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Sample records for aerosol backscatter coefficient

  1. Intercomparison of Remote and Flight Level Measured Aerosol Backscatter Coefficient During GLOBE 2 Pacific Survey Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhime, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data are examined from two local flights undertaken during NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May - June, 1990. During each of these two flights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provides an ideal opportunity to allow flight level measured or modeled aerosol backscafter to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscafter data that were obtained at these same altitudes either earlier or later than the flight level measurements. Aerosol backscafter comparisons were made at 1.06-, 9.11- and 9.25-mm wavelengths, using data from three lidar systems and two aerosol optical counters. The best agreement between all sensor's was found in the altitude region below 7 km where backscafter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscafter data at 1.06- and 9.25-mm wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters. Possible reasons are offered to explain this discrepancy. During the Japan local flight, microphysics analysis revealed: (1) evidence of a strong advected seasalt aerosol plume from the marine boundary layer, and (2) where backscatter was low, the large lidar sampling volume included many large particles which were of different chemical composition to the small particle category sampled by the particle counters.

  2. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  3. Characteristics of aerosol size distribution and vertical backscattering coefficient profile during 2014 APEC in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaoshi; Chen, Zhenyi; Lu, Yihuai; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Wenqing; Wang, Jie; Yu, Tongzhu; Cheng, Yin; Chen, Yong; Ge, Baozhu; Fan, Yu; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) conference period, Beijing's air quality was greatly improved as a result of a series of tough emission control measures being implemented in Beijing and its surrounding provinces. However, a moderate haze occurred during the period of 4-5 November. In order to evaluate the emission control measures and study the formation mechanism of the haze, a comprehensive field observation based on a supersite and a lidar network was carried out from 25 October 2014 to 20 January 2015. By investigating the variations in aerosol number concentration and mean backscattering coefficient before, during and after the APEC period, it was found that number concentration of accumulation mode and coarse mode particles experienced the most significant decrease by 47% and 68%, and mean backscattering coefficient below 1 km decreased by 34% during the APEC period. Being characterized as "rapidly accumulating and rapidly dispersing", the moderate haze occurred during the APEC period was probably initiated by a wind direction change to south and an increase of wind speed to 4 m/s. Sulfur dioxide involved plume nucleation without growth in size as well as a burst of particles ranging between 100 and 300 nm were observed simultaneously during the haze episode. The elevation of sulfur dioxide concentration and particle number concentration was highly correlated with the southerly wind, signifying the contribution of regional transport. It was observed by the lidar network that the aerosol backscattering coefficient increased in sequence among three sites along the southwest pathway, suggesting that aerosols might be transported from the southwest to the northeast of Beijing with a speed of approximately 17 km/h, which agreed with the movement of air masses modeled by Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT). The dual-wavelength lidar (355 and 532 nm) observation suggested that transportation of fine particles

  4. Measurements of aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient using a charge-coupled device side-scatter lidar.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Ma, Xiaomin; Zhang, Qingze; Xie, Chenbo; Bo, Guangyu; Hu, Shunxing; Wang, Yingjian

    2014-01-13

    By using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as the detector, side-scatter lidar has great potential applications in the near range atmospheric detection. A new inversion method is proposed for CCD side-scatter lidar (Clidar) to retrieve aerosol phase function and vertical backscattering coefficient. Case studies show the retrieved results from Clidar are in good agreements with those obtained from other instruments. It indicates that the new proposed inversion method is reliable and feasible and that the Clidar is practicable.

  5. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  6. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  7. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients by a combined vibrational pure-rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balin, I.; Serikov, I.; Bobrovnikov, S.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; Arshinov, Y.; van den Bergh, H.

    2004-10-01

    Implementation of the pure-rotational Raman (PRR) lidar method for simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients is reported. The isolation of two wavelength domains of the PRR spectrum and the suppression of the elastically scattered light is carried out by a double-grating polychromator. Experiments involving elastic backscatter from dense clouds and a solid target confirm the high level of suppression of the elastic light in the corresponding acquisition channels of the two selected PRR domains. Calibration of the temperature channel was done both by comparison with an experimentally verified atmospheric temperature model profile and by inter-comparison with radiosondes. Night-time temperature profiles with high vertical resolution were obtained up to the lower stratosphere. The PRR temperature profile combined with the water vapor mixing ratio obtained from the ro-vibrational Raman channel is used to estimate the relative humidity.

  9. Lidar backscattering measurements of background stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Northam, G. B.; Butler, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative lidar-dustsonde experiment was conducted in San Angelo, Texas, in May 1974 in order to estimate the uncertainties in stratospheric-aerosol backscatter for the NASA Langley 48-inch lidar system. The lidar calibration and data-analysis procedures are discussed. Results from the Texas experiment indicate random and systematic uncertainties of 35 and 63 percent, respectively, in backscatter from a background stratospheric-aerosol layer at 20 km.

  10. Multiwavelength Comparison of Modeled and Measured Remote Tropospheric Aerosol Backscatter Over Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol concentrations and size distributions in the middle and upper troposphere over the remote Pacific Ocean were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. The FSSP size channels were recalibrated based on refractive index estimates from flight-level aerosol volatility measurements with a collocated laser optical particle counter (LOPC). The recalibrated FSSP size distributions were averaged over 100-s intervals, fitted with lo-normal distributions and used to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients at selected wavelengths. The FSSP-derived backscatter estimates were averaged over 300-s intervals to reduce large random fluctuations. The smoothed FSSP aerosol backscatter coefficients were then compared with LOPC-derived backscatter values and with backscatter measured at or near flight level from four lidar systems operating at 0.53, 1.06, 9.11, 9.25, and 10.59 micrometers. Agreement between FSSP-derived and lidar-measured backscatter was generally best at flight level in homogeneous aerosol fields and at high backscatter values. FSSP data often underestimated low backscatter values especially at the longer wavelengths due to poor counting statistics for larger particles (greater than 0.8 micrometers diameter) that usually dominate aerosol backscatter at these wavelengths. FSSP data also underestimated backscatter at shorter wavelengths when particles smaller than the FSSP lower cutoff diameter (0.35 micrometers) made significant contributions to the total backscatter.

  11. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  12. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  13. Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Results: Aerosol Backscatter Global Distribution and Wavelength Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) was initiated by NASA in 1986 as an interagency and international research effort to characterize tropospheric backscatter properties. The primary objective of the program is to develop realistic aerosol backscatter inputs for design and simulation studies for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). To achieve this, GLOBE incorporates several different types of aerosol sensors, which operate from a variety of sensor platforms, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and measure a diverse set of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties. The results of this analysis have provided important new information on the life cycles and physicochemical properties of global scale tropospheric aerosol systems. In addition, GLOBE analytical methods will be useful for the Earth Observing System (EOS) and other studies that involve the assimilation of large, complex atmospheric aerosol databases.

  14. Laser remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol over Southern Ireland using a backscatter Raman LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Acheson, Karen; Apituley, Arnoud; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Nicolae, Doina; Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Trickl, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Raman backscatter coefficients, extinction coefficients and lidar ratios were measured with a ground based Raman lidar system at University College Cork, Ireland, during the periods of July 2012 - August 2012, April 2013 - December 2013 and March 2014 - May 2014. Statistical analysis of these parameters in this time provided information about seasonal effects of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer. The mean of the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer over these time periods is 950 ± 302 m. The values are larger in summer, 1206 ± 367 m, than in winter, 735 m. The altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer measured at Cork is lower than most EARLINET stations. Raman backscatter coefficients above and altitude of 2 km are highest in summer and spring where the values are greater than 0.28 Mm-1 sr-1. Winter values of Raman backscatter coefficient are less than 0.06 Mm-1 sr-1. These seasonal effects are consistent with most EARLINET stations. Large aerosol loads were detected in July 2013 due to a Canadian forest fire event. HYSPLIT air-mass back trajectory models were used to trace the origin of the detected aerosol layers. The aerosol forecast model, MACC, was used to further investigate and verify the propagation of the smoke. The Lidar ratio values and Klett and Raman backscatter coefficients at Cork, for the 4th July, the 7th to 9th of July and the 11th July were compared with observations at Cabauw, Minsk, Granada, Bucharest, Sofia and Garmisch. Lidar ratio values for the smoke detected at Cork were determined to be between 33 sr and 62 sr. The poster will discuss the seasonal changes of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer at Cork. An investigation of a Canadian forest fire event measured at Cork will be compared with other data from the EARLINET database.

  15. Calculations of radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A model for simulating the measured backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soil surfaces includes both coherent and incoherent components of the backscattered radar pulses from a rough sil surface. The effect of vegetation canopy scattering is also incorporated into the model by making the radar pulse subject to two-way attenuation and volume scattering when it passes through the vegetation layer. Model results agree well with the measured angular distributions of the radar backscattering coefficient for HH polarization at the 1.6 GHz and 4.75 GHz frequencies over grass-covered fields. It was found that the coherent scattering component is very important at angles near nadir, while the vegetation volume scattering is dominant at incident angles 30 degrees.

  16. Effects of vegetation canopy on the radar backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne L- and C-band scatterometer data, taken over both vegetation-covered and bare fields, were systematically analyzed and theoretically reproduced, using a recently developed model for calculating radar backscattering coefficients of rough soil surfaces. The results show that the model can reproduce the observed angular variations of radar backscattering coefficient quite well via a least-squares fit method. Best fits to the data provide estimates of the statistical properties of the surface roughness, which is characterized by two parameters: the standard deviation of surface height, and the surface correlation length. In addition, the processes of vegetation attenuation and volume scattering require two canopy parameters, the canopy optical thickness and a volume scattering factor. Canopy parameter values for individual vegetation types, including alfalfa, milo and corn, were also determined from the best-fit results. The uncertainties in the scatterometer data were also explored.

  17. Use of aerosol microphysical measurements to model IR backscatter in support of GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Edward M.; Bowdle, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Data on the concentration and composition of free tropospheric aerosol over the Pacific Ocean, collected during the GAMETAG program in 1977-1978 (Davis, 1980 and Patterson et al., 1980) are used to model values of aerosol optical extinction coefficients (sigma) at two wavelengths (0.55 and 1 micron) and values of volume backscatter coefficients (beta) at four wavelengths (1 micron, 9.11 microns, 9.25 microns, and 10.6 microns) and to investigate the relationship between these parameters. The mass concentrations inferred from the GAMETAG measurements with optical particle spectrometers agreed with the results of simultaneous chemical measurements. The study of the relationships among the optical parameters indicates that visible and near-visible values of beta and sigma may be useful in predicting 9.11- and 10.6-micron backscatter.

  18. Relating the microwave backscattering coefficient to leaf area index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Allen, C. T.; Eger, G., III; Kanemasu, E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the microwave backscattering coefficient of a vegetation canopy, sigma (can, 0) and the canopy's leaf area index (LAI). The relationship is established through the development of one model for corn and sorghum and another for wheat. Both models are extensions of the cloud model of Attema and Ulaby (1978). Analysis of experimental data measured at 8.6, 13.0, 17.0, and 35.6 GHz indicates that most of the temporal variations of sigma (can, 0) can be accounted for through variations in green LAI alone, if the latter is greater than 0.5.

  19. Relating the radar backscattering coefficient to leaf-area index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Allen, C.; Eger, G.; Kanemasu, E.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient of a vegetation canopy, sigma(0) sub can, and the canopy's leaf area index (LAI) is examined. The relationship is established through the development of a model for corn and sorghum and another for wheat. Both models are extensions of the cloud model of Attema and Ulaby (1978). Analysis of experimental data measured at 8.6, 13.0, 17.0, and 35.6 GHz indicates that most of the temporal variations of sigma(0) sub can can be accounted for through variations in green LAI alone, if the latter is greater than 0.5.

  20. Comparison of Modeled Backscatter using Measured Aerosol Microphysics with Focused CW Lidar Data over Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1997-01-01

    During NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) II flight mission over the Pacific Ocean in May-June 1990, extensive aerosol backscatter data sets from two continuous wave, focused CO2 Doppler lidars and an aerosol microphysics data set from a laser optical particle counter (LOPC) were obtained. Changes in aerosol loading in various air masses with associated changes in chemical composition, from sulfuric acid and sulfates to dustlike crustal material, significantly affected aerosol backscatter, causing variation of about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Some of the significant backscatter features encountered in different air masses were the low backscatter in subtropical air with even lower values in the tropics near the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), highly variable backscatter in the ITCZ, mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode, and high backscatter in an Asian dust plume off the Japanese coast. Differences in aerosol composition and backscatter for northern and southern hemisphere also were observed. Using the LOPC measurements of physical and chemical aerosol properties, we determined the complex refractive index from three different aerosol mixture models to calculate backscatter. These values provided a well-defined envelope of modeled backscatter for various atmospheric conditions, giving good agreement with the lidar data over a horizontal sampling of approximately 18000 km in the mid-troposphere.

  1. Retrieval of UV Aerosol Index using backscattered monochromatic radiance measured by GOSAT CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Park, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    UV Aerosol Index(AI) using backscattered radiance at a single channel has been retrieved. In the current UV AI algorithm, two UV channels are used to contrast the absorbing aerosol loaded atmosphere to Rayleigh scattering condition. There have been needs to retrieve information of absorbing aerosol from a single UV channel, such as GOSAT CAI. 30-day minimum composite method, however, makes the process possible to construct the condition with the use of only single UV channel. Also, absorption by aerosol changes with respect to AOD and wavelength for different aerosol types. Therefore, single channel aerosol index(SAI) can detect absorbing aerosol qualitatively. Correlation coefficient of SAI to current UV AI indicate significant value, showing possibility of detecting highly absorbing aerosols. The application of a cloud screening makes the presence of absorbing aerosols even more clear. Radiative transfer calculations using VLIDORT were performed to test the sensitivity of SAI and UV AI to aerosol optical properties, showing that highly absorbing aerosol results in meaningful SAI. Results from dust case study in East Asia show reasonable performance of SAI for the region with single scattering albedo below 0.90. This study concludes with a comparison of SAI from GOSAT lv.1b data to OMI UVAI data, where reasonable agreement and low false detection was found for dust cases in East Asia. The SAI value of -0.2 to 0.0 from GOSAT-CAI was comparable to OMI dust threshold value of 0.7. These findings corroborate the suitability of SAI as a for detecting absorbing aerosols for satellite instrument with a single UV channel.

  2. Retrieval of ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient from space-borne CALIOP lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Lucker, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; Audouy, Claude; Ferrier, Christophe; Haouchine, Said; Hunt, Bill; Getzewich, Brian

    2016-12-12

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30° off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180° scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  3. Intercomparison of Pulsed Lidar Data with Flight Level CW Lidar Data and Modeled Backscatter from Measured Aerosol Microphysics Near Japan and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data were examined from two nights near Japan and Hawaii undertaken during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. During each of these two nights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provided an ideal opportunity to allow flight level focused continuous wave (CW) lidar backscatter measured at 9.11-micron wavelength and modeled aerosol backscatter from two aerosol optical counters to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths. The best agreement between all sensors was found in the altitude region below 7 km, where backscatter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters, suggesting sample volume effects were responsible for this. Aerosol microphysics analysis of data near Japan revealed a strong sea-salt aerosol plume extending upward from the marine boundary layer. On the basis of sample volume differences, it was found that large particles were of different composition compared with the small particles for low backscatter conditions.

  4. Use of aerosol microphysical measurements to model IR backscatter in support of GLOBE

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, E.M. ); Bowdle, D.A. )

    1991-03-20

    The authors have used the GAMETAG Pacific mid-tropospheric aerosol data set to calculate aerosol optical extinction coefficients ({sigma}) at two wavelengths (0.55 {mu}m and 1 {mu}m) and volume backscatter coefficients ({beta}) at 4 wavelengths (1 {mu}m, 9.11 {mu}m, 9.25 {mu}m, and 10.6 {mu}m). At an altitude of 5 km over the Pacific, northern hemispheric mean values of {beta} for 10.6 {mu} are near 10{sup {minus}10} m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} at an altitude of 5 km, with southern hemispheric values approximately an order of magnitude lower. The 9.11 {mu}m values are roughly a factor of 3 higher than the 10.6 {mu}m values; 9.25 {mu}m values are approximately the same as 9.11 {mu}m values. For the data averaging times of 5-10 min are necessary for the calculated {beta} values as seen by a satellite lidar system. Under the assumptions of this study the molecular form of the sulfate aerosol is not a major determining factor in the calculated {beta} values at 10.6 {mu}m but could be significant at 9.11 {mu}m. A study of relationships among the optical parameters indicates that visible and near-visible values of {beta} and {sigma} may be useful in predicting 9.11- and 10.6 {mu}m backscatter, so that short wavelength aerosol data bases form satellites and Nd-YAG lidars may be useful in extending the data base of direct backscatter measurements at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  5. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO2 Doppler lidar measurements. I - Algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Bowdle, David A.; Vaughan, Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Woodfield, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kindom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 microns, using an airborne continuous-wave-focused CO2 Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). In this paper, the heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio, and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  6. Vertical Profiling of Atmospheric Backscatter with a Raman-Aerosol Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleva, Atanaska D.; Peshev, Zahary Y.; Slesar, Alexander S.; Denisov, Sergey; Avramov, Lachezar A.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols have a strong impact on the planet's thermal balance, air quality, and a variety of atmospheric processes and phenomena. In this work we present some results from a long term lidar observation of tropospheric aerosols over the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, within the framework of the European project "EARLINET-ASSOS." Vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and range corrected lidar signals are processed and analyzed. The temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of atmospheric aerosol fields are illustrated by 2D-colormaps in height-time coordinates. We present here several cases of aerosol loading: transport of Saharan dust (at altitudes from 3 km to 5 km), highly situated layers (from 9 km to 15 km), and anthropogenic smog (up to 2 km). All measurements were performed by using the two aerosol spectral channels of a combined Raman-aerosol lidar developed in the Laser Radar Lab, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It is based on a Q-switched powerful frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser (output pulse power: up to 1 J at 1064 nm; up to 100 mJ at 532 nm; pulse duration 15 ns FWHM; repetition rate 2 Hz). A Cassegrain telescope (35 cm diameter, 200 cm focal length) collects the backscattered radiation. The lidar receiving system is based on novel smart high sensitive photo-receiving modules. The acquisition system provides signal registration with spatial resolution of 15 m (100 MHz 14-bit ADC). It allows for detection, storage, and processing of large volume lidar data. Our observations are in good agreement with the forecasts of Barcelona Supercomputing Center, concerning Saharan dust transport.

  7. Ozone and Aerosol Retrieval from Backscattered Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the techniques to estimate total column ozone and aerosol absorption optical depth from the measurements of backscattered ultraviolet (buv) radiation. The total ozone algorithm has been used to create a unique record of the ozone layer, spanning more than 3 decades, from a series of instruments (BUV, SBUV, TOMS, SBUV/2) flown on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and Russian satellites. We will discuss how this algorithm can be considered a generalization of the well-known Dobson/Brewer technique that has been used to process data from ground-based instruments for many decades, and how it differs from the DOAS techniques that have been used to estimate vertical column densities of a host of trace gases from data collected by GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments. The BUV aerosol algorithm is most suitable for the detection of UV absorbing aerosols (smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash) and is the only technique that can detect aerosols embedded in clouds. This algorithm has been used to create a quarter century record of aerosol absorption optical depth using the BUV data collected by a series of TOMS instruments. We will also discuss how the data from the OM1 instrument launched on July 15,2004 will be combined with data from MODIS and CALIPSO lidar data to enhance the accuracy and information content of satellite-derived aerosol measurements. The OM1 and MODIS instruments are currently flying on EOS Aura and EOS Aqua satellites respectively, part of a constellation of satellites called the "A-train". The CALIPSO satellite is expected to join this constellation in mid 2005.

  8. Application of a coherent model in simulating the backscattering coefficient of a mangrove forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirion, L.; Chênerie, I.; Galy, C.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, a single scattering model is presented for a coherent forest scattering simulation. It is tested on the backscattering coefficient of mangrove forests, which are known to involve large coherent effects. Analysis of branches, leaves and ground contributions is done to understand the backscattering coefficient composition. Finally the sensitivity of the code is investigated.

  9. The deconvolution of aerosol backscattered optical pulses to obtain system-independent aerosol signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, D.; Conner, M.

    1981-06-01

    Means are discussed for extracting system-independent aerosol signatures from aerosol backscatter measurements obtained with a specific pencil beam active optical detection system. Such signatures are required before the backscatter data can be applied to various proposed optical fuze designs for determining their aerosol vulnerability and to the investigation of aerosol discrimination schemes. The measurement system, which has been used in numerous experiments to probe such aerosols as weather clouds and military smokes, is a short pulse GaAs laser probe (pulse width + or - 10 nanoseconds whose range sensitivity extends from near the system to beyond 10 meters. A computationally fast numerical deconvolution algorithm is devised together with a comprehensive supporting analysis. Both indicate that severe signal-to-noise ratio constraints apply to the achievement of meaningful superresolution. While the signal-to-noise ratios typical of recent measurements are likely to satisfy the severe constraints discovered, many of the earlier data are too noisy and thus require other signature determination methods.

  10. Tissue characterization by imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenderka, Klaus V.; Gaertner, Tilio; Cobet, Ulrich; Zacharias, Mario; Heynemann, Hans

    2000-04-01

    Conventional B-scan systems only use the amplitude information of the backscattered signals for imaging. By imaging the local frequency dependent relative backscatter coefficient it is possible to improve the image contrast and to reduce system effects. Based on spectral analysis of rf echo signals, a procedure was developed to correct for system specific effects and to determine the relative backscatter coefficient. A new image with improved contrast results from grayscale or color coding of the frequency components of the relative backscatter coefficient. The method was applied to in vivo measurements of human prostate and transplanted kidney. For cancerous prostate tissue the relative backscatter coefficient is about 8 dB lower than for normal tissue regions. The results of the investigations on kidneys show no correlation to the current function of the organ. Certainly the different course of the frequency dependence of the relative backscatter coefficient of renal cortex and calices regions allows a contrast improvement. The method provides a system independent imaging procedure with improved image contrast for tissues with different scattering behavior and slightly reduced spatial resolution. Imaging the relative backscatter coefficient will not substitute the conventional B-mode image, but it is a useful tool providing additional information about the tissue state.

  11. Theory of CW lidar aerosol backscatter measurements and development of a 2.1 microns solid-state pulsed laser radar for aerosol backscatter profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The performance and calibration of a focused, continuous wave, coherent detection CO2 lidar operated for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter coefficient, B(m), was examined. This instrument functions by transmitting infrared (10 micron) light into the atmosphere and collecting the light which is scattered in the rearward direction. Two distinct modes of operation were considered. In volume mode, the scattered light energy from many aerosols is detected simultaneously, whereas in the single particle mode (SPM), the scattered light energy from a single aerosol is detected. The analysis considered possible sources of error for each of these two cases, and also considered the conditions where each technique would have superior performance. The analysis showed that, within reasonable assumptions, the value of B(m) could be accurately measured by either the VM or the SPM method. The understanding of the theory developed during the analysis was also applied to a pulsed CO2 lidar. Preliminary results of field testing of a solid state 2 micron lidar using a CW oscillator is included.

  12. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  13. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  14. Phase function, backscatter, extinction, and absorption for standard radiation atmosphere and El Chichon aerosol models at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabular values of phase function, Legendre polynominal coefficients, 180 deg backscatter, and extinction cross section are given for eight wavelengths in the atmospheric windows between 0.4 and 2.2 microns. Also included are single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and refractive indices. These values are based on Mie theory calculations for the standard rediation atmospheres (continental, maritime, urban, unperturbed stratospheric, volcanic, upper atmospheric, soot, oceanic, dust, and water-soluble) assest measured volcanic aerosols at several time intervals following the El Chichon eruption. Comparisons of extinction to 180 deg backscatter for different aerosol models are presented and related to lidar data.

  15. Visible and near infrared observation on the Global Aerosol Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Chudamani, S.; Bufton, Jack L.; Sullivan, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Aerosol Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) was intended to provide data on prevailing values of atmospheric backscatter cross-section. The primary intent was predicting the performance of spaceborne lidar systems, most notably the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) for the Earth Observing System (EOS). The second and related goal was to understand the source and characteristics of atmospheric aerosol particles. From the GLOBE flights, extensive data was obtained on the structure of clouds and the marine planetary boundary layer. A notable result for all observations is the consistency of the large increases in the aerosol scattering ratio for the marine boundary layer. Other results are noted.

  16. On the Feasibility of Studying Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Dual-Wavelength Aerosol Backscatter Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Winker, David M.; McCormick, M. Patrick; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The current low confidence in the estimates of aerosol-induced perturbations of Earth's radiation balance is caused by the highly non-uniform compositional, spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric aerosols on a global scale owing to their heterogeneous sources and short lifetimes. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the inclusion of aerosol effects in climate model calculations can improve agreement with observed spatial and temporal temperature distributions. In light of the short lifetimes of aerosols, determination of their global distribution with space-borne sensors seems to be a necessary approach. Until recently, satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols have been approximate and did not provide the full set of information required to determine their radiative effects. With the advent of active aerosol remote sensing from space (e.g., PICASSO-CENA), the applicability fo lidar-derived aerosol 180 deg -backscatter data to radiative flux calculations and hence studies of aerosol effects on climate needs to be investigated.

  17. The change of depolarization of backscattering light from the polar stratospheric aerosol layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The change of polarization properties of scattered light strongly depends on the non-spherisity of target particles. It should be helpful information for the study of stratospheric aerosols to know the non-spherisity of stratospheric aerosol particles. The change of the total backscatter depolarization ratio of the stratospheric aerosol layer measured at Syowa Station (69.00 deg S, 39.35 deg E), Antarctica is described.

  18. Interlaboratory comparison of backscatter coefficient estimates for tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Janelle J; Herd, Maria-Teresa; King, Michael R; Haak, Alexander; Hafez, Zachary T; Song, Jun; Oelze, Michael L; Madsen, Ernest L; Zagzebski, James A; O'Brien, William D; Hall, Timothy J

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter is useful for characterizing tissues and several groups have reported methods for estimating backscattering properties. Previous interlaboratory comparisons have been made to test the ability to accurately estimate the backscatter coefficient (BSC) by different laboratories around the world. Results of these comparisons showed variability in BSC estimates but were acquired only for a relatively narrow frequency range, and, most importantly, lacked reference to any independent predictions from scattering theory. The goal of this study was to compare Faran-scattering-theory predictions with cooperatively-measured backscatter coefficients for low-attenuating and tissue-like attenuating phantoms containing glass sphere scatterers of different sizes for which BSCs can independently be predicted. Ultrasonic backscatter measurementswere made for frequencies from 1 to 12 MHz. Backscatter coefficients were estimated using two different planar-reflector techniques at two laboratories for two groups of phantoms. Excellent agreement was observed between BSC estimates from both laboratories. In addition, good agreement with the predictions of Faran's theory was obtained, with average fractional (bias) errors ranging from 8-14%. This interlaboratory comparison demonstrates the ability to accurately estimate parameters derived from the BSC, including an effective scatterer size and the acoustic concentration, both of which may prove useful for diagnostic applications of ultrasound tissue characterization.

  19. Selection Algorithm for the CALIPSO Lidar Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S(sub a)) is an important parameter used in the determination of the aerosol extinction and subsequently the optical depth from lidar backscatter measurements. We outline the algorithm used to determine Sa for the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) lidar. S(sub a) for the CALIPSO lidar will either be selected from a look-up table or calculated using the lidar measurements depending on the characteristics of aerosol layer. Whenever suitable lofted layers are encountered, S(sub a) is computed directly from the integrated backscatter and transmittance. In all other cases, the CALIPSO observables: the depolarization ratio, delta, the layer integrated attenuated backscatter, beta, and the mean layer total attenuated color ratio, gamma, together with the surface type, are used to aid in aerosol typing. Once the type is identified, a look-up-table developed primarily from worldwide observations, is used to determine the S(sub a) value. The CALIPSO aerosol models include desert dust, biomass burning, background, polluted continental, polluted dust, and marine aerosols.

  20. Improving the detection of wind fields from LIDAR aerosol backscatter using feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Brady R.; Rotthoff, Eric R.; Walters, Gage S.; Kane, Timothy J.; Mayor, Shane D.

    2016-04-01

    The tracking of winds and atmospheric features has many applications, from predicting and analyzing weather patterns in the upper and lower atmosphere to monitoring air movement from pig and chicken farms. Doppler LIDAR systems exist to quantify the underlying wind speeds, but cost of these systems can sometimes be relatively high, and processing limitations exist. The alternative is using an incoherent LIDAR system to analyze aerosol backscatter. Improving the detection and analysis of wind information from aerosol backscatter LIDAR systems will allow for the adoption of these relatively low cost instruments in environments where the size, complexity, and cost of other options are prohibitive. Using data from a simple aerosol backscatter LIDAR system, we attempt to extend the processing capabilities by calculating wind vectors through image correlation techniques to improve the detection of wind features.

  1. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 1; Methods and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.0 1 5 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0. I and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  2. [Impact of Light Polarization on the Measurement of Water Particulate Backscattering Coefficient].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Gong, Fang; He, Xian-qiang; Zhu, Qian-kun; Huang, Hai-qing

    2016-01-01

    Particulate backscattering coefficient is a main inherent optical properties (IOPs) of water, which is also a determining factor of ocean color and a basic parameter for inversion of satellite ocean color remote sensing. In-situ measurement with optical instruments is currently the main method for obtaining the particulate backscattering coefficient of water. Due to reflection and refraction by the mirrors in the instrument optical path, the emergent light source from the instrument may be partly polarized, thus to impact the measurement accuracy of water backscattering coefficient. At present, the light polarization of measuring instruments and its impact on the measurement accuracy of particulate backscattering coefficient are still poorly known. For this reason, taking a widely used backscattering coefficient measuring instrument HydroScat6 (HS-6) as an example in this paper, the polarization characteristic of the emergent light from the instrument was systematically measured, and further experimental study on the impact of the light polarization on the measurement accuracy of the particulate backscattering coefficient of water was carried out. The results show that the degree of polarization(DOP) of the central wavelength of emergent light ranges from 20% to 30% for all of the six channels of the HS-6, except the 590 nm channel from which the DOP of the emergent light is slightly low (-15%). Therefore, the emergent light from the HS-6 has significant polarization. Light polarization has non-neglectable impact on the measurement of particulate backscattering coefficient, and the impact degree varies with the wave band, linear polarization angle and suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration. At different SPM concentrations, the mean difference caused by light polarization can reach 15.49%, 11.27%, 12.79%, 14.43%, 13.76%, and 12.46% in six bands, 420, 442, 470, 510, 590, and 670 nm, respectively. Consequently, the impact of light polarization on the

  3. Application of neural network to remote sensing of soil moisture using theoretical polarimetric backscattering coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.; Shin, R. T.; Kong, J. A.; Yueh, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential application of neural network to inversion of soil moisture using polarimetric remote sensing data. The neural network used for the inversion of soil parameters is multi-layer perceptron trained with the back-propagation algorithm. The training data include the polarimetric backscattering coefficients obtained from theoretical surface scattering models together with an assumed nominal range of soil parameters which are comprised of the soil permittivity and surface roughness parameters. Soil permittivity is calculated from the soil moisture and the assumed soil texture based on an empirical formula at C-, L-, and P-bands. The rough surface parameters for the soil surface, which is described by the Gaussian random process, are the root-mean-square (rms) height and correlation length. For the rough surface scattering, small perturbation method is used for the L-band frequency, and Kirchhoff approximation is used for the C-band frequency to obtain the corresponding backscattering coefficients. During the training, the backscattering coefficients are the inputs to the neural net and the output from the net are compared with the desired soil parameters to adjust the interconnecting weights. The process is repeated for each input-output data entry and then for the entire training data until convergence is reached. After training, the backscattering coefficients are applied to the trained neural net to retrieve the soil parameters which are compared with the desired soil parameters to verify the effectiveness of this technique. Several cases are examined. First, for simplicity, the correlation length and rms height of the soil surface are fixed while soil moisture is varied. Soil moisture obtained using the neural networks with either L-band or C-band backscattering coefficients for the HH and VV polarizations as inputs is in good agreement with the desired soil moisture. The neural net output matches the desired output for the soil

  4. Wavelength dependence of coherent and incoherent satellite-based lidar measurements of wind velocity and aerosol backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Huffaker, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results are presented of a capability study of Earth orbiting lidar systems, at various wavelengths from 1.06 to 10.6 microns, for the measurement of wind velocity and aerosol backscatter, and for the detection of clouds. Both coherent and incoherent lidar systems were modeled and compared for the aerosol backscatter and cloud detection applications.

  5. Aerosol and cloud observations with a CO2 backscatter lidar on the NASA DC-8 GLOBE Pacific Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents an airborne backscatter lidar developed to fly multiple times on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft and measure vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud backscatter throughout the vertical extent of the troposphere, with emphasis on coverage of the range of latitudes. The lidar instrument characteristics are summarized and the calibration procedures are described. Results of aerosol and cloud observations are presented.

  6. Stand-off detection of aerosols using mid-infrared backscattering Fourier transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, L.; Zhang, Z.; Bowditch, M. D.; Howle, C. R.; Reid, D. T.

    2016-10-01

    The spectrum of mid-infrared light scattered from an actively illuminated aerosol was used to distinguish between different chemicals. Using spectrally broad illumination from an optical parametric oscillator covering 3.2 - 3.55 μm, characteristic absorption features of two different chemicals were detected, and two similar molecules were clearly distinguished using the spectra of backscattered light from each chemical aerosol.

  7. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  8. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar.

    PubMed

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O'Dowd, Colin

    2017-02-15

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val.

  9. Comparisons of aerosol backscatter using satellite and ground lidars: implications for calibrating and validating spaceborne lidar

    PubMed Central

    Gimmestad, Gary; Forrister, Haviland; Grigas, Tomas; O’Dowd, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the polar orbiter Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) is an elastic backscatter lidar that produces a global uniformly-calibrated aerosol data set. Several Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) studies for CALIOP conducted with ground-based lidars and CALIOP data showed large aerosol profile disagreements, both random and systematic. In an attempt to better understand these problems, we undertook a series of ground-based lidar measurements in Atlanta, Georgia, which did not provide better agreement with CALIOP data than the earlier efforts, but rather prompted us to investigate the statistical limitations of such comparisons. Meaningful Cal/Val requires intercomparison data sets with small enough uncertainties to provide a check on the maximum expected calibration error. For CALIOP total attenuated backscatter, reducing the noise to the required level requires averaging profiles along the ground track for distances of at least 1,500 km. Representative comparison profiles often cannot be acquired with ground-based lidars because spatial aerosol inhomogeneities introduce systematic error into the averages. These conclusions have implications for future satellite lidar Cal/Val efforts, because planned satellite lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, wind vector, and CO2 concentration profiles may all produce data requiring considerable along-track averaging for meaningful Cal/Val. PMID:28198389

  10. Feasibility of inter-comparing airborne and spaceborne obsevations of radar backscattering coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide global soil moisture products that will facilitate new science and application areas. The SMAP mission, scheduled for launch in November 2014, will offer synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements of backscattering coefficients for the re...

  11. Ozone and Aerosol Retrieval from Backscattered Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the techniques to estimate total column ozone and aerosol absorption optical depth from the measurements of back scattered ultraviolet (buv) radiation. The total ozone algorithm has been used to create a unique record of the ozone layer, spanning more than 3 decades, from a series of instruments (BUV, SBUV, TOMS, SBUV/2) flown on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and Russian satellites. We will discuss how this algorithm can be considered a generalization of the well-known Dobson/Brewer technique that has been used to process data from ground-based instruments for many decades, and how it differs from the DOAS techniques that have been used to estimate vertical column densities of a host of trace gases from data collected by GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments. The buv aerosol algorithm is most suitable for the detection of UV absorbing aerosols (smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash) and is the only technique that can detect aerosols embedded in clouds. This algorithm has been used to create a quarter century record of aerosol absorption optical depth using the buv data collected by a series of TOMS instruments. We will also discuss how the data from the OMI instrument launched on July 15, 2004 will be combined with data from MODIS and CALIPSO lidar data to enhance the accuracy and information content of satellite-derived aerosol measurements. The OMI and MODIS instruments are currently flying on EOS Aura and EOS Aqua satellites respectively, part of a constellation of satellites called the "A-train".

  12. How much information do extinction and backscattering measurements contain about the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosol?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahnert, Michael; Andersson, Emma

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the problem of assimilating multiwavelength lidar observations of extinction and backscattering coefficients of aerosols into a chemical transport model. More specifically, we consider the inverse problem of determining the chemical composition of aerosols from these observations. The main questions are how much information the observations contain to determine the particles' chemical composition, and how one can optimize a chemical data assimilation system to make maximum use of the available information. We first quantify the information content of the measurements by computing the singular values of the scaled observation operator. From the singular values we can compute the number of signal degrees of freedom, Ns, and the reduction in Shannon entropy, H. As expected, the information content as expressed by either Ns or H grows as one increases the number of observational parameters and/or wavelengths. However, the information content is strongly sensitive to the observation error. The larger the observation error variance, the lower the growth rate of Ns or H with increasing number of observations. The right singular vectors of the scaled observation operator can be employed to transform the model variables into a new basis in which the components of the state vector can be partitioned into signal-related and noise-related components. We incorporate these results in a chemical data assimilation algorithm by introducing weak constraints that restrict the assimilation algorithm to acting on the signal-related model variables only. This ensures that the information contained in the measurements is fully exploited, but not overused. Numerical tests show that the constrained data assimilation algorithm provides a solution to the inverse problem that is considerably less noisy than the corresponding unconstrained algorithm. This suggests that the restriction of the algorithm to the signal-related model variables suppresses

  13. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010.

  14. Seasat over-land scatterometer data. I - Global overview of the Ku-band backscatter coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennett, Rosemary G.; Li, Fuk K.

    1989-01-01

    Statistics on the backscatter coefficient sigma(0) from the Ku-band Seasat-A Satellite Scatterometer (SASS) collected over the world's land surfaces are presented. This spaceborne scatterometer provided data on sigma(0) between latitudes 80 deg S and 80 deg N at incidence angles up to 70 deg. The global statistics of vertical (V) and horizontal (H) polarization backscatter coefficients for 10 deg bands in latitude are presented for incidence angles between 20 deg and 70 deg and compared with the Skylab and ground spectrometer results. Global images of the time-averaged V polarization sigma(0) at a 45 deg incidence angle and its dependence on the incidence angle are presented and compared to a generalized map of the terrain type. Global images of the differences between the V and H polarization backscatter coefficients are presented and discussed. The most inhomogeneous region, which contains the deserts of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, is studied in greater detail and compared with the terrain type.

  15. A tunable coherent CO2 lidar for measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    A coherent laser radar system using a grating-tunable, injection-locked TEA-CO2 transmitter is being used to measure the altitude dependence of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and attenuation at a variety of CO2 laser wavelengths in the 9-11 micron region. Injection control of the TEA-CO2 laser allows one to obtain Single-Longitudinal-Mode (SLM) pulses which will follow the frequency of the injected radiation if the TEA laser cavity length is adjusted so that a cavity resonance is in proximity with the injected signal frequency, and if various additional conditions are satisfied. Requirements for generation of SLM pulses in this manner from a TEA CO2 laser with an unstable resonator cavity will be discussed. Procedures used for quantitative range-gated measurements of aerosol backscatter and attenuation will also be discussed.

  16. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  17. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  18. Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Amit; Tripathi, S. N.; Kaul, D. S.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2012-01-01

    The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction values near the surface during October March. Higher extinction values at altitudes of 24 km are observed from April to June, a period marked by frequent dust episodes. Version 3 level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol profile products have been compared with corresponding data from MPLNET over Kanpur for the above-mentioned period. Out of the available backscatter profiles, the16 profiles used in this study have time differences less than 3 h and distances less than 130 km. Among these profiles, four cases show good comparison above 400 m with R2 greater than 0.7. Comparison with AERONET data shows that the aerosol type is properly identified by the CALIOP algorithm. Cloud contamination is a possible source of error in the remaining cases of poor comparison. Another source of error is the improper backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which further affects the accuracy of extinction coefficient retrieval.

  19. Backscatter and depolarization measurements of aerosolized biological simulants using a chamber lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Santarpia, Josh; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure agent optical cross sections are well understood from the UV to the LWIR, volume integrated measurements of aerosolized agent material at a few key wavelengths is required to validate existing simulations. Ultimately these simulations will be used to assess the detection performance of various classes of lidar technology spanning the entire range of the optical spectrum. The present work demonstrates an optical measurement architecture based on lidar allowing the measurement of backscatter and depolarization ratio from biological aerosols released in a refereed, 1-m cubic chamber. During 2009, various upgrades have been made to the chamber LIDAR system, which operates at 1.064 μm with sub nanosecond pulses at a 120 Hz repetition rate. The first build of the system demonstrated a sensitivity of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) on the order of 5×105 ppl with 1 GHz InGaAs detectors. To increase the sensitivity and reduce noise, the InGaAs detectors were replaced with larger-area silicon avalanche photodiodes for the second build of the system. In addition, computer controlled step variable neutral density filters are now incorporated to facilitate calibrating the system for absolute back-scatter measurements. Calibrated hard target measurements will be combined with data from the ground truth instruments for cross-section determination of the material aerosolized in the chamber. Measured results are compared to theoretical simulations of cross-sections.

  20. Approximate Global Convergence and Quasi-Reversibility for a Coefficient Inverse Problem with Backscattering Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    L1u. Assume that geodesic lines, generated by the eikonal equation corresponding to the function c (x) are regular, i.e. any two points in R3 can be...backscattering data for a Coefficient Inverse Problem (CIP) for a hyperbolic PDE are generated by a single location of the point source. We develop a new...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 we model the most suitable arrangement for this case, which is to use a single position of the point source and

  1. Ultrasonic backscatter coefficients for weakly scattering, agar spheres in agar phantoms

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael R.; Anderson, Janelle J.; Herd, Maria-Teresa; Ma, Darryl; Haak, Alexander; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Zagzebski, James A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Hall, Timothy J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2010-01-01

    Applicability of ultrasound phantoms to biological tissue has been limited because most phantoms have generally used strong scatterers. The objective was to develop very weakly scattering phantoms, whose acoustic scattering properties are likely closer to those of tissues and then compare theoretical simulations and experimental backscatter coefficient (BSC) results. The phantoms consisted of agar spheres of various diameters (nominally between 90 and 212 μm), containing ultrafiltered milk, suspended in an agar background. BSC estimates were performed at two institutions over the frequency range 1–13 MHz, and compared to three models. Excellent agreement was shown between the two laboratory results as well as with the three models. PMID:20707460

  2. On the non-closure of particle backscattering coefficient in oligotrophic oceans.

    PubMed

    Lee, ZhongPing; Huot, Yannick

    2014-11-17

    Many studies have consistently found that the particle backscattering coefficient (bbp) in oligotrophic oceans estimated from remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) using semi-analytical algorithms is higher than that from in situ measurements. This overestimation can be as high as ~300% for some oligotrophic ocean regions. Various sources potentially responsible for this discrepancy are examined. Further, after applying an empirical algorithm to correct the impact from Raman scattering, it is found that bbp from analytical inversion of Rrs is in good agreement with that from in situ measurements, and that a closure is achieved.

  3. Measurements of the absorption coefficient of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogren, J. A.; Ahlquist, N. C.; Clarke, A. D.; Charlson, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of stratospheric aerosols are measured using a variation on the integrating plate method. The technique is based on the decrease in the transparency of a substrate when an absorbing aerosol is deposited on it. A Lambert scatterer is placed behind the substrate to integrate forward scattered light and minimize the effect of scattering on the measurement. The low pressure in the stratosphere is used for the direct impaction of particles onto a narrow strip of opal glass. The eight samples collected had a median value of 4 x 10 to the -9th m with an uncertainty of + or - 5 x 10 to the -9th m. If this absorption is due to graphitic carbon, then its concentration is estimated at about 0.4 ng/cu m, or about 0.25% of the total aerosol mass concentration. Estimates of the aerosol scattering coefficients based on satellite extinction inversions result in an aerosol single-scattering albedo in the range of 0.96-1.0.

  4. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  5. Accommodation coefficient of HOBr on deliquescent sodium bromide aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachsmuth, M.; Gäggeler, H. W.; von Glasow, R.; Ammann, M.

    2002-06-01

    Uptake of HOBr on sea salt aerosol, sea salt brine or ice is believed to be a key process providing a source of photolabile bromine (Br2) and sustaining ozone depletion cycles in the Arctic troposphere. In the present study, uptake of HOBr on sodium bromide (NaBr) aerosol particles was investigated at an extremely low HOBr concentration of 300 cm-3 using the short-lived radioactive isotopes 83-86Br. Under these conditions, at maximum one HOBr molecule was taken up per particle. The rate of uptake was clearly limited by the mass accommodation coefficient, which was calculated to be 0.6 ± 0.2. This value is a factor of 10 larger than estimates used in earlier models. The atmospheric implications are discussed using the box model "MOCCA'', showing that the increase of the accommodation coefficient of HOBr by a factor of 10 only slightly affects net ozone loss, but significantly increases chlorine release.

  6. Two-wavelength backscattering lidar for stand off detection of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Gawlikowski, Andrzej; Gietka, Andrzej; Kaszczuk, Miroslawa; Knysak, Piotr; Mlodzianko, Andrzej; Muzal, Michal; Piotrowski, Wiesław; Wojtanowski, Jacek

    2008-10-01

    Following article presents LIDAR for stand off detection of aerosols which was constructed in Institute of Optoelectronics in Military University of Technology. LIDAR is a DISC type system (DIfferential SCattering) and is based on analysis of backscattering signal for two wavelengths (λ1 = 1064 nm and λ2 = 532 nm) - the first and the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. Optical receiving system is consisted of aspherical mirror lens, two additional mirrors and a system of interference filters. In detection system of LIDAR a silicon avalanche photodiode and two different amplifiers were used. Whole system is mounted on a specialized platform designed for possibility of LIDAR scanning movements. LIDAR is computer controlled. The compiled software enables regulation of the scanning platform work, gain control, and control of data processing and acquisition system. In the article main functional elements of LIDAR are shown and typical parameters of system work and construction are presented. One presented also first results of research with use of LIDAR. The aim of research was to detect and characterize scattering aerosol, both natural and anthropogenic one. For analyses of natural aerosols, cumulus cloud was used. For analyses of anthropogenic aerosols one used three various pyrotechnic mixtures (DM11, M2, M16) which generate smoke of different parameters. All scattering centers were firstly well described and theoretical analyses were conducted. Results of LIDAR research were compared with theoretical analyses and general conclusions concerning correctness of LIDAR work and its application were drawn.

  7. Cross-imaging system comparison of backscatter coefficient estimates from a tissue-mimicking material

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kibo; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren A.; Kumar, Viksit; Madsen, Ernest L.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Pawlicki, Alexander D.; Oelze, Michael L.; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Zagzebski, James A.; O’Brien, William D.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    A key step toward implementing quantitative ultrasound techniques in a clinical setting is demonstrating that parameters such as the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient (BSC) can be accurately estimated independent of the clinical imaging system used. In previous studies, agreement in BSC estimates for well characterized phantoms was demonstrated across different laboratory systems. The goal of this study was to compare the BSC estimates of a tissue mimicking sample measured using four clinical scanners, each providing RF echo data in the 1-15 MHz frequency range. The sample was previously described and characterized with single-element transducer systems. Using a reference phantom for analysis, excellent quantitative agreement was observed across the four array-based imaging systems for BSC estimates. Additionally, the estimates from data acquired with the clinical systems agreed with theoretical predictions and with estimates from laboratory measurements using single-element transducers. PMID:22978860

  8. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Lofted Aerosol Layers Observed During the First Three Months of CALIPSO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yongxiang; Reagan, John A.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Case studies from the first three months of the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) measurements of lofted aerosol layers are analyzed using transmittance [Young, 1995] and two-wavelength algorithms [Vaughan et al., 2004] to determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratios at 532 and 1064 nm. The transmittance method requires clear air below the layer so that the transmittance through the layer can be determined. Suitable scenes are selected from the browse images and clear air below features is identified by low 532 nm backscatter signal and confirmed by low depolarization and color ratios. The transmittance and two-wavelength techniques are applied to a number of lofted layers and the extinction-to-backscatter ratios are compared with values obtained from the CALIPSO aerosol models [Omar et al., 2004]. The results obtained from these studies are used to adjust the aerosol models and develop observations based extinction-to-backscatter ratio look-up tables and phase functions. Values obtained by these techniques are compared to Sa determinations using other independent methods with a goal of developing probability distribution functions of aerosol type-specific extinction to backscatter ratios. In particular, the results are compared to values determined directly by the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) during the CALIPSO CloudSat Validation Experiments (CCVEX) and Sa determined by the application of the two-wavelength lidar Constrained Ratio Aerosol Model-fit (CRAM) retrieval approach [Cattrall et al., 2005; Reagan et al., 2004] to the HSRL data. The results are also compared to values derived using the empirical relationship between the multiple-scattering fraction and the linear depolarization ratio by using Monte Carlo simulations of water clouds [Hu et al., 2006].

  9. Analysis of DIAL/HSRL aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles during the SEAC4RS campaign with an aerosol assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Randles, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We retrieve aerosol concentrations and optical information from vertical profiles of airborne 532 nm extinction and 532 and 1064 nm backscatter measurements made during the SEAC4RS summer 2013 campaign. The observations are from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) on board the NASA DC-8. Instead of retrieving information about aerosol microphysical properties such as indexes of refraction, we seek information more directly applicable to an aerosol transport model - in our case the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module used in the GEOS-5 Earth modeling system. A joint atmosphere/aerosol mini-reanalysis was performed for the SEAC4RS period using GEOS-5. The meteorological reanalysis followed the MERRA-2 atmospheric reanalysis protocol, and aerosol information from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET provided a constraint on the simulated aerosol optical depth (i.e., total column loading of aerosols). We focus on the simulated concentrations of 10 relevant aerosol species simulated by the GOCART module: dust, sulfate, and organic and black carbon. Our first retrieval algorithm starts with the SEAC4RS mini-reanalysis and adjusts the concentration of each GOCART aerosol species so that differences between the observed and simulated backscatter and extinction measurements are minimized. In this case, too often we are unable to simulate the observations by simple adjustment of the aerosol concentrations. A second retrieval approach adjusts both the aerosol concentrations and the optical parameters (i.e., assigned mass extinction efficiency) associated with each GOCART species. We present results from DC-8 flights over smoke from forest fires over the western US using both retrieval approaches. Finally, we compare our retrieved quantities with in-situ observations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and mass concentrations at flight altitude.

  10. Aerosol hygroscopic growth parameterization based on a solute specific coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Steil, B.; Xu, L.; Penner, J. E.; Lelieveld, J.

    2011-09-01

    Water is a main component of atmospheric aerosols and its amount depends on the particle chemical composition. We introduce a new parameterization for the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), based on an empirical relation between water activity (aw) and solute molality (μs) through a single solute specific coefficient νi. Three main advantages are: (1) wide applicability, (2) simplicity and (3) analytical nature. (1) Our approach considers the Kelvin effect and covers ideal solutions at large relative humidity (RH), including CCN activation, as well as concentrated solutions with high ionic strength at low RH such as the relative humidity of deliquescence (RHD). (2) A single νi coefficient suffices to parameterize the HGF for a wide range of particle sizes, from nanometer nucleation mode to micrometer coarse mode particles. (3) In contrast to previous methods, our analytical aw parameterization depends not only on a linear correction factor for the solute molality, instead νi also appears in the exponent in form x · ax. According to our findings, νi can be assumed constant for the entire aw range (0-1). Thus, the νi based method is computationally efficient. In this work we focus on single solute solutions, where νi is pre-determined with the bisection method from our analytical equations using RHD measurements and the saturation molality μssat. The computed aerosol HGF and supersaturation (Köhler-theory) compare well with the results of the thermodynamic reference model E-AIM for the key compounds NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 relevant for CCN modeling and calibration studies. The equations introduced here provide the basis of our revised gas-liquid-solid partitioning model, i.e. version 4 of the EQuilibrium Simplified Aerosol Model (EQSAM4), described in a companion paper.

  11. Backscatter factors and mass energy-absorption coefficient ratios for diagnostic radiology dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Bouchard, Hugo; Fransson, Annette; Andreo, Pedro

    2011-11-21

    Backscatter factors, B, and mass energy-absorption coefficient ratios, (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air), for the determination of the surface dose in diagnostic radiology were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The main purpose was to extend the range of available data to qualities used in modern x-ray techniques, particularly for interventional radiology. A comprehensive database for mono-energetic photons between 4 and 150 keV and different field sizes was created for a 15 cm thick water phantom. Backscattered spectra were calculated with the PENELOPE Monte Carlo system, scoring track-length fluence differential in energy with negligible statistical uncertainty; using the Monte Carlo computed spectra, B factors and (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air) were then calculated numerically for each energy. Weighted averaging procedures were subsequently used to convolve incident clinical spectra with mono-energetic data. The method was benchmarked against full Monte Carlo calculations of incident clinical spectra obtaining differences within 0.3-0.6%. The technique used enables the calculation of B and (μ(en)/ρ)(w, air) for any incident spectrum without further time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. The adequacy of the extended dosimetry data to a broader range of clinical qualities than those currently available, while keeping consistency with existing data, was confirmed through detailed comparisons. Mono-energetic and spectra-averaged values were compared with published data, including those in ICRU Report 74 and IAEA TRS-457, finding average differences of 0.6%. Results are provided in comprehensive tables appropriated for clinical use. Additional qualities can easily be calculated using a designed GUI interface in conjunction with software to generate incident photon spectra.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of particle backscattering and extinction coefficients and wind velocity by lidar with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer: principle of operation and performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, Didier; Pelon, Jacques

    2003-02-01

    The development of remote-sensing instruments that can be used to monitor several parameters at the same time is important for the study of complex processes such as those that control climate and environment. In this paper the performance of a new concept of lidar receiver that allows for the direct measurement of aerosol and cloud optical properties simultaneously with wind velocity is investigated. This receiver uses a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Two different configurations, either with four photometric output channels or with fringe imaging on a multichannel detector, are studied. Analytical expressions of the statistical errors are given under the assumption of Gaussian signal spectra. It is shown that similar accuracies can be achieved for both configurations. Performance modeling of the retrieval of semitransparent cloud optical scattering properties and wind velocity was done at different operation wavelengths for a Nd:YAG laser source. Results for such a lidar system onboard an aircraft flying at an altitude of 12 km show that for semitransparent clouds the best results were obtained at 355 nm, with relative standard deviations of 0.5% and 5% for the backscatter and extinction coefficients, respectively, together with a velocity accuracy of 0.2 ms-1. The accuracy of optical properties retrieved for boundary layer aerosols are comparable, whereas the velocity accuracy is decreased to 1 ms-1. Finally, an extrapolation to a large 355-nm spaceborne lidar shows accuracies in the range from 2.5% to 5% for the backscatter coefficient and from 10% to 15% for the extinction coefficient together with a vertical wind speed accuracy of better than 0.5 ms-1 for semitransparent clouds and boundary layer, with a vertical resolution of 500 m and a 100 shot averaging.

  13. Use of Probability Distribution Functions for Discriminating Between Cloud and Aerosol in Lidar Backscatter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, Davd M.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Poole, Lamont R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; McGill, Mathew

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the algorithm hat will be used during the upcoming Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission for discriminating between clouds and aerosols detected in two wavelength backscatter lidar profiles. We first analyze single-test and multiple-test classification approaches based on one-dimensional and multiple-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) in the context of a two-class feature identification scheme. From these studies we derive an operational algorithm based on a set of 3-dimensional probability distribution functions characteristic of clouds and aerosols. A dataset acquired by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) is used to test the algorithm. Comparisons are conducted between the CALIPSO algorithm results and the CPL data product. The results obtained show generally good agreement between the two methods. However, of a total of 228,264 layers analyzed, approximately 5.7% are classified as different types by the CALIPSO and CPL algorithm. This disparity is shown to be due largely to the misclassification of clouds as aerosols by the CPL algorithm. The use of 3-dimensional PDFs in the CALIPSO algorithm is found to significantly reduce this type of error. Dust presents a special case. Because the intrinsic scattering properties of dust layers can be very similar to those of clouds, additional algorithm testing was performed using an optically dense layer of Saharan dust measured during the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). In general, the method is shown to distinguish reliably between dust layers and clouds. The relatively few erroneous classifications occurred most often in the LITE data, in those regions of the Saharan dust layer where the optical thickness was the highest.

  14. Aerosol measurements over the Pacific Ocean in support of the IR aerosol backscatter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Savoie, Dennis L.

    1995-01-01

    The major efforts under NASA contract NAG8-841 included: (1) final analyses of the samples collected during the first GLOBE survey flight that occurred in November 1989 and collections and analysis of aerosol samples during the second GLOBE survey flight in May and June 1990. During the first GLOBE survey flight, daily samples were collected at four stations (Midway, Rarotonga, American Samoa, and Norfolk Island) throughout the month of November 1989. Weekly samples were collected at Shemya, Alaska, and at Karamea, New Zealand. During the second GLOBE survey flight, daily samples were collected at Midway, Oahu, American Samoa, Rarotonga, and Norfolk Island; weekly samples were collected at Shemya. These samples were all analyzed for sodium (sea-salt), chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and methanesulfonate at the University of Miami and for aluminum at the University of Rhode Island (under a subcontract). (2) Samples continued to be collected on a weekly basis at all stations during the periods between and after the survey flights. These weekly samples were also analyzed at the University of Miami for the suite of water-soluble species. (3) In August 1990, the results obtained from the above studies were submitted to the appropriate personnel at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to become part of the GLOBE data base for comparison with data from instruments used aboard the aircraft. In addition, the data will be compared with data previously obtained at these stations as part of the Sea-Air Exchange (SEAREX) Program. This comparison will provide valuable information on the representativeness of the periods in terms of the longer term aerosol climatology over the Pacific Ocean. (4) Several publications have been written using data from this grant. The data will continue to be used in the future as part of a continuing investigation of the long-term trends and interannual variations in aerosol species concentrations over the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  16. A Parameterized Inversion Model for Soil Moisture and Biomass from Polarimetric Backscattering Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Saatchi, Sassan; Jaruwatanadilok, Sermsak

    2012-01-01

    A semi-empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture, root mean square (RMS) height and biomass from polarimetric SAR data is explained and analyzed in this paper. The algorithm is a simplification of the distorted Born model. It takes into account the physical scattering phenomenon and has three major components: volume, double-bounce and surface. This simplified model uses the three backscattering coefficients ( sigma HH, sigma HV and sigma vv) at low-frequency (P-band). The inversion process uses the Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear least-squares method to estimate the structural parameters. The estimation process is entirely explained in this paper, from initialization of the unknowns to retrievals. A sensitivity analysis is also done where the initial values in the inversion process are varying randomly. The results show that the inversion process is not really sensitive to initial values and a major part of the retrievals has a root-mean-square error lower than 5% for soil moisture, 24 Mg/ha for biomass and 0.49 cm for roughness, considering a soil moisture of 40%, roughness equal to 3cm and biomass varying from 0 to 500 Mg/ha with a mean of 161 Mg/ha

  17. Application of HARLIE Measurements in Mesoscale Studies: Measurements of Aerosol Backscatter and Winds During A Gust Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Miller, David; Schwemmer, Geary; Starr, David OC (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar atmospheric systems have required large telescope for receiving atmospheric backscatter signals. Thus, the relative complexity in size and ease of operation has limited their wider use in the atmospheric science and meteorology community. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) uses a scanning holographic receiver and demonstrates that these issues can be overcome. HARLIE participated at the DOE-ARM Southern Great Plains site (CART) during the Water Vapor Intensive Operation Period (WVIOP2000) held September-October 2000. It provided exceptional high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three dimensions. HARLIE recorded over 110 hours of data were recorded on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000. Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1-micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar measures atmospheric backscatter on the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km, 360-degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds during the daily, operating period. In this study we present highlights of HARLIE-based measurements of the boundary layer and cloud parameters as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is sufficiently resolved structure in the backscatter. In particular we present data and discussions from a bore-front case observed on 23 September 2000.

  18. Elastic back-scattering patterns via particle surface roughness and orientation from single trapped airborne aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard; Wang, Chuji; Muñoz, Olga; Videen, Gorden; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for simultaneously measuring the back-scattering patterns and images of single laser-trapped airborne aerosol particles. This arrangement allows us to observe how the back-scattering patterns change with particle size, shape, surface roughness, orientation, etc. The recoded scattering patterns cover the angular ranges of θ=167.7-180° (including at 180° exactly) and ϕ=0-360° in spherical coordinates. The patterns show that the width of the average speckle intensity islands or rings is inversely proportional to particle size and how the shape of these intensity rings or islands also depends on the surface roughness. For an irregularly shaped particle with substantial roughness, the back-scattering patterns are formed with speckle intensity islands, the size and orientations of these islands depend more on the overall particle size and orientation, but have less relevance to the fine alteration of the surface structure and shapes. The back-scattering intensity at 180° is very sensitive to the particle parameters. It can change from a maximum to a minimum with a change of 0.1% in particle size or refractive index. The method has potential use in characterizing airborne aerosol particles, and may be used to provide back-scattering information for LIDAR applications.

  19. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  20. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  1. Aerosol Backscatter from Airborne Continuous Wave CO2 Lidars Over Western North America and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter, beta, variability gives a direct indication of aerosol loading. Since aerosol variability is governed by regional sources and sinks as well as affected by its transport due to meteorological conditions, it is important to characterize this loading at different locations and times. Lidars are sensitive instruments that can effectively provide high-resolution, large-scale sampling of the atmosphere remotely by measuring aerosol beta, thereby capturing detailed temporal and spatial variability of aerosol loading, Although vertical beta profiles are usually obtained by pulsed lidars, airborne-focused CW lidars, with high sensitivity and short time integration, can provide higher resolution sampling in the vertical, thereby revealing detailed structure of aerosol layers. During the 1995 NASA Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission, NASA MSFC airborne-focused CW CO2 Doppler lidars, operating at 9.1 and 10.6-micrometers wavelength, obtained high resolution in situ aerosol beta measurements to characterize aerosol variability. The observed variability in beta at 9.1-micrometers wavelength with altitude is presented as well as comparison with some pulsed lidar profiles.

  2. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  3. An Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio Database Derived from the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network: Applications for Space-based Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Spinhime, James D.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Holben, Brent; Tsay, Si-Chee; Bucholtz, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Backscatter lidar signals are a function of both backscatter and extinction. Hence, these lidar observations alone cannot separate the two quantities. The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio, S, is the key parameter required to accurately retrieve extinction and optical depth from backscatter lidar observations of aerosol layers. S is commonly defined as 4*pi divided by the product of the single scatter albedo and the phase function at 180-degree scattering angle. Values of S for different aerosol types are not well known, and are even more difficult to determine when aerosols become mixed. Here we present a new lidar-sunphotometer S database derived from Observations of the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). MPLNET is a growing worldwide network of eye-safe backscatter lidars co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Values of S for different aerosol species and geographic regions will be presented. A framework for constructing an S look-up table will be shown. Look-up tables of S are needed to calculate aerosol extinction and optical depth from space-based lidar observations in the absence of co-located AOD data. Applications for using the new S look-up table to reprocess aerosol products from NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will be discussed.

  4. Simulation of Cloud-aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) Attenuated Backscatter Profiles Using the Global Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart; Cope, Martin; Lee, Sunhee; Emmerson, Kathryn; Woodhouse, Matthew; Bellouin, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    To permit the calculation of the radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols, we have linked our aerosol-chemical transport model (CTMGLOMAP) to a new radiation module (UKCARADAER). In order to help assess and improve the accuracy of the radiation code, in particular the height dependence of the predicted scattering, we have developed a module that simulates attenuated backscatter (ABS) profiles that would be measured by the satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) if it were to sample an atmosphere with the same aerosol loading as predicted by the CTM. Initial results of our comparisons of the predicted ABS profiles with actual CALIOP data are encouraging but some differences are noted, particularly in marine boundary layers where the scattering is currently under-predicted and in dust layers where it is often over-predicted. The sources of these differences are being investigated.

  5. Developing a portable, autonomous aerosol backscatter lidar for network or remote operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2013-03-01

    Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols with high spatial and temporal resolution, making it well suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. Environment Canada has developed a portable, autonomous lidar system that can be monitored remotely and operated continuously except during precipitation events. The lidar, housed in a small trailer, simultaneously emits two wavelengths of laser light (1064 nm and 532 nm) at energies of approximately 150 mJ/pulse/wavelength and detects the backscatter signal at 1064 nm and both polarizations at 532 nm. For laser energies of this magnitude, the challenge resides in designing a system that meets the airspace safety requirements for autonomous operations. Through the combination of radar technology, beam divergence, laser cavity interlocks and using computer log files, this risk was mitigated. A Continuum Inlite small footprint laser is the backbone of the system because of three design criteria: requiring infrequent flash lamp changes compared to previous Nd : YAG Q-switch lasers, complete software control capability and a built-in laser energy monitoring system. A computer-controlled interface was designed to monitor the health of the system, adjust operational parameters and maintain a climate-controlled environment. Through an Internet connection, it also transmitted the vital performance indicators and data stream to allow the lidar profile data for multiple instruments from near ground to 15 km, every 10 s, to be viewed, in near real-time via a website. The details of the system design and calibration will be discussed and the success of the instrument as tested within the framework of a national lidar network dubbed CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network). In addition, the transport of a forest fire plume across the country will be shown as evidenced by the lidar

  6. Developing a portable, autonomous aerosol backscatter lidar for network or remote operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2012-11-01

    Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols with high spatial and temporal resolution, making it well-suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. Environment Canada has developed a portable, autonomous lidar system that can be monitored remotely and operate continuously except during precipitation events. The lidar, housed in a small trailer, simultaneously emits two wavelengths of laser light (1064 nm and 532 nm) at energies of approximately 150 mJ/pulse/wavelength and detects the backscatter signal at 1064 nm and both polarizations at 532 nm. For laser energies of this magnitude, the challenge resides in designing a system that meets the airspace safety requirements for autonomous operations. Through the combination of radar technology, beam divergence, laser cavity interlocks and using computer log files, this risk was mitigated. A Continuum Inlite small footprint laser is the backbone of the system because of three design criteria: requiring infrequent flash lamp changes compared to previous Nd:YAG Q-switch lasers, complete software control capability and a built-in laser energy monitoring system. A computer-controlled interface was designed to monitor the health of the system, adjust operational parameters and maintain a climate-controlled environment. Through an internet connection, it also transmitted the vital performance indicators and data stream to allow the lidar profile data for multiple instruments from near ground to 15 km, every 10 s, to be viewed, in near real-time via a website. The details of the system design and calibration will be discussed and the success of the instrument as tested within the framework of a national lidar network dubbed CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network). In addition, the transport of a forest fire plume across the country will be shown as evidenced by the lidar network

  7. Retrieve the soil moisture from radar backscattering coefficient using ALOS/PALSAR polarization (HH/VV) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buho, Hoshino; Ruichen, Jia; Nawata, Hiroshi; Abdelaziz, Karamalla; Yoda, Kiyotsugu; Abdel, Babiker

    Mesquite (Prosopis spp) are ever green leguminous trees or shrubs. These species are native to North and South America. They were introduced to Sudan in 1917 from South Africa and Egypt and planted in Khartoum state in central Sudan (Broun and Massey, 1929). Mesquite was originally favored as sand dunes stabilizer and as fodder for livestock. However, sparse stands will often form impenetrable thickets formations that hinder movement of humans and animals. Many infestations are along waterways, both natural and constructed, however, plants can grow also well in drier areas away from water sites. Even in natural rangelands it is an aggressive competitor and can quickly invade upland country. Mesquite thickets can out-compete other vegetation, interfere with mustering and block access to watering places. The sharp thorns can injure animals and puncture vehicle tyres. Seeds can stay dormant for years, and therefore seedlings can re-appear in areas that have been previously cleared. The main objective of Remote Sensing Method for Mesquite Control (RSMMC) is to identify pattern and extend of mesquite spread along spatial and temporal variations using remote sensing means, as main part of mesquite control. Estimation of soil moisture by inversion of SAR data can be performed using physical or semi-empirical approaches. The physical approach uses backscattering models that are capable of reproducing the radar backscattering coefficient from the sensor configuration (wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle) and soil parameters (soil moisture and surface roughness for bare soils). This study adopted calculation of PALSAR L-band radar backscattering coefficient (dB), to estimate soil moisture distribution area based on TDR soil moisture ground measurement data. To retrieve soil moisture (mv) from a single radar configuration, it is necessary to establish a relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient (dB) and soil moisture (mv) measurement.

  8. Toward a Combined SAGE II-HALOE Aerosol Climatology: An Evaluation of HALOE Version 19 Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 microns is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 microns is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 micron aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40micronaerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 micron channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived data sets.

  9. Monitoring spatial and temporal variations of the rice backscatter coefficient (σ0) at different phenological stages in Sungai Burong and Sawah Sempadan, Kuala Selangor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aishah Mohd Rasit, Siti; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Razak, Janatul Aziera Abdul; Ghani, Aisyah Afiqah Abdul; Fikri Abdullah, Ahmad; Wayayok, Aimrun

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring rice growth and yield estimation using optical remote sensing data constitutes a big challenge largely due to cloud conditions that are typical of tropical regions. Using Radar remote sensing data helps because it overcomes the cloud issue and distinguishes the behaviour of the radar backscattering of rice crops specifically. This study indicated the temporal change of rice backscatter (σ°) at two different growth stages using HH polarimetric Radarsat-2. The aims of this study are: (1) to identify crop with different life spans based on the backscatter coefficient's values from a single polarisation for understanding the backscatter characteristic of rice over the entire growth cycle, and (2) to understand the advantages and limitations using the RADARSAT-2, C band with HH polarisation. The values of backscattering coefficients have been related to the Malaysia rice crop calendar to get the information of the growth status. The result shows strong backscatter coefficient values on the 21st of May that referred to the reproductive-maturity of rice in the Sawah Sempadan area, and out of season for the Sungai Burong area. While for the August 1st imagery, the result shows weak backscatter values which refers to early vegetative and vegetative-reproductive. The values of backscattering coefficient are found to be much less for early vegetation compare to mature rice crop. In this paper, we have also performed a classification of a rice field using Landsat 8 OLI.

  10. Boundary Layer Aerosol Composition over Sierra Nevada Mountains using 9.11- and 10.59-micron CW Lidars and Modeled Backscatter from Size Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An inversion technique has been developed to determine volume fractions of an atmospheric aerosol composed primarily of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate and water combined with fixed concentration of elemental and organic carbon. It is based on measured aerosol backscatter obtained with 9.11 - and 10.59-micron wavelength continuous wave CO2 lidars and modeled backscatter from aerosol size distribution data. The technique is demonstrated during a flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft over the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, California on 19 September, 1995. Volume fraction of each component and effective complex refractive index of the composite particle were determined assuming an internally mixed composite aerosol model. The volume fractions were also used to re-compute aerosol backscatter, providing good agreement with the lidar-measured data. The robustness of the technique for determining volume fractions was extended with a comparison of calculated 2.1,-micron backscatter from size distribution data with the measured lidar data converted to 2.1,-micron backscatter using an earlier derived algorithm, verifying the algorithm as well as the backscatter calculations.

  11. GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Pacific survey mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Arnold, James E.; Williams, Steven F.

    1991-01-01

    NASA conducted the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Survey Mission over the near coastal and remote Pacific Ocean during 6 to 30 Nov. 1989 (GLOBE 1) and 13 May to 5 Jun. 1990 (GLOBE 2). These missions studied the optical, physical, and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Particular emphasis was given to the magnitude and spatial variability of aerosol backscatter coefficients at mid-infrared wavelengths, and to the remote middle and upper troposphere, where these aerosol properties are poorly understood. Survey instruments were selected to provide either direct beta measurements at the key wavelengths, empirical links with long term or global scale aerosol climatologies, or aerosol microphysics data required to model any of these quantities. The survey deployment included both long distance 6 to 8 hour transit flights and detailed 4 to 6 hour local flights. Several general features were observed from preliminary Survey data analyses. Validation and intercomparison results have shown good agreement, usually better than a factor of two. Atmospheric aerosols frequently exhibited a three layer vertical structure, with (1) high and fairly uniform backscatter in the shallow cloud capped marine boundary layer; (2) moderate and highly variable backscatter in a deeper overlaying cloud pumped layer; and (3) low, regionally uniform, but seasonally and latitudinally variable backscatter in the middle and upper troposphere. The survey missions represent two isolated snapshots of a small portion of the global aerosol system. Consequently, Survey results can best be understood by synthesizing them with the more comprehensive GLOBE data base, which is being compiled at NASA-Marshall.

  12. An analysis of the characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficients at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B.; Eun, S.; Seo, W.; Park, J.; Ahn, J.; Moon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can scatter and absorb solar radiation and their spatial/temporal distributions are highly inhomogeneous due to short lifetimes (about a few weeks or less). Through scattering and absorption of solar radiation, aerosols directly affect visibility and climate through the modification of the Earth's energy budget (Charlson et al., 1992; Yan, 2007; Wang, 2012). This study investigates long-term trends and characteristics of aerosol light scattering coefficient at Seoul and Baengnyeongdo, 100 km upstream of Seoul, in Korea. Aerosol scattering coefficients were measured continuously with nephelometers. The analysis period is limited to one year of 2011. For the relationship analysis of extinction coefficients (σext) to visibility and aerosol optical depth, σsp observed at 3 p.m. have been used with help of aerosol absorption coefficients (σap) in order to remove its dependence upon relative humidity (RH), and also those of rainy period have been excluded. As expected, σext estimated are inversely proportional to visibility observation by eye. Aerosol extinction coefficients have been vertically integrated with an assumption of nearly well-mixed within an e-folding height to determine aerosol optical depth (τa), and compared with those retrieved from sunphotometer. The results show a reasonable agreement in spite of an inherent difference of each definition. We expect these findings would help to eventually understand aerosol radiative forcing and its effect on the regional climate change around Korea.

  13. First results from the aerosol lidar and backscatter sonde intercomparison campaign STRAIT'1997 at table mountain facility during February-March 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M. R.; Haner, D. A.; Kjome, N. T.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Schaefer, H. - J.; Schrems, O.

    1998-01-01

    First results of an intercomparison measurement campaign between three aerosol lidar instruments and in-situ backscatter sondes performed at Table Mountain Facility (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg E, 2280 m asl) in February-March 1997 are presented. During the campaign a total of 414 hours of lidar data were acquired by the Aerosol-Temperature-Lidar (ATL, Goddard Space Flight Center) the Mobile-aerosol-Raman-Lidar (MARL, Alfred Wegener Institute), and the TMF-Aerosol-Lidar (TAL, Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and four backscatter sondes were launched. From the data set altitude profiles of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization of stratospheric background aerosols at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and optically thin high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are derived. On the basis of a sulfuric acid aerosol model color ratio profiles obtained from two wavelength lidar data are compared to the corresponding profiles derived from the sonde observations. We find an excellent agreement between the in-situ and ATL lidar data with respect to backscatter and color ratio. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of 26 nights during the campaign. Lidar observations with 17 minute temporal and 120-300 m spatial resolution indicate high spatial and temporal variability of the cirrus layers. Qualitative agreement is found between concurrent lidar measurements of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization.

  14. Electron back-scattering coefficient below 5 keV: Analytical expressions and surface-barrier effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazaux, J.

    2012-10-01

    Simple analytical expressions for the electron backscattering coefficient, η, are established from published data obtained in the ˜0.4-5 keV range for 21 elements ranging from Be to Au. They take into account the decline in η with a decrease in energy E° for high-Z elements and the reverse behavior for low-Z elements. The proposed expressions for η (E°) lead to crossing energies situated in the 0.4-1 keV range and they may be reasonably extended to any of the other elements—via an interpolation procedure—to metallic alloys and probably to compounds. The influence of the surface barrier on the escape probability of the back-scattered electrons is next evaluated. This evaluation provides a theoretical basis to explain the observed deviation between various published data as a consequence of surface contamination or oxidation. Various practical applications and strategies are deduced for the η-measurements in dedicated instruments as well for the image interpretation in low voltage scanning electron microscopy based on the backscattered electron detection. In this microscopy, the present investigation allows to generalize the scarce contrast changes and contrast reversals previously observed on multi elemental samples and it suggests the possibility of a new type of contrast: the work function contrast.

  15. Applications of interferometrically derived terrain slopes: Normalization of SAR backscatter and the interferometric correlation coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Charles L.; Wegmueller, Urs; Small, David L.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Terrain slopes, which can be measured with Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferometry either from a height map or from the interferometric phase gradient, were used to calculate the local incidence angle and the correct pixel area. Both are required for correct thematic interpretation of SAR data. The interferometric correlation depends on the pixel area projected on a plane perpendicular to the look vector and requires correction for slope effects. Methods for normalization of the backscatter and interferometric correlation for ERS-1 SAR are presented.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of coherent backscatter for identification of the optical coefficients of biological tissues in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddowes, M. H.; Mills, T. N.; Delpy, D. T.

    1995-05-01

    A Monte Carlo model of light backscattered from turbid media has been used to simulate the effects of weak localization in biological tissues. A validation technique is used that implies that for the scattering and absorption coefficients and for refractive index mismatches found in tissues, the Monte Carlo method is likely to provide more accurate results than the methods previously used. The model also has the ability to simulate the effects of various illumination profiles and other laboratory-imposed conditions. A curve-fitting routine has been developed that might be used to extract the optical coefficients from the angular intensity profiles seen in experiments on turbid biological tissues, data that could be obtained in vivo.

  17. Specific absorption and backscatter coefficient signatures in southeastern Atlantic coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Measurements of natural water samples in the field and laboratory of hyperspectral signatures of total absorption and reflectance were obtained using long pathlength absorption systems (50 cm pathlength). Water was sampled in Indian River Lagoon, Banana River and Port Canaveral, Florida. Stations were also occupied in near coastal waters out to the edge of the Gulf Stream in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center, Florida and estuarine waters along Port Royal Sound and along the Beaufort River tidal area in South Carolina. The measurements were utilized to calculate natural water specific absorption, total backscatter and specific backscatter optical signatures. The resulting optical cross section signatures suggest different models are needed for the different water types and that the common linear model may only appropriate for coastal and oceanic water types. Mean particle size estimates based on the optical cross section, suggest as expected, that particle size of oceanic particles are smaller than more turbid water types. The data discussed and presented are necessary for remote sensing applications of sensors as well as for development and inversion of remote sensing algorithms.

  18. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  19. Backscatter Modeling at 2.1 Micron Wavelength for Space-Based and Airborne Lidars Using Aerosol Physico-Chemical and Lidar Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, V.; Rothermel, J.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Clarke, A. D.; Cutten, D. R.; Bowdle, D. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    Space-based and airborne coherent Doppler lidars designed for measuring global tropospheric wind profiles in cloud-free air rely on backscatter, beta from aerosols acting as passive wind tracers. Aerosol beta distribution in the vertical can vary over as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of a wave length-specific, space-borne or airborne lidar must account for the magnitude of 8 in the region or features of interest. The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and scheduled for launch on the Space Shuttle in 2001, will demonstrate wind measurements from space using a solid-state 2 micrometer coherent Doppler lidar. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand variability of aerosol beta at 2.1 micrometers, to evaluate signal detection under varying aerosol loading conditions. Although few direct measurements of beta at 2.1 micrometers exist, extensive datasets, including climatologies in widely-separated locations, do exist for other wavelengths based on CO2 and Nd:YAG lidars. Datasets also exist for the associated microphysical and chemical properties. An example of a multi-parametric dataset is that of the NASA GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in 1990 in which aerosol chemistry and size distributions were measured concurrently with multi-wavelength lidar backscatter observations. More recently, continuous-wave (CW) lidar backscatter measurements at mid-infrared wavelengths have been made during the Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment in 1995. Using Lorenz-Mie theory, these datasets have been used to develop a method to convert lidar backscatter to the 2.1 micrometer wavelength. This paper presents comparison of modeled backscatter at wavelengths for which backscatter measurements exist including converted beta (sub 2.1).

  20. THE MASS ACCOMMODATION COEFFICIENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE AEROSOL. (R823514)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mass transfer rate of pure ammonium nitrate between the aerosol and gas phases was
    quantified experimentally by the use of the tandem differential mobility analyzer/scanning mobility
    particle sizer (TDMA/SMPS) technique. Ammonium nitrate particles 80-220 nm in diameter<...

  1. Retrievals of atmospheric CO2 from simulated space-borne measurements of backscattered near-infrared sunlight: accounting for aerosol effects.

    PubMed

    Butz, André; Hasekamp, Otto P; Frankenberg, Christian; Aben, Ilse

    2009-06-20

    Retrievals of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from space-borne measurements of backscattered near-infrared sunlight are hampered by aerosol and cirrus cloud scattering effects. We propose a retrieval approach that allows for the retrieval of a few effective aerosol parameters simultaneously with the CO2 total column by parameterizing particle amount, height distribution, and microphysical properties. Two implementations of the proposed method covering different spectral bands are tested for an ensemble of simulated nadir observations for aerosol (and cirrus) loaded scenes over low- and mid-latitudinal land surfaces. The residual aerosol-induced CO(2) errors are mostly below 1% up to aerosol optical thickness 0.5. The proposed methods also perform convincing for scenes where cirrus clouds of optical thickness 0.1 overlay the aerosol.

  2. Tunable 2.1-micron Ho lidar for simultaneous range-resolved measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, Sungdo; Chan, Kin P.; Killinger, Dennis K.

    1991-01-01

    An eye-safe tunable differential-absorption lidar system has been developed for the range-resolved measurement of aerosol backscatter and water vapor in the atmosphere. The lidar uses a flash-lamp-pumped, Q-switched, 10-mJ solid-state Ho:YSGG laser that is continuously tunable over a 20/cm wavelength range near 2.084 microns. Both path-averaged and range-resolved measurements were performed with the Ho differential-absorption lidar system. Preliminary measurements have been made of the temporal variation of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and water-vapor profiles at ranges out to 1 km. These results indicate that the Ho lidar has the potential for the eye-safe remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor and backscatter profiles at longer ranges if suitably enhanced in laser power and laser linewidth.

  3. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficients onto single component organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lakey, P S J; George, I J; Whalley, L K; Baeza-Romero, M T; Heard, D E

    2015-04-21

    Measurements of HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) were made onto a variety of organic aerosols derived from glutaric acid, glyoxal, malonic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, squalene, monoethanol amine sulfate, monomethyl amine sulfate, and two sources of humic acid, for an initial HO2 concentration of 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3), room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. Values in the range of γ < 0.004 to γ = 0.008 ± 0.004 were measured for all of the aerosols apart from the aerosols from the two sources of humic acid. For humic acid aerosols, uptake coefficients in the range of γ = 0.007 ± 0.002 to γ = 0.09 ± 0.03 were measured. Elevated concentrations of copper (16 ± 1 and 380 ± 20 ppb) and iron (600 ± 30 and 51 000 ± 3000 ppb) ions were measured in the humic acid atomizer solutions compared to the other organics that can explain the higher uptake values measured. A strong dependence upon relative humidity was also observed for uptake onto humic acid, with larger uptake coefficients seen at higher humidities. Possible hypotheses for the humidity dependence include the changing liquid water content of the aerosol, a change in the mass accommodation coefficient or in the Henry's law constant.

  4. Validation of quantitative attenuation and backscattering coefficient measurements by optical coherence tomography in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime.

    PubMed

    Almasian, Mitra; Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Faber, Dirk J

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the potential to quantitatively measure optical properties of tissue such as the attenuation coefficient and backscattering coefficient. However, to obtain reliable values for strong scattering tissues, accurate consideration of the effects of multiple scattering and the nonlinear relation between the scattering coefficient and scatterer concentration (concentration-dependent scattering) is required. We present a comprehensive model for the OCT signal in which we quantitatively account for both effects, as well as our system parameters (confocal point spread function and sensitivity roll-off). We verify our model with experimental data from controlled phantoms of monodisperse silica beads (scattering coefficients between 1 and 30  mm(−1) and scattering anisotropy between 0.4 and 0.9). The optical properties of the phantoms are calculated using Mie theory combined with the Percus–Yevick structure factor to account for concentration-dependent scattering. We demonstrate excellent agreement between the OCT attenuation and backscattering coefficient predicted by our model and experimentally derived values. We conclude that this model enables us to accurately model OCT-derived parameters (i.e., attenuation and backscattering coefficients) in the concentration-dependent and multiple scattering regime for spherical monodisperse samples.

  5. Measurement of the emission rate of an aerosol source--comparison of aerosol and gas transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Callé, S; Godinot, S; Régnier, R; Dessagne, J M

    2000-12-01

    A measuring method of the emission rate of an atmospheric pollutant source, based on the use of a tracer gas (helium) and developed in the case of a gaseous source, was tested for an aerosol source. The influence of both particle sedimentation and wall depositions was studied. The transport coefficients of the tracer gas and of alumina particles of various particle sizes (MMAD from 8 to 36 microns) were measured on a vertical axis close to the source, in a 71 m3 room swept by a piston flow. The measurements clearly demonstrated the predominant influence of sedimentation in the case of particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 microns. Particle wall deposition was determined by measuring the gas and particle concentration decay in the ventilated room. To do this, a new tracing method using a fluorescent aerosol was developed. The measured aerosol deposition rates are much higher than those calculated from the formula of Corner for a cubical volume. Aerosol sedimentation and wall deposition are two phenomena limiting the use of a tracer gas to measure the aerosol emission rate. The chemical substances and materials used in work premises are likely to be released into the atmosphere and lead to the formation of pollutants. These emissions stem from either physical or chemical processes (evaporation of a solvent) or from mechanical processes (dispersion of oil droplets at the source of mists).

  6. Scanning Backscatter Lidar Observations for Characterizing 4-D Cloud and Aerosol Fields to Improve Radiative Transfer Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.

    2005-01-01

    Clouds have a powerful influence on atmospheric radiative transfer and hence are crucial to understanding and interpreting the exchange of radiation between the Earth's surface, the atmosphere, and space. Because clouds are highly variable in space, time and physical makeup, it is important to be able to observe them in three dimensions (3-D) with sufficient resolution that the data can be used to generate and validate parameterizations of cloud fields at the resolution scale of global climate models (GCMs). Simulation of photon transport in three dimensionally inhomogeneous cloud fields show that spatial inhomogeneities tend to decrease cloud reflection and absorption and increase direct and diffuse transmission, Therefore it is an important task to characterize cloud spatial structures in three dimensions on the scale of GCM grid elements. In order to validate cloud parameterizations that represent the ensemble, or mean and variance of cloud properties within a GCM grid element, measurements of the parameters must be obtained on a much finer scale so that the statistics on those measurements are truly representative. High spatial sampling resolution is required, on the order of 1 km or less. Since the radiation fields respond almost instantaneously to changes in the cloud field, and clouds changes occur on scales of seconds and less when viewed on scales of approximately 100m, the temporal resolution of cloud properties should be measured and characterized on second time scales. GCM time steps are typically on the order of an hour, but in order to obtain sufficient statistical representations of cloud properties in the parameterizations that are used as model inputs, averaged values of cloud properties should be calculated on time scales on the order of 10-100 s. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) provides exceptional temporal (100 ms) and spatial (30 m) resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three

  7. Inference of the aerosol Angstrom coefficient from SAGE short-wavelength data. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Pruvost, P.

    1983-01-01

    SAGE four-channel transmission profiles are inverted to retrieve the extinction profiles from which the aerosol Angstrom coefficient alpha is obtained. The procedure allows one to check the influence of the NO2 absorption profile, which is small below 25 km. The results compare well with those obtained by a completely different procedure at NASA Langley Research Center, and the main features of the alpha profiles seem to be significant, even considering the rather large error bars. The relation between the retrieved Angstrom coefficient, the particle effective radius and the asymmetry factor is considered.

  8. Comparison of vertical aerosol extinction coefficients from in-situ and LIDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Herrmann, E.; Bucci, S.; Fierli, F.; Cairo, F.; Gysel, M.; Tillmann, R.; Größ, J.; Gobbi, G. P.; Di Liberto, L.; Di Donfrancesco, G.; Wiedensohler, A.; Weingartner, E.; Virtanen, A.; Mentel, T. F.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ~ 50-800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a LIDAR system provided aerosol extinction coefficients for a vertically resolved comparison between in-situ and remote sensing results. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20% was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 to 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ~ 10 local time) before the mixed layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ~ 12 local time) the ML was fully developed, resulting in constant extinction coefficients at all altitudes measured on the Zeppelin NT. LIDAR results captured these dynamic features well and good agreement was found for the extinction coefficients compared to the in-situ results, using fixed LIDAR ratios (LR) between 30 and 70 sr for the altitudes probed with the Zeppelin. These LR are

  9. Inter-Comparison of ILAS-II Version 1.4 Aerosol Extinction Coefficient at 780 nm with SAGE II, SAGE III, and POAM III Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saitoh, Naoko; Hayashida, S.; Sugita, T.; Nakajima, H.; Yokota, T.; Hayashi, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kanzawa, H.; Ejiri, M. K.; Irie, H.; Tanaka, T.; Terao, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Sasano, Y.; Bevilacqua, R.; Randall, C.; Thomason, L.; Taha, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Improved Limb Atmospheric Spectrometer (ILAS) II on board the Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (ADEOS) II observed stratospheric aerosol in visible/near-infrared/infrared spectra over high latitudes in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Observations were taken intermittently from January to March, and continuously from April through October, 2003. We assessed the data quality of ILAS-II version 1.4 aerosol extinction coefficients at 780 nm from comparisons with the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, SAGE III, and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM) III aerosol data. At heights below 20 km in the Northern Hemisphere, aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II agreed with those from SAGE II and SAGE III within 10%, and with those from POAM III within 15%. From 20 to 26 km, ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients were smaller than extinction coefficients from the other sensors; differences between ILAS-II and SAGE II ranged from 10% at 20 km to 34% at 26 km. ILAS-II aerosol extinction coefficients from 20 to 25 km in February over the Southern Hemisphere had a negative bias (12-66%) relative to SAGE II aerosol data. The bias increased with increasing altitude. Comparisons between ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol extinction coefficients from January to May in the Southern Hemisphere (defined as the non-Polar Stratospheric Cloud (PSC) season ) yielded qualitatively similar results. From June to October (defined as the PSC season ), aerosol extinction coefficients from ILAS-II were smaller than those from POAM III above 17 km, as in the case of the non-PSC season; however, ILAS-II and POAM III aerosol data were within 15% of each other from 12 to 17 km.

  10. [Development of a photoacoustic spectroscopy system for the measurement of absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Niu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    In the present paper, the authors focus on the effect of the resonance frequency shift due to the changes in temperature and humidity on the PA signal, present several methods to control the noise derived form gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Based on the efforts mentioned above, a detection limit of 1.4 x 10(-8) W x cm(-1) x Hz(-1/2) was achieved for the measurement of atmospheric aerosols absorption coefficient. During the experiments, the PA cell was calibrated with the absorption of standard NO2 gas at 532 nm and the atmospheric aerosols were measured continuously. The measurement results show that the PAS is suitable for the real-time measurement of the absorption coefficient of atmospheric aerosols in their natural suspended state.

  11. Comparison of activity coefficient models for atmospheric aerosols containing mixtures of electrolytes, organics, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Chinghang; Clegg, Simon L.; Seinfeld, John H.

    Atmospheric aerosols generally comprise a mixture of electrolytes, organic compounds, and water. Determining the gas-particle distribution of volatile compounds, including water, requires equilibrium or mass transfer calculations, at the heart of which are models for the activity coefficients of the particle-phase components. We evaluate here the performance of four recent activity coefficient models developed for electrolyte/organic/water mixtures typical of atmospheric aerosols. Two of the models, the CSB model [Clegg, S.L., Seinfeld, J.H., Brimblecombe, P., 2001. Thermodynamic modelling of aqueous aerosols containing electrolytes and dissolved organic compounds. Journal of Aerosol Science 32, 713-738] and the aerosol diameter dependent equilibrium model (ADDEM) [Topping, D.O., McFiggans, G.B., Coe, H., 2005. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: part 2—including organic compounds. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 1223-1242] treat ion-water and organic-water interactions but do not include ion-organic interactions; these can be referred to as "decoupled" models. The other two models, reparameterized Ming and Russell model 2005 [Raatikainen, T., Laaksonen, A., 2005. Application of several activity coefficient models to water-organic-electrolyte aerosols of atmospheric interest. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 5, 2475-2495] and X-UNIFAC.3 [Erdakos, G.B., Change, E.I., Pandow, J.F., Seinfeld, J.H., 2006. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 3: Organic compounds, water, and ionic constituents by consideration of short-, mid-, and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.3. Atmospheric Environment 40, 6437-6452], include ion-organic interactions; these are referred to as "coupled" models. We address the question—Does the inclusion of a treatment of ion-organic interactions substantially improve the performance of the coupled models over

  12. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosols over Europe: Impact of Activity Coefficients and Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Sartelet, K.; Couvidat, F.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-volatile organic species (SVOC) can condense on suspended particulate materials (PM) in the atmosphere. The modeling of condensation/evaporation of SVOC often assumes that gas-phase and particle-phase concentrations are at equilibrium. However, recent studies show that secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may not be accurately represented by an equilibrium approach between the gas and particle phases, because organic aerosols in the particle phase may be very viscous. The condensation in the viscous liquid phase is limited by the diffusion from the surface of PM to its core. Using a surrogate approach to represent SVOC, depending on the user's choice, the secondary organic aerosol processor (SOAP) may assume equilibrium or model dynamically the condensation/evaporation between the gas and particle phases to take into account the viscosity of organic aerosols. The model is implemented in the three-dimensional chemistry-transport model of POLYPHEMUS. In SOAP, activity coefficients for organic mixtures can be computed using UNIFAC for short-range interactions between molecules and AIOMFAC to also take into account the effect of inorganic species on activity coefficients. Simulations over Europe are performed and POLYPHEMUS/SOAP is compared to POLYPHEMUS/H2O, which was previously used to model SOA using the equilibrium approach with activity coefficients from UNIFAC. Impacts of the dynamic approach on modeling SOA over Europe are evaluated. The concentrations of SOA using the dynamic approach are compared with those using the equilibrium approach. The increase of computational cost is also evaluated.

  13. Identification of aerosol composition from multi-wavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop the potential of lidar for the identification of the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. Available numerical computations suggest that aerosols can be identified by the wavelength dependence of aerosol optical properties. Since lidar can derive the volume backscatter coefficient as a function of wavelength, a multi-wavelength lidar system may be able to provide valuable information on the composition of aerosols. This research theoretically investigates the volume backscatter coefficients for the aerosol classes, sea-salts, and sulfates, as a function of wavelength. The results show that these aerosol compositions can be characterized and identified by their backscatter wavelength dependence. A method to utilize multi-wavelength lidar measurements to discriminate between compositionally different thin aerosol layers is discussed.

  14. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10.6 microns with airborne and ground-based CO2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado High Plains. I - Lidar intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Vaughan, J. Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    An airborne continuous-wave (CW) focused CO2 Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar were to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6-micron wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter, the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than about 50 percent near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients, the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  15. Measurements of the absorption and scattering coefficients of aerosol particles in suburb of Nanjing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yan; Chen, Yu; Wang, Weiwei; Yan, Jiade; Qian, Ling; Tong, Yaoqing; Lin, Zhenyi

    2008-08-01

    The absorption and scattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosols were continuously measured with a Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS, DMT Inc. USA) at a suburb site of Nanjing, one of the regions experiencing rapid industrialization in China. The measurements were carried out during autumn and winter 2007. A preliminary analysis of the data shows that, the scattering coefficient, Bscat, is two to ten times larger than the absorption coefficient, Babs, implying that the aerosols formed/emitted in this area are more scattering than previous assumed, and can be more important in cooling the Earth-atmosphere system. The results also indicate that the absolute values of both parameters are very much dependent on the meteorological conditions, such as wind speed and direction, fog, rain, etc. as well as the time of the day. Higher values often appear at nighttimes when wind is weak, especially when a temperature inverse layer is present near the surface. Higher values of Bscat and Babs were also observed under hazy and foggy weather conditions or when wind is blown from east, where a large industrial zone is located. Simultaneous measurements of the number concentrations, chemical compositions, and size distributions of aerosol particles are used to explain the characteristics of the changes in Bscat and Babs.

  16. GLOBE backscatter - Climatologies and mission results. [Global Backscatter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) goals require intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at IR wavelengths. Airborne and ground-based lidars have been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. Descriptions of the calibration techniques and selected measurement results are presented.

  17. Improved identification of transition metals in airborne aerosols by SEM-EDX combined backscattered and secondary electron microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Pietrodangelo, A; Pareti, S; Perrino, C

    2014-03-01

    The SEM EDX backscattered electron (BSE) atomic number contrast has been largely used in this work, in combination with conventional secondary electron microanalysis, to investigate the presence of metal particles in airborne particulate collected at three sites (industrial, residential, and rural background) in the Po Valley (Italy). Individual particle x-ray microanalysis was used for this aim. In many cases, the presence of metal particles was not evident by secondary electron imaging and it was instead revealed by BSE detection. Metal particles were observed either as isolated (not clustered to other particles), or gathered together (homogeneous clusters). In addition, the BSE microanalysis put on evidence two main types of association of metals to other particulate components: heterogeneous clusters and metals embedded or enclosed in other materials. In this study, the first association (heterogeneous clusters) was observed mostly between Fe-bearing metallic particles and soot aggregates (or other carbonaceous particles) and it was found in the particulate matter (PM) of all studied sites. The second association, conversely, seems to be characterized by more selective relationships between composition/size of metal particles and type of other particulate components. These associations could be evidenced only when using the BSE Z-contrast and mainly concern three cases: (1) unusual silicate-carbonate mixed aggregates were observed at the industrial site only. In these aggregates, embedded Mn, Cr, Co, Bi, W, and Zr fine particles were selectively observed. (2) Ni and V rich ultrafine particles were only observed as embedded particles in the surface structure of carbon cenospheres. (3) Pb or Pb-Zn bearing fine and ultrafine particles were largely detected only in oxygenated organic aerosols in the ultrafine PM.

  18. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  19. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  20. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2008-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH+4, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO-3, HSO-4, and SO2-4 as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol+water+salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  1. A thermodynamic model of mixed organic-inorganic aerosols to predict activity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, Th.

    2008-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosols contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. Interactions between these substances in liquid mixtures lead to discrepancies from ideal thermodynamic behaviour. By means of activity coefficients, non-ideal behaviour can be taken into account. We present here a thermodynamic model named AIOMFAC (Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients) that is able to calculate activity coefficients covering inorganic, organic, and organic-inorganic interactions in aqueous solutions over a wide concentration range. This model is based on the activity coefficient model LIFAC by Yan et al. (1999) that we modified and reparametrised to better describe atmospherically relevant conditions and mixture compositions. Focusing on atmospheric applications we considered H+, Li+, Na+, K+, NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, Br-, NO3-, HSO4-, and SO42- as cations and anions and a wide range of alcohols/polyols composed of the functional groups CHn and OH as organic compounds. With AIOMFAC, the activities of the components within an aqueous electrolyte solution are well represented up to high ionic strength. Most notably, a semi-empirical middle-range parametrisation of direct organic-inorganic interactions in alcohol + water + salt solutions strongly improves the agreement between experimental and modelled activity coefficients. At room temperature, this novel thermodynamic model offers the possibility to compute equilibrium relative humidities, gas/particle partitioning and liquid-liquid phase separations with high accuracy. In further studies, other organic functional groups will be introduced. The model framework is not restricted to specific ions or organic compounds and is therefore also applicable for other research topics.

  2. Analysis of the Dielectric constant of saline-alkali soils and the effect on radar backscattering coefficient: a case study of soda alkaline saline soils in Western Jilin Province using RADARSAT-2 data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-yang; Zhao, Kai; Ren, Jian-hua; Ding, Yan-ling; Wu, Li-li

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is a global problem, especially in developing countries, which affects the environment and productivity of agriculture areas. Salt has a significant effect on the complex dielectric constant of wet soil. However, there is no suitable model to describe the variation in the backscattering coefficient due to changes in soil salinity content. The purpose of this paper is to use backscattering models to understand behaviors of the backscattering coefficient in saline soils based on the analysis of its dielectric constant. The effects of moisture and salinity on the dielectric constant by combined Dobson mixing model and seawater dielectric constant model are analyzed, and the backscattering coefficient is then simulated using the AIEM. Simultaneously, laboratory measurements were performed on ground samples. The frequency effect of the laboratory results was not the same as the simulated results. The frequency dependence of the ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is influenced by the ion's components. Finally, the simulated backscattering coefficients measured from the dielectric constant with the AIEM were analyzed using the extracted backscattering coefficient from the RADARSAT-2 image. The results show that RADARSAT-2 is potentially able to measure soil salinity; however, the mixed pixel problem needs to be more thoroughly considered.

  3. Analysis of the Dielectric Constant of Saline-Alkali Soils and the Effect on Radar Backscattering Coefficient: A Case Study of Soda Alkaline Saline Soils in Western Jilin Province Using RADARSAT-2 Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang-yang; Zhao, Kai; Ren, Jian-hua; Ding, Yan-ling; Wu, Li-li

    2014-01-01

    Soil salinity is a global problem, especially in developing countries, which affects the environment and productivity of agriculture areas. Salt has a significant effect on the complex dielectric constant of wet soil. However, there is no suitable model to describe the variation in the backscattering coefficient due to changes in soil salinity content. The purpose of this paper is to use backscattering models to understand behaviors of the backscattering coefficient in saline soils based on the analysis of its dielectric constant. The effects of moisture and salinity on the dielectric constant by combined Dobson mixing model and seawater dielectric constant model are analyzed, and the backscattering coefficient is then simulated using the AIEM. Simultaneously, laboratory measurements were performed on ground samples. The frequency effect of the laboratory results was not the same as the simulated results. The frequency dependence of the ionic conductivity of an electrolyte solution is influenced by the ion's components. Finally, the simulated backscattering coefficients measured from the dielectric constant with the AIEM were analyzed using the extracted backscattering coefficient from the RADARSAT-2 image. The results show that RADARSAT-2 is potentially able to measure soil salinity; however, the mixed pixel problem needs to be more thoroughly considered. PMID:25101317

  4. Statistics of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and optical depth using lidar measurement over Lanzhou, China since 2005-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, X.; Wang, Z.; Tian, P.; Wang, J.; Zhang, L.; Quan, X.

    2013-06-01

    The aerosol extinction coefficient profiles and optical depth over Lanzhou in China were observed under no precipitation and dust free condition using the micropulse lidar CE370-2 from September 2005 to July 2008. The statistics of the variations of monthly average aerosol optical depth (AOD) and daily average AOD, frequency distribution of daily average AOD, and the seasonal variation of aerosol vertical distribution were analyzed based on the observation data. The results showed that the daily average AOD of Main Observatory and City Observatory was 87.8% and 78.2% ranged below 0.4 respectively with similar frequency distribution patterns. The AOD in autumn and winter were larger than that in spring and summer, and AOD in suburb was in certain extent smaller than that in city of Lanzhou. Aerosol existed in the layer below 4km, and its extinction coefficient decreased with increasing of height.

  5. A Multi-Band Analytical Algorithm for Deriving Absorption and Backscattering Coefficients from Remote-Sensing Reflectance of Optically Deep Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-band analytical (MBA) algorithm is developed to retrieve absorption and backscattering coefficients for optically deep waters, which can be applied to data from past and current satellite sensors, as well as data from hyperspectral sensors. This MBA algorithm applies a remote-sensing reflectance model derived from the Radiative Transfer Equation, and values of absorption and backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated from values of remote-sensing reflectance. There are only limited empirical relationships involved in the algorithm, which implies that this MBA algorithm could be applied to a wide dynamic range of waters. Applying the algorithm to a simulated non-"Case 1" data set, which has no relation to the development of the algorithm, the percentage error for the total absorption coefficient at 440 nm a (sub 440) is approximately 12% for a range of 0.012 - 2.1 per meter (approximately 6% for a (sub 440) less than approximately 0.3 per meter), while a traditional band-ratio approach returns a percentage error of approximately 30%. Applying it to a field data set ranging from 0.025 to 2.0 per meter, the result for a (sub 440) is very close to that using a full spectrum optimization technique (9.6% difference). Compared to the optimization approach, the MBA algorithm cuts the computation time dramatically with only a small sacrifice in accuracy, making it suitable for processing large data sets such as satellite images. Significant improvements over empirical algorithms have also been achieved in retrieving the optical properties of optically deep waters.

  6. Influence of Humidity on the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, B. S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.; Jonsson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of attitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands or the EOS-AM ("Terra") detectors, MODIS and MISR. The UWPH measured (sigma(sub sp)) at 2 RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient (sigma(sub sp)) was obtained by interpolation of these 2 measurements. The data were stratified in terms of 3 types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., 2- or 1-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of (sigma(sub sp)) on RH, defined by (sigma(sub sp))(RH) = k. ((1 - RH/100)(exp -gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 + 0.06. Based on the measured (gamma)(s), the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each of those aerosol models at several ambient humidities. For the pre-launch estimated precision of the sensors and

  7. Influence of Humidity On the Aerosol Scattering Coefficient and Its Effect on the Upwelling Radiance During ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, S.; Hegg, D. A.; Covert, D. S.; Collins, D.; Noone, K. J.; Oestroem, E.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol scattering coefficients (sigma(sub sp)) have been measured over the ocean at different relative humidities (RH) as a function of altitude in the region surrounding the Canary Islands during the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) in June and July 1997. The data were collected by the University of Washington passive humidigraph (UWPH) mounted on the Pelican research aircraft. Concurrently, particle size distributions, absorption coefficients and aerosol optical depth were measured throughout 17 flights. A parameterization of sigma(sub sp) as a function of RH was utilized to assess the impact of aerosol hydration on the upwelling radiance (normalized to the solar constant and cosine of zenith angle). The top of the atmosphere radiance signal was simulated at wavelengths corresponding to visible and near-infrared bands of the EOS (Earth Observing System) AM-1 (Terra) detectors, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) and MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer). The UWPH measured sigma(sub sp) at two RHs, one below and the other above ambient conditions. Ambient sigma(sub sp) was obtained by interpolation of these two measurements. The data were stratified in terms of three types of aerosols: Saharan dust, clean marine (marine boundary layer background) and polluted marine aerosols (i.e., two- or one-day old polluted aerosols advected from Europe). An empirical relation for the dependence of sigma(sub sp) on RH, defined by sigma(sub sp)(RH) = k.(1 - RH/100)(sup gamma), was used with the hygroscopic exponent gamma derived from the data. The following gamma values were obtained for the 3 aerosol types: gamma(dust) = 0.23 +/- 0.05, gamma(clean marine) = 0.69 +/- 0.06 and gamma(polluted marine) = 0.57 +/- 0.06. Based on the measured gammas, the above equation was utilized to derive aerosol models with different hygroscopicities. The satellite simulation signal code 6S was used to compute the upwelling radiance corresponding to each

  8. A factor limiting the accuracy of optical loss measurements in single-mode fibres: ‘frozen-in’ inhomogeneities of the Rayleigh backscatter coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busurin, V. I.; Gorshkov, B. G.; Gorshkov, G. B.; Grinshtein, M. L.; Taranov, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Backscatter coefficient fluctuations at a wavelength of 1560 nm in Fujikura FutureGuide-LWP, Corning ClearCurve XB and Corning SMF-28 ULL telecom fibres have been studied using optical time-domain reflectometry and broadband (10 nm) depolarised light. It has been shown that, under the conditions of our experiments, such fluctuations are ‘frozen-in’ and that a typical standard deviation in noiselike reflectograms is 0.16 dB, with a correlation distance no greater than 1 m. Such results have been obtained for all fibre samples. The effect studied experimentally limits the accuracy of attenuation measurements in optical fibres, especially at short fibre lengths (tens and hundreds of metres). Moreover, it should be taken into account in designing distributed physical parameter sensors using Rayleigh scattering intensity as a reference channel. Possible sources of the inhomogeneities in the fibres are discussed.

  9. Absorption Coefficient, Molecular Composition, and Photodegradation of Different Types of Brown Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Aiona, P. K.; Nizkorodov, S.; Laskin, J.; Laskin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols that absorb solar radiation have a direct effect on climate. Brown carbon (BrC) represents the type of carbonaceous aerosols characterized by large absorption coefficients in the near-UV range of the spectrum. BrC can be either directly emitted into the atmosphere from combustion sources, or be formed in the atmosphere through multi-phase reactions, such as aging of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) mediated by ammonium sulfate (AS). Under the conditions of exposure to solar radiation, both primary and secondary BrC can potentially change their molecular composition and optical properties as a result of photodegradation of chromophoric compounds. This presentation will discuss the molecular level composition, the absorption and fluorescence spectra, and the mechanism of photodegradation among several representative types of BrC. The primary BrC samples include aerosol produced by smoldering wood combustion. The secondary BrC samples include AS aged products of chamber-generated SOA, products of reaction between methylglyoxal and AS, and SOA produced by the hogh-NOx photooxdiation of aromatic compounds, such as naphthalene. This presentation will also include preliminary data on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of photo-degraded bioaerosols. In all cases, absorption spectra of extracted bulk samples are measured during irradiation by a known flux of UV or visible light. The molecular level composition of the fresh and photobleached samples are characterized by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS). Photobleaching of BrC is found to occur over a range of atmospherically relevant time scales. In many cases, the molecular level composition of photobleached BrC exhibits only subtle changes suggesting that the optical and fluorescence properties of BrC are controlled by a few compounds present in low quantities. The observed fluorescence from non-biological BrC indicates potential issues in using fluorescence

  10. A neural network-based method for merging ocean color and Argo data to extend surface bio-optical properties to depth: Retrieval of the particulate backscattering coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauzède, R.; Claustre, H.; Uitz, J.; Jamet, C.; Dall'Olmo, G.; D'Ortenzio, F.; Gentili, B.; Poteau, A.; Schmechtig, C.

    2016-04-01

    The present study proposes a novel method that merges satellite ocean color bio-optical products with Argo temperature-salinity profiles to infer the vertical distribution of the particulate backscattering coefficient (bbp). This neural network-based method (SOCA-BBP for Satellite Ocean-Color merged with Argo data to infer the vertical distribution of the Particulate Backscattering coefficient) uses three main input components: (1) satellite-based surface estimates of bbp and chlorophyll a concentration matched up in space and time with (2) depth-resolved physical properties derived from temperature-salinity profiles measured by Argo profiling floats and (3) the day of the year of the considered satellite-Argo matchup. The neural network is trained and validated using a database including 4725 simultaneous profiles of temperature-salinity and bio-optical properties collected by Bio-Argo floats, with concomitant satellite-derived products. The Bio-Argo profiles are representative of the global open-ocean in terms of oceanographic conditions, making the proposed method applicable to most open-ocean environments. SOCA-BBP is validated using 20% of the entire database (global error of 21%). We present additional validation results based on two other independent data sets acquired (1) by four Bio-Argo floats deployed in major oceanic basins, not represented in the database used to train the method; and (2) during an AMT (Atlantic Meridional Transect) field cruise in 2009. These validation tests based on two fully independent data sets indicate the robustness of the predicted vertical distribution of bbp. To illustrate the potential of the method, we merged monthly climatological Argo profiles with ocean color products to produce a depth-resolved climatology of bbp for the global ocean.

  11. Effect of hygroscopic growth on the aerosol light-scattering coefficient: A review of measurements, techniques and error sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titos, G.; Cazorla, A.; Zieger, P.; Andrews, E.; Lyamani, H.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Olmo, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the scattering enhancement factor, f(RH), is important for an accurate description of direct aerosol radiative forcing. This factor is defined as the ratio between the scattering coefficient at enhanced relative humidity, RH, to a reference (dry) scattering coefficient. Here, we review the different experimental designs used to measure the scattering coefficient at dry and humidified conditions as well as the procedures followed to analyze the measurements. Several empirical parameterizations for the relationship between f(RH) and RH have been proposed in the literature. These parameterizations have been reviewed and tested using experimental data representative of different hygroscopic growth behavior and a new parameterization is presented. The potential sources of error in f(RH) are discussed. A Monte Carlo method is used to investigate the overall measurement uncertainty, which is found to be around 20-40% for moderately hygroscopic aerosols. The main factors contributing to this uncertainty are the uncertainty in RH measurement, the dry reference state and the nephelometer uncertainty. A literature survey of nephelometry-based f(RH) measurements is presented as a function of aerosol type. In general, the highest f(RH) values were measured in clean marine environments, with pollution having a major influence on f(RH). Dust aerosol tended to have the lowest reported hygroscopicity of any of the aerosol types studied. Major open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are outlined.

  12. Using satellite-derived backscattering coefficients in addition to chlorophyll data to constrain a simple marine biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, H.

    2009-08-01

    Biogeochemical models of the ocean carbon cycle are frequently validated by, or tuned to, satellite chlorophyll data. However, ocean carbon cycle models are required to accurately model the movement of carbon, not chlorophyll, and due to the high variability of the carbon to chlorophyll ratio in phytoplankton, chlorophyll is not a robust proxy for carbon. Using inherent optical property (IOP) inversion algorithms it is now possible to also derive the amount of light backscattered by the upper ocean (bb) which is related to the amount of particulate organic carbon (POC) present. Using empirical relationships between POC and bb, a 1-D marine biogeochemical model is used to simulate bb at 490 nm thereby allowing the model to be compared with both remotely-sensed chlorophyll or bb data. Here I investigate the possibility of using bb in conjunction with chlorophyll data to help constrain the parameters in a simple 1-D NPZD model. The parameters of the biogeochemical model are tuned with a genetic algorithm, so that the model is fitted to either chlorophyll data or to both chlorophyll and bb data at three sites in the Atlantic with very different characteristics. Several inherent optical property (IOP) algorithms are available for estimating bb, three of which are used here. The effect of the different bb datasets on the behaviour of the tuned model is examined to ascertain whether the uncertainty in bb is significant. The results show that the addition of bb data does not consistently alter the same model parameters at each site and in fact can lead to some parameters becoming less well constrained, implying there is still much work to be done on the mechanisms relating chlorophyll to POC and bb within the model. However, this study does indicate that including bb data has the potential to significantly effect the modelled mixed layer detritus and that uncertainties in bb due to the different IOP algorithms are not particularly significant.

  13. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 2; Derivation of Aerosol Real Refractive Index, Single-Scattering Albedo, and Humidification Factor using Raman Lidar and Aircraft Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Poellot, M.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site during two nights in April 1994 are discussed. These profiles are shown to be consistent with the simultaneous aerosol size distribution measurements made by a PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe) optical particle counter flown on the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. We describe a technique which uses both lidar and PCASP measurements to derive the dependence of particle size on relative humidity, the aerosol real refractive index n, and estimate the effective single-scattering albedo Omega(sub 0). Values of n ranged between 1.4-1.5 (dry) and 1.37-1.47 (wet); Omega(sub 0) varied between 0.7 and 1.0. The single-scattering albedo derived from this technique is sensitive to the manner in which absorbing particles are represented in the aerosol mixture; representing the absorbing particles as an internal mixture rather than the external mixture assumed here results in generally higher values of Omega(sub 0). The lidar measurements indicate that the change in particle size with relative humidity as measured by the PCASP can be represented in the form discussed by Hattel with the exponent gamma = 0.3 + or - 0.05. The variations in aerosol optical and physical characteristics captured in the lidar and aircraft size distribution measurements are discussed in the context of the meteorological conditions observed during the experiment.

  14. Evaluating Nighttime CALIOP 0.532 micron Aerosol Optical Depth and Extinction Coefficient Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Tackett, J. L.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Curtis, C. A.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Prospero, J. M.; Welton, E. J.; Omar, A. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) Version 3.01 5-km nighttime 0.532 micron aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from 2007 are screened, averaged and evaluated at 1 deg X 1 deg resolution versus corresponding/co-incident 0.550 micron AOD derived using the US Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of quality-assured NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) AOD. In the absence of sunlight, since passive radiometric AOD retrievals rely overwhelmingly on scattered radiances, the model represents one of the few practical global estimates available from which to attempt such a validation. Daytime comparisons, though, provide useful context. Regional-mean CALIOP vertical profiles of night/day 0.532 micron extinction coefficient are compared with 0.523/0.532 micron ground-based lidar measurements to investigate representativeness and diurnal variability. In this analysis, mean nighttime CALIOP AOD are mostly lower than daytime (0.121 vs. 0.126 for all aggregated data points, and 0.099 vs. 0.102 when averaged globally per normalised 1 deg. X 1 deg. bin), though the relationship is reversed over land and coastal regions when the data are averaged per normalised bin (0.134/0.108 vs. 0140/0.112, respectively). Offsets assessed within single bins alone approach +/- 20 %. CALIOP AOD, both day and night, are higher than NAAPS over land (0.137 vs. 0.124) and equal over water (0.082 vs. 0.083) when averaged globally per normalised bin. However, for all data points inclusive, NAAPS exceeds CALIOP over land, coast and ocean, both day and night. Again, differences assessed within single bins approach 50% in extreme cases. Correlation between CALIOP and NAAPS AOD is comparable during both day and night. Higher correlation is found nearest the equator, both as a function of sample size and relative signal magnitudes inherent at

  15. Aerosol dynamics above the water area of the Peter the Great Bay during the dust storm in the Gobi desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukin, O. A.; Pavlov, A. N.; Kulchin, J. N.; Shmirko, K. A.; Salyuk, P. A.; Stoluarchuk, S. Y.

    2006-11-01

    This article presents aerosol dynamic monitoring over the Peter the Great bay during dust storms in continental areas of the China and Mongolia. Both satellite and lidar data was analyzed. Vertical profiles of aerosol backscattering coefficient and aerosol optical thickness were calculated. Aerosol optical thickness in different layers were retrieved and compared with the satellite ones. Correlation coefficient between satellite and lidar data was calculated. Aerosol layer location was compared to Brent-Vaisal criterion of stability. Aerosol layer stratification during spring - summer (April - June 2006) period was analyzed.

  16. Can we better use existing and emerging computing hardware to embed activity coefficient predictions in complex atmospheric aerosol models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, David; Alibay, Irfan; Ruske, Simon; Hindriksen, Vincent; Noisternig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To predict the evolving concentration, chemical composition and ability of aerosol particles to act as cloud droplets, we rely on numerical modeling. Mechanistic models attempt to account for the movement of compounds between the gaseous and condensed phases at a molecular level. This 'bottom up' approach is designed to increase our fundamental understanding. However, such models rely on predicting the properties of molecules and subsequent mixtures. For partitioning between the gaseous and condensed phases this includes: saturation vapour pressures; Henrys law coefficients; activity coefficients; diffusion coefficients and reaction rates. Current gas phase chemical mechanisms predict the existence of potentially millions of individual species. Within a dynamic ensemble model, this can often be used as justification for neglecting computationally expensive process descriptions. Indeed, on whether we can quantify the true sensitivity to uncertainties in molecular properties, even at the single aerosol particle level it has been impossible to embed fully coupled representations of process level knowledge with all possible compounds, typically relying on heavily parameterised descriptions. Relying on emerging numerical frameworks, and designed for the changing landscape of high-performance computing (HPC), in this study we show that comprehensive microphysical models from single particle to larger scales can be developed to encompass a complete state-of-the-art knowledge of aerosol chemical and process diversity. We focus specifically on the ability to capture activity coefficients in liquid solutions using the UNIFAC method, profiling traditional coding strategies and those that exploit emerging hardware.

  17. A Lidar and Backscatter Sonde Aerosol Measurement Campaign at Table Mountain During February-March 1997: Observations of Stratospheric Background Aerosols and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M.; Haner, D.; Kjome, N.; McDermid, I.; McGee, T.; Rosen, J.; Schafer, H. J.; Schrems, O.

    1999-01-01

    Altitude profiles of backscater ratio of the stratospheric background aerosol layer at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are analyzed and discussed. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of the 26 campaign nights.

  18. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  19. Assessment of accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator method in determining red blood cell aggregate size from ultrasound spectral backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratan K; Franceschini, Emilie; Cloutier, Guy

    2011-04-01

    A computer simulation study to produce ultrasonic backscatter coefficients (BSCs) from red blood cell (RBC) clusters is discussed. The simulation algorithm is suitable for generating non-overlapping, isotropic, and fairly identical RBC clusters. RBCs were stacked following the hexagonal close packing (HCP) structure to form a compact spherical aggregate. Such an aggregate was repeated and placed randomly under non-overlapping condition in the three-dimensional space to mimic an aggregated blood sample. BSCs were computed between 750 KHz and 200 MHz for samples of various cluster sizes at different hematocrits. Magnitudes of BSCs increased with mean aggregate sizes at low frequencies (<20 MHz). The accuracy of the structure-factor-size-estimator (SFSE) method in determining mean aggregate size and packing factor was also examined. A good correlation (R(2) ≥ 0.94) between the mean size of aggregates predicted by the SFSE and true size was found for each hematocrit. This study shows that for spherical aggregates there exists a region for each hematocrit where SFSE works most accurately. Typically, error of SFSE in estimating mean cluster size was <20% for dimensions between 14 and 17 μm at 40% hematocrit. This study suggests that the theoretical framework of SFSE is valid under the assumption of isotropic aggregates.

  20. Ground-level spectral distribution of solar direct-normal irradiance and marine aerosol attenuation coefficients at Reunion Island

    SciTech Connect

    Vaxelaire, P.; Leveau, J.; Baldy, S. ); Menguy, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The ground-level spectral distribution of direct solar irradiance at Reunion Island was measured for six bands covering the spectrum of solar radiation. The measurements, distributed over one year, were made under clear sky conditions with a pyrheliometer (Eppley, NIP) and six large pass-band flat filters. Good stability of spectral irradiances as a function of solar height allows us to propose approximate relationships which significantly characterize the irradiance into each spectral band. Measurements at Reunion vary significantly from data obtained with the same apparatus in a northern hemisphere continental area (Lyon). The determination of aerosol attenuation coefficients, for different spectral bands, allows the establish of a mean curve, for these coefficients as a function of wavelength, characteristic for marine aerosols.

  1. Organic aerosol molecular composition and gas-particle partitioning coefficients at a Mediterranean site (Corsica).

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Couvidat, Florian; Rio, Caroline; Fable, Sébastien; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli; Pailly, Olivier; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Chiappini, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Molecular speciation of atmospheric organic matter was investigated during a short summer field campaign performed in a citrus fruit field in northern Corsica (June 2011). Aimed at assessing the performance on the field of newly developed analytical protocols, this work focuses on the molecular composition of both gas and particulate phases and provides an insight into partitioning behavior of the semi-volatile oxygenated fraction. Limonene ozonolysis tracers were specifically searched for, according to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data previously recorded for smog chamber experiments. A screening of other oxygenated species present in the field atmosphere was also performed. About sixty polar molecules were positively or tentatively identified in gas and/or particle phases. These molecules comprise a wide range of branched and linear, mono and di-carbonyls (C3-C7), mono and di-carboxylic acids (C3-C18), and compounds bearing up to three functionalities. Among these compounds, some can be specifically attributed to limonene oxidation and others can be related to α- or β-pinene oxidation. This provides an original snapshot of the organic matter composition at a Mediterranean site in summer. Furthermore, for compounds identified and quantified in both gaseous and particulate phases, an experimental gas/particle partitioning coefficient was determined. Several volatile products, which are not expected in the particulate phase assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, were nonetheless present in significant concentrations. Hypotheses are proposed to explain these observations, such as the possible aerosol viscosity that could hinder the theoretical equilibrium to be rapidly reached.

  2. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  3. NOAA backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    In the past year, NOAA has measured and analyzed another year's worth of backscatter over Boulder, CO. The average profile was computed from 80 satellite observations of backscatter spread throughout the year, using NOAA's CO2 coherent lidar operating at a wavelength of 10.59 microns. The seasonal averages show a familiar trend (highest backscattering in spring, perhaps due to Asian dust or biomass burning, and lowest backscattering in fall). The 1990 average profile was not significantly different from the 1988 or 1989 profiles, except that it displays a slight increase in the upper troposphere, perhaps due to the Redoubt Volcano. The NOAA's backscatter processing program (BETA) was refined to enable the calculation of gaseous absorption effects based on rawinsonde measurements, as well as using atmospheric models. NOAA participated in two intercomparisons of aerosol measuring instruments near Boulder, called FRLAB (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon Experiment). Considerable effort was also put into developing a multiagency science proposal to NASA headquarters to work with both JPL and NASA-Marshall to produce an airborne Doppler lidar facility for the DC-8.

  4. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  5. Aerosol Products from The Future Space Lidar AEOLUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Pauline; Dabas, Alain; Lever, Vincent; Flamant, Pierre; Huber, Dorit

    2016-06-01

    Ready for launch by the end of 2016, the Doppler lidar mission AEOLUS from the European Space Agency (ESA) will be the first High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in space. Operating in the UV, it implements two detection channels for aerosol and molecular backscatter. The system is primarily designed for the measurement of winds, but the HSRL capability enables the measurement of the particulate backscatter and extinction coefficients without any a priori assumption on the aerosol type. The level-2A (L2A) processor has been developed for these measurements and tested with synthetic data. The results show good aerosol backscatter profiles can be retrieved. Extinction coefficients are reasonable but do not reach the quality of backscatter coefficients. A precise, full, radiometric calibration of the lidar is required. A major limitation of the system is a single polarization component of the light is detected leading to an underestimation of backscatter coefficients when the atmospheric particles are depolarizing. The vertical resolution goes from 250 meters in the lowest part of the atmosphere, to 2 km in the lower stratosphere. The maximum altitude can reach above 20km. The basic horizontal averaging is 90km. Averaging on shorter distances (down to a few km) are possible but require a sufficient signal to noise ratio.

  6. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  7. Verification and application of the extended spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA+) methodology to estimate aerosol fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, K. C.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Eck, T. F.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA) and SDA+ (extended SDA) methodologies can be employed to separate the fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients from measured total aerosol extinction coefficients, but their common use is currently limited to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Here we provide the verification of the SDA+ methodology on a non-AERONET aerosol product, by applying it to fine and coarse mode nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) data sets collected in the marine boundary layer. Using data sets collected on research vessels by NOAA-PMEL(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory), we demonstrate that with accurate input, SDA+ is able to predict the fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficient partition in global data sets representing a range of aerosol regimes. However, in low-extinction regimes commonly found in the clean marine boundary layer, SDA+ output accuracy is sensitive to instrumental calibration errors. This work was extended to the calculation of coarse and fine mode scattering coefficients with similar success. This effort not only verifies the application of the SDA+ method to in situ data, but by inference verifies the method as a whole for a host of applications, including AERONET. Study results open the door to much more extensive use of nephelometers and PSAPs, with the ability to calculate fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficients in field campaigns that do not have the resources to explicitly measure these values.

  8. Measurements of the HO2 uptake coefficient onto aqueous salt and organic aerosols and interpretation using the kinetic multi-layer model of aerosol surface and bulk chemistry (KM-SUB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S. J.; Berkemeier, T.; George, I. J.; Whalley, L. K.; Moon, D. R.; Ammann, M.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Poeschl, U.; Shiraiwa, M.; Heard, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    HO2 is closely coupled with OH which is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict OH and HO2 concentrations. However, many studies have reported a large discrepancy between HO2 radical concentrations measured during field campaigns and predicted by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms (1,2). However, there have been very few laboratory studies (3,4) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for deliquesced ammonium nitrate and sodium chloride aerosols and copper doped sucrose aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. By either placing the HO2 injector in set positions and varying the aerosol concentration or by moving it along the flow tube at given aerosol concentrations, uptake coefficients could be measured. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a SMPS. Larger uptake coefficients were measured at shorter times and lower HO2 concentrations for aqueous salt aerosols. The time dependence was able to be modelled by the KM-SUB model (5) as the HO2 concentration decreases along the flow tube and the HO2 uptake mechanism is known to be a second order reaction. Measurements have shown that at higher HO2 concentrations there was also more H2O2 exiting the injector which could convert back to HO2 if trace amounts of metals are present within the aerosol via Fenton reactions. Preliminary results have shown that the inclusion of a Fenton-like reaction within the KM-SUB model has the potential to explain the apparent HO2 concentration dependence. Finally, the KM-SUB model has been used to demonstrate that the increase in uptake coefficient observed when increasing the relative humidity for copper doped sucrose aerosols could be explained by an

  9. Extinction coefficient (1 micrometer) properties of high-altitude clouds from solar occultation measurements (1985-1990): Evidence of volcanic aerosol effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Minnis, Patrick; Yue, Glenn K.

    1995-01-01

    The properties of the 1-micrometer volume extinction coefficient of two geographically different high-altitude cloud systems have been examined for the posteruption period (1985-1990) of the April 1982 El Chichon volcanic event with emphasis on the effect of volcanic aerosols on clouds. These two high-altitude cloud systems are the tropical clouds in the tropopause region observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 and the polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) sighted by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) 2. The results indicate that volcanic aerosols alter the frequency distributions of these high-altitude clouds in such a manner that the occurrence of clouds having high extinction coefficients (6 x 10(exp -3) - 2 x 10(exp -2)/km) is suppressed, while that of clouds having low extinction coefficients (2 x 10(exp -3) - 6 x 10(exp -2)/km) is enhanced. This influence of the volcanic aerosols appears to be opposite to the increase in the extinction coefficient of optically thick clouds observed by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) during the initial posteruption period of the June 1991 Pinatubo eruption. A plausible explanation of this difference, based on the Mie theory, is presented. As a consequence of the Mie theory, the effective radius of most, if not all, of the high-altitude clouds, measured by the SAGE series of satellite instruments must be less than about 0.8 micrometers. This mean cloud particle size implied by the satellite extinction-coefficient data at a single wavelength (1 micrometer) is further substantiated by the particle size analysis based on cloud extinction coefficient at two wavelengths (0.525 and 1.02 micrometers) obtained by the SAGE 2 observations. Most of the radiation measured by ERBE is reflected by cloud systems comprised of particles having effective radii much greater than 1 micrometer. A reduction in the effective radius of these clouds due to volcanic aerosols is expected to increase their

  10. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  11. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  12. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai.

  13. Field calibration of multi-scattering correction factor for aethalometer aerosol absorption coefficient during CAPMEX Campaign, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.; Yoon, S. C.; Park, R.; Ogren, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filter-based instrument, such as aethalometer, is being widely used to measure equivalent black carbon(EBC) mass concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient(AAC). However, many other previous studies have poited that AAC and its aerosol absorption angstrom exponent(AAE) are strongly affected by the multi-scattering correction factor(C) when we retrieve AAC from aethalometer EBC mass concentration measurement(Weingartner et al., 2003; Arnott et al., 2005; Schmid et al., 2006; Coen et al., 2010). We determined the C value using the method given in Weingartner et al. (2003) by comparing 7-wavelngth aethalometer (AE-31, Magee sci.) to 3-wavelength Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3, DMT) at Gosan climate observatory, Korea(GCO) during Cheju ABC plume-asian monsoon experiment(CAPMEX) campaign(August and September, 2008). In this study, C was estimated to be 4.04 ± 1.68 at 532 nm and AAC retrieved with this value was decreased as approximately 100% as than that retrieved with soot case value from Weingartner et al (2003). We compared the AAC determined from aethalomter measurements to that from collocated Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measurements from January 2012 to December 2013 at GCO and found good agreement in both AAC and AAE. This result suggests the determination of site-specific C is crucially needed when we calculate AAC from aethalometer measurements.

  14. Effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on ultrafine aerosol particles clogging in nanofiber based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Realistic SEM image based 3D filter model considering transition/free molecular flow regime, Brownian diffusion, aerodynamic slip, particle-fiber and particle-particle interactions together with a novel Euclidian distance map based methodology for the pressure drop calculation has been utilized for a polyurethane nanofiber based filter prepared via electrospinning process in order to more deeply understand the effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on filter clogging and basic filter characteristics. Based on the performed theoretical analysis, it has been revealed that the increase in the fiber-particle friction coefficient causes, firstly, more weaker particle penetration in the filter, creation of dense top layers and generation of higher pressure drop (surface filtration) in comparison with lower particle-fiber friction coefficient filter for which deeper particle penetration takes place (depth filtration), secondly, higher filtration efficiency, thirdly, higher quality factor and finally, higher quality factor sensitivity to the increased collected particle mass. Moreover, it has been revealed that even if the particle-fiber friction coefficient is different, the cake morphology is very similar.

  15. Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties at Four North American Surface Monitoring Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delene, David J.; Ogren, John A.

    2002-03-01

    Aerosol optical properties measured over several years at surface monitoring stations located at Bondville, Illinois (BND); Lamont, Oklahoma (SGP); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (WSA); and Barrow, Alaska (BRW), have been analyzed to determine the importance of the variability in aerosol optical properties to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The amount of aerosol present is of primary importance and the aerosol optical properties are of secondary importance to direct aerosol radiative forcing calculations. The mean aerosol light absorption coefficient (ap) is 10 times larger and the mean aerosol scattering coefficient (sp) is 5 times larger at the anthropogenically influenced site at BND than at BRW. The aerosol optical properties of single scattering albedo (o) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) have variability of approximately ±3% and ±8%, respectively, in mean values among the four stations. To assess the importance of the variability in o and b on top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing calculations, the aerosol radiative forcing efficiency (F/) is calculated. The F/ is defined as the aerosol forcing (F) per unit optical depth () and does not depend explicitly on the amount of aerosol present. Based on measurements at four North American stations, radiative transfer calculations that assume fixed aerosol properties can have errors of 1%-6% in the annual average forcing at the top of the atmosphere due to variations in average single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction among the sites studied. The errors increase when shorter-term variations in aerosol properties are considered; for monthly and hourly timescales, errors are expected to be greater than 8% and 15%, respectively, approximately one-third of the time. Systematic relationships exist between various aerosol optical properties [ap, o, b, F/, and Ångström exponent (å)] and the amount of aerosol present (measured by sp) that are qualitatively similar but quantitatively

  16. Atmospheric Backscatter Model Development for CO Sub 2 Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Kent, G.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the problems of modeling atmospheric backscatter from aerosols, in the lowest 20 km of the atmosphere, at CO2 wavelengths are presented, along with a summary of the relevant aerosol characteristics and their variability, and a discussion of the measurement techniques and errors involved. The different methods of calculating the aerosol backscattering function, both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, and limits are placed on the accuracy of these methods. The effects of changing atmospheric humidity and temperature on the backscatter are analyzed and related to the actual atmosphere. Finally, the results of modeling CO2 backscatter in the atmosphere are presented and the variation with height and geographic location discussed, and limits placed on the magnitude of the backscattering function. Conclusions regarding modeling techniques and modeled atmospheric backscatter values are presented in tabular form.

  17. Airborne backscatter lidar measurements at three wavelengths during ELITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, H. G.; Wirth, Martin; Moerl, P.; Renger, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    The German Aerospace Establishment (DLR) operates an airborne backscatter lidar based on a Nh:YAG laser which is flashlamp-pumped at 10 Hz. It works on the wavelengths 1064, 532, and 354 nm. It is mounted downward-looking on the research aircraft Falcon 20, flying at about 12 km altitude at speeds of 200 m/s. We present airborne measurements correlated with the orbit tracks of the shuttle-borne LITE-instrument (lidar in-space technology experiment). The emphasis in data evalution is on the comparison between the airborne and the shuttle- borne lidars. First results show excellent agreement between the two instruments even on details of cirrus clouds. The results comprise cloud geometrical and optical depths, as well as profiles of aerosol backscattering coefficients at three wavelengths.

  18. The Accommodation Coefficient of Water Molecules on Ice: Results from Cirrus Cloud Experiments at the Aerosol Chamber AIDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrotzki, J.; Connolly, P.; Niemand, M.; Saathoff, H.; Moehler, O.; Ebert, V.; Leisner, T.

    2010-12-01

    Cirrus clouds are pure ice clouds in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. One of the parameters governing the growth of ice crystals in these clouds is the accommodation coefficient of water molecules on ice. However, its magnitude is still uncertain to a large degree, since experimental results vary from below 0.01 up to unity depending on the design of the experiment and the examined ice growth process [1]. For the specific case of ice crystal growth in cirrus clouds, no previous experimental studies regarding the accommodation coefficient exist. Therefore, dedicated experiments were carried out at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA [2], examining the ice crystal growth for deposition nucleation in the temperature range from -75 °C to -40 °C. These experiments were evaluated with two different models, a simple one, which just incorporates kinetic and diffusive theory of ice crystal growth, and the more advanced and extended aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction model (ACPIM) [3]. The outcome of these two models is compared to absolute in-situ humidity data measured within AIDA using extractive as well as open path diode laser hygrometers (TDLAS) [4]. For every experiment, this is done by varying the value of the accommodation coefficient within each model, in order to get best agreement with experimental data. The values obtained for the accommodation coefficient at different temperatures are presented and the overall uncertainties as well as the consistency between the two different models are discussed. [1] D. R. Heynes, N. J. Tro, and S. M. George, J. Phys. Chem. 1992, 96, 8502-8509 (1992) [2] O. Möhler et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 3, 211-223 (2003) [3] P. J. Connolly et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys. 9, 2805-2824 (2009) [4] D. W. Fahey et al., AquaVIT White Paper, avail. at https://aquavit.icg.kfa-juelich.de/AquaVit/AquaVitWiki

  19. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  20. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  1. Retrieval of Aerosol Parameters from Continuous H24 Lidar-Ceilometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisi, D.; Barnaba, F.; Costabile, F.; Di Liberto, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wille, H.

    2016-06-01

    Ceilometer technology is increasingly applied to the monitoring and the characterization of tropospheric aerosols. In this work, a method to estimate some key aerosol parameters (extinction coefficient, surface area concentration and volume concentration) from ceilometer measurements is presented. A numerical model has been set up to derive a mean functional relationships between backscatter and the above mentioned parameters based on a large set of simulated aerosol optical properties. A good agreement was found between the modeled backscatter and extinction coefficients and the ones measured by the EARLINET Raman lidars. The developed methodology has then been applied to the measurements acquired by a prototype Polarization Lidar-Ceilometer (PLC). This PLC instrument was developed within the EC- LIFE+ project "DIAPASON" as an upgrade of the commercial, single-channel Jenoptik CHM15k system. The PLC run continuously (h24) close to Rome (Italy) for a whole year (2013-2014). Retrievals of the aerosol backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm and of the relevant aerosol properties were performed using the proposed methodology. This information, coupled to some key aerosol type identification made possible by the depolarization channel, allowed a year-round characterization of the aerosol field at this site. Examples are given to show how this technology coupled to appropriate data inversion methods is potentially useful in the operational monitoring of parameters of air quality and meteorological interest.

  2. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  3. The impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the single-scattering albedo and its application on the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jiangchuan; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles can significantly affect their single-scattering albedo (ω), and consequently alters the aerosol effect on tropospheric photochemistry. In this study, the impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on ω and its application to the NO2 photolysis rate coefficient (JNO2) are investigated for a typical aerosol particle population in the North China Plain (NCP). The variations of aerosol optical properties with relative humidity (RH) are calculated using a Mie theory aerosol optical model, on the basis of field measurements of number-size distribution and hygroscopic growth factor (at RH values above 90 %) from the 2009 HaChi (Haze in China) project. Results demonstrate that ambient ω has pronouncedly different diurnal patterns from ω measured at dry state, and is highly sensitive to the ambient RHs. Ambient ω in the NCP can be described by a dry state ω value of 0.863, increasing with the RH following a characteristic RH dependence curve. A Monte Carlo simulation shows that the uncertainty ofω from the propagation of uncertainties in the input parameters decreases from 0.03 (at dry state) to 0.015 (RHs > 90 %). The impact of hygroscopic growth on ω is further applied in the calculation of the radiative transfer process. Hygroscopic growth of the studied aerosol particle population generally inhibits the photolysis of NO2 at the ground level, whereas accelerates it above the moist planetary boundary layer. Compared with dry state, the calculated JNO2 at RH of 98 % at the height of 1 km increases by 30.4 %, because of the enhancement of ultraviolet radiation by the humidified scattering-dominant aerosol particles. The increase of JNO2 due to the aerosol hygroscopic growth above the upper boundary layer may affect the tropospheric photochemical processes and this needs to be taken into account in the atmospheric chemical models.

  4. Lidar measurements of wildfire smoke aerosols in the atmosphere above Sofia, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Deleva, Atanaska D.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2016-01-01

    Presented are results of lidar measurements and characterization of wildfire caused smoke aerosols observed in the atmosphere above the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, related to two local wildfires raging in forest areas near the city. A lidar systems based on a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser operated at 532 nm and 1064 nm is used in the smoke aerosol observations. It belongs to the Sofia LIDAR Station (at Laser Radars Laboratory, Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences), being a part of the European Aerosol Lidar Network. Optical, dynamical, microphysical, and geometrical properties and parameters of the observed smoke aerosol particles and layers are displayed and analyzed, such as: range/height-resolved profiles of the aerosol backscatter coefficient; integral aerosol backscattering; sets of colormaps displaying time series of the height distribution of the aerosol density; topologic, geometric, and volumetric properties of the smoke aerosol layers; time-averaged height profiles of backscatter-related Ångström exponent (BAE). Obtained results of retrieving and profiling smoke aerosols are commented in their relations to available meteorological and air-mass-transport forecasting and modelling data.

  5. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  6. A method for retrieving vertical distribution of aerosol mass concentration in atmosphere from results of lidar sensing at Nd:YAG laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2011-03-01

    A method for retrieving the vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol concentration from the results of lidar sensing at Ng:YAG laser wavelengths is developed based on the found multiple regressions between the optical location characteristics of aerosol at wavelengths of 0.355, 0.532, and 1.064 nm, as well as between the aerosol backscattering coefficient at these wavelengths and the concentration of aerosol particles. The method does not require solving ill-posed inverse problems and minimizes the use of a priori information. The reliability and generality of regressions obtained are confirmed by their good agreement with the AERO-NET data. The method efficiency is demonstrated by numerical experiments on retrieving profiles of back-scattering coefficients and concentration that corresponds to different optical models of aerosol.

  7. Aerosol and Cloud Interaction Observed From High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wenying; Schuster, Gregory L.; Loeb, Norman G.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies utilizing satellite retrievals have shown a strong correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud cover. However, these retrievals from passive sensors are subject to many limitations, including cloud adjacency (or 3D) effects, possible cloud contamination, uncertainty in the AOD retrieval. Some of these limitations do not exist in High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) observations; for instance, HSRL observations are not a ected by cloud adjacency effects, are less prone to cloud contamination, and offer accurate aerosol property measurements (backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, backscatter Angstrom exponent,and aerosol optical depth) at a neospatial resolution (less than 100 m) in the vicinity of clouds. Hence, the HSRL provides an important dataset for studying aerosol and cloud interaction. In this study, we statistically analyze aircraft-based HSRL profiles according to their distance from the nearest cloud, assuring that all profile comparisons are subject to the same large-scale meteorological conditions. Our results indicate that AODs from HSRL are about 17% higher in the proximity of clouds (approximately 100 m) than far away from clouds (4.5 km), which is much smaller than the reported cloud 3D effect on AOD retrievals. The backscatter and extinction coefficients also systematically increase in the vicinity of clouds, which can be explained by aerosol swelling in the high relative humidity (RH) environment and/or aerosol growth through in cloud processing (albeit not conclusively). On the other hand, we do not observe a systematic trend in lidar ratio; we hypothesize that this is caused by the opposite effects of aerosol swelling and aerosol in-cloud processing on the lidar ratio. Finally, the observed backscatter Angstrom exponent (BAE) does not show a consistent trend because of the complicated relationship between BAE and RH. We demonstrate that BAE should not be used as a surrogate for Angstrom

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties Characterization By Means Of The CNR-IMAA Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; D'Amico, G.; Pappalardo, G.

    2007-12-01

    A Raman/elastic lidar for tropospheric aerosol study is operational at CNR-IMAA (40°36'N, 15°44'E, 760 m above sea level) since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET. Since August 2005, this system provides aerosol backscatter coefficient profiles at 1064 nm, and independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 and 532 nm. In this way, lidar ratio (i.e. extinction to backscatter ratio) profiles at 355 and 532 nm are also obtained. In addition, depolarization ratio measurements at 532 nm are obtained by means of detection of components of backscattered light polarized perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the linearly polarized transmitted laser beam. Depolarization ratio measurements provide information about shape and orientation of aerosolic particles, while lidar ratio measurements and wavelength dependences of both backscatter and extinction are important for aerosol characterization in terms of aerosol type and size. In addition, high quality multi-wavelength measurements (3 backscatter + 2 extinction) can allow the determination of microphysical aerosol properties (refractive index, single-scattering albedo and effective particles radii). Systematic measurements are performed three times per week according to the EARLINET schedule since May 2000, and further measurements are performed in order to investigate particular events, like dust intrusions, volcanic eruptions and forest fires. This extended dataset allows the optical characterization of aerosol located close to the surface, namely in the Planetary Boundary Layer, as well as in the free troposphere. In the free troposphere, an high occurrence of Saharan dust intrusions at CNR-IMAA (about 1 day of Saharan dust intrusion every 10 days) has been identified by means of back-trajectory analysis and in accordance with satellite images, because of the short distance from the Sahara region. In addition, CNR-IMAA is pretty close to Etna, the largest European

  9. Intercomparison of aerosol extinction profiles retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Klein Baltink, H.; Beirle, S.; Clémer, K.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Irie, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Li, A.; Moerman, M. M.; van Roozendael, M.; Shaiganfar, R.; Wagner, T.; Wang, Y.; Xie, P.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.

    2016-07-01

    A first direct intercomparison of aerosol vertical profiles from Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations, performed during the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in summer 2009, is presented. Five out of 14 participants of the CINDI campaign reported aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) as deduced from observations of differential slant column densities of the oxygen collision complex (O4) at different elevation angles. Aerosol extinction vertical profiles and AOT are compared to backscatter profiles from a ceilometer instrument and to sun photometer measurements, respectively. Furthermore, the near-surface aerosol extinction coefficient is compared to in situ measurements of a humidity-controlled nephelometer and dry aerosol absorption measurements. The participants of this intercomparison exercise use different approaches for the retrieval of aerosol information, including the retrieval of the full vertical profile using optimal estimation and a parametrised approach with a prescribed profile shape. Despite these large conceptual differences, and also differences in the wavelength of the observed O4 absorption band, good agreement in terms of the vertical structure of aerosols within the boundary layer is achieved between the aerosol extinction profiles retrieved by the different groups and the backscatter profiles observed by the ceilometer instrument. AOTs from MAX-DOAS and sun photometer show a good correlation (R>0.8), but all participants systematically underestimate the AOT. Substantial differences between the near-surface aerosol extinction from MAX-DOAS and from the humidified nephelometer remain largely unresolved.

  10. Uptake Co-efficient Studies of HO2 Radicals with NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 Aerosols under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faloon, Kate H.; Bloss, William J.

    2010-05-01

    The atmospheric oxidising capacity determines the rate of removal of many atmospheric constituents, including pollutants and greenhouse gases such as methane. For most compounds, tropospheric degradation is initiated through reaction with the hydroxyl radical. OH is rapidly interconverted with hydroperoxy radicals HO2 and organic peroxy radicals (e.g. CH3O2, referred to as RO2 in general) through reaction with volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides; consequently loss of peroxy species affects atmospheric oxidising capacity. Model analyses have shown that heterogeneous loss of hydro- and organic peroxy radicals may significantly affect OH levels and hence factors such as pollutant degradation, ozone production and SOA formation - however these processes are poorly understood. This work aims to increase our understanding of heterogeneous reactions between HO2 radicals and aerosol; specifically the rate at which HO2 is lost to aerosols particles. The rate and mechanism of this HO2 loss process is highly uncertain at present and reducing this uncertainty will allow improved simulation of this process within atmospheric models. We present new values of the mass accommodation co-efficient, αHO2, and the uptake co-efficient,γHO2, for NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aqueous aerosols. Sodium chloride is used as a substitute for marine aerosols and ammonium sulphate as a substitute for an urban aerosol. A laboratory flow-tube system, mimicking tropospheric conditions, is used for determination of these values. Hydroperoxy radicals are produced by the photolysis of water vapour and detected using a PEroxy Radical Chemical Amplification (PERCA) technique, while aerosols are generated using a constant output atomiser and detected using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The flow tube system allows variation of the radical aerosol contact distance, and hence time, allowing a rate of uptake, γ, to be determined. Mass accommodation, α, values are determined using aerosols

  11. Aerosol profiling by calibrated ceilometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Recently, networks of automated single-wavelength backscatter lidars ("ceilometers") were implemented, primarily by weather services. As a consequence, the potential of ceilometers to quantitatively determine the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols was investigated, to derive mixing layer heights for air quality studies and to assess optical properties. The main issues are the limited signal-to-noise ratio and the inherent problems of the calibration. We have studied several approaches for calibrating ceilometers, based on different numerical solutions and on auxiliary data of different remote sensing techniques. As a result, the backscatter coefficient can be determined with a relative accuracy of typically 10% and a time resolution in the order of 5 minutes. This parameter is used to estimate the mixing layer height by applying different techniques of averaging and pattern recognition. In this context, it is assumed that aerosols are a good tracer for the thermodynamic stratification of the troposphere. Our algorithm is fully automated and was tested for several commercially available ceilometers. For this purpose, a simplified version for non-calibrated ceilometers, based on the so called range corrected signal, was additionally developed. We used data of the CHM15k-x ceilometer (manufactured by Jenoptik) from more than 5 years of continuous operation by the LMU-MIM in Munich (Germany) to establish climatologies of mixing layer heights (MLH), cloud cover, cloud heights and vertical profiles of the backscatter coefficient. Among others, the mean diurnal cycle and the interannual variability of the MLH for different months were determined. Ceilometer derived MLH were also used to validate different parameterization of chemistry transport models and to validate forecasts of the dispersion of aerosol layers. For the latter applications backscatter coefficients are required. That means, a calibration of the ceilometers is mandatory.

  12. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  13. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient and volatility of important BVOC oxidation products using the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G.; Hohaus, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schmitt, S. H.; Yu, Z.; Schlag, P.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can alter the Earth's radiative budget and global climate but can also affect human health. A dominant contributor to the submicrometer particulate matter (PM) is organic aerosol (OA). OA can be either directly emitted through e.g. combustion processes (primary OA) or formed through the oxidation of organic gases (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). A detailed understanding of SOA formation is of importance as it constitutes a major contribution to the total OA. The partitioning between the gas and particle phase as well as the volatility of individual components of SOA is yet poorly understood adding uncertainties and thus complicating climate modelling. In this work, a new experimental methodology was used for compound-specific analysis of organic aerosol. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) is a newly developed instrument that deploys an aerodynamic lens to separate the gas and particle phase of an aerosol. The particle phase is directed to a cooled sampling surface. After collection particles are thermally desorbed and transferred to a detector for further analysis. In the present work, the ACM was coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to detect and quantify organic compounds partitioning between the gas and particle phase. This experimental approach was used in a set of experiments at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR to investigate SOA formation. Ozone oxidation with subsequent photochemical aging of β-pinene, limonene and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were studied. Simultaneous measurement of the gas and particle phase using the ACM-PTR-ToF-MS allows to report partitioning coefficients of important BVOC oxidation products. Additionally, volatility trends and changes of the SOA with photochemical aging are investigated and compared for all systems studied.

  14. Infrared Extinction Coefficients of Aerosolized Conductive Flake Powders and Flake Suspensions having a Zero-Truncated Poisson Size Distribution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle was used to disseminate all materials into a stirred 190 m 3 cylindrical aerosol chamber. After dispersion by the... nozzle and thorough chamber mixing with a low speed fan, spectral aerosol transmittance and concentration were simultaneously measured to obtain spectral...varying concentrations were prepared by stirring and sonicating the powders in ethanol. A twin-fluid atomizing nozzle , consisting of a jet of the

  15. Application of the two-stream inversion algorithm for retrieval of extinction, backscatter, and lidar ratio for clean and polluted Arctic air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Christoph, Ritter; Neuber, Roland

    2005-10-01

    The background aerosol conditions and the conditions contaminated with aerosol of antropogenic origin (Arctic haze) were investigated during two Arctic campaigns, the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR) in 2004 and Svalbard Experiment (SVALEX) in 2005, respectively. Results obtained by application of the two-stream inversion algorithm to the elastic lidar signals measured on two days representative for each campaign are presented. The calculations were done using signals obtained by the nadir-looking Airborne Mobile Aerosol Lidar (AMALi) probing lower troposphere from the AWI research aircraft Polar 2 overflying the stationary Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) based at the AWI Koldewey Research Station in Ny Ålesund, Svalbard. The method allowed independent retrieval of extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles and lidar ratio profiles for each of the two days representative for both clean and polluted lower troposphere in Arctic.

  16. Optical backscatter characteristics of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Schaffner, S. K.; Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Hunt, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements have been made of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January-February 1989. These show the existence of a systematic relationship between the backscatter depolarization ratio and the (aerosol + molecular)/molecular backscatter ratio. The data are consistent with a two population PSC particle model.

  17. Aerosol absorption coefficient and Equivalent Black Carbon by parallel operation of AE31 and AE33 aethalometers at the Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Kalogridis, Athina-Cerise; Vratolis, Sterios; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing carbon in atmospheric aerosol plays a critical role in radiative forcing and climate change. Despite the long term measurements across the Arctic, comparing data obtained by a variety of methods across stations requires caution. A method for extracting the aerosol absorption coefficient from data obtained over the decades by filter based instrument is still under development. An IASOA Aerosol working group has been initiated to address this and other cross-site aerosol comparison opportunities. Continuous ambient measurements of EBC/light attenuation by means of a Magee Sci. AE-31 aethalometer operating at the Zeppelinfjellet station (474 m asl; 78°54'N, 11°53'E), Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, have been available since 2001 (Eleftheriadis et al, 2009), while a new aethalometer model (AE33, Drinovec et al, 2014) has been installed to operate in parallel from the same inlet since June 2015. Measurements are recorded by a Labview routine collecting all available parameters reported by the two instrument via RS232 protocol. Data are reported at 1 and 10 minute intervals as averages for EBC (μg m-3) and aerosol absorption coefficients (Mm-1) by means of routine designed to report Near Real Time NRT data at the EBAS WDCA database (ebas.nilu.no) Results for the first 6 month period are reported here in an attempt to evaluate comparative performance of the two instruments in terms of their response with respect to the variable aerosol load of light absorbing carbon during the warm and cold seasons found in the high arctic. The application of available conversion schemes for obtaining the absorption coefficient by the two instruments is found to demonstrate a marked difference in their output. During clean periods of low aerosol load (EBC < 30 ng m-3), the two instruments display a better agreement with regression slope for the 880 nm signal between the two at ~ 0.9 compared to a slope at ~ 0.6 during the period of higher absorbing carbon loads (400< EBC<30 ng m

  18. Airborne Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols during the GLOBE Pacific Circumnavigation Missions of 1989 and 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R.; Tratt, D.

    1995-01-01

    Tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol backscatter profiles were obtained with an airborne backscatter lidar during the NASA Globe Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) missions in November 1989 and May/June 1990.

  19. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  20. Accuracy Remote-Sensing of Aerosol Spatial Distribution in the Lower Troposphere by Twin Scanning Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; Hua, D.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Wang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the lower troposphere play an important role in the absorption and scattering of atmospheric radiation, the forming of precipitation and the circulation of chemistry. Due to the influence of solar heating at the surface, the aerosol distribution is inhomogeneous and variation with time. Lidar is proven to be a powerful tool in the application of remote sensing of atmospheric properties (Klett 1981). However, the existing of overlap function in lidar equation limits the fine detection of aerosol optical properties in the lower troposphere by vertical measurement, either by Raman lidar (Whiteman 2003) or by high spectral resolution lidar (Imaki 2005). Although the multi-angle method can succeed the aerosol measurement from the ground, the homogeneous atmospheric is needed (Pahlow 2004). Aiming to detect the inhomogeneous aerosols in the lower troposphere and to retrieve the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients in the lidar equation, a novel method for accuracy remote-sensing of aerosol properties based on twin scanning lidars has been proposed. In order to realize the fine detection of the aerosol spatial distribution from the ground to the height of interest of atmosphere, the scanning lidar is utilized as the remote sensing tool combined with the cross scanning by the twin systems, which makes the exact solutions of those two unknown parameters retrievable. Figure shows the detection method for aerosol spatial distribution using twin scanning lidars. As two lidar equations are provided simultaneously, the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients are retrievable. Moreover, by selecting the transmitting laser wavelength, the presented method can realize the fine detection of aerosol at any spectrum, even the theoretical and technical analysis of the aerosol characteristics by applying multi-spectra.

  1. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the South African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  2. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  3. An Accuracy Assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO Version 2/Version 3 Daytime Aerosol Extinction Product Based on a Detailed Multi-Sensor, Multi-Platform Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP s level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. spaceborne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth s Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP s low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth s surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP s extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  4. An accuracy assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO version 2/version 3 daytime aerosol extinction product based on a detailed multi-sensor, multi-platform case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-04-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP's level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. space-borne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth's Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP's low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth's surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP's extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  5. An alternative method estimating hygroscopic growth factor of aerosol light scattering coefficient: a case study in an urban area of Guangzhou, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. S.; Zhang, L.; Tao, J.; Zhang, R. J.; Cao, J. J.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed to estimate hygroscopic growth factor (f(RH)) of aerosol light scattering coefficient (bsp), making use of the measured size- and chemically-resolved aerosol samples. Regarding this method, chemical composition of the measured aerosol samples were first reconstructed using the equilibrium model ISOPPORIA II. The model reconstructed chemical composition varies with a varying relative humidity (RH) input, which was then employed to calculate bsp and f(RH) of bsp using Mie Model. Further, the RH dependence of f(RH) of bsp (denoted as f(RH) derived from model calculation was empirically fitted with a two-parameter formula. One of the two parameters was set to be a constant for practical applications. For validation, the developed formula of fsp(RH) was applied to correct the long-term records of measured bsp from the values under comparative dry conditions to the ones under ambient RH conditions. Compared with the original bsp data, the f(RH)-corrected bsp had a higher linear correlation with and a smaller discrepancy from the bsp data derived directly from visibility and absorption measurements. The method described in this paper provides an alternative approach to estimate fsp(RH) and has many potential applications.

  6. Development of a high-spectral-resolution lidar for continuous observation of aerosols in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Ristori, Pablo; Papandrea, Sebastian; Otero, Lidia; Quel, Eduardo; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Continuous monitoring of aerosol profiles using lidar is helpful for a quasi-real-time indication of aerosol concentration. For instance, volcanic ash concentration and its height distribution are essential information for plane flights. Depolarization ratio and multi-wavelength measurements are useful for characterizing aerosol types such as volcanic ash, smoke, dust, sea-salt, and air pollution aerosols. High spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and Raman scattering lidar can contribute to such aerosol characterization significantly since extinction coefficients can be measured independently from backscattering coefficients. In particular, HSRL can measure aerosol extinction during daytime and nighttime with a high sensitivity. We developed an HSRL with the iodine filter method for continuous observation of aerosols at 532nm in the northern region of Argentina in the framework of the South American Environmental Atmospheric Risk Management Network (SAVER.Net)/SATREPS project. The laser wavelength of the HSRL was controlled by a feedback system to tune the laser wavelength to the center of an iodine absorption line. The stability of the laser wavelength with the system satisfied the requirement showing very small systematic errors in the retrieval of extinction and backscatter.

  7. Concept Design of a Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar System With Mitigated Diattenuation Effects and Depolarization-Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Vidal, Eric; Barragán, Rubén; Muñoz, Constantino; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Tiana-Alsina, Jordi; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; García-Vizcaíno, David

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients from lidar data acquired through so-called total-power channels - intended to measure the backscattered power irrespective of the polarization - can be adversely affected by varying depolarization effects produced by the aerosol under measurement. This effect can be particularly noticeable in advanced multiwavelength systems, where different wavelengths are separated using a system of dichroic beam splitters, because in general the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beam splitters will be different for fields with polarization parallel or perpendicular to the incidence plane. Here we propose a setup for multiwavelength aerosol lidars alleviating diattenuation effects due to changing depolarization conditions while allowing measure linear depolarization.

  8. Multispectral Backscattering: A Fractal-Structure Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    discussed in more details below in Sec.D. 2.1 Orientation-Averaged T - Matrix Code In principle, for the case of rigid aggregate of homogeneous spheres, the...reliable approximation up to the largest values of x attainable by T - matrix code with our computers. 3 Backscattering Coefficient The backscattering...basic T - matrix code may be found at http://www.giss.nasa.gov crmim/, and original DDA code comes from http://www.astro.princeton.edu

  9. Signal Processing and Calibration of Continuous-Wave Focused CO2 Doppler Lidars for Atmospheric Backscatter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Chambers, Diana M.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Bowdle, David A.; Jones, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Two continuous-wave(CW)focused C02 Doppler lidars (9.1 and 10.6 micrometers) were developed for airborne in situ aerosol backscatter measurements. The complex path of reliably calibrating these systems, with different signal processors, for accurate derivation of atmospheric backscatter coefficients is documented. Lidar calibration for absolute backscatter measurement for both lidars is based on range response over the lidar sample volume, not solely at focus. Both lidars were calibrated with a new technique using well-characterized aerosols as radiometric standard targets and related to conventional hard-target calibration. A digital signal processor (DSP), a surface acoustic and spectrum analyzer and manually tuned spectrum analyzer signal analyzers were used. The DSP signals were analyzed with an innovative method of correcting for systematic noise fluctuation; the noise statistics exhibit the chi-square distribution predicted by theory. System parametric studies and detailed calibration improved the accuracy of conversion from the measured signal-to-noise ratio to absolute backscatter. The minimum backscatter sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 9.1 micrometers and approximately 9 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 10.6 micrometers. Sample measurements are shown for a flight over the remote Pacific Ocean in 1990 as part of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) survey missions, the first time to our knowledge that 9.1-10.6 micrometer lidar intercomparisons were made. Measurements at 9.1 micrometers, a potential wavelength for space-based lidar remote-sensing applications, are to our knowledge the first based on the rare isotope C-12 O(2)-18 gas.

  10. Optical properties of Southern Hemisphere aerosols: Report of the joint CSIRO/NASA study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, John L.; Platt, C. Martin; Huffaker, R. Milton; Jones, William D.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Gras, John L.

    1988-01-01

    This study was made in support of the LAWS and GLOBE programs, which aim to design a suitable Doppler lidar system for measuring global winds from a satellite. Observations were taken from 5 deg S to 45 deg S along and off the E and SE Australian coast, thus obtaining representative samples over a large latitude range. Observations were made between 0 and 6 km altitude of aerosol physical and chemical properties in situ from the CSIRO F-27 aircraft; of lidar backscatter coefficients at 10.6 micron wavelength from the F-27 aircraft; of lidar backscatter profiles at 0.694 microns at Sale, SE Australia; and of lidar backscatter profiles at 0.532 microns at Cowley Beach, NE Australia. Both calculations and observations in the free troposphere gave a backscatter coefficient of 1-2 x 10 to the -11/m/sr at 10.6 microns, although the accuracies of the instruments were marginal at this level. Equivalent figures were 2-8 x 10 to the -9/m/sr (aerosol) and 9 x 10 to the -9 to 2 x 10 to the -8/m/sr (lidar) at 0.694 microns wavelength at Sale; and 3.7 x 10 to the -9/m/sr (aerosol) and 10 to the -8 to 10 to the -7/m/sr (lidar) at 0.532 microns wavelength at Cowley Beach. The measured backscatter coefficients at 0.694 and 0.532 microns were consistently higher than the values calculated from aerosol size distributions by factors of typically 2 to 10.

  11. The 48-inch lidar aerosol measurements taken at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, David C.; Osborn, M. T.; Winker, D. M.; Decoursey, R. J.; Youngbluth, Otto, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents lidar data taken between July 1991 and December 1992 using a ground-based 48-inch lidar instrument at the Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Seventy lidar profiles (approximately one per week) were obtained during this period, which began less than 1 month after the eruption of the Mount Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines. Plots of backscattering ratio as a function of altitude are presented for each data set along with tables containing numerical values of the backscattering ratio and backscattering coefficient versus altitude. The enhanced aerosol backscattering seen in the profiles highlights the influence of the Mount Pinatubo eruption on the stratospheric aerosol loading over Hampton. The long-term record of the profiles gives a picture of the evolution of the aerosol cloud, which reached maximum loading approximately 8 months after the eruption and then started to decrease gradually. NASA RP-1209 discusses 48-inch lidar aerosol measurements taken at the Langley Research Center from May 1974 to December 1987.

  12. Composition and spectral characteristics of ambient aerosol at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R. )

    1991-03-20

    Ambient aerosol particles were sampled continuously with a time resolution of {approximately}4 hours for a period of 8 days at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, in August 1986. The samples were analyzed on-site for their chemical composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra of the samples also provided data on aerosol light absorbance characteristics at 9.1 and 10.6 {mu}m - wavelengths of interest in determining aerosol backscatter coefficients for CO{sub 2} lidars. The chemical species in the ambient aerosol varied considerably during this 8-day period. The aerosol was acidic ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) rather than neutral ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) for a major fraction of the sampling time. The samples generally showed much higher absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m than at 10.6 {mu}m. Changes in the chemical composition between (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and the more acidic forms were accompanied by substantial changes in the sample's absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m but lesser changes in the absorbance at 10.6 {mu}m. These variations could have a profound effect on backscatter coefficients of atmospheric aerosol particles at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  13. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  14. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  15. C-band backscattering from corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  16. Independent measurement of extinction and backscatter profiles in cirrus clouds by using a combined Raman elastic-backscatter lidar.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, A; Wandinger, U; Riebesell, M; Weitkamp, C; Michaelis, W

    1992-11-20

    Height profiles of the extinction and the backscatter coefficients in cirrus clouds are determined independently from elastic- and inelastic- (Raman) backscatter signals. An extended error analysis is given. Examples covering the measured range of extinction-to-backscatter ratios (lidar ratios) in ice clouds are presented. Lidar ratios between 5 and 15 sr are usually found. A strong variation between 2 and 20 sr can be observed within one cloud profile. Particle extinction coefficients determined from inelastic-backscatter signals and from elastic-backscatter signals by using the Klett method are compared. The Klett solution of the extinction profile can be highly erroneous if the lidar ratio varies along the measuring range. On the other hand, simple backscatter lidars can provide reliable information about the cloud optical depth and the mean cloud lidar ratio.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radar Backscatter from Sea Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    predicts that the depolarized backscattering coefficient is zero. Moreover, there is no distinction in this model between vertical and horizontal... Backscattering Cross-Section of First-Year Ice at 13 GHz. 38 angles except vertical incidence, mainly due to the 3rewster angle effect. The depolarized ...theories to properly explain the polarization dependence of the backscatter from sea ice. Because depolarization is a secondary effect for the surface

  18. Variation of the vertical distribution of Nabro volcano aerosol layers in the stratosphere observed by LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Shin, Dong Ho; Müller, Detlef

    2017-04-01

    We present results of the vertical distribution variation of volcanic aerosol layers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The data were taken with our multiwavelength aerosol Raman lidar at Gwangju (35.10° N, 126.53° E), Korea. The volcanic ash particles and gases were released around 12 June 2011 during the eruption of the Nabro volcano (13.37° N, 41.7° E) in Eritrea, east Africa. Forward trajectory computations show that the volcanic aerosols were advected from North Africa to East Asia. The first measurement of the aerosol layer over Korea was on 19 June 2011. The aerosol layers appeared between 15 km and 17 km height asl (above sea level). The maximum value of the aerosol layer of the particle backscatter coefficient (1.5 ± 0.3 Mm-1 sr-1) and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532 nm (2.2%) were observed at 16.4 km height asl. We continuously probed the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for this volcanic aerosol layer during the following 6 months, until December 2011. The volcanic aerosol layer showed a single-peak of the particle backscatter coefficient and a comparably narrow vertical thickness at our observation site at the beginning of our observation period (i.e. comparably soon after the initial eruption period). After that initial period the vertical distribution of the plume changed. Multiple peaks and a comparably broad geometrical thickness developed with progressing observation time. The vertical thickness of the volcanic aerosol layer expanded up to 10 km by 3 August 2011. The linear particle depolarization ratios were larger in the lower part of the aerosol layer than the upper part of the aerosol layer. We observed a strong variation of the AOD (aerosol optical depth) in the first two months of our lidar observations. After these two months the AOD gradually decreased with time from September to December 20111 and the maximum particle backscatter coefficients consistently decreased. The corresponding e

  19. Scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols over Lanzhou City and applications using an integrating nephelometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhang; Bo, Hu; Changhe, Chen; Ping, Du; Lei, Zhang; Guanghong, Feng

    2004-12-01

    The data, measured by a three-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer over Lanzhou City during the winters of 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 respectively, have been analyzed for investigating the scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols and exploring their relationship and the status of air pollution. The aerosol particle volume distribution is inverted with the measured spectral scattering coefficients. The results show that the daily variation of the aerosol scattering coefficients is in a tri-peak shape. The average ratio of backscattering coefficient to total scattering coefficient at 550 nm is 0.158; there exists an excellent correlation between the scattering coefficients and the concentration of PM10. The average ratio of the concentration of PM10 to the scattering coefficients is 0.37 g m-2, which is contingent on the optical parameters of aerosol particles such as the size distribution, etc.; an algorithm is developed for inverting the volume distribution of aerosol particles by using the histogram and Monte-Carlo techniques, and the test results show that the inversion is reasonable.

  20. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  1. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  2. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  3. Two-wavelength lidar characterization of atmospheric aerosol fields at low altitudes over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Toncheva, Eleonora N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities for applying multiwavelength elastic lidar probing of the atmosphere to help monitor air-quality over large industrial and densely populated areas, based predominantly on the use and analysis of commonly obtainable backscatter-related lidar quantities, are examined. Presented are two-wavelength (1064/532 nm) lidar observations on the spatial distribution, structure, composition, and temporal evolution of close-to-surface atmospheric aerosol fields over heterogeneous orographic areas (adjacent city, plain, and mountain) near Sofia, Bulgaria. Selected winter-time evening lidar measurements are described. Range profiles, histograms, and evolutional range-time diagrams of the aerosol backscatter coefficients, range-corrected lidar signals, normalized standard deviations, and backscatter-related Ångström exponents (BAE) are analyzed. Near-perfect correlation between the aerosol density distribution and orographic differentiation of the underlying terrain is established, finding expression in a sustained horizontal stratification of the probed atmospheric domains. Distinctive features in the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of both the fine- and coarse aerosol fractions are revealed in correlation with terrain's orography. Zonal aerosol particle size distributions are qualitatively characterized by using an approach based on BAE occurrence frequency distribution analysis. Assumptions are made about the aerosol particle type, origin, and dominating size as connected (by transport-modeling data) to local pollution sources. Specifics and patterns of temporal dynamics of the fine- and coarse aerosol fraction density distributions and movements, revealed by using statistical analysis of lidar data, are discussed. The obtained results prove the capability of the used two-wavelength lidar approach to perform fast-, reliable, and self-consistent characterization of important optical-, micro-physical-, and dynamical properties of atmospheric

  4. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the third year of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this one-year grant consisted in analysis and publication of field studies using a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180 deg backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Analyzed data consisted of measurements made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with target in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator.

  5. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the first two years of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this two-year grant consisted in the development and deployment of a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180' backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Measurements were made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with targeted in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator and radiative transfer modeling by the University of Lille, France.

  6. Variability of aerosol optical properties in the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandolfi, M.; Cusack, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.

    2011-08-01

    Aerosol light scattering, absorption and particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured at Montseny, a regional background site in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) which is part of the European Supersite for Atmospheric Aerosol Research (EUSAAR). Off line analyses of 24 h PM filters collected with Hi-Vol instruments were performed for the determination of the main chemical components of PM. Mean scattering and hemispheric backscattering coefficients (@ 635 nm) were 26.6±23.2 Mm-1 and 4.3±2.7 Mm-1, respectively and the mean aerosol absorption coefficient (@ 637 nm) was 2.8±2.2 Mm-1. Mean values of Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Ångström exponent (å) (calculated from 450 nm to 635 nm) at MSY were 0.90±0.05 and 1.3±0.5 respectively. A clear relationship was observed between the PM1/PM10 and PM2.5/PM10 ratios as a function of the calculated Ångström exponents. Mass scattering cross sections (MSC) for fine mass and sulfate at 635 nm were 2.8±0.5 m2 g-1 and 11.8±2.2 m2 g-1, respectively, while the mean aerosol absorption cross section (MAC) was 10.4±2.0 m2 g-1. The variability in aerosol optical properties in the WMB were largely explained by the origin and ageing of air masses over the measurement site. The MAC values appear dependent of particles aging: similar to the expected absorption cross-section for fresh emissions under Atlantic Advection episodes and higher under aerosol pollution episodes. The analysis of the Ångström exponent as a function of the origin the air masses revealed that polluted winter anticyclonic conditions and summer recirculation scenarios typical of the WMB led to an increase of fine particles in the atmosphere (å = 1.5±0.1) while the aerosol optical properties under Atlantic Advection episodes and Saharan dust outbreaks were clearly dominated by coarser particles (å = 1.0±0.4). The sea breeze played an important role in transporting pollutants from the developed WMB coastlines towards inland rural areas

  7. On the spectral dependence of backscatter from cirrus clouds: Assessing CALIOP's 1064 nm calibration assumptions using cloud physics lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; McGill, Matthew J.; Hu, Yongxiang; Obland, Michael D.

    2010-07-01

    Recent space-based lidar missions rely on assumptions about the spectral dependence of the backscatter signals from cirrus clouds to calibrate measurements made at 1064 nm. In particular, the calibration procedure employed by the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission assumes that the backscatter color ratio, defined as the ratio of particulate backscatter coefficients at 1064 nm and 532 nm, has a value of 1.00, with an expected standard deviation on the order of 0.04. This work assesses the accuracy of this assumption, and its implications for the CALIPSO 1064 nm calibration scheme, using over 400 h of lidar measurements acquired in the northern hemisphere between 2002 and 2007 by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). For the strongly scattering cirrus clouds typically used for CALIPSO calibrations, the uncorrected CPL-derived backscatter color ratio is 0.83 ± 0.19. Accounting for computational biases introduced by the CPL assumption of pristine air in the calibration region yields a best estimate cirrus cloud color ratio of 1.01 ± 0.25.

  8. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions.

  9. Directional ultrasonic backscattering in polycrystals with elongated grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkis, O. I.; Yang, L.; Li, J.; Rokhlin, S. I.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical solution for a three dimensional integral representation of the backscattering (BS) coefficient in polycrystals with elongated grains is obtained. The theory was applied to evaluation of experimental data in Ti alloy with duplex microstructure, which consists of micro-textured regions (MTR) and smaller crystallites. Experiment shows that for microstructure characterization there is significant advantage in using the directional ratios of backscattering coefficients instead their absolute values for data analysis.

  10. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  11. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  12. Lidar data assimilation for improved analyses of volcanic aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Observations of hazardous events with release of aerosols are hardly analyzable by today's data assimilation algorithms, without producing an attenuating bias. Skillful forecasts of unexpected aerosol events are essential for human health and to prevent an exposure of infirm persons and aircraft with possibly catastrophic outcome. Typical cases include mineral dust outbreaks, mostly from large desert regions, wild fires, and sea salt uplifts, while the focus aims for volcanic eruptions. In general, numerical chemistry and aerosol transport models cannot simulate such events without manual adjustments. The concept of data assimilation is able to correct the analysis, as long it is operationally implemented in the model system. Though, the tangent-linear approximation, which describes a substantial precondition for today's cutting edge data assimilation algorithms, is not valid during unexpected aerosol events. As part of the European COPERNICUS (earth observation) project MACC II and the national ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) initiative, we developed a module that enables the assimilation of aerosol lidar observations, even during unforeseeable incidences of extreme emissions of particulate matter. Thereby, the influence of the background information has to be reduced adequately. Advanced lidar instruments comprise on the one hand the aspect of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and on the other hand they can deliver a detailed quantification of the detected aerosols. For the assimilation of maximal exploited lidar data, an appropriate lidar observation operator is constructed, compatible with the EURAD-IM (European Air Pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) system. The observation operator is able to map the modeled chemical and physical state on lidar attenuated backscatter, transmission, aerosol optical depth, as well as on the extinction and backscatter coefficients. Further, it has the ability to process the observed discrepancies with lidar

  13. Investigating vertical distributions of ozone and of the aerosol extinction coefficient in the middle atmosphere with the MKS-M and SFN-4 instruments on board Salyut-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badaev, V. V.; Grechko, G. M.; Elanskii, N. F.; Kan, V.; Plotkin, M. E.

    1989-04-01

    The technical characteristics of the multichannel spectrometer (MKS-M) system combined with a camera containing a spectrophotography attachment (SFN-4) are discussed together with results obtained by this system on distributions of ozone and aerosol in the middle atmosphere. It is demonstrated that this system is capable of retrieving the fine structure of vertical ozone and aerosol extinction distributions in the lower stratosphere. Results show that, in the ozonosphere, the contents of ozone and of aerosol exhibit a negative correlation.

  14. Measurements of Stratospheric Pinatubo Aerosol Extinction Profiles by a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo, Makoto; Nagasawa, Chikao

    1992-01-01

    The Raman lidar has been used for remote measurements of water vapor, ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower troposphere because the Raman cross section is three orders smaller than the Rayleigh cross section. We estimated the extinction coefficients of the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere using a Raman lidar. If the precise aerosol extinction coefficients are derived, the backscatter coefficient of a Mie scattering lidar will be more accurately estimated. The Raman lidar has performed to measure density profiles of some species using Raman scattering. Here we used a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for transmitter and received nitrogen vibrational Q-branch Raman scattering signal. Ansmann et al. (1990) derived tropospherical aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar. We think that this method can apply to dense stratospheric aerosols such as Pinatubo volcanic aerosols. As dense aerosols are now accumulated in the stratosphere by Pinatubo volcanic eruption, the error of Ramen lidar signal regarding the fluctuation of air density can be ignored.

  15. The surface aerosol optical properties in the urban area of Nanjing, west Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bingliang; Wang, Tijian; Liu, Jane; Li, Shu; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Chen, Pulong; Hu, Qiduo; Yang, Xiu-qun; Fu, Congbin; Zhu, Jialei

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies of aerosol optical properties are useful for reducing uncertainties in estimations of aerosol radiative forcing and forecasting visibility. In this study, the observed near-surface aerosol optical properties in urban Nanjing are analysed from March 2014 to February 2016. Results show that near-surface urban aerosols in Nanjing are mainly from local emissions and the surrounding regions. They have lower loadings but are more scattering than aerosols in most cities in China. The annual mean aerosol extinction coefficient (EC), single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASP) at 550 nm are 381.96 Mm-1, 0.9 and 0.57, respectively. The aerosol absorption coefficient (AAC) is about 1 order of magnitude smaller than its scattering coefficient (SC). However, the absorbing aerosol has a larger Ångström exponent (AAE) value, 1.58 at 470/660 nm, about 0.2 larger than the scattering aerosols (SAE). All the aerosol optical properties follow a near-unimodal pattern, and their values are mostly concentrated around their averages, accounting for more than 60 % of the total samplings. Additionally, they have substantial seasonality and diurnal variations. High levels of SC and AAC all appear in winter due to higher aerosol and trace gas emissions. AAE (ASP) is the smallest (largest) in summer, possibly because of high relative humidity (RH) which also causes considerably larger SC and smaller SAE, although intensive gas-to-particle transformation could produce a large number of finer scattering aerosols in this season. Seasonality of EC is different from the columnar aerosol optical depth. Larger AACs appear during the rush hours of the day while SC and back-scattering coefficient (Bsp) only peak in the early morning. Aerosols are fresher in the daytime than at night-time, leading to their larger Ångström exponent and smaller ASP. Different temporal variations between AAC and SC cause the aerosols to be more absorbing (smaller SSA) in autumn

  16. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  17. Emissions of trace elements during the 2012-2013 effusive eruption of Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka: enrichment factors, partition coefficients and aerosol contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, M.; Malik, N.; Taran, Yu.

    2014-09-01

    Gases and aerosols from the 2012-13 effusive eruption of Tolbachik basaltic volcano, Kamchatka, were sampled in February and May, 2013, from a lava tube window located 300 m from the eruptive crater; temperature at the sampling point was 1060-1070 °C. The chemical and isotopic compositions of the sampled gases (92.4% H2O, 3.5% CO2, 2.3% SO2 on average; δD from - 25.0 to - 38.6‰) correspond to a typical volcanic arc gas without dilution by meteoric or hydrothermal water. Halogen contents in the gases (1.37% HCl, 0.5% HF) were higher than average arc values. The total amount of analyzed metallic and metalloid (trace) elements in the gas exceeded 665 ppm. Six most abundant trace elements, K (250 ppm), Na (220 ppm), Si (74 ppm), Br (48 ppm), Cu (21 ppm) and Fe (12 ppm), accounted for 95% of the total content of trace elements in the gas. The gases contained 24 ppb Re, 12 ppb Ag, 4.9 ppb Au and 0.45 ppb Pt. Refractory rock-forming elements (Mg, Al, Ca) and some other elements such as Ba and Th were transported mainly in the form of silicate microspheres and altered rock particles. The concentrations of metals in the eruptive Tolbachik gases are higher than the corresponding concentrations in high-temperature fumaroles worldwide, although the mutual ratios of the elements are approximately the same. The gas/magma partition coefficients of eleven elements exceed unity, including the non-metals F, S, Cl, Br, As, Se and Te and the rare metals Cd, Re, Tl and Bi. Despite the relatively low concentrations of trace elements in the volcanic gases at the highest temperatures, superficial magma degassing provides information on the sources and sinks of metals.

  18. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  19. Retrieving the height of smoke and dust aerosols by synergistic use of VIIRS, OMPS, and CALIOP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, N. Christina; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jeong, Myeong-Jae

    2015-08-01

    This study extends the application of the previously developed Aerosol Single-scattering albedo and layer Height Estimation (ASHE) algorithm, which was originally applied to smoke aerosols only, to both smoke and dust aerosols by including nonspherical dust properties in the retrieval process. The main purpose of the algorithm is to derive aerosol height information over wide areas using aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors simultaneously: aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), UV aerosol index from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), and total backscatter coefficient profile from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). The case studies suggest that the ASHE algorithm performs well for both smoke and dust aerosols, showing root-mean-square error of the retrieved aerosol height as compared to CALIOP observations from 0.58 to 1.31 km and mean bias from -0.70 to 1.13 km. In addition, the algorithm shows the ability to retrieve single-scattering albedo to within 0.03 of Aerosol Robotic Network inversion data for moderate to thick aerosol loadings (AOD of ~1.0). For typical single-layered aerosol cases, the estimated uncertainty in the retrieved height ranges from 1.20 to 1.80 km over land and from 1.15 to 1.58 km over ocean when favorable conditions are met. Larger errors are observed for multilayered aerosol events, due to the limited sensitivities of the passive sensors to such cases.

  20. Initial assessment of space-based lidar CALIOP aerosol and cloud layer structures through inter-comparison with a ground-based back-scattering lidar and CloudSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Chung, E.-S.; Sohn, B.-J.; Berthier, S.; Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Dulac, F.

    2009-03-01

    This study presents results of the intercomparison of aerosol/cloud top and bottom heights obtained from a space-borne active sensor Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO, and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat, and the space-borne passive sensor Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua, and ground-based 2-wavelenght polarization lidar system (532 and 1064 nm) at Seoul National University (SNU), Seoul, South Korea. This result confirms that the CALIPSO science team algorithms for the discrimination of cloud and aerosol as well as for the detection of layer top and base altitude provide reliable information both under cloud-free conditions and in cases of multiple aerosol layers underlying semi-transparent cirrus clouds. Simultaneous space-borne CALIOP, CPR and ground-based SNU lidar (SNU-L) measurements complement each other and can be combined to provide full information on the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, especially for thick opaque clouds. The aerosol extinction profiles from both lidars show good agreement for aerosols within the planetary boundary layer under cloud-free conditions and for the night-time CALIOP flight.

  1. On deriving the accurate aerosol extinction profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere using the range dependent scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, M. V.; Radhakrishnan, S. R.; Mahadevanpillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2008-12-01

    Lidar has proven to be an effective instrument for obtaining high resolution profiles of atmospheric aerosols. Deriving the optical properties of aerosols from the experimentally obtained lidar data is one of the most interesting and challenging task for the atmospheric scientists. A few methods had been developed so far, to obtain the quantitative profiles of extinction and backscattering coefficient of aerosols from the pulsed backscattering lidar measurements. Most of the existing inversion methods assume a range independent value for the scattering ratio for inverting the lidar signal even though it is known that the scattering ratio depends on the nature of aerosols and as such range dependent. We used a modified Klett's method for the inversion of lidar signal that uses range dependent scattering ratio (s) for the characterization of atmospheric aerosols. This method provides the constants k and s for all the altitude regions of the atmosphere and leads to derive the aerosol extinction profile for the lidar data. In this paper we made a study on the errors involved in the extinction profiles derived using the range dependent scattering ratio and discuss the approach in this regard to obtain the accurate extinction profiles.

  2. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  3. Coupling aerosol optics to the chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) and aerosol dynamics module SALSA (v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling aerosol optical properties is a notoriously difficult task due to the particles' complex morphologies and compositions. Yet aerosols and their optical properties are important for Earth system modelling and remote sensing applications. Operational optics models often make drastic and non realistic approximations regarding morphological properties, which can introduce errors. In this study a new aerosol optics model is implemented, in which more realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon aerosols. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey shell" model. Simulated results of radiative fluxes, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent from the new optics model are compared with results from another model simulating particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. To gauge the impact on the optical properties from the new optics model, the known and important effects from using aerosol dynamics serves as a reference. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing states influences the optical properties to the same degree as aerosol dynamics. This is an important finding suggesting that over-simplified optics models coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors; this can strongly effect simulations of radiative fluxes in Earth-system models, and it can compromise the use of remote sensing observations of aerosols in model evaluations and chemical data assimilation.

  4. Aerosol Profile Retrievals from Integrated Dual Wavelengths Space Lidar ESSP3-CENA and Spectral Radiance MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Kleidman, Richard; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ESSP3-CENA space mission (formally PICASSO-CENA) will provide continues global observations with a two wavelength lidar. The attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar, have valuable information about the vertical distribution of aerosol particles and their sizes. However the information cannot be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties. Infinite number of physical solutions with different attenuations through the atmosphere can reconstruct the same two wavelength backscattered profile measured from space. Spectral radiance measured by MODIS simultaneously with the ESSP3 data can constrain the problem and resolve this ambiguity to a large extent. Sensitivity study shows that inversion of the integrated MODIS+ESSP3 data can derive the vertical profiles of the fine and coarse modes mixed in the same atmospheric column in the presence of moderate calibration uncertainties and electronic noise (approx. 10%). We shall present the sensitivity study and results from application of the technique to measurements in the SAFARI-2000 and SHADE experiments.

  5. 2014 iAREA campaign on aerosol in Spitsbergen - Part 2: Optical properties from Raman-lidar and in-situ observations at Ny-Ålesund

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, C.; Neuber, R.; Schulz, Alexander; Markowicz, K. M.; Stachlewska, I. S.; Lisok, J.; Makuch, P.; Pakszys, P.; Markuszewski, P.; Rozwadowska, A.; Petelski, T.; Zielinski, T.; Becagli, S.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.; Gausa, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work multi wavelength Raman lidar data from Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen have been analysed for the spring 2014 Arctic haze season, as part of the iAREA campaign. Typical values and probability distributions for aerosol backscatter, extinction and depolarisation, the lidar ratio and the color ratio for 4 different altitude intervals within the troposphere are given. These quantities and their dependencies are analysed and the frequency of altitude-dependent observed aerosol events are given. A comparison with ground-based size distribution and chemical composition is performed. Hence the aim of this paper is to provide typical and statistically meaningful properties of Arctic aerosol, which may be used in climate models or to constrain the radiative forcing. We have found that the 2014 season was only moderately polluted with Arctic haze and that sea salt and sulphate were the most dominant aerosol species. Moreover the drying of an aerosol layer after cloud disintegration has been observed. Hardly any clear temporal evolution over the 4 week data set on Arctic haze is obvious with the exception of the extinction coefficient and the lidar ratio, which significantly decreased below 2 km altitude by end April. In altitudes between 2 and 5 km the haze season lasted longer and the aerosol properties were generally more homogeneous than closer to the surface. Above 5 km only few particles were found. The variability of the lidar ratio is discussed. It was found that knowledge of the aerosol's size and shape does not determine the lidar ratio. Contrary to shape and lidar ratio, there is a clear correlation between size and backscatter: larger particles show a higher backscatter coefficient.

  6. Influence of biogenic pollen on optical properties of atmospheric aerosols observed by lidar over Gwangju, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Müller, Detlef; Lee, Hanlim; Choi, Tae Jin

    2013-04-01

    For the first time, optical properties of biogenic pollen, i.e., backscatter coefficients and depolarization ratios at 532 nm were retrieved by lidar observations. The extinction coefficient was derived with the assumption of possible values of the extinction-to-backscatter (lidar) ratio. We investigate the effect of the pollen on the optical properties of the observed atmospheric aerosols by comparing lidar and sun/sky radiometer measurements carried out at the lidar site. The observations were made with a depolarization lidar at the Gwangju Institute of Science & Technology (GIST) in Gwangju, Korea (35.13°N, 126.50°E) during an intensive observational period that lasted from 5 to 7 May 2009. The pollen concentration was measured with a Burkard trap sampler at the roof top of the Gwangju Bohoon hospital which is located 1 km away from the lidar site. During the observation period, high pollen concentrations of 1360, 2696, and 1952 m-3 day-1 were measured on 5, 6, and 7 May, respectively. A high lidar depolarization ratio caused by biogenic pollen was only detected during daytime within the planetary boundary layer which was at 1.5-2.0 km height above ground during the observational period. The contribution of biogenic pollen to the total backscatter coefficient was estimated from the particle depolarization ratio. Average hourly values of pollen optical depth were retrieved by integrating the pollen extinction coefficients. We find average values of 0.062 ± 0.037, 0.041 ± 0.028 and 0.067 ± 0.036 at 532 nm on 5, 6, and 7 May, respectively. The contribution of pollen optical depth to total aerosol optical depth was 2-34%. The sun/sky radiometer data show that biogenic pollen can affect optical properties of atmospheric aerosol by increasing aerosol optical depth and decreasing the Ångström exponent during daytime during the season of high pollen emission.

  7. Aerosol detection methods in lidar-based atmospheric profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbakary, Mohamed I.; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; De Young, Russell; Afrifa, Kwasi

    2016-09-01

    A compact light detection and ranging (LiDAR) system provides aerosols profile measurements by identifying the aerosol scattering ratio as function of the altitude. The aerosol scattering ratios are used to obtain multiple aerosol intensive ratio parameters known as backscatter color ratio, depolarization ratio and lidar ratio. The aerosol ratio parameters are known to vary with aerosol type, size, and shape. Different methods in the literature are employed for detection and classification of aerosol from the measurements. In this paper, a comprehensive review for aerosol detection methods is presented. In addition, results of implemented methods of quantifying aerosols in the atmosphere on real data are compared and presented showing how the backscatter color, depolarization and lidar ratios vary with presence of aerosols in the atmosphere.

  8. Development of a global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micrometers within the free troposphere was investigated and a model to describe this variation was developed. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets used were obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series, and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained that describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season.

  9. Development of global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The improvement of an understanding of the variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micron within the free troposphere and the development model to describe this was undertaken. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets are obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained, which describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season. Most data are available and greatest consistency is found inside the Northern Hemisphere.

  10. Lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosols at Bandung, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Itabe, Toshikasu; Yasui, Motoaki; Aoki, Tetsuo; Nagai, Tomohiro; Fujimoto, Toshifumi; Hirota, Masao; Uchino, Osamu; Nuryanto, Agus; Kaloka Prabotosari, Sri; Hamdi, Saipul

    1998-08-01

    We installed a lidar system for observations of the stratospheric aerosols at Bandung, Indonesia on November 1996. The system employed the second harmonic wavelength (532 nm) of Nd:YAG laser. We can measure scattering ratio and depolarization of 532 nm, and Raman scattering of N2 (607 nm). The system works well and the stratospheric aerosols were detected between 18 km and about 35 km. Cirrus clouds are always observed between 10 km and tropopause and area around tropopause is clear except for cloud-like structures. Integrated backscattering coefficient (IBC) of the stratospheric aerosols in 1997 is about 6 X 10-5sr-1 level and smaller than the value observed in mid-latitude, corresponding to the higher tropopause in the equatorial region. Variation of IBC at Bandung seems to be small. It is yet not clear whether current aerosol load is background level or not. We need more long period observations to discuss about seasonal, QBO, and long term variation of aerosol load.

  11. Investigation of wintertime cold-air pools and aerosol layers in the Salt Lake Valley using a lidar ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Joseph Swyler

    subjectively during periods with low clouds or precipitation, a time series of aerosol depths was obtained. The mean depth of the surface-based aerosol layer during PCAP events was 1861 m MSL with a standard deviation of 135 m. The aerosol layer depth, given the approximate 1300 m altitude of the valley floor, is thus about 550 m, about 46% of the basin depth. The aerosol layer is present during much of the winter and is removed only during strong or prolonged precipitation periods or when surface winds are strong. Nocturnal fogs that formed near the end of high-stability PCAP episodes had a limited effect on aerosol layer depth. Aerosol layer depth was relatively invariant during the winter and during the persistent cold-air pools, while PM10 concentrations at the valley floor varied with bulk atmospheric stability associated primarily with passage of large-scale high- and low-pressure weather systems. PM10 concentrations also increased with cold-air pool duration. Mean aerosol loading in the surface-based aerosol layer, as determined from ceilometer backscatter coefficients, showed weaker variations than those of surface PM10 concentrations, suggesting that ineffective vertical mixing and aerosol layering are present in the cold-air pools. This is supported by higher time-resolution backscatter data, and it distinguishes the persistent cold-air pools from well-mixed convective boundary layers where ground-based air pollution concentrations are closely related to time-dependent convective boundary layer/aerosol depths. These results are discussed along with recommendations for future explorations of the ceilometer and cold-air pool topics.

  12. Lidar observations and characterization of biomass burning aerosols over Sofia: Long-range transport of forest wildfire smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshev, Zahary Y.; Dreischuh, Tanja N.; Toncheva, Eleonora N.; Stoyanov, Dimitar V.

    2013-03-01

    Results of remote measurements and characterization of biomass burning aerosols observed in the low troposphere over Sofia, Bulgaria, are presented and discussed. Measurements are accomplished by using two-wavelength elastic-scatter lidar, operating at 1064 nm and 532 nm. The aerosols are identified as to be consisted mainly of aged smoke of wildfires raging in the USA in the last third of July 2012. The long-range transport of the smoke aerosols, taking place from 24 July to 6 August 2012, is determined to be driven by the Northern hemisphere Polar jet stream. Spatial distribution of the observed aerosols is displayed by retrieving averaged vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter coefficients. The temporal evolution of the aerosol layers during the period of measurement is shown by height-time coordinate colormaps of range-corrected lidar data. In order to characterize qualitatively the size range of the aerosol particles, the vertical profile of the backscatter-related Ångström exponent (BAE) is also retrieved. As an accent of the work, distributions of BAE corresponding to distinguished aerosol layers, as well as the overall one, are obtained and analyzed, representing qualitative counterparts of the real particle size distributions. In the case of the fire smoke layer, BAE values vary in the range 1.0-1.3, indicating processes of considerable aggregation of the finest particle size mods during the aging period. The reliability of the results and conclusions concerning the fire smoke BAE distributions and their evolution are indirectly validated by the obtained typical distribution ranges of the observed urban- and water aerosols.

  13. Summer-winter differences in the relationships among background southeastern U.S. aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Relationships among aerosol optical, micro-physical, and chemical properties are useful for evaluating regional climate models, developing satellite-based aerosol retrievals, and understanding aerosol sources and processes. Since aerosol loading and optical properties vary primarily on seasonal scales in the southeastern U.S., it is important that such studies be carried out over multiple seasons but few (if any) such multi-season studies have been conducted in the region. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1080m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were also made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. Some of the major findings will be presented. Higher values of lower tropospheric aerosol light scattering coefficient at 550nm (a proxy for aerosol loading) are associated with higher single-scattering albedo (SSA) and lower hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) during both summer and winter. Absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE) is typically well under 1 during summer and near 1.3-1.4 during winter. Lowest summer AAE values coincide with large, highly-reflective particles and higher aerosol light scattering coefficient but summer AAE is only weakly anti-correlated with organic and sulfate mass concentrations. Winter AAE is consistent with a mixture of elemental carbon and light-absorbing organic carbon, possibly influenced by regional residential wood-burning during winter. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to sulfate and organic aerosol mass fractions during both summer and winter

  14. Aerosol content survey by mini N 2 -Raman lidar: Application to local and long-range transport aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Lardier, Melody; Sauvage, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This study shows an aerosol content survey in the low and middle troposphere over Paris with a compact and light Nitrogen-Raman lidar which has been recently developed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and LEOSPHERE company. This eye-safe and wide field-of-view system (full overlap between 150 and 200 m) is particularly well-adapted to air pollution survey in the vicinity of Megalopolis. Extinction-to-backscatter coefficient (so-called Lidar Ratio LR) profiles obtained with a Tikhonov regularization scheme are presented for long-range transport events of aerosols (volcanic ash plume LR = 48 ± 10 sr, and desert dust, LR = 45 ± 8 sr) which may contribute to the local load of aerosols emitted by traffic and industries in Megalopolis. Due to an insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR < 30), a new dichotomous algorithm has been developed to perform daytime inversions every hour which is in accordance with the typical time evolution of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer. This inversion scheme is based on the constraint of the elastic channel with the aerosol optical depth (between typically 0.2 and 0.7 km) determined with the N 2-Raman channel and thus only gives access to an equivalent LR between 0.2 and 0.7 km with a relative uncertainty lower than 15%. This approach has been applied to retrieve diurnal cycle of LR for polluted continental aerosols over Paris and is compared with Tikhonov regularization applied during the night. We found a mean value of 85 ± 18 sr for polluted continental aerosols which is in agreement with other studies performed around the Paris urban area. Results for aerosol optical properties are presented and the error sources are discussed for each approach.

  15. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    . Analysis of the aerosol and water vapor data collected by the Raman lidar during the 2003 Aerosol IOP indicated that the sensitivity of the lidar was significantly lower than when the lidar was initially deployed. A detailed analysis after the IOP of the long-term dataset demonstrated that the lidar began degrading in early 2002, and that it lost approximately a factor of 4 in sensitivity between 2002 and 2004. We participated in the development of the remediation plan for the system to restore its initial performance. We conducted this refurbishment and upgrade from May- September 2004. This remediation lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of 10 and 30 for the Raman lidar's water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol backscatter coefficient data, respectively as compared to the signal strengths when the system was first deployed. The DOE ARM Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE), which was conducted during September 2005, evaluated the impact of these modifications and upgrades on the SGP Raman lidar measurements of aerosol extinction and optical thickness. The CARL modifications significantly improved the accuracy and temporal resolution of the aerosol measurements. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Raman lidar were also used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter-Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) (http://nansen.ipsl.jussieu.fr/AEROCOM/aerocomhome.html) project. There was a wide range in how the models represent the aerosol extinction profiles over the ARM SGP site, even though the average annual AOT represented by the various models and measured by CARL and the Sun photometer were in general agreement, at least within the standard deviations of the averages. There were considerable differences in the average vertical distributions among the models, even among models that had similar average aerosol optical thickness. Deviations between mean

  16. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  17. 35 years of stratospheric aerosol measurements at Garmisch-Partenkirchen: from Fuego to Eyjafjallajökull, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, T.; Giehl, H.; Jäger, H.; Vogelmann, H.

    2012-09-01

    The powerful backscatter lidar at Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) has almost continually delivered backscatter coefficients of the stratospheric aerosol since 1976. The time series is dominated by signals from the particles injected into or formed in the stratosphere due to major volcanic eruptions, in particular those of El Chichon (Mexico, 1982) and Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines, 1991). The volcanic aerosol disappears within about five years, the removal from the stratosphere being modulated by the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation. Here, we focus more on the long-lasting background period since the late 1990s and 2006, in view of processes maintaining a residual lower-stratospheric aerosol layer in absence of major eruptions, as well as the period of moderate volcanic impact afterwards. During the long background period the stratospheric backscatter coefficients reached a level even below that observed in the late 1970s. This suggests that the predicted potential influence of the strongly growing air traffic on the stratospheric aerosol loading is very low. Some correlation may be found with single strong forest-fire events, but the average influence of biomass burning seems to be quite limited. No positive trend in background aerosol can be resolved over a period as long as that observed by lidar at Mauna Loa or Boulder. This suggests being careful with invoking Asian air pollution as the main source as found in the literature. Rather an impact of previously missed volcanic eruptions on the stratospheric aerosol must be taken into consideration. A key observation in this regard was that of the plume from the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull above Garmisch-Partenkirchen (April 2010) due to the proximity of that source. The top altitude of the ash next to the source was reported just as roughly 9.3 km, but the lidar measurements revealed enhanced stratospheric aerosol up to 14.5 km. Our analysis suggests for two, perhaps three, of the four measurement days

  18. A novel approach for the characterisation of transport and optical properties of aerosol particles near sources - Part II: Microphysics-chemistry-transport model development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdebenito B, Álvaro M.; Pal, Sandip; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Lammel, Gerhard

    2011-06-01

    A new high-resolution microphysics-chemistry-transport model (LES-AOP) was developed and applied for the investigation of aerosol transformation and transport in the vicinity of a livestock facility in northern Germany (PLUS1 field campaign). The model is an extension of a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. The PLUS1 field campaign included the first deployment of the new eye-safe scanning aerosol lidar system of the University of Hohenheim. In a combined approach, model and lidar results were used to characterise a faint aerosol source. The farm plume structure was investigated and the absolute value of its particle backscatter coefficient was determined. Aerosol optical properties were predicted on spatial and temporal resolutions below 100 m and 1 min, upon initialisation by measured meteorological and size-resolved particulate matter mass concentration and composition data. Faint aerosol plumes corresponding to a particle backscatter coefficient down to 10 -6 sr -1 m -1 were measured and realistically simulated. Budget-related quantities such as the emission flux and change of the particulate matter mass, were estimated from model results and ground measurements.

  19. Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Molina, L. T.

    2011-04-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical simulations to identify different plumes affecting the basin and to characterize transformation inside the plumes. The High Spectral Resolution Lidar on board the NASA LaRC B-200 King Air aircraft measured extinction coefficients and extinction to backscatter ratio at 532 nm, and backscatter coefficients and depolarization ratios at 532 and 1064 nm. These can be used to identify aerosol types. The measurement curtains are compared with particle trajectory simulations using WRF-Flexpart for different source groups. The good correspondence between measurements and simulations suggests that the aerosol transport is sufficiently well characterized by the models to estimate aerosol types and ages. Plumes in the basin undergo complex transport, and are frequently mixed together. Urban aerosols are readily identifiable by their low depolarization ratios and high lidar ratios, and dust by the opposite properties. Fresh biomass burning plumes have very low depolarization ratios which increase rapidly with age. This rapid transformation is consistent with the presence of atmospheric tar balls in the fresh plumes.

  20. Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Foy, B.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Molina, L. T.

    2010-11-01

    The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical simulations to identify different plumes affecting the basin and to characterize transformation inside the plumes. The airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measures extinction coefficients and extinction to backscatter ratio at 532 nm, and backscatter coefficients and depolarization ratios at 532 and 1064 nm. These can be used to identify aerosol types. The measurement curtains are compared with particle trajectory simulations using WRF-Flexpart for different source groups. The good correspondence between measurements and simulations suggests that the aerosol transport is sufficiently well characterized by the models to estimate aerosol types and ages. Plumes in the basin undergo complex transport, and are frequently mixed together. Urban aerosols are readily identifiable by their low depolarization ratios and high lidar ratios, and dust by the opposite properties. Fresh biomass burning plumes have very low depolarization ratios which increase rapidly with age. This rapid transformation is consistent with the presence of atmospheric tar balls in the fresh plumes.

  1. Effect of particle settling on lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasteiger, Josef; Groß, Silke

    2016-04-01

    A large amount of desert aerosol is transported in the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) westwards from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. Lidar profiles of transported Saharan aerosol may contain some information about the vertically-resolved aerosol microphysics that could be used to characterize processes that affected the measured aerosol during transport. We present modelled lidar profiles of long-range transported Saharan aerosol assuming that initially the SAL is well-mixed and that there is no vertical mixing of air within the SAL as soon as it reaches the Atlantic. We consider Stokes gravitational settling of aerosol particles over the ocean. The lidar profiles are calculated using optical models for irregularly-shaped mineral dust particles assuming settling-induced particle removal as function of distance from the SAL top. Within the SAL we find a decrease of both the backscatter coefficients and the linear depolarization ratios with decreasing distance from the SAL top. For example, the linear depolarization ratio at a wavelength of 532nm decreases from 0.289 at 1000m to 0.256 at 200m and 0.215 at 100m below SAL top. We compare the modelled backscatter coefficients and linear depolarization ratios to ground-based lidar measurements performed during the SALTRACE field campaign in Barbados (Caribbean) and find agreement within the estimated uncertainties. We discuss the uncertainties of our modeling approach in our presentation. Assumed mineral dust particle shapes, assumed particle mixture properties, and assumptions about processes in the SAL over the continent and the ocean are important aspects to be considered. Uncertainties are relevant for the potential of lidar measurements of transported Saharan dust to learn something about processes occuring in the SAL during long-range transport. We also compare our modeling results to modeling results previously published in the literature.

  2. Multi-year Cluster Analyses of CALIPSO Aerosol Layer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, A. H.; Sumner, A. J.; Vaughan, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission, a collaboration between NASA and Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), was launched in April 2006 to provide vertically resolved measurements of cloud and aerosol distributions. The primary instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), a near-nadir viewing two-wavelength polarization-sensitive instrument. The unique nature of CALIOP measurements make it quite challenging to validate backscatter profiles, aerosol type, and cloud phase, all of which are used to retrieve extinction and optical depth. We exploit the large data set generated by CALIPSO between 2006 - 2013 to find groups in the data from which we can infer aerosol type. We use classical clustering analyses (k-means) to group the data based on five Level 2 data parameters: integrated attenuated backscatter (532 nm), volume depolarization ratio, integrated attenuated color ratio, layer base altitude, and layer top altitude. The data are screened using standard CALIPSO quality assurance flags, cloud aerosol discrimination (CAD) scores, overlying features and layer properties. Furthermore, the data were standardized to a 'z score' in order to remove weighting bias due to arbitrary units. The k-means algorithm forms clusters by minimizing the Euclidian distance between each data point and its respective cluster centroid independently for each parameter. Silhouette coefficients, a dimensionless measure of internal cluster interrelation or consistency and external cluster separation or uniqueness were used to determine the validity of clusters. These investigations yielded optimally distinct clusters when six groups were formed similar to the result in Omar et al, 2005 which form the basis for the current CALIPSO aerosol subtypes. While the number of clusters in both studies coincide, the clusters do not match with all aerosol subtypes. Analysis of the data

  3. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  4. Backscatter and attenuation properties of mammalian brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekularatne, Pushpani Vihara

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common category of brain injuries, which contributes to a substantial number of deaths and permanent disability all over the world. Ultrasound technology plays a major role in tissue characterization due to its low cost and portability that could be used to bridge a wide gap in the TBI diagnostic process. This research addresses the ultrasonic properties of mammalian brain tissues focusing on backscatter and attenuation. Orientation dependence and spatial averaging of data were analyzed using the same method resulting from insertion of tissue sample between a transducer and a reference reflector. Apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF) at 1 to 10 MHz, attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient (BSC) at 1 to 5 MHz frequency ranges were measured on ovine brain tissue samples. The resulting ABTF was a monotonically decreasing function of frequency and the attenuation coefficient and BSC generally were increasing functions of frequency, results consistent with other soft tissues such as liver, blood and heart.

  5. Characterization of the aerosol type using simultaneous measurements of the lidar ratio and estimations of the single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiridis, Vassilis; Balis, Dimitrios; Giannakaki, Eleni; Kazadzis, Stylianos; Arola, Antti; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos

    2011-07-01

    Lidar measurements of the vertical distribution of the aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient and the corresponding extinction to backscatter ratio (so-called lidar ratio) at 355 nm have been performed at Thessaloniki, Greece using a Raman lidar system in the frame of the EARLINET for the period 2001-2005. Coincident spectral UV irradiance measurements, total ozone observations and aerosol optical depth estimates were available from a double Brewer spectroradiometer. The retrieval of single scattering albedo employed the Brewer global irradiance measurements and radiative transfer modeling. Vertically averaged values of the lidar ratio ranged from a minimum of 16 sr to a maximum value of 90 sr, while the effective single scattering albedo ranged from 0.78 to 1.00. The mean value of the lidar ratio for the dataset under study was 45.5 ± 21.0 sr while the average value of the single scattering albedo was 0.94 ± 0.05. For the majority of our measurements (80%) the single scattering albedo found to be greater than 0.90. Using additional information from backward trajectory calculations and lidar-derived free tropospheric contribution of aerosols in the columnar aerosol optical depth, it is shown that the combined use of the directly measured lidar ratio, and the indirectly estimated single scattering albedo, leads to a better characterization of the aerosol type probed.

  6. Demonstration of Aerosol Property Profiling by Multi-wavelength Lidar Under Varying Relative Humidity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, D.N.; Veselovskii, I.; Kolgotin, A.; Korenskii, M.; Andrews, E.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar based on a tripled Nd:YAG laser for profiling aerosol physical parameters in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) under varying conditions of relative humidity (RH) is studied. The lidar quantifies three aerosol backscattering and two extinction coefficients and from these optical data the particle parameters such as concentration, size and complex refractive index are retrieved through inversion with regularization. The column-integrated, lidar-derived parameters are compared with results from the AERONET sun photometer. The lidar and sun photometer agree well in the characterization of the fine mode parameters, however the lidar shows less sensitivity to coarse mode. The lidar results reveal a strong dependence of particle properties on RH. The height regions with enhanced RH are characterized by an increase of backscattering and extinction coefficient and a decrease in the Angstrom exponent coinciding with an increase in the particle size. We present data selection techniques useful for selecting cases that can support the calculation of hygroscopic growth parameters using lidar. Hygroscopic growth factors calculated using these techniques agree with expectations despite the lack of co-located radiosonde data. Despite this limitation, the results demonstrate the potential of multi-wavelength Raman lidar technique for study of aerosol humidification process.

  7. Retrievals of Profiles of Fine And Coarse Aerosols Using Lidar And Radiometric Space Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Tanre, Didier; Leon, Jean-Francois; Pelon, Jacques; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In couple of years we expect the launch of the CALIPSO lidar spaceborne mission designed to observe aerosols and clouds. CALIPSO will collect profiles of the lidar attenuated backscattering coefficients in two spectral wavelengths (0.53 and 1.06 microns). Observations are provided along the track of the satellite around the globe from pole to pole. The attenuated backscattering coefficients are sensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosol particles, their shape and size. However the information is insufficient to be mapped into unique aerosol physical properties and vertical distribution. Infinite number of physical solutions can reconstruct the same two wavelength backscattered profile measured from space. CALIPSO will fly in formation with the Aqua satellite and the MODIS spectro-radiometer on board. Spectral radiances measured by MODIS in six channels between 0.55 and 2.13 microns simultaneously with the CALIPSO observations can constrain the solutions and resolve this ambiguity, albeit under some assumptions. In this paper we describe the inversion method and apply it to aircraft lidar and MODIS data collected over a dust storm off the coast of West Africa during the SHADE experiment. It is shown that the product of the single scattering albedo, omega, and the phase function, P, for backscattering can be retrieved from the synergism between measurements avoiding a priori hypotheses required for inverting lidar measurements alone. The resultant value of (omega)P(180 deg.) = 0.016/sr are significantly different from what is expected using Mie theory, but are in good agreement with recent results obtained from lidar observations of dust episodes. The inversion is robust in the presence of noise of 10% and 20% in the lidar signal in the 0.53 and 1.06 pm channels respectively. Calibration errors of the lidar of 5 to 10% can cause an error in optical thickness of 20 to 40% respectively in the tested cases. The lidar calibration errors cause degradation in the

  8. Optical properties of mixed aerosol layers over Japan derived with multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Yukari; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Pan, Xiaole; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kazuo; Uno, Itsushi

    2017-02-01

    Mixing state of aerosols and optical properties including lidar ratio, particle depolarization ratio, and Ångström exponent were investigated at Fukuoka in western Japan using a multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar (MMRL), various aerosol mass-concentration measurements, and a polarization optical particle counter during Winter-Spring 2015. Aerosol extinction coefficient, backscatter coefficient, and depolarization at 355 and 532 nm and attenuated backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm are obtained from the MMRL measurements. Ten aerosol episodes were classified into three categories (air pollution, mineral dust, and marine aerosol) based on aerosol mass-concentration measurements in the fine-mode (particle diameter Dp<2.5 μm) and coarse-mode (2.5 μmaerosols. The lowest lidar ratio was obtained for marine case. Classification of aerosol types using the lidar ratio and particle depolarization ratio was conducted based on the results obtained in this study. The classified aerosol types almost corresponded to aerosol category obtained by previous studies. We found no remarkable correlation between the fraction of black carbon and the lidar ratio: this might be due to the complexity of the mixing state among various aerosols. The obtained lidar ratio was rather correlated with the ratio of PMf to PM10, representing the mixing state of fine- and coarse-mode particles.

  9. High Spectral Resolution Lidar and MPLNET Micro Pulse Lidar Aerosol Optical Property Retrieval Intercomparison During the 2012 7-SEAS Field Campaign at Singapore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lolli, Simone; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Eloranta, Edwin; Holben, Brent N.; Chew, Boon Ning; Salinas, Santo V.

    2014-01-01

    From August 2012 to February 2013 a High Resolution Spectral Lidar (HSRL; 532 nm) was deployed at that National University of Singapore near a NASA Micro Pulse Lidar NETwork (MPLNET; 527 nm) site. A primary objective of the MPLNET lidar project is the production and dissemination of reliable Level 1 measurements and Level 2 retrieval products. This paper characterizes and quantifies error in Level 2 aerosol optical property retrievals conducted through inversion techniques that derive backscattering and extinction coefficients from MPLNET elastic single-wavelength datasets. MPLNET Level 2 retrievals for aerosol optical depth and extinction/backscatter coefficient profiles are compared with corresponding HSRL datasets, for which the instrument collects direct measurements of each using a unique optical configuration that segregates aerosol and cloud backscattered signal from molecular signal. The intercomparison is performed, and error matrices reported, for lower (0-5km) and the upper (>5km) troposphere, respectively, to distinguish uncertainties observed within and above the MPLNET instrument optical overlap regime.

  10. High Spectral Resolution Lidar and MPLNET Micro Pulse Lidar aerosol optical property retrieval intercomparison during the 2012 7-SEAS field campaign at Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Eloranta, Edwin; Holben, Brent N.; Chew, Boom Ning; Salinas, Santo V.

    2014-10-01

    From August 2012 to February 2013 a High Resolution Spectral Lidar (HSRL; 532 nm) was deployed at that National University of Singapore near a NASA Micro Pulse Lidar NETwork (MPLNET; 527 nm) site. A primary objective of the MPLNET lidar project is the production and dissemination of reliable Level 1 measurements and Level 2 retrieval products. This paper characterizes and quantifies error in Level 2 aerosol optical property retrievals conducted through inversion techniques that derive backscattering and extinction coefficients from MPLNET elastic single-wavelength datasets. MPLNET Level 2 retrievals for aerosol optical depth and extinction/backscatter coefficient profiles are compared with corresponding HSRL datasets, for which the instrument collects direct measurements of each using a unique optical configuration that segregates aerosol and cloud backscattered signal from molecular signal. The intercomparison is performed, and error matrices reported, for lower (0-5km) and the upper (>5km) troposphere, respectively, to distinguish uncertainties observed within and above the MPLNET instrument optical overlap regime.

  11. Aerosol optical properties and mixing state of black carbon in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Haobo; Liu, Li; Fan, Shaojia; Li, Fei; Yin, Yan; Cai, Mingfu; Chan, P. W.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols contribute the largest uncertainty to the total radiative forcing estimate, and black carbon (BC) that absorbs solar radiation plays an important role in the Earth's energy budget. This study analysed the aerosol optical properties from 22 February to 18 March 2014 at the China Meteorological Administration Atmospheric Watch Network (CAWNET) station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. The representative values of dry-state particle scattering coefficient (σsp), hemispheric backscattering coefficient (σhbsp), absorption coefficient (σabsp), extinction coefficient (σep), hemispheric backscattering fraction (HBF), single scattering albedo (SSA), as well as scattering Ångström exponent (α) were presented. A comparison between a polluted day and a clean day shows that the aerosol optical properties depend on particle number size distribution, weather conditions and evolution of the mixing layer. To investigate the mixing state of BC at the surface, an optical closure study of HBF between measurements and calculations based on a modified Mie model was employed for dry particles. The result shows that the mixing state of BC might be between the external mixture and the core-shell mixture. The average retrieved ratio of the externally mixed BC to the total BC mass concentration (rext-BC) was 0.58 ± 0.12, and the diurnal pattern of rext-BC can be found. Furthermore, considering that non-light-absorbing particles measured by a Volatility-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (V-TDMA) exist independently with core-shell and homogenously internally mixed BC particles, the calculated optical properties were just slightly different from those based on the assumption that BC exist in each particle. This would help understand the influence of the BC mixing state on aerosol optical properties and radiation budget in the PRD.

  12. Preliminary Lidar Experiment to Study the Backscatter Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.

    2016-06-01

    Long-term continuous measurements for detection relative backscatter amplification on a horizontal path of 2 km long are performed by using a specific micro pulse lidar. The laser beam path is limited by a solid obstacle. The lidar is located next to an ultrasonic anemometer that measures 3D wind velocity and temperature; the laser spot on the obstacle is observed by using a telephoto lens. The results showed that the backscatter amplification has a clear diurnal variation. Moreover, the backscatter amplification was completely absent in the morning and evening under neutral stratification in the atmospheric surface layer. At night and in the daytime there was a significant increase of the backscatter amplification coefficient.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of laser backscatter from sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, B. W.; Phillips, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study of laser backscatter from sea water has been carried out to provide data required to assess the feasibility of measuring inherent optical propagation properties of sea water from an aircraft. The possibility was examined of deriving such information from the backscatter component of the return signals measured by the WRELADS laser airborne depth sounder system. Computations were made for various water turbidity conditions and for different fields of view of the WRELADS receiver. Using a simple model fitted to the computed backscatter data, it was shown that values of the scattering data absorption coefficients can be derived from the initial amplitude and the decay rate of the backscatter envelope.

  14. Quantitative retrieval of aerosol optical properties by means of ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegner, Matthias; Gