aerosol (SOA) modeling frameworks are developed, one based on an aromatic gas and particle-phase kinetic mechanism and another based on a parameterized SOA model used in conjunction with an underlying gas-phase mechanism, both of which simulate SOA formation through partitioning to two stable liquid phases: one hydrophilic containing particle aqueous-phase and the other hydrophobic comprising mainly organic components. The models were evaluated against outdoor smog chamber experiments with different combinations of initial toluene, o-xylene, p-xylene, toluene and xylene mixtures, NOx, non-SOA-forming hydrocarbon mixture, initial seed type, and humidity. Aerosol data for experiments with either ammonium sulfate or initial background seed particles, in the presence of an atmospheric hydrocarbon mixture, NOx and in sunlight under a dry atmosphere (RH = 6 to 10%) show reduced SOA formation when compared to experiments with similar initial gas and particle concentrations at higher relative humidities (RH = 40 to 90%). Both frameworks simulated reasonable fits to the total observed SOA concentrations under all conditions. For both dry and wet experiments with low initial seed, semi-volatile product partitioning in particle organic-phase is mass-transfer limited and is modeled using a dynamic gas-particle partitioning algorithm with accommodation coefficient as the primary pseudo-transport parameter. Further, the modeled SOA product distributions for both frameworks clearly show the importance of the contribution of aqueous-phase SOA particularly under conditions of low initial seed concentrations and high-humidity. For both models, under these conditions, aqueous-phase SOA from uptake of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and related polar products to particle water phase dominates as compared to the partitioning of semi-volatiles to particle organic phase. Interestingly, both the kinetic and parameterized SOA frameworks simulate similar amounts of aqueous-phase

  5. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  6. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  7. Kinetics, Mechanism, and Secondary Organic Aerosol Yield of Aqueous Phase Photo-oxidation of α-Pinene Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Aljawhary, Dana; Zhao, Ran; Lee, Alex K Y; Wang, Chen; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2016-03-10

    Formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) involves atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the majority of which are emitted from biogenic sources. Oxidation can occur not only in the gas-phase but also in atmospheric aqueous phases such as cloudwater and aerosol liquid water. This study explores for the first time the aqueous-phase OH oxidation chemistry of oxidation products of α-pinene, a major biogenic VOC species emitted to the atmosphere. The kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and formation of SOA compounds in the aqueous phase of two model compounds, cis-pinonic acid (PIN) and tricarballylic acid (TCA), were investigated in the laboratory; TCA was used as a surrogate for 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA), a known α-pinene oxidation product. Aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS) was used to follow the kinetics and reaction mechanisms at the molecular level. Room-temperature second-order rate constants of PIN and TCA were determined to be 3.3 (± 0.5) × 10(9) and 3.1 (± 0.2) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, from which were estimated their condensed-phase atmospheric lifetimes. Aerosol-ToF-CIMS detected a large number of products leading to detailed reaction mechanisms for PIN and MBTCA. By monitoring the particle size distribution after drying, the amount of SOA material remaining in the particle phase was determined. An aqueous SOA yield of 40 to 60% was determined for PIN OH oxidation. Although recent laboratory studies have focused primarily on aqueous-phase processing of isoprene-related compounds, we demonstrate that aqueous formation of SOA materials also occurs from monoterpene oxidation products, thus representing an additional source of biogenically driven aerosol formation.

  8. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: a kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroflič, Ana; Grgić, Irena

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate and public health (Pöschl 2005). Despite a great effort invested in the studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget, composition, and its formation mechanisms, there is still a gap between field observations and atmospheric model predictions (Heald et al. 2005, Hallquist et al. 2009, and Lim et al. 2010). The insisting uncertainties surrounding SOA formation and aging thus gained an increasing interest in atmospheric aqueous phase chemistry; they call for more complex and time consuming studies at the environmentally relevant conditions allowing confident extrapolation to desired ambient conditions. In addition to the adverse health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) as such, toxicity is also attributed to nitro-aromatic and other organic compounds which have already been detected in real aerosol samples (Traversi et al. 2009). Moreover, low-volatility aromatic derivatives are believed to form at least partly in the aerosol aqueous phase and not only in the gas phase from where they partition into water droplets (Ervens et al. 2011). Two nitro derivatives of biomass burning tracer guaiacol have recently been found in winter PM10 samples from the city of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and aqueous photonitration reaction was proposed as their possible production pathway (Kitanovski et al. 2012). In this study the kinetics of guaiacol nitration in aqueous solution was investigated in the presence of H2O2 and NO2¯ upon simulated solar irradiation (Xenon lamp, 300 W). During the experiment the DURAN® flask with the reaction mixture was held in the thermostated bath and thoroughly mixed. The reaction was monitored for 44 hours at different temperatures. Guaiacol and its main nitro-products (4-nitroguaiacol, 4-NG; 6-nitroguaiacol, 6-NG; and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol, 4,6-DNG) were quantified in every aliquot, taken from the reaction mixture, by use of high pressure liquid

  9. Ethylene glycol emissions from on-road vehicles: implications for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, E. C.; Knighton, W. B.; Fortner, E.; Herndon, S. C.; Onasch, T. B.; Franklin, J.; Harley, R. A.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH), used as an engine coolant for most on-road vehicles, is an intermediate volatility organic compound (IVOC) with a high Henry's Law Coefficient (kH > 10,000 M atm-1) . Oxidation of ethylene glycol, especially in the atmospheric aqueous phase (clouds, fog, wet aerosol), can lead to the formation of glycolaldehyde, oxalic acid, and ultimately secondary organic aerosol. We present measurements of unexpectedly high ethylene glycol emissions in the Caldecott Tunnel near San Francisco (Summer 2010) and the Washburn Tunnel near Houston (Spring 2009). Ethylene glycol was detected using a proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) at m/z = 45, which is usually interpreted as acetaldehyde. Although not necessarily a tailpipe emission, effective fuel-based emission factors are calculated using the carbon balance method and range from 50 to 400 mg ethylene glycol per kg fuel. Total US and global emissions are estimated using these emission factors and fuel consumption rates and are compared to previous model estimates of ethylene glycol emissions (e.g., the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Model). Compared to biogenically emitted isoprene, ethylene glycol is likely a minor source of glycolaldehyde globally, but may contribute significantly to glycolaldehyde, oxalate and SOA formation in areas dominated by urban emissions.

  10. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  11. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for...

  12. simpleGAMMA v1.0 - a reduced model of secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous aerosol phase (aaSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. L.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that the uptake and aqueous processing of water-soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by wet aerosols or cloud droplets is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We recently developed GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a zero-dimensional kinetic model that couples gas-phase and detailed aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry for speciated prediction of SOA and organosulfate formation in cloud water or aqueous aerosols. Results from GAMMA simulations of SOA formation in aerosol water (aaSOA) (McNeill et al., 2012) indicate that it is dominated by two pathways: isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) uptake followed by ring-opening chemistry (under low-NOx conditions) and glyoxal uptake. This suggested that it is possible to model the majority of aaSOA mass using a highly simplified reaction scheme. We have therefore developed a reduced version of GAMMA, simpleGAMMA. Close agreement in predicted aaSOA mass is observed between simpleGAMMA and GAMMA under all conditions tested (between pH 1-4 and RH 40-80 %) after 12 h of simulation. simpleGAMMA is computationally efficient and suitable for coupling with larger-scale atmospheric chemistry models or analyzing ambient measurement data.

  13. Key parameters controlling OH-initiated formation of secondary organic aerosol in the aqueous phase (aqSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, Barbara; Sorooshian, Armin; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2014-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA) might contribute substantially to the total SOA burden and help to explain discrepancies between observed and predicted SOA properties. In order to implement aqSOA formation in models, key processes controlling formation within the multiphase system have to be identified. We explore parameters affecting phase transfer and OH(aq)-initiated aqSOA formation as a function of OH(aq) availability. Box model results suggest OH(aq)-limited photochemical aqSOA formation in cloud water even if aqueous OH(aq) sources are present. This limitation manifests itself as an apparent surface dependence of aqSOA formation. We estimate chemical OH(aq) production fluxes, necessary to establish thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases (based on Henry's law constants) for both cloud and aqueous particles. Estimates show that no (currently known) OH(aq) source in cloud water can remove this limitation, whereas in aerosol water, it might be feasible. Ambient organic mass (oxalate) measurements in stratocumulus clouds as a function of cloud drop surface area and liquid water content exhibit trends similar to model results. These findings support the use of parameterizations of cloud-aqSOA using effective droplet radius rather than liquid water volume or drop surface area. Sensitivity studies suggest that future laboratory studies should explore aqSOA yields in multiphase systems as a function of these parameters and at atmospherically relevant OH(aq) levels. Since aerosol-aqSOA formation significantly depends on OH(aq) availability, parameterizations might be less straightforward, and oxidant (OH) sources within aerosol water emerge as one of the major uncertainties in aerosol-aqSOA formation.

  14. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-04-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase, despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by Aerosol Time of Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Aerosol-ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information to determine potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. As well, bond scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double bond equivalence to carbon ratio (DBE / #C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of poly-carbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol-ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the ambient

  15. Aqueous-phase photooxidation of levoglucosan - a mechanistic study using aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Mungall, E. L.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Aljawhary, D.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-09-01

    Levoglucosan (LG) is a widely employed tracer for biomass burning (BB). Recent studies have shown that LG can react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the aqueous phase despite many mass balance receptor models assuming it to be inert during atmospheric transport. In the current study, aqueous-phase photooxidation of LG by OH radicals was performed in the laboratory. The reaction kinetics and products were monitored by aerosol time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (Aerosol ToF-CIMS). Approximately 50 reaction products were detected by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS during the photooxidation experiments, representing one of the most detailed product studies yet performed. By following the evolution of mass defects of product peaks, unique trends of adding oxygen (+O) and removing hydrogen (-2H) were observed among the products detected, providing useful information for determining potential reaction mechanisms and sequences. Additionally, bond-scission reactions take place, leading to reaction intermediates with lower carbon numbers. We introduce a data analysis framework where the average oxidation state (OSc) is plotted against a novel molecular property: double-bond-equivalence-to-carbon ratio (DBE/#C). The trajectory of LG photooxidation on this plot suggests formation of polycarbonyl intermediates and their subsequent conversion to carboxylic acids as a general reaction trend. We also determined the rate constant of LG with OH radicals at room temperature to be 1.08 ± 0.16 × 109 M-1 s-1. By coupling an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to the system, we observed a rapid decay of the mass fraction of organic signals at mass-to-charge ratio 60 (f60), corresponding closely to the LG decay monitored by the Aerosol ToF-CIMS. The trajectory of LG photooxidation on a f44-f60 correlation plot matched closely to literature field measurement data. This implies that aqueous-phase photooxidation might be partially contributing to aging of BB particles in the

  16. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  17. Light-induced multiphase chemistry of gas phase ozone on aqueous pyruvic and oxalic acids: Aerosol chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gligorovski, S.; Grgic, I.; Net, S.; Böge, O.; Iinuma, Y.; Kahnt, A.; Scheinhardt, S.; Herrmann, H.; Wortham, H.

    2010-12-01

    The light-absorbing organic compounds present in and on condensed aerosol particles interacting with trace gases such as ozone can initiate a new and potentially important photo-induced multiphase chemistry. However, investigations of light induced multiphase processes are very scarce at present. We have launched the idea of pyruvic acid (PA) acting as a photosensitizer in the multiphase reactions between gas-phase ozone and aqueous oxalic acid (OA). The performed photochemical batch experiments yielded a complex suite of organic molecules which resulted primarily from the oligomerization of OA/PA and subsequent reactions, including decarboxylation and cycloadition (Grgic et al., 2010). In the atmosphere, pyruvic acid will always be accompanied by other carboxylic acids (and also other organics) which are constituents of either aerosol particles or aqueous droplets the effects of a possible photochemistry triggered by pyruvic acid should be experimentally studied in depth and under natural conditions as far as possible. Hence, in a very recent study experiments in the aerosol chamber facility LEAK at IFT, Leipzig, were performed to verify the influence of pyruvic on the multiphase (photo)oxidation of oxalic acid. The aim of these experiments was to study the multiphase photo-induced oxidation reactions with airborne deliquescent particles to demonstrate the applicability of the reactions mentioned above under more realistic conditions than in a batch reactor. State of the art sampling and analytical tools were applied for the analysis of the ongoing chamber runs and the formed particulate products which include denuder sampling, carbonyl compound derivatisation, PTR-MS measurements, GC-MS measurements and HPLC-MS and CE-MS for the particle phase. First results from these joint complex chamber experiments will be presented and discussed. Reference: Grgić I., Nieto-Gligorovski L.I., Net S., Temime-Roussel B., Gligorovski S., Wortham H. Light induced multiphase

  18. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  19. Formation of Epoxide Derived SOA and Gas-Phase Acids through Aqueous Aerosol Processing in the Southeastern United States during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skog, K.; Teng, A.; Nguyen, T. B.; Nguyen, K.; Suda, S. R.; Xu, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Feiner, P. A.; Zhang, L.; Olson, K. F.; Koss, A.; Wild, R. J.; St Clair, J.; Crounse, J.; Baumann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Petters, M.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Ng, N. L.; Brune, W. H.; De Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Brown, S. S.; Edgerton, E. S.; McNeill, V. F.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributes to climate and adversely affects human health, but the formation of SOA is poorly understood. Recent studies have proposed that aqueous processing of water-soluble compounds like glyoxal and IEPOX can help explain the abundance of organosulfates, higher oxygen to carbon ratios, and SOA abundance. A comprehensive set of ambient gas- and aerosol-phase data was collected during June and July of 2013 as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Centreville, AL ground site. Both gas-phase photochemistry and aqueous-phase aerosol chemistry were modeled using a zero-dimensional box model. While it has been suggested that glyoxal can contribute to aqueous aerosol through the formation of acids and higher-molecular-weight compounds, it did not produce enhanced aqSOA concentrations. Instead, processing of aqueous glyoxal resulted in the production of gas-phase acids. AqSOA consisted almost entirely of epoxide processing products, mainly from the processing of IEPOX to methyl tetrol, and the organosulfate. In addition, the pinene oxides contributed to the formation of aqSOA, through the formation of organosulfates, diols, and organonitrates. These data are consistent with the abundance of IEPOX and pinene oxide organonitrate derived SOA seen at this site.

  20. FT-IR quantification of the carbonyl functional group in aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol from phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kathryn M.; Ruthenburg, Travis C.; Smith, Jeremy; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort; Dillner, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed from aqueous-phase reactions of some organic species, including phenols, contribute significantly to particulate mass in the atmosphere. In this study, we employ a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique to identify and quantify the functional group makeup of phenolic SOA. Solutions containing an oxidant (hydroxyl radical or 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde) and either one phenol (phenol, guaiacol, or syringol) or a mixture of phenols mimicking softwood or hardwood emissions were illuminated to make SOA, atomized, and collected on a filter. We produced laboratory standards of relevant organic compounds in order to develop calibrations for four functional groups: carbonyls (Cdbnd O), saturated C-H, unsaturated C-H and O-H. We analyzed the SOA samples with transmission FT-IR to identify and determine the amounts of the four functional groups. The carbonyl functional group accounts for 3-12% of the SOA sample mass in single phenolic SOA samples and 9-14% of the SOA sample mass in mixture samples. No carbonyl functional groups are present in the initial reactants. Varying amounts of each of the other functional groups are observed. Comparing carbonyls measured by FT-IR (which could include aldehydes, ketones, esters, and carboxylic acids) with eight small carboxylic acids measured by ion chromatography indicates that the acids only account for an average of 20% of the total carbonyl reported by FT-IR.

  1. Aqueous-phase mechanism for secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene: application to the southeast United States and co-benefit of SO2 emission controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Krechmer, J.; Zhu, L.; Kim, P. S.; Miller, C. C.; Fisher, J. A.; Travis, K.; Yu, K.; Hanisco, T. F.; Wolfe, G. M.; Arkinson, H. L.; Pye, H. O. T.; Froyd, K. D.; Liao, J.; McNeill, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Isoprene emitted by vegetation is an important precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but the mechanism and yields are uncertain. Aerosol is prevailingly aqueous under the humid conditions typical of isoprene-emitting regions. Here we develop an aqueous-phase mechanism for isoprene SOA formation coupled to a detailed gas-phase isoprene oxidation scheme. The mechanism is based on aerosol reactive uptake coefficients (γ) for water-soluble isoprene oxidation products, including sensitivity to aerosol acidity and nucleophile concentrations. We apply this mechanism to simulation of aircraft (SEAC4RS) and ground-based (SOAS) observations over the southeast US in summer 2013 using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) over the southeast US are such that the peroxy radicals produced from isoprene oxidation (ISOPO2) react significantly with both NO (high-NOx pathway) and HO2 (low-NOx pathway), leading to different suites of isoprene SOA precursors. We find a mean SOA mass yield of 3.3 % from isoprene oxidation, consistent with the observed relationship of total fine organic aerosol (OA) and formaldehyde (a product of isoprene oxidation). Isoprene SOA production is mainly contributed by two immediate gas-phase precursors, isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX, 58 % of isoprene SOA) from the low-NOx pathway and glyoxal (28 %) from both low- and high-NOx pathways. This speciation is consistent with observations of IEPOX SOA from SOAS and SEAC4RS. Observations show a strong relationship between IEPOX SOA and sulfate aerosol that we explain as due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume. Isoprene SOA concentrations increase as NOx emissions decrease (favoring the low-NOx pathway for isoprene oxidation), but decrease more strongly as SO2 emissions decrease (due to the effect of sulfate on aerosol acidity and volume). The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) projects 2013-2025 decreases in anthropogenic emissions of

  2. Chemical insights, explicit chemistry, and yields of secondary organic aerosol from OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in the aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Tan, Y.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospherically abundant, volatile water-soluble organic compounds formed through gas-phase chemistry (e.g., glyoxal (C2), methylglyoxal (C3), and acetic acid) have great potential to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via aqueous chemistry in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols. This paper (1) provides chemical insights into aqueous-phase OH-radical-initiated reactions leading to SOA formation from methylglyoxal and (2) uses this and a previously published glyoxal mechanism (Lim et al., 2010) to provide SOA yields for use in chemical transport models. Detailed reaction mechanisms including peroxy radical chemistry and a full kinetic model for aqueous photochemistry of acetic acid and methylglyoxal are developed and validated by comparing simulations with the experimental results from previous studies (Tan et al., 2010, 2012). This new methylglyoxal model is then combined with the previous glyoxal model (Lim et al., 2010), and is used to simulate the profiles of products and to estimate SOA yields. At cloud-relevant concentrations (~ 10-6 - ~ 10-3 M; Munger et al., 1995) of glyoxal and methylglyoxal, the major photooxidation products are oxalic acid and pyruvic acid, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ~ 120% for glyoxal and ~ 80% for methylglyoxal. During droplet evaporation oligomerization of unreacted methylglyoxal/glyoxal that did not undergo aqueous photooxidation could enhance yields. In wet aerosols, where total dissolved organics are present at much higher concentrations (~ 10 M), the major oxidation products are oligomers formed via organic radical-radical reactions, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ~ 90% for both glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Non-radical reactions (e.g., with ammonium) could enhance yields.

  3. Oxidant supply and aqueous photochemical SOA formation in cloud droplets and aqueous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Ervens, B.; Lim, Y. B.

    2012-12-01

    Many recent laboratory, field and model studies point to significant contributions to the total secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget from aqueous phase reactions in cloud droplets and aqueous aerosol particles. Laboratory studies of the photochemical oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in the aqueous phase show a strong dependence on the initial concentration of dissolved organics, with preferential formation of large molecules (dimers, oligomers) at the high concentrations found in ambient deliquesced aerosol particles. In such experimental studies OH radicals are produced in the aqueous phase (via hydrogen peroxide photolysis) and OH radical is assumed to be the major oxidant. An explicit aqueous photooxidation mechanism has been validated, in part, based on the observed temporal evolution of organic intermediates and products in these experiments. In this work, this mechanism was incorporated into multiphase process models (box, cloud parcel) in order to further explore aqueous SOA formation in dilute cloud droplets and concentrated aerosol particles. We found that the predicted SOA mass in both aqueous phases can be comparable despite the much lower liquid water content in aerosols, where oligomer formation is favored. Direct uptake from the gas phase was the largest source of OH radicals in the aqueous phase. In-situ production through the Fenton reaction (Fe), hydrogen peroxide and nitrate photolysis were minor sources. Since phase transfer is slower than the OH(aq) consumption by organics, modeled OH(aq) concentrations were smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitude than predicted based on thermodynamic equilibrium. Our model studies suggest that, unless there are substantial additional sources of OH radical in the aqueous phase, aqueous SOA formation will be oxidant limited. Since the phase transfer rate is a function of the drop (or particle) surface area, aqueous SOA formation may occur preferentially at or near the drop/particle surface (e.g., be surface

  4. A Study on the Aqueous Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, K.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2013-12-01

    The effect aerosols have on radiative forcing in the atmosphere is recognized as one of the largest uncertainties in the radiation budget. About 80% of organic aerosol mass in the atmosphere is estimated to be created though secondary processes. Recently, the aqueous formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has become recognized as important when considering the source, transformation and radiative impacts of SOA. This work focuses on implementing a mechanism for aqueous SOA formation that can be used in atmospheric chemistry and models of all scales, from box to global. A box model containing a simplified chemical mechanism for the aqueous production of precursors of aqueous SOA (Myriokefalitakis et al. (2011) is coupled to gas-phase chemistry which uses the carbon bond mechanism (CBM) IV is presented. The model implements aqueous chemistry of soluble gases, both in-cloud and aerosol water, including organic compounds such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, which have been shown as potentially significant sources for dissolved secondary organic aerosols. This mechanism implements aqueous phase mass transfer and molecular dissociation. The model's performance is evaluated against previous box model studies from the literature. A comparison is conducted between the detailed GAMMA model (McNeill et al., 2012), which is constrained with chamber experiments and the one developed here. The model output under different atmospheric conditions is explored and differences and sensitivities are assessed. The objective of this work is to create a robust framework for simulating aqueous phase formation of SOA and maximizing the computational efficiency of the model, while maintaining accuracy, in order to later use the exact mechanism in global climate simulations.

  5. Aqueous-phase chemical processes in deliquescent sea-salt aerosols: A mechanism that couples the atmospheric cycles of S and sea salt

    SciTech Connect

    Chameides, W.L.; Stelson, A.W. )

    1992-12-20

    The aqueous-phase chemistry of deliquescent sea-salt aerosols in the remote marine boundary layer is investigated with a steady state box model. The model simulates the scavenging of soluble and reactive gaseous species by the sea-salt aerosols, the chemical reactions of these species and sea-salt ions in the deliquescent solution, and changes in the aerosol composition that occur as a result of these processes. The calculations indicate that deliquescent sea-salt aerosols are strongly buffered with a pH that remains close to 8 until the amount of acid added to the aerosol solution exceeds the alkalinity of sea salt. The oxidation of chloride by O[sub 3] and by free radicals is found to proceed at extremely slow rates, and thus these reactions cannot explain the high-chloride deficits recently observed over the North Atlantic Ocean. On the other hand, the oxidation of dissolved S[sub IV] by O[sub 3] in sea-salt aerosols is found to proceed at rates approaching 0.1 eq L[sup [minus]1] hr[sup [minus]1] and appears to be sufficiently rapid to qualitatively explain the observations of nss-SO[sub 4][sup +] in sea-salt aerosols over the North Atlantic Ocean. The calculations suggest the existence of a removal mechanism for atmospheric S that is largely controlled by the alkalinity of seawater and the flux of this alkalinity into the atmosphere in sea salt. It is estimated that this process will and ultimately remove about (1-4) [times] 10[sup 11]moles of SO[sub 2] from the atmosphere annually. Comparison of this loss rate with other elements of the atmospheric S cycle suggests that sea salt may remove a significant amount of S from the marine atmosphere and thereby depress the SO[sub 2] concentration in the marine boundary layer and limit the number of cloud condensation nuclei generated from the oxidation of SO[sub 2]. 59 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Nighttime aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles and its implication for fine particulate matter composition and oxidative potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Arian; Hasheminassab, Sina; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-05-01

    Recent investigations suggest that aqueous phase oxidation of hydrophilic organic compounds can be a significant source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Here we investigate the possibility of nighttime aqueous phase formation of SOA in Los Angeles during winter, through examination of trends in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) carbonaceous content during two contrasting seasons. Distinctive winter and summer trends were observed for the diurnal variation of organic carbon (OC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC), with elevated levels during the nighttime in winter, suggesting an enhanced formation of SOA during that period. The nighttime ratio of SOC to OC was positively associated with the relative humidity (RH) at high RH levels (above 70%), which is when the liquid water content of the ambient aerosol would be high and could facilitate dissolution of hydrophilic primary organic compounds into the aqueous phase. Time-integrated collection and analysis of wintertime particles at three time periods of the day (morning, 6:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.; afternoon, 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; night, 8:00 p.m.-4:00 a.m.) revealed higher levels of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and organic acids during the night and afternoon periods compared to the morning period, indicating that the SOA formation in winter continues throughout the nighttime. Furthermore, diurnal trends in concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from primary emissions showed that partitioning of SVOCs from the gas to the particle phase due to the decreased nighttime temperatures cannot explain the substantial OC and SOC increase at night. The oxidative potential of the collected particles (quantified using a biological macrophage-based reactive oxygen species assay, in addition to the dithiothreitol assay) was comparable during afternoon and nighttime periods, but higher (by at least ∼30%) compared to the morning period, suggesting that SOA formation processes possibly

  7. Secondary Organic Aerosol and Brown Carbon Formation in the Sunlit Aqueous Phase: Aldehyde Photooxidation in the Presence of Ammonium Salts and Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Haan, D. O.; Galloway, M. M.; Sharp, K. D.; Jiménez, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    The chemistry of water-soluble carbonyl compounds in clouds is now acknowledged as an important source of secondary organic aerosol. These reactive carbonyl compounds are oxidized to carboxylic acids and form oligomers by radical-radical reactions and by "dark reactions" with ammonium salts (AS) and/or amines. The latter class of reactions also produces light-absorbing brown carbon compounds, especially reactions involving methylglyoxal or glyoxal and amines. However, recent work has found that UV light fades the color of glyoxal + AS and methylgyloxal + AS reaction mixtures. We recently studied aldehyde-AS-amine reactions in sunlight and in control vessels at the same temperature to determine the effects of solar radiation on the aqueous-phase production of brown carbon. In sunlight, methylglyoxal reaction mixtures lost their initial color and failed to brown, indicating the photolytic loss of reactants and/or pre-brown intermediates. In many other reactions, brown products are lost to photolysis, reducing the overall browning of solutions exposed to sunlight. In other experiments, hydrogen peroxide was added to generate OH radicals by photolysis. In the presence of OH radicals, some carbonyl compound mixtures (e.g. those containing hydroxyacetone or glycolaldehyde) browned more rapidly when exposed to sunlight. This indicates the existence of uncharacterized photooxidative browning pathways involving aqueous-phase OH radicals, carbonyls, ammonium salts, and/or amine compounds.

  8. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1999-11-01

    Ambient aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climatic changes as well. Both natural and anthropogenic sources contribute to the formation of ambient aerosols, which are composed mostly of sulfates, nitrates, and chlorides in either pure or mixed forms. These inorganic salt aerosols are hygroscopic by nature and exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in humid air. For pure inorganic salt particles with diameter larger than 0.1 micron, the phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet occurs only when the relative humidity in the surrounding atmosphere reaches a certain critical level corresponding to the water activity of the saturated solution. The droplet size or mass in equilibrium with relative humidity can be calculated in a straightforward manner from thermodynamic considerations. For aqueous droplets 0.1 micron or smaller, the surface curvature effect on vapor pressure becomes important and the Kelvin equation must be used.

  9. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  10. Phototransformation of 4-phenoxyphenol sensitised by 4-carboxybenzophenone: Evidence of new photochemical pathways in the bulk aqueous phase and on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Socorro, Joanna; Vione, Davide; Quivet, Etienne; Brigante, Marcello; Mailhot, Gilles; Wortham, Henri; Gligorovski, Sasho

    2013-12-01

    In addition to direct photolysis, degradation of organic compounds by solar light can also occur by indirect photolysis or photo-sensitised processes. These reactions are important because they are involved in, among others, direct and indirect climate changes, adverse health effects from inhaled particles, effects on cloud chemistry and ozone production. In this work, the importance of atmospheric photo-sensitisation is evaluated in bulk aqueous solution and on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles. Irradiation experiments in aqueous solution indicate that 4-carboxybenzophenone (CBP) is able to photosensitise the degradation of 4-phenoxyphenol (4 PP). The process takes place via the CBP triplet state (3CBP*), which has an oxidising nature. 4 PP is fluorescent, unlike the photosensitiser CBP, with two emission bands at ˜320 and ˜380 nm. However, addition of CBP to a 4 PP solution considerably decreases the intensity of 4 PP fluorescence bands and causes a very intense new band to appear at ˜420 nm. This behaviour suggests a possible interaction between CBP and 4 PP in solution, which could favour further light-induced processes. Moreover, the new band overlaps with the fluorescence spectrum of atmospheric HULIS (HUmic-LIke Substances), suggesting that supramolecular photosensitiser-substrate interactions may have a role in HULIS fluorescence properties. The interaction between CBP and 4 PP coated on silica particles (gas-solid system) was also investigated under simulated sunlight, and in the presence of variable relative humidity. The water molecules inhibit the degradation of 4 PP, induced by 3CBP* on the surface of aerosol particles, indicating that the process could be even faster on particles than in solution. We demonstrate that phenol substances adsorbed on aerosol surfaces and in bulk solution are substantially altered upon photosensitised processes.

  11. Phase transition behaviour of sodium oleate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nájera, Juan J.

    Field measurements have shown that organic surfactants are significant components of atmospheric aerosols. While fatty acids, among other surfactants, are prevalent in the atmosphere, the influence of these species on the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols remains not fully characterized. In order to assess the phase in which particles may exist, a detailed study of the deliquescence of a model surfactant aerosol has been carried out. Sodium oleate was chosen as a surfactant proxy relevant in atmospheric aerosol. Sodium oleate micelle aerosol particles were generated nebulizing a sodium oleate aqueous solution. In this study, the water uptake and phase transition of sodium oleate aerosol particles have been studied in a room temperature aerosol flow tube system (AFT) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Aerosol morphology and elemental composition were also analysed using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX) techniques. The particles are homogeneously distributed as ellipsoidal-shape aggregates of micelles particles with an average size of ˜1.1 μm. The deliquescence by the sodium oleate aerosol particles was monitored by infrared extinction spectroscopy, where the dried aerosol particles were exposed to increasing relative humidity as they passed through the AFT. Observations of the infrared absorption features of condensed phase liquid water enable to determine the sodium oleate deliquescence phase transition at 88±2%.

  12. Identifying precursors and aqueous organic aerosol formation pathways during the SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, Neha; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Surratt, Jason D.; Gold, Avram; Lee, Ben; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Mohr, Claudia; Thornton, Joel A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-11-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized, low-volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light-absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, and health. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented, forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols), leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify additional precursors and products that may be atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere into water at Brent, Alabama, during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Hydroxyl (OH⚫) radical oxidation experiments were conducted with the aqueous mixtures collected from SOAS to better understand the formation of SOA through gas-phase followed by aqueous-phase chemistry. Total aqueous-phase organic carbon concentrations for these mixtures ranged from 92 to 179 µM-C, relevant for cloud and fog waters. Aqueous OH-reactive compounds were primarily observed as odd ions in the positive ion mode by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultra high-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) spectra and tandem MS (MS-MS) fragmentation of these ions were consistent with the presence of carbonyls and tetrols. Products were observed in the negative ion mode and included pyruvate and oxalate, which were confirmed by ion chromatography. Pyruvate and oxalate have been found in the particle phase in many locations (as salts and complexes). Thus

  13. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  14. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Aqueous Reactions of Phenols in Fog Drops and Deliquesced Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.

    2014-12-01

    The formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in atmospheric condensed phases (i.e., aqueous SOA) can proceed rapidly, but relatively little is known of the important aqueous SOA precursors or their reaction pathways. In our work we are studying the aqueous SOA formed from reactions of phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol), benzene-diols (catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone), and phenolic carbonyls (e.g., vanillin and syringaldehyde). These species are potentially important aqueous SOA precursors because they are released in large quantities from biomass burning, have high Henry's Law constants (KH = 103 -109 M-1 atm-1) and are rapidly oxidized. To evaluate the importance of aqueous reactions of phenols as a source of SOA, we first quantified the kinetics and SOA mass yields for 11 phenols reacting via direct photodegradation, hydroxyl radical (•OH), and with an excited organic triplet state (3C*). In the second step, which is the focus of this work, we use these laboratory results in a simple model of fog chemistry using conditions during a previously reported heavy biomass burning event in Bakersfield, CA. Our calculations indicate that under aqueous aerosol conditions (i.e., a liquid water content of 100 μg m-3) the rate of aqueous SOA production (RSOA(aq)) from phenols is similar to the rate in the gas phase. In contrast, under fog/cloud conditions the aqueous RSOA from phenols is 10 times higher than the rate in the gas phase. In both of these cases aqueous RSOA is dominated by the oxidation of phenols by 3C*, followed by direct photodegradation of phenolic carbonyls, and then •OH oxidation. Our results suggest that aqueous oxidation of phenols is a significant source of SOA during fog events and also during times when deliquesced aerosols are present.

  15. Laboratory evidence of organic peroxide and peroxyhemiacetal formation in the aqueous phase and implications for aqueous OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Turpin, B. J.

    2015-11-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is considered a potentially important atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3) are precursors for SOAaq; products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high-molecular-weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra-high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals and epoxides (i.e., IEPOX), and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  16. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  17. Surface tension depression by low-solubility organic material in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, Allison; Mitroo, Dhruv; McNeill, V. Faye

    2012-07-01

    Surface-active material, including long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), comprises a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass. Surface-active species are thought to form a film at the gas-aerosol interface, with implications for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation. However, LCFA phase behavior and surface-bulk partitioning has not been characterized under most conditions typical of tropospheric aerosol water (i.e. acidic, high ionic content), making it challenging to predict surface film formation in aerosols. In this study, we present measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions containing the slightly soluble LCFAs oleic and stearic acid. The effect of varying pH, organic concentration, and inorganic salt content was tested for each system. We observe surface tension depression compared to water of up to ˜30 and 45% for aqueous solutions containing stearic or oleic acid at pH 0-8 and high inorganic salt concentrations (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4). This suggests that surface film formation is favorable for these species in atmospheric aerosols.

  18. Oxidation of Glyoxal in the Aqueous Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The emitted VOCs can be further oxidized in the gas phase as well as in the aqueous phase (cloud droplets, fog, rain and deliquescent particles) to form semivolatile carbonyl compounds. For example, the carbonyl compound glyoxal can be produced by the oxidation process of isoprene. Additionally, these semivolatile carbonyl compounds might be important for the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) by partitioning between gas- and liquid phase of pre-existing particles. In the gas phase as well as in the aqueous phase (cloud droplets, fog, rain and deliquescent particles) these compounds can be further oxidized, e.g., by radicals (OH and NO3) leading to peroxy radicals and then to substituted organics. Two concepts exist in the literature to describe the glyoxal oxidation pathway via alkyl radicals to the peroxy radicals by the addition of molecular oxygen. The first one[1] states that peroxy radical formation occurs with a rate constant of k = 1 × 109 M-1 s-1. The second concept[2] assumes that this is a minor reaction pathway because of the lower rate constant of k = 1 × 106 M-1 s-1. The difference in the rate constants of the oxygen addition is of about three orders of magnitude which might lead to different oxidation products and yields in aqueous solution. In the present work, the formation and the decay of the formed glyoxyl radicals and glyoxyl peroxy radicals were studied in low and high concentrated oxygen solutions using a laser photolysis long path absorption setup (LP-LPA). To clarify the difference a method introduced by Adams et al., 1969[3] to measure the rate constant of the oxygen addition on alkyl radical was modified for laser flash photolysis conditions and successfully applied. In this study a rate constant for the addition reaction of molecular oxygen of k = 8 × 108 M-1 s-1 was measured. This clearly indicates

  19. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous reactions of atmospheric phenols with an organic triplet excited state.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy D; Sio, Vicky; Yu, Lu; Zhang, Qi; Anastasio, Cort

    2014-01-21

    Condensed-phase chemistry plays a significant role in the formation and evolution of atmospheric organic aerosols. Past studies of the aqueous photoformation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have largely focused on hydroxyl radical oxidation, but here we show that triplet excited states of organic compounds ((3)C*) can also be important aqueous oxidants. We studied the aqueous photoreactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol) with the aromatic carbonyl 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde (DMB); all of these species are emitted by biomass burning. Under simulated sunlight, DMB forms a triplet excited state that rapidly oxidizes phenols to form low-volatility SOA. Rate constants for these reactions are fast and increase with decreasing pH and increasing methoxy substitution of the phenols. Mass yields of aqueous SOA are near 100% for all three phenols. For typical ambient conditions in areas with biomass combustion, the aqueous oxidation of phenols by (3)C* is faster than by hydroxyl radical, although rates depend strongly on pH, oxidant concentrations, and the identity of the phenol. Our results suggest that (3)C* can be the dominant aqueous oxidant of phenols in areas impacted by biomass combustion and that this is a significant pathway for forming SOA.

  20. Anthracene and pyrene photolysis kinetics in aqueous, organic, and mixed aqueous-organic phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Jarod N.; Stern, Adam P.; Kirich, Makena L.; Kahan, Tara F.

    2016-03-01

    Condensed phases in the atmosphere, such as cloud droplets and aerosols, often contain both water and organic matter (OM). Reactivity can differ significantly between aqueous and organic phases. We have measured photolysis kinetics of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anthracene and pyrene in several organic solvents and in water, as well as in miscible and phase-separated aqueous-organic mixtures at atmospherically-relevant wavelengths. Photolysis rate constants generally increased with increasing solvent polarity; photolysis of both PAHs was more than ten times faster in water than in octanol. Local polarity had a much greater effect on PAH photolysis kinetics than changes in PAH absorptivity or singlet oxygen concentrations. Photolysis kinetics in homogeneous aqueous-organic mixtures varied monotonically with2 OM volume fraction. Kinetics in immiscible (phase-separated) solutions were more complex, with different dependences on OM content observed in stagnant and turbulent solutions. Our results suggest that OM could greatly affect the photochemical lifetimes of PAHs in atmospheric condensed phases such as aerosols, even if the OM does not itself absorb photons.

  1. Phase transformation and growth of hygroscopic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.

    1995-09-01

    Ambient aerosols frequently contain large portions of hygroscopic inorganic salts such as chlorides, nitrates, and sulfates in either pure or mixed forms. Such inorganic salt aerosols exhibit the properties of deliquescence and efflorescence in air. The phase transformation from a solid particle to a saline droplet usually occurs spontaneously when the relative humidity of the atmosphere reaches a level specific to the chemical composition of the aerosol particle. Conversely, when the relative humidity decreases and becomes low enough, the saline droplet will evaporate and suddenly crystallize, expelling all its water content. The phase transformation and growth of aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes affecting air quality, visibility degradation, and climate changes. In this chapter, an exposition of the underlying thermodynamic principles is given, and recent advances in experimental methods utilizing single-particle levitation are discussed. In addition, pertinent and available thermodynamic data, which are needed for predicting the deliquescence properties of single and multi-component aerosols, are compiled. This chapter is useful to research scientists who are either interested in pursuing further studies of aerosol thermodynamics, or required to model the dynamic behavior of hygroscopic aerosols in a humid environment.

  2. Urban Air Pollution from Ethanol (E85) in the Presence of Aqueous Aerosols and Fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginnebaugh, D. L.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    This is a study to examine the effect of ethanol (E85) versus gasoline on urban air pollution in the presence of aqueous aerosols and fog. In previous work, we analyzed the temperature-dependence of ethanol and gasoline exhaust chemistry and its impact on urban air pollution considering only gas-phase chemistry. We used the near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.1, LEEDS University) with the SMVGEAR II chemical ordinary differential solver to provide the speed necessary to simulate explicit chemistry. The MCM has over 13,500 organic reactions and 4,600 species. SMVGEAR II is a sparse-matrix Gear solver that reduces the computation time significantly while maintaining any specified accuracy. We found that the average ozone concentrations through the range of temperatures tested could be higher with E85 than with gasoline by up to 8 parts per billion volume (ppbv) at room temperature but much higher at cold temperatures and low sunlight (winter conditions) for a region with a high nitrogen oxide (NOx) to non-methane organic gases (NMOG) ratio. We also found that the solution to chemistry in a 3-D urban airshed model was practical. We now extend our study to include aqueous chemistry in the presence of aerosols and fog. We combine the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism, CAPRAM 3.0 with the MCM 3.1 and gas-particle transfer in box model calculations. CAPRAM treats aqueous phase chemistry among 390 species and 829 reactions (including 51 gas-to-aqueous phase reactions). We investigate the impact aqueous reactions have on unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde mixing ratios in the atmosphere in particular because acetaldehyde is an ozone precursor and carcinogen, and aqueous oxidation has potential to speed the conversion of unburned ethanol to acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde also forms acetic acid in aqueous solution. Acetic acid vapor is an eye, nose, and lung irritant, so both species contribute negatively to human health. We look at the impact of aerosol

  3. Sources and interrelations of oxidants (peroxides and {sup {center_dot}}OH), iron(II), and organic acids formed from aqueous-phase photochemical reactions in clouds, fogs, and aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, B.C.; Arakaki, T.; Shu P.G.

    1995-12-31

    Based on studies of cloud waters from Whiteface Mountain, New York, the aqueous photoformation of OH is attributed to two different mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the direct photolysis of nitrate, and the other mechanism involves an HOOH-Fe(II) photo-Fenton reaction. Separate studies of well-defined aqueous solutions (pH=3.7) of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes, for dicarboxylates commonly found in atmospheric waters (oxalate, malonate, succinate, glutarate), reveals that these complexes rapidly form Fe(II) and HOOH with 313-nm illumination. Finally, studies of the aqueous (pH=3.7) photolysis of biacetyl, which is commonly found in fogs and clouds, produces acetic acid, peroxyacetic acid, HOOH, CH{sub 3}OOH, and pyruvic acid. The peroxylacetyl radical is proposed as a key intermediate; it is the most strongly oxidizing organic peroxyl radical known to date.

  4. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Chiara Pietrogrande, Maria; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate.

  5. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    PubMed Central

    Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1–0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4–20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate. PMID:27551086

  6. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform

  7. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences. Current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets. Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Due to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. Reference: Cheng, Y. et al. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles. Nature Communications. 5:5923 doi: 10.1038/ncomms6850 (2015).

  8. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60-80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary

  9. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly

  10. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    DOE PAGES

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; ...

    2015-09-30

    In this study, the effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) bothmore » significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH < 40%, and increasing up to 0.16 and 0.12 when RH reached 60–80%, respectively. The enhanced conversion ratios of N and S in the late haze period is likely due to heterogeneous aqueous reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than <15 ppb but increased with increasing O3 when O3 concentration is higher than 15 ppb. The results suggest that heterogeneous aqueous reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the

  11. Laboratory studies of aqueous-phase oxidation of polyols in submicron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous-phase oxidation has received recent attention as a potential pathway for the formation of highly oxidized organic aerosol. However most aqueous oxidation studies are performed in bulk solutions rather than aqueous droplets. Here we describe experiments in which aqueous oxidation is carried out within submicron particles, allowing for gas-particle partitioning of reactants, intermediates, and products. Using Fenton chemistry as a source of hydroxyl radicals, and a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for online characterization of particle composition, we find that aqueous oxidation can be quite rapid. The formation of high concentrations of oxalic acid is observed in the particle phase with some loss of carbon to the gas phase, indicating the formation of volatile products. We see a rapid degradation of condensed-phase oxidation products upon exposure to ultraviolet lights (centered at 350 nm) suggesting that these products may exist as iron(III)-oxalate complexes. Similar results are also seen when oxidation is carried out in bulk solution (with AMS analysis of the atomized solution); however in some cases the mass loss is less than is observed for submicron particles, likely due to differences in partitioning of early-generation products. Such products can partition out of the aqueous phase at the low liquid water contents in the chamber but remain in solution for further aqueous processing in bulk oxidation experiments. This work suggests that the product distributions from oxidation in aqueous aerosol may be substantially different than those in bulk oxidation, pointing to the need to carry out aqueous oxidation studies under atmospherically relevant partitioning conditions (with liquid water contents mimicking those of cloud droplets or wet aerosol).

  12. Volatility of organic aerosol: evaporation of ammonium sulfate/succinic acid aqueous solution droplets.

    PubMed

    Yli-Juuti, Taina; Zardini, Alessandro A; Eriksson, Axel C; Hansen, Anne Maria K; Pagels, Joakim H; Swietlicki, Erik; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Glasius, Marianne; Worsnop, Douglas R; Riipinen, Ilona; Bilde, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol.

  13. Method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  14. Constraining condensed-phase formation kinetics of secondary organic aerosol components from isoprene epoxydiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, T. P.; Lin, Y.-H.; Zhang, Z.; Chu, K.; Thornton, J. A.; Vizuete, W.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2016-02-01

    Isomeric epoxydiols from isoprene photooxidation (IEPOX) have been shown to produce substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass and are therefore considered a major isoprene-derived SOA precursor. Heterogeneous reactions of IEPOX on atmospheric aerosols form various aerosol-phase components or "tracers" that contribute to the SOA mass burden. A limited number of the reaction rate constants for these acid-catalyzed aqueous-phase tracer formation reactions have been constrained through bulk laboratory measurements. We have designed a chemical box model with multiple experimental constraints to explicitly simulate gas- and aqueous-phase reactions during chamber experiments of SOA growth from IEPOX uptake onto acidic sulfate aerosol. The model is constrained by measurements of the IEPOX reactive uptake coefficient, IEPOX and aerosol chamber wall losses, chamber-measured aerosol mass and surface area concentrations, aerosol thermodynamic model calculations, and offline filter-based measurements of SOA tracers. By requiring the model output to match the SOA growth and offline filter measurements collected during the chamber experiments, we derive estimates of the tracer formation reaction rate constants that have not yet been measured or estimated for bulk solutions.

  15. An investigation for unexpected high yield of peroxides from isoprene through aqueous phase ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Chen, Z.; Hua, W.; Jie, C.

    2007-12-01

    It has recently become evident that isoprene, the atmosphere's most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon, and its oxidation products can considerably result in formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) through the acid- catalyzed aqueous phase reaction with hydrogen peroxide. However, the peroxide source in the atmospheric aqueous process is unclear. The present study revealed a potentially important route to the formation of aqueous peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide and hydroxylmethyl hydroperoxide, from the aqueous phase ozonolysis of isoprene. In this study, the atmospheric aqueous phase ozonolysis of isoprene at different pHs and temperatures were studied with the method of laboratory simulation. The major products, including peroxides and carbonyl compounds, were well-characterized, with a measured carbon balance approaching 100%, and the detailed reaction mechanisms were proposed. Most strikingly, peroxides have been found in the aqueous phase ozonolysis of isoprene with unexpected high yields. Considering the huge amount of isoprene in the atmosphere, we suggest that the aqueous phase ozonolysis of isoprene and its first-generation oxidation products may contribute a considerable and even the main source of oxidants to the atmospheric aqueous phase. This means that isoprene and its oxidation products can be transformed into SOA by peroxides provided from their aqueous phase ozonolysis reactions, even if there is no other peroxide source.

  16. A new source of methylglyoxal in the aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigast, Maria; Mutzel, Anke; Schindelka, Janine; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    Carbonyl compounds are ubiquitous in atmospheric multiphase system participating in gas, particle, and aqueous-phase chemistry. One important compound is methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), as it is detected in significant amounts in the gas phase as well as in cloud water, ice, and rain. Consequently, it can be expected that MEK influences the liquid-phase chemistry. Therefore, the oxidation of MEK and the formation of corresponding oxidation products were investigated in the aqueous phase. Several oxidation products were identified from the oxidation with OH radicals, including 2,3-butanedione, hydroxyacetone, and methylglyoxal. The molar yields were 29.5 % for 2,3-butanedione, 3.0 % for hydroxyacetone, and 9.5 % for methylglyoxal. Since methylglyoxal is often related to the formation of organics in the aqueous phase, MEK should be considered for the formation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Based on the experimentally obtained data, a reaction mechanism for the formation of methylglyoxal has been developed and evaluated with a model study. Besides known rate constants, the model contains measured photolysis rate constants for MEK (kp = 5 × 10-5 s-1), 2,3-butanedione (kp = 9 × 10-6 s-1), methylglyoxal (kp = 3 × 10-5 s-1), and hydroxyacetone (kp = 2 × 10-5 s-1). From the model predictions, a branching ratio of 60 /40 for primary/secondary H-atom abstraction at the MEK skeleton was found. This branching ratio reproduces the experiment results very well, especially the methylglyoxal formation, which showed excellent agreement. Overall, this study demonstrates MEK as a methylglyoxal precursor compound for the first time.

  17. A new source of methyl glyoxal in the aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigast, M.; Mutzel, A.; Schindelka, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-11-01

    Carbonyl compounds are ubiquitous in atmospheric multiphase system participating in gas, particle, and aqueous-phase chemistry. One important compound is methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), as it is detected in significant amounts in the gas phase as well as in cloud water, ice, and rain. Consequently, it can be expected that MEK influences the liquid phase chemistry. Therefore, the oxidation of MEK and the formation of corresponding oxidation products were investigated in the aqueous phase. Several oxidation products were identified from the oxidation with OH radicals, including 2,3-butanedione, hydroxyacetone, and methyl glyoxal. The molar yields were 29.5 % for 2,3-butanedione, 3.0 % for hydroxyacetone, and 9.5 % for methyl glyoxal. Since methyl glyoxal is often related to the formation of organics in the aqueous phase, MEK should be considered for the formation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Based on the experimentally obtained data, a reaction mechanism for the formation of methyl glyoxal has been developed and evaluated with a model study. Besides known rate constants, the model contains measured photolysis rate constants for MEK (kp = 5 × 10-5 s-1), 2,3-butanedione (kp = 9 × 10-6 s-1), methyl glyoxal (kp = 3 × 10-5 s-1), and hydroxyacetone (kp = 2 × 10-5 s-1). From the model predictions, a branching ratio of 60/40 for primary/secondary H-atom abstraction at the MEK skeleton was found. This branching ratio reproduces the experiment results very well, especially the methyl glyoxal formation, which showed excellent agreement. Overall, this study demonstrates MEK as a methyl glyoxal precursor compound for the first time.

  18. Modeling the Thermodynamics of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols to Predict Water Activities and Phase Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behavior. While the thermodynamics of aqueous inorganic systems at atmospheric temperatures are well established, little is known about the physicochemistry of mixed organic-inorganic particles. Salting-out and salting-in effects result from organic-inorganic interactions and are used to improve industrial separation processes. In the atmosphere, they may influence the aerosol phases. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar (aqueous) and a less polar organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile substances compared to a single phase estimation. Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol define the reaction medium for heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring in aerosol particles. A correct description of these phases is needed when gas- or cloud-phase reaction schemes are adapted to aerosols. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy. We present the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients), which explicitly accounts for molecular interactions between solution constituents, both organic and inorganic, to calculate activities, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed systems. This model allows to compute vapor-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid-liquid (SLE) equilibria within one framework. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered eight different cations, five anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are very well represented up to high ionic strength. We show that the semiempirical middle

  19. ON-LINE ANALYSIS OF AQUEOUS AEROSOLS BY LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work the effects of water on the laser desorption ionization mass spectra of single aerosol particles are explored. Aqueous aerosols are produced by passing dry particles through a humid environment so that they undergo deliquescent growth. Laser desorption ionization is ...

  20. Aqueous phase oxidation of sulphur dioxide by ozone in cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Saathoff, H.; Dias, A.; El Haddad, I.; Gysel, M.; Coburn, S. C.; Tröstl, J.; Bernhammer, A.-K.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Corbin, J. C.; Craven, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Höppel, N.; Heinritzi, M.; Kristensen, T. B.; Molteni, U.; Nichman, L.; Pinterich, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Vogel, A. L.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Wexler, A. S.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P. M.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flagan, R. C.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D. R.; Baltensperger, U.

    2016-02-01

    The growth of aerosol due to the aqueous phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone was measured in laboratory-generated clouds created in the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Experiments were performed at 10 and -10 °C, on acidic (sulfuric acid) and on partially to fully neutralised (ammonium sulfate) seed aerosol. Clouds were generated by performing an adiabatic expansion - pressurising the chamber to 220 hPa above atmospheric pressure, and then rapidly releasing the excess pressure, resulting in a cooling, condensation of water on the aerosol and a cloud lifetime of approximately 6 min. A model was developed to compare the observed aerosol growth with that predicted using oxidation rate constants previously measured in bulk solutions. The model captured the measured aerosol growth very well for experiments performed at 10 and -10 °C, indicating that, in contrast to some previous studies, the oxidation rates of SO2 in a dispersed aqueous system can be well represented by using accepted rate constants, based on bulk measurements. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first laboratory-based measurements of aqueous phase oxidation in a dispersed, super-cooled population of droplets. The measurements are therefore important in confirming that the extrapolation of currently accepted reaction rate constants to temperatures below 0 °C is correct.

  1. Aqueous phase oxidation of sulphur dioxide by ozone in cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, C. R.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Saathoff, H.; Dias, A.; El Haddad, I.; Gysel, M.; Coburn, S. C.; Tröstl, J.; Bernhammer, A.-K.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Corbin, J. C.; Craven, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Höppel, N.; Heinritzi, M.; Kristensen, T. B.; Molteni, U.; Nichman, L.; Pinterich, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Simon, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Steiner, G.; Tomé, A.; Vogel, A. L.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Wexler, A. S.; Williamson, C.; Winkler, P. M.; Yan, C.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Curtius, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Flagan, R. C.; Hansel, A.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Möhler, O.; Stratmann, F.; Worsnop, D.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-12-01

    The growth of aerosol due to the aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by O3 was measured in laboratory generated clouds created in the CLOUD chamber at CERN. Experiments were performed at 10 and -10 °C, on acidic (sulphuric acid) and on partially to fully neutralised (ammonium sulphate) seed aerosol. Clouds were generated by performing an adiabatic expansion - pressurising the chamber to 220 hPa above atmospheric pressure, and then rapidly releasing the excess pressure, resulting in a cooling, condensation of water on the aerosol and a cloud lifetime of approximately 6 min. A model was developed to compare the observed aerosol growth with that predicted by oxidation rates previously measured in bulk solutions. The model captured the measured aerosol growth very well for experiments performed at 10 and -10 °C, indicating that, in contrast to some previous studies, the oxidation rates of SO2 in a dispersed aqueous system are well represented by accepted rates, based on bulk measurements. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first laboratory based measurements of aqueous phase oxidation in a dispersed, super-cooled population of droplets. The measurements are therefore important in confirming that the extrapolation of currently accepted reaction rates to temperatures below 0 °C is correct.

  2. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  3. Aerosol spray pyrolysis & solution phase synthesis of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongwang

    This dissertation focuses on the synthesis of nanomaterials by both solution phase and gas phase methods. By the solution phase method, we demonstrate the synthesis of Au/CdS binary hybrid nanoparticles and the Au-induced growth of CdS nanorods. At higher reaction temperature, extremely uniform CdS nanorods were obtained. The size of the Au seed nanoparticles has an important influence on the length and diameter of the nanorods. In addition, preparation of peanut-like FePt-CdS hybrid nanoparticles by spontaneous epitaxial nucleation and growth of CdS onto FePt-seed nanoparticles in high-temperature organic solution is reported. The FePt-CdS hybrid nanoparticles reported here are an example of a bifunctional nanomaterial that combines size-dependent magnetic and optical properties. In the gas phase method, a spray pyrolysis aerosol synthesis method was used to produce tellurium dioxide nanoparticles and zinc sulfide nanoparticles. Tellurite glasses (amorphous TeO2 based materials) have two useful optical properties, high refractive index and high optical nonlinearity, that make them attractive for a range of applications. In the work presented here, TeO2 nanoparticles were prepared by spray pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of telluric acid, Te(OH)6. This laboratory-scale process is capable of producing up to 80 mg/hr of amorphous TeO2-nanoparticles with primary particle diameters from 10 to 40 nm, and allows their synthesis in significant quantities from an inexpensive and environmentally friendly precursor. Furthermore, both Er3+ doped and Er3+ and Yb3+ co-doped tellurium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized by spray pyrolysis of an aqueous mixture of telluric acid with erbium/ytterbium salts, which exhibit the infrared to green visible upconversion phenomena. ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by spray pyrolysis using zinc diethyldithiocarbamate as a single-source precursor. The home-built scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) is a useful tool for

  4. Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2004-02-19

    Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid or "NPAL" is a term that most environmental professionals are familiar with because NAPL has been recognized in the literature as a significant source of groundwater contamination. There are two types of NAPL: DNAPL and LNAPL. DNAPL is a ‘dense’ non-aqueous phase liquid. In this context, dense means having a density greater than water (1.0 kg/L). Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachioroethylene (PCE) are examples of DNAPL compounds. A compound that is heaver than water means this type of NAPL will sink in an aquifer. Conversely, LNAPL is a ‘light’ non-aqueous phase liquid with a density less than water, and will float on top of the aquifer. Examples of LNAPL’s are benzene and toluene. LNAPL or DNAPL often manifest as a complex, multi-component mixture of organic compounds that can occur in environmental media. Complex multi-component mixtures distributed in soil pore-air, pore-water, soil particles and in free phase complicate residual saturation of single and multi component NAPL compounds in soil samples. The model output also includes estimates of the NAPL mass and volume and other physical and chemical properties that may be useful for characterization, modeling, and remedial system design and operation. The discovery of NAPL in the aquifer usually leads to a focused characterization for possible sources of NAPL in the vadose zone using a variety of innovative technologies and characterization methods. Often, the analytical data will indicated the presence of NAPL, yet, the NAPL will go unrecognized. Failure to recognize the NAPL can be attributed to the complicated processes of inter-media transfer or a general lack of knowledge about the physical characteristics of complex organic mixtures in environmental samples.

  5. Cell Partition in Two Polymer Aqueous Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Partition of biological cells in two phase aqueous polymer systems is recognized as a powerful separation technique which is limited by gravity. The synthesis of new, selective polymer ligand conjugates to be used in affinity partition separations is of interest. The two most commonly used polymers in two phase partitioning are dextran and polyethylene glycol. A thorough review of the chemistry of these polymers was begun, particularly in the area of protein attachment. Preliminary studies indicate the importance in affinity partitioning of minimizing gravity induced randomizing forces in the phase separation process. The PEG-protein conjugates that were prepared appear to be ideally suited for achieving high quality purifications in a microgravity environment. An interesting spin-off of this synthetic work was the observation of catalytic activity for certain of our polymer derivatives.

  6. Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, V. P.; Kuryakov, V. N.; Muratov, A. R.

    2012-12-15

    Phase behavior of DODAB aqueous solution, prepared without sonication, was studied by adiabatic scanning calorimetry. Measurements revealed four phase transitions with the temperatures 35.2, 39.6, 44.6, and 52.4 Degree-Sign C at heating and one transition at the temperature 40.4 Degree-Sign C at cooling. The first three transitions at heating occur in unilamellar vesicles. The first and third transitions correspond to the subgel-gel and gelliquid phase transitions, corresponding enthalpy jumps are equal to 33 and 49 kJ/mol. The second transition appears after some aging and is similar to gel-ripple phase transition in a DPPC solution, with the enthalpy jump under the transition exceeding 7.4 kJ/mol. The transition occurs in unilamellar vesicles. The transition at the temperature 52.4 Degree-Sign C occurs in another subsystem of the solution, which we believe to be multilamellar vesicles. The enthalpy jump at this transition is equal to 97 kJ/mol, and data analysis suggests that this is a subgel-liquid transition. The phase transition at cooling is the liquid-gel transition in unilamellar vesicles. During the measurements, a slow evolution of the solution occurs, consisting in a change of concentrations of unilamellar and multilamellar vesicles. This transformation mainly occurs at low temperatures.

  7. Aqueous Oxidation of Green Leaf Volatiles as a Source of Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Hansel, A.; Pham, A. T.; Vempati, H. S.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Anastasio, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation emits volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons - the green leaf volatiles (GLVs) - which are formed from the biochemical conversion of linoleic and linolenic acids within plant cells. Stress or damage to vegetation can significantly elevate emission fluxes of these compounds, some of which are fairly water soluble. Aqueous-phase reactions of the GLVs with photochemically generated oxidants - such as hydroxyl radical (OH), singlet oxygen (1O2) and excited triplet states of organic compounds (3C*) _ might then form low-volatility products that can act as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In order to determine if GLVs can be a significant source of secondary organic carbon in fogwater, studies of GLVs in laboratory solutions are needed to elucidate the oxidation kinetics and the corresponding SOA mass yields. In this study we are determining the second-order rate constants, and SOA mass yields, for five GLVs (cis-3-hexen-1-ol, cis-3-hexenylacetate, methyl salicylate, methyl jasmonate, and 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol) reacting with OH,1O2 and 3C*. Experiments are performed at relevant fog water pHs, temperatures, and oxidant concentrations. Rate constants are determined using a relative rate approach in which the decay of GLVs and reference compounds are monitored as function of time by HPLC. The capacity of GLVs to form aqueous SOA was determined by following the formation of their decomposition products with HPLC-UV/DAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. SOA mass yields are measured gravimetrically from laboratory solutions containing atmospherically relevant concentrations of photooxidants and GLVs, and irradiated with simulated sunlight. We will use our results to assess the potential contribution of aqueous GLV reactions as a source of SOA in cloudy or foggy atmospheres.

  8. Secondary organic aerosol production from aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde: Laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Mark J.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Turpin, Barbara J.

    Organic particulate matter (PM) formed in the atmosphere (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) is a substantial yet poorly understood contributor to atmospheric PM. Aqueous photooxidation in clouds, fogs and aerosols is a newly recognized SOA formation pathway. This study investigates the potential for aqueous glycolaldehyde oxidation to produce low volatility products that contribute SOA mass. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmation that aqueous oxidation of glycolaldehyde via the hydroxyl radical forms glyoxal and glycolic acid, as previously assumed. Subsequent reactions form formic acid, glyoxylic acid, and oxalic acid as expected. Unexpected products include malonic acid, succinic acid, and higher molecular weight compounds, including oligomers. Due to (1) the large source strength of glycolaldehyde from precursors such as isoprene and ethene, (2) its water solubility, and (3) the aqueous formation of low volatility products (organic acids and oligomers), we predict that aqueous photooxidation of glycolaldehyde and other aldehydes in cloud, fog, and aerosol water is an important source of SOA and that incorporation of this SOA formation pathway in chemical transport models will help explain the current under-prediction of organic PM concentrations.

  9. Formation of Brown Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol during Multiphase Cloud Simulations using the CESAM Chamber Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Welsh, H.; De Haan, D. O.; Doussin, J. F.; Pednekar, R.; Caponi, L.; Pangui, E.; Gratien, A.; Cazaunau, M.; Formenti, P.; Pajunoja, A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the formation of aqueous brown carbon (aqBrC) from methylglyoxal and methylamine in multiphase reactions using the CESAM chamber facility at the University Paris-Est Creteil. Following reaction in the chamber, droplets and particles were sampled with a Particle-Into-Liquid-Sampler (PILS), a capillary waveguide cell for UV/visible spectroscopy, and a total organic carbon analyzer (TOC). Particle size distributions were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer and used to determine the mass absorption coefficient (a normalized absorbance measurement). Absorption spectra were recorded while aerosol or gas phase aqBrC precursors were introduced into the humid chamber. Sampling was continuous during and after cloud events. The events lasted 5-10 minutes and produced measurable brown carbon signal at 365 nm. When lights were used, absorbance at 365 nm decreased steadily indicating photobleaching of aqBrC products or preferential formation of different, non-absorbing products. Although absorptivity increases prior to cloud formation, cloud events produce sharp increased in aqBrC absorptivity. While measurable absorbance at 365 nm indicates aqBrC formation, very little absorbance was recorded beyond 450 nm indicating that the products were not as oligomerized as products observed in prior work in multi-day, bulk phase simulations.

  10. Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol (aqSOA) Formation By Radical Reactions: Model Studies Comparing the Role of OH Versus Organic Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Reed Harris, A.; Vaida, V.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical reactions in the aqueous phase are thought to significantly contribute to ambient aerosol mass under specific conditions. Results from many laboratory studies suggest that these reactions are efficiently initiated by the OH radical and lead to high molecular weight compounds (oligomers). Recent laboratory experiments have shown that methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) can form oligomers in high yield in aqueous solutions similar to aerosol water. Additional experiments have shown that the direct photolysis of pyruvic acid can generate organic radicals that initiate similar oligomer products upon oxidation of MVK (Renard et al., submitted). Sources of the OH radical in the aerosol aqueous phase include the direct uptake from the gas phase, Fenton reactions and, to a smaller extent, direct photolyses of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate. Recent model studies imply that under many conditions, aqSOA formation might be oxidant-limited since these OH(aq) sources are not sufficient to provide a continuous OH supply. This limitation can be (partially) removed if additional radical sources in the multiphase system are considered. Exemplary, we include the direct photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid as a proxy for possible other radical sources. Model results will be shown and consequences for aqSOA formation and processing under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  11. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM ∕ OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM ∕ OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH  >  SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM ∕ OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were hig

  12. Modeling Gas-phase Glyoxal and Associated Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in a Megacity using WRF/Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hodzic, A.; Barth, M. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Ervens, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) as one of a major fine particulate matter in the atmosphere plays an important role in air pollution, human health, and climate forcing. OA is composed of directly emitted primary organic aerosol and chemically produced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Despite much recent progress in understanding SOA formation, current air quality models cannot explain the magnitude and growth of atmospheric SOA, due to high uncertainties in sources, properties, and chemical reactions of precursors and formation pathways of SOA. Recent laboratory and modeling studies showed that glyoxal may serve as an important SOA precursor in the condensed solution of inorganic or organic aerosol particles (e.g., ammonium sulfate, fulvic acid, and amino acids). In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF/Chem) is modified to account for the latest observed gas-phase yields of glyoxal from various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the associated SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase. The SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase is implemented using two approaches. In the first approach, two simplified parameterizations are used to represent the lumped particle-phase chemical processes under dark conditions and photochemical surface uptake. In the second approach, more detailed kinetic glyoxal reactions such as reversible glyoxal uptake, dimer formation of glyoxal, and oligomerization are treated and resolved explicitly. The updated WRF/Chem is assessed over the Mexico City and the surrounding region during March 2006 using the MILAGRO campaign data. Various observations such as organic matter from Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and VOCs from Proton-transfer Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry were compared. The preliminary results showed that the addition of the SOA formation from glyoxal in aqueous particles brings SOA predictions into a better agreement with field observations, in particular in presence of high relative humidity

  13. Chemical characterization of the main products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-08-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e., burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed atmospherically in the gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the main products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by solid-phase extraction and then purified with semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state proton, carbon-13 and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of ultraviolet and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  14. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Murphy, Benjamin N.; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Guo, Hongyu; Weber, Rodney; Vasilakos, Petros; Wyat Appel, K.; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Surratt, Jason D.; Nenes, Athanasios; Hu, Weiwei; Jimenez, Jose L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Misztal, Pawel K.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2017-01-01

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratios are high such that separation relative humidities (SRH) are below the ambient relative humidity (RH). As OM / OC ratios in the SE US are often between 1.8 and 2.2, organic aerosol experiences both mixing with inorganic water and separation from it. Regional chemical transport model simulations including inorganic water (but excluding water uptake by organic compounds) in the partitioning medium for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) when RH > SRH led to increased SOA concentrations, particularly at night. Water uptake to the organic phase resulted in even greater SOA concentrations as a result of a positive feedback in which water uptake increased SOA, which further increased aerosol water and organic aerosol. Aerosol properties, such as the OM / OC and hygroscopicity parameter (κorg), were captured well by the model compared with measurements during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) 2013. Organic nitrates from monoterpene oxidation were predicted to be the least water-soluble semivolatile species in the model, but most biogenically derived semivolatile species in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were highly water soluble and expected to contribute to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Organic aerosol and SOA precursors were abundant at night, but additional improvements in daytime organic aerosol are needed to close the model-measurement gap. When taking into account deviations from ideality, including both inorganic (when RH > SRH) and organic water in the organic partitioning medium reduced the mean bias in SOA for routine monitoring networks and improved model performance compared to observations from SOAS. Property updates from

  15. Aqueous-phase story of isoprene - A mini-review and reaction with HONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudziński, Krzysztof J.; Szmigielski, Rafał; Kuznietsova, Inna; Wach, Paulina; Staszek, Dorota

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is a major biogenic hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere and a well-recognized player in atmospheric chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosol and air quality. Most of the scientific work on isoprene has focused on the gas-phase and smog chamber processing while direct aqueous chemistry has escaped the major attention because physical solubility of isoprene in water is low. Therefore, this work recollects the results of genuine research carried on atmospherically relevant aqueous-phase transformations of isoprene. It clearly shows that isoprene dissolves in water and reacts in aqueous solutions with common atmospheric oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, ozone, hydroxyl radicals, sulfate radicals and sulfite radicals. The reactions take place in the bulk of solutions or on the gas-liquid interfaces and often are acid-catalyzed and/or enhanced by light. The review is appended by an experimental study of the aqueous-phase reaction of isoprene with nitrous acid (HONO). The decay of isoprene and formation of new products are demonstrated. The tentative chemical mechanism of the reaction is suggested, which starts with slow decomposition of HONO to NO2 and NO. The aqueous chemistry of isoprene explains the formation of a few tropospheric components identified by scientists yet considered of unknown origin. The reaction of isoprene with sulfate radicals explains formation of the MW 182 organosulfate found in ambient aerosol and rainwater while the reaction of isoprene with HONO explains formation of the MW 129 and MW 229 nitroorganic compounds identified in rainwater. Thus, aqueous transformations of isoprene should not be neglected without evidence but rather considered and evaluated in modeling of atmospheric chemical processes even if alternative and apparently dominant heterogeneous pathways of isoprene transformation, dry or wet, are demonstrated.

  16. Tunable aqueous polymer-phase impregnated resins-technology-a novel approach to aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    van Winssen, F A; Merz, J; Schembecker, G

    2014-02-14

    Aqueous Two-Phase Extraction (ATPE) represents a promising unit operation for downstream processing of biotechnological products. The technique provides several advantages such as a biocompatible environment for the extraction of sensitive and biologically active compounds. However, the tendency of some aqueous two-phase systems to form intensive and stable emulsions can lead to long phase separation times causing an increased footprint for the required mixer-settler devices or the need for additional equipment such as centrifuges. In this work, a novel approach to improve ATPE for downstream processing applications called 'Tunable Aqueous Polymer-Phase Impregnated Resins' (TAPPIR(®))-Technology is presented. The technology is based on the immobilization of one aqueous phase inside the pores of a solid support. The second aqueous phase forms the bulk liquid around the impregnated solids. Due to the immobilization of one phase, phase emulsification and phase separation of ATPE are realized in a single step. In this study, a biodegradable and sustainable aqueous two-phase system consisting of aqueous polyethylene glycol/sodiumcitrate solutions was chosen. The impregnation of different macroporous glass and ceramic solids was investigated and could be proven to be stable. Additionally, the separation of the dye Patent blue V was successfully performed with the TAPPIR(®)-Technology. Thus, the "proof of principle" of this technology is presented.

  17. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  18. Aerosol Particle Interfacial Thermodynamics and Phase Partitioning Measurements Using Biphasic Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutcher, Cari; Metcalf, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol particles are nearly ubiquitous in the atmosphere and yet there remain large uncertainties in their formation processes and ambient properties. These particles are complex microenvironments, which can contain multiple interfaces due to internal aqueous-organic phase partitioning and to the external liquid-vapor surface. Interfacial properties affect the ambient aerosol morphology, or internal structure of the particle, which in turn can affect the way a particle interacts with an environment of condensable clusters and organic vapors. To improve our ability to accurately predict ambient aerosol morphology, we must improve our knowledge of aerosol interfaces and their interactions with the ambient environment. Unfortunately, many techniques employed to measure interfacial properties do so in bulk solutions or in the presence of a ternary (e.g. solid) phase. In this talk, a novel method using biphasic microscale flows will be introduced for generating, trapping, and perturbing complex interfaces at atmospherically relevant conditions. These microfluidic experiments utilize high-speed imaging to monitor interfacial phenomena at the microscale and are performed with phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy on a temperature-controlled inverted microscope stage. From these experiments, interfacial thermodynamic properties such as surface or interfacial tension, rheological properties such as interfacial moduli, and kinetic properties such as mass transfer coefficients can be measured or inferred.

  19. Effects of Relative Humidity and Particle Phase Water on the Heterogeneous OH Oxidation of 2-Methylglutaric Acid Aqueous Droplets.

    PubMed

    Chim, Man Mei; Chow, Chun Yin; Davies, James F; Chan, Man Nin

    2017-03-02

    Organic aerosols can exist as aqueous droplets, with variable water content depending on their composition and environmental conditions (e.g., relative humidity (RH)). Recent laboratory studies have revealed that oxidation kinetics in highly concentrated droplets can be much slower than those in dilute solutions. However, it remains unclear whether aerosol phase water affects the formation of reaction products physically and/or chemically. In this work, we investigate the role of aerosol phase water on the heterogeneous chemistry of aqueous organic droplets consisting of 2-methylglutaric acid (2-MGA), measuring the reaction kinetics and the reaction products upon heterogeneous OH oxidation over a range of RH. An atmospheric pressure soft ionization source (direct analysis in real time, DART) coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer is used to obtain real-time molecular information on the reaction products. Aerosol mass spectra show that the same reaction products are formed at all measured RH. At a given reaction extent of the parent 2-MGA, the aerosol composition is independent of RH. These results suggest the aerosol phase water does not alter reaction mechanisms significantly. Kinetic measurements find that the effective OH uptake coefficient, γeff, decreases with decreasing RH below 72%. Isotopic exchange measurements performed using aerosol optical tweezers reveal water diffusion coefficients in the 2-MGA droplets to be 3.0 × 10(-13) to 8.0 × 10(-13) m(2) s(-1) over the RH range of 47-58%. These values are comparable to those of other viscous organic aerosols (e.g., citric acid), indicating that 2-MGA droplets are likely to be viscous at low humidity. Smaller γeff at low RH is likely attributed to the slower diffusion of reactants within the droplets. Taken together, the observed relationship between the γeff and RH is likely attributed to changes in aerosol viscosity rather than changes in reaction mechanisms.

  20. Phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of mixed oleic acid/sodium chloride/water aerosol particles before and after ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Hanford, Kate L; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-06-21

    Aerosol optical tweezers are used to probe the phase, morphology, and hygroscopicity of single aerosol particles consisting of an inorganic component, sodium chloride, and a water insoluble organic component, oleic acid. Coagulation of oleic acid aerosol with an optically trapped aqueous sodium chloride droplet leads to formation of a phase-separated particle with two partially engulfed liquid phases. The dependence of the phase and morphology of the trapped particle with variation in relative humidity (RH) is investigated by cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy over the RH range <5% to >95%. The efflorescence and deliquescence behavior of the inorganic component is shown to be unaffected by the presence of the organic phase. Whereas efflorescence occurs promptly (<1 s), the deliquescence process requires both dissolution of the inorganic component and the adoption of an equilibrium morphology for the resulting two phase particle, occurring on a time-scale of <20 s. Comparative measurements of the hygroscopicity of mixed aqueous sodium chloride/oleic acid droplets with undoped aqueous sodium chloride droplets show that the oleic acid does not impact on the equilibration partitioning of water between the inorganic component and the gas phase or the time response of evaporation/condensation. The oxidative aging of the particles through reaction with ozone is shown to increase the hygroscopicity of the organic component.

  1. Analysis of Arctic Cloud Thermodynamic Phase Susceptibility to Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Q.; Garrett, T. J.; Riedi, J.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Even if Arctic is remote from industrialized areas, this region is influenced by elevated concentration of aerosols from mid-latitude, especially during winter. This is mainly due to the decrease of wet scavenging and the surface temperature inversion, both acting as a trap for the atmospheric particles. Aerosols play a key role on cloud's microphysics, because they act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) or Ice Nuclei (IN). Both nuclei influence directly on cloud's presence and formation, potentially impacting also thermodynamic phase transition through different mechanisms, which in turn affect cloud radiative properties and forcing. In our study we used two sets of data: i) A combination of POLDER-3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA satellite measurements to retrieve cloud properties; ii) The numerical transport model FLEXPART which use carbon monoxide tracer to inform on concentration of biomass burning and anthropogenic aerosols. The main advantage of combining these two sets of data is to obtain large statistics about clouds that have been potentially influenced by varied concentrations of aerosol. We report here results of a study in which we analyze potential interaction between clouds and aerosols from biomass burning and anthropogenic sources. We first analyzed the temperature at which thermodynamic phase transition is most likely to occur according to the types and concentrations of aerosols. It is shown a correlation between the temperature of thermodynamic phase transition and aerosols concentrations and type. Unlike we could have expected from previous studies, preliminary analyses suggest that aerosols from anthropogenic sources accelerate the liquid-ice transition whereas aerosols from biomass burning inhibit the transition from water to ice. Different hypotheses can be responsible for this observation and we analyze parameters that can play a role on the transition temperature shift and how aerosols act as an inhibitor or activator of the phase transition, for

  2. Surfactant Driven Post-Deposition Spreading of Aerosols on Complex Aqueous Subphases. 2: Low Deposition Flux Representative of Aerosol Delivery to Small Airways

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ramankur; Khanal, Amsul; Corcoran, Timothy E.; Przybycien, Todd M.; Tilton, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with the accumulation of dehydrated mucus in the pulmonary airways. This alters ventilation and aerosol deposition patterns in ways that limit drug delivery to peripheral lung regions. We investigated the use of surfactant-based, self-dispersing aerosol carriers that produce surface tension gradients to drive two-dimensional transport of aerosolized medications via Marangoni flows after deposition on the airway surface liquid (ASL). We considered the post-deposition spreading of individual aerosol droplets and two-dimensional expansion of a field of aerosol droplets, when deposited at low fluxes that are representative of aerosol deposition in the small airways. Methods: We used physically entangled aqueous solutions of poly(acrylamide) or porcine gastric mucin as simple ASL mimics that adequately capture the full miscibility but slow penetration of entangled macromolecular chains of the ASL into the deposited drop. Surfactant formulations were prepared with aqueous solutions of nonionic tyloxapol or FS-3100 fluorosurfactant. Fluorescein dye served as a model “drug” tracer and to visualize the extent of post-deposition spreading. Results: The surfactants not only enhanced post-deposition spreading of individual aerosol droplets due to localized Marangoni stresses, as previously observed with macroscopic drops, but they also produced large-scale Marangoni stresses that caused the deposited aerosol fields to expand into initially unexposed regions of the subphase. We show that the latter is the main mechanism for spreading drug over large distances when aerosol is deposited at low fluxes representative of the small airways. The large scale convective expansion of the aerosol field drives the tracer (drug mimic) over areas that would cover an entire airway generation or more, in peripheral airways, where sub-monolayer droplet deposition is expected during aerosol inhalation. Conclusions: The results suggest

  3. Aqueous benzene-diols react with an organic triplet excited state and hydroxyl radical to form secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy D; Kinney, Haley; Anastasio, Cort

    2015-04-21

    Chemical processing in atmospheric aqueous phases, such as cloud and fog drops, can play a significant role in the production and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we examine aqueous SOA production via the oxidation of benzene-diols (dihydroxy-benzenes) by the triplet excited state of 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, (3)DMB*, and by hydroxyl radical, ˙OH. Reactions of the three benzene-diols (catechol (CAT), resorcinol (RES) and hydroquinone (HQ)) with (3)DMB* or ˙OH proceed rapidly, with rate constants near diffusion-controlled values. The two oxidants exhibit different behaviors with pH, with rate constants for (3)DMB* increasing as pH decreases from pH 5 to 2, while rate constants with ˙OH decrease in more acidic solutions. Mass yields of SOA were near 100% for all three benzene-diols with both oxidants. We also examined the reactivity of atmospherically relevant mixtures of phenols and benzene-diols in the presence of (3)DMB*. We find that the kinetics of phenol and benzene-diol loss, and the production of SOA mass, in mixtures are generally consistent with rate constants determined in experiments containing a single phenol or benzene-diol. Combining our aqueous kinetic and SOA mass yield data with previously published gas-phase data, we estimate a total SOA production rate from benzene-diol oxidation in a foggy area with significant wood combustion to be nearly 0.6 μg mair(-3) h(-1), with approximately half from the aqueous oxidation of resorcinol and hydroquinone, and half from the gas-phase oxidation of catechol.

  4. On the Implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for modeled organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current chemical transport models assume that organic aerosol (OA)-forming compounds partition mostly to a water-poor, organic-rich phase in accordance with their vapor pressures. However, in the southeast United States, a significant fraction of ambient organic compounds are wat...

  5. Enrichment of 13C in diacids and related compounds during photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: New proxy for organic aerosols aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the applicability of compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of organics in assessment of their photochemical aging in the atmosphere, batch UV irradiation experiments were conducted on two ambient (anthropogenic and biogenic) aerosol samples in aqueous phase for 0.5–120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for δ13C of diacids, glyoxylic acid (ωC2) and glyoxal. δ13C of diacids and related compounds became larger with irradiation time (i.e., aging), except for few cases. In general, δ13C of C2-C4 diacids showed an increasing trend with decreasing chain length. Based on δ13C of diacids and related compounds and their relations to their concentrations, we found that C2 and C3 are enriched with 13C during the photochemical decomposition and production from their higher homologues and oxoacids. Photochemical breakdown of higher (≥C3) to lower diacids is also important in the enrichment of 13C in C3-C9 diacids whereas their production from primary precursors causes depletion of 13C. In case of ωC2 and glyoxal, their photochemical production and further oxidation to highly oxygenated compounds both cause the enrichment of 13C. This study reveals that δ13C of diacids and related compounds can be used as a proxy to trace the aging of organic aerosols during long-range atmospheric transport.

  6. Enrichment of 13C in diacids and related compounds during photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: New proxy for organic aerosols aging

    PubMed Central

    Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the applicability of compound specific stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of organics in assessment of their photochemical aging in the atmosphere, batch UV irradiation experiments were conducted on two ambient (anthropogenic and biogenic) aerosol samples in aqueous phase for 0.5–120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for δ13C of diacids, glyoxylic acid (ωC2) and glyoxal. δ13C of diacids and related compounds became larger with irradiation time (i.e., aging), except for few cases. In general, δ13C of C2-C4 diacids showed an increasing trend with decreasing chain length. Based on δ13C of diacids and related compounds and their relations to their concentrations, we found that C2 and C3 are enriched with 13C during the photochemical decomposition and production from their higher homologues and oxoacids. Photochemical breakdown of higher (≥C3) to lower diacids is also important in the enrichment of 13C in C3-C9 diacids whereas their production from primary precursors causes depletion of 13C. In case of ωC2 and glyoxal, their photochemical production and further oxidation to highly oxygenated compounds both cause the enrichment of 13C. This study reveals that δ13C of diacids and related compounds can be used as a proxy to trace the aging of organic aerosols during long-range atmospheric transport. PMID:27811980

  7. Control over hygroscopic growth of saline aqueous aerosol using Pluronic polymer additives.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Hargreaves, Graham; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2013-02-25

    The hygroscopic properties of an aerosol originating from a nebulizer solution can affect the extent of peripheral deposition within the respiratory tract, which in turn affects drug efficacy of drugs delivered to the lungs. Thus, the ability to tailor the degree and rate of hygroscopic growth of an aerosol produced by a nebulizer through modification of the formulation would serve to improve drug efficacy through targeted lung deposition. In this study, the kinetic and thermodynamic hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride aerosol mixed with commercially available Pluronic polymers, specifically F77 and F127, are reported using three complementary single aerosol analysis techniques, specifically aerosol optical tweezers, a double ring electrodynamic balance and a concentric cylinder electrodynamic balance. The F77 polymer is shown to have a predictable effect on the hygroscopic properties of the aerosol: the ability of the droplet to uptake water from the air depends on the solute weight percent of sodium chloride present in a linear dose dependant manner. Unlike the smaller F77, a non-linear relationship was observed for the larger molecular weight F127 polymer, with significant suppression of hygroscopic growth (>50% by mass) for solution aerosol containing even only 1 wt% of the polymer and 99 wt% sodium chloride. The suppression of growth is shown to be consistent with the formation of mixed phase aerosol particles containing hydrophilic inorganic rich domains and hydrophobic polymer rich domains that sequester some of the inorganic component, with the two phases responding to changes in relative humidity independently. This independence of coupling with the gas phase is apparent in both the equilibrium state and the kinetics of water evaporation/condensation. By starting with a saline nebulizer solution with a concentration of F127 ∼10(-2)mM, a 12% reduction in the radius of all aerosol produced at a relative humidity (RH) of 84% is possible. The

  8. Brown carbon formation by aqueous-phase carbonyl compound reactions with amines and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Powelson, Michelle H; Espelien, Brenna M; Hawkins, Lelia N; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O

    2014-01-21

    Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyl compounds, ammonium sulfate (AS), and/or amines were evaluated for their ability to form light-absorbing species in aqueous aerosol. Aerosol chemistry was simulated with bulk phase reactions at pH 4, 275 K, initial concentrations of 0.05 to 0.25 M, and UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring. Glycolaldehyde-glycine mixtures produced the most intense absorbance. In carbonyl compound reactions with AS, methylamine, or AS/glycine mixtures, product absorbance followed the order methylglyoxal > glyoxal > glycolaldehyde > hydroxyacetone. Absorbance extended into the visible, with a wavelength dependence fit by absorption Ångstrom coefficients (Å(abs)) of 2 to 11, overlapping the Å(abs) range of atmospheric, water-soluble brown carbon. Many reaction products absorbing between 300 and 400 nm were strongly fluorescent. On a per mole basis, amines are much more effective than AS at producing brown carbon. In addition, methylglyoxal and glyoxal produced more light-absorbing products in reactions with a 5:1 AS-glycine mixture than with AS or glycine alone, illustrating the importance of both organic and inorganic nitrogen in brown carbon formation. Through comparison to biomass burning aerosol, we place an upper limit on the contribution of these aqueous carbonyl-AS-amine reactions of ≤ 10% of global light absorption by brown carbon.

  9. Explicit modeling of volatile organic compounds partitioning in the atmospheric aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Bräuer, P.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.; Madronich, S.; Herrmann, H.; Aumont, B.

    2013-01-01

    The gas phase oxidation of organic species is a multigenerational process involving a large number of secondary compounds. Most secondary organic species are water-soluble multifunctional oxygenated molecules. The fully explicit chemical mechanism GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is used to describe the oxidation of organics in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase. The oxidation of three hydrocarbons of atmospheric interest (isoprene, octane and α-pinene) is investigated for various NOx conditions. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a new two dimensional space defined by the mean oxidation state and the solubility. The amount of dissolved organic matter was found to be very low (yield less than 2% on carbon atom basis) under a water content typical of deliquescent aerosols. For cloud water content, 50% (isoprene oxidation) to 70% (octane oxidation) of the carbon atoms are found in the aqueous phase after the removal of the parent hydrocarbons for low NOx conditions. For high NOx conditions, this ratio is only 5% in the isoprene oxidation case, but remains large for α-pinene and octane oxidation cases (40% and 60%, respectively). Although the model does not yet include chemical reactions in the aqueous phase, much of this dissolved organic matter should be processed in cloud drops and modify both oxidation rates and the speciation of organic species.

  10. Explicit modeling of volatile organic compounds partitioning in the atmospheric aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Bräuer, P.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.; Madronich, S.; Herrmann, H.; Aumont, B.

    2012-09-01

    The gas phase oxidation of organic species is a multigenerational process involving a large number of secondary compounds. Most secondary organic species are water-soluble multifunctional oxygenated molecules. The fully explicit chemical mechanism GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is used to describe the oxidation of organics in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase. The oxidation of three hydrocarbons of atmospheric interest (isoprene, octane and α-pinene) is investigated for various NOx conditions. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a new two dimensional space defined by the mean oxidation state and the solubility. The amount of dissolved organic matter was found to be very low (<2%) under a water content typical of deliquescent aerosols. For cloud water content, 50% (isoprene oxidation) to 70% (octane oxidation) of the carbon atoms are found in the aqueous phase after the removal of the parent hydrocarbons for low NOx conditions. For high NOx conditions, this ratio is only 5% in the isoprene oxidation case, but remains large for α-pinene and octane oxidation cases (40% and 60%, respectively). Although the model does not yet include chemical reactions in the aqueous phase, much of this dissolved organic matter should be processed in cloud drops and modify both oxidation rates and the speciation of organic species.

  11. Secondary organic aerosol formation from aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde in atmospheric waters: Chemical insights and kinetic model studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Tan, Y.; Altieri, K. E.; Perri, M. J.; Carlton, A. G.; Seitzinger, S.; Turpin, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Aqueous chemistry in clouds, fog and aerosol water is now considered an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Modeling studies confirm that the underlying chemistry is kinetically favorable. Laboratory studies have begun to validate and refine the aqueous chemical mechanisms. Field observations, such as the atmospheric abundance of oxalate, ubiquitous presence of high molecular weight or humic-like substances (HULIS), high ambient O/C ratios, and correlations between SOA and aerosol liquid water content provide atmospheric evidence for SOA formation through aqueous chemistry. In the aqueous phase, small and volatile (C2-C3) but water soluble organic compounds undergo radical (photooxidation) and non-radical (acid/base catalysis) reactions, or reactions with inorganic constituents (sulfate, nitrate or ammonia) to form low volatility products including organic acids, organic-inorganic complexes and oligomers. These products are expected to remain at least in part in the particle phase after water evaporation, forming SOA. While not traditionally considered to be SOA precursors, atmospherically abundant and water soluble organic compounds like glyoxal (C2), methylglyoxal (C3) and glycolaldehyde (C2) have great potential to form SOA via aqueous chemistry. This paper presents a unified reaction mechanism and full kinetic model for the aqueous-phase reaction of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, pyruvic acid and acetic acid with OH radical and validates this mechanism, in part, with laboratory experiments. At cloud relevant concentrations (~1E-6 M), the major product is oxalic acid and formation is well predicted by the previous cloud model (Lim et al., 2005). As concentrations increase radical-radical reactions become increasingly important and yield higher molecular weight products. The full kinetic model suggests that SOA formed in aerosol water (where organic concentrations are > 1 M) is comprised of high molecular weight multifunctional compounds

  12. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear-magnetic-resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, and methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water, but it may also be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  13. Formation of aqueous-phase α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHP): potential atmospheric impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Soong, R.; Simpson, A. J.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-02-01

    The focus of this work is on quantifying the degree of the aqueous-phase formation of α-hydroxyhydroperoxides (α-HHPs) via reversible nucleophilic addition of H2O2 to aldehydes. Formation of this class of highly oxygenated organic hydroperoxides represents a poorly characterized aqueous-phase processing pathway that may lead to enhanced SOA formation and aerosol toxicity. Specifically, the equilibrium constants of α-HHP formation have been determined using proton nuclear resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Significant α-HHP formation was observed from formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyoxylic acid, methylglyoxal, but not from methacrolein and ketones. Low temperatures enhanced the formation of α-HHPs but slowed their formation rates. High inorganic salt concentrations shifted the equilibria toward the hydrated form of the aldehydes and slightly suppressed α-HHP formation. Using the experimental equilibrium constants, we predict the equilibrium concentration of α-HHPs to be in the μM level in cloud water but may be present in the mM level in aerosol liquid water (ALW), where the concentrations of H2O2 and aldehydes can be high. Formation of α-HHPs in ALW may significantly affect the effective Henry's law constants of H2O2 and aldehydes but may not affect their gas-phase levels. The photochemistry and reactivity of this class of atmospheric species have not been studied.

  14. Catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  15. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  16. Aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by O3 measured at the CERN CLOUD chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Christopher; Fuchs, Claudia; Gysel, Martin; Troestl, Jasmin; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Dommen, Josef; Dias, Antonio; Jaervinen, Emma; Moehler, Ottmar; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of aerosol growth due to the oxidation of SO2 by O3 in cloud droplets at temperatures of 10° C and -10° C are presented. Although this reaction has been well studied in bulk solutions at temperatures above 0° C, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time the reaction rate has been studied in laboratory formed, super-cooled cloud droplets. These experiments were made possible by utilising the adiabatic expansion system in the 27 m3 CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN. Experiments were performed on both acidic (sulphuric acid) and neutral (ammonium sulphate) seed aerosol. During 6 minute cloud cycles, droplets of approximately 10μm diameter were formed, and the growth of the aerosol due to the uptake and oxidation of SO2 was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). A microphysical model was developed to simulate the cloud droplet activation and growth as well as the aqueous phase chemistry. The ability of the model to accurately represent the observed aerosol growth is assessed, and the implications for the extrapolation of the SO2+O3oxidation rates to sub-zero temperatures are discussed.

  17. Aqueous Gemini Surfactant Self-Assembly into Complex Lyotropic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthappa, Mahesh; Sorenson, Gregory

    2012-02-01

    In spite of the potentially wide-ranging applications of aqueous bicontinuous lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs), the discovery of amphiphiles that reliably form these non-constant mean curvature morphologies over large phase windows remains largely serendipitous. Recent work has established that cationic gemini surfactants exhibit a pronounced tendency to form bicontinuous cubic (e.g. gyroid) phases as compared to their parent single-tail amphiphiles. The universality of this phenomenon in other surfactant systems remains untested. In this paper, we will report the aqueous LLC phase behavior of a new class of anionic gemini surfactants derived from long chain carboxylic acids. Our studies show that these new surfactants favor the formation of non-constant mean curvature gyroid and primitive (``Plumber's Nightmare'') structures over amphiphile concentration windows up to 20 wt% wide. Based on these observations, we will discuss insights gained into the delicate force balance governing the self-assembly of these surfactants into aqueous bicontinuous LLCs.

  18. Oxidation of Organic Compoundsin the Atmospheric Aqueous Phase: Development of a New Explicit Oxidation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Monod, A.; Leriche, M.; Doussin, J. F.; Chaumerliac, N. M.; Deguillaume, L.

    2014-12-01

    Current 3D models tend to underestimate the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere (Volkamer et al., 2006). Recent studies argue that aqueous chemistry in clouds could be responsible for a significant production of SOA (Ervens et al., 2011; Carlton and Turpin, 2013) through oxidative and non-oxidative processes. Aqueous phase reactivity of organic compounds needs to be thoroughly described in models to identify organic molecules available to contribute to SOA mass. Recently, new empirical methods have been developed to allow the estimate of HO·reaction rates in the aqueous phase (Doussin and Monod, 2013, Minakata et al., 2009). These methods provide global rate constants together with branching ratios for HO·abstraction and addition on organic compounds of atmospheric interests. Current cloud chemistry mechanisms do not take the different possible pathways into account. Based on these structure-activity relationships, a new detailed aqueous phase mechanism describing the oxidation of hydrosoluble organic compounds resulting from isoprene oxidation is proposed. This new aqueous phase mechanism is coupled with the detailed gas phase mechanism MCM v3.2 (Jenkin et al., 1997; Saunders et al., 2003) through a kinetic of mass transfer parameterization for the exchange between gas phase and aqueous phase. The GROMHE SAR (Raventos-Duran et al., 2010) allows the evaluation of Henry's law constants for organic compounds. Variable photolysis in both phases using the TUV 4.5 radiative transfer model (Madronich and Flocke, 1997) is also calculated. The resulting multiphase mechanism has been implemented in a cloud chemistry model. Focusing on oxygenated compounds produced from the isoprene oxidation, sensitivity tests and comparisons with multiphase experiments performed in the framework of the CUMULUS project in the CESAM atmospheric simulation chamber (Wang et al., 2011) will be presented. Volkamer et al., GRL, 33, L17811, 2006. Carlton and Turpin

  19. Aqueous-phase source of formic acid in clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The coupled gas- and aqueous-phase cloud chemistry of HCOOH were examined for controlling factors in the acidity of cloud and rainwater. Attention was given to the aqueous OH/HO2 system that yields an OH species that is highly reactive with other species, notably SO2 and the formaldehyde/formic acid complex. A numerical model was developed to simulate the cloud chemistry in the remote troposphere, with considerations given to CH4-CO-NO(x)-O3-H(x)O(y) system. It was determined that aqueous phase OH radicals can produce and destroy formic acid droplets in daylight conditions, as well as control formic acid levels in rainwater. It is sugested that the same types of reactions may be involved in the control of acetic acid and other organic acids.

  20. Humidity influence on gas-particle phase partitioning of α-pinene + O3 secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisle, N. L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Bilde, M.; Donahue, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    Water vapor uptake to particles could potentially affect organic-aerosol mass in three ways: first, water in the organic phase could reduce organic (equilibrium) partial pressures according to Raoult's law; second, an aqueous phase could attract water soluble organics according to Henry's law; finally, deliquescence of inorganic particle cores could mix the organic and inorganic particle phases, significantly diluting the organics and again reducing organic partial pressures according to Raoult's law. We present experiments using initially dry α-pinene + ozone secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on ammonium sulfate (AS) seeds at atmospheric concentrations in a smog chamber. After SOA formation, the chamber relative humidity is increased steadily by addition of steam to near 100%. Little subsequent SOA mass growth is observed, suggesting that none of these potential effects play a strong role in this system.

  1. Regional Air Quality Model Application of the Aqueous-Phase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In most ecosystems, atmospheric deposition is the primary input of mercury. The total wet deposition of mercury in atmospheric chemistry models is sensitive to parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of divalent oxidized mercury (Hg2+). However, most atmospheric chemistry models use a parameterization of the aqueous-phase reduction of Hg2+ that has been shown to be unlikely under normal ambient conditions or use a non mechanistic value derived to optimize wet deposition results. Recent laboratory experiments have shown that Hg2+ can be photochemically reduced to elemental mercury (Hg) in the aqueous-phase by dissolved organic matter and a mechanism and the rate for Hg2+ photochemical reduction by dicarboxylic acids (DCA) has been proposed. For the first time in a regional scale model, the DCA mechanism has been applied. The HO2-Hg2+ reduction mechanism, the proposed DCA reduction mechanism, and no aqueous-phase reduction (NAR) of Hg2+ are evaluated against weekly wet deposition totals, concentrations and precipitation observations from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model version 4.7.1. Regional scale simulations of mercury wet deposition using a DCA reduction mechanism evaluated well against observations, and reduced the bias in model evaluation by at least 13% over the other schemes evaluated, although summertime deposition estimates were still biased by −31.4% against observations. The use of t

  2. On-demand generation of aqueous two-phase microdroplets with reversible phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B; Mruetusatorn, Prachya; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems contained entirely within microdroplets enable a bottom-up approach to mimicking the dynamic microcompartmentation of biomaterial that naturally occurs within the cytoplasm of cells. Here, we demonstrate the on-demand generation of femtolitre aqueous two-phase droplets within a microfluidic oil channel. Gated pressure pulses were used to generate individual, stationary two-phase microdroplets with a well-defined time zero for carrying out controlled and sequential phase transformations over time. Reversible phase transitions between single-phase, two-phase, and core-shell microgel states were obtained via evaporation-induced dehydration and on-demand water rehydration. In contrast to other microfluidic aqueous two-phase droplets, which require continuous flows and high-frequency droplet formation, our system enables the controlled isolation and reversible transformation of a single microdroplet and is expected to be useful for future studies in dynamic microcompartmentation and affinity partitioning.

  3. Computation of Phase Equilibria, State Diagrams and Gas/Particle Partitioning of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of organic-inorganic aerosols is linked to several processes and specific topics in the field of atmospheric aerosol science. Photochemical oxidation of organics in the gas phase lowers the volatility of semi-volatile compounds and contributes to the particulate matter by gas/particle partitioning. Heterogeneous chemistry and changes in the ambient relative humidity influence the aerosol composition as well. Molecular interactions between condensed phase species show typically non-ideal thermodynamic behavior. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar, aqueous and a less polar, organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile organics and inorganics (Erdakos and Pankow, 2004; Chang and Pankow, 2006). Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol particles feed back on the heterogeneous, multi-phase chemistry, influence the scattering and absorption of radiation and affect the CCN ability of the particles. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy, enabling the calculation of activity coefficients. We use the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008) to calculate activity coefficients, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed organic-inorganic systems. This thermodynamic model was combined with a robust global optimization module to compute potential liquid-liquid (LLE) and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria (VLLE) as a function of particle composition at room temperature. And related to that, the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile components. Furthermore, we compute the thermodynamic stability (spinodal limits) of single-phase solutions, which provides information on the process type and kinetics of a phase separation. References Chang, E. I. and Pankow, J. F.: Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water - Part

  4. High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Molecular Characterization of Aqueous Photochemistry Products of Common Types of Secondary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-03-19

    A significant fraction of atmospheric organic compounds is predominantly found in condensed phases, such as aerosol particles and cloud droplets. Many of these compounds are photolabile and can degrade through direct photolysis or indirect photooxidation processes on time scales that are comparable to the typical lifetimes of aqueous droplets (hours) and particles (days). This paper presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d- limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features, and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx generated SOA had more unique visual appearance, and indicated a lower extent of products overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents

  5. Aqueous phase oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone through photooxidation - Part 2: Development of the chemical mechanism and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Ravier, S.; Clément, J.-L.; Monod, A.

    2014-08-01

    We developed a chemical mechanism based on laboratory experiments that have shown efficient oligomerization from methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) in the bulk aqueous phase. Kinetic data are applied (if known) or fitted to the observed MVK decay and oligomer mass increase. The mechanism is then implemented into a multiphase box model that simulates (i) oligomer formation upon uptake of MVK from the gas phase, and (ii) SOA formation from isoprene, as a precursor of MVK and methacrolein (MACR) in the aqueous and gas phases. Model results show that under atmospheric conditions, the oligomer formation rate strongly depends on the availability of dissolved oxygen. If oxygen is consumed too quickly or its solubility is kinetically or thermodynamically limited, oligomerization is accelerated, in agreement with the laboratory studies. The comparison of predicted oligomer formation shows that for most model assumptions (e.g. depending on the assumed partitioning of MVK and MACR), SOA formation from isoprene in the gas phase exceeds aqueous SOA formation by a factor 3-4. However, at high aerosol liquid water content and potentially high partitioning of oligomer precursors into the aqueous phase, SOA formation in both phases might be equally efficient.

  6. NMR Studies on the Aqueous Phase Photochemical Degradation of TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2008-04-06

    Aqueous phase photochemical degradation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is an important pathway in several environments, including washout lagoon soils, impact craters from partially detonated munitions that fill with rain or groundwater, and shallow marine environments containing unexploded munitions that have corroded. Knowledge of the degradation products is necessary for compliance issues on military firing ranges and formerly used defense sites. Previous laboratory studies have indicated that UV irradiation of aqueous TNT solutions results in a multicomponent product mixture, including polymerization compounds, that has been only partially resolved by mass spectrometric analyses. This study illustrates how a combination of solid and liquid state 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR spectroscopy, including two dimensional analyses, provides complementary information on the total product mixture from aqueous photolysis of TNT, and the effect of reaction conditions. Among the degradation products detected were amine, amide, azoxy, azo, and carboxylic acid compounds.

  7. X-Ray Microspectroscopic Investigations of Remote Aerosol Composition and Changes in Aerosol Microstructure and Phase State upon Hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.; Bechtel, M.; Förster, J. D.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Saturno, J.; Weigand, M.; Wiedemann, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the Earth's climate system and hydrological cycle by scattering and absorbing sunlight and affecting the formation and development of clouds and precipitation. Our research focuses on aerosols in remote regions, in order to characterize the properties and sources of natural aerosol particles and the extent of human perturbations of the aerosol burden. The phase and mixing state of atmospheric aerosols, and particularly their hygroscopic response to relative humidity (RH) variations, is a central determinant of their atmospheric life cycle and impacts. We present an investigation using X-ray microspectroscopy on submicrometer aerosols under variable RH conditions, showing in situ changes in morphology, microstructure, and phase state upon humidity cycling. We applied Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy with Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) under variable RH conditions to standard aerosols for a validation of the experimental approach and to internally mixed aerosol particles from the Amazonian rain forest collected during periods with anthropogenic pollution. The measurements were conducted at X-ray microscopes at the synchrotron facilities Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley, USA, and BESSY II in Berlin, Germany. Upon hydration, we observed substantial and reproducible changes in microstructure of the Amazonian particles (internal mixture of secondary organic material, ammoniated sulfate, and soot), which appear as mainly driven by efflorescence and recrystallization of sulfate salts. Multiple solid and liquid phases were found to coexist, especially in intermediate humidity regimes (60-80% RH). This shows that X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH is a valuable technique to analyze the hygroscopic response of individual ambient aerosol particles. Our initial results underline that RH changes can trigger strong particle restructuring, in agreement with previous studies on

  8. “Towards building better linkages between aqueous phase ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Currently, CMAQ’s aqueous phase chemistry routine (AQCHEM-base) assumes Henry’s Law equilibrium and employs a forward Euler method to solve a small set of oxidation equations, considering the additional processes of aitken scavenging and wet deposition in series and employing a bisection method to calculate H+ concentrations. With potentially hundreds of reactions that may be important in cloud water and only seven reactions in the current model, expansion of the existing mechanism is an important area of investigation. However, with the current mechanism hardwired into the solver code, the module is difficult to expand with additional chemistry. It also ignores the impacts of mass transfer limitations on cloud chemistry which may be significant. Here, the Kinetic PreProcessor has been applied to generate a Rosenbrock solver for the CMAQ v5.0.1 aqueous phase chemistry mechanism. The module has been updated to simultaneously solve kinetic mass transfer between the phases, dissociation/association, chemical kinetics, Aitken scavenging, and wet deposition. This will allow for easier expansion of the chemical mechanism in the future and a better link between aqueous phase chemistry and droplet microphysics. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Atmospheric Modeling and Analysis Division (AMAD) conducts research in support of EPA mission to protect human health and the environment. AMAD research program is engaged in developing and evaluating pre

  9. Interfacial Chemistry of Aqueous Sulfur/Iodide Aerosol Microdroplets in Gaseous Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, S.; Vecitis, C. D.; Cheng, J.; Colussi, A. J.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    The intermediates ISO3- (m/z = 207) and IS2O3- (m/z = 239) generated in aqueous (iodide - thiosulfate) microdroplets traversing dilute ozone gas plumes at atmospheric pressure are detected via online electrospray mass spectrometry within 1 ms, and their stabilities gauged by collision-induced dissociation. The simultaneous detection of anionic reactants and the S2O62-, HSO4-, IO3- and I3- products as a function of experimental conditions provides evidence of unique interfacial reaction kinetics. Although ozone reacts ~3-4 times faster with I- than S2O332- in bulk solution, only S2O32- is apparently oxidized in [I--]o/[S2O32- ]o = 10 microdroplets below [O3(g)] ~ 50 ppm. The sulfite to sulfate and iodide to triiodide and iodate oxidations in the interfacial layers of aqueous thiosulfate or mixed thiosulfate and iodide microdroplets briefly exposed to dilute O3(g) gas mixtures are also investigated. S(IV) oxidation kinetics in sodium thiosulfate solutions, where the rates are proportional to [S(IV)] [O3(g)] in the ranges investigated, correspond to a surface-specific reaction. I3-/IO3- yields based on interfacial I- losses exceed their stoichiometric limits in the presence of excess S(IV), revealing that interfacial I- is competitively replenished from the microdroplets inner layers. Present results provide unequivocal evidence of distinct interfacial chemistry in gas-aerosol reactions of atmospheric relevance.

  10. Stability and Vapor Pressure of Aqueous Aggregates and Aerosols Containing a Monovalent Ion.

    PubMed

    Perez Sirkin, Yamila A; Factorovich, Matías H; Molinero, Valeria; Scherlis, Damián A

    2017-04-06

    The incidence of charged particles on the nucleation and the stability of aqueous aggregates and aerosols was reported more than a century ago. Many studies have been conducted ever since to characterize the stability, structure, and nucleation barrier of ion-water droplets. Most of these studies have focused on the free-energy surface as a function of cluster size, with an emphasis on the role of ionic charge and radius. This knowledge is fundamental to go beyond the rudimentary ion-induced classical nucleation theory. In the present article, we address this problem from a different perspective, by computing the vapor pressures of (H2O)nLi(+) and (H2O)nCl(-) aggregates using molecular simulations. Our calculations shed light on the structure, the critical size, the range of stability, and the role of ion-water interactions in aqueous clusters. Moreover, they allow one to assess the accuracy of the classical thermodynamic model, highlighting its strengths and weaknesses.

  11. Converting sugars to sugar alcohols by aqueous phase catalytic hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2003-05-27

    The present invention provides a method of converting sugars to their corresponding sugar alcohols by catalytic hydrogenation in the aqueous phase. It has been found that surprisingly superior results can be obtained by utilizing a relatively low temperature (less than 120.degree. C.), selected hydrogenation conditions, and a hydrothermally stable catalyst. These results include excellent sugar conversion to the desired sugar alcohol, in combination with long life under hydrothermal conditions.

  12. Aqueous-phase oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone through photooxidation - Part 2: Development of the chemical mechanism and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Tlili, S.; Ravier, S.; Clément, J.-L.; Monod, A.

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory experiments of efficient oligomerization from methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) in the bulk aqueous phase were simulated in a box model. Kinetic data are applied (if known) or fitted to the observed MVK decay and oligomer mass increase. Upon model sensitivity studies, in which unconstrained rate constants were varied over several orders of magnitude, a set of reaction parameters was found that could reproduce laboratory data over a wide range of experimental conditions. This mechanism is the first that comprehensively describes such radical-initiated oligomer formation. This mechanism was implemented into a multiphase box model that simulates secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene, as a precursor of MVK and methacrolein (MACR) in the aqueous and gas phases. While in laboratory experiments oxygen limitation might occur and lead to accelerated oligomer formation, such conditions are likely not met in the atmosphere. The comparison of predicted oligomer formation shows that MVK and MACR likely do negligibly contribute to total SOA as their solubilities are low and even reduced in aerosol water due to ionic strength effects (Setchenov coefficients). Significant contribution by oligomers to total SOA might only occur if a substantial fraction of particulate carbon acts as oligomer precursors and/or if oxygen solubility in aerosol water is strongly reduced due to salting-out effects.

  13. Multiphase OH oxidation kinetics of organic aerosol: The role of particle phase state and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Jonathan H.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2014-07-01

    Organic aerosol can exhibit different phase states in response to changes in relative humidity (RH), thereby influencing heterogeneous reaction rates with trace gas species. OH radical uptake by laboratory-generated levoglucosan and methyl-nitrocatechol particles, serving as surrogates for biomass burning aerosol, is determined as a function of RH. Increasing RH lowers the viscosity of amorphous levoglucosan aerosol particles enabling enhanced OH uptake. Conversely, OH uptake by methyl-nitrocatechol aerosol particles is suppressed at higher RH as a result of competitive coadsorption of H2O that occupies reactive sites. This is shown to have substantial impacts on organic aerosol lifetimes with respect to OH oxidation. The results emphasize the importance of organic aerosol phase state to accurately describe the multiphase chemical kinetics and thus chemical aging process in atmospheric models to better represent the evolution of organic aerosol and its role in air quality and climate.

  14. A HRMS study of oligomer formation through aqueous phase photooxidation of methylvinyl-ketone and methacrolein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salque-moreton, G.; Liu, Y.; Voisin, D.; Siekmann, F.; Renard, P.; Monod, A.; Thissen, R.

    2012-04-01

    Global estimates of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation flux show that the current descriptions miss a large fraction of the sources. Aqueous phase photochemistry in cloud droplets and deliquescent aerosol may provide some of this missing flux. Organic reactions in those media, particularly leading to higher molecular weight products thus need better understanding. Here, we investigated the aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein (MACR) and methylvinyl-ketone (MVK), which are the two main oxidation products of isoprene, the volatile organic compound (VOC) that is mostly emitted on the global scale. In our experiments, photolysis of H2O2 provided OH radicals whose reaction with MACR or MVK produced oligomers. Firstly, oligomers were analyzed using electrospray ionization coupled with high-resolution linear ion trap Orbitrap™ (Thermo Corp.) mass spectrometer (HRMS). This technique enabled to propose the unambiguous elemental composition of the produced compounds as data were collected for a mass range of m/z 50-2000 amu. The mass of oligomers increased strongly in positive and negative ionization modes when initial concentrations of MACR and MVK were increased from 2 to 20 mM. Typical regular patterns of oligomer formation were observed for both precursors, and extended up to 1400 amu. These patterns were very different from each other for the two precursors although both showed regular mass differences of 70 amu. In addition, we used a Kendrick analysis and identified more than 20 distinct chemical oligomer series produced by photooxidation of both MACR and MVK, some of which reaching more than 1400 amu. The HRMS investigations allowed us to propose a mechanism of production of oligomers. Upon nebulization, both oligomer systems produce SOA with a mass yield of 2-12%. This mass yield increases with reaction time and precursor concentration. Moreover, time evolution of the oligomer systems observed with the Orbitrap will be compared to HR

  15. Radical mechanisms of methyl vinyl ketone oligomerization through aqueous phase OH-oxidation: on the paradoxical role of dissolved molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Siekmann, F.; Gandolfo, A.; Socorro, J.; Salque, G.; Ravier, S.; Quivet, E.; Clément, J.-L.; Traikia, M.; Delort, A.-M.; Voisin, D.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Monod, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is now accepted that one of the important pathways of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs through aqueous phase chemistry in the atmosphere. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to macromolecules are still not well understood. It was recently shown that oligomer production by OH radical oxidation in the aerosol aqueous phase from α-dicarbonyl precursors, such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal, is irreversible and fast. Methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was chosen in the present study as it is an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl that can undergo radical oligomerization in the aerosol aqueous phase. We present here experiments on the aqueous phase OH-oxidation of MVK, performed under various conditions. Using NMR and UV absorption spectroscopy, high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, we show that the fast formation of oligomers up to 1800 Da is due to radical oligomerization of MVK, and 13 series of oligomers (out of a total of 26 series) are identified. The influence of atmospherically relevant parameters such as temperature, initial concentrations of MVK and dissolved oxygen are presented and discussed. In agreement with the experimental observations, we propose a chemical mechanism of OH-oxidation of MVK in the aqueous phase that proceeds via radical oligomerization of MVK on the olefin part of the molecule. This mechanism highlights in our experiments the paradoxical role of dissolved O2: while it inhibits oligomerization reactions, it contributes to produce oligomerization initiator radicals, which rapidly consume O2, thus leading to the dominance of oligomerization reactions after several minutes of reaction. These processes, together with the large range of initial concentrations investigated show the fundamental role that radical oligomerization processes likely play in polluted fogs and atmospheric aerosol.

  16. Distribution of Dechlorinating Bacteria between the Aqueous and Solid Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cápiro, N. L.; Hatt, J. K.; Wang, Y.; Loeffler, F. E.; Pennell, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial monitoring of aquifers relies on nucleic acid biomarker analysis, which is typically performed with biomass recovered from groundwater samples; however, it is unclear what fraction of the target population(s) is associated with groundwater (i.e., planktonic cells) or is attached to solid phases (i.e., biofilms). Understanding how the titer of target organism(s) in groundwater correlates with the true cell titers of the target organism in the aquifer (i.e., planktonic plus attached cells) is critical for a meaningful interpretation of the data, the prediction of bioremediation performance, and the implementation of site management strategies. To evaluate the distribution of active cells between resident solid phase and the aqueous phase, one-dimensional columns were packed under water-saturated conditions with Bio-Dechlor INOCULUM, a PCE-to ethene-dechlorinating bacterial consortium containing both multiple Dehalococcoides (Dhc) strains and Geobacter lovleyi strain SZ (GeoSZ). The columns were packed with two distinct solid matrices: a low organic content sandy Federal Fine Ottawa soil or Appling soil with higher organic matter content. Influent reduced mineral salts medium supplied at a groundwater pore-water velocity of 0.3 m/day contained both 10 mM lactate as electron donor and 0.33 mM PCE as electron acceptor. Routine collection of biomass from column side ports and effluent samples measured the titers of target cells in the aqueous phase and determined when steady state conditions had been reached. A second set of column experiments evaluated delivery and filtration effects by the solid matrix (i.e., Federal Fine Ottawa sand versus Appling soil) under the same conditions except that electron donor or acceptor were omitted (no growth conditions). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis using Dhc and GeoSZ 16S rRNA gene-targeted primer and probe sets determined the planktonic cell counts, and destructive sampling of the columns allowed measurement

  17. On the implications of aerosol liquid water and phase separation for organic aerosol mass

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic compounds and liquid water are major aerosol constituents in the southeast United States (SE US). Water associated with inorganic constituents (inorganic water) can contribute to the partitioning medium for organic aerosol when relative humidities or organic matter to org...

  18. Rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical ({center_dot}OH) with aldehydes and ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.M.; Allen, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    A wide variety of aldehydes and ketones are formed in the troposphere by the gas-phase oxidation of hydrocarbons. These compounds are expected to readily partition into cloud, fog, and aquated aerosol drops where they can participate in a variety of aqueous-phase reactions. It has been previously demonstrated by other researchers that aqueous-phase photochemical reactions involving aromatic aldehydes and ketones may lead to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidant for S(IV) and is also an {center_dot}OH precursor. Aldehydes and ketones may also participate in other aqueous-phase reactions within atmospheric water drops including reactions with {center_dot}OH. Rate constants for reactions involving {center_dot}OH in aqueous solutions have been reported for only a limited number of tropospheric aldehydes and ketones. The authors have measured the rate constants for aqueous-phase reactions of {center_dot}OH with several tropospheric aldehydes and ketones by the technique of competition kinetics. Hydroxyl radicals were generated by continuous illumination at 313 nm of an aqueous acidified solution containing Fe(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3}, an {center_dot}OH scavenger, the aldehyde or ketone whose rate constant was to be measured, and a standard for which the rate constant for reaction with {center_dot}OH is well known. Nitrobenzene was used as the standard in all experiments. Loss of the aldehyde or ketone and the standard were monitored by HPLC. Losses attributable to direct photolysis and dark reactions were minimal.

  19. Simultaneous Separation of Manganese, Cobalt, and Nickel by the Organic-Aqueous-Aqueous Three-Phase Solvent Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirayama, Sakae; Uda, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    This research outlines an organic-aqueous-aqueous three-phase solvent extraction method and proposes its use in a new metal separation process for the recycling of manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), and nickel (Ni) from used lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The three-phase system was formed by mixing xylene organic solution, 50 pct polyethylene glycol (PEG) aqueous solution, and 1 mol L-1 sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) aqueous solution. The xylene organic solution contained 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (D2EHPA) as an extractant for Mn ion, and the Na2SO4 aqueous solution contained 1 mol L-1 potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) as an extractant for Co ion. Concentrations of the metal ions were varied by dissolving metal sulfates in the Na2SO4 aqueous solution. As a result of the experiments, Mn, Co, and Ni ions were distributed in the xylene organic phase, PEG-rich aqueous phase, and Na2SO4-rich aqueous phase, respectively. The separation was effective when the pH value was around 4. Numerical simulation was also conducted in order to predict the distribution of metal ions after the multi-stage counter-current extractions.

  20. Aerosol absorption measurement with a sinusoidal phase modulating fiber optic photo thermal interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuwang; Shao, Shiyong; Mei, Haiping; Rao, Ruizhong

    2016-10-01

    Aerosol light absorption plays an important role in the earth's atmosphere direct and semi-direct radiate forcing, simultaneously, it also has a huge influence on the visibility impairment and laser engineering application. Although various methods have been developed for measuring aerosol light absorption, huge challenge still remains in precision, accuracy and temporal resolution. The main reason is that, as a part of aerosol light extinction, aerosol light absorption always generates synchronously with aerosol light scattering, and unfortunately aerosol light scattering is much stronger in most cases. Here, a novel photo-thermal interferometry is proposed only for aerosol absorption measurement without disturbance from aerosol scattering. The photo-thermal interferometry consists of a sinusoidal phase-modulating single mode fiber-optic interferometer. The thermal dissipation, caused by aerosol energy from photo-thermal conversion when irritated by pump laser through interferometer, is detected. This approach is completely insensitive to aerosol scattering, and the single mode fiber-optic interferometer is compact, low-cost and insensitive to the polarization shading. The theory of this technique is illustrated, followed by the basic structure of the sinusoidal phase-modulating fiber-optic interferometer and demodulation algorithms. Qualitative and quantitative analysis results show that the new photo-thermal interference is a potential approach for aerosol absorption detection and environmental pollution detection.

  1. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  2. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E.; Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-05-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120°, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20%±15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law size distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, a, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for λ = 0.87 μm). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with α. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distributions before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate particles with rm

  3. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  4. Heterogeneous oxidation of pesticides on aerosol condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socorro, Joanna; Durand, Amandine; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Ravier, Sylvain; Gligorovski, Sasho; Wortham, Henri; Quivet, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Pesticides are widely used all over the world. It is known that they exhibit adverse health effects and environmental risks due to their physico-chemical properties and their extensive use which is growing every year. They are distributed in the atmosphere, an important vector of dissemination, over long distances away from the target area. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences their atmospheric fate. Most of the pesticides are semi-volatile compounds, emphasizing the importance of assessing their heterogeneous reactivity towards atmospheric oxidants. These reactions are important because they are involved in, among others, direct and indirect climate changes, adverse health effects from inhaled particles, effects on cloud chemistry and ozone production. In this work, the importance of atmospheric degradation of pesticides is evaluated on the surface of aerosol deliquescent particles. The photolysis processing and heterogeneous reactivity towards O3 and OH, was evaluated of eight commonly used pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin, tetraconazole) adsorbed on silica particles. Silicate particles are present in air-borne mineral dust in atmospheric aerosols, and heterogeneous reactions can be different in the presence of these mineral particles. Depending on their origin and conditioning, aerosol particles containing pesticides can have complex and highly porous microstructures, which are influenced by electric charge effects and interaction with water vapour. Therefore, the kinetic experiments and consecutive product studies were performed at atmospherically relevant relative humidity (RH) of 55 %. The identification of surface bound products was performed using GC-(QqQ)-MS/MS and LC-(Q-ToF)-MS/MS and the gas-phase products were on-line monitored by PTR-ToF-MS. Based on the detected and identified reaction products, it was observed that water plays a crucial

  5. Aerosol and gas phase organic acids during aging of secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene in smog chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praplan, Arnaud P.; Tritscher, Torsten; Barmet, Peter; Mertes, Peter; Decarlo, Peter F.; Dommen, Josef; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2010-05-01

    Organic acids represent an important class of organic compounds in the atmosphere for both the gas and aerosol phase. They are either emitted directly from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources or formed as oxidation products from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and precursors in the aqueous, gaseous and particle phase (Chebbi & Carlier, 1996) Monoterpenes are a prominent class of VOCs with annual emissions of 127 Tg per year (Guenther et al., 1995). Because of their high formation potential of secondary organic aerosols, several compounds of this class, particularly a-pinene, have been investigated extensively in many laboratory studies. Among other acids, cis-pinic and cis-pinonic acid have been found as products of a-pinene ozonolysis. Ma et al. (2007) published evidence that these organic acids are formed in the gas phase via Criegee Intermediates (CIs). Recently, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA) was identified by Szmigielski et al. (2007) as a product from a-pinene photooxidation, as well as diaterpenylic acid acetate (Iinuma et al., 2009) and terpenylic acid (Claeys et al., 2009). These compounds could serve as tracers for a-pinene in ambient samples. The present work sets its focus on the fate of a-pinene SOA organic acids under different aging conditions. (1) low NOx concentration (2) high NOx concentration (3) exposure to OH radicals in both dark and lighted environments. a-pinene SOA is produced by ozonolysis without OH scavenger in the PSI smog chamber. It consists of a 27m3 Teflon® bag that can be irradiated by four Xe arc lamps to simulate sunlight (Paulsen et al., 2004). The organic acids are sampled with a wet effluent diffusion denuder (WEDD) and an aerosol collector (AC) for the gas phase and the aerosol particles, respectively. WEDD and AC samples are alternatively concentrated for 30 minutes on a trace anion concentrator (TAC) column (Dionex, Switzerland) and subsequently analyzed by ion chromatography coupled to mass

  6. Photochemistry of aqueous pyruvic acid.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Elizabeth C; Carpenter, Barry K; Shoemaker, Richard K; Vaida, Veronica

    2013-07-16

    The study of organic chemistry in atmospheric aerosols and cloud formation is of interest in predictions of air quality and climate change. It is now known that aqueous phase chemistry is important in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. Here, the photoreactivity of pyruvic acid (PA; CH3COCOOH) is investigated in aqueous environments characteristic of atmospheric aerosols. PA is currently used as a proxy for α-dicarbonyls in atmospheric models and is abundant in both the gas phase and the aqueous phase (atmospheric aerosols, fog, and clouds) in the atmosphere. The photoreactivity of PA in these phases, however, is very different, thus prompting the need for a mechanistic understanding of its reactivity in different environments. Although the decarboxylation of aqueous phase PA through UV excitation has been studied for many years, its mechanism and products remain controversial. In this work, photolysis of aqueous PA is shown to produce acetoin (CH3CHOHCOCH3), lactic acid (CH3CHOHCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and oligomers, illustrating the progression from a three-carbon molecule to four-carbon and even six-carbon molecules through direct photolysis. These products are detected using vibrational and electronic spectroscopy, NMR, and MS, and a reaction mechanism is presented accounting for all products detected. The relevance of sunlight-initiated PA chemistry in aqueous environments is then discussed in the context of processes occurring on atmospheric aerosols.

  7. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy phenols from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-03-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O : C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to depend on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O : C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  8. Aqueous-phase photochemical oxidation and direct photolysis of vanillin - a model compound of methoxy-phenols from biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. J.; Huang, D. D.; Cheung, H. Y.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Chan, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    We present here experimental results on aqueous-phase (A) photochemical oxidation (with UV and OH radicals generated from H2O2 photolysis) and (B) direct photolysis (with only UV irradiation) of a methoxy-phenol, vanillin (VL), as a model compound from biomass burning. Both on-line aerosol mass spectrometric (AMS) characterization and off-line chemical analyses were performed. AMS analyses of dried atomized droplets of the bulk reacting mixtures showed that VL almost entirely evaporates during the drying process. Large amounts of organic mass remained in the particle phase after reactions under both conditions. Under condition (A), AMS measured organic mass first increased rapidly and then decreased, attributable to the formation of non-volatile products and subsequent formation of smaller and volatile products, respectively. The oxygen-to-carbon (O:C) ratio of the products reached 1.5 after about 80 min, but dropped substantially thereafter. In contrast, organic mass increased slowly under condition (B). The O:C ratio reached 1.0 after 180 min. In off-line analyses, small oxygenates were detected under condition (A), while hydroxylated products and dimers of VL were detected under condition (B). Particle hygroscopic growth factor (GF) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the reacting mixtures were found to be dependent on both organic volume fraction and the degree of oxygenation of organics. Results show that (1) aqueous-phase processes can lead to the retention of a large portion of the organic mass in the particle phase; (2) once retained, this portion of organic mass significantly changes the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of the aerosol particles; (3) intensive photochemical oxidation gave rise to an O:C ratio as high as 1.5 but the ratio decreased as further oxidation led to smaller and more volatile products; and (4) polymerization occurred with direct photolysis, resulting in high-molecular-weight products of a yellowish color. This study

  9. A numerical study of aerosol influence on mixed-phase stratiform clouds through modulation of the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2013-02-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out in a high-resolution two-dimensional framework to increase our understanding of aerosol indirect effects in mixed-phase stratiform clouds. Aerosol characteristics explored include insoluble particle type, soluble mass fraction, influence of aerosol-induced freezing point depression and influence of aerosol number concentration. Simulations were analyzed with a focus on the processes related to liquid phase microphysics, and ice formation was limited to droplet freezing. Of the aerosol properties investigated, aerosol insoluble mass type and its associated freezing efficiency was found to be most relevant to cloud lifetime. Secondary effects from aerosol soluble mass fraction and number concentration also alter cloud characteristics and lifetime. These alterations occur via various mechanisms, including changes to the amount of nucleated ice, influence on liquid phase precipitation and ice riming rates, and changes to liquid droplet nucleation and growth rates. Alteration of the aerosol properties in simulations with identical initial and boundary conditions results in large variability in simulated cloud thickness and lifetime, ranging from rapid and complete glaciation of liquid to the production of long-lived, thick stratiform mixed-phase cloud.

  10. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2015-03-01

    Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partition coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualisation and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM-phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content) and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalisation, and dimerisation). The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile α-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the conditions of high liquid water content

  11. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2014-10-01

    Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space, which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partitioning coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualization and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content), and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalization, and dimerisation). The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered, but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile α-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the high liquid water content

  12. Fibril Formation and Phase Separation in Aqueous Cellulose Ethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Amanda; Schmidt, Peter; McAllister, John; Lott, Joseph; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    Aqueous solutions of many cellulose ethers are known to undergo thermoreversible gelation and phase separation upon heating to form turbid hydrogels, but the mechanism and resulting structures have not been well understood. Turbidity, light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are used to show that hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) chains are dissolved in water below 50 °C and undergo phase separation at higher temperatures. At 70 °C, at sufficiently high concentrations in water, HPMC orders into fibrillar structures with a well-defined radius of 18 +/- 2 nm, as characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and SANS. The HPMC fibril structure is independent of concentration and heating rate. However, HPMC fibrils do not form a percolating network as readily as is seen in methylcellulose, resulting in a lower hot-gel modulus, as demonstrated by rheology.

  13. Aqueous phase microemulsions employing alkyl glucamide surfactants with chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, E.; Baran, J.R. Jr.; Pope, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes experiments on nonionic surfactants for electrolyte-free aquifer remediation of chlorocarbon contaminants. Various combinations of linear and branched alkylglucamides succeeded in producing Winsor Type I and III microemulsions at room temperature with various chlorinated hydrocarbons with little or no added electrolyte. Solubilization parameters at 0 and 0.1% NaCl were determined for the surfactant solutions. In comparing these two values, the solubilization parameter shows no definite trend of increasing as had been previously noted. There is no apparent explanation for this anomaly, except that operating at 0% NaCl may not be governed by the same rules that apply to systems with an electrolyte. A class of nonionic surfactants that produce aqueous phase microemulsions with no electrolyte and Winsor III middle phase microemulsions was identified.

  14. The partitioning of ketones between the gas and aqueous phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, Eric A.

    Most ketones are not significantly hydrated; they therefore retain their chromophore and they could be photolytically degraded in solution yielding a variety of products including carboxylic acids, aldehydes and radicals. It is difficult to accurately model the partitioning of ketones between the gas phase and aqueous phase because of the lack suitable estimates of the Henry's Law constants; consequently the fate and environmental effects of ketones cannot be confidently predicted. Here we report the experimental determination of the Henry's Law constants of a series of ketones that has yielded a simple straight line equation to predict the Henry's Law constants of simple aliphatic ketones: log H ∗ =0.23Σσ ∗ + 1.51; where H ∗ is the effective Henry's Law constant (M atm -1, and Σσ ∗ is the Taft polar substituents constants. The results for 25°C are (M atm -1) CH 3COCH 3, 32; C 6H 5COCH 3, 110; CH 2ClCOCH 3, 59; CH 3COCOCH 3, 74; CF 3COCH 3, 138. Acetophenone appears to have an abnormally high H ∗. Most low molecular weight aliphatic ketones are predicted to characterized by H ∗⩾30 M atm -1 and therefore they are expected to be found in the aqueous phase at concentrations of ⩾5 - 0.5 μM (given a typical gas-phase concentration range of 1-10 ppbv). The expected rate of decomposition of ketones due to photolysis in hydrometers is briefly discussed.

  15. Glycine phases formed from frozen aqueous solutions: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Malinovsky, V. K.; Ogienko, A. G.; Drebushchak, V. A.; Manakov, A. Yu.; Ancharov, A. I.; Yunoshev, A. S.; Boldyreva, E. V.

    2012-08-01

    Glycine phases formed when aqueous solutions were frozen and subsequently heated under different conditions were studied by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Crystallization of ice Ih was observed in all the cases. On cooling at the rates of 0.5 K/min and 5 K/min, glassy glycine was formed as an intermediate phase which lived about 1 min or less only, and then transformed into β-polymorph of glycine. Quench cooling of glycine solutions (15% w/w) in liquid nitrogen resulted in the formation of a mixture of crystalline water ice Ih and a glassy glycine, which could be preserved at cryogenic temperatures (80 K) for an indefinitely long time. This mixture remained also quite stable for some time after heating above the cryogenic temperature. Subsequent heating under various conditions resulted in the transformation of the glycine glass into an unknown crystalline phase (glycine "X-phase") at 209-216 K, which at 218-226 K transformed into β-polymorph of glycine. The "X-phase" was characterized by Raman spectroscopy; it could be obtained in noticeable amounts using a special preparation technique and tentatively characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (P2, a = 6.648 Å, b = 25.867 Å, c = 5.610 Å, β = 113.12°); the formation of "X-phase" from the glycine glassy phase and its transformation into β-polymorph were followed by DSC. Raman scattering technique with its power for unambiguous identification of the crystalline and glassy polymorphs without limitation on the crystallite size helped us to follow the phase transformations during quenching, heating, and annealing. The experimental findings are considered in relation to the problem of control of glycine polymorphism on crystallization.

  16. Sources of secondary organic aerosols in the Pearl River Delta region in fall: Contributions from the aqueous reactive uptake of dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Fu, Tzung-May; Cao, Junji; Lee, Shuncheng; Huang, Xiao-Feng; He, Ling-Yan; Ho, Kin-Fai; Fu, Joshua S.; Lam, Yun-Fat

    2013-09-01

    We used the regional air quality model CMAQ to simulate organic aerosol (OA) concentrations over the Pearl River Delta region (PRD) and compared model results to measurements. Our goals were (1) to evaluate the potential contribution of the aqueous reactive uptake of dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) as a source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in an urban environment, and (2) to quantify the sources of SOA in the PRD in fall. We improved the representation of dicarbonyl gas phase chemistry in CMAQ, as well as added SOA formation via the irreversible uptake of dicarbonyls by aqueous aerosols and cloud droplets, characterized by a reactive uptake coefficient γ = 2.9 × 10-3 based on laboratory studies. Our model results were compared to aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements in Shenzhen during a photochemical smog event in fall 2009. Including the new dicarbonyl SOA source in CMAQ led to an increase in the simulated mean SOA concentration at the sampling site from 4.1 μg m-3 to 9.0 μg m-3 during the smog event, in better agreement with the mean observed oxygenated OA (OOA) concentration (8.0 μg m-3). The simulated SOA reproduced the variability of observed OOA (r = 0.89). Moreover, simulated dicarbonyl SOA was highly correlated with simulated sulfate (r = 0.72), consistent with the observed high correlation between OOA and sulfate (r = 0.84). Including the dicarbonyl SOA source also increased the mean simulated concentrations of total OA from 8.2 μg m-3 to 13.1 μg m-3, closer to the mean observed OA concentration (16.5 μg m-3). The remaining difference between the observed and simulated OA was largely due to impacts from episodic biomass burning emissions, but the model did not capture this variability. We concluded that, for the PRD in fall and outside of major biomass burning events, 75% of the total SOA was biogenic. Isoprene was the most important precursor, accounting for 41% of the total SOA. Aromatics accounted for 13% of the total SOA

  17. Determination of protein loss during aqueous and phase partition fixation using formalin and glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, E.T.; Feldhoff, R.C.; Nettleton, G.S.

    1984-10-01

    In phase partition fixation tissue is immersed in an organic solvent at equilibrium with an aqueous phase containing a fixing agent. By using radioisotope labeling techniques the effects of phase partition fixation on protein retention during fixation of tissue with formalin and glutaraldehyde have been determined and compared with those of standard aqueous fixation using these fixatives. It has been shown that retention of protein in tissue during phase partition fixation was as good or better than during aqueous fixation. Improved retention provides further evidence that phase partition fixation may be a useful alternative to aqueous fixation.

  18. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic aerosols (BA), for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment, except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8) that showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids dominates their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  19. Laboratory photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols: formation and degradation of dicarboxylic acids, oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavuluri, C. M.; Kawamura, K.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Swaminathan, T.

    2015-07-01

    To better understand the photochemical processing of dicarboxylic acids and related polar compounds, we conducted batch UV irradiation experiments on two types of aerosol samples collected from India, which represent anthropogenic (AA) and biogenic (BA) aerosols, for time periods of 0.5 to 120 h. The irradiated samples were analyzed for molecular compositions of diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls. The results show that photochemical degradation of oxalic (C2), malonic (C3) and other C8-C12 diacids overwhelmed their production in aqueous aerosols, whereas succinic acid (C4) and C5-C7 diacids showed a significant increase (ca. 10 times) during the course of irradiation experiments. The photochemical formation of oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls overwhelmed their degradation during the early stages of experiment except for ω-oxooctanoic acid (ωC8), which showed a similar pattern to that of C4. We also found a gradual decrease in the relative abundance of C2 to total diacids and an increase in the relative abundance of C4 during prolonged experiment. Based on the changes in concentrations and mass ratios of selected species with the irradiation time, we hypothesize that iron-catalyzed photolysis of C2 and C3 diacids controls their concentrations in Fe-rich atmospheric waters, whereas photochemical formation of C4 diacid (via ωC8) is enhanced with photochemical processing of aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This study demonstrates that the ambient aerosols contain abundant precursors that produce diacids, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls, although some species such as oxalic acid decompose extensively during an early stage of photochemical processing.

  20. Adsorption of water from aqueous acetonitrile on silica-based stationary phases in aqueous normal-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jan; Jandera, Pavel

    2014-12-29

    Excess adsorption of water from aqueous acetonitrile mobile phases was investigated on 16 stationary phases using the frontal analysis method and coulometric Karl-Fischer titration. The stationary phases include silica gel and silica-bonded phases with different polarities, octadecyl and cholesterol, phenyl, nitrile, pentafluorophenylpropyl, diol and zwitterionic sulfobetaine and phosphorylcholine ligands bonded on silica, hybrid organic-silica and hydrosilated matrices. Both fully porous and core-shell column types were included. Preferential uptake of water by the columns can be described by Langmuir isotherms. Even though a diffuse rather than a compact adsorbed discrete layer of water on the adsorbent surface can be formed because of the unlimited miscibility of water with acetonitrile, for convenience, the preferentially adsorbed water was expressed in terms of a hypothetical monomolecular water layer equivalent in the inner pores. The uptake of water strongly depends on the polarity and type of the column. Less than one monomolecular water layer equivalent was adsorbed on moderate polar silica hydride-based stationary phases, Ascentis Express F5 and Ascentis Express CN column at the saturation capacity, while on more polar stationary phases, several water layer equivalents were up-taken from the mobile phase. The strongest affinity to water was observed on the ZIC cHILIC stationary phases, where more than nine water layer equivalents were adsorbed onto its surface at its saturation capacity. Columns with bonded hydroxyl and diol ligands show stronger water adsorption in comparison to bare silica. Columns based on hydrosilated silica generally show significantly decreased water uptake in comparison to stationary phases bonded on ordinary silica. Significant correlations were found between the water uptake and the separation selectivity for compounds with strong polarity differences.

  1. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates particulate-phase sulfate and ammonium. In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics for sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, and chloride have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Compared to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and thus could improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing, SWCF) on the global scale. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry could further improve the prediction of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD on the global scale. IMN can improve the prediction of secondary PM2

  2. Direct Aqueous Photochemistry of Isoprene High-NOx Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-05-17

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the high-NOx photooxidation of isoprene was dissolved in water and irradiated with {lambda} > 290 nm light to simulate direct photolytic processing of organics in atmospheric water droplets. High-resolution mass spectrometry was used to characterize the composition at four time intervals (0, 1, 2, and 4 h). Photolysis resulted in the decomposition of high molecular weight (MW) oligomers, reducing the average length of organics by 2 carbon units. Approximately 65% by count of SOA molecules decomposed during photolysis, accompanied by the formation of new products. An average of 30 % of the organic mass was modified after 4 h of direct photolysis. In contrast, only a small fraction of the mass (<2 %), belonging primarily to organic nitrates, decomposed in the absence of irradiation by hydrolysis. We observed a statistically-significant increase in average O/C, decrease in H/C, and increase in N/C ratios resulting from photolysis. Furthermore, the concentration of aromatic compounds increased significantly during photolysis. Approximately 10 % of photodegraded compounds and 50 % of the photoproducts contain nitrogen. Organic nitrates and multifunctional oligomers were identified as compounds degraded by photolysis. Low-MW 0N (compounds with 0 nitrogen atoms in their structure) and 2N compounds were the dominant photoproducts. Fragmentation experiments using tandem mass spectrometry (MSn, n = 2-3) indicate that the 2N products are likely heterocyclic/aromatic and are tentatively identified as furoxans. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, these 2N heterocyclic compounds are produced by reactions between photochemically-formed aqueous NOx species and SOA organics.

  3. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I—Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R.; Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. In addition, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  4. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I-Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    DOE PAGES

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; ...

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facilitymore » (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). In addition, these layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. Lastly, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.« less

  5. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I-Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R.; Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek III, Arthur J.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). In addition, these layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. Lastly, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  6. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I - Overview and Impact of Elevated Aerosol Layers on Aerosol Optical Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, K.; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Rogers, Ray; Russell, P.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Art; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-08

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), which was conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique field study that was designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere at a number of altitudes, from near the surface to as high as 8 km, within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) that was located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods of the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from TCAP is the relatively common occurrence (on four of six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed in the column. Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning aerosol and nitrate compared to the aerosol found near the surface.

  7. A numerical study of aerosol influence on mixed-phase stratiform clouds through modulation of the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out in a high-resolution two dimensional framework to increase our understanding of aerosol indirect effects in mixed-phase stratiform clouds. Aerosol characteristics explored include insoluble particle type, soluble mass fraction, the influence of aerosol-induced freezing point depression and the influence of aerosol number concentration. These experiments were completed with an emphasis on the liquid phase, with droplet freezing the mechanism for ice production. Of the aerosol properties investigated, aerosol insoluble mass type and its associated freezing efficiency was found to be most relevant to cloud lifetime. Secondary effects from aerosol soluble mass fraction and number concentration also alter cloud characteristics and lifetime. These alterations occur via various mechanisms, including changes to the amount of nucleated ice, influence on liquid phase precipitation and ice riming rates, and changes to liquid droplet growth rates. Simulation of the same environment leads to large variability of cloud thickness and lifetime, ranging from rapid and complete glaciation of the cloud to the production of a long-lived, thick stratiform mixed-phase cloud. In the end, these processes are summarized into a diagram that includes internal feedback loops that act within the cloud system.

  8. Metastable states in calcium phosphate - aqueous phase equilibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driessens, F. C. M.; Verbeeck, R. M. H.

    1981-05-01

    A critical evaluation of the literature reveals that during equilibration of well crystallized hydroxyapatite in aqueous solutions metastable states can occur. They are characterized by a persistent supersaturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and a systematical dependence of the ion activity product of this compound on the solution composition. For products synthesized by thermal treatment it is known that they are transformed into oxyhydroxyapatite so that the theoretical solubility behaviour could be predicted from the extrapolated value of the free energy of oxyapatite at room temperature: the negative logarithm of the ionic product for hydroxyapatite should become close to that of oxyapatite during equilibration. The discrepancy with experimental data is probably due to the formation of thin layers seeming dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octocalcium phosphate or defective hydroxyapatite as coatings on the apatite crystals. This is derived from the apparent Ca/P ratio of the solubility controlling phase. According to chemical potential plots this apparent Ca/P ratio can have values close to 1, 1.33, 1.50 or 1.67. The aqueous solutions are clearly undersaturated with respect to the more acidic calcium phosphates so that the coatings must deviate from the compositions of these compounds in their pure state. The formation of these metastable states during equilibration of oxyhydroxyapatites is compared with others occuring during precipitation and crystal growth of calcium phosphates. A model is proposed which explains the observations qualitatively.

  9. Aqueous two-phase system based on natural quaternary ammonium compounds for the extraction of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chao-Xi; Xin, Rui-Pu; Qi, Sui-Jian; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Hua

    2016-02-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems, based on the use of natural quaternary ammonium compounds, were developed to establish a benign biotechnological route for efficient protein separation. In this study, aqueous two-phase systems of two natural resources betaine and choline with polyethyleneglycol (PEG400/600) or inorganic salts (K2 HPO4 /K3 PO4 ) were formed. It was shown that in the K2 HPO4 -containing aqueous two-phase system, hydrophobic interactions were an important driving force of protein partitioning, while protein size played a vital role in aqueous two-phase systems that contained polyethylene glycol. An extraction efficiency of more than 90% for bovine serum albumin in the betaine/K2 HPO4 aqueous two-phase system can be obtained, and this betaine-based aqueous two-phase system provided a gentle and stable environment for the protein. In addition, after investigation of the cluster phenomenon in the betaine/K2 HPO4 aqueous two-phase systems, it was suggested that this phenomenon also played a significant role for protein extraction in this system. The development of aqueous two-phase systems based on natural quaternary ammonium compounds not only provided an effective and greener method of aqueous two-phase system to meet the requirements of green chemistry but also may help to solve the mystery of the compartmentalization of biomolecules in cells.

  10. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly-simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+). In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Comparing to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions, as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF)) on globe. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry further improves the predictions of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD over globe. IMN can improve the predictions of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe, as well as AOD and CDNC over globe. The explicit

  11. Vacuum FTIR observation on hygroscopic properties and phase transition of malonic acid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xu; Zhang, Yun; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach based on a combination of a pulse relative humidity (RH) controlling system and a rapid scan vacuum FTIR spectrometer was utilized to investigate the hygroscopic property and phase transition of malonic acid (MA) aerosols. By using this approach, both water vapor amount around the aerosols and water content within aerosols with sub-second time resolution were obtained. Based on the features of FTIR absorbing bands, it can be known that the evolution of hydrogen-bonding structures of malonic acid aerosols took place from (H2O)n-MA to MA-MA accompanying with phase transition in the dehumidifying process. And in present paper, the stepwise efflorescence of MA aerosols and nucleation rates at different RHs are first reported. Our observation has shown that the efflorescence of MA started at ∼17% RH and the nucleation rates increased with decreasing RH.

  12. Oligomer and SOA formation through aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Siekmann, Frank; Renard, Pascal; El Zein, Atallah; Salque, Guillaume; El Haddad, Imad; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Voisin, Didier; Thissen, Roland; Monod, Anne

    2012-03-01

    This work investigates the ability of methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) (the two main gas phase atmospheric oxidation products of isoprene) to form oligomers and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) upon aqueous phase OH-oxidation and subsequent water evaporation. For the two precursors, electrospray mass spectrometry (in infusion and coupled to liquid chromatography) analysis of the reacting solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1400 Da. More than 11 series of oligomers were found. For MVK, the intensity and masses of oligomers became increasingly important as MVK initial concentrations increased from 0.2 to 20 mM. For both precursors, the oligomers were responsible for the SOA formation during nebulization experiments. The evaluated SOA mass yield ranged from 3.9 to 9.9% for MVK. These yields were time dependent and were in good agreement with the range (1.6-11.7%) obtained for MACR under the same conditions by El Haddad et al. (2009).

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of homogeneously nucleated hydrazine aerosols - Disordered and crystalline phases. [in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunder, T.; Clapp, M. L.; Miller, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that aerosols generated at low temperatures and high condensation rate spontaneously form in a highly crystalline state. The resonant absorption bands in the IR spectra of these highly crystalline particles are much sharper than any reported previously in the bulk, and reveal details in the N-H vibrational bands that have not been previously observed. A disordered phase is also observed at somewhat higher temperatures. These results are consistent with this being a supercooled liquid. The fact that the spectra associated with these two aerosol phases are quite different is important to any future attempts at detecting hydrazine aerosols in planetary atmospheres by remote sensing techniques.

  14. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; George, Katheryn M.; Anastasio, Cort; Laskin, Julia; Dillner, Ann M.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants - the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C∗) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as a function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to ˜ 2 h irradiation under midday winter solstice sunlight in Northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated ring-opening molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures (C∗) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C∗ values is observed

  15. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; George, K. M.; Anastasio, C.; Laskin, J.; Dillner, A. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-10-01

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants - the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as a function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to ∼ 2 h irradiation under midday, winter solstice sunlight in northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated open-ring molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures C*) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C* values is observed

  16. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; ...

    2016-04-13

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants – the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C∗) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as amore » function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to  ∼  2 h irradiation under midday winter solstice sunlight in Northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated ring-opening molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures (C∗) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C∗ values

  17. Tobacco protein separation by aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Deepa; Wilkinson, Carol; Van Cott, Kevin; Zhang, Chenming

    2003-03-07

    Tobacco has long been considered as a host to produce large quantity of high-valued recombinant proteins. However, dealing with large quantities of biomass is a challenge for downstream processing. Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) has been widely used in purifying proteins from various sources. It is a protein-friendly process and can be scaled up easily. In this paper, ATPE was studied for its applicability to recombinant protein purification from tobacco with egg white lysozyme as the model protein. Separate experiments with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-salt-tobacco extract and PEG-salt-lysozyme were carried out to determine the partition behavior of tobacco protein and lysozyme, respectively. Two-level fractional factorial designs were used to study the effects of factors such as, PEG molecular mass, PEG concentration, the concentration of phase forming salt, sodium chloride concentration and pH, on protein partitioning. The results showed that, among the studied systems, PEG-sodium sulfate system was most suitable for lysozyme purification. Detailed experiments were conducted by spiking lysozyme into the tobacco extract. The conditions with highest selectivity of lysozyme over native tobacco protein were determined using a response surface design. The purification factor was further improved by decreasing the phase ratio along the tie line corresponding to the phase compositions with the highest selectivity. Under selected conditions the lysozyme yield was predicted to be 87% with a purification factor of 4 and concentration factor of 14. From this study, ATPE was shown to be suitable for initial protein recovery and partial purification from transgenic tobacco.

  18. Global Impacts of Gas-Phase Chemistry-Aerosol Interactions on Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-01-01

    We present here a first global modeling study on the influence of gas-phase chemistry/aerosol interactions on estimates of anthropogenic forcing by tropospheric O3 and aerosols. Concentrations of gas-phase species and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols in the preindustrial, present-day, and year 2100 (IPCC SRES A2) atmospheres are simulated online in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II' (GISS GCM II'). With fully coupled chemistry and aerosols, the preindustrial, presentday, and year 2100 global burdens of tropospheric ozone are predicted to be 190, 319, and 519 Tg, respectively. The burdens of sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted respectively to be 0.32. 0.18, 0.01, 0.33 Tg in preindustrial time, 1.40, 0.48, 0.23, 1.60 Tg in presentday, and 1.37, 1.97, 0.54, 3.31 Tg in year 2100. Anthropogenic O3 is predicted to have a globally and annually averaged present-day forcing of +0.22 W m(sup -2) and year 2100 forcing of +0.57 W m(sup -2) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Net anthropogenic TOA forcing by internally mixed sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols is estimated to be virtually zero in the present-day and +0.34 W m(sup -2) in year 2100, whereas it is predicted to be -0.39 W m(sup -2) in present-day and -0.61 W m(sup -2) in year 2100 if the aerosols are externally mixed. Heterogeneous reactions are shown to be important in affecting anthropogenic forcing. When reactions of N2O5, NO3, NO2, and HO2 on aerosols are accounted for, TOA anthropogenic O3 forcing is less by 20-45% in present-day and by 20-32% in year 2100 at mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, as compared with values predicted in the absence of heterogeneous gas aerosol reactions. Mineral dust uptake of HNO3 and O3 is shown to have practically no influence on anthropogenic O3 forcing. Heterogeneous reactions of N2Os

  19. A study of phase transformations in hygroscopic aerosols by Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, I.N.; Fung, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are composed mostly of hygroscopic inorganic salts. These aerosols play an important role in many atmospheric processes which affect local air quality, visibility degradation, and the global climate as well. Indeed, hygroscopic aerosols as metastable supersaturated solution droplets are routinely observed in laboratories. Here, we report first spectroscopic evidence that new metastable solid states form from hygroscopic aerosol particles. Levitated single particles undergo hydration and crystallization in calibrated humidity environment. Laser Raman and Mie scattering techniques are used to probe the chemical and physical state of the microparticle before and after phase transformation. The formation of these states is not predicted from bulk-phase thermodynamics. In some cases, the resulting metastable state is entirely unknown heretofore. We also present new solid/solution and solid/solid phase transitions which occur exclusively in microparticles.

  20. Structure and phase behavior of aqueous methylcellulose solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, John; Schmidt, Peter; Lodge, Timothy; Bates, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose ethers (CE) constitute a multi-billion dollar industry, and have found end uses in a broad array of applications from construction materials, food products, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals for more than 80 years. Methylcellulose (MC, with the trade name METHOCEL™) is a CE in which there is a partial substitution of -OH groups with -OCH3 groups. This results in a polymer that is water-soluble at low temperatures, and aqueous solutions of MC display gelation and phase separation at higher temperatures. The nature of MC gelation has been debated for many years, and this project has made significant advances in the understanding of the solution properties of CEs. We have characterized a fibrillar structure of MC gels by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Using light scattering, turbidity measurements, and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) we report that MC microphase separates by nucleation and growth of fibril aggregates, and is a different process from LCST phase separation.

  1. Distribution of local anesthetics between aqueous and liposome phases.

    PubMed

    Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Duša, Filip; Rantamäki, Antti H; Robciuc, Alexandra; Holma, Paula; Holopainen, Juha M; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2017-01-06

    Liposomes were used as biomimetic models in capillary electrokinetic chromatography (EKC) for the determination of distribution constants (KD) of certain local anesthetics and a commonly used preservative. Synthetic liposomes comprised phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol phospholipids with and without cholesterol. In addition, ghost liposomes made from red blood cell (RBC) lipid extracts were used as pseudostationary phase to acquire information on how the liposome composition affects the interactions between anesthetics and liposomes. These results were compared with theoretical distribution coefficients at pH 7.4. In addition to 25°C, the distribution constants were determined at 37 and 42°C to simulate physiological conditions. Moreover, the usability of five electroosmotic flow markers in liposome (LEKC) and micellar EKC (MEKC) was studied. LEKC was proven to be a convenient and fast technique for obtaining data about the distribution constants of local anesthetics between liposome and aqueous phase. RBC liposomes can be utilized for more representative model of cellular membranes, and the results indicate that the distribution constants of the anesthetics are greatly dependent on the used liposome composition and the amount of cholesterol, while the effect of temperature on the distribution constants is less significant.

  2. Aqueous Two Phase System Assisted Self-Assembled PLGA Microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeredla, Nitish; Kojima, Taisuke; Yang, Yi; Takayama, Shuichi; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai

    2016-06-01

    Here, we produce poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based microparticles with varying morphologies, and temperature responsive properties utilizing a Pluronic F127/dextran aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) assisted self-assembly. The PLGA polymer, when emulsified in Pluronic F127/dextran ATPS, forms unique microparticle structures due to ATPS guided-self assembly. Depending on the PLGA concentration, the particles either formed a core-shell or a composite microparticle structure. The microparticles facilitate the simultaneous incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules, due to their amphiphilic macromolecule composition. Further, due to the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) properties of Pluronic F127, the particles exhibit temperature responsiveness. The ATPS based microparticle formation demonstrated in this study, serves as a novel platform for PLGA/polymer based tunable micro/nano particle and polymersome development. The unique properties may be useful in applications such as theranostics, synthesis of complex structure particles, bioreaction/mineralization at the two-phase interface, and bioseparations.

  3. Non-equilibrium phase transitions of aqueous starch systems.

    PubMed

    Biliaderis, C G

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data on phase transitions of aqueous starch systems, obtained by thermal analysis (TA) methods, are often indicative of irreversible (non-equilibrium) processes involving various metastable states. The thermal responses usually reflect composite effects from contributions of several opposing processes [e.g. annealing, melting, and (re)crystallization] taking place concurrently during TA. It is important, therefore, to recognize the temperature- and time-dependence of the structure of starch materials, if non-isothermal techniques are used for their characterization. Identifying the pertinent morphological features (supermolecular structure) of each particular system, as well as recognizing the role of water as a plasticizer which depresses the Tg of the amorphous domains, is essential to predict heat/moisture-mediated transformations of this biopolymer. The phase transition behaviour of granular starch and amylose-lipid complexes, as revealed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Thermomechanical Analysis, and the metastability of these materials are considered herein with respect to the effects of water and low molecular weight solutes.

  4. Sequential electrolytic oxidation and reduction of aqueous phase energetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, David M; Sale, Tom C

    2005-12-01

    Contamination of soils and groundwater with energetic compounds has been documented at many former ammunition manufacturing plants and ranges. Recent research at Colorado State University (CSU) has demonstrated the potential utility of electrolytic degradation of organic compounds using an electrolytic permeable reactive barrier (e-barrier). In principle, an electrolytic approach to degrade aqueous energetic compounds such as hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) can overcome limitations of management strategies that involve solely oxidation or reduction, through sequential oxidation-reduction or reduction-oxidation. The objective of this proof-of-concept research was to evaluate transformation of aqueous phase RDX and TNT in flow-through electrolytic reactors. Laboratory experiments were conducted using six identical column reactors containing porous media and expanded titanium-mixed-metal-oxide electrodes. Three columns tested TNT transformation and three tested RDXtransformation. Electrode sequence was varied between columns and one column for each contaminant acted as a no-voltage control. Over 97% of TNT and 93% of RDX was transformed in the reactors under sequential oxidation-reduction. Significant accumulation of known degradation intermediates was not observed under sequential oxidation-reduction. Removal of approximately 90% of TNT and 40% of RDX was observed under sequential reduction-oxidation. Power requirements on the order of 3 W/m2 were measured during the experiment. This suggests that an in-situ electrolytic approach may be cost-practical for managing groundwater contaminated with explosive compounds.

  5. Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies Prepared by Interstate Technology and...Regulatory Cooperation Work Group DNAPLs /Chemical Oxidation Work Team June 2000 Technology Overview Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids ( DNAPLs ): Review of Emerging Characterization and Remediation Technologies 5a. CONTRACT

  6. Chemical properties of rutherfordium (Rf) and dubnium (Db) in the aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagame, Yuichiro; Kratz, Jens Volker; Schädel, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Recent experimental studies of the chemical characterization of the first two transactinide elements, rutherfordium (Rf) and dubnium (Db), conducted atom-at-a-time in aqueous phases are reviewed. A short description on experimental techniques based on partition methods, specifically automated rapid chemical separation systems, is also given. Perspectives for aqueous-phase chemistry experiments on heavier elements are briefly discussed.

  7. Temperature- and pH-dependent aqueous-phase kinetics of the reactions of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with atmospheric amines and ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Nahzaneen; Takano, Hiromi; Blasic, Vanessa A.; Sullivan, Kristin A.; De Haan, David O.

    2013-10-01

    Reactions of glyoxal (Glx) and methylglyoxal (MG) with primary amines and ammonium salts may produce brown carbon and N-containing oligomers in aqueous aerosol. 1H NMR monitoring of reactant losses and product appearance in bulk aqueous reactions were used to derive rate constants and quantify competing reaction pathways as a function of pH and temperature. Glx + ammonium sulfate (AS) and amine reactions generate products containing C-N bonds, with rates depending directly on pH: rate = (70 ± 60) M-1 s-1fAld [Glx]totfAm [Am]tot, where fAld is the fraction of aldehyde with a dehydrated aldehyde functional group, and fAm is the fraction of amine or ammonia that is deprotonated at a given pH. MG + amine reactions generate mostly aldol condensation products and exhibit less pH dependence: rate = 10[(0.36 ± 0.06) × pH - (3.6 ± 0.3)] M-1 s-1fAld [MG]tot [Am]tot. Aldehyde + AS reactions are less temperature-dependent (Ea = 18 ± 8 kJ mol-1) than corresponding amine reactions (Ea = 50 ± 11 kJ mol-1). Using aerosol concentrations of [OH] = 10-12 M, [amine]tot = [AS] = 0.1 M, fGlx = 0.046 and fMG = 0.09, we estimate that OH radical reactions are normally the major aerosol-phase sink for both dicarbonyl compounds. However, reactions with AS and amines together can account for up to 12 and 45% of daytime aerosol-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal reactivity, respectively, in marine aerosol at pH 5.5. Reactions with AS and amines become less important in acidic or non-marine aerosol, but may still be significant atmospheric sources of brown carbon, imidazoles, and nitrogen-containing oligomers.

  8. Reactions of important OVOCs with hydrogen peroxide and ozone in the tropospheric aqueous phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöne, Luisa; Weller, Christian; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Besides research on the microphysics of cloud droplets and similar aqueous systems in the troposphere, the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from anthropogenic and biogenic sources cannot be neglected for the understanding of tropospheric processes such as the organic particle mass formation. Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can exceed those of VOCs from anthropogenic sources by a factor of 10[1]. Oxidation products of BVOCs like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolate, glyoxylate and pyruvate, glycolaldehyde, and the unsaturated compounds methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone are known precursors for less volatile organic substances found in secondary organic aerosols[2,3]. Yet, the main decomposition of these substances is believed to occur via radical reactions. However, Tilgner and Herrmann[2] showed evidence that the turnovers by non-radical reactions with H2O2 or ozone and some non-oxidative organic accretion reactions may even exceed those from the most reactive species in the lower troposphere, the hydroxyl radical OH. This work investigated the reactivities of the atmospheric relevant oxidation products including pyruvic acid and glyoxylic acid towards O3 and H2O2 in the aqueous phase. Furthermore, pH effects were studied by measuring the kinetics of both the protonated and deprotonated forms. The measurements were performed using a UV/VIS-spectrometer (conventional and in addition a Stopped Flow technique) and capillary electrophoresis. In some cases the results indicate higher turnovers of H2O2 and ozone reactions compared to interactions with atmospheric radicals. The experimental data obtained will be presented and their implications for atmospheric multiphase chemistry are discussed. [1] Guenther et al., 1995, Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmosphere, 100(D5), 8873-8892. [2] Tilgner and Herrmann, 2010, Atmospheric Environment, 44, 5415-5422. [3] van Pinxteren et al., 2005, Atmospheric Environment, 39, 4305-4320.

  9. How Is the Oxidative Capacity of the Cloud Aqueous Phase Modified By Bacteria?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Passananti, M.; Wirgot, N.; Joly, M.; Sancelme, M.; Bianco, A.; Cartier, N.; Brigante, M.; Mailhot, G.; Delort, A. M.; Chaumerliac, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The aqueous phase photochemical reactions of constituents present in atmospheric water like H2O2, NO3-, NO2- and Fe(III) aqua-complexes or organic complexes can form radicals such as the hydroxyl radical HO within the water drop. However, the literature lacks of data precising the rate of HO formation and the relative contribution of the photochemical sources of HO. The production of radicals in cloud aqueous phase drives the oxidative capacity of the cloud medium and the efficiency of organic matter oxidation. The oxidation of organic compounds is suspected to lead to oxygenated species that could contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass (Ervens et al., 2011). In current cloud chemistry models, HO concentrations strongly depend on the organic and iron amount. For high concentrations of organic compounds, this radical is efficiently consumed during the day due to the oxidation process. When iron concentrations are typical from continental cloud, the photolysis of Fe(III) complexes and the Fenton reaction drive the HO concentrations in the cloud models. The concept of biocatalysed reactions contributing to atmospheric chemistry as an alternative route to photochemistry is quite new (Vaïtilingom et al., 2013); it emerged from the recent discovery of metabolically active microorganisms in clouds. Microorganisms are well-known to degrade organic matter but they could also interact with oxidant species such as H2O2 (or their precursors) thanks to their oxidative and nitrosative stress metabolism that will act directly on these species and on their interactions with iron (metalloproteins and siderophores). For the moment, biological impact on radical chemistry within cloud has not been yet considered in cloud chemistry models. Bacterial activity will be introduced as catalysts in a multiphase cloud chemistry model using degradation rates measured in the laboratory. For example, biodegradation rates of the oxidants H2O2 by model bacteria will be tested in the

  10. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  11. Development of tropine-salt aqueous two-phase systems and removal of hydrophilic ionic liquids from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoran; Yao, Shun; Qian, Guofei; Song, Hang

    2016-08-26

    A novel aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) composed of a small molecule organic compound tropine and an organic or inorganic salt aqueous solution has been developed for the first time. The phase behavior of tropine-salt ATPS was systemically investigated and the phase equilibrium data were measured in different temperatures and concentrations and correlated by the Merchuk equation with satisfactory results. The detection of the conductivity and particle size proved the formation of micelle in the process of forming tropine-salt ATPS. The separation application of the ATPS was assessed with the removal of hydrophilic benzothiazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) from aqueous solution. The result showed that ILs were effectively extracted into the top tropine-rich phase. Finally, ILs in the top tropine-rich phase were further separated by the means of adsorption-desorption with DM301 macroporous resin and ethanol. The method of novel tropine-salt ATPS combined with adsorption-desorption is demonstrated a promising alternative thought and approach for the removal or recovery of hydrophilic compounds from aqueous media and also could provide a potential application for bio-separation.

  12. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vaporextraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2000-06-27

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air-water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE.

  13. Non-aqueous-phase fluids in heterogeneous aquifers -- experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, T.H.; Yates, D.N.; Armbruster, E.J. III.

    1995-08-01

    Understanding of flow and entrapment of non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in aquifers contaminated with organic chemicals is important in the effective design of recovery and remediation schemes. Soil heterogeneities play a significant role in the physical behavior of these chemicals. An experimental facility consisting of a large soil tank (lysimeter) and a dual-gamma spectroscopy system for fluid saturation measurements was developed to simulate and monitor plume migration in water-table aquifers after chemical spills. Experimental techniques and results form a preliminary set of experiments conducted in unsaturated and saturated soils under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions are presented. the effects of the layered homogeneities were pronounced in modifying the migration pattern and velocity of the plume. Pockets of coarse sand placed across the path of the plume resulted in the soil acting as a light NAPL trap. A fine-sand pocket acted as a barrier. Qualitative and quantitative data generated in the type of experiments presented in this paper can be used to validate multiphase flow models.

  14. Non-aqueous phase liquid spreading during soil vapor extraction

    PubMed Central

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Many non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are expected to spread at the air – water interface, particularly under non-equilibrium conditions. In the vadose zone, this spreading should increase the surface area for mass transfer and the efficiency of volatile NAPL recovery by soil vapor extraction (SVE). Observations of spreading on water wet surfaces led to a conceptual model of oil spreading vertically above a NAPL pool in the vadose zone. Analysis of this model predicts that spreading can enhance the SVE contaminant recovery compared to conditions where the liquid does not spread. Experiments were conducted with spreading volatile oils hexane and heptane in wet porous media and capillary tubes, where spreading was observed at the scale of centimeters. Within porous medium columns up to a meter in height containing stagnant gas, spreading was less than ten centimeters and did not contribute significantly to hexane volatilization. Water film thinning and oil film pinning may have prevented significant oil film spreading, and thus did not enhance SVE at the scale of a meter. The experiments performed indicate that volatile oil spreading at the field scale is unlikely to contribute significantly to the efficiency of SVE. PMID:14734243

  15. Quantification of Feedbacks in Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, F.; Herger, N.; Ramelli, F.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    The notion of clouds as buffered or resilient systems implies that generalized feedback processes unaccounted for in climate simulations may lead to an overestimation of the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions, i.e. cloud lifetime effects. In this contribution, we study the importance of microphysical feedback processes in response to anthropogenic aerosols in orographic mixed-phase clouds. Our methods can be extended to other cloud regimes as well as dynamical and thermodynamical feedbacks. For our simulations, we use the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART-M7 in a 2D setup with an idealized mountain. To capture major processes from aerosol emission to precipitation, the model is coupled to a modal aerosol scheme and includes aerosol activation and heterogeneous freezing as well as two-moment cold and warm cloud microphysics. We perform simulations with aerosol conditions that vary in amount and chemical composition and thus perturb the warm- and ice-phase pathways of precipitation formation and their mixed-phase interactions. Our analysis is based on quantifying the interaction strength between aerosol, cloud and precipitation variables by susceptibilities, i.e. relative sensitivities d ln(Y) / d ln(X), where the change in variable Y is a response to a perturbation in variable X. We describe how to decompose susceptibilities into a direct response expected from the parameterization and a contribution from feedbacks. Resilience features similar magnitudes but opposite signs for those contributions, resulting in an overall small susceptibility. We find considerable contributions from feedbacks, which appear more important for warm-phase than for cold-phase processes. We do not observe, however, a trend for resilience in mixed-phase cloud microphysics. Moreover, feedback contributions seem of secondary importance when compared to the strong dependence of susceptibilities on the microphysical state of the cloud.

  16. Electro-Optical Aerosol Phase Function Database PFNDAT2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    Pollack, J.B.; Khare, B.N. Optical Constants of Several Atmospheric Aerosol Species, Ammonium Sulphate , Aluminum Oxide and Sodium Chloride. J. of...16 Table 12. Precipitation rates, number...rain at three precipitation rates (drizzle, moderate, and heavy); and two classes of snow, “dry” and “wet”. Dusts are treated under four categories

  17. Phase-contrast helium-3 MRI of aerosol deposition in human airways.

    PubMed

    Sarracanie, Mathieu; Grebenkov, Denis; Sandeau, Julien; Coulibaly, Soulé; Martin, Andrew R; Hill, Kyle; Pérez Sánchez, José Manuel; Fodil, Redouane; Martin, Lionel; Durand, Emmanuel; Caillibotte, Georges; Isabey, Daniel; Darrasse, Luc; Bittoun, Jacques; Maître, Xavier

    2015-02-01

    One of the key challenges in the study of health-related aerosols is predicting and monitoring sites of particle deposition in the respiratory tract. The potential health risks of ambient exposure to environmental or workplace aerosols and the beneficial effects of medical aerosols are strongly influenced by the site of aerosol deposition along the respiratory tract. Nuclear medicine is the only current modality that combines quantification and regional localization of aerosol deposition, and this technique remains limited by its spatial and temporal resolutions and by patient exposure to radiation. Recent work in MRI has shed light on techniques to quantify micro-sized magnetic particles in living bodies by the measurement of associated static magnetic field variations. With regard to lung MRI, hyperpolarized helium-3 may be used as a tracer gas to compensate for the lack of MR signal in the airways, so as to allow assessment of pulmonary function and morphology. The extrathoracic region of the human respiratory system plays a critical role in determining aerosol deposition patterns, as it acts as a filter upstream from the lungs. In the present work, aerosol deposition in a mouth-throat phantom was measured using helium-3 MRI and compared with single-photon emission computed tomography. By providing high sensitivity with high spatial and temporal resolutions, phase-contrast helium-3 MRI offers new insights for the study of particle transport and deposition.

  18. Prostaglandin H synthase kinetics in the two-phase aqueous-micellar system.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Olga A; Trushkin, Nikita A; Filimonov, Ivan S; Krivoshey, Alexandr V; Barkhatov, Vladimir I; Mitrofanov, Sergey I; Vrzheshch, Petr V

    2016-09-01

    Reaction mixture for PGHS (prostaglandin-H-synthase) is a two-phase system including micellar hydrophobic phase and hydrophilic aqueous phase. Reagents added to the mixture are distributed between phases, thus concentrations of reagents dissolved in phases can differ significantly from their overall contents. Using dynamic light scattering we found that the hydrophobic phase produced by tween-20 consists of micelles, which radius (4-5nm) does not depend on either tween-20 overall content (0.1%-1% v/v) or arachidonic acid (AA) addition (10-1000μM) or PGHS addition (1μM). Tween-20 overall content changing from 0.1% to 2% v/v dramatically affected COX kinetic, but accounting AA distribution between phases allowed us to estimate "true" parameters, independent of the tween-20 overall content and the concentration of another substrate: KM(Ox) equals 9.8μM O2 in the aqueous phase or 0.0074bar in the gaseous phase, KM(AA) equals 5400μM AA in the phase of tween-20 micelles and 5400/PμM AA in the aqueous phase (P is the distribution ratio for the AA between the aqueous phase and the hydrophobic phase (P≫1000)). This approach allowed to evaluate PS, the distribution ratio for the AA between the hydrophobic phase and the PGHS active center (PS ~310). This coefficient indicates the AA selectivity toward the cyclooxygenase active center.

  19. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer for Field and Aircraft Measurements of Aerosol Phase Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgos, G.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the radiative balance and water cycle of our planet through influencing atmospheric radiation. Remote sensing of aerosols relies on scattering phase matrix information to retrieve aerosol properties with frequent global coverage. At the Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County we developed a new technique to directly measure the aerosol phase function and the degree of linear polarization of the scattered light (two elements of the phase matrix). We designed and built a portable instrument called the Polarized Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph). The PI-Neph successfully participated in dozens of flights of the NASA Development and Evaluation of satellite ValidatiOn Tools by Experimenters (DEVOTE) project and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) project. The ambient aerosol enters the PI-Neph through an inlet and the sample is illuminated by laser light (wavelength of 532 nm); the scattered light is imaged by a stationary wide field of view camera in the scattering angle range of 2° to 178°. (In some cases stray light limited the scattering angle range to 3° to 176°). The PI-Neph measurement of phase function and the AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) retrievals have already been compared in some cases when the aircraft spiraled over AERONET sites, for example at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, on October 18 2011, as shown in Figure 1. The differences between the PI-Neph and the AERONET retrievals can be attributed to differences between the ambient size distribution and the one sampled inside the aircraft. The data that is resolved with respect to scattering angle is used to compute the volume scattering coefficient. The above mentioned October 18 flight data showed good agreement between the PI-Neph measurements of volume scattering coefficient and the parallel TSI integrating nephelometer measurements. On average the TSI measurements were 1.02 times the PI

  20. Radical mechanisms of methyl vinyl ketone oligomerization through aqueous phase OH-oxidation: on the paradoxical role of dissolved molecular oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Siekmann, F.; Gandolfo, A.; Socorro, J.; Salque, G.; Ravier, S.; Quivet, E.; Clément, J.-L.; Traikia, M.; Delort, A.-M.; Voisin, D.; Thissen, R.; Monod, A.

    2013-01-01

    It is now accepted that one of the important pathways of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation occurs through aqueous phase chemistry in the atmosphere. However, the liquid phase chemical mechanisms leading to macromolecules are still not well understood. For α-dicarbonyl precursors, such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal, radical reactions through OH-oxidation produce oligomers, irreversibly and faster than accretion reactions. Methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was chosen in the present study as it is an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl that can undergo such reaction pathways in the aqueous phase and forms even high molecular weight oligomers. We present here experiments on the aqueous phase OH-oxidation of MVK, performed under atmospheric relevant conditions. Using NMR and UV absorption spectroscopy, high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, we show that the fast formation of oligomers up to 1800 Da is due to radical oligomerization of MVK, and 13 series of oligomers (out of a total of 26 series) are identified. The influence of atmospherically relevant parameters such as temperature, initial concentrations of MVK and dissolved oxygen are presented and discussed. In agreement with the experimental observations, we propose a chemical mechanism of OH-oxidation of MVK in the aqueous phase that proceeds via radical oligomerization of MVK on the olefin part of the molecule. This mechanism highlights the paradoxical role of dissolved O2: while it inhibits oligomerization reactions, it contributes to produce oligomerization initiator radicals, which rapidly consume O2, thus leading to the supremacy of oligomerization reactions after several minutes of reaction. These processes, together with the large ranges of initial concentrations investigated (60-656 μM of dissolved O2 and 0.2-20 mM of MVK) show the fundamental role that O2 likely plays in atmospheric organic aerosol.

  1. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process.

  2. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor: conceptual framework and experimental evidence for restructuring, phase transitions and kinetic limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E.; Vlasenko, S.; Martin, S. T.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we present a conceptual framework for the interaction of amorphous aerosol particles with water vapor, outlining characteristic features and differences in comparison to crystalline particles. We used a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) to characterize the hydration and dehydration of crystalline ammonium sulfate, amorphous oxalic acid and amorphous levoglucosan particles (diameter ~100 nm, relative humidity 5-95% at 298 K). The experimental data and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following conclusions: (1) Many organic substances, including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids. (2) Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts. (3) In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supramolecular networks) and undergo transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures. (4) Organic gels or (semi-)solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous) with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water and may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN). Moreover, (semi-)solid amorphous phases may influence the uptake of gaseous photo-oxidants and the chemical transformation and aging of

  3. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  4. REDOX AND ELECTROPHILIC PROPERTIES OF VAPOR- AND PARTICLE-PHASE COMPONENTS OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    PubMed Central

    Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Shinyashiki, Masaru; Schmitz, Debra A.; DiStefano, Emma; Hinds, William; Kumagai, Yoshito; Cho, Arthur K.; Froines, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM) has been the primary focus of studies aiming to understand the relationship between the chemical properties of ambient aerosols and adverse health effects. Size and chemical composition of PM have been linked to their oxidative capacity which has been postulated to promote or exacerbate pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases. But in the last few years, new studies have suggested that volatile and semivolatile components may also contribute to many adverse health effects. The objectives of this study were: i) assess for the first time the redox and electrophilic potential of vapor-phase components of ambient aerosols, and ii) evaluate the relative contributions of particle- and vapor-fractions to the hazard of a given aerosol. To achieve these objectives vapor- and particle-phase samples collected in Riverside (CA) were subjected to three chemical assays to determine their redox and electrophilic capacities. The results indicate that redox active components are mainly associated with the particle-phase, while electrophilic compounds are found primarily in the vapor-phase. Vapor-phase organic extracts were also capable of inducing the stress responding protein, heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. These results demonstrate the importance of volatile components in the overall oxidative and electrophilic capacity of aerosols, and point out the need for inclusion of vapors in future health and risk assessment studies. PMID:20152964

  5. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  6. Cloud droplet activation through oxidation of organic aerosol influenced by temperature and particle phase state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, Jonathan H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Arangio, Andrea; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Wang, Jian; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-02-01

    Chemical aging of organic aerosol (OA) through multiphase oxidation reactions can alter their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopicity. However, the oxidation kinetics and OA reactivity depend strongly on the particle phase state, potentially influencing the hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion rate of carbonaceous aerosol. Here, amorphous Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) aerosol particles, a surrogate humic-like substance (HULIS) that contributes substantially to global OA mass, are oxidized by OH radicals at different temperatures and phase states. When oxidized at low temperature in a glassy solid state, the hygroscopicity of SRFA particles increased by almost a factor of two, whereas oxidation of liquid-like SRFA particles at higher temperatures did not affect CCN activity. Low-temperature oxidation appears to promote the formation of highly-oxygenated particle-bound fragmentation products with lower molar mass and greater CCN activity, underscoring the importance of chemical aging in the free troposphere and its influence on the CCN activity of OA.

  7. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  8. Cell separations and the demixing of aqueous two phase polymer solutions in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Donald E.; Bamberger, Stephan; Harris, J. M.; Van Alstine, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Partition in phase separated aqueous polymer solutions is a cell separation procedure thought to be adversely influenced by gravity. In preparation for performing cell partitioning experiments in space, and to provide general information concerning the demixing of immiscible liquids in low gravity, a series of phase separated aqueous polymer solutions have been flown on two shuttle flights. Fluorocarbon oil and water emulsions were also flown on the second flight. The aqueous polymer emulsions, which in one g demix largely by sedimentation and convection due to the density differences between the phases, demixed more slowly than on the ground and the final disposition of the phases was determined by the wetting of the container wall by the phases. The demixing behavior and kinetics were influenced by the phase volume ratio, physical properties of the systems and chamber wall interaction. The average domain size increased linearly with time as the systems demixed.

  9. Impacts of aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) on SOA formation: on the prevailing role of dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Ervens, B.; Siekmann, F.; Vassalo, L.; Ravier, S.; Clement, J.; Monod, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is now recognized that the aqueous phase photochemistry of organic compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent aerosol particles lead to the formation of oligomers and thus it might produce a substantial amount of atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) with unique properties. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to these oligomers are still poorly understood, and consequently, their atmospheric impacts are difficult to assess. The goal of this study was to investigate the atmospheric impact of an aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK: one of the main reaction products of isoprene) on SOA formation. Aqueous phase photooxidation of MVK was investigated in a photoreactor using photolysis of H2O2 as OH radical generator. Electrospray high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1800 Da within less than 15 minutes of reaction. Highest oligomer formation rates were obtained under conditions of low dissolved oxygen, highest temperature and highest MVK initial concentrations. A radical mechanism of polymerization is proposed to explain this oligomer formation. Furthermore, we quantified the total amount of carbon present in oligomers, and the initial radical branching ratios. Kinetic parameters of the proposed oligomerization mechanism are constrained by means of a box model that is able to reproduce the temporal evolution of intermediates and products as observed in the laboratory experiments. Additional model simulations for atmospherically-relevant conditions will be presented that show the extent to which these radical processes contribute to SOA formation in the multiphase system as compared to other aqueous phase as well as traditional SOA sources.

  10. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; Anastasio, Cort N.; Laskin, Julia; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85-1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than •OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O/C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.

  11. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; ...

    2014-08-19

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (·OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified,more » including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than ·OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  12. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; ...

    2014-12-23

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol (compound with formula C6H5OH)), guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), and syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) with two major aqueous-phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (· OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenatedmore » molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than · OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenolic compound has reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV–visible region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols may contribute to formation of secondary brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  13. Estimating the importance of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol based on a functional-group resolving volatility basis set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C. J.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional understanding views secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere as continuous gas-phase oxidation of precursors such as isoprene, aromatics or alkanes. Recent research found that these oxidation products are also highly water soluble. It is further understood that the liquid-phase of cloud droplets as well as deliquesced particles could mediate SOA formation through chemistry in the aqueous-phase. While the effect of multi-phase processing has been studied in detailed for specific compounds like glyoxal or methylglyoxal, an integrated approach that considers the large number of individual compounds has been missing due to the complexity involved. In our work we explore the effects of multi-phase processing on secondary organic aerosol from an explicit modeling perspective.Volatility and solubility determine in which phase a given molecule will be found under given atmospheric conditions. Volatility has already been used to simplify the description of SOA formation in the gas-phase in what became known as the Volatility Basis Set approach (VBS). Compounds contributing to SOA formation are grouped by volatility and then treated as a whole. A number of studies extended the VBS by adding a second dimension like oxygen to carbon ratio or the mean oxidation state. In our work we use functional groups as second dimension.Using explicit oxidation chemistry modeling (GECKO-A) we derive SOA yields as well as their composition in terms of functional groups for commonly used precursors. We then investigate the effect of simply partitioning functional-group specific organic mass into cloud droplets and deliquesced aerosol based on their estimated solubility. Finally we apply simple chemistry in the aqueous-phase and relate changes in functional groups to changes in volatility and subsequent changes in partitioning between gas- and aerosol-phase.In our presentation we will explore the sensitivites of the multi-phase system in a box model setting with

  14. Organic component vapor pressures and hygroscopicities of aqueous aerosol measured by optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chen; Stewart, David J; Reid, Jonathan P; Zhang, Yun-hong; Ohm, Peter; Dutcher, Cari S; Clegg, Simon L

    2015-01-29

    Measurements of the hygroscopic response of aerosol and the particle-to-gas partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds are crucial for providing more accurate descriptions of the compositional and size distributions of atmospheric aerosol. Concurrent measurements of particle size and composition (inferred from refractive index) are reported here using optical tweezers to isolate and probe individual aerosol droplets over extended timeframes. The measurements are shown to allow accurate retrievals of component vapor pressures and hygroscopic response through examining correlated variations in size and composition for binary droplets containing water and a single organic component. Measurements are reported for a homologous series of dicarboxylic acids, maleic acid, citric acid, glycerol, or 1,2,6-hexanetriol. An assessment of the inherent uncertainties in such measurements when measuring only particle size is provided to confirm the value of such a correlational approach. We also show that the method of molar refraction provides an accurate characterization of the compositional dependence of the refractive index of the solutions. In this method, the density of the pure liquid solute is the largest uncertainty and must be either known or inferred from subsaturated measurements with an error of <±2.5% to discriminate between different thermodynamic treatments.

  15. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  16. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 15 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 15 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m-2, with a mean of -0.30 W m-2 for the 15 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.39 W m-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  17. Radiative Forcing of the Direct Aerosol Effect from AeroCom Phase II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; vanNoije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m(sup-2), with a mean of -0.27 W m(sup-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 W m(sup-2). Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study.We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results

  18. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  19. Pinning of phase separation of aqueous solution of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose by gelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Rio; Kaku, Takeshi; Kubota, Kenji; Dobashi, Toshiaki

    1999-08-01

    Opalescence of the aqueous solution of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) induced by heating has been studied in terms of the phase diagram and the phase separation dynamics. The cloud point curve and the sol-to-gel transition curve intersected with each other at about 55 °C. Just above the cloud-point curve at which the spinodal curve has its minimum, a ring-like scattering pattern appeared corresponding to the spinodal decomposition. Temporal growth of the scattering function in the course of phase separation was studied by a time-resolved light scattering technique. The gelation pinned the phase separation (spinodal decomposition) of the aqueous HPMC solution.

  20. Aqueous phase synthesis of CdTe quantum dots for biophotonics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Law, Wing-Cheung; Roy, Indrajit; Jing, Zhu; Huang, Huijie; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, CdTe quantum dots have been demonstrated as powerful probes for biophotonics applications. The aqueous phase synthesis technique remains the best approach to make high quality CdTe QDs in a single-pot process. CdTe QDs prepared directly in the aqueous phase can have quantum yield as high as 80%. In addition, the surface of CdTe QDs prepared using the aqueous phase technique is functionalized with reactive groups that enable them to be directly conjugated with specific ligands for targeted delivery and sensing. In this contribution, we review recent progress in fabricating aqueous CdTe QDs and exploiting their optical properties in novel approaches to biomedical imaging and sensing applications.

  1. Multi-stage mixer-settler planet centrifuge. Preliminary studies on partition of macromolecules with organic-aqueous and aqueous-aqueous two-phase solvent systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Zhang, T Y

    1988-03-11

    A rotary-seal-free planetary centrifuge holds a separation column which consists of multiple partition units (ca. 200) connected in series with transfer tubes. In the cavity of each partition unit the transfer tube extends to form a mixer which vibrates to stir the contents under an oscillating force field generated by the planetary motion of the centrifuge. Consequently, solutes locally introduced at the inlet of the column are subjected to an efficient partition process in each partition unit and separated according to their partition coefficients. The mixer tube equipped with a flexible silicone rubber joint was found to produce excellent results for partition with viscous polymer phase systems. The capability of the method was demonstrated on separation of cytochrome c and lysozyme using a PEG-aqueous dibasic potassium phosphate-aqueous two-phase solvent system.

  2. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results: AEROSOL PROFILES IN AEROCOM II GCM

    SciTech Connect

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-27

    The ability of eleven models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model inter-comparison initiative (AeroCom II) is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded dataset of aerosol extinction profiles built on purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 sub-continental regions show that five models improved whereas three degraded in reproducing the Zα 0-6 km mean extinction height diagnostic, which is computed over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models’ performance remains highly variable, it has generally improved in terms of inter-regional diversity and seasonality. The biases in Zα 0-6 km have notably decreased in the U.S. and European industrial and downwind maritime regions, whereas the timing of the Zα 0-6 km peak season has improved for all but two models. However, most of the models now show a Zα 0-6 km underestimation over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα 0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the (changes in the) the performance of the individual models and for the inter-model diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties that can contribute to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  3. Analysis of polar peptides using a silica hydride column and high aqueous content mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Kulsing, Chadin; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2013-09-01

    The retention behavior of a set of polar peptides separated on a silica hydride stationary phase was examined with a capillary HPLC system coupled to ESI-MS detection. The mobile phases consisted of formic acid or acetic acid/acetonitrile/water mixtures with the acetonitrile content ranging from 5 to 80% v/v. The effects on peptide retention of these two acidic buffer additives and their concentrations in the mobile phase were systematically investigated. Strong retention of the peptides on the silica hydride phase was observed with relatively high-organic low-aqueous mobile phases (i.e. under aqueous normal-phase conditions). However, when low concentrations of acetic acid were employed as the buffer additive, strong retention of the peptides was also observed even when high aqueous content mobile phases were employed. This unique feature of the stationary phase therefore provides an opportunity for chromatographic analysis of polar peptides with water-rich eluents, a feature usually not feasible with traditional RP sorbents, and thus under conditions more compatible with analytical green chemistry criteria. In addition, both isocratic and gradient elution procedures can be employed to optimize peptide separations with excellent reproducibility and resolution under these high aqueous mobile phase conditions with this silica hydride stationary phase.

  4. Development of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) sustained-release microspheres by a low temperature aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion method.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jian; Wu, Fei; Cai, Yunpeng; Xu, Mingxin; He, Mu; Yuan, Weien

    2014-10-01

    A novel method has been developed to protect Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres using an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion and S/O/W multi-emulsion method. This method develops a novel rhGH sustained-release system, which is based on the combination of rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles and PLGA microspheres. The process to fabricate rhGH-loaded dextran microparticles involves an aqueous phase/aqueous phase emulsion system formed at the reduced temperature. RhGH was first dissolved in water together with dextran and polyethylene glycol, followed by stirring at the speed of 2000 rpm for 20-30s at 0°C, and then a freezing process could enable the dextran phase to separate from the continuous PEG phase and rhGH could preferentially be loaded with dextran. The sample after freezing and phase separation was then lyophilized to powder and washed with dichloromethane to remove the PEG. Once loaded in the dextran microparticles (1-4 μm in diameter), rhGH gained resistance to interface tensions and was encapsulated into PLGA microspheres without aggregation thereafter. RhGH released from PLGA microspheres was in a sustained manner with minimal burst and maximally reduced incomplete release in vitro. Single subcutaneous injection of rhGH-loaded PLGA microspheres to rats resulted in a stable plasma concentration for 30 days avoiding the drug concentration fluctuations after multiple injections of protein solutions. In a hypophysectomized rat model, the IGF-1 and bodyweight results showed that there were higher than the levels obtained for the sustained release formulation by W/O/W for 40 days. These results suggest that the microsphere delivery system had the potential to be an injectable depot for sustained-release of the biocompatible protein of rhGH.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentel, Th.; Sebald, H.

    2003-04-01

    In our large Aerosol Chamber at the FZ Jülich we apply HR FTIR absorption spectroscopy for the determination of trace gases. In the FTIR spectra we also observe broad absorptions of several 10 to a few 100 cm-1 widths that arise from species in the condensed aerosol phase: liquid H_2O, NO_3^-, SO_42-, HSO_4^-, or dicarboxylic acids. Moreover, the aerosol droplets caused extinctions over several 1000 cm-1 by IR scattering. This allows for in-situ observation of changes in the condensed aerosol phase e.g. on HNO_3 uptake, like the shift of the sulfate/bisulfate equilibrium or the growth by water condensation. The IR absorptions of the condensed aerosol phase provide useful extra information in process studies, if they can be quantified. Therefore the absorption cross section, respective, the absorption index which is the imaginary part of the complex refractive index is needed. We set up an aerosol flow tube in which IR spectroscopy on a 8 m light path and aerosol size distribution measurements in the range from 20 nm - 10 μm can be performed simultaneously. We measured sulfate aerosols at several relative humidities (dry, metastable, deliquescent). We will demonstrate an iterative procedure based on Mie calculations and Kramers Kronig transformation to retrieve the absorption index from the observed IR spectra and the corresponding size distribution (for dry ammonium sulfate). We will compare resulting absorption indices for aqueous sodium bisulfate aerosols at several relative humidties with thermodynamic model calculations for the Na^+/H^+/HSO_4^-/SO_42-/H_2O system.

  6. Initiation of the ice phase by marine biogenic surfaces in supersaturated gas and supercooled aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Peter A; Aller, Josephine Y; Knopf, Daniel A

    2011-11-28

    Biogenic particles have the potential to affect the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere with subsequent consequences for the hydrological cycle and climate. We present laboratory observations of heterogeneous ice nucleation in immersion and deposition modes under atmospherically relevant conditions initiated by Nannochloris atomus and Emiliania huxleyi, marine phytoplankton with structurally and chemically distinct cell walls. Temperatures at which freezing, melting, and water uptake occur are observed using optical microscopy. The intact and fragmented unarmoured cells of N. atomus in aqueous NaCl droplets enhance ice nucleation by 10-20 K over the homogeneous freezing limit and can be described by a modified water activity based ice nucleation approach. E. huxleyi cells covered by calcite plates do not enhance droplet freezing temperatures. Both species nucleate ice in the deposition mode at an ice saturation ratio, S(ice), as low as ~1.2 and below 240 K, however, for each, different nucleation modes occur at warmer temperatures. These observations show that markedly different biogenic surfaces have both comparable and contrasting effects on ice nucleation behaviour depending on the presence of the aqueous phase and the extent of supercooling and water vapour supersaturation. We derive heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients, J(het), and cumulative ice nuclei spectra, K, for quantification and analysis using time-dependent and time-independent approaches, respectively. Contact angles, α, derived from J(het)via immersion freezing depend on T, a(w), and S(ice). For deposition freezing, α can be described as a function of S(ice) only. The different approaches yield different predictions of atmospheric ice crystal numbers primarily due to the time evolution allowed for the time-dependent approach with implications for the evolution of mixed-phase and ice clouds.

  7. Gas-phase CO2 subtraction for improved measurements of the organic aerosol mass concentration and oxidation degree by an aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Collier, S; Zhang, Q

    2013-12-17

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) has been widely used for real-time characterization of the size-resolved chemical composition of sub-micrometer aerosol particles. The first step in AMS sampling is the pre-concentration of aerosols while stripping away the gas-phase components, which contributes to the high sensitivity of this instrument. The strength of the instrument lies in particle phase measurement; however, ion signals generated from gas-phase species can influence the interpretation of the particle-phase chemistry data. Here, we present methods for subtracting the varying contributions of gas-phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in the AMS spectra of aerosol particles, which is critical for determining the mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio of organic aerosol. This report gives details on the gaseous CO2 subtraction analysis performed on a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) data set acquired from sampling of fresh and diluted vehicle emissions. Three different methods were used: (1) collocated continuous gas-phase CO2 measurement coupled with periodic filter tests consisting of sampling the same particle-free air by the AMS and the CO2 analyzer, (2) positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis to separate the gas- and particle-phase signals of CO2(+) at m/z 44, and (3) use of the particle time-of-flight (PTOF) size-resolved chemical information for separation of gas- and particle-phase signals at m/z 44. Our results indicate that these three different approaches yield internally consistent values for the gas/particle apportionment of m/z 44, but methods 2 and 3 require certain conditions to be met to yield reliable results. The methods presented are applicable to any situation where gas-phase components may influence the PM signal of interest.

  8. Modeling immersion freezing with aerosol-dependent prognostic ice nuclei in Arctic mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, M.; Hoose, C.

    2014-07-01

    While recent laboratory experiments have thoroughly quantified the ice nucleation efficiency of different aerosol species, the resulting ice nucleation parameterizations have not yet been extensively evaluated in models on different scales. Here the implementation of an immersion freezing parameterization based on laboratory measurements of the ice nucleation active surface site density of mineral dust and ice nucleation active bacteria, accounting for nucleation scavenging of ice nuclei, into a cloud-resolving model with two-moment cloud microphysics is presented. We simulated an Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during Flight 31 of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign near Barrow, Alaska. Through different feedback cycles, the persistence of the cloud strongly depends on the ice number concentration. It is attempted to bring the observed cloud properties, assumptions on aerosol concentration, and composition and ice formation parameterized as a function of these aerosol properties into agreement. Depending on the aerosol concentration and on the ice crystal properties, the simulated clouds are classified as growing, dissipating, and quasi-stable. In comparison to the default ice nucleation scheme, the new scheme requires higher aerosol concentrations to maintain a quasi-stable cloud. The simulations suggest that in the temperature range of this specific case, mineral dust can only contribute to a minor part of the ice formation. The importance of ice nucleation active bacteria and possibly other ice formation modes than immersion freezing remains poorly constrained in the considered case, since knowledge on local variations in the emissions of ice nucleation active organic aerosols in the Arctic is scarce.

  9. Nickel/ruthenium catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Sealock, John L.

    1998-01-01

    A method of hydrogenation using a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional ruthenium metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional ruthenium metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst during hydrogenation reactions.

  10. Influence of particle phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids, to phase-separated particles, to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40-90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids, (2) forcing a single phase, but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations, and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation between the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water-uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  11. Influence of particle-phase state on the hygroscopic behavior of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, N.; Zuend, A.; Mui, W.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-05-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that organic and mixed organic-inorganic particles can exhibit multiple phase states depending on their chemical composition and on ambient conditions such as relative humidity (RH). To explore the extent to which water uptake varies with particle-phase behavior, hygroscopic growth factors (HGFs) of nine laboratory-generated, organic and organic-inorganic aerosol systems with physical states ranging from well-mixed liquids to phase-separated particles to viscous liquids or semi-solids were measured with the Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe at RH values ranging from 40 to 90%. Water-uptake measurements were accompanied by HGF and RH-dependent thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) model. In addition, AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are compared to several simplified HGF modeling approaches: (1) representing particles as ideal, well-mixed liquids; (2) forcing a single phase but accounting for non-ideal interactions through activity coefficient calculations; and (3) a Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson-like calculation in which complete separation of the inorganic and organic components is assumed at all RH values, with water uptake treated separately in each of the individual phases. We observed variability in the characteristics of measured hygroscopic growth curves across aerosol systems with differing phase behaviors, with growth curves approaching smoother, more continuous water uptake with decreasing prevalence of liquid-liquid phase separation and increasing oxygen : carbon ratios of the organic aerosol components. We also observed indirect evidence for the dehydration-induced formation of highly viscous semi-solid phases and for kinetic limitations to the crystallization of ammonium sulfate at low RH for sucrose-containing particles. AIOMFAC-predicted growth curves are generally in good agreement with the HGF

  12. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  13. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of the phase diagram. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system simulation

  14. Phase state of ambient aerosol linked with water uptake and chemical aging in the southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Hu, Weiwei; Leong, Yu J.; Taylor, Nathan F.; Miettinen, Pasi; Palm, Brett B.; Mikkonen, Santtu; Collins, Don R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Virtanen, Annele

    2016-09-01

    During the summer 2013 Southern Aerosol and Oxidant Study (SOAS) field campaign in a rural site in the southeastern United States, the effect of hygroscopicity and composition on the phase state of atmospheric aerosol particles dominated by the organic fraction was studied. The analysis is based on hygroscopicity measurements by a Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA), physical phase state investigations by an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) and composition measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). To study the effect of atmospheric aging on these properties, an OH-radical oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was used to simulate longer atmospheric aging times of up to 3 weeks. Hygroscopicity and bounce behavior of the particles had a clear relationship showing higher bounce at elevated relative humidity (RH) values for less hygroscopic particles, which agrees well with earlier laboratory studies. Additional OH oxidation of the aerosol particles in the OFR increased the O : C and the hygroscopicity resulting in liquefying of the particles at lower RH values. At the highest OH exposures, the inorganic fraction starts to dominate the bounce process due to production of inorganics and concurrent loss of organics in the OFR. Our results indicate that at typical ambient RH and temperature, organic-dominated particles stay mostly liquid in the atmospheric conditions in the southeastern US, but they often turn semisolid when dried below ˜ 50 % RH in the sampling inlets. While the liquid phase state suggests solution behavior and equilibrium partitioning for the SOA particles in ambient air, the possible phase change in the drying process highlights the importance of thoroughly considered sampling techniques of SOA particles.

  15. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  16. Rapid aqueous phase SO2 oxidation in winter fog in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Himanshu; Sarkar, Chinmoy; Sinha, Baerbel

    2013-04-01

    Sulphate and sulphur dioxide play an important role in environmental chemistry and climate. The majority of anthropogenic sulphur is released directly as SO2, and a significant fraction of biogenic and natural sulphur emissions are also either directly released as SO2 or oxidised to SO2 in the atmosphere (e.g. H2S, OCS, DMS). Around 50% of global atmospheric sulphur dioxide is then oxidised to sulphate, while the rest is lost through dry and wet deposition. The pathway by which SO2 is oxidised to sulphate is critical in determining the climate forcing and environmental effects of sulphate. Gas-phase oxidation of SO2 by OH radicals or criegee intermediates produces H2SO4 (g), which plays an important role in controlling new particle formation in the troposphere and also modifies the surface properties of hydrophobic particles such as soot and mineral dust. Heterogeneous oxidation of SO2 is considered to occur primarily in cloud droplets, although oxidation on sea salt aerosols and mineral dust surfaces are considered to be regionally important. Heterogeneous oxidation leads to the formation of fewer and larger particles with shorter atmospheric lifetime. The major oxidation pathways which are considered to contribute to sulphate formation in the aqueous phase are oxidation by H2O2 and oxidation by O3 and the lifetime of SO2 with respect to all known loss processes combined is considered to be 1-2 days. Here we report measurements of SO2 measurements from IISER Mohali - Ambient Air Quality Station (30.67°N, 76.73°E), a station located at a suburban site in the Indo Gangetic Basin (IGB) during wintertime (10th Dec. 2011 to 29th Feb. 2012). We use a strong point source of SO2 with known SO2/CO emission ratio (brick kiln) located 6.5 km east of our measurement site to estimate the loss rate of SO2 in wintertime fog in the IGB. We consider the transport from the source to the receptor site to be Lagrangian and use the measured CO concentration at the receptors site to

  17. Aqueous phase removal of nitrogen from nitrogen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Fassbender, Alex G.

    1993-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of compounds containing nitrogen present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the types of nitrogen compounds present in a waste stream, (2) determining the concentrations of nitrogen compounds, (3) balancing oxidized and reduced form of nitrogen by adding a reactant, and (4) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 300.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., thereby resulting in less harmful nitrogen and oxygen gas, hydroxides, alcohols, and hydrocarbons.

  18. Nickel/ruthenium catalyst and method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, J.L.

    1998-09-29

    A method of hydrogenation is described using a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional ruthenium metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional ruthenium metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst during hydrogenation reactions. 2 figs.

  19. Computation of liquid-liquid equilibria and phase stabilities: implications for RH-dependent gas/particle partitioning of organic-inorganic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2010-08-01

    Semivolatile organic and inorganic aerosol species partition between the gas and aerosol particle phases to maintain thermodynamic equilibrium. Liquid-liquid phase separation into an organic-rich and an aqueous electrolyte phase can occur in the aerosol as a result of the salting-out effect. Such liquid-liquid equilibria (LLE) affect the gas/particle partitioning of the different semivolatile compounds and might significantly alter both particle mass and composition as compared to a one-phase particle. We present a new liquid-liquid equilibrium and gas/particle partitioning model, using as a basis the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008). This model allows the reliable computation of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve (binodal), corresponding tie-lines, the limit of stability/metastability (spinodal), and further thermodynamic properties of multicomponent systems. Calculations for ternary and multicomponent alcohol/polyol-water-salt mixtures suggest that LLE are a prevalent feature of organic-inorganic aerosol systems. A six-component polyol-water-ammonium sulphate system is used to simulate effects of relative humidity (RH) and the presence of liquid-liquid phase separation on the gas/particle partitioning. RH, salt concentration, and hydrophilicity (water-solubility) are identified as key features in defining the region of a miscibility gap and govern the extent to which compound partitioning is affected by changes in RH. The model predicts that liquid-liquid phase separation can lead to either an increase or decrease in total particulate mass, depending on the overall composition of a system and the particle water content, which is related to the hydrophilicity of the different organic and inorganic compounds. Neglecting non-ideality and liquid-liquid phase separations by assuming an ideal mixture leads to an overestimation of the total particulate mass by up to 30% for the composition and RH range considered in the six-component system

  20. Influence of metal-mediated aerosol-phase oxidation on secondary organic aerosol formation from the ozonolysis and OH-oxidation of α-pinene

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Biwu; Liggio, John; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Takekawa, Hideto; Li, Shao-Meng; Hao, Jiming

    2017-01-01

    The organic component is the most abundant fraction of atmospheric submicron particles, while the formation mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are not fully understood. The effects of sulfate seed aerosols on SOA formation were investigated with a series of experiments carried out using a 9 m3 smog chamber. The presence of FeSO4 or Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols decreased SOA yields and increased oxidation levels in both ozonolysis and OH-oxidation of α-pinene compared to that in the presence of ZnSO4 or (NH4)2SO4. These findings were explained by metal-mediated aerosol-phase oxidation of organics: reactive radicals were generated on FeSO4 or Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols and reacted further with the organic mass. This effect would help to explain the high O/C ratios of organics in ambient particles that thus far cannot be reproduced in laboratory and model studies. In addition, the gap in the SOA yields between experiments with different seed aerosols was more significant in OH-oxidation experiments compared to ozonolysis experiments, while the gap in estimated O/C ratios was less obvious. This may have resulted from the different chemical compositions and oxidation levels of the SOA generated in the two systems, which affect the branching ratio of functionalization and fragmentation during aerosol oxidation. PMID:28059151

  1. Influence of metal-mediated aerosol-phase oxidation on secondary organic aerosol formation from the ozonolysis and OH-oxidation of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Biwu; Liggio, John; Liu, Yongchun; He, Hong; Takekawa, Hideto; Li, Shao-Meng; Hao, Jiming

    2017-01-01

    The organic component is the most abundant fraction of atmospheric submicron particles, while the formation mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are not fully understood. The effects of sulfate seed aerosols on SOA formation were investigated with a series of experiments carried out using a 9 m3 smog chamber. The presence of FeSO4 or Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols decreased SOA yields and increased oxidation levels in both ozonolysis and OH-oxidation of α-pinene compared to that in the presence of ZnSO4 or (NH4)2SO4. These findings were explained by metal-mediated aerosol-phase oxidation of organics: reactive radicals were generated on FeSO4 or Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols and reacted further with the organic mass. This effect would help to explain the high O/C ratios of organics in ambient particles that thus far cannot be reproduced in laboratory and model studies. In addition, the gap in the SOA yields between experiments with different seed aerosols was more significant in OH-oxidation experiments compared to ozonolysis experiments, while the gap in estimated O/C ratios was less obvious. This may have resulted from the different chemical compositions and oxidation levels of the SOA generated in the two systems, which affect the branching ratio of functionalization and fragmentation during aerosol oxidation.

  2. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GAS-PHASE AND AEROSOL-BORNE HYDROPEROXIDES IN URBAN AIR. (R827352)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous measurements of hydroperoxides in both the gas- and the aerosol-phase have been made for the first time. In addition, hydroperoxide levels in the ‘coarse’ (>PM2) and ‘fine’ (PM2) aerosol modes have been characteriz...

  3. The effect of phase partitioning of semivolatile compounds on the measured CCN activity of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, S.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Nenes, A.; Raatikainen, T.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of inorganic semivolatile aerosol compounds on the CCN activity of aerosol particles was studied by using a computational model for a DMT-CCN counter, a cloud parcel model for condensation kinetics and experiments to quantify the modelled results. Concentrations of water vapour and semivolatiles as well as aerosol trajectories in the CCN column were calculated by a computational fluid dynamics model. These trajectories and vapour concentrations were then used as an input for the cloud parcel model to simulate mass transfer kinetics of water and semivolatiles between aerosol particles and the gas phase. Two different questions were studied: (1) how big fraction of semivolatiles is evaporated from particles before activation in the CCN counter? (2) How much the CCN activity can be increased due to condensation of semivolatiles prior to the maximum water supersaturation in the case of high semivolatile concentration in the gas phase? The results show that, to increase the CCN activity of aerosol particles, a very high gas phase concentration (as compared to typical ambient conditions) is needed. We used nitric acid as a test compound. A concentration of several ppb or higher is needed for measurable effect. In the case of particle evaporation, we used ammonium nitrate as a test compound and found that it partially evaporates before maximum supersaturation is reached in the CCN counter, thus causing an underestimation of CCN activity. The effect of evaporation is clearly visible in all supersaturations, leading to an underestimation of the critical dry diameter by 10 to 15 nanometres in the case of ammonium nitrate particles in different supersaturations. This result was also confirmed by measurements in supersaturations between 0.1 and 0.7%.

  4. An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huthwelker, T.; Zelenay, V.; Birrer, M.; Krepelova, A.; Raabe, J.; Ammann, M.; Tzvetkov, G.; Vernooij, M. G. C.

    2010-11-15

    A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 deg. C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

  5. An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Huthwelker, T; Zelenay, V; Birrer, M; Krepelova, A; Raabe, J; Tzvetkov, G; Vernooij, M G C; Ammann, M

    2010-11-01

    A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 °C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

  6. An in situ cell to study phase transitions in individual aerosol particles on a substrate using scanning transmission x-ray microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthwelker, T.; Zelenay, V.; Birrer, M.; Krepelova, A.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Vernooij, M. G. C.; Ammann, M.

    2010-11-01

    A new in situ cell to study phase transitions and chemical processes on individual aerosol particles in the x-ray transmission microscope at the PolLux beamline of the Swiss light source has been built. The cell is machined from stainless steel and aluminum components and is designed to be used in the standard mount of the microscope without need of complicated rearrangements of the microscope. The cell consists of two parts, a back part which contains connections for the gas supply, heating, cooling devices, and temperature measurement. The second part is a removable clip, which hosts the sample. This clip can be easily exchanged and brought into a sampling unit for aerosol particles. Currently, the cell can be operated at temperatures ranging from -40 to +50 °C. The function of the cell is demonstrated using two systems of submicron size: inorganic sodium bromide aerosols and soot originating from a diesel passenger car. For the sodium bromide we demonstrate how phase transitions can be studied in these systems and that O1s spectra from aqueous sodium bromide solution can be taken from submicron sized particles. For the case of soot, we demonstrate that the uptake of water onto individual soot particles can be studied.

  7. Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions in Atmospheric Forecast Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    combustion, biomass burning, and biogenic activity are sources of particulate oxalic acid ; photooxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...acids are likely particle-phase compounds formed by cloud and fog processing. Oxalic acid , which has also been shown to be formed by aqueous-phase...chemistry in cloud droplets, remains in the aerosol phase after subsequent droplet evaporation. In the aqueous phase, oxalic acid is formed by oxidation

  8. Preparative crystallization of a single chain antibody using an aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Huettmann, Hauke; Berkemeyer, Matthias; Buchinger, Wolfgang; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-11-01

    A simultaneous crystallization and aqueous two-phase extraction of a single chain antibody was developed, demonstrating process integration. The process conditions were designed to form an aqueous two-phase system, and to favor crystallization, using sodium sulfate and PEG-2000. At sufficiently high concentrations of PEG, a second phase was generated in which the protein crystallization occurred simultaneously. The single chain antibody crystals were partitioned to the top, polyethylene glycol-rich phase. The crystal nucleation took place in the sodium sulfate-rich phase and at the phase boundary, whereas crystal growth was progressing mainly in the polyethylene glycol-rich phase. The crystals in the polyethylene glycol-rich phase grew to a size of >50 µm. Additionally, polyethylene glycol acted as an anti-solvent, thus, it influenced the crystallization yield. A phase diagram with an undersaturation zone, crystallization area, and amorphous precipitation zone was established. Only small differences in polyethylene glycol concentration caused significant shifts of the crystallization yield. An increase of the polyethylene glycol content from 2% (w/v) to 4% (w/v) increased the yield from approximately 63-87%, respectively. Our results show that crystallization in aqueous two-phase systems is an opportunity to foster process integration.

  9. Mass spectrometry of interfacial layers during fast aqueous aerosol/ozone gas reactions of atmospheric interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, S.; Vecitis, C. D.; Cheng, J.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2008-04-01

    The oxidations of sulfite and iodide in the interfacial layers of aqueous microdroplets exposed to O 3(g) for 1 ms are investigated by online mass spectrometry of the electrostatically ejected anions. S(IV) oxidation losses in Na 2SO 3 microdroplets are proportional to [S(IV)] [O 3(g)] up to ˜90% conversion. I - is more abundant than HSO3- in the interfacial layers of equimolar (Na 2SO 3 + NaI) microdroplets and ˜3 times more reactive than HSO3- toward O 3(aq) in bulk solution, but it is converted withminimalloss to I3- and IO3- plus a persistent ISO3- intermediate. These observations reveal unanticipated interfacial gradients, reactivity patterns and transport phenomena that had not been taken into account in previous treatments of fast gas-liquid reactions.

  10. Ultralow interfacial tensions of aqueous two-phase systems measured using drop shape.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Mann, J Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-08-19

    Aqueous solutions of different polymers can separate and form aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). ATPS provide an aqueous, biocompatible, and mild environment for separation and fractionation of biomolecules. The interfacial tension between the two aqueous phases plays a major role in ATPS-mediated partition of biomolecules. Because of the structure of the two aqueous phases, the interfacial tensions between the phases can be 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than conventional fluid-liquid systems: ∼1-100 μJ/m(2) for ATPS compared to ∼72 mJ/m(2) for the water-vapor interface. This poses a major challenge for the experimental measurements of reproducible interfacial tension data for these systems. We address the need for precise determination of ultralow interfacial tensions by systematically studying a series of polymeric ATPS comprising of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran (DEX) as the phase-forming polymers. Sessile and pendant drops of the denser DEX phase are formed within the immersion PEG phase. An axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) is used to determine interfacial tensions of eight different ATPS. Specific criteria are used to reproducibly determine ultralow interfacial tensions of the ATPS from pendant and sessile drops. Importantly, for a given ATPS, pendant drop and sessile drop experiments return values within 0.001 mJ/m(2) indicating reliability of our measurements. Then, the pendant drop technique is used to measure interfacial tensions of all eight ATPS. Our measured values range from 0.012 ± 0.001 mJ/m(2) to 0.381 ± 0.006 mJ/m(2) and vary with the concentration of polymers in equilibrated phases of ATPS. Measurements of ultralow interfacial tensions with such reproducibility will broadly benefit studies involving partition of different biomolecules in ATPS and elucidate the critical effect of interfacial tension.

  11. Phase volume changes accompanying water extraction from aqueous electrolyte solutions by 1-octanol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; Moyer, B.A.

    1995-03-01

    The extraction of water by 1-octanol was calculated as a function of aqueous electrolyte concentration and initial O/A volume ratio for a series of representative salts, including LiCl, NaCl, KCl, NaNO{sub 3}, NaClO{sub 4}, MgCl{sub 2}, and CaCl{sub 2}. These results were then used to calculate the resultant phase-volume changes and aqueous-electrolyte-concentration changes. Such corrections are necessitated for precise extraction measurements employing 1-octanol as a diluent, especially as the O/A phase ratio exceeds unity. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Efflorescence upon humidification? X-ray microspectroscopic in situ observation of changes in aerosol microstructure and phase state upon hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöhlker, Christopher; Saturno, Jorge; Krüger, Mira L.; Förster, Jan-David; Weigand, Markus; Wiedemann, Kenia T.; Bechtel, Michael; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2014-05-01

    The phase and mixing state of atmospheric aerosols is a central determinant of their properties and thus their role in atmospheric cycling and climate. Particularly, the hygroscopic response of aerosol particles to relative humidity (RH) variation is a key aspect of their atmospheric life cycle and impacts. Here we applied X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH conditions to internally mixed aerosol particles from the Amazonian rain forest collected during periods with anthropogenic pollution. Upon hydration, we observed substantial and reproducible changes in particle microstructure, which appear as mainly driven by efflorescence and recrystallization of sulfate salts. Multiple solid and liquid phases were found to coexist, especially in intermediate humidity regimes. We show that X-ray microspectroscopy under variable RH is a valuable technique to analyze the hygroscopic response of individual ambient aerosol particles. Our initial results underline that RH changes can trigger strong particle restructuring, in agreement with previous studies on artificial aerosols.

  13. Condensed-Phase Photochemical Processes in Titan's Aerosols and Surface: The Role of Longer Wavelength Photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Jacovi, Ronen; Lignell, Antti; Couturier, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    We will discuss photochemical properties of Titan's organic molecules in the condensed phase as solid aerosols or surface material, from small linear polyyenes (polyacetylenes and polycyanoacetylenes) such as C2H2, C4N2, HC5N, etc. In particular we will focus on photochemistry caused by longer wavelength UV-VIS photons (greater than 250 nm) photons that make it through Titan's atmosphere to the haze region (approximately 100 km) and on to the surface of Titan.

  14. Aqueous-phase oxidation of green leaf volatiles by hydroxyl radical as a source of SOA: Product identification from methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Amie K.; Ehrenhauser, Franz S.; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Anastasio, Cort; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    2015-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into the atmosphere by vegetation. BVOCs produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via gas-phase reactions, but little is known of their aqueous-phase oxidation as a source of SOA. GLVs can partition into atmospheric water phases, e.g., fog, mist, dew or rain, and be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). These reactions in the liquid phase also lead to products that have higher molecular weights, increased polarity, and lower vapor pressures, ultimately forming SOA after evaporation of the droplet. To examine this process, we investigated the aqueous, ˙OH-mediated oxidation of methyl jasmonate (MeJa) and methyl salicylate (MeSa), two GLVs that produce aqueous-phase SOA. High performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used to monitor product formation. The oxidation products identified exhibit higher molecular mass than their parent GLV due to either dimerization or the addition of oxygen and hydroxyl functional groups. The proposed structures of potential products are based on mechanistic considerations combined with the HPLC/ESI-MS data. Based on the structures, the vapor pressure and the Henry's law constant were estimated with multiple methods (SPARC, SIMPOL, MPBPVP, Bond and Group Estimations). The estimated vapor pressures of the products identified are significantly (up to 7 orders of magnitude) lower than those of the associated parent compounds, and therefore, the GLV oxidation products may remain as SOA after evaporation of the water droplet. The contribution of the identified oxidation products to SOA formation is estimated based on measured HPLC-ESI/MS responses relative to previous aqueous SOA mass yield measurements.

  15. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  16. IMPROVING LIQUID CRYSTAL-BASED BIOSENSING IN AQUEOUS PHASES

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Wilder; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Jákli, Antal

    2012-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC)-based biological sensors permit the study of aqueous biological samples without the need for the labeling of biological species with fluorescent dyes (which can be laborious and change the properties of the biological sample under study). To date, studies of LC-based biosensors have explored only a narrow range of the liquid crystal/alignment layer combinations essential to their operation. Here we report a study of the role of LC elastic constants and the surface anchoring energy in determining the sensitivity of LC-based biosensors. By investigating a mixture of rod-shape and bent-shape mesogens, and three different alignment layers, we were able to widen the useful detection range of a LC-based sensor by providing an almost linear mapping of effective birefringence with concentration between 0.05 and 1mM of an anionic surfactant (model target analyte). These studies pave the way for optimization of LC-based biosensors and reveal the importance of the choice of both the LC material and the alignment layer in determining sensor properties. PMID:23157269

  17. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Kokkola, Harri; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Gan; van Noije, Twan; Pringle, Kirsty J.; von Salzen, Knut; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Zhang, Kai

    2016-02-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN > 3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN > 100 nm) are controlled by the

  18. What Controls the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol? Relationships Between Process Sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and Inter-Model Variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Johnson, Colin E.; Mann, Graham W.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bergman, Tommi; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Ghan, Steven J.; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2016-01-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors in one particular model, we investigate the effects of individual processes in HadGEM3-UKCA and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global-mean profile and, to a lesser extent, the zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. In HadGEM3-UKCA, convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number (e.g. total CN >3 nm), while the profiles of larger particles (e.g. CN>100 nm) are controlled by the

  19. What controls the vertical distribution of aerosol? Relationships between process sensitivity in HadGEM3-UKCA and inter-model variation from AeroCom Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Z.; Stier, P.; Johnson, C. E.; Mann, G. W.; Bellouin, N.; Bauer, S. E.; Bergman, T.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Kokkola, H.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; van Noije, T.; Pringle, K. J.; von Salzen, K.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2015-09-01

    The vertical profile of aerosol is important for its radiative effects, but weakly constrained by observations on the global scale, and highly variable among different models. To investigate the controlling factors, we investigate the effects of individual processes in one particular model (HadGEM3-UKCA), and compare the resulting diversity of aerosol vertical profiles with the inter-model diversity from the AeroCom Phase II control experiment. In this way we show that (in this model at least) the vertical profile is controlled by a relatively small number of processes, although these vary among aerosol components and particle sizes. We also show that sufficiently coarse variations in these processes can produce a similar diversity to that among different models in terms of the global mean profile and zonal-mean vertical position. However, there are features of certain models' profiles that cannot be reproduced, suggesting the influence of further structural differences between models. Convective transport is found to be very important in controlling the vertical profile of all aerosol components by mass. In-cloud scavenging is very important for all except mineral dust. Growth by condensation is important for sulphate and carbonaceous aerosol (along with aqueous oxidation for the former and ageing by soluble material for the latter). The vertical extent of biomass-burning emissions into the free troposphere is also important for the profile of carbonaceous aerosol. Boundary-layer mixing plays a dominant role for sea-salt and mineral dust, which are emitted only from the surface. Dry deposition and below-cloud scavenging are important for the profile of mineral dust only. In this model, the microphysical processes of nucleation, condensation and coagulation dominate the vertical profile of the smallest particles by number, while the profiles of larger particles are controlled by the same processes as the component mass profiles, plus the size distribution of

  20. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Yee, L. D.; Schilling, K.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zuend, A.; Ziemann, P. J.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multi-generation gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a mid-experiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. The results of the current work have a number of implications for SOA models. While the dynamics of an aerosol size distribution reflects the mechanism of growth, we demonstrate here that it provides a key constraint in interpreting laboratory and ambient SOA formation. This work, although carried out specifically for the long chain alkane, dodecane, is expected to be widely applicable to other major classes of SOA precursors. SOA consists of a myriad of organic compounds containing various functional groups, which can generally undergo heterogeneous/multiphase reactions forming low-volatility products such as oligomers and other high molecular mass compounds. If particle-phase chemistry is indeed

  1. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF LIGHT GASES IN HYDROCARBON AND AQUEOUS SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    KHALED A.M. GASEM; ROBERT L. ROBINSON, JR.

    1998-08-31

    Under previous support from the Department of Energy, an experimental facility has been established and operated to measure valuable vapor-liquid equilibrium data for systems of interest in the production and processing of coal fluids. To facilitate the development and testing of models for prediction of the phase behavior for such systems, we have acquired substantial amounts of data on the equilibrium phase compositions for binary mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon solvents with a variety of supercritical solutes, including hydrogen, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The present project focuses on measuring the phase behavior of light gases and water in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) type solvents at conditions encountered in indirect liquefaction processes and evaluating and developing theoretically-based correlating frameworks to predict the phase behavior of such systems. Specific goals of the proposed work include (a) developing a state-of-the-art experimental facility to permit highly accurate measurements of equilibrium phase compositions (solubilities) of challenging F-T systems, (b) measuring these properties for systematically-selected binary, ternary and molten F-T wax mixtures to provide critically needed input data for correlation development, (c) developing and testing models suitable for describing the phase behavior of such mixtures, and (d) presenting the modeling results in generalized, practical formats suitable for use in process engineering calculations. During the present period, the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) equation of state (EOS) has been modified to improve its volumetric and equilibrium predictions. Specifically, the attractive term of the PGR equation was modified to enhance the flexibility of the model, and a new expression was developed for the temperature dependence of the attractive term in this segment-segment interaction model. The predictive capability of the modified PGR EOS for vapor pressure, and saturated liquid and

  2. On-chip aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) formation, consequential self-mixing, and their influence on drop-to-drop aqueous two-phase extraction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijethunga, Pavithra A. L.; Moon, Hyejin

    2015-09-01

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) allow an advantageous aqueous two-phase extraction process (ATPE), a special type of liquid-liquid extraction. Compared with conventional liquid-liquid extraction using aqueous/organic extraction media, ATPE is known to provide relatively easy mass transfer and a gentle environment for biological separation applications. Considering the recent interest in microscale ATPE, we aimed to study (i) the potential of preparing ATPS droplets on a digital microfluidic device, and (ii) the influence of the fluidic dynamics created during the formation of ATPS, with the goal of enhancing on-chip ATPE process. On-chip ATPS formation was evaluated by preparing a series of ATPSs on electrowetting on dielectric digital microfluidic chips and comparing their characteristics with the same ATPSs prepared at macroscale using conventional procedures. An enhanced on-chip drop-to-drop ATPE process was achieved by incorporating a self-mixing condition created during ATPSformation. Results indicate a successful on-chip ATPS preparation as well as enhanced extraction performance by self-mixing in the absence of forced mixing. Findings of this research suggest an alternative, simple, yet adequate technique to provide mixing for on-chip applications, such as sample preparation in portable microfluidics, for which it is unfavorable to implement complicated mixing sequences or complex device geometries.

  3. Aqueous-, pore-water-, and sediment-phase cadmium: Toxicity relationships for a meiobenthic copepod

    SciTech Connect

    Green, A.S.; Chandler, G.T.; Blood, E.R. . Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences)

    1993-08-01

    Comparative effects of aqueous-, pore-water-, and sediment-phase cadmium on mortality of an infaunal laboratory-cultured copepod, Amphiascus tenuiremis, were determined using acute 96-h bioassays. Experimental design included five cadmium concentrations, three replicates per concentration, and 50 adult copepods per replicate for each of the exposure. Exposures included cadmium solubilized in seawater only, whole sediment, and pore water only. In addition, two whole-sediment bioassays were compared in which pore-water cadmium concentrations were altered experimentally but sediment concentrations remained the same. Results of these experiments showed that for Amphiascus tenuiremis, cadmium is most toxic in the aqueous phase, less toxic in the pore-water phase, and last toxic in the sediment-bound phase. The lowered toxicity of cadmium in the pore water was most likely due to complexation of cadmium with DOC, because concentrations of DOC were six times higher in the pore-water phase than in the aqueous phase. In whole sediments, pore-water-phase cadmium was the primary source of acute toxicity, as sediment-associated cadmium contributed negligible effects.

  4. Aqueous-phase hydrogenation of acetic acid over transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Olcay, Hakan; Xu, Lijun; Xu, Ye; Huber, George

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of acetic acid to ethanol has been carried out in aqueous phase on several metals, with ruthenium being the most active and selective. DFT calculations suggest that the initial CO bond scission yielding acetyl is the key step and that the intrinsic reactivity of the metals accounts for the observed activity.

  5. Aqueous phase sensing of cyanide ions using a hydrolytically stable metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Avishek; Joarder, Biplab; Mallick, Abhik; Samanta, Partha; Desai, Aamod V; Basu, Sudipta; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2017-01-19

    A pure aqueous phase recognition and corresponding detoxification of highly toxic cyanide ions has been achieved by a fluorescent metal-organic framework (MOF). The cyanide detoxification has been shown to be effective even in in vitro studies and the MOF could be recycled to show the same efficiency of detoxification.

  6. “Towards building better linkages between aqueous phase chemistry and microphysics in CMAQ”

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, CMAQ’s aqueous phase chemistry routine (AQCHEM-base) assumes Henry’s Law equilibrium and employs a forward Euler method to solve a small set of oxidation equations, considering the additional processes of aitken scavenging and wet deposition in series and e...

  7. Development of linear free energy relationships for aqueous phase radical-involved chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Mezyk, Stephen P; Jones, Jace W; Daws, Brittany R; Crittenden, John C

    2014-12-02

    Aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) produce hydroxyl radicals (HO•) which can completely oxidize electron rich organic compounds. The proper design and operation of AOPs require that we predict the formation and fate of the byproducts and their associated toxicity. Accordingly, there is a need to develop a first-principles kinetic model that can predict the dominant reaction pathways that potentially produce toxic byproducts. We have published some of our efforts on predicting the elementary reaction pathways and the HO• rate constants. Here we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) that predict the rate constants for aqueous phase radical reactions. The LFERs relate experimentally obtained kinetic rate constants to quantum mechanically calculated aqueous phase free energies of activation. The LFERs have been applied to 101 reactions, including (1) HO• addition to 15 aromatic compounds; (2) addition of molecular oxygen to 65 carbon-centered aliphatic and cyclohexadienyl radicals; (3) disproportionation of 10 peroxyl radicals, and (4) unimolecular decay of nine peroxyl radicals. The LFERs correlations predict the rate constants within a factor of 2 from the experimental values for HO• reactions and molecular oxygen addition, and a factor of 5 for peroxyl radical reactions. The LFERs and the elementary reaction pathways will enable us to predict the formation and initial fate of the byproducts in AOPs. Furthermore, our methodology can be applied to other environmental processes in which aqueous phase radical-involved reactions occur.

  8. Cloud droplet activation through oxidation of organic aerosol influenced by temperature and particle phase state

    DOE PAGES

    Slade, Jonathan H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Arangio, Andrea; ...

    2017-01-27

    Chemical aging of organic aerosol (OA) through multiphase oxidation reactions can alter their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopicity. However, the oxidation kinetics and OA reactivity depend strongly on the particle phase state, potentially influencing the hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion rate of carbonaceous aerosol. Here, amorphous Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) aerosol particles, a surrogate humic-like substance (HULIS) that contributes substantially to global OA mass, are oxidized by OH radicals at different temperatures and phase states. When oxidized at low temperature in a glassy solid state, the hygroscopicity of SRFA particles increased by almost a factor of two, whereas oxidation ofmore » liquid-like SRFA particles at higher temperatures did not affect CCN activity. Low-temperature oxidation appears to promote the formation of highly-oxygenated particle-bound fragmentation products with lower molar mass and greater CCN activity, underscoring the importance of chemical aging in the free troposphere and its influence on the CCN activity of OA.« less

  9. Secondary organic aerosol formation from low-NO(x) photooxidation of dodecane: evolution of multigeneration gas-phase chemistry and aerosol composition.

    PubMed

    Yee, Lindsay D; Craven, Jill S; Loza, Christine L; Schilling, Katherine A; Ng, Nga Lee; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Ziemann, Paul J; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2012-06-21

    The extended photooxidation of and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dodecane (C(12)H(26)) under low-NO(x) conditions, such that RO(2) + HO(2) chemistry dominates the fate of the peroxy radicals, is studied in the Caltech Environmental Chamber based on simultaneous gas and particle-phase measurements. A mechanism simulation indicates that greater than 67% of the initial carbon ends up as fourth and higher generation products after 10 h of reaction, and simulated trends for seven species are supported by gas-phase measurements. A characteristic set of hydroperoxide gas-phase products are formed under these low-NO(x) conditions. Production of semivolatile hydroperoxide species within three generations of chemistry is consistent with observed initial aerosol growth. Continued gas-phase oxidation of these semivolatile species produces multifunctional low volatility compounds. This study elucidates the complex evolution of the gas-phase photooxidation chemistry and subsequent SOA formation through a novel approach comparing molecular level information from a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and high m/z ion fragments from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Combination of these techniques reveals that particle-phase chemistry leading to peroxyhemiacetal formation is the likely mechanism by which these species are incorporated in the particle phase. The current findings are relevant toward understanding atmospheric SOA formation and aging from the "unresolved complex mixture," comprising, in part, long-chain alkanes.

  10. Comparison of different gas-phase mechanisms and aerosol modules for simulating particulate matter formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngseob; Couvidat, Florian; Sartelet, Karine; Seigneur, Christian

    2011-11-01

    The effects of two gas-phase chemical kinetic mechanisms, Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism version 2 (RACM2) and Carbon-Bond 05 (CB05), and two secondary organic aerosol (SOA) modules, the Secondary Organic Aerosoi Model (SORGAM) and AER/EPRI/Caltech model (AEC), on fine (aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm) particulate matter (PM2.5) formation is studied. The major sources of uncertainty in the chemistry of SOA formation are investigated. The use of all major SOA precursors and the treatment of SOA oligomerization are found to be the most important factors for SOA formation, leading to 66% and 60% more SOA, respectively. The explicit representation of high-NO, and low-NOx gas-phase chemical regimes is also important with increases in SOA of 30-120% depending on the approach used to implement the distinct SOA yields within the gas-phase chemical kinetic mechanism; further work is needed to develop gas-phase mechanisms that are fully compatible with SOA formation algorithms. The treatment of isoprene SOA as hydrophobic or hydrophilic leads to a significant difference, with more SOA being formed in the latter case. The activity coefficients may also be a major source of uncertainty, as they may differ significantly between atmospheric particles, which contain a myriad of SOA, primary organic aerosol (POA), and inorganic aerosol species, and particles formed in a smog chamber from a single precursor under dry conditions. Significant interactions exist between the uncertainties of the gas-phase chemistry and those of the SOA module.

  11. Optical phase curves as diagnostics for aerosol composition in exoplanetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshenko, Maria; Heng, Kevin; Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Optical phase curves have become one of the common probes of exoplanetary atmospheres, but the information they encode has not been fully elucidated. Building on a diverse body of work, we upgrade the Flexible Modelling System to include scattering in the two-stream, dual-band approximation and generate plausible, three-dimensional structures of irradiated atmospheres to study the radiative effects of aerosols or condensates. In the optical, we treat the scattering of starlight using a generalization of Beer's law that allows for a finite Bond albedo to be prescribed. In the infrared, we implement the two-stream solutions and include scattering via an infrared scattering parameter. We present a suite of four-parameter general circulation models for Kepler-7b and demonstrate that its climatology is expected to be robust to variations in optical and infrared scattering. The westward and eastward shifts of the optical and infrared phase curves, respectively, are shown to be robust outcomes of the simulations. Assuming micron-sized particles and a simplified treatment of local brightness, we further show that the peak offset of the optical phase curve is sensitive to the composition of the aerosols or condensates. However, to within the measurement uncertainties, we cannot distinguish between aerosols made of silicates (enstatite or forsterite), iron, corundum or titanium oxide, based on a comparison to the measured peak offset (41° ± 12°) of the optical phase curve of Kepler-7b. Measuring high-precision optical phase curves will provide important constraints on the atmospheres of cloudy exoplanets and reduce degeneracies in interpreting their infrared spectra.

  12. High-resolution mass spectrometry and molecular characterization of aqueous photochemistry products of common types of secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Romonosky, Dian E; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2015-03-19

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the molecular level composition and the extent of aqueous photochemical processing in different types of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors including α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, α-humulene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, and guaiacol, oxidized by ozone (to simulate a remote atmosphere) or by OH in the presence of NOx (to simulate an urban atmosphere). Chamber- and flow-tube-generated SOA samples were collected, extracted in a methanol/water solution, and photolyzed for 1 h under identical irradiation conditions. In these experiments, the irradiation was equivalent to about 3-8 h of exposure to the sun in its zenith. The molecular level composition of the dissolved SOA was probed before and after photolysis with direct-infusion electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HR-MS). The mass spectra of unphotolyzed SOA generated by ozone oxidation of monoterpenes showed qualitatively similar features and contained largely overlapping subsets of identified compounds. The mass spectra of OH/NOx-generated SOA had more unique visual appearance and indicated a lower extent of product overlap. Furthermore, the fraction of nitrogen-containing species (organonitrates and nitroaromatics) was highly sensitive to the SOA precursor. These observations suggest that attribution of high-resolution mass spectra in field SOA samples to specific SOA precursors should be more straightforward under OH/NOx oxidation conditions compared to the ozone-driven oxidation. Comparison of the SOA constituents before and after photolysis showed the tendency to reduce the average number of atoms in the SOA compounds without a significant effect on the overall O/C and H/C ratios. SOA prepared by OH/NOx photooxidation of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and guaiacol were more resilient to photolysis despite being the most light-absorbing. The composition of SOA prepared by ozonolysis of

  13. Depositional phasing of volcanic aerosols in the WAIS Divide ice core over the past 2400 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffman, B. G.; Kreutz, K. J.; Breton, D. J.; Dunbar, N. W.; Kurbatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic events originating in the tropics are an intermittent but significant factor in climate forcing, with the potential to cause global cooling for up to several years. Evidence of prehistoric eruptions in the form of tephra has been documented in sedimentary records throughout the globe, including the polar ice sheets. The chemical record of volcanic aerosols is also found in ice core records. While the record of tropical volcanism observed in Antarctic ice cores (based on sulfate deposition) is consistent regionally, little to no evidence of insoluble aerosols (ash particles) from tropical eruptions has been found. The upper 577 m (2400 years) of the WAIS Divide deep ice core (WDC06A) was melted using the UMaine WAIS Melt Monitor system, which allows accurate mm-scale depth co-registration of electrical conductivity and particle data, with subsequent collection of discrete samples for expanded particle, glaciochemical and geochemical analysis. The concentration and size distribution of microparticles were measured using a flow-through Klotz Abakus laser particle detector, developed by Ruth et al (2002) and calibrated with Coulter-Counter measurements. High-resolution analysis of ice spanning these volcanic intervals indicates that insoluble aerosols consistently arrive sooner than soluble aerosols (i.e., sulfate) at the WAIS Divide site (e.g., the Kuwae, Vanuatu eruption of ~1452 C.E.; Figure 1). We have observed this phasing difference for multiple tropical eruptions, including Agung (1963 C.E.), Krakatau/Tarawera (1886/1883), Tambora (1815), Kuwae (~1452) and Unknown (~1259). This phasing difference, which is on the order of 6-18 months, appears to be related to the eruptive column height and atmospheric transport of material.

  14. Oxidation and detoxification of pentachlorophenol in aqueous phase by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Anotai, Jin; Wuttipong, Rosawan; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2007-10-01

    The degradation and detoxification performance of ozonation in treating pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated wastewater was determined. All experiments were conducted in a bench scale glass column equipped with ceramic diffuser and a lab-scale ozone generator under ambient temperature and pH 7. The decomposition rate of PCP in this study was primarily controlled by the ozone mass transfer rate from gas to liquid phases. Principal intermediates found were 2,3,4,6- and 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenols (TeCP) and phenol. PCP seems to be more vulnerable to ozone than its intermediates. A bioluminescence technique was used to evaluate the toxicity of PCP with Vibrio fisheri NRRL B-11177 as the test bacterium, and the EC(50) of PCP was found to be 1.0 mg l(-1). Detoxification occurred as the PCP and TeCP reacted with ozone and decomposed to less chlorinated congeners and phenol.

  15. Photocatalytic selective oxidation of hydrocarbons in the aqueous phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Howell, S.G.; Sikdar, S.K.

    1999-04-01

    The sustainable transformation of an inert alkane into its corresponding oxygenates has been the subject of intense chemical research. These oxygenates typically produced from processes using stringent conditions and materials offer disadvantages that include decreased selectivities to the partial oxygenates and by-product formation. As environmental concerns and regulations become more rigorous, the need for alternative catalytic oxidation processes that use mild or ambient conditions is increased. In this Note, the authors have investigated the use of photocatalysis as a low-temperature and green alternative for the direct and selective oxidation of alkanes with molecular oxygen. Research has been directed toward the use of a heterogeneous liquid-phase reactor for the partial oxidation of cyclohexane, toluene, methylcyclohexane, ethylbenzene, and cumene to their corresponding oxygenates.

  16. Treatment of aqueous phase of bio-oil by granular activated carbon and evaluation of biogas production.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Saravanan R; Adhikari, Sushil; Wang, Zhouhang; Shakya, Rajdeep

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction of wet biomass such as algae is a promising thermochemical process for the production of bio-oil. Bio-oil aqueous phase generated during liquefaction process is rich in complex organics and can be utilized for biogas production following its pre-treatment with granular activated carbon. In our study, use of 30% activated carbon resulted in higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (53±0.3%) from aqueous phase. Higher CH4 production (84±12mL/gCOD) was also observed in 30% carbon-treated aqueous phase fed cultures, whereas only 32±6mLCH4/gCOD was observed in control (non-carbon treated) cultures. The results from this study indicate that almost 67±0.3% initial COD of aqueous phase can be reduced using a combination of both carbon treatment and biogas production. This study shows that aqueous phase can be utilized for CH4 production.

  17. Nutrient removal and energy production from aqueous phase of bio-oil generated via hydrothermal liquefaction of algae.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Saravanan R; Adhikari, Sushil; Shakya, Rajdeep

    2017-04-01

    Removal of nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) as struvite from bio-oil aqueous phase generated via hydrothermal liquefaction of algae was evaluated in this study. Effect of process parameters such as pH, temperature and reaction time on struvite formation was studied. More than 99% of phosphorus and 40-100% ammonium nitrogen were removed under all experimental conditions. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of struvite, and the struvite recovered from bio-oil aqueous phase can be used as a slow-release fertilizer. Biogas production from struvite recovered bio-oil aqueous phase showed 3.5 times higher CH4 yield (182±39mL/g COD) as compared to non-struvite recovered aqueous phase. The results from this study indicate that both struvite and methane can be produced from bio-oil aqueous phase.

  18. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M; Freire, Mara G; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2014-11-05

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol(-1)) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant - vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase.

  19. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M.; Freire, Mara G.; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol−1) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant – vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase. PMID:25729320

  20. Graphene-Embedded Hydrogel Nanofibers for Detection and Removal of Aqueous-Phase Dyes.

    PubMed

    Im, Kyungun; Nguyen, Duong Nguyen; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Kim, Yukyung; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2017-03-16

    A facile route to graphene/polymer hydrogel nanofibers was developed. An aqueous dispersion of graphene (containing >40% bilayer graphene flakes) stabilized by a functionalized water-soluble polymer with phenyl side chains was successfully electrospun to yield nanofibers. Subsequent vapor-phase cross-linking of the nanofibers produced graphene-embedded hydrogel nanofibers (GHNFs). Interestingly, the GHNFs showed chemical sensitivity to the cationic dyes methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV) in the aqueous phase. The adsorption capacities were as high as 0.43 and 0.33 mmol g(-1) s(-1) for MB and CV, respectively, even in a 1.5 mL s(-1) flow system. A density functional theory calculation revealed that aqueous-phase MB and CV dyes were oriented parallel to the graphene surface and that the graphene/dye ensembles were stabilized by secondary physical bonding mechanisms such as the π-π stacking interaction in an aqueous medium. The GHNFs exhibited electrochemical properties arising mainly from the electric double-layer capacitance, which were applied in a demonstration of GHNF-based membrane electrodes (5 cm in diameter) for detecting the dyes in the flow system. It is believed that the GHNF membrane can be a successful model candidate for commercialization of graphene due to its easy-to-fabricate process and remarkable properties.

  1. Biodegradation of multiple aromatic solutes from non-aqueous phase liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, P.; Ramaswami A.; Basile, F.

    1995-12-31

    Multi-component dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) act as long-term sources of subsurface contamination, slowly releasing organic pollutants into soil and groundwater. This study evaluates the potential for biological stabilization of the pollution source region containing a separate organic phase liquid (NAPL). Biostabilization refers to the process by which aqueous contaminant concentrations may be controlled without complete microbial destruction of the NAPL mass. Very little is known about the concurrent dissolution and degradation of multiple organic substrates from complex NAPLs, such as coal tar, creosote, PCB congeners and mixtures of waste solvents. In this study, biodegradation experiments are being conducted with a model multi-component NAPL to evaluate the rate of depletion of three target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds from the NAPL source. Dissolved aqueous-phase PAH concentrations, as well as the time-scale for depletion of the target PAH constituents from the NAPL due to microbial activity, are being monitored. These experiments will offer insights on the potential for minimizing aqueous plume development and generating a stable post-degradation NAPL residue through biostabilization.

  2. Phase diagrams and water activities of aqueous ammonium salts of malonic acid.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Keith D; Richardson, Michael; Reusch, Breanna

    2011-04-14

    Malonic acid has been observed in the free troposphere and as a component of tropospheric aerosol, among other dicarboxylic acids. These aerosols can uptake ammonia, which partially or completely neutralizes the acids. Therefore, the impact of ammoniated dicarboxylic acids on the phases that can exist in aerosols at atmospheric temperatures needs investigation. To that end, the low temperature, solid/liquid phase diagrams of ammonium hydrogen malonate/water, ammonium malonate/water, and triammonium hydrogen malonate/water have been investigated with differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy of thin films. Results show that the order of increasing solubility is triammonium hydrogen malonate, ammonium hydrogen malonate, malonic acid, and ammonium malonate. We have also determined a hydrate may form in the ammonium malonate system and decompose below 240 K. We report water activities at the ice melting points for each system up to the respective eutectic concentrations, and find for a given mole fraction of water, increasing ammonium content leads to decreasing water activity coefficients.

  3. Liquid-liquid phase separation in aerosol particles: Imaging at the Nanometer Scale

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Lundt, Nils; You, Yuan; Bertram, Allan K.; Leone, Stephen R.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, Mary K.

    2015-04-21

    Atmospheric aerosols can undergo phase transitions including liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) while responding to changes in the ambient relative humidity (RH). Here, we report results of chemical imaging experiments using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) to investigate the LLPS of micron sized particles undergoing a full hydration-dehydration cycle. Internally mixed particles composed of ammonium sulfate (AS) and either: limonene secondary organic carbon (LSOC), a, 4-dihydroxy-3-methoxybenzeneaceticacid (HMMA), or polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) were studied. Events of LLPS with apparent core-shell particle morphology were observed for all samples with both techniques. Chemical imaging with STXM showed that both LSOC/AS and HMMA/AS particles were never homogeneously mixed for all measured RH’s above the deliquescence point and that the majority of the organic component was located in the shell. The shell composition was estimated as 65:35 organic: inorganic in LSOC/AS and as 50:50 organic: inorganic for HMMA/AS. PEG-400/AS particles showed fully homogeneous mixtures at high RH and phase separated below 89-92% RH with an estimated 50:50% organic to inorganic mix in the shell. These two chemical imaging techniques are well suited for in-situ analysis of the hygroscopic behavior, phase separation, and surface composition of collected ambient aerosol particles.

  4. Phase state is a limiting factor in hygroscopic growth of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, Aki; Virtanen, Annele

    2014-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from oxidation products of volatile organic compounds (VOC) form a significant fraction of the total atmospheric particulate matter affecting climate both directly and indirectly. The dependence of hygroscopicity on particle composition is often represented with the single parameter κ, commonly used in global models to describe the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles. The physical phase state of SOA particles affects the partitioning of organic vapors and also may affect the uptake of water vapor and particle activation into cloud droplets. Thus, hygroscopic behaviour of SOA particles is affected by composition (i.e. oxidation state and molecular size) but also by phase of particles. In this study the following three distinct studies were performed: (1) particle bounced fraction (BF) measurements, which are qualitatively related to particle phase, as a function of relative humidity using an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI). We assume that the particles with BF > 0 are solid or semisolid, and that particles with BF = 0 behave mechanically as liquids (2) water uptake measured in the sub-saturated region using hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) by measuring the ratio of wet to dry particle diameter following exposure to water vapor at a controlled RH (3) cloud droplet formation in the supersaturated region using a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc). Particle composition and oxidation state was measured with a compact time of flight aerosol mass spectrometer (c-ToF-AMS). In this study we show that at sub-saturation conditions water uptake by SOA particles is restricted due to the kinetic limitations. Diffusion and solubility limitations inhibit water uptake until the humidity is high enough for dissolution to occur. Our studies show that this 'threshold' humidity is dependent on particle composition, oxidation state, and average molecular size. Our laboratory results

  5. Reforming and decomposition of glucose in an aqueous phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amin, S.; Reid, R. C.; Modell, M.

    1975-01-01

    Exploratory experiments have been carried out to study the decomposition of glucose, a typical carbohydrate, in a high temperature-high pressure water reactor. The objective of the study was to examine the feasibility of such a process to decompose cellulosic waste materials in long-term space missions. At temperatures below the critical point of water, glucose decomposed to form liquid products and char. Little gas was noted with or without reforming catalysts present. The rate of the primary glucose reaction increased significantly with temperature. Partial identification of the liquid phase was made and the C:H:O ratios determined for both the liquid and solid products. One of the more interesting results from this study was the finding that when glucose was injected into a reactor held at the critical temperature (and pressure) of water, no solid products formed. Gas production increased, but the majority of the carbon was found in soluble furans (and furan derivatives). This significant result is now being investigated further.

  6. Structural and optical properties of solid-phase singlet oxygen photosensitizers based on fullerene aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, I. M.; Belousov, V. P.; Kiselev, V. M.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Sirotkin, A. K.; Starodubtsev, A. M.; Kris'ko, T. K.; Bagrov, I. V.; Ermakov, A. V.

    2008-11-01

    The relationship between the structural and photosensitizing properties of solid-phase particles of fullerene C60 in aqueous suspensions is studied using the methods of absorption spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), X-ray diffraction, and spectrophotometry of solutions of singlet oxygen chemical traps—histidine in combination with p-nitrosodimethylaniline. Two new variants are proposed for obtaining aqueous suspensions of particles of solid-phase fullerene whose structures are disordered and whose degrees of amorphization are 67 and 40%, respectively. It is shown that an increase in the disorder of the structure of particles in suspensions and a decrease in their average size facilitate an increase in the formation efficiency of singlet oxygen by solid-phase fullerene presumably due to an in increase in the concentration of surface localized excitons.

  7. Solvent properties governing solute partitioning in polymer/polymer aqueous two-phase systems: nonionic compounds.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Pedro P; Reis, Celso A; Rodrigues, Alírio E; Mikheeva, Larissa M; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2010-01-14

    The solvatochromic solvent parameters characterizing the solvent polarity (pi*), solvent hydrogen-bond donor acidity (alpha), and solvent hydrogen-bond acceptor basicity (beta) of aqueous media were measured in the coexisting phases of nine different aqueous polymer/polymer two-phase systems (ATPS), containing 0.15 M NaCl in 0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Partitioning coefficients of six neutral compounds were measured in the nine ATPS at particular polymer concentrations. The solvatochromic equation was used to describe the partitioning of each compound. Three descriptors of the solvent properties of the phases could describe adequately the partitioning of the solutes in all the ATPS employed.

  8. Relationship between solution structure and phase behavior: a neutron scattering study of concentrated aqueous hexamethylenetetramine solutions.

    PubMed

    Burton, R C; Ferrari, E S; Davey, R J; Finney, J L; Bowron, D T

    2009-04-30

    The water-hexamethylenetetramine system displays features of significant interest in the context of phase equilibria in molecular materials. First, it is possible to crystallize two solid phases depending on temperature, both hexahydrate and anhydrous forms. Second, saturated aqueous solutions in equilibrium with these forms exhibit a negative dependence of solubility (retrograde) on temperature. In this contribution, neutron scattering experiments (with isotopic substitution) of concentrated aqueous hexamethylenetetramine solutions combined with empirical potential structure refinement (EPSR) were used to investigate the time-averaged atomistic details of this system. Through the derivation of radial distribution functions, quantitative details emerge of the solution coordination, its relationship to the nature of the solid phases, and of the underlying cause of the solubility behavior of this molecule.

  9. Recovery of ionic liquids with aqueous two-phase systems induced by carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Dazhen; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Jianji

    2012-11-01

    Recovery is a very important factor for the industrial application of ionic liquids (ILs). In this work, a novel method is presented for the recovery of ILs by using carbon dioxide (CO₂-induced formation of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs). It was found that, in the presence of amines, introduction of CO₂ into aqueous IL solutions leads to the formation of ATPSs at 25 °C and atmospheric pressure, in which the upper phase is ammonium-salt-rich and the lower phase is IL-rich. Thus, the ILs in aqueous solutions can be significantly enriched, and the amines can be regenerated by heating and bubbling Ar or N₂ in the salt-rich phase. To better understand the recovery of ILs, the phase diagrams of the ATPSs were measured at 25 °C, and the effects of the molecular structure of the ILs and the amines and temperature of the systems on the recovery efficiency of the ILs were investigated. It was shown that the single-step recovery efficiency of the ILs could be as high as 99 % in the presence of primary or secondary amines. Therefore, this new method could potentially be sustainable, efficient, and attractive to industry.

  10. DNA-controlled partition of carbon nanotubes in polymer aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Ao, Geyou; Khripin, Constantine Y; Zheng, Ming

    2014-07-23

    Sorting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) of different chiralities is both scientifically interesting and technologically important. Recent studies have shown that polymer aqueous two-phase extraction is a very effective way to achieve nanotube sorting. However, works published to date have demonstrated only separation of surfactant-dispersed SWCNTs, and the mechanism of chirality-dependent SWCNT partition is not well understood. Here we report a systematic study of spontaneous partition of DNA-wrapped SWCNTs in several polymer aqueous two-phase systems. We show that partition of DNA-SWCNT hybrids in a given polymer two-phase system is strongly sequence-dependent and can be further modulated by salt and polymer additives. With the proper combination of DNA sequence, polymer two-phase system, and partition modulators, as many as 15 single-chirality nanotube species have been effectively purified from a synthetic mixture. As an attempt to provide a unified partition mechanism of SWCNTs dispersed by surfactants and by DNA, we present a qualitative analysis of solvation energy for SWCNT colloids in a polymer-modified aqueous phase. Our observation and analysis highlight the sensitive dependence of the hydration energy on the spatial distribution of hydrophilic functionalities.

  11. Effect of Sodium Sulfate, Ammonium Chloride, Ammonium Nitrate, and Salt Mixtures on Aqueous Phase Partitioning of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lei, Ying Duan; Wania, Frank

    2016-12-06

    Dissolved inorganic salts influence the partitioning of organic compounds into the aqueous phase. This influence is especially significant in atmospheric aerosol, which usually contains large amounts of ions, including sodium, ammonium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate. However, empirical data on this salt effect are very sparse. Here, the partitioning of numerous organic compounds into solutions of Na2SO4, NH4Cl, and NH4NO3 was measured and compared with existing data for NaCl and (NH4)2SO4. Salt mixtures were also tested to establish whether the salt effect is additive. In general, the salt effect showed a decreasing trend of Na2SO4 > (NH)2SO4 > NaCl > NH4Cl > NH4NO3 for the studied organic compounds, implying the following relative strength of the salt effect of individual anions: SO4(2-) > Cl(-) > NO3(-) and of cations: Na(+) > NH4(+). The salt effect of different salts is moderately correlated. Predictive models for the salt effect were developed based on the experimental data. The experimental data indicate that the salt effect of mixtures may not be entirely additive. However, the deviation from additivity, if it exists, is small. Data of very high quality are required to establish whether the effect of constituent ions or salts is additive or not.

  12. Phase Partitioning of Soluble Trace Gases with Size-Resolved Aerosols during the Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT) Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A.; Keene, W. C.; Pszenny, A.; Sander, R.; Maben, J. R.; Warrick-Wriston, C.; Bearekman, R.

    2011-12-01

    During February and March 2011, size-resolved and bulk aerosol were sampled at 22 m above the surface over nominal 12-hour (daytime and nighttime) intervals from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (40.05 N, 105.01 W, 1584-m elevation). Samples were analyzed for major organic and inorganic ionic constituents by high performance ion chromatography (IC). Soluble trace gases (HCl, HNO3, NH3, HCOOH, and CH3COOH) were sampled in parallel over 2-hour intervals with tandem mist chambers and analyzed on site by IC. NH4+, NO3-, and SO42- were the major ionic components of aerosols (median values of 57.7, 34.5, and 7.3 nmol m-3 at STP, respectively, N = 45) with 86%, 82%, and 82%, respectively, associated with sub-μm size fractions. Cl- and Na+ were present at significant concentrations (median values of 6.8 and 6.6 nmol m-3, respectively) but were associated primarily with super-μm size fractions (75% and 78%, respectively). Median values (and ranges) for HCl, HNO3, and NH3 were 21 (<20-1257), 120 (<45-1638), and 5259 (<1432-48,583) pptv, respectively. Liquid water contents of size-resolved aerosols and activity coefficients for major ionic constituents were calculated with the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model II and IV (E-AIM) based on the measured aerosol composition, RH, temperature, and pressure. Size-resolved aerosol pHs were inferred from the measured phase partitioning of HCl, HNO3, and NH3. Major controls of phase partitioning and associated chemical dynamics will be presented.

  13. Phase-transition and aggregation characteristics of a thermoresponsive dextran derivative in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan-Ying; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2006-10-16

    Grafting of poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) side chains onto a hydrophilic dextran backbone was found to provide the dextran with new, thermoresponsive properties in aqueous solutions. Depending on its solution concentration, the resulting dextran derivative could exhibit a temperature-induced phase-transition and critical transition temperature (T(c)). Different anions and cations of added salts, including five potassium salts and five alkali-metal chlorides, were observed to influence the T(c) value of its aqueous solution. Except for potassium iodide, all added salts were found to lower the T(c) value. The addition of the surfactant, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, resulted in an increase of the T(c) value. With the help of the Coomassie Brilliant Blue dye as a polarity probe, the formation of hydrophobic aggregates above the T(c) was revealed for this new dextran derivative in aqueous solution.

  14. Fullerene-containing phases obtained from aqueous dispersions of carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, S. P.; Kovalevskii, V. V.; Rozhkova, N. N.

    2007-06-01

    The hydration of fullerenes and shungite carbon nanoclusters in aqueous dispersions at various carbon concentrations is studied on frozen samples by EPR with spin probes. It is found that, for stable dispersions of both substances (at carbon concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml), the probe rotation frequency versus 1/T dependences exhibit a plateau in the range 243 257 K, which is probably associated with the peculiarities of freezing of water localized near hydrophobic structures of carbon nanoclusters. Solid phases isolated from supersaturated aqueous dispersions of fullerenes and shungites by slow evaporation of water at temperatures higher than 0°C are examines by electron diffraction and electron microscopy. It is established that obtained films of fullerenes contain at least two phases: fullerite with a face-centered cubic lattice and a phase similar in interplanar spacing and radically different in distribution of intensities of diffraction peaks. It is concluded that this phase is formed by the interaction of fullerenes and water (an analogous phase is found in shungite carbon films). It is found that the morphology of the new crystal phase is characterized by globules of size 20 to 70 nm, for fullerenes, and 10 to 400 nm for shungites. It is established that processes of crystallization of fullerites and fullerene-containing phases are very sensitive to temperature: a decrease in the temperature (within the range from 40 to 1°C) is accompanied by an increase in the new phase content.

  15. Continuous aqueous two-phase extraction of human antibodies using a packed column.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a pilot scale packed differential contactor was evaluated for the continuous counter-current aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) from a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells supernatant (CS) enriched with pure protein. Preliminary studies have been firstly performed in order to select the dispersed phase (phosphate-rich or polyethylene glycol 3350 Da (PEG)-rich phase) and the column packing material. The PEG-rich phase has been selected as the dispersed phase and the stainless steel as the preferred material for the column packing bed since it was not wetted preferentially by the selected dispersed phase. Hydrodynamic studies have been also performed, and the experimental results were successfully adjusted to the Richardson-Zaki and Mísek equations, typically used for the conventional organic-aqueous two-phase systems. An experimental set-up combining the packed column with a pump mixer-settler stage showed to have the best performance and to be advantageous when compared to the IgG batch extraction. An IgG recovery yield of 85% could be obtained with about 50% of total contaminants and more than 85% of contaminant proteins removal. Mass transfer studies have revealed that the mass transfer was controlled by the PEG-rich phase. A higher efficiency could be obtained when using an extra pump mixer-settler stage and higher flow rates.

  16. A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase transfer protocol for the highly efficient extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; Cao, Hongbin; Yang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    A 1-dodecanethiol-based phase-transfer protocol is developed for the extraction of noble metal ions from aqueous solution to a hydrocarbon phase, which calls for first mixing the aqueous metal ion solution with an ethanolic solution of 1-dodecanethiol, and then extracting the coordination compounds formed between noble metal ions and 1-dodecanethiol into a non-polar organic solvent. A number of characterization techniques, including inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis demonstrate that this protocol could be applied to extract a wide variety of noble metal ions from water to dichloromethane with an efficiency of >96%, and has high selectivity for the separation of the noble metal ions from other transition metals. It is therefore an attractive alternative for the extraction of noble metals from water, soil, or waste printed circuit boards.

  17. Extraction of the antimicrobial peptide cerein 8A by aqueous two-phase systems and aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lappe, R; Sant'anna, V; Brandelli, A

    2012-01-01

    Cerein 8A is an antimicrobial peptide with potential application against food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. The partitioning of cerein 8A was investigated in two liquid-liquid extraction systems that are considered promising for bioseparation and purification purposes. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) were prepared with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and inorganic salts, and the addition of NaCl was investigated in this system. The best results concerning partition coefficients (K (b)) were obtained with PEG + ammonium sulphate, and K (b) value significantly increases when NaCl was added. Cerein 8A was effectively extracted into the micelle-rich phase in a 4% Triton X-114 medium. Recovery yield was higher for ATPS compared to micellar systems. Cerein 8A can be isolated from a crude suspension containing the bioactive molecule by ATPSs. Successful implementation of peptide partitioning represents an important step towards developing a low-cost effective separation method for cerein 8A.

  18. Interplay between gelation and phase separation in aqueous solutions of methylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, J Patrick A; Yu, Hao; Kelly, Oscar; Ryan, Anthony J; Sammler, Robert L; Radler, Michael

    2012-07-17

    Thermally induced gelation in aqueous solutions of methylcellulose (MC) and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) has been studied by rheological, optical microscopy, and turbidimetry measurements. The structural and mechanical properties of these hydrogels are dominated by the interplay between phase separation and gelation. In MC solutions, phase separation takes place almost simultaneously with gelation. An increase in the storage modulus is coupled to the appearance of a bicontinuous structure upon heating. However, a thermal gap exists between phase separation and gelation in the case of HPMC solutions. The storage modulus shows a dramatic decrease during phase separation and then rises in the subsequent gelation. A macroporous structure forms in the gels via "viscoelastic phase separation" linked to "double phase separation".

  19. Time-slice last millennium experiments with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Legrande, A. N.; Koch, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary results from coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols are presented. These experiments are decadal scale time-slices within millennial-length simulations performed with the GISS GCM (ModelE), using two different ocean models. The boundary conditions for the transient simulations follow the last millennium coordinated PMIP3 experiment protocol. This experiment directly links in with other pre-Industrial experiments being completed as part of IPCC AR5, using the same model and resolution as in GISS IPCC AR5. Preliminary time-slice results from the early medieval and Maunder Minimum periods will be presented. The impact of the presence of short-lived gases and aerosols on the simulated climate is studied. An initial attempt to identify previously omitted additional forcing mechanisms will be performed during these contrasting climate periods, in short duration experiments driven by ocean conditions from the transient experiments. The results presented are the initial runs from a larger set of experiments that will assess the climate impact of changes to dust, sea-salt, and ocean-derived sulfate, biomass burning ozone-precursors and aerosols, organic carbon, wetland methane emissions, and a final set with all components. These species are standard components in the GISS model’s 20th century simulations, so that we may compare millennial variability characteristics with those better constrained from more recent climate periods. Dust and sea-salt are wind-driven aerosols from deserts and oceans, sulfate comes from oxidation of volcanic and oceanic precursors, while organic carbon comes from biomass burning, secondary plant sources and primary oceanic emissions. Comparison of model and proxy records will test model-simulated mechanisms while the model provides insight into factors contributing to proxy variability. The addition of potentially important forcing mechanisms will enable a more comprehensive

  20. Aqueous polymer two-phase systems: effective tools for plasma membrane proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Jens; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2006-10-01

    Plasma membranes (PMs) are of particular importance for all living cells. They form a selectively permeable barrier to the environment. Many essential tasks of PMs are carried out by their proteinaceous components, including molecular transport, cell-cell interactions, and signal transduction. Due to the key role of these proteins for cellular function, they take center-stage in basic and applied research. A major problem towards in-depth identification and characterization of PM proteins by modern proteomic approaches is their low abundance and immense heterogeneity in different cells. Highly selective and efficient purification protocols are hence essential to any PM proteome analysis. An effective tool for preparative isolation of PMs is partitioning in aqueous polymer two-phase systems. In two-phase systems, membranes are separated according to differences in surface properties rather than size and density. Despite their rare application to the fractionation of animal tissues and cells, they represent an attractive alternative to conventional fractionation protocols. Here, we review the principles of partitioning using aqueous polymer two-phase systems and compare aqueous polymer two-phase systems with other methods currently used for the isolation of PMs.

  1. Hydrolysis of ionized deoxycholic acid in the aqueous phase and rate analysis for transfer of neutralized deoxycholic acid into the benzene phase across the benzene/water interface.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ryo; Nakamura, Shohei; Moroi, Yoshikiyo; Isoda-Yamashita, Teruyo

    2008-11-13

    Sodium deoxycholate in water dissociates into sodium cation and deoxycholate anion in the aqueous phase, and then, the latter anions partially hydrolyze to form deionized deoxycholic acids. The acids move into the benzene phase, when liquid benzene is placed upon the aqueous phase, and finally the partition equilibrium is reached. The above processes were traced by pH change in the aqueous phase by a pH meter or the change in [OH-] with time, from which the rate for transfer of neutralized acid to the organic phase was analyzed. From the trace, the rate constants for hydrolysis of acid anion ( kf), neutralization of acid ( kb), transfer of neutralized acid from the aqueous phase to the organic phase ( kin*), and its back-transfer from the organic phase to the aqueous phase ( kut*) were evaluated; kf = 2.18 x 10 (-4) mol (-1) dm (3) min (-1), kb = 1.24 x 10 (5) mol (-1) dm (3) min (-1), kin* = 4.06 x 10 (-1) min (-1) cm (-2), and kout*) = 8.00 x 10 (-2) min (-1) cm (-2). The above values are supported by the partition constant of deoxycholic acid between the benzene phase and the aqueous phase.

  2. Reactivity of aqueous phase hydroxyl radical with halogenated carboxylate anions: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Song, Weihua; Crittenden, John

    2011-07-15

    With concerns about emerging contaminants increasing, advanced oxidation processes have become attractive technologies because of potential mineralization of these contaminants via radical involved reactions that are induced by highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Considering the expensive and time-consuming experimental studies of degradation intermediates and byproduct, there is a need to develop a first-principles computer-based kinetic model that predict reaction pathways and associated reaction rate constants. In this study, we measured temperature-dependent hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants for a series of haloacetate ions and obtained their Arrhenius kinetic parameters. We found a linear correlation between these reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated aqueous-phase free energies of activation. To understand the quantitative effects on entropy of solvation due to solvent water molecules, we calculate each portion of the entropic energies that contribute to the overall aqueous phase entropy of activation; cavity formation is a dominant portion. For the series of reactions of hydroxyl radical with carboxylate ions, the increase in the entropy of activation during the solvation process is approximately 10-15 cal mol(-1)K(-1) because of interactions with solvent water molecules and the transition state. Finally, charge distribution analysis for the aqueous-phase reactions of hydroxyl radical with acetate/haloacetate ions reveals that in the aqueous phase, the degree of polarizability at the transition state is less substantial than those that are in the gaseous phase resulting in a high charge density. In the presence of electronegative halogenated functional groups, the transition state is less polarized and hydrogen bonding interactions are expected to be weaker.

  3. Understanding hygroscopic growth and phase transformation of aerosols using single particle Raman spectroscopy in an electrodynamic balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alex K Y; Ling, T Y; Chan, Chak K

    2008-01-01

    Hygroscopic growth is one of the most fundamental properties of atmospheric aerosols. By absorbing or evaporating water, an aerosol particle changes its size, morphology, phase, chemical composition and reactivity and other parameters such as its refractive index. These changes affect the fate and the environmental impacts of atmospheric aerosols, including global climate change. The ElectroDynamic Balance (EDB) has been widely accepted as a unique tool for measuring hygroscopic properties and for investigating phase transformation of aerosols via single particle levitation. Coupled with Raman spectroscopy, an EDB/Raman system is a powerful tool that can be used to investigate both physical and chemical changes associated with the hygroscopic properties of individually levitated particles under controlled environments. In this paper, we report the use of an EDB/Raman system to investigate (1) contact ion pairs formation in supersaturated magnesium sulfate solutions; (2) phase transformation in ammonium nitrate/ammonium sulfate mixed particles; (3) hygroscopicity of organically coated inorganic aerosols; and (4) heterogeneous reactions altering the hygroscopicity of organic aerosols.

  4. Retrieval of the columnar aerosol phase function and single-scattering albedo from sky radiance over the ocean - Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Menghua; Gordon, Howard R.

    1993-01-01

    Based on the fact that the part of downward radiance that depends on the optical properties of the aerosol in the atmosphere can be extracted from the measured sky radiance, a new scheme for retrieval of the aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo over the ocean is developed. This retrieval algorithm is tested with simulations for several cases. It is found that the retrieved aerosol phase function and the single-scattering albedo are virtually error-free if the vertical structure of the atmosphere is known and if the sky radiance and the aerosol optical thickness can be measured accurately. The robustness of the algorithm in realistic situations, in which the measurements are contaminated by calibration errors or noise, is examined. It is found that the retrieved value of omega(0) is usually in error by less than about 10 percent, and the phase function is accurately retrieved for theta less than about 90 deg. However, as the aerosol optical thickness becomes small, e.g., less than about 0.1, errors in the sky radiance measurement can lead to serious problems with the retrieval algorithm, especially in the blue. The use of the retrieval scheme should be limited to the red and near IR when the aerosol optical thickness is small.

  5. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Properties in Mixed-Phase Clouds Under Varying Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comstock, J. M.; Fan, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Schmid, B.

    2014-12-01

    Cloud microphysical properties impact the interaction of clouds and radiation in the atmosphere, and can influence atmospheric circulations through changes in cloud phase. Characterizing the conditions that control phase changes and the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds is important for improving understanding of physical processes that influence cloud phase. We characterize the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in relation to the atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic conditions observed in mixed-phase clouds during several aircraft-based field experiments. The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Gulfstream-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and cloud properties in warm and cold clouds during several recent field experiments. We analyze in-situ observations from the CalWater and TCAP field campaigns to examine the variability of cloud properties (phase, hydrometeor size, ice and liquid water content, particle habit) with changes in aerosol, vertical velocity, and temperature. These measurements indicate that in addition to aerosol concentration, vertical velocity strength has important influence on cloud phase in mixed-phase cloud regimes.

  6. Phase behavior and molecular dynamics simulation studies of new aqueous two-phase separation systems induced by HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Khoiroh, Ianatul; Lee, Ming-Jer

    2013-01-17

    Here, for the first time, we show that with addition of a biological buffer, 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), into aqueous solutions of tetrahydrofuran (THF), 1,3-dioxolane, 1,4-dioxane, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, tert-butanol, acetonitrile, or acetone, the organic solvent can be excluded from water to form a new liquid phase. The phase diagrams have been determined at ambient temperature. In order to understand why and how a zwitterion solute (HEPES) induced phase separation of the investigated systems, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies are performed for HEPES + water + THF system. The MD simulations were conducted for the aqueous mixtures with 12 different compositions. The reliability of the simulation results of HEPES in pure water and beyond the phase separation mixtures was justified by comparing the densities obtained from MD with the experimental values. The simulation results of HEPES in pure THF and in a composition inside the phase separation region were justified qualitatively. Interestingly, all HEPES molecules entirely aggregated in pure THF. This reveals that HEPES is insoluble in pure THF, which is consistent with the experimental results. Even more interestingly, the MD simulation for the mixture with composition inside the phase separation region showed the formation of two phases. The THF molecules are squeezed out from the water network into a new liquid phase. The hydrogen bonds (HBs), HB lifetime, HB Gibbs energy (ΔG), radial distribution functions (RDFs), coordination numbers (CNs), electrostatic interactions, and the van der Waals interactions between the different species have been analyzed. Further, MD simulations for the other phase separation systems by choosing a composition inside the two liquids region for each system were also simulated. Our findings will therefore pave the way for designing new benign separation auxiliary agents.

  7. First-principles Study of Phenol Hydrogenation on Pt and Ni Catalysts in Aqueous Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Yeohoon; Rousseau, Roger J.; Weber, Robert S.; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-07-23

    The effects of aqueous phase on the reactivity of phenol hydrogenation over Pt and Ni catalysts were investigated using density functional theory based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) calculations. The adsorption of phenol and the first hydrogenation steps via three carbon positions (ortho, meta and para) with respect to the phenolic OH group were studied in both vacuum and liquid phase conditions. To gain insight into how the aqueous phase affects the metal catalyst surface, increasing water environments including singly adsorbed water molecule, mono- (9 water molecules), double layers (24 water molecules), and the bulk liquid water which (52 water molecules) on the Pt(111) and the Ni(111) surfaces were modeled. Compared to the vacuum/metal interfaces, AIMD simulation results suggest that the aqueous Pt(111) and Ni(111) interfaces have a lower metal work function in the order of 0.8 - 0.9 eV, thus, making the metals in aqueous phase stronger reducing agents and poorer oxidizing agents. Phenol adsorption from the aqueous phase is found to be slightly weaker that from the vapor phase. The first hydrogenation step of phenol at the ortho position of the phenolic ring is slightly favored over the other two positions. The polarization induced by the surrounding water molecules and the solvation effect play important roles in stabilizing the transition states associated with phenol hydrogenation by lowering the barriers of 0.1 - 0.4 eV. The detailed discussion on the basis of the interfacial electrostatics from the current study is very useful to understand the nature of a broader class of metal catalyzed reactions in liquid solution phase. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing

  8. Retention behavior of proton pump inhibitors using immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases with organic-aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Roberto; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Zanitti, Leo

    2013-08-23

    In the present study, the chromatographic behavior of two immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases (CSPs), the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3, under aqueous mobile phases conditions is presented. Four proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (omeprazole, lansoprazole, pentaprazole and rabeprazole) were selected as test compounds. The effect of the concentration of water in the mobile phase was investigated with respect to its contribution to enantioselectivity and retention. Under acetonitrile-water mobile phase conditions, retention behavior evidenced an interesting pattern. At lower water content, the retention factors decreased with increasing water and at higher water content a reversed trend was observed. These findings support the hypothesis that two retention mechanisms operated successively on the same CSP: the HILIC (with water-poor eluents) and RPLC (with water-rich eluents) modes. The retention factors were minimum in the intermediate region, corresponding to a water concentration of about 20%. Interestingly, the baseline separation of all PPIs investigated was optimized under organic-aqueous mobile phases containing a high water content (from about 50 to 65%). Thus, the dual retention behavior of the PPIs on the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3 made it possible to reach greener and harmless enantioselective conditions in a short analysis time.

  9. Method and device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    A device for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a groundwater system includes a generally cylindrical push-rod defining an internal recess therein. The push-rod includes first and second end portions and an external liquid collection surface. A liquid collection member is detachably connected to the push-rod at one of the first and second end portions thereof. The method of the present invention for removing a non-aqueous phase liquid from a contaminated groundwater system includes providing a lance including an external hydrophobic liquid collection surface, an internal recess, and a collection chamber at the bottom end thereof. The lance is extended into the groundwater system such that the top end thereof remains above the ground surface. The liquid is then allowed to collect on the liquid collection surface, and flow downwardly by gravity into the collection chamber to be pumped upwardly through the internal recess in the lance.

  10. Yeast fermentation of carboxylic acids obtained from pyrolytic aqueous phases for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Coates, Ralph; Wu, Hongwei; Chen, Shulin

    2012-08-01

    The presence of very reactive C1-C4 molecules adversely affects the quality bio-oils produced from the pyrolysis of lignocellulosic materials. In this paper a scheme to produce lipids with Cryptococcus curvatus from the carboxylic acids in the pyrolytic aqueous phase collected in fractional condensers is proposed. The capacities of three oleaginous yeasts C. curvatus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Lipomyces starkeyi to ferment acetate, formate, hydroxylacat-aldehyde, phenol and acetol were investigated. While acetate could be a good carbon source for lipid production, formate provides additional energy and contributes to yeast growth and lipid production as auxiliary energy resource. Acetol could slightly support yeast growth, but it inhibits lipid accumulation. Hydroxyacetaldehyde and phenols showed high yeast growth and lipid accumulation inhibition. A pyrolytic aqueous phase with 20 g/L acetate was fermented with C. curvatus, after neutralization and detoxification to produce 6.9 g/L dry biomass and 2.2 g/L lipid.

  11. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    -ToF-MS) were used to quantify OA and VOC emissions, respectively. SOA production potential of the different emissions was quantified by introducing them into the PSI mobile smog chamber and a potential aerosol chamber (PAM) where they were photochemically aged. The measurements of primary emissions suggest that the COA factor identified in ambient atmospheric aerosols is mostly related to fat release from frying with vegetable oils or grilling fatty-meats. In contrast, vegetable cooking (boiling and frying) was associated with significant VOC emissions. The VOC emissions from frying consist mainly of aldehydes which are formed through breaking of fatty acids. Gas phase composition, emission factors and SAPP from all these processes will be presented. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation as well as the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n.° 290605 (COFUND: PSI-FELLOW). J. Allan et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 647-668 (2010) X.-F. Huang et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 8933-8945 (2010) Y.-L. Sun et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 1581-1602 (2011)

  12. Ruthenium on rutile catalyst, catalytic system, and method for aqueous phase hydrogenations

    DOEpatents

    Elliot, Douglas C.; Werpy, Todd A.; Wang, Yong; Frye, Jr., John G.

    2001-01-01

    An essentially nickel- and rhenium-free catalyst is described comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile. A catalytic system containing a nickel-free catalyst comprising ruthenium on a titania support where the titania is greater than 75% rutile, and a method using this catalyst in the hydrogenation of an organic compound in the aqueous phase is also described.

  13. Characterization of the Changes in Hygroscopicity of Ambient Organic Aerosol due to Oxidation by Gas Phase OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, J. P.; McWhinney, R. D.; Slowik, J. G.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the ubiquitous nature of organic aerosols and their importance in climate forcing, the influence of chemical processes on their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere remains uncertain. Changes to the hygroscopicity of ambient organic aerosol due to OH oxidation were explored at a remote forested (Whistler, British Columbia) and an urban (Toronto, Ontario) site. Organic aerosol was exposed to controlled levels of OH radicals in a portable flow tube reactor, the Toronto Photo-Oxidation Tube (TPOT). An Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitored the changes in the chemical composition due to OH-initiated oxidation. The CCN activity of size-selected particles was measured with a DMT Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNc) to determine the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Preliminary results suggest that gas phase OH oxidation increases the degree of oxygenation of organic aerosol, leading to increases in hygroscopicity. These results yield insights into the mechanism by which oxidation affects the hygroscopicity of ambient aerosol of various sources, and to constrain the main aging process that leads to the observation of increasing hygroscopicity with increasing oxidation of organic aerosol.

  14. Aerosol Inflluence on Ice Nucleation via the Immersion Mode in Mixed-Phase Arctic Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are commonly observed at high latitudes (e.g. Shupe et al., 2006; de Boer et al., 2009a). Herman and Goody (1976), as well as Curry et al. (1996) present summaries of Arctic cloud climatologies that show low altitude stratus frequencies of up to 70% during transitional seasons. In addition to their frequent occurrence, these clouds have significant impacts on the near-surface atmospheric radiative budget, with estimates of wintertime reductions in net surface cooling of 40-50 Wm-2 (Curry et al., 1996) due predominantly to liquid in the mixed-phase layer. Both observational and modeling studies (e.g. Harrington et al., 1999; Jiang et al., 2000; Shupe et al., 2008; Klein et al., 2008) show a strong connection between the amount of ice present and the lifetime of the liquid portion of the cloud layer. This is thought to occur via the Bergeron-Findeissen mechanism (Pruppacher and Klett, 1997) in which ice grows at the expense of liquid due to its lower saturation vapor pressure. Unfortunately, the mechanisms by which ice is nucleated within these mixed-phase layers are not yet fully understood, and therefore an accurate depiction of this process for mixed-phase stratiform clouds has not yet been characterized. The nucleation mechanisms that are active in a given environment are sensitive to aerosol properties. Insoluble particles are typically good nuclei for ice particle formation, while soluble particles are typically better at nucleating water droplets. Aerosol observations from the Arctic often show mixed aerosol particles that feature both soluble and insoluble mass (Leaitch et al., 1984). Soluble mass fractions for these particles have been shown to be high, with estimates of 60-80% and are often made up of sulfates (Zhou et al., 2001; Bigg and Leck, 2001). It is believed that a significant portion of this sulfate mass comes from dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the Arctic Ocean and subsequent atmospheric oxidation. Since these

  15. Representing effects of aqueous phase reactions in shallow cumuli in global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Ji; Kuang, Zhiming; Jacob, Daniel J.; Guo, Jiahua

    2016-05-01

    Aqueous phase reactions are important, sometimes dominant (e.g., for SO2), pathways for the oxidation of air pollutants at the local and/or global scale. In many current chemical transport models (CTMs), the transport and aqueous reactions of chemical species are treated as split processes, and the subgrid-scale heterogeneity between cloudy and environmental air is not considered. Here using large eddy simulation (LES) with idealized aqueous reactions mimicking the oxidation of surface-originated SO2 by H2O2 in shallow cumuli, we show that the eddy diffusivity mass flux (EDMF) approach with a bulk plume can represent those processes quite well when entrainment/detrainment rates and eddy diffusivity are diagnosed using a conservative thermodynamic variable such as total water content. The reason is that a typical aqueous reaction such as SO2 aqueous oxidation is relatively slow compared to the in-cloud residence time of air parcels in shallow cumuli. As a result, the surface-originated SO2 is well correlated with and behaves like conservative thermodynamic variables that also have sources at the surface. Experiments with various reaction rate constants and relative abundances of SO2 and H2O2 indicate that when the reaction timescale approaches the in-cloud residence time of air parcels, the errors of the bulk plume approach start to increase. Treating chemical tracer transport and aqueous reaction as split processes leads to significant errors, especially when the reaction is fast compared to the in-cloud residence time. Overall, the EDMF approach shows large improvement over the CTM-like treatments in matching the LES results.

  16. Generation of aerosolized drugs.

    PubMed

    Wolff, R K; Niven, R W

    1994-01-01

    The expanding use of inhalation therapy has placed demands on current aerosol generation systems that are difficult to meet with current inhalers. The desire to deliver novel drug entities such as proteins and peptides, as well as complex formulations including liposomes and microspheres, requires delivery systems of improved efficiency that will target the lung in a reproducible manner. These efforts have also been spurred by the phase out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and this has included a directed search for alternative propellants. Consequently, a variety of new aerosol devices and methods of generating aerosols are being studied. This includes the use of freon replacement propellants, dry powder generation systems, aqueous unit spray systems and microprocessor controlled technologies. Each approach has advantages and disadvantages depending upon each principle of action and set of design variables. In addition, specific drugs may be better suited for one type of inhaler device vs. another. The extent to which aerosol generation systems achieve their goals is discussed together with a summary of selected papers presented at the recent International Congress of Aerosols in Medicine.

  17. Lignin solubilization and aqueous phase reforming for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zakzeski, Joseph; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2011-03-21

    The solubilization and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, and alcell lignin along with sugarcane bagasse, at low temperatures (T≤498 K) and pressures (P≤29 bar) is reported for the first time for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. Analysis of lignin model compounds and the distribution of products obtained during the lignin aqueous phase reforming revealed that lignin was depolymerized through disruption of the abundant β-O-4 linkages and, to a lesser extent, the 5-5' carbon-carbon linkages to form monomeric aromatic compounds. The alkyl chains contained on these monomeric compounds were readily reformed to produce hydrogen and simple aromatic platform chemicals, particularly guaiacol and syringol, with the distribution of each depending on the lignin source. The methoxy groups present on the aromatic rings were subject to hydrolysis to form methanol, which was also readily reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The composition of the isolated yields of monomeric aromatic compounds and overall lignin conversion based on these isolated yields varied from 10-15% depending on the lignin sample, with the balance consisting of gaseous products and residual solid material. Furthermore, we introduce the use of a high-pressure autoclave with optical windows and an autoclave with ATR-IR sentinel for on-line in situ spectroscopic monitoring of biomass conversion processes, which provides direct insight into, for example, the solubilization process and aqueous phase reforming reaction of lignin.

  18. Aqueous-phase synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles and composites for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchao; Wang, Shige; Shi, Xiangyang; Shen, Mingwu

    2017-03-14

    The design and development of multifunctional nanoplatforms for biomedical applications still remains to be challenging. This review reports the recent advances in aqueous-phase synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and their composites for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer. Water dispersible and colloidally stable Fe3O4 NPs synthesized via controlled coprecipitation route, hydrothermal route and mild reduction route are introduced. Some of key strategies to improve the r2 relaxivity of Fe3O4 NPs and to enhance their uptake by cancer cells are discussed in detail. These aqueous-phase synthetic methods can also be applied to prepare Fe3O4 NP-based composites for dual-mode molecular imaging applications. More interestingly, aqueous-phase synthesized Fe3O4 NPs are able to be fabricated as multifunctional theranostic agents for multi-mode imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer. This review will provide some meaningful information for the design and development of various Fe3O4 NP-based multifunctional nanoplatforms for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Robotic production of cancer cell spheroids with an aqueous two-phase system for drug testing.

    PubMed

    Ham, Stephanie Lemmo; Atefi, Ehsan; Fyffe, Darcy; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-04-23

    Cancer cell spheroids present a relevant in vitro model of avascular tumors for anti-cancer drug testing applications. A detailed protocol for producing both mono-culture and co-culture spheroids in a high throughput 96-well plate format is described in this work. This approach utilizes an aqueous two-phase system to confine cells into a drop of the denser aqueous phase immersed within the second aqueous phase. The drop rests on the well surface and keeps cells in close proximity to form a single spheroid. This technology has been adapted to a robotic liquid handler to produce size-controlled spheroids and expedite the process of spheroid production for compound screening applications. Spheroids treated with a clinically-used drug show reduced cell viability with increase in the drug dose. The use of a standard micro-well plate for spheroid generation makes it straightforward to analyze viability of cancer cells of drug-treated spheroids with a micro-plate reader. This technology is straightforward to implement both robotically and with other liquid handling tools such as manual pipettes.

  20. Hydrothermal upgrading of algae paste: Inorganics and recycling potential in the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavish; Guo, Miao; Chong, Chinglih; Sarudin, Syazwani Hj Mat; Hellgardt, Klaus

    2016-10-15

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) for algal biomass conversion is a promising technology capable of producing high yields of biocrude as well as partitioning even higher quantity of nutrients in the aqueous phase. To assess the feasibility of utilizing the aqueous phase, HTL of Nannochloropsis sp. was carried out in the temperature range of 275 to 350°C and Residence Times (RT) ranging between 5 and 60min The effect of reaction conditions on the NO3(-),PO4(3-),SO4(2-),Cl(-),Na(+),andK(+) ions as well as Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and pH was investigated with view of recycling the aqueous phase for either cultivation or energy generation via Anaerobic Digestion (AD), quantified via Lifecycle Assessment (LCA). It addition to substantial nutrient partitioning at short RT, an increase in alkalinity to almost pH10 and decrease in COD at longer RT was observed. The LCA investigation found reaction conditions of 275°C/30min and 350°C/10min to be most suitable for nutrient and energy recovery but both processing routes offer environmental benefit at all reaction conditions, however recycling for cultivation has marginally better environmental credentials compared to AD.

  1. Interfacial Tension Effect on Cell Partition in Aqueous Two-Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Atefi, Ehsan; Joshi, Ramila; Mann, Jay Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-09-30

    Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) provide a mild environment for the partition and separation of cells. We report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the effect of interfacial tension of polymeric ATPS on the partitioning of cells between two phases and their interface. Two-phase systems are generated using polyethylene glycol and dextran of specific properties as phase-forming polymers and culture media as the solvent component. Ultralow interfacial tensions of the solutions are precisely measured using an axisymmetric drop shape analysis method. Partition experiments show that two-phase systems with an interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2) result in distribution of majority of cells to the bottom dextran phase. An increase in the interfacial tension results in a distribution of cells toward the interface. An independent cancer cell spheroid formation assay confirms these observations: a drop of the dextran phase containing cancer cells is dispensed into the immersion polyethylene glycol phase to form a cell-containing drop. Only at very small interfacial tensions do cells remain within the drop to aggregate into a spheroid. We perform a thermodynamic modeling of cell partition to determine variations of free energy associated with displacement of cells in ATPS with respect to the ultralow interfacial tensions. This modeling corroborates with the experimental results and demonstrates that at the smallest interfacial tension of 30 μJ/m(2), the free energy is a minimum with cells in the bottom phase. Increasing the interfacial tension shifts the minimum energy and partition of cells toward the interfacial region of the two aqueous phases. Examining differences in the partition behavior and minimum free energy modeling of A431.H9 cancer cells and mouse embryonic stem cells shows that the surface properties of cells further modulate partition in ATPS. This combined approach provides a fundamental understanding of interfacial tension role on cell partition in

  2. Integrating phase and composition of secondary organic aerosol from the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Carla; Perraud, Véronique; Wingen, Lisa M.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Airborne particles are important for public health, visibility, and climate. Predicting their concentrations, effects, and responses to control strategies requires accurate models of their formation and growth in air. This is challenging, as a large fraction is formed by complex reactions of volatile organic compounds, generating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which grows to sizes important for visibility, climate, and deposition in the lung. Growth of SOA is particularly sensitive to the phase/viscosity of the particles and remains poorly understood. We report studies using a custom-designed impactor with a germanium crystal as the impaction surface to study SOA formed from the ozonolysis of α-pinene at relative humidities (RHs) up to 87% at 297 ± 2 K (which corresponds to a maximum RH of 70–86% inside the impactor). The impaction patterns provide insight into changes in phase/viscosity as a function of RH. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and aerosol mass spectrometry provide simultaneous information on composition changes with RH. The results show that as the RH at which the SOA is formed increases, there is a decrease in viscosity, accompanied by an increasing contribution from carboxylic acids and a decreasing contribution from higher molecular mass products. In contrast, SOA that is formed dry and subsequently humidified remains solid to high RH. The results of these studies have significant implications for modeling the growth, aging, and ultimately, lifetime of SOA in the atmosphere. PMID:24821796

  3. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  4. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  5. Simultaneous separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides with a silica hydride stationary phase using aqueous normal phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Reinhard I; Yang, Yuanzhong; Chowdhury, Jamil; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Hearn, Milton T W

    2011-11-04

    The application of a silica hydride modified stationary phase with low organic loading has been investigated as a new type of chromatographic material suitable for the separation and analysis of peptides with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection. Retention maps were established to delineate the chromatographic characteristics of a series of peptides with physical properties ranging from strongly hydrophobic to very hydrophilic and encompassing a broad range of pI values (pI 5.5-9.4). The effects of low concentrations of two additives (formic acid and acetic acid) in the mobile phase were also investigated with respect to their contribution to separation selectivity and retention under comparable conditions. Significantly, strong retention of both the hydrophobic and the hydrophilic peptides was observed when high-organic low-aqueous mobile phases were employed, thus providing a new avenue to achieve high resolution peptide separations. For example, simultaneous separation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides was achieved under aqueous normal phase (ANP) chromatographic conditions with linear gradient elution procedures in a single run, whilst further gradient optimization enabled improved peak efficiencies of the more strongly retained hydrophobic and hydrophilic peptides.

  6. Solubilization of proteins in aqueous two-phase extraction through combinations of phase-formers and displacement agents.

    PubMed

    Kress, Christian; Sadowski, Gabriele; Brandenbusch, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    The aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) of therapeutic proteins is a promising separation alternative to cost-intensive chromatography, still being the workhorse of nowadays downstream processing. As shown in many publications, using NaCl as displacement agent in salt-polymer ATPE allows for a selective purification of the target protein immunoglobulin G (IgG) from human serum albumin (HSA, represents the impurity). However a high yield of the target protein is only achievable as long as the protein is stabilized in solution and not precipitated. In this work the combined influence of NaCl and polyethylene glycol (Mw=2000g/mol) on the IgG-IgG interactions was determined using composition gradient multi-angle light scattering (CG-MALS) demonstrating that NaCl induces a solubilization of IgG in polyethylene glycol 2000 solution. Moreover it is shown that the displacement agent NaCl has a significant and beneficial influence on the IgG solubility in polyethyleneglycol2000-citrate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) which can also be accessed by these advanced B22 measurements. By simultaneous consideration of IgG solubility data with results of the ATPS phase behavior (especially volume fraction of the respective phases) allows for the selection of process tailored ATPS including identification of the maximum protein feed concentration. Through this approach an ATPS optimization is accessible providing high yields and selectivity of the target protein (IgG).

  7. A new extraction method for the preparation of zinc oxide nanoparticles in aqueous two-phase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshkin, A. A.; Shkinev, V. M.; Zakhodyaeva, Yu. A.

    2017-02-01

    An extraction method was suggested for the preparation of differently shaped nano- and micrometer- sized zinc oxide particles at the interface boundary of aqueous two-phase systems based on polyethylene glycol (polyethylene oxide) and sodium sulfate using NaOH and aqueous ammonia as precipitating agents.

  8. Purification of Active Myrosinase from Plants by Aqueous Two-Phase Counter-Current Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Kristina L.; Ito, Yoichiro; Ramarathnam, Aarthi; Holtzclaw, W. David; Fahey, Jed W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myrosinase (thioglucoside glucohydrolase; E.C. 3.2.1.147), is a plant enzyme of increasing interest and importance to the biomedical community. Myrosinase catalyses the formation of isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane (frombroccoli) and 4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate (from moringa), which are potent inducers of the cytoprotective phase-2 response in humans, by hydrolysis of their abundant glucosinolate (β-thioglucoside N-hydroxysulphate) precursors. Objective To develop an aqueous two-phase counter-current chromatography (CCC) system for the rapid, three-step purification of catalytically active myrosinase. Methods A high-concentration potassium phosphate and polyethylene glycol biphasic aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) is used with a newly developed CCC configuration that utilises spiral-wound, flat-twisted tubing (with an ovoid cross-section). Results Making the initial crude plant extract directly in the ATPS and injecting only the lower phase permitted highly selective partitioning of the myrosinase complex before a short chromatography on a spiral disk CCC. Optimum phase retention and separation of myrosinase from other plant proteins afforded a 60-fold purification. Conclusion Catalytically active myrosinase is purified from 3-day broccoli sprouts, 7-day daikon sprouts, mustard seeds and the leaves of field-grown moringa trees, in a CCC system that is predictably scalable. PMID:25130502

  9. Multistage aqueous two-phase extraction of a monoclonal antibody from cell supernatant.

    PubMed

    Muendges, Jan; Zalesko, Alexej; Górak, Andrzej; Zeiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This article presents results of continuous multistage aqueous two-phase extraction of an immunoglobulin G1 from cell supernatant in a mixer-settler unit. An aqueous two-phase system consisting of polyethylene glycol 2000, phosphate salt, and water was applied without and with sodium chloride (NaCl). Influences of different parameters such as throughput, phase ratio, and stage number on the extraction performance were analyzed. For systems without NaCl, the extraction was carried out as a washing step. An increase of stage number from one to five stages enabled to increase the immunoglobulin G1 purity from 11.8 to 32.6% at a yield of nearly 90%. Furthermore, a reduction of product phase volume due to a higher phase ratio led to an increase of purity from 20.8 to 29.6% in a three-stage countercurrent extraction. For experiments with NaCl moderate partitioning conditions were adjusted by adding 8 wt% NaCl. In that case, the extraction was carried out as a stripping step.

  10. Development of a correlation for aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatkowski, Andrew; Imhoff, Paul T.; Miller, Cass T.

    1995-03-01

    In many situations vapor-phase extraction procedures (e.g., soil venting, air sparging, and bioventing) may be suitable methods for remediating porous media contaminated by volatile organic compounds. This has led to increased study of operative processes in these systems, including aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer. Past work has shown the importance of the flow regime on this process, but a quantitative estimate of mass-transfer coefficients is lacking, especially for systems not confounded by uncertainties involving interfacial area between the phases. An experimental investigation was conducted to isolate the resistance to aqueous-vapor phase mass transfer at the phase boundary, using an ideal porous medium system. Mass-transfer coefficients were measured for toluene for a wide range of Reynolds numbers. An empirical model was fit to the data in dimensionless form. The mass-transfer model was coupled with an available interfacial area model, yielding a dimensionless expression for the mass-transfer rate coefficient. This expression was used to compare results from this work to three other experimental studies reported in the literature. These comparisons showed that for experiments where infiltrating water flowed uniformly within the porous medium, the predicted mass-transfer coefficients were within a factor of 5 of the measured coefficients. Mass transfer was significantly slower than the rate predicted, using the results from this work, in experiments where infiltrating water flowed nonuniformly.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of PLGA Shell Microcapsules Containing Aqueous Cores Prepared by Internal Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Abulateefeh, Samer R; Alkilany, Alaaldin M

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of microcapsules consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymer shell and aqueous core is a clear challenge and hence has been rarely addressed in literature. Herein, aqueous core-PLGA shell microcapsules have been prepared by internal phase separation from acetone-water in oil emulsion. The resulting microcapsules exhibited mean particle size of 1.1 ± 0.39 μm (PDI = 0.35) with spherical surface morphology and internal poly-nuclear core morphology as indicated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The incorporation of water molecules into PLGA microcapsules was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aqueous core-PLGA shell microcapsules and the corresponding conventional PLGA microspheres were prepared and loaded with risedronate sodium as a model drug. Interestingly, aqueous core-PLGA shell microcapsules illustrated 2.5-fold increase in drug encapsulation in comparison to the classical PLGA microspheres (i.e., 31.6 vs. 12.7%), while exhibiting sustained release behavior following diffusion-controlled Higuchi model. The reported method could be extrapolated to encapsulate other water soluble drugs and hydrophilic macromolecules into PLGA microcapsules, which should overcome various drawbacks correlated with conventional PLGA microspheres in terms of drug loading and release.

  12. Low-temperature aqueous-phase reforming of ethanol on bimetallic PdZn catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Haifeng; DelaRiva, Andrew; Wang, Yong; Dayte, Abhaya

    2015-01-01

    Bimetallic PdZn catalysts supported on carbon black (CB) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were found to be selective for CO-free H-2 production from ethanol at low temperature (250 degrees C). On Pd, the H-2 yield was low (similar to 0.3 mol H-2/mol ethanol reacted) and the CH4/CO2 ratio was high (similar to 1.7). Addition of Zn to Pd formed the intermetallic PdZn beta phase (atomic ratio of Zn to Pd is 1) with increased H-2 yield (similar to 1.9 mol H-2/mol ethanol reacted) and CH4/CO2 ratio of <1. The higher H-2 yield and low CH4 formation was related to the improved dehydrogenation activity of the L1(0) PdZn beta phase. The TOF increased with particle size and the CNTs provided the most active and selective catalysts, which may be ascribed to pore-confinement effects. Furthermore, no significant changes in either the supports or the PdZn beta particles was found after aqueous-phase reforming (APR) indicating that the metal nanoparticles and the carbon support are hydrothermally stable in the aqueous phase at elevated temperatures and pressures (>200 degrees C, 65 bar). No CO was detected for all the catalysts performed in aqueous-phase reaction, indicating that both monometallic Pd and bimetallic PdZn catalysts have high water-gas shift activity during APR. However, the yield of H-2 is considerably lower than the theoretical value of 6 H-2 per mole ethanol which is due to the presence of oxygenated products and methane on the PdZn catalysts.

  13. Distribution of selected halogenated organic compounds among suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases in the Mississippi River and major tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Daniel, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Suspended particulate, colloid, and aqueous phases were separated and analyzed to determine spatial variation of specific organic compound transport associated with each phase in a dynamic river system. Sixteen sites along the Mississippi River and its major tributaries were sampled at low-flow conditions to maximize the possibility of equilibrium. Across the solubility range studied, the proportion transported by each phase depended on the compound solubility, with more water-soluble compounds (dacthal, trifluralin) transported predominantly in the aqueous phase and less-water soluble compounds (polychlorinated biphenyls, chlordane-related compounds) transported predominantly in the particulate and colloid phases. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  14. From Conventional to Phase-Sensitive Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy: Probing Water Organization at Aqueous Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Dominique; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2012-10-18

    Elucidation of water organization at aqueous interfaces has remained a challenging problem. Conventional vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy and its most recent extension, phase-sensitive VSFG (PS-VSFG), have emerged as powerful experimental methods for unraveling structural information at various aqueous interfaces. In this Perspective, we briefly describe the two possible VSFG detection modes, and we point out features that make these methods highly suited to address questions about water organization at air/aqueous interfaces. Several important aqueous interfacial systems are discussed to illustrate the versatility of these methods. Remaining challenges and exciting prospective directions are also presented.

  15. Relative hydrophobicity between the phases and partition of cytochrome-c in glycine ionic liquids aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changzeng; Wang, Jianji; Li, Zhiyong; Jing, Jun; Wang, Huiyong

    2013-08-30

    In this work, glycine ionic liquids tetramethylammonium glycine ([N1111][Gly]), tetraethylammonium glycine ([N2222][Gly]), tetra-n-butylammonium glycine ([N4444][Gly]), tetra-n-butylphosphonium glycine ([P4444][Gly]) and tetra-n-pentylammonium glycine ([N5555][Gly]) were synthesized and used to prepare aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) in the presence of K2HPO4. Binodal curves of such ATPSs and partition coefficients of a series of dinitrophenylated (DNP) amino acids in these ATPSs were determined at 298.15K to understand the effect of cationic structure of the ionic liquids on the phase-forming ability of glycine ionic liquids, relative hydrophobicity between the phases in the ionic liquids ATPSs, and polarity of the ionic liquids-rich phases. With the attempt to correlate the relative hydrophobicity of the phases in the ATPSs with their extraction capability for proteins, partition coefficients of cytochrome-c in the ATPSs were also determined. It was shown that partition coefficients of cytochrome-c were in the range from 2.83 to 20.7 under the studied pH conditions. Then, hydrophobic interactions between cytochrome-c and the ionic liquid are suggested to be the main driving force for the preferential partition of cytochrome-c in the glycine ionic liquid-rich phases of the ATPSs. Result derived from polarity of the ionic liquids-rich phases supports this mechanism.

  16. Extractive purification of enzymes from animal tissue using aqueous two phase systems: pilot scale studies.

    PubMed

    Boland, M J; Hesselink, P G; Papamichael, N; Hustedt, H

    1991-06-01

    Pilot scale trials have been carried out to assess the feasibility of using PEG-salt aqueous phase systems for extraction and purification of enzymes from animal tissue on an industrial scale. Comminuted bovine liver was used as a starting material, and it was easy to separate a clear upper phase containing proteins of interest from a mixture containing 20% biomass, 15% PEG and 8% phosphate using a disc separator. Similar attempts with decanters were unsuccessful. Second-phase separation was simply accomplished by the addition of salt to the separated, clear upper layer and standing or allowing passage through a disc separator. The method was tested using continuous mixing on the GBF continuous mixing aqueous phase extraction plant, with and without computer control. Good separations were achieved. The enzyme superoxide dismutase was purified using this method yielding a 4-fold purification factor with respect to soluble protein and a recovery rate of 83%, with the enzyme in a clarified solution suitable for further processing by chromatographic methods. The general applicability of this method, its economics and its potential application in industry are discussed.

  17. LPS-protein aggregation influences protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; Novaes, Leticia Celia de Lencastre; Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide endotoxins (LPS) are the most common pyrogenic substances in recombinant peptides and proteins purified from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. In this respect, aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS) have already proven to be a good strategy to purify recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest and remove high LPS concentrations. In this paper, we review our recent experimental work in protein partitioning in Triton X-114 ATPMS altogether with some new results and show that LPS-protein aggregation can influence both protein and LPS partitioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was employed as a model protein. The ATPMS technology proved to be effective for high loads of LPS removal into the micelle-rich phase (%REM(LPS) > 98 %) while GFPuv partitioned preferentially to the micelle-poor phase (K GFP(uv) < 1.00) due to the excluded-volume interactions. However, theoretically predicted protein partition coefficient values were compared with experimentally obtained ones, and good agreement was found only in the absence of LPS. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that protein-LPS interactions were taking place and influenced the partitioning process. We believe that this phenomenon should be considered in LPS removal employing any kind of aqueous two-phase system. Nonetheless, ATPMS can still be considered as an efficient strategy for high loads of LPS removal, but being aware that the excluded-volume partitioning theory available might overestimate partition coefficient values due to the presence of protein-LPS aggregation.

  18. Improving the treatment of non-aqueous phase TCE in low permeability zones with permanganate.

    PubMed

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Comfort, Steve; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Dvorak, Bruce

    2014-03-15

    Treating dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) embedded in low permeability zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate (MnO4(-)) into LPZs to treat high concentrations of TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the penetration of various permanganate flooding solutions into a LPZ that was spiked with non-aqueous phase (14)C-TCE. The treatments we evaluated included permanganate paired with: (i) a shear-thinning polymer (xanthan); (ii) stabilization aids that minimized MnO2 rind formation and (iii) a phase-transfer catalyst. In addition, we quantified the ability of these flooding solutions to improve TCE destruction under batch conditions by developing miniature LPZ cylinders that were spiked with (14)C-TCE. Transport experiments showed that MnO4(-) alone was inefficient in penetrating the LPZ and reacting with non-aqueous phase TCE, due to a distinct and large MnO2 rind that inhibited the TCE from further oxidant contact. By including xanthan with MnO4(-), the sweeping efficiency increased (90%) but rind formation was still evident. By including the stabilization aid, sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) with xanthan, permanganate penetrated 100% of the LPZ, no rind was observed, and the percentage of TCE oxidized increased. Batch experiments using LPZ cylinders allowed longer contact times between the flooding solutions and the DNAPL and results showed that SHMP+MnO4(-) improved TCE destruction by ∼16% over MnO4(-) alone (56.5% vs. 40.1%). These results support combining permanganate with SHMP or SHMP and xanthan as a means of treating high concentrations of TCE in low permeable zones.

  19. Carbon nanotubes induce secondary structure changes of bovine albumin in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Meng, Jie; Mao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xuelian; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2010-11-01

    Interaction of nanomaterials to protein molecules is one of the most important issues to deeply understand the influences of the nanomaterials upon physiological processes and protein functions. So far most of investigations focused on the protein molecules adsorbed on the nanomaterials surface, less is known about those in the aqueous phase (not absorbed). In this work, luminescent spectroscopy analysis, circular dichroism measurement, atomic force microscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, isoelectric focusing and sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to investigate the influence of oxidized water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) dispersing in aqueous solution upon the structures of bovine serum albumin (BSA) through co-incubation. We focused on BSA molecules that stayed in the aqueous phase instead of those adsorbed by CNT. Experimental results show that the fractions of beta-sheet decreased from 33.3% to 29.8% and beta-turn increased from 2% to 5% in reference with native BSA. There was a slight increase of alpha-helix and a slight reduction of random coil. BSA molecules that had been encountered with CNT and were left in the solution formed a loose and flatten morphology on graphite substrates instead of their native tight and round morphology observed by AFM. The value of isoelectric point for BSA after exposed to CNT moved towards to a higher pH position compared with native BSA. All together, it was concluded that the oxidized water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes not only adsorb bovine serum albumin molecules to their surface, but also induces albumin molecules in the aqueous solution undergo secondary structure changes, which lead to a conformation change.

  20. Cloud droplet activation through oxidation of organic aerosol influenced by temperature and particle phase state: CLOUD ACTIVATION BY AGED ORGANIC AEROSOL

    DOE PAGES

    Slade, Jonathan H.; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Arangio, Andrea; ...

    2017-02-04

    Chemical aging of organic aerosol (OA) through multiphase oxidation reactions can alter their cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopicity. However, the oxidation kinetics and OA reactivity depend strongly on the particle phase state, potentially influencing the hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion rate of carbonaceous aerosol. Here, amorphous Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) aerosol particles, a surrogate humic-like substance (HULIS) that contributes substantially to global OA mass, are oxidized by OH radicals at different temperatures and phase states. When oxidized at low temperature in a glassy solid state, the hygroscopicity of SRFA particles increased by almost a factor of two, whereas oxidation ofmore » liquid-like SRFA particles at higher temperatures did not affect CCN activity. Low-temperature oxidation appears to promote the formation of highly-oxygenated particle-bound fragmentation products with lower molar mass and greater CCN activity, underscoring the importance of chemical aging in the free troposphere and its influence on the CCN activity of OA.« less

  1. New insights into Titan's organic chemistry in the gas and aerosol phases.

    PubMed

    Raulin, F; Coll, P; Smith, N; Benilan, Y; Bruston, P; Gazeau, M C

    1999-01-01

    Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, with a dense atmosphere very rich in organics, and many couplings in the various parts of its "geofluid", is a reference for studying prebiotic chemistry on a planetary scale. New data have been obtained from experiments simulating this organic chemistry (gas and aerosol phases), within the right ranges of temperature and a careful avoiding of any chemical contamination. They show a very good agreement with the observational data, demonstrating for the first time the formation of all the organic species already detected in Titan atmosphere including, at last, C4N2, together with many other species not yet detected in Titan. This strongly suggests the presence of more complex organics in Titan's atmosphere and surface, including high molecular weight polyynes and cyanopolyynes. The NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission has been successfully launched in October 1997. The Cassini spacecraft will reach the Saturn system in 2004 and become an orbiter around Saturn, while the Huygens probe will penetrate into Titan's atmosphere. In situ measurements, in particular from Huygens GC-MS and ACP instruments, will provide a detailed analysis of the organics present in the air, aerosols, and surface. This very ambitious mission should yield much information of crucial importance for our knowledge of the complexity of Titan's chemistry, and, more generally for the field of exobiology.

  2. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Ross L.; Jang, Myoseon

    2016-05-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+], mol L-1) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of photooxidation products and sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (eight groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (six groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx (VOC - volatile organic compound). The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF APHOR) chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total organic mass formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H

  3. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. L.; Jang, M.

    2015-11-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+]) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of the photooxidation products and the sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (8 groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (6 groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx. The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor UF APHOR chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total OM formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC, and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H+] but is dynamically related to all three parameters. For VOC / NOx > 10, with increasing NOx both experimental and

  4. Aqueous phase separation as a possible route to compartmentalization of biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Keating, Christine D

    2012-12-18

    How could the incredible complexity of modern cells evolve from something simple enough to have appeared in a primordial soup? This enduring question has sparked the interest of researchers since Darwin first considered his theory of natural selection. Organic molecules, even potentially functional molecules including peptides and nucleotides, can be produced abiotically. Amphiphiles such as surfactants and lipids display remarkable self-assembly processes including the spontaneous formation of vesicles resembling the membranes of living cells. Nonetheless, numerous questions remain. Given the presumably dilute concentrations of macromolecules in the prebiotic pools where the earliest cells are thought to have appeared, how could the necessary components become concentrated and encapsulated within a semipermeable membrane? What would drive the further structural complexity that is a hallmark of modern living systems? The interior of modern cells is subdivided into microcompartments such as the nucleoid of bacteria or the organelles of eukaryotic cells. Even within what at first appears to be a single compartment, for example, the cytoplasm or nucleus, chemical composition is often nonuniform, containing gradients, macromolecular assemblies, and/or liquid droplets. What might the internal structure of intermediate evolutionary forms have looked like? The nonideal aqueous solution chemistry of macromolecules offers an attractive possible answer to these questions. Aqueous polymer solutions will form multiple coexisting thermodynamic phases under a variety of readily accessible conditions. In this Account, we describe aqueous phase separation as a model system for biological compartmentalization in both early and modern cells, with an emphasis on systems that have been encapsulated within a lipid bilayer. We begin with an introduction to aqueous phase separation and discuss how this phenomenon can lead to microcompartmentalization and could facilitate biopolymer

  5. Aqueous Phase Separation as a Possible Route to Compartmentalization of Biological Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    How could the incredible complexity of modern cells evolve from something simple enough to have appeared in a primordial soup? This enduring question has sparked the interest of researchers since Darwin first considered his theory of natural selection. Organic molecules, even potentially functional molecules including peptides and nucleotides, can be produced abiotically. Amphiphiles such as surfactants and lipids display remarkable self-assembly processes including the spontaneous formation of vesicles resembling the membranes of living cells. Nonetheless, numerous questions remain. Given the presumably dilute concentrations of macromolecules in the prebiotic pools where the earliest cells are thought to have appeared, how could the necessary components become concentrated and encapsulated within a semipermeable membrane? What would drive the further structural complexity that is a hallmark of modern living systems? The interior of modern cells is subdivided into microcompartments such as the nucleoid of bacteria or the organelles of eukaryotic cells. Even within what at first appears to be a single compartment, for example, the cytoplasm or nucleus, chemical composition is often nonuniform, containing gradients, macromolecular assemblies, and/or liquid droplets. What might the internal structure of intermediate evolutionary forms have looked like? The nonideal aqueous solution chemistry of macromolecules offers an attractive possible answer to these questions. Aqueous polymer solutions will form multiple coexisting thermodynamic phases under a variety of readily accessible conditions. In this Account, we describe aqueous phase separation as a model system for biological compartmentalization in both early and modern cells, with an emphasis on systems that have been encapsulated within a lipid bilayer. We begin with an introduction to aqueous phase separation and discuss how this phenomenon can lead to microcompartmentalization and could facilitate biopolymer

  6. Effect of salt identity on the phase diagram for a globularprotein in aqueous electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bostrom, Mathias; Tavares, Frederico W.; Ninham, Barry W.; Prausnitz, John M.

    2006-02-22

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to establish the potential of mean force between two globular proteins in an aqueous electrolyte solution. This potential includes nonelectrostatic contributions arising from dispersion forces first, between the globular proteins, and second, between ions in solution and between each ion and the globular protein. These latter contributions are missing from standard models. The potential of mean force, obtained from simulation, is fitted to an analytic equation. Using our analytic potential of mean force and Barker-Henderson perturbation theory, we obtain phase diagrams for lysozyme solutions that include stable and metastable fluid-fluid and solid-fluid phases when the electrolyte is 0.2 M NaSCN or NaI or NaCl. The nature of the electrolyte has a significant effect on the phase diagram.

  7. Glass-liquid phase separation in highly supersaturated aqueous solutions of telaprevir.

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Giraldo, Laura I; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-02-02

    Amorphous solid dispersions are of great current interest because they can improve the delivery of poorly water-soluble compounds. It has been recently noted that the highly supersaturated solutions generated by dissolution of some ASDs can undergo a phase transition to a colloidal, disordered, drug-rich phase when the concentration exceeds the "amorphous solubility" of the drug. The purpose of this study was to investigate the phase behavior of supersaturated solutions of telaprevir, which is formulated as an amorphous solid dispersion in the commercial product. Different analytical techniques including proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), fluorescence spectroscopy and flux measurements were used to evaluate the properties of aqueous supersaturated solutions of telaprevir. It was found that highly supersaturated solutions of telaprevir underwent glass-liquid phase separation (GLPS) when the concentration exceeded 90 μg/mL, forming a water-saturated colloidal, amorphous drug-rich phase with a glass transition temperature of 52 °C. From flux measurements, it was observed that the "free" drug concentration reached a maximum at the concentration where GLPS occurred, and did not increase further as the concentration was increased. This phase behavior, which results in a precipitate and a metastable equilibrium between a supersaturated solution and a drug-rich phase, is obviously important in the context of evaluating amorphous solid dispersion formulations and their crystallization routes.

  8. Control and measurement of the phase behavior of aqueous solutions using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jung-Uk; Cristobal, Galder; Link, Darren R; Thorsen, Todd; Jia, Yanwei; Piattelli, Katie; Fraden, Seth

    2007-07-18

    A microfluidic device denoted the Phase Chip has been designed to measure and manipulate the phase diagram of multicomponent fluid mixtures. The Phase Chip exploits the permeation of water through poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) in order to controllably vary the concentration of solutes in aqueous nanoliter volume microdrops stored in wells. The permeation of water in the Phase Chip is modeled using the diffusion equation, and good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The Phase Chip operates by first creating drops of the water/solute mixture whose composition varies sequentially. Next, drops are transported down channels and guided into storage wells using surface tension forces. Finally, the solute concentration of each stored drop is simultaneously varied and measured. Two applications of the Phase Chip are presented. First, the phase diagram of a polymer/salt mixture is measured on-chip and validated off-chip, and second, protein crystallization rates are enhanced through the manipulation of the kinetics of nucleation and growth.

  9. Liquid crystalline phases and their dispersions in aqueous mixtures of glycerol monooleate and glyceryl monooleyl ether.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Georgeta; Barauskas, Justas; Nylander, Tommy; Tiberg, Fredrik

    2007-01-16

    The aqueous phase behavior of mixtures of 1-glycerol monooleate (GMO) and its ether analogue, 1-glyceryl monooleyl ether (GME) has been investigated by a combination of polarized microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and NMR techniques. Three phase diagrams of the ternary GMO/GME/water system have been constructed at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results demonstrate that the increasing amount of GME favors the formation of the reversed phases, evidenced by the transformation of the lamellar and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystalline phases of the binary GMO/water system into reversed micellar or reversed hexagonal phases. For a particular liquid crystalline phase, increasing the GME content has no effect on the structural characteristics and hydration properties, thus suggesting ideal mixing with GMO. Investigations of dispersed nanoparticle samples using shear and a polymeric stabilizer, Pluronic F127, show the possibility of forming two different kinds of bicontinuous cubic phase nanoparticles by simply changing the GMO/GME ratio. Also NMR self-diffusion measurements confirm that the block copolymer, Pluronic F127, used to facilitate dispersion formation, is associated with nanoparticles and provides steric stabilization.

  10. Rapid Formation of Molecular Bromine from Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol in the Presence of Ozone and UV Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of gas-phase bromine from aqueous sodium bromide aerosols is investigated through a combination of chamber experiments and chemical kinetics modeling. Experiments show that Br2(g) is produced rapidly from deliquesced NaBr aerosols in the presence of OH radicals prod...

  11. ''Pulling'' Nanoparticles into Water: Phase Transfer of Oleic Acid Stabilized Monodisperse Nanoparticles into Aqueous Solutions of alpha-Cyclodextrin

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Wong, J.F.; Teng, X.; Lin, X.Z.; Yang, H.

    2003-10-18

    (B204)This paper describes a general method to drastically improve the disparity of oleic acid stabilized nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. We use oleic acid stabilized monodisperse nanoparticles of iron oxides and silver as model systems, and have modified the surface properties of these nanoparticles through the formation of an inclusion complex between surface-bound surfactant molecules and alpha-cyclodextrin (alpha-CD). After the modification, the nanoparticles of both iron oxide and Ag can transfer from hydrophobic solvents, such as hexane, to alpha-CD aqueous phase. The efficiency of the phase transfer to the aqueous solutions depend son the initial alpha-CD concentration. The alpha-CD/oleic acid complex stabilized nanoparticles can be stable for long periods of time in aqueous phase under ambient atmospheric conditions. Transmission electron microscopy (TME), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and colorimetric methods have been used in the characterization of these nanoparticles.

  12. Equivalent aqueous phase modulation of domain segregation in myelin monolayers and bilayer vesicles.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rafael G; Schneck, Emanuel; Funari, Sergio S; Tanaka, Motomu; Maggio, Bruno

    2010-09-08

    Purified myelin can be spread as monomolecular films at the air/aqueous interface. These films were visualized by fluorescence and Brewster angle microscopy, showing phase coexistence at low and medium surface pressures (<20-30 mN/m). Beyond this threshold, the film becomes homogeneous or not, depending on the aqueous subphase composition. Pure water as well as sucrose, glycerol, dimethylsulfoxide, and dimethylformamide solutions (20% in water) produced monolayers that become homogeneous at high surface pressures; on the other hand, the presence of salts (NaCl, CaCl(2)) in Ringer's and physiological solution leads to phase domain microheterogeneity over the whole compression isotherm. These results show that surface heterogeneity is favored by the ionic milieu. The modulation of the phase-mixing behavior in monolayers is paralleled by the behavior of multilamellar vesicles as determined by small-angle and wide-angle x-ray scattering. The correspondence of the behavior of monolayers and multilayers is achieved only at high surface pressures near the equilibrium adsorption surface pressure; at lower surface pressures, the correspondence breaks down. The equilibrium surface tension on all subphases corresponds to that of the air/alkane interface (27 mN/m), independently on the surface tension of the clean subphase.

  13. Novel Displacement Agents for Aqueous 2-Phase Extraction Can Be Estimated Based on Hybrid Shortcut Calculations.

    PubMed

    Kress, Christian; Sadowski, Gabriele; Brandenbusch, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    The purification of therapeutic proteins is a challenging task with immediate need for optimization. Besides other techniques, aqueous 2-phase extraction (ATPE) of proteins has been shown to be a promising alternative to cost-intensive state-of-the-art chromatographic protein purification. Most likely, to enable a selective extraction, protein partitioning has to be influenced using a displacement agent to isolate the target protein from the impurities. In this work, a new displacement agent (lithium bromide [LiBr]) allowing for the selective separation of the target protein IgG from human serum albumin (represents the impurity) within a citrate-polyethylene glycol (PEG) ATPS is presented. In order to characterize the displacement suitability of LiBr on IgG, the mutual influence of LiBr and the phase formers on the aqueous 2-phase system (ATPS) and partitioning is investigated. Using osmotic virial coefficients (B22 and B23) accessible by composition gradient multiangle light-scattering measurements, the precipitating effect of LiBr on both proteins and an estimation of both protein partition coefficients is estimated. The stabilizing effect of LiBr on both proteins was estimated based on B22 and experimentally validated within the citrate-PEG ATPS. Our approach contributes to an efficient implementation of ATPE within the downstream processing development of therapeutic proteins.

  14. Mechanisms of catalytic cleavage of benzyl phenyl ether in aqueous and apolar phases

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiayue; Lu, Lu; Zhao, Chen; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic pathways for the cleavage of ether bonds in benzyl phenyl ether (BPE) in liquid phase using Ni- and zeolite-based catalysts are explored. In the absence of catalysts, the C-O bond is selectively cleaved in water by hydrolysis, forming phenol and benzyl alcohol as intermediates, followed by alkylation. The hydronium ions catalyzing the reactions are provided by the dissociation of water at 523 K. Upon addition of HZSM-5, rates of hydrolysis and alkylation are markedly increased in relation to proton concentrations. In the presence of Ni/SiO2, the selective hydrogenolysis dominates for cleaving the Caliphatic-O bond. Catalyzed by the dual-functional Ni/HZSM-5, hydrogenolysis occurs as the major route rather than hydrolysis (minor route). In apolar undecane, the non-catalytic thermal pyrolysis route dominates. Hydrogenolysis of BPE appears to be the major reaction pathway in undecane in the presence of Ni/SiO2 or Ni/HZSM-5, almost completely suppressing radical reactions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations strongly support the proposed C-O bond cleavage mechanisms on BPE in aqueous and apolar phases. These calculations show that BPE is initially protonated and subsequently hydrolyzed in the aqueous phase. Finally, DFT calculations suggest that the radical reactions in non-polar solvents lead to primary benzyl and phenoxy radicals in undecane, which leads to heavier condensation products as long as metals are absent for providing dissociated hydrogen.

  15. Aqueous Phase Reforming of Glycerol for Hydrogen Production Over Pt-Re Supported on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Zhang, Liang; Xia, Guanguang; Karim, Ayman M.; Heldebrant, David J.; Wang, Xianqin; Peterson, Thomas H.; Wang, Yong

    2010-03-02

    Hydrogen production from the aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over several 3%Pt-Re/C catalysts (1-4.5% Re) has been studied in the absence and presence of base, and the results compared with a Re-free 3%Pt/C catalyst. Although the Pt/C catalyst is very selective toward the production of hydrogen, catalytic activity is low. Addition of Re significantly increases the conversion of glycerol, at some loss of hydrogen selectivity to light hydrocarbons and water-soluble oxygenates. Addition of 1%KOH to the feedstock increases the selectivity of the Pt-Re/C catalysts toward hydrogen, but selectivity toward aqueous phase oxygenates also increases except for 3%Pt-3%Re/C, where it remains constant. The increase in hydrogen selectivity with base addition arises primarily from reducing the selectivity toward methane and higher alkanes, products that consume H2. For comparison, KOH addition to the glycerol feed with the Re-free 3%Pt/C catalyst provides an increase in glycerol conversion but results in a decline in both H2 and alkanes relative to aqueous phase oxygenates. This indicates that alternative pathways have been enabled by base addition. The highest hydrogen productivity among the catalysts tested is achieved with a 3%Pt-3%Re/C catalyst with added KOH base, but this hydrogen productivity declines with time on stream. The observed product distributions as well as deactivation with base can be understood in terms of the different reaction pathways that become emphasized depending on catalyst composition and pH.

  16. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and phase transition of viscous α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Virtanen, Annele; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. Global model simulations of monoterpene SOA particles suggest that viscous biogenic SOA are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle (INP) budget. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN (Ignatius et al., 2015, Järvinen et al., 2015). In the CLOUD chamber, the SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10° C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. As the RHw was increased to between 35 % at -10° C and 80 % at -38° C, a transition to spherical shape was observed with a new in-situ optical method. This transition confirms previous modelling of the viscosity transition conditions. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber SPIN (Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei) for different SOA particle sizes. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4, significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3° C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. References Ignatius, K. et al., Heterogeneous ice

  17. High-yield isolation of extracellular vesicles using aqueous two-phase system

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyunwoo; Han, Chungmin; Labuz, Joseph M.; Kim, Jiyoon; Kim, Jongmin; Cho, Siwoo; Gho, Yong Song; Takayama, Shuichi; Park, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as exosomes and microvesicles released from cells are potential biomarkers for blood-based diagnostic applications. To exploit EVs as diagnostic biomarkers, an effective pre-analytical process is necessary. However, recent studies performed with blood-borne EVs have been hindered by the lack of effective purification strategies. In this study, an efficient EV isolation method was developed by using polyethylene glycol/dextran aqueous two phase system (ATPS). This method provides high EV recovery efficiency (~70%) in a short time (~15 min). Consequently, it can significantly increase the diagnostic applicability of EVs. PMID:26271727

  18. Different types of aqueous two-phase systems for biomolecule and bioparticle extraction and purification.

    PubMed

    Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Viana Marques, Daniela de Araújo; Júnior, Adalberto Pessoa; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari

    2013-01-01

    Upstream improvements have led to significant advances in the productivity of biomolecules and bioparticles. Today, downstream processes are the bottleneck in the production of some biopharmaceuticals, a change from previous years. Current purification platforms will reach their physical limits at some point, indicating the need for new approaches. This article reviews an alternative method to extract and purify biomolecules/bioparticles named aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Biocompatibility and readiness to scale up are some of the ATPS characteristics. We also discuss some of ATPS applications in the biotechnology field.

  19. The aqueous alteration of carbon-bearing phases in CR carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    By studying carbonaceous chondrites, we can understand the processes that occurred in the protoplanetary disk, constrain the conditions in the solar nebula, and determine the composition and evolution of organic chemicals that led up to the origin of life on Earth. The CR chondrites contain ~ 5 wt% carbon, mainly in the form of macromolecular carbon (MMC). There are examples of petrologic type 3 (primitive) and type 1 (extensively aqueously altered) CR chondrites, which makes the CRs particularly interesting for studying the stages of aqueous alteration. The MMC has been studied using in situ electron probe micro analysis (EPMA), Raman spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). EPMA mapping of the carbon Kalpha X-rays reveals that there are three types of carbon materials in these chondrites: high carbon phases (HCPs), matrix carbon (MC), and calcite. By Raman spectroscopy, we determine that the MC is MMC, but its spectra are unchanged by aqueous alteration. EPMA X-ray mapping suggests that the morphology of the HCPs and the spatial distribution of the MMC changes with extent of aqueous alteration. SIMS measurements have revealed that there is an isotopic difference between the HCPs and the MC in the GRO 95577 and QUE 99177 samples. HCPs have delta13C ≈ --25 ‰ and delta 15N ≈ 40 ‰, and the MC have delta13C ≈ 35 ‰ and delta15N ≈ 160 ‰, relative to standard terrestrial isotope ratios. In order to produce the MC isotopic values, there must be a mix of the +delta15N and +delta13C soluble organic molecules and MMC (both present in the matrix). Therefore, the 'true' values for the MMC must be more enriched in 12C and 15N than the MC values. Results from the calcite measurements show that the production of calcite fractionates the carbon due to a combination of calcite crystallization and outgassing of CO2 on the CR parent body.

  20. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2013-03-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and used to construct the stoichiometric coefficients (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. OMP is estimated using the SOA partitioning model that has been used in a regional air quality model (CMAQ 5.0.1). OMAR predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model was evaluated with the SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene using an outdoor reactor (UF-APHOR chamber). The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fraction in the SOA predicted by the model was in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fraction.

  1. Studies on aqueous two phase polymer systems useful for partitioning of biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.; Bamberger, S.

    1982-01-01

    The two phase systems that result when aqueous solutions of dextran and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) are mixed above a critical concentration of a few percent provide a useful medium for the separation of biological cell subpopulations via partition between the top, PEG-rich phase and the liquid-liquid phase boundary. Interfacial tensions of such systems have been measured by the rotating drop technique and found to range between 0.1-100 micro-N/m. The tension was found to depend on the length of the tie line describing the system on a phase diagram, via a power law relationship which differed depending on the concentration of Na phosphate buffer present. The electrokinetic properties of drops of one phase suspended in the other were studied for a variety of systems. It was found that the droplet electrophoretic mobility increased monotonically with phosphate concentration and drop diameter but exhibited the opposite sign from that anticipated from phosphate partition measurements. It was possible to take advantage of these electrokinetic properties and dramatically enhance the speed of phase separation through application of relatively small electric fields.

  2. Good's buffers as novel phase-forming components of ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Luís, Andreia; Dinis, Teresa B V; Passos, Helena; Taha, Mohamed; Freire, Mara G

    2015-09-15

    Aiming at the development of self-buffering and benign extraction/separation processes, this work reports a novel class of aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of ionic liquids (ILs) and organic biological buffers (Good's buffers, GBs). A large array of ILs and GBs was investigated, revealing than only the more hydrophobic and fluorinated ILs are able to form ABS. For these systems, the phase diagrams, tie-lines, tie-line lengths, and critical points were determined at 25 °C. The ABS were then evaluated as alternative liquid-liquid extraction strategies for two amino acids (L-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan). The single-step extraction efficiencies for the GB-rich phase range between 22.4 and 100.0 % (complete extraction). Contrarily to the most conventional IL-salt ABS, in most of the systems investigated, the amino acids preferentially migrate for the most biocompatible and hydrophilic GB-rich phase. Remarkably, in two of the studied ABS, L-phenylalanine completely partitions to the GB-rich phase while L-tryptophan shows a preferential affinity for the opposite phase. These results show that the extraction efficiencies of similar amino acids can be tailored by the design of the chemical structures of the phase-forming components, creating thus new possibilities for the use of IL-based ABS in biotechnological separations.

  3. Partition of volatile compounds in pea globulin-maltodextrin aqueous two-phase system.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Dat; Lafarge, Céline; Murat, Chloé; Mession, Jean-Luc; Cayot, Nathalie; Saurel, Rémi

    2014-12-01

    This study is based on the assumption that the off-flavour of pea proteins might be decreased using the retention of volatile compounds by a mixture with another biopolymer. The partition of volatile compounds in an aqueous system containing pea protein and maltodextrins was followed under thermodynamic incompatibility conditions. Firstly, the phase diagram of the system was established. Then, the partition of aroma compounds between the phase rich in protein and the phase rich in maltodextrin was measured by SPME-GC-MS. There was a transfer of volatile compounds during phase separation. Variations of pH were also used to vary the retention of volatile compounds by proteins. The concentration of volatile compounds in protein solution at pH 2.4 was higher than at pH 7.2. It was possible to increase the transfer of volatile compounds from the phase rich in protein to the phase rich in maltodextrin using the effect of pH on protein denaturation.

  4. A theory of electrophoresis of emulsion drops in aqueous two-phase polymer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S.

    1982-01-01

    An electrophoresis study has been carried out in an emulsion formed from an electrically neutral aqueous mixture of dextran and polyethylene glycol equilibrated at sufficient concentrations in the presence of electrolytes. Electrophoresis of a drop of one phase suspended in the other is observed, and the direction of the drop's motion is reversed when the disperse phase and the continuous phase are interchanged. In the presence of sulfate, phosphate, or citrate ions, an electrostatic potential difference of the order of a few mV exists between the two phases. The potential implied by the direction of the electrophoretic motion is opposite to the Donnan potential observed between the two phases. The mobility of an emulsion drop increases with the drop radius and depends on ion concentration. These results are explained in terms of a model postulating an electric dipole layer associated with a mixture of oriented polymer molecules at the surface of a drop, with a potential difference between the interiors of the two phases resulting from the unequal ion distribution.

  5. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Sebastien; Maltagliati, Luca; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bézard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008).Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 μm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°.We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  6. A new description of Titan's aerosol optical properties from the analysis of VIMS Emission Phase Function observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltagliati, Luca; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Sotin, Christophe; Rannou, Pascal; Bezard, Bruno; Cornet, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The Huygens probe gave unprecedented information on the properties of Titan's aerosols (vertical distribution, opacity as a function of wavelength, phase function, single scattering albedo) by in-situ measurements (Tomasko et al. 2008). Being the only existing in-situ atmospheric probing for Titan, this aerosol model currently is the reference for many Titan studies (e.g. by being applied as physical input in radiative transfer models of the atmosphere). Recently a reanalysis of the DISR dataset, corroborated by data from the Downward-Looking Visible Spectrometer (DLVS), was carried out by the same group (Doose et al. 2016), leading to significant changes to the indications given by Tomasko et al. (2008). Here we present the analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation (EPF) performed by VIMS during the Cassini flyby T88 (November 2012). An EPF observes the same spot on the surface (and thus the same atmosphere) with the same emergence angle but with different incidence angles. In this way, our EPF allows, for the first time, to have direct information on the phase function of Titan's aerosols, as well as on other important physical parameters of the aerosols as the behavior of their extinction as a function of wavelength and the single scattering albedo (also as a function of wavelength) for the whole VIMS range (0.8-5.2 µm). The T88 EPF is composed of 25 VIMS datacubes spanning a scattering angle range approximately from 0°to 70°. We used the radiative transfer model described in Hirtzig et al. (2013) as baseline, updated with improved methane (+ related isotopes) spectroscopy. By changing the aerosol description in the model, we found the combination of aerosol optical parameters that fits best a constant aerosol column density over the whole set of the VIMS datacubes. We confirmed that the new results from Doose et al. (2016) do improve the fit for what concerns the vertical profile and the extinction as a function of wavelength. However, a different

  7. Laboratory studies of humidity-driven phase transitions of perchlorate/chloride mixtures: Relevance to aqueous phases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Perchlorate salts, known to exist on Mars, can readily absorb water vapor and deliquesce into aqueous solution. We have previously studied pure perchlorate and found that the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) is <60% regardless of cation, hydration state or temperature (223 to 273 K). We have also shown that efflorescence (recrystallization) of perchlorate solutions is kinetically hindered, allowing supersaturation to occur at RH values below the DRH. In addition to perchlorate, Phoenix instruments found chloride, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, sodium, potassium and calcium in the Martian regolith. The vertical and spatial distributions of these ions are unknown, but all were present in a single 1 g sample. It is therefore likely that these ions coexist with perchlorate. Many salts likely present in the regolith are less deliquescent than perchlorates, and it is important to understand how these additional species will affect perchlorate deliquescence. Here we study deliquescence (solid to aqueous transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid transition) of 3 perchlorate/chloride systems: KClO4/KCl at 253 K and NaClO4/NaCl and Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 at 243 and 253 K. A Raman microscope and environmental cell were used to monitor phase transitions of internally mixed perchlorate/chloride particles. The eutonic RH, where an aqueous phase first forms, is 30% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2, 38% RH for NaClO4/NaCl and 82% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures regardless of initial composition. We observed complete deliquescence of all salt mixtures at RH values below the DRH of the least deliquescent pure salt. When humidity is lowered, efflorescence of all solutions occurred below the DRH suggesting supersaturated solutions can exist. The low eutonic RH values of the sodium and magnesium perchlorate/chloride mixtures are significant for Mars, as these humidities can be reached at the Martian surface. It is likely that some salts in the regolith may exist as stable or metastable solutions

  8. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation in atmospheric aerosol particles: dependence on organic functionalities and mixture complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, M.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Peter, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the troposphere, aerosol particles undergo phase transitions such as deliquescence and efflorescence during humidity cycles (Marcolli and Krieger, 2006). In addition, interactions between organic and inorganic compounds lead to liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) (Ciobanu et al., 2009). Recent studies on a limited number of model systems have shown that oxygen-to-carbon ratios (O:C) of the organic aerosol fraction might be a good predictor for LLPS in mixed organic/ammonium sulfate (AS) particles (Bertram et al., 2011; Song et al., 2011). However, in order to corroborate this hypothesis experiments with an organic fraction that consists of a higher number of components with different O:C ratios and functional groups are needed. In order to determine the influence of O:C ratio, the specific organic functionalities and the mixture complexity on LLPS, we subjected organic/AS particles deposited on a hydrophobically coated substrate to relative humidity (RH) cycles and observed phase changes using optical microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. To determine the influence of mixture complexity, we mixed together up to 10 organic compounds. We also prepared mixtures that were rich in different types of functional groups like polyols, aromatics and dicarboxylic acids which were identified from field measurements. We screened for a miscibility gap by varying the organic-to-inorganic ratio from 2:1 to 1:6. AS in the investigated single particles effloresced at 27 - 50 %RH and deliquesced at 72 - 79 %RH during humidity cycles. The occurrence of LLPS is determined to a high degree by the O:C of the organics: there was no LLPS for mixtures with O:C > 0.8 and there was always LLPS for mixtures with O:C < 0.57. In the range in between, we observed a dependence on the specific functional groups: a high share of aromatic functionalities shifts the range of O:C for which LLPS occurs to lower values. A correlation was also found for the onset RH of LLPS as a function of O

  10. Continuous protein purification using functionalized magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous micellar two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ingo; Hsu, Chia-Chang; Gärtner, Markus; Müller, Christine; Overton, Tim W; Thomas, Owen R T; Franzreb, Matthias

    2013-08-30

    A novel technique for technical-scale continuous purification of proteins is presented. It is based on the combined use of functionalized magnetic nano-particles and an Aqueous Micellar Two-Phase System featuring the non-ionic surfactant, Eumulgin ES, which undergoes temperature induced phase separation at ∼25°C. In the first step, conducted below the transition temperature (i.e. 15°C), the magnetic sorbent particles are added into the single dispersed phase and bind the protein of interest. Next, on raising the temperature to 30°C the protein-laden magnetic particles partition strongly into the micelle-rich top phase of the micellar two-phase system that's formed. The magnetically susceptible top phase is then continuously separated from the micelle-poor phase in a flowthrough tailor-made magnetic extractor featuring a permanent magnet providing an upwardly acting magnetic force. This separation device was shown to be effective for continuous separation of a wide range of differently sized magnetic particle sorbents (i.e. from 2μm diameter to as small as 25nm) from a 10% (w/w) Eumulgin ES system; high separation efficiencies were recorded for the phase-forming surfactant (87 to >98%), and all magnetic sorbent particles tested (95-99.9%). Finally, protein purification by continuous magnetic extraction was demonstrated at 15L scale for the recovery of an antibody fragment, A33 Fab', from a crude extract of Escherichia coli periplasm. Nearly 70% of the A33 Fab' initially present in the extract at 15.6% of the total protein content was recovered in a 2-fold concentrated and highly purified (>98%) state. Further, the amounts of magnetic sorbent and phase-forming surfactant lost in the process were very small; thus recycling of both components into subsequent rounds of continuous magnetic extraction is highly feasible.

  11. Quantification of colloidal and aqueous element transfer in soils: The dual-phase mass balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Thompson, Aaron; Chadwick, Oliver A.

    2015-01-01

    Mass balance models have become standard tools for characterizing element gains and losses and volumetric change during weathering and soil development. However, they rely on the assumption of complete immobility for an index element such as Ti or Zr. Here we describe a dual-phase mass balance model that eliminates the need for an assumption of immobility and in the process quantifies the contribution of aqueous versus colloidal element transfer. In the model, the high field strength elements Ti and Zr are assumed to be mobile only as suspended solids (colloids) and can therefore be used to distinguish elemental redistribution via colloids from redistribution via dissolved aqueous solutes. Calculations are based upon element concentrations in soil, parent material, and colloids dispersed from soil in the laboratory. We illustrate the utility of this model using a catena in South Africa. Traditional mass balance models systematically distort elemental gains and losses and changes in soil volume in this catena due to significant redistribution of Zr-bearing colloids. Applying the dual-phase model accounts for this colloidal redistribution and we find that the process accounts for a substantial portion of the major element (e.g., Al, Fe and Si) loss from eluvial soil. In addition, we find that in illuvial soils along this catena, gains of colloidal material significantly offset aqueous elemental loss. In other settings, processes such as accumulation of exogenous dust can mimic the geochemical effects of colloid redistribution and we suggest strategies for distinguishing between the two. The movement of clays and colloidal material is a major process in weathering and pedogenesis; the mass balance model presented here is a tool for quantifying effects of that process over time scales of soil development.

  12. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. The model was evaluated with aromatic SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) under various concentrations of NOx and SO2 using an outdoor reactor (University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF-APHOR) chamber). When inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium and water) are present in aerosol, the prediction of both toluene SOA and 135-TMB SOA, in which the oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio is lower than 0.62, are approached under the assumption of a complete organic/electrolyte-phase separation below a certain relative humidity. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on their volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and exploited to construct the stoichiometric coefficient (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on aromatic SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. The OMAR module predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fractions in the SOA predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fractions.

  13. Crossover Leung-Griffiths model and the phase behavior of dilute aqueous ionic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, M. Yu.; Kiselev, S. B.; Rainwater, J. C.

    1997-08-01

    A new parametric crossover model for the phase behavior of a binary mixture is presented that corresponds to the Leung-Griffiths model in the critical region and is transformed into the regular classical expansion far away from the critical point. The model is optimized to, and leads to excellent agreement with, isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for dilute aqueous solutions of sodium chloride by Bischoff and co-workers. It then accurately predicts constant-composition phase equilibrium loci as measured by independent workers. This crossover model is therefore capable of representing the thermodynamic surface of ionic solutions in a large range of temperatures and densities around the critical points of vapor-liquid equilibrium.

  14. Versatile phase transfer of gold nanoparticles from aqueous media to different organic media.

    PubMed

    Karg, Matthias; Schelero, Natascha; Oppel, Claudia; Gradzielski, Michael; Hellweg, Thomas; von Klitzing, Regine

    2011-04-11

    A novel, simple, and very efficient method to prepare hydrophobically modified gold particles is presented. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and polydispersities were prepared. The diameter of the gold particles ranges from 5 to 37 nm. All systems were prepared in aqueous solution stabilized by citrate and afterwards transferred into an organic phase by using amphiphilic alkylamine ligands with different alkyl chain lengths. The chain length was varied between 8 and 18 alkyl groups. Depending on the particle size and the alkylamine, different transfer efficiencies were obtained. In some cases, the phase transfer has a yield of about 100%. After drying, the particles can be redispersed in different organic solvents. Characterization of the particles before and after transfer was performed by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The effect of organic solvents with various refractive indices on the plasmon band position was investigated.

  15. Nickel (II) Oxide Solubility and Phase Stability in High Temperature Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    SE Ziemniak; MA Goyette

    2004-06-17

    A platinum-lined, flowing autoclave facility was used to investigate the solubility behavior of nickel(II) oxide (NiO) in deoxygenated ammonium and sodium hydroxide solutions between 21 and 315 C. Solubilities were found to vary between 0.4 and 400 nmol kg{sup -1}. The measured nickel ion solubilities were interpreted via a Ni(II) ion hydroxo-and amino-complexing model and thermodynamic functions for these equilibria were obtained from a least-squares analysis of the data. Two solid phase transformations were observed: at temperatures below 149 C, the activity of Ni(II) ions in aqueous solution was controlled by a hydrous Ni(II) oxide (theophrastite) solid phase rather than anhydrous NiO (bunsenite); above 247 C, Ni(II) activities were controlled by cubic rather than rhombohedral bunsenite.

  16. Effect of high pressure homogenization on aqueous phase solvent extraction of lipids from Nannochloris Oculata microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Samarasinghe, Nalin; Fernando, Sandun; Faulkner, William B.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to extract lipids from high-moisture Nannochloris Oculata algal biomass disrupted with high pressure homogenization was investigated. During the first phase, the effect of high pressure homogenization (system pressure and number of passes) on disrupting aqueous algae (of different concentrations and degree of stress) was investigated. Secondly, the effect of degree of cell wall disruption on the amount of lipids extracted with three solvents, namely: hexane, dichloromethane and chloroform, were compared. Studies reveled that high pressure homogenization is effective on cell disruption while the amount of system pressure being the most significant factor affecting the degree of cell breakage. Although the number of passes had some impact, the level of disruption seemed to level-off after a certain number of passes. The study revealed that slightly polar solvents (such as chloroform and dichloromethane) performed better in aqueous-phase lipid extractions as compared to hexane. Also, it was revealed that it was not necessary to disrupt the algal cells completely to achieve appreciable levels of lipid yields. In fact, conditions that exerted only 20% of the cells to completely disrupt, allowed sufficient damage to liberate most of the lipids contained in the remainder of the cells.

  17. Mechanism of carboxylic acid photooxidation in atmospheric aqueous phase: Formation, fate and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbouillot, Tiffany; Gorini, Sophie; Voyard, Guillaume; Parazols, Marius; Brigante, Marcello; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie; Mailhot, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In the first part of the work, we investigated the reactivity toward photogenerated hydroxyl radicals (rad OH) of seven monocarboxylic acids and six dicarboxylic acids found in natural cloud water. This leads to the proposition of a schematic degradation pathway linking glutaric acid (C5) to complete mineralization into CO2. We report a detailed mechanism on the succinic acid reactivity toward rad OH leading to the formation of malonic, glyoxylic and consequently oxalic acids and a comparison with reported pathways proposed by the CAPRAM (Chemical Aqueous Phase RAdical Mechanism) is discussed. We also investigated the photooxidation of formic acid under atmospherically relevant conditions leading to the possible formation of oxalic acid via radical mediated recombination. The second part focuses on the polychromatic irradiation (closed to solar irradiation) of a collected cloud aqueous phase showing that irradiation of cloud water leads to the formation of both formic and acetic acids. Carboxylic acid formation increases in the presence of photogenerated hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide, showing that photooxidation could play a key role in the formation of carboxylic acids under atmospherically relevant conditions.

  18. Mechanistic insights into aqueous phase propanol dehydration in H-ZSM-5 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-10-06

    Aqueous phase dehydration of 1-propanol over H-ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The water molecules in the zeolite pores prefer to aggregate via the hydrogen bonding network and be protonated at the Brønsted acidic sites (BAS). Two typical configurations, i.e., dispersed and clustered, of water molecules were identified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of the mimicking aqueous phase H-ZSM-5 zeolite unit cell with 20 water molecules per unit cell. DFT calculated Gibbs free energies suggest that the dimeric propanol-propanol, the propanol-water complex, and the trimeric propanol-propanol-water are formed at high propanol concentrations, which provide a kinetically feasible dehydration reaction channel of 1-propanol to propene. However, calculation results also indicate that the propanol dehydration via the unimolecular mechanism becomes kinetically discouraged due to the enhanced stability of the protonated dimeric propanol and the protonated water cluster acting as the BAS site for alcohol dehydration reaction. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  19. Thermally induced coupling of phase separation and gelation in an aqueous solution of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Rio; Kaku, Takeshi; Ohashi, Hitoshi; Kurosu, Tateki; Iida, Masamori; Yagihara, Shin; Dobashi, Toshiaki

    2003-03-01

    Thermally induced coupling of gelation and phase separation in polysaccharide aqueous solutions has a complex feature because of critical and tricritical phenomena, thermally induced hydrophobic interaction, and molecular-weight distribution of the polysaccharide. To elucidate the process, the criticality of a hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) aqueous solution was assessed, and then dielectric relaxation and fluorescence intensity experiments were carried out. The diffusion coefficient of the solution with a weight fraction of HPMC being 0.06 could be extrapolated to zero at the cloud-point curve which showed the criticality of the solution. The fluorescence intensity increased at a temperature much lower than the cloud point and the gel point, especially for concentrated solutions, indicating the hydrophobic interaction as the driving force of the gelation coupled by the phase separation. Dielectric relaxation measurements by time-domain reflectometry revealed two characteristic relaxations of chain motions around 100 MHz and orientation of free water around 20 GHz, which is accompanied by a low-frequency tail reflecting hydration water.

  20. Effect of high pressure homogenization on aqueous phase solvent extraction of lipids from Nannochloris Oculata microalgae

    DOE PAGES

    Samarasinghe, Nalin; Fernando, Sandun; Faulkner, William B.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to extract lipids from high-moisture Nannochloris Oculata algal biomass disrupted with high pressure homogenization was investigated. During the first phase, the effect of high pressure homogenization (system pressure and number of passes) on disrupting aqueous algae (of different concentrations and degree of stress) was investigated. Secondly, the effect of degree of cell wall disruption on the amount of lipids extracted with three solvents, namely: hexane, dichloromethane and chloroform, were compared. Studies reveled that high pressure homogenization is effective on cell disruption while the amount of system pressure being the most significant factor affecting the degree of cell breakage.more » Although the number of passes had some impact, the level of disruption seemed to level-off after a certain number of passes. The study revealed that slightly polar solvents (such as chloroform and dichloromethane) performed better in aqueous-phase lipid extractions as compared to hexane. Also, it was revealed that it was not necessary to disrupt the algal cells completely to achieve appreciable levels of lipid yields. In fact, conditions that exerted only 20% of the cells to completely disrupt, allowed sufficient damage to liberate most of the lipids contained in the remainder of the cells.« less

  1. Ionic liquid-based aqueous two-phase system extraction of sulfonamides in milk.

    PubMed

    Shao, Mingyuan; Zhang, Xuli; Li, Na; Shi, Jiayuan; Zhang, Huijie; Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Yu, Yong

    2014-06-15

    A simple method for the determination of six sulfonamides (SAs) in milk samples was developed. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and trisodium citrate dihydrate were used to form aqueous two-phase system. The aqueous two phase system was applied to the extraction of the SAs and the determination of the analytes was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. To achieve optimum extraction performance, several experimental parameters, including the type and the amount of salt, the type and amount of ionic liquid, ultrasonic time and pH of sample solution, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, good linearity was observed in the range of 8.55-1036.36ngmL(-1). The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 2.04-2.84 and 6.73-9.37ngmL(-1), respectively. The present method was successfully applied to the determination of SAs in milk samples, and the recoveries of analytes were in the range of 72.32-108.96% with relative standard deviations ranging from 0.56 to 12.20%. The results showed that the present method was rapid, feasible and environmentally friendly.

  2. Hydrogen production through aqueous-phase reforming of ethylene glycol in a washcoated microchannel.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M Fernanda Neira; Ordomsky, Vitaly; Paunovic, Violeta; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, T Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of biocarbohydrates is conducted in a catalytically stable washcoated microreactor where multiphase hydrogen removal enhances hydrogen efficiency. Single microchannel experiments are conducted following a simplified model based on the microreactor concept. A coating method to deposit a Pt-based catalyst on the microchannel walls is selected and optimized. APR reactivity tests are performed by using ethylene glycol as the model compound. Optimum results are achieved with a static washcoating technique; a highly uniform and well adhered 5 μm layer is deposited on the walls of a 320 μm internal diameter (ID) microchannel in one single step. During APR of ethylene glycol, the catalyst layer exhibits high stability over 10 days after limited initial deactivation. The microchannel presents higher conversion and selectivity to hydrogen than a fixed-bed reactor. The benefits of using a microreactor for APR can be further enhanced by utilizing increased Pt loadings, higher reaction temperatures, and larger carbohydrates (e.g., glucose). The use of microtechnology for aqueous-phase reforming will allow for a great reduction in the reformer size, thus rendering it promising for distributed hydrogen production.

  3. Aqueous two-phase extraction as a platform in the biomanufacturing industry: economical and environmental sustainability.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2011-01-01

    The biotech industry is, nowadays, facing unparalleled challenges due to the enhanced demand for biotechnology-based human therapeutic products, such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This has led companies to improve substantially their upstream processes, with the yield of monoclonals increasing to titers never seen before. The downstream processes have, however, been overlooked, leading to a production bottleneck. Although chromatography remains the workhorse of most purification processes, several limitations, such as low capacity, scale-related packing problems, low chemical and proteolytic stability and resins' high cost, have arisen. Aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) has been successfully revisited as a valuable alternative for the capture of antibodies. One of the important remaining questions for this technology to be adopted by the biotech industries is, now, how it compares to the currently established platforms in terms of costs and environmental impact. In this report, the economical and environmental sustainability of the aqueous two-phase extraction process is evaluated and compared to the currently established protein A affinity chromatography. Accordingly, the ATPE process was shown to be considerably advantageous in terms of process economics, especially when processing high titer cell culture supernatants. This alternative process is able to purify continuously the same amount of mAbs reducing the annual operating costs from 14.4 to 8.5 million (US$/kg) when cell culture supernatants with mAb titers higher than 2.5 g/L are processed.

  4. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate.

  5. Anti-Adhesive Behaviors between Solid Hydrate and Liquid Aqueous Phase Induced by Hydrophobic Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Min, Juwon; Baek, Seungjun; Somasundaran, P; Lee, Jae W

    2016-09-20

    This study introduces an "anti-adhesive force" at the interface of solid hydrate and liquid solution phases. The force was induced by the presence of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles or one of the common anti-agglomerants (AAs), sorbitan monolaurate (Span 20), at the interface. The anti-adhesive force, which is defined as the maximum pushing force that does not induce the formation of a capillary bridge between the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate particle and the aqueous solution, was measured using a microbalance. Both hydrophobic silica nanoparticles and Span 20 can inhibit adhesion between the CP hydrate probe and the aqueous phase because silica nanoparticles have an aggregative property at the interface, and Span 20 enables the hydrate surface to be wetted with oil. Adding water-soluble sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the nanoparticle system cannot affect the aggregative property or the distribution of silica nanoparticles at the interface and, thus, cannot change the anti-adhesive effect. However, the combined system of Span 20 and SDS dramatically reduces the interfacial tension: emulsion drops were formed at the interface without any energy input and were adsorbed on the CP hydrate surface, which can cause the growth of hydrate particles. Silica nanoparticles have a good anti-adhesive performance with a relatively smaller dosage and are less influenced by the presence of molecular surfactants; consequently, these nanoparticles may have a good potential for hydrate inhibition as AAs.

  6. Analysis of the WRF-Chem contributions to AQMEII phase2 with respect to aerosol radiative feedbacks on meteorology and pollutant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocio; Bianconi, Roberto; Curci, Gabriele; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Lorenz, Christof; Im, Ulas; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Žabkar, Rahela

    2015-08-01

    As a contribution to phase2 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII), eight different simulations for the year 2010 were performed with WRF-Chem for the European domain. The four simulations using RADM2 gas-phase chemistry and the MADE/SORGAM aerosol module are analyzed in this paper. The simulations included different degrees of aerosol-meteorology feedback, ranging from no aerosol effects at all to the inclusion of the aerosol direct radiative effect as well as aerosol cloud interactions and the aerosol indirect effect. In addition, a modification of the RADM2 gas phase chemistry solver was tested. The yearly simulations allow characterizing the average impact of the consideration of feedback effects on meteorology and pollutant concentrations and an analysis of the seasonality. Pronounced feedback effects were found for the summer 2010 Russian wildfire episode, where the direct aerosol effect lowered the seasonal mean solar radiation by 20 W m-3 and seasonal mean temperature by 0.25°. This might be considered as a lower limit as it must be taken into account that aerosol concentrations were generally underestimated by up to 50%. The high aerosol concentrations from the wildfires resulted in a 10%-30% decreased precipitation over Russia when aerosol cloud interactions were taken into account. The most pronounced and persistent feedback due to the indirect aerosol effect was found for regions with very low aerosol concentrations like the Atlantic and Northern Europe. The low aerosol concentrations in this area result in very low cloud droplet numbers between 5 and 100 droplets cm-1 and a 50-70% lower cloud liquid water path. This leads to an increase in the downward solar radiation by almost 50%. Over Northern Scandinavia, this results in almost one degree higher mean temperatures during summer. In winter, the decreased liquid water path resulted in increased long-wave cooling and a decrease of the mean temperature by almost the same

  7. Studies on equilibrium of anthranilic acid in aqueous solutions and in two-phase systems: aromatic solvent-water.

    PubMed

    Zapała, Lidia; Kalembkiewicz, Jan; Sitarz-Palczak, Elzbieta

    2009-03-01

    The acid-base equilibria of anthranilic acid have been characterized in terms of macro- and microdissociation constants (dissociation constants K(a1), K(a2) and tautomeric constant K(z)). On the basis of spectrophotometric investigations the values of the distribution ratio D of anthranilic acid in the two-phase systems: aromatic solvent (benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene)-aqueous solution were obtained. Employing the results of potentiometric titration in the two-phase systems: aromatic solvent-aqueous solution the distribution constant K(D) and dimerization constant K(dim) values were calculated. The influence of organic solvent polarity and pH of the aqueous phase on the contents of the particular forms of the acid in the two-phase systems were analyzed.

  8. Alkyl-bis(imidazolium) salts: a new amphiphile platform that forms thermotropic and non-aqueous lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, LA; Schenkel, MR; Wiesenauer, BR; Gin, DL

    2013-01-01

    New ionic amphiphiles with a hexyl-bridged bis(imidazolium) headgroup; Br-, BF4-, or Tf2N- anions; and a long n-alkyl tail can form thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystal phases in neat form and/or lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases with several non-aqueous solvents or water.

  9. Phase separation in aqueous solutions of lens gamma-crystallins: special role of gamma s.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Asherie, N; Lomakin, A; Pande, J; Ogun, O; Benedek, G B

    1996-01-01

    We have studied liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous ternary solutions of calf lens gamma-crystallin proteins. Specifically, we have examined two ternary systems containing gamma s--namely, gamma IVa with gamma s in water and gamma II with gamma s in water. For each system, the phase-separation temperatures (Tph (phi)) alpha as a function of the overall protein volume fraction phi at various fixed compositions alpha (the "cloud-point curves") were measured. For the gamma IVa, gamma s, and water ternary solution, a binodal curve composed of pairs of coexisting points, (phi I, alpha 1) and (phi II, alpha II), at a fixed temperature (20 degrees C) was also determined. We observe that on the cloud-point curve the critical point is at a higher volume fraction than the maximum phase-separation temperature point. We also find that typically the difference in composition between the coexisting phases is at least as significant as the difference in volume fraction. We show that the asymmetric shape of the cloud-point curve is a consequence of this significant composition difference. Our observation that the phase-separation temperature of the mixtures in the high volume fraction region is strongly suppressed suggests that gamma s-crystallin may play an important role in maintaining the transparency of the lens. PMID:8552642

  10. An aqueous two-phase system as a strategy for serum albumin depletion.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcelo Anselmo Oseas; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2009-01-15

    An aqueous two-phase system, based on the cloud point phenomenon, was proposed for blood plasma albumin depletion prior to gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Albumin removal was evaluated using a mixture of Triton X-114 and SDS. Variables affecting phase separation and the partition coefficient (K), such as pH (from 5.0 to 7.6) and salt composition, were first optimized to carry out phase separation at room temperature and to promote albumin removal (15 min with ca. 95% efficiency) to the surfactant-rich phase, in a global process that results in reduction of 12% alpha-helix structures, confirmed through circular dichroism analysis. Gel electrophoresis analyses were carried out to compare crude human plasma composition with human plasma submitted to the cloud point procedure as well as the same plasma submitted to the separation of albumin using a commercially available system based on a chromatographic affinity column. The cloud point extraction procedure allowed identification of 18 protein bands present in the surfactant-poor phase, resulting in a more detailed electrophoretic profile, when compared with crude plasma (10 protein bands).

  11. Aqueous Two-Phase System (ATPS) Containing Gemini (12-3-12,2Br-)and SDS 1: Phase Diagram and Properties of ATPS

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying; Prausnitz, John M.

    2005-07-21

    Two phases coexist in an aqueous system that contains the two surfactants cationic gemini 12-3-12,2Br- and anionic SDS. An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) is formed in a narrow region of the ternary phase diagram different from that of traditional aqueous cationic-anionic surfactant systems. In that region, the molar ratio of gemini to SDS varies with the total concentration of surfactants. ATPS not only has higher stability but also has longer phase separation time for the new systems than that of the traditional system. Furthermore, the optical properties of ATPS are different at different total concentrations. All of these experimental observations can be attributed to the unique properties of gemini surfactant and the synergy between the cationic gemini surfactant and the anionic surfactant SDS.

  12. Tropospheric aqueous-phase free-radical chemistry: radical sources, spectra, reaction kinetics and prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Hartmut; Hoffmann, Dirk; Schaefer, Thomas; Bräuer, Peter; Tilgner, Andreas

    2010-12-17

    The most important radicals which need to be considered for the description of chemical conversion processes in tropospheric aqueous systems are the hydroxyl radical (OH), the nitrate radical (NO(3)) and sulphur-containing radicals such as the sulphate radical (SO(4)(-)). For each of the three radicals their generation and their properties are discussed first in the corresponding sections. The main focus herein is to summarize newly published aqueous-phase kinetic data on OH, NO(3) and SO(4)(-) radical reactions relevant for the description of multiphase tropospheric chemistry. The data compilation builds up on earlier datasets published in the literature. Since the last review in 2003 (H. Herrmann, Chem. Rev. 2003, 103, 4691-4716) more than hundred new rate constants are available from literature. In case of larger discrepancies between novel and already published rate constants the available kinetic data for these reactions are discussed and recommendations are provided when possible. As many OH kinetic data are obtained by means of the thiocyanate (SCN(-)) system in competition kinetic measurements of OH radical reactions this system is reviewed in a subchapter of this review. Available rate constants for the reaction sequence following the reaction of OH+SCN(-) are summarized. Newly published data since 2003 have been considered and averaged rate constants are calculated. Applying competition kinetics measurements usually the formation of the radical anion (SCN)(2)(-) is monitored directly by absorption measurements. Within this subchapter available absorption spectra of the (SCN)(2)(-) radical anion from the last five decades are presented. Based on these spectra an averaged (SCN)(2)(-) spectrum was calculated. In the last years different estimation methods for aqueous phase kinetic data of radical reactions have been developed and published. Such methods are often essential to estimate kinetic data which are not accessible from the literature. Approaches for

  13. Ion Partitioning at the liquid/vapor interface of a multi-component alkali halidesolution: A model for aqueous sea salt aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Brown, Matthew A.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Krisch, Maria J.; Salmeron, Miquel; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hemminger, John C.

    2008-12-22

    The chemistry of Br species associated with sea salt ice and aerosols has been implicated in the episodes of ozone depletion reported at Arctic sunrise. However, Br{sup -} is only a minor component in sea salt, which has a Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} molar ratio of {approx}0.0015. Sea salt is a complex mixture of many different species, with NaCl as the primary component. In recent years experimental and theoretical studies have reported enhancement of the large, more polarizable halide ion at the liquid/vapor interface of corresponding aqueous alkali halide solutions. The proposed enhancement is likely to influence the availability of sea salt Br{sup -} for heterogeneous reactions such as those involved in the ozone depletion episodes. We report here ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies and molecular dynamics simulations showing direct evidence of Br{sup -} enhancement at the interface of an aqueous NaCl solution doped with bromide. The experiments were carried out on samples with Br{sup -}/Cl{sup -} ratios in the range 0.1% to 10%, the latter being also the ratio for which simulations were carried out. This is the first direct measurement of interfacial enhancement of Br{sup -} in a multi-component solution with particular relevance to sea salt chemistry.

  14. Aqueous nitrite ion determination by selective reduction and gas phase nitric oxide chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, A. J.; Barkley, R. M.; Sievers, R. E.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method of flow injection analysis for aqueous nitrite ion exploits the sensitivity and selectivity of the nitric oxide (NO) chemilluminescence detector. Trace analysis of nitrite ion in a small sample (5-160 microL) is accomplished by conversion of nitrite ion to NO by aqueous iodide in acid. The resulting NO is transported to the gas phase through a semipermeable membrane and subsequently detected by monitoring the photoemission of the reaction between NO and ozone (O3). Chemiluminescence detection is selective for measurement of NO, and, since the detection occurs in the gas-phase, neither sample coloration nor turbidity interfere. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample is 0.04 ppb of nitrite ion. The precision at the 10 ppb level is 2% relative standard deviation, and 60-180 samples can be analyzed per hour. Samples of human saliva and food extracts were analyzed; the results from a standard colorimetric measurement are compared with those from the new chemiluminescence method in order to further validate the latter method. A high degree of selectivity is obtained due to the three discriminating steps in the process: (1) the nitrite ion to NO conversion conditions are virtually specific for nitrite ion, (2) only volatile products of the conversion will be swept to the gas phase (avoiding turbidity or color in spectrophotometric methods), and (3) the NO chemiluminescence detector selectively detects the emission from the NO + O3 reaction. The method is free of interferences, offers detection limits of low parts per billion of nitrite ion, and allows the analysis of up to 180 microL-sized samples per hour, with little sample preparation and no chromatographic separation. Much smaller samples can be analyzed by this method than in previously reported batch analysis methods, which typically require 5 mL or more of sample and often need chromatographic separations as well.

  15. Microfluidic generation of aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) droplets by controlled pulsating inlet pressures.

    PubMed

    Moon, Byeong-Ui; Jones, Steven G; Hwang, Dae Kun; Tsai, Scott S H

    2015-06-07

    We present a technique that generates droplets using ultralow interfacial tension aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS). Our method combines a classical microfluidic flow focusing geometry with precisely controlled pulsating inlet pressure, to form monodisperse ATPS droplets. The dextran (DEX) disperse phase enters through the central inlet with variable on-off pressure cycles controlled by a pneumatic solenoid valve. The continuous phase polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution enters the flow focusing junction through the cross channels at a fixed flow rate. The on-off cycles of the applied pressure, combined with the fixed flow rate cross flow, make it possible for the ATPS jet to break up into droplets. We observe different droplet formation regimes with changes in the applied pressure magnitude and timing, and the continuous phase flow rate. We also develop a scaling model to predict the size of the generated droplets, and the experimental results show a good quantitative agreement with our scaling model. Additionally, we demonstrate the potential for scaling-up of the droplet production rate, with a simultaneous two-droplet generating geometry. We anticipate that this simple and precise approach to making ATPS droplets will find utility in biological applications where the all-biocompatibility of ATPS is desirable.

  16. Aqueous two-phase system purification for superoxide dismutase induced by menadione from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Kavakcıoğlu, Berna; Tongul, Burcu; Tarhan, Leman

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, the partitioning behavior of menadione-induced superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), an antioxidant enzyme that has various applications in the medical and cosmetic industries, from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been characterized on different types of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) (poly(ethylene glycol)/polypropylene glycol (PEG/PPG)-dextran, PEG-salt and PPG-salt). PEG-salt combinations were found most optimal systems for the purification of SOD. The best partition conditions were found using the PEG-3350 24% and K2HPO4 5% (w/w) with pH 7.0 at 25 °C. The partition coefficient of total SOD activity and total protein concentration observed in this system were 0.17 and 6.65, respectively, with the recovery percentage as 78.90% in the bottom phase and 13.17% in the top phase. The highest purification fold for SOD from P. chrysosporium was found as 6.04 in the bottom phase of PEG 3350%24 - K2HPO4%5 (w/w) system with pH 7.0. SOD purified from P. chrysosporium was determined to be a homodimer in its native state with a molecular weight of 60  ± 4 kDa. Consequently, simple and only one step PEG-salt ATPS system was developed for SOD purification from P. chrysosporium.

  17. Characterization of partitioning behaviors of immunoglobulin G in polymer-salt aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yin Hui; Yap, Yee Jiun; Show, Pau Loke; Juan, Joon Ching; Anuar, Mohd Shamsul; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ooi, Chien-Wei; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2016-11-01

    The partitioning behavior of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and phosphate was studied. The parameters of ATPS exhibiting the pronounced effects on the partitioning behavior of IgG include phase composition, PEG molecular weight, and the addition of sodium chloride (NaCl). The accumulation of IgG at the interface of the ATPS increased drastically as the tie-line length (TLL) was increased. This trend was correlated with a linear relationship relating the natural logarithm of interfacial partition coefficient (ln G) to the difference of PEG concentration between the top phase and the bottom phase (Δ[PEG]), and a good fit was obtained. An attempt was made to correlate the natural logarithm of partition coefficient (ln K) to the presence of NaCl with the proposed linear relationship, ln K = α″ ln [Cl(-)] + β″. The proposed relationship, which serves as a better description of the underlying mechanics of the protein partitioning behavior in the polymer-salt ATPS, provides a good fit (r(2) > 0.95) for the data of IgG partitioning. An optimum recovery of 99.97% was achieved in an ATPS (pH 7.5) composed of 14.0% (w/w) PEG 1450, 12.5% (w/w) phosphate and 5.0% (w/w) NaCl.

  18. Chromatographic behaviour of synthetic high pressure high temperature diamond in aqueous normal phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peristyy, Anton; Paull, Brett; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2016-10-28

    The chromatographic properties of high pressure high temperature synthesised diamond (HPHT) are investigated under the conditions of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). A 50×4.6mm ID stainless steel column packed with HPHT particles of mean diameter 1.6μm and specific surface area 5.1m(2)g(-1) is used. According to the results of acid-base titration with NaOH the purified HPHT batch contains 4.59μeqg(-1) of protogenic, mainly carboxyl- and hydroxyl-, groups, which make this polar adsorbent suitable for use as a stationary phase in HILIC. The retention behaviour of several classes of polar compounds including benzoic and benzenesulfonic acids, nitro- and chlorophenols, various organic bases, and quaternary ammonium compounds are studied using acetonitrile and methanol based mobile phases containing 5-30v/v% of water. The effects of the buffer pH and concentration, column temperature and organic solvent content on retention of model compounds are also investigated. It is shown that both pH and acetonitrile/methanol ratio in the mobile phase can be used to vary the separation selectivity. Molecular adsorption mechanism (related to aqueous normal phase mode), rather than partitioning is established to be responsible for the retention.

  19. Thermodynamic studies of partitioning behavior of lysozyme and conalbumin in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rita de Cássia Superbi; Coimbra, Jane Sélia dos Reis; da Silva, Luis Henrique Mendes; da Silva, Maria do Carmo Hespanhol; Rojas, Edwin Elard Garcia; Vicente, Antonio António Augusto

    2009-08-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the thermodynamic parameters (Delta(tr)G, Delta(tr)H and Delta(tr)S) associated with lysozyme and conalbumin partitioning in aqueous two-phases systems (ATPS). Influence of salt type and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations on the partition coefficient of lysozyme and conalbumin from egg white was studied. The evaluated ATPS were composed of PEG 1500 and inorganic salts (sodium citrate and sodium sulfate) at a temperature of 25 degrees C and pH 7.0, with PEG 1500 g mol(-1) concentrations of 14%, 16% and 18% (mass basis). Partitioning of lysozyme in PEG-citrate ATPS was enthalpically driven, however the PEG-sulfate ATPS was entropically driven. The tested systems can be employed for the separation of these two proteins in egg white, due to the fact that lysozyme migrates toward the polymeric phase and conalbumin to the saline phase in both ATPS. A high recovery of conalbumin in the saline phase of the PEG-sulfate ATPS was determined to be enthalpically driven.

  20. Dynamic speciation analysis of atrazine in aqueous latex nanoparticle dispersions using solid phase microextraction (SPME).

    PubMed

    Benhabib, Karim; Town, Raewyn M; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2009-04-09

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is applied in the dynamic speciation analysis of the pesticide atrazine in an aqueous medium containing sorbing latex nanoparticles. It is found that the overall rate of extraction of the analyte is faster than in the absence of nanoparticles and governed by the coupled diffusion of free and particle-bound atrazine toward the solid/sample solution interface. In the eventual equilibrium the total atrazine concentration in the solid phase is dictated by the solid phase/water partition coefficient (K(sw)) and the concentration of the free atrazine in the sample solution. These observations demonstrate that the nanoparticles do not enter the solid phase. The experimental data show that the rate of release of sorbed atrazine from the latex particles is fast on the effective time scale of the microextraction process. A lability criterion is derived to quantitatively describe the relative rates of these two processes. All together, the results indicate that SPME has a strong potential for dynamic speciation analysis of organic compounds in media containing sorbing nanoparticles.

  1. Purification and In Situ Immobilization of Papain with Aqueous Two-Phase System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingliang; Su, Erzheng; You, Pengyong; Gong, Xiangyu; Sun, Ming; Xu, Diansheng; Wei, Dongzhi

    2010-01-01

    Papain was purified from spray-dried Carica papaya latex using aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Then it was recovered from PEG phase by in situ immobilization or preparing cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs). The Plackett-Burman design and the central composite design (CCD) together with the response surface methodology (RSM) were used to optimize the APTS processes. The highly purified papain (96–100%) was achieved under the optimized conditions: 40% (w/w) 15 mg/ml enzyme solution, 14.33–17.65% (w/w) PEG 6000, 14.27–14.42% (w/w) NaH2PO4/K2HPO4 and pH 5.77–6.30 at 20°C. An in situ enzyme immobilization approach, carried out by directly dispersing aminated supports and chitosan beads into the PEG phase, was investigated to recover papain, in which a high immobilization yield (>90%) and activity recovery (>40%) was obtained. Moreover, CLEAs were successfully used in recovering papain from PEG phase with a hydrolytic activity hundreds times higher than the carrier-bound immobilized papain. PMID:21179198

  2. Effects of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones in aqueous two-phase polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, B; Aurbach, G D

    1974-10-01

    1. The effect of iodination on the distribution of peptide hormones into the aqueous two-phase dextran-polyethylene glycol system and on the solubility of these hormones in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water was assessed. Hormones that were studied included insulin, glucagon and parathyroid hormone. 2. The partition coefficient of native insulin in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system showed a minimum (about 1) near the isoelectric point of the hormone (pH 5). Partial iodination of insulin (one atom per molecule) caused little change in the distribution of the hormone. More extensive iodination markedly decreased the partition coefficient in the region of the isoelectric point and displaced the pH value at which the partition coefficient was a minimum towards lower values. 3. The solubility of native insulin in aqueous polyethylene glycol and in water showed a pH-dependence similar to that observed for the distribution in the dextran-polyethylene glycol system. Iodination of insulin decreased the solubility of the hormone in polyethylene glycol and in water in parallel, and decreased the pH value at which solubility was a minimum. The changes in solubility correlated with the degree of iodination and accounted for the changes in distribution observed at high concentrations of insulin. 4. Comparable effects of iodination on distribution and solubility were also observed with glucagon. 5. At concentrations of insulin below its maximum solubility, serum proteins caused a decrease in the partition coefficient of iodinated hormone, but not of native hormone. These effects correlated with the degree of iodination and resulted from a co-precipitation of iodinated insulin with serum proteins.

  3. Separation of Erythromycin-Resistant and -Susceptible Subpopulations of Escherichia coli 15 by Partition in Two-Polymer Aqueous Phases

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, Lawrence G.; Walter, Harry

    1974-01-01

    Partition of cells in two-polymer aqueous phases depends on subtle differences in the cells' surface properties (primarily surface charge). A culture of Escherichia coli 15 arg− was subjected to countercurrent distribution in a dextranpolyethylene glycol aqueous phase system and found to consist of two well-differentiated subpopulations. Clones derived from these two subpopulations (designated clones 5 and 6) exhibited characteristic partitions and were stable on subculture. Clone 5 cells were found to be susceptible to erythromycin and clone 6 cells were resistant. When a culture of clone 5 was exposed to erythromycin, resistant mutants were selected with the same partition as clone 6. Countercurrent distribution in two-polymer aqueous phase systems is thus shown to be a sensitive method for detecting some heterogeneities of bacterial populations and resolving such mixtures. Possible clinical implications of changes in bacterial surface properties associated with acquired drug resistance are discussed. PMID:4599119

  4. Evaporation kinetics and phase of laboratory and ambient secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Timothy D; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-02-08

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find significantly higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense effort focused on finding additional SOA sources but leaving the fundamental assumptions used by models unchallenged. Current air-quality models use absorptive partitioning theory assuming SOA particles are liquid droplets, forming instantaneous reversible equilibrium with gas phase. Further, they ignore the effects of adsorption of spectator organic species during SOA formation on SOA properties and fate. Using accurate and highly sensitive experimental approach for studying evaporation kinetics of size-selected single SOA particles, we characterized room-temperature evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated α-pinene SOA and ambient atmospheric SOA. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic models. Adsorption of "spectator" organic vapors during SOA formation, and aging of these coated SOA particles, dramatically reduced the evaporation rate, and in some cases nearly stopped it. Ambient SOA was found to exhibit evaporation behavior very similar to that of laboratory-generated coated and aged SOA. For all cases studied in this work, SOA evaporation behavior is nearly size-independent and does not follow the evaporation kinetics of liquid droplets, in sharp contrast with model assumptions. The findings about SOA phase, evaporation rates, and the importance of spectator gases and aging all indicate that there is need to reformulate the way SOA formation and evaporation are treated by models.

  5. Evaporation kinetics and phase of laboratory and ambient secondary organic aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, Dan; Beránek, Josef; Shrivastava, Manish; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Field measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) find significantly higher mass loads than predicted by models, sparking intense effort focused on finding additional SOA sources but leaving the fundamental assumptions used by models unchallenged. Current air-quality models use absorptive partitioning theory assuming SOA particles are liquid droplets, forming instantaneous reversible equilibrium with gas phase. Further, they ignore the effects of adsorption of spectator organic species during SOA formation on SOA properties and fate. Using accurate and highly sensitive experimental approach for studying evaporation kinetics of size-selected single SOA particles, we characterized room-temperature evaporation kinetics of laboratory-generated α-pinene SOA and ambient atmospheric SOA. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic models. Adsorption of “spectator” organic vapors during SOA formation, and aging of these coated SOA particles, dramatically reduced the evaporation rate, and in some cases nearly stopped it. Ambient SOA was found to exhibit evaporation behavior very similar to that of laboratory-generated coated and aged SOA. For all cases studied in this work, SOA evaporation behavior is nearly size-independent and does not follow the evaporation kinetics of liquid droplets, in sharp contrast with model assumptions. The findings about SOA phase, evaporation rates, and the importance of spectator gases and aging all indicate that there is need to reformulate the way SOA formation and evaporation are treated by models. PMID:21262848

  6. Near-highway aerosol and gas-phase measurements in a high-diesel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2015-04-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of light duty vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September 2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter - DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the vehicle type, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen-containing aerosol with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol. While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel from that of gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are typically found to have low oxygen incorporation, OOA was found to comprise the majority of the measured organic aerosol, and isotopic analysis showed that the measured OOA contained mainly modern carbon, not fossil-derived carbon. Thus, even in this heavily vehicular-emission-impacted environment, photochemical processes

  7. Studies of single aerosol particles containing malonic acid, glutaric acid, and their mixtures with sodium chloride. I. Hygroscopic growth.

    PubMed

    Pope, Francis D; Dennis-Smither, Ben J; Griffiths, Paul T; Clegg, Simon L; Cox, R Anthony

    2010-04-29

    We describe a newly constructed electrodynamic balance with which to measure the relative mass of single aerosol particles at varying relative humidity. Measurements of changing mass with respect to the relative humidity allow mass (m) growth factors (m(aqueous)/m(dry)) and diameter (d) growth factors (d(aqueous)/d(dry)) of the aerosol to be determined. Four aerosol types were investigated: malonic acid, glutaric acid, mixtures of malonic acid and sodium chloride, and mixtures of glutaric acid and sodium chloride. The mass growth factors of the malonic acid and glutaric acid aqueous phase aerosols, at 85% relative humidity, were 2.11 +/- 0.08 and 1.73 +/- 0.19, respectively. The mass growth factors of the mixed organic/inorganic aerosols are dependent upon the molar fraction of the individual components. Results are compared with previous laboratory determinations and theoretical predictions.

  8. Headspace liquid-phase microextraction of methamphetamine and amphetamine in urine by an aqueous drop.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Vargas, Angelica; Kang, Youn-Jung

    2007-04-25

    This study developed a headspace liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) method by using a single aqueous drop in combination with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection for the determination of methamphetamine (MAP) and amphetamine (AP) in urine samples. The analytes, volatile and basic, were released from sample matrix into the headspace first, and then protonated and dissolved in an aqueous H(3)PO(4) drop hanging in the headspace by a HPLC syringe. After extraction, this drop was directly injected into HPLC. Parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. This method showed good linearity in the investigated concentration range of 1.0-1500 microg L(-1), repeatability of the extraction (R.S.D.<5%, n=6), and low detection limits (0.3 microg L(-1) for both analytes). Enrichment factors of about 400-fold and 220-fold were achieved for MAP and AP, respectively, at optimum conditions. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by analyzing human urine samples.

  9. Dispersing carbon-based nanomaterials in aqueous phase by graphene oxides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yilun; Yang, Juan; Zhao, Qinghua; Li, Yan

    2013-11-05

    Graphene oxides (GO) can be considered as polyelectrolytes with surfactant-like characteristics. On one hand, due to the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged ionized edges, GO exhibits great water solubility; on the other hand, its hydrophobic central plane retains the potential of strong π-π interaction with other conjugated sp(2) network structures. Therefore, it is expected that GO can serve as an excellent dispersing agent for dispersion of various carbon-based nanomaterials in aqueous phase. Here we report a systematic study of dispersing various carbon-based nanomaterials, including SWNTs, C60, and graphene, by aqueous GO. The GO-dispersed all-carbon nanocomposites are characterized using various spectroscopic methods and electron microscopies, and their stabilities are tested. Compared to other dispersing agents, the GO concentration is much lower than the concentrations of other dispersing agents used when similar contents of carbon-based nanomaterials are dispersed. Involving only simple ultrasonication and centrifugation processes, GO dispersion thus offers an easy manipulation for large-scale solution-dispersed all-carbon nanocomposites.

  10. Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides with different phases in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Matjaž; Hojnik, Nuša; Gyergyek, Sašo; Drofenik, Miha

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides in aqueous solutions is reported. ► CuS and Cu{sub 2}S nanoparticles with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm were obtained. ► Crystallite size can be changed using different complexing agents. ► Thermal behavior was studied by TG and XRD measurements. - Abstract: There is a growing interest in the synthesis of nanostructured copper sulfides due to their ability to form compounds with various stoichiometries. We report a sonochemical route for the preparation of copper sulfides with different compositions in aqueous solutions, using different, general and convenient copper sources such as copper acetate, copper hydroxide or basic copper carbonate and thiourea or thioacetamide as sulfur precursors under ambient air. Phase analysis, purity and morphology of the products were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results revealed that nanoparticles of covellite, CuS, with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm can be obtained by using different precursors and complexing agents and that chalcocite, Cu{sub 2}S, can also be prepared sonochemically.

  11. Solubilization of Mixed Non-aqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) by Tween-80

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Jeong, H. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by organic pollutants is a widespread problem. Due to the low water solubility of many organic pollutants, conventional pump-and-treat technology has had little success in the remediation of contaminated groundwater. Thus, surfactant- enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is under investigation to enhance the performance of conventional pump-and-treat technologies. Surfactants have the ability to increase apparent aqueous solubility of many insoluble organic compounds. To date, most SEAR works have been focused on the examination of the pure non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)-contaminated sites. However, a discharge into groundwater is usually not composed of a single component, but rather a mixture of several NAPLs. In this study, ternary mixtures of organic compounds with a range of hydrophobicity were investigated to assess the micellar solubilization behavior of each component in mixed NAPLs using Tween-80, a non-ionic surfactant. The experimental results reveal that the micellar solubilization behavior in the mixed NAPLS differs significantly from that in the corresponding single component systems. Compared with the pure NAPLs, less hydrophobic constituents in the mixed NAPLs show the decreased solubilization, while more hydrophobic components exhibit the elevated solubilization. Acknowledgement: This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "The GAIA Project No. 173-092-011."

  12. Study of organic compounds-water interactions by partition in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Pedro P; Bessa, Ana; Teixeira, Miguel A; Álvares-Ribeiro, Luís; Aires-Barros, M Raquel; Rodrigues, Alírio E; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2013-12-27

    Partition coefficients of fourteen organic compounds were determined in 10 or 20 different polymer/polymer aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) all at physiological pH (0.15M NaCl in 0.01M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4). Solute-specific coefficients characterizing different types of solute-water interactions for the compounds examined were determined by the multiple linear regression analysis. It is shown that (i) the partition behavior for the polar organic compounds is affected not only by dipole-dipole and hydrogen-bond interactions with aqueous environment but, notably, in most cases also by dipole-ion interactions; (ii) it is possible to predict partition behavior for compounds with pre-determined solute-specific coefficients in ATPS with characterized solvent features; and (iii) linear combinations of the solute-specific coefficients for the organic compounds might be useful in the development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis to describe their odor detection threshold.

  13. Extraction and separation of tungsten (VI) from aqueous media with Triton X-100-ammonium sulfate-water aqueous two-phase system without any extractant.

    PubMed

    Yongqiang Zhang; Tichang Sun; Tieqiang Lu; Chunhuan Yan

    2016-11-25

    An aqueous two-phase system composed of Triton X-100-(NH4)2SO4-H2O was proposed for extraction and separation of tungsten(VI) from aqueous solution without using any extractant. The effects of aqueous pH, concentration of ammonium sulfate, Triton X-100 and tungsten, extracting temperature on the extraction of tungsten were investigated. The extraction of tungsten has remarkable relationship with aqueous pH and are to above 90% at pH=1.0-3.0 under studied pH range (pH=1.0-7.0) and increases gradually with increasing Triton X-100 concentration, but decreases slightly with increasing ammonium sulfate concentration. The extraction percentage of tungsten is hardly relevant to temperature but its distribution coefficient linearly increases with increasing temperature within 303.15-343.15K. The distribution coefficient of tungsten increases with the increase of initial tungsten concentration (0.1-3%) and temperature (303.15 K-333.15K). The solubilization capacity of tungsten in Triton X-100 micellar phase is independent of temperature. FT-IR analysis reveals that there is no evident interaction between polytungstate anion and ether oxygen unit in Triton X-100, and DLS analysis indicates that zeta potential of Triton X-100 micellar phase have a little change from positive to negative after extracting tungsten. Based on the above-mentioned results, it can be deduced that polytungstate anions are solubilized in hydrophilic outer shell of Triton X-100 micelles by electrostatic attraction depending on its relatively high hydrophobic nature. The stripping of tungsten is mainly influenced by temperature and can be easily achieved to 95% in single stage stripping. The tungsten (VI) is separated out from solution containing Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Al(III), Cr(III) and Mn(II) under the suitable conditions.

  14. Downstream processing of antibodies: single-stage versus multi-stage aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Rosa, P A J; Azevedo, A M; Ferreira, I F; Sommerfeld, S; Bäcker, W; Aires-Barros, M R

    2009-12-11

    Single-stage and multi-stage strategies have been evaluated and compared for the purification of human antibodies using liquid-liquid extraction in aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) composed of polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG 3350), dextran, and triethylene glycol diglutaric acid (TEG-COOH). The performance of single-stage extraction systems was firstly investigated by studying the effect of pH, TEG-COOH concentration and volume ratio on the partitioning of the different components of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells supernatant. It was observed that lower pH values and high TEG-COOH concentrations favoured the selective extraction of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) to the PEG-rich phase. Higher recovery yields, purities and percentage of contaminants removal were always achieved in the presence of the ligand, TEG-COOH. The extraction of IgG could be enhanced using higher volume ratios, however with a significant decrease in both purity and percentage of contaminants removal. The best single-stage extraction conditions were achieved for an ATPS containing 1.3% (w/w) TEG-COOH with a volume ratio of 2.2, which allowed the recovery of 96% of IgG in the PEG-rich phase with a final IgG concentration of 0.21mg/mL, a protein purity of 87% and a total purity of 43%. In order to enhance simultaneously both recovery yield and purity, a four stage cross-current operation was simulated and the corresponding liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data determined. A predicted optimised scheme of a counter-current multi-stage aqueous two-phase extraction was hence described. IgG can be purified in the PEG-rich top phase with a final recovery yield of 95%, a final concentration of 1.04mg/mL and a protein purity of 93%, if a PEG/dextran ATPS containing 1.3% (w/w) TEG-COOH, 5 stages and volume ratio of 0.4 are used. Moreover, according to the LLE data of all CHO cells supernatant components, it was possible to observe that most of the cells supernatant contaminants can be removed during this

  15. Cloud Point and Liquid-Liquid Equilibrium Behavior of Thermosensitive Polymer L61 and Salt Aqueous Two-Phase System.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wenwei; Wang, Yun; Han, Juan; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tong; Liu, Yan; Ni, Liang

    2015-06-25

    The cloud point of thermosensitive triblock polymer L61, poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO), was determined in the presence of various electrolytes (K2HPO4, (NH4)3C6H5O7, and K3C6H5O7). The cloud point of L61 was lowered by the addition of electrolytes, and the cloud point of L61 decreased linearly with increasing electrolyte concentration. The efficacy of electrolytes on reducing cloud point followed the order: K3C6H5O7 > (NH4)3C6H5O7 > K2HPO4. With the increase in salt concentration, aqueous two-phase systems exhibited a phase inversion. In addition, increasing the temperature reduced the concentration of salt needed that could promote phase inversion. The phase diagrams and liquid-liquid equilibrium data of the L61-K2HPO4/(NH4)3C6H5O7/K3C6H5O7 aqueous two-phase systems (before the phase inversion but also after phase inversion) were determined at T = (25, 30, and 35) °C. Phase diagrams of aqueous two-phase systems were fitted to a four-parameter empirical nonlinear expression. Moreover, the slopes of the tie-lines and the area of two-phase region in the diagram have a tendency to rise with increasing temperature. The capacity of different salts to induce aqueous two-phase system formation was the same order as the ability of salts to reduce the cloud point.

  16. Bromelain purification through unconventional aqueous two-phase system (PEG/ammonium sulphate).

    PubMed

    Coelho, D F; Silveira, E; Pessoa Junior, A; Tambourgi, E B

    2013-02-01

    This paper focuses on the feasibility of unconventional aqueous two-phase systems for bromelain purification from pineapple processing waste. The main difference in comparison with conventional systems is the integration of the liquid-liquid extraction technique with fractional precipitation, which can decrease the protein content with no loss of biological activity by removing of unwanted molecules. The analysis of the results was based on the response surface methodology and revealed that the use of the desirability optimisation methodology (DOM) was necessary to achieve higher purification factor values and greater bromelain recovery. The use of DOM yielded an 11.80-fold purification factor and 66.38 % biological activity recovery using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with a molar mass of 4,000, 10.86 % PEG concentration (m/m) and 36.21 % saturation of ammonium sulphate.

  17. Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Hyun; Moon, Dong Ju

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production was carried out at 225 degrees C, 23 bar and LHSV = 4 h(-1). The Ni-based catalyst was prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts before and after the reaction were characterized by N2 physisorption, CO chemisorption, XRD, TPR, SEM and TEM techniques. It was found that Ni(20 wt%)-Co(3 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst showed higher glycerol conversion and hydrogen selectivity than Ni(20 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. There are no major changes in Ni particles after the reaction over Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. The results suggest that the Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst can be applied to the hydrogen production system using APR of glycerol.

  18. Platinum-Modulated Cobalt Nanocatalysts for Low-Temperature Aqueous-Phase Fischer Tropsch Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hang; Zhou, Wu; Liu, JinXun; Si, Rui; Sun, Geng; Zhong, Mengqi; Su, Haiyan; Zhao, Huabo; Rodrigues, Jose; Pennycook, Stephen J; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Li, Weixue; Kou, Yuan; Ma, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Fischer Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is an important catalytic process for liquid fuel generation, which converts coal/shale gas/biomass-derived syngas (a mixture of CO and H2) to oil. While FTS is thermodynamically favored at low temperature, it is desirable to develop a new catalytic system that could allow working at a relatively low reaction temperature. In this article, we present a one-step hydrogenation reduction route for the synthesis of Pt Co nanoparticles (NPs) which were found to be excellent catalysts for aqueous-phase FTS at 433 K. Coupling with atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and theoretical calculations, the outstanding activity is rationalized by the formation of Co overlayer structures on Pt NPs or Pt Co alloy NPs. The improved energetics and kinetics from the change of the transition states imposed by the lattice mismatch between the two metals are concluded to be the key factors responsible for the dramatically improved FTS performance.

  19. Characterization of aqueous phase from the hydrothermal liquefaction of Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Gai, Chao; Zhang, Yuanhui; Chen, Wan-Ting; Zhou, Yan; Schideman, Lance; Zhang, Peng; Tommaso, Giovana; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Dong, Yuping

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of aqueous phase from hydrothermal liquefaction of low-lipid microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The interactions of operating conditions, including reaction temperature, retention time and total solid ratio were evaluated by response surface methodology. The chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were selected as indicators of the property of AP. Results indicated that total solid ratio was found to be the dominant factor affecting the nutrient recovery efficiencies of AP. Based on energy recovery, GC-MS indicated that the AP at two optimized operating conditions (280 °C, 60 min, 35 wt.% and 300 °C, 60 min, 25 wt.%) were observed to have a higher concentration of organic acids (10.35% and 8.34%) while the sample (260 °C, 30 min, 35 wt.%) was observed to have the highest concentration of N&O-heterocyclic compounds (36.16%).

  20. Direct recovery of cyclodextringlycosyltransferase from Bacillus cereus using aqueous two-phase flotation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu Kiat; Show, Pau Loke; Yap, Yee Jiun; Tan, Chin Ping; Ng, Eng-Poh; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamad Annuar, Mohamad Suffian B; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Purification of cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase (CGTase) from Bacillus cereus using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-potassium phosphates aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system was studied in this paper. The effects of varying PEG molecular weight, tie-line length (TLL) value, volume ratio (VR), pH value, crude concentration and gas nitrogen flotation time were investigated. The optimal condition for purification of CGTase was attained at 18.0% (w/w) PEG 8000, 7.0% (w/w) potassium phosphates, VR of 3.0, 20% (w/w) crude load at pH 7, and 80 min nitrogen flotation time at a flow rate of 5 L/min. With this optimal condition, purification factor (PFT) of 21.8 and a yield (YT) of 97.1% were attained. CGTase was successfully purified in a single downstream processing step using the ATPF.

  1. Volumetric monitoring of aqueous two phase system droplets using time-lapse optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Bathany, C.; Ahn, Y.; Takayama, S.; Jung, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a volumetric monitoring method to observe the morphological changes of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in a microfluidic system. Our method is based on time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) which allows the study of the dynamics of ATPS droplets while visualizing their 3D structures and providing quantitative information on the droplets. In this study, we monitored the process of rehydration and deformation of an ATPS droplet in a microfluidic system and quantified the changes of its volume and velocity under both static and dynamic fluid conditions. Our results indicate that time-lapse OCT is a very promising tool to evaluate the unprecedented features of droplet-based microfluidics.

  2. Confounding effects of aqueous-phase impinger chemistry on apparent oxidation of mercury in flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Brydger Cauch; Geoffrey D. Silcox; Joann S. Lighty; Jost O.L. Wendt; Andrew Fry; Constance L. Senior

    2008-04-01

    Gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and chlorine are a possible pathway to producing oxidized mercury species such as mercuric chloride in combustion systems. This study examines the effect of the chemistry of a commonly used sample conditioning system on apparent and actual levels of mercury oxidation in a methane-fired, 0.3 kW, quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, Cl{sub 2}, NOx, SO{sub 2}) and quench rate were varied. The sample conditioning system included two impingers in parallel: one containing an aqueous solution of KCl to trap HgCl{sub 2}, and one containing an aqueous solution of SnCl{sub 2} to reduce HgCl{sub 2} to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}). Gas-phase concentrations of Cl{sub 2} as low as 1.5 ppmv were sufficient to oxidize a significant fraction of the elemental mercury in the KCl impinger via the hypochlorite ion. Furthermore, these low, but interfering levels of Cl{sub 2} appeared to persist in flue gases from several doped rapidly mixed flames with varied post flame temperature quench rates. The addition of 0.5 wt% sodium thiosulfate to the KCl solution completely prevented the oxidation from occurring in the impinger. The addition of thiosulfate did not inhibit the KCl impinger's ability to capture HgCl{sub 2}. The effectiveness of the thiosulfate was unchanged by NO or SO{sub 2}. These results bring into question laboratory scale experimental data on mercury oxidation where wet chemistry was used to partition metallic and oxidized mercury without the presence of sufficient levels of SO{sub 2}. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Optimizing photo-Fenton like process for the removal of diesel fuel from the aqueous phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, pollution of soil and groundwater caused by fuel leakage from old underground storage tanks, oil extraction process, refineries, fuel distribution terminals, improper disposal and also spills during transferring has been reported. Diesel fuel has created many problems for water resources. The main objectives of this research were focused on assessing the feasibility of using photo-Fenton like method using nano zero-valent iron (nZVI/UV/H2O2) in removing total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and determining the optimal conditions using Taguchi method. Results The influence of different parameters including the initial concentration of TPH (0.1-1 mg/L), H2O2 concentration (5-20 mmole/L), nZVI concentration (10-100 mg/L), pH (3-9), and reaction time (15-120 min) on TPH reduction rate in diesel fuel were investigated. The variance analysis suggests that the optimal conditions for TPH reduction rate from diesel fuel in the aqueous phase are as follows: the initial TPH concentration equals to 0.7 mg/L, nZVI concentration 20 mg/L, H2O2 concentration equals to 5 mmol/L, pH 3, and the reaction time of 60 min and degree of significance for the study parameters are 7.643, 9.33, 13.318, 15.185 and 6.588%, respectively. The predicted removal rate in the optimal conditions was 95.8% and confirmed by data obtained in this study which was between 95-100%. Conclusion In conclusion, photo-Fenton like process using nZVI process may enhance the rate of diesel degradation in polluted water and could be used as a pretreatment step for the biological removal of TPH from diesel fuel in the aqueous phase. PMID:24955242

  4. Multiparametric Analysis of Oncology Drug Screening with Aqueous Two-Phase Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shahi Thakuri, Pradip; Ham, Stephanie L; Luker, Gary D; Tavana, Hossein

    2016-11-07

    Spheroids present a biologically relevant three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and a unique tool for discovery of anticancer drugs. Despite being used in research laboratories for several decades, spheroids are not routinely used in the mainstream drug discovery pipeline primarily due to the difficulty of mass-producing uniformly sized spheroids and intense labor involved in handling, drug treatment, and analyzing spheroids. We overcome this barrier using a polymeric aqueous two-phase microtechnology to robotically microprint spheroids of well-defined size in standard 384-microwell plates. We use different cancer cells and show that resulting spheroids grow over time and display characteristic features of solid tumors. We demonstrate the feasibility of robotic, high-throughput screening of 25 standard chemotherapeutics and molecular inhibitors against tumor spheroids of three different cancer cell lines. This screening uses over 7000 spheroids to elicit high quality dose-dependent drug responses from spheroids. To quantitatively compare performance of different drugs, we employ a multiparametric scoring system using half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50), maximum inhibition (Emax), and area under the dose-response curve (AUC) to take into account both potency and efficacy parameters. This approach allows us to identify several compounds that effectively inhibit growth of spheroids and compromise cellular viability, and distinguish them from moderately effective and ineffective drugs. Using protein expression analysis, we demonstrate that spheroids generated with the aqueous two-phase microtechnology reliably resolve molecular targets of drug compounds. Incorporating this low-cost and convenient-to-use tumor spheroid technology in preclinical drug discovery will make compound screening with realistic tumor models a routine laboratory technique prior to expensive and tedious animal tests to dramatically improve testing throughput and efficiency and

  5. Hydration State and Aqueous Phase Connectivity Shape Microbial Dispersal Rates in Unsaturated Angular Pore Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Ebrahimi, A.

    2014-12-01

    The limited dispersal of self-propelled microorganisms and constrained nutrient transport in unsaturated soils are considered key factors in the promotion and maintenance of soil microbial diversity. Despite the importance of microbial dispersal to biogeochemical and ecological functioning of soil, little is known about how pore spaces and hydration conditions affect dispersal ranges and rates of motile bacteria. To address these questions quantitatively, we developed a novel 3-D pore network model (PNM) composed of triangular bonds connected to cubic (volumeless) bonds to mimic the salient geometrical and physical properties of natural pore spaces. Within this abstracted physical domain we employed individual based models for motile microorganisms that are capable of motion, nutrient consumption, growth and cell division. We focused on dispersal rates through the network as a function of hydration conditions through its impact on aqueous phase fragmentation that suppress nutrient diffusion (hence growth rates) and dispersal rates in good agreement with limited experimental data. Chemotactically-biased mean travel rates of microbial cells across the saturated PNM was ~3 mm/hr and decreased exponentially to 0.45 mm/hr for matric potential of (at dispersal practically ceases and cells are pinned by capillary forces). Individual-based results were upscaled to describe population scale dispersal rates, and PNM predictions considering different microbial cell sizes were in good agreement with experimental results for unsaturated soils. The role of convection for most unsaturated conditions was negligible relative to self-motility highlighting the need to constrain continuum models with respect to cell size and motility to imporve predictions of transport of motile microorganisms. The modeling platform confirms universal predictions based on percolation theory for the onset of aqueous phase fragmentation that limit dispersal and provide niches essential for species

  6. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV

  7. Phase Transition of the PLGA-g-PEG Copolymer Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Byeongmoon; Windisch, Charles F.; Park, Moon J.; Sohn, Youn S.; Gutowska, Anna; Char, Kookheon

    2003-09-18

    The aqueous solution of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) becomes a gel as the temperature increases. The sol-to-gel transition temperature can be controlled from 15 to 45 °C by varying the number of poly(ethylene glycol) grafts and the composition of the polymer. In addition, hysteresis between heating and cooling cycles could be controlled by adding poly(ethylene glycol) with different molecular weights as an additive. To prove the hypothesis of micellar aggregation for the sol-to-gel transition and the change in hydration status for the gel-to-sol transition, several experiments were performed. Small-angle neutron scattering and Raman spectroscopy sensitively detected the sol-to-gel transition, because it involves aggregation of the scattering particle of micelles. IR and 13C NMR showed that little change in hydration status is involved during the sol-to-gel transition, whereas significant change in hydration status is involved in the gel-to-sol transition. The intrinsic viscosity of the PEG showed that more significant dehydration can occur when PEG is attached to the hydrophobic group. On the basis of the experiments above, PEG dehydration is the major driving force for the phase change of the PLGA-g-PEG aqueous solution. At the sol-to-gel transition temperature, partial dehydration of the PEG induces the micellar aggregation while keeping the core-shell structure. However, at the gel-to-sol transition, dehydration of the PEG is so significant that the core-shell structure is broken and macroscopic phase separation occurs. These phenomena were associated with changes in the carbonyl stretching and ether bending modes in the IR spectra.

  8. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E.; Dewald, Howard D.; Chen, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  9. Online Investigation of Aqueous-Phase Electrochemical Reactions by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Martin, Gary E; Dewald, Howard D; Chen, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electrochemistry (EC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for elucidation of electrochemical reaction mechanisms. However, direct online analysis of electrochemical reaction in aqueous phase was rarely explored. This paper presents the online investigation of several electrochemical reactions with biological relevance in the aqueous phase, such as nitrosothiol reduction, carbohydrate oxidation, and carbamazepine oxidation using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). It was found that electroreduction of nitrosothiols [e.g., nitrosylated insulin B (13-23)] leads to free thiols by loss of NO, as confirmed by online MS analysis for the first time. The characteristic mass shift of 29 Da and the reduced intensity provide a quick way to identify nitrosylated species. Equally importantly, upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the reduced peptide ion produces more fragment ions than its nitrosylated precursor ion (presumably the backbone fragmentation cannot compete with the facile NO loss for the precursor ion), thus facilitating peptide sequencing. In the case of saccharide oxidation, it was found that glucose undergoes electro-oxidation to produce gluconic acid at alkaline pH, but not at neutral and acidic pHs. Such a pH-dependent electrochemical behavior was also observed for disaccharides such as maltose and cellobiose. Upon electrochemical oxidation, carbamazepine was found to undergo ring contraction and amide bond cleavage, which parallels the oxidative metabolism observed for this drug in leucocytes. The mechanistic information of these redox reactions revealed by EC/DESI-MS would be of value in nitroso-proteome research and carbohydrate/drug metabolic studies.

  10. Molecular features determining different partitioning patterns of papain and bromelain in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Maria Victoria; Nerli, Bibiana Beatriz

    2013-10-01

    The partitioning patterns of papain (PAP) and bromelain (BR), two well-known cysteine-proteases, in polyethyleneglycol/sodium citrate aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) were determined. Polyethyleneglycols of different molecular weight (600, 1000, 2000, 4600 and 8000) were assayed. Thermodynamic characterization of partitioning process, spectroscopy measurements and computational calculations of protein surface properties were also carried out in order to explain their differential partitioning behavior. PAP was observed to be displaced to the salt-enriched phase in all the assayed systems with partition coefficients (KpPAP) values between 0.2 and 0.9, while BR exhibited a high affinity for the polymer phase in systems formed by PEGs of low molecular weight (600 and 1000) with partition coefficients (KpBR) values close to 3. KpBR values resulted higher than KpPAP in all the cases. This difference could be assigned neither to the charge nor to the size of the partitioned biomolecules since PAP and BR possess similar molecular weight (23,000) and isoelectric point (9.60). The presence of highly exposed tryptophans and positively charged residues (Lys, Arg and His) in BR molecule would be responsible for a charge transfer interaction between PEG and the protein and, therefore, the uneven distribution of BR in these systems.

  11. Optimization of pancreatic trypsin extraction in PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Rocío L; Loureiro, Dana B; Nerli, Bibiana B; Tubio, Gisela

    2015-02-01

    Enzyme extraction using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) has been increasingly used as a primary recovery technique which integrates the clarification, concentration and partial purification of important biomolecules from their natural source in a single step. The goal of this work was to optimize the extraction of trypsin from pancreas homogenate with polyethylene glycol and sodium citrate (PEG/NaCit) ATPS by using the tools of experimental design. The variables NaCl concentration - added inert salt -, the top/bottom phase volume ratio - Vr - and the biomass loaded into the system - in percentage - were selected as the main factors in the trypsin extraction. The yield (%) and the purification factor of trypsin were considered the responses to be optimized. The central composite design and the response surface analysis proved to be suitable tools for a quick and efficient study. As a result, the optimal extraction conditions in PEG3350/NaCit system were 3.34% wt/wt for NaCl concentration, a biomass load which represented 9.30% wt/wt of the total ATPS mass and 6.37 top/bottom volume ratio giving a purification factor of 2.55 and a yield of 99.7% in top phase.

  12. Measurements of aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient using a charge-coupled device side-scatter lidar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qingze; Xie, Chenbo; Bo, Guangyu; Hu, Shunxing; Wang, Yingjian

    2014-01-13

    By using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as the detector, side-scatter lidar has great potential applications in the near range atmospheric detection. A new inversion method is proposed for CCD side-scatter lidar (Clidar) to retrieve aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient. Case studies show the retrieved results from Clidar are in good agreements with those obtained from other instruments. It indicates that the new proposed inversion method is reliable and feasible and that the Clidar is practicable.

  13. Aerosol-phase Activity of Iodine Captured from a Triiodide Resin Filter on Fine Particles Containing an Infectious Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    phage, filter, infection , iodine, triiodide U U U SAR 6 Joseph D. Wander 850 283-6240 Reset ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aerosol-phase activity of iodine captured... infections in enclosed areas. Introduction Recurring reminders of the risk of respiratory infection by airborne pathogenic microbes include malicious...enhancing protection against the airborne infections by the integration of anti microbials such as silver (Foss Manufacturing Company, Inc. 2004; Mia

  14. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, H.; Kajiwara, K.; Miyata, K.

    2010-05-01

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for TH (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and Tm (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the TH curve for a DMSO solution of R =20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at Pc2=˜200 MPa and at Tc2<-100 °C (Pc2: pressure of SCP, Tc2: temperature of SCP). The presence of two TH peaks for DMSO solutions (R =15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (R ≤15) at high pressures and low temperatures (<-90 °C). The pressure dependence of the two TH curves for DMSO solutions of R =10 and 12 indicates that the two phase-separated components in the DMSO solution of R =10 have different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  15. Supercooling of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solution at normal and high pressures: Evidence for the coexistence of phase-separated aqueous dimethylsulfoxide solutions of different water structures.

    PubMed

    Kanno, H; Kajiwara, K; Miyata, K

    2010-05-21

    Supercooling behavior of aqueous dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution was investigated as a function of DMSO concentration and at high pressures. A linear relationship was observed for T(H) (homogeneous ice nucleation temperature) and T(m) (melting temperature) for the supercooling of aqueous DMSO solution at normal pressure. Analysis of the DTA (differential thermal analysis) traces for homogeneous ice crystallization in the bottom region of the T(H) curve for a DMSO solution of R=20 (R: moles of water/moles of DMSO) at high pressures supported the contention that the second critical point (SCP) of liquid water should exist at P(c2)= approximately 200 MPa and at T(c2)<-100 degrees C (P(c2): pressure of SCP, T(c2): temperature of SCP). The presence of two T(H) peaks for DMSO solutions (R=15, 12, and 10) suggests that phase separation occurs in aqueous DMSO solution (Rphase-separated components in the DMSO solution of R=10 have different liquid water structures [LDL-like and HDL-like structures (LDL: low-density liquid water, HDL: high-density liquid water)] in the pressure range of 120-230 MPa.

  16. Aqueous phase oligomerization of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls and acids investigated using ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (IMS-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Pascal; Tlili, Sabrine; Ravier, Sylvain; Quivet, Etienne; Monod, Anne

    2016-04-01

    One of the current essential issues to unravel our ability to forecast future climate change and air quality, implies a better understanding of natural processes leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, and in particular the formation and fate of oligomers. The difficulty in characterizing macromolecules is to discern between large oxygenated molecules from series of oligomers containing repeated small monomers of diverse structures. In the present study, taking advantage from previously established radical vinyl oligomerization of methyl vinylketone (MVK) in the aqueous phase, where relatively simple oligomers containing up to 14 monomers were observed, we have investigated the same reactivity on several other unsaturated water soluble organic compounds (UWSOCs) and on a few mixtures of these precursor compounds. The technique used to characterize the formed oligomers was a traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry coupled to a hybrid quadrupole - time of flight mass spectrometer (IMS-MS) fitted with an electrospray source and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The technique allows for an additional separation, especially for large ions, containing long carbon chains. We have shown the efficiency of the IMS-mass spectrometry technique to detect oligomers derived from MVK photooxidation in the aqueous phase. The results were then compared to other oligomers, derived from ten other individual biogenic UWSOCs. The technique allowed distinguishing between different oligomers arising from different precursors. It also clearly showed that compounds bearing a non-conjugated unsaturation did not provide oligomerization. Finally, it was shown that the IMS-mass spectrometry technique, applied to mixtures of unsaturated conjugated precursors, exhibited the ability of these precursors to co-oligomerize, i.e. forming only one complex oligomer system bearing monomers of different structures. The results are discussed in terms of atmospheric

  17. Low-abundant protein extraction from complex protein sample using a novel continuous aqueous two-phase systems device.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Villegas, Patricia; Espitia-Saloma, Edith; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Aguilar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a novel continuous aqueous two-phase system prototype for the recovery of biomolecules. The prototype is an alternative platform for protein recovery and α-amylase from soybean extracts was used as a model system. The system was selected as an example of low-abundant protein present in complex mixtures. Compared with batch systems, continuous operation in this prototype seems to increase partition coefficient with higher recovery efficiencies. Processing time is reduced at least three times in the continuous system when compared to batch mode, while hold up (volumetric quantity of the opposing phase in a determined phase sample) decreases with decreasing phases flow. Furthermore, similar partition coefficient (Kp > 4) with a higher top phase enzyme recovery (81%) is also obtained in this system probably due to better contact surface between phases, compared with that obtained in batch (79%). A continuous aqueous two-phase system process with purification factor 40-fold higher than batch experiments was achieved. These preliminary results exhibit the potential of continuous systems for the recovery of low-abundant proteins from complex mixtures. The promising performance of this prototype can raise the attention of the industry for the adoption of aqueous two-phase system processes.

  18. Aqueous two-phase partition applied to the isolation of plasma membranes and Golgi apparatus from cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. M.; Morre, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Partitioning in dextran-poly(ethylene)glycol (PEG) aqueous-aqueous phase systems represents a mature technology with many applications to separations of cells and to the preparation of membranes from mammalian cells. Most applications to membrane isolation and purification have focused on plasma membranes, plasma membrane domains and separation of right side-out and inside-out plasma membrane vesicles. The method exploits a combination of membrane properties, including charge and hydrophobicity. Purification is based upon differential distributions of the constituents in a sample between the two principal compartments of the two phases (upper and lower) and at the interface. The order of affinity of animal cell membranes for the upper phase is: endoplasmic reticulum aqueous two-phase partition with other procedures to obtain a more highly purified preparation. A procedure is described for preparation of Golgi apparatus from transformed mammalian cells that combines aqueous two-phase partition and centrifugation. Also described is a periodic NADH oxidase, a new enzyme marker for right side-out plasma membrane vesicles not requiring detergent disruptions for measurement of activity.

  19. Analysis of partitioning of organic compounds and proteins in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-10-09

    Partition behavior of nine small organic compounds and six p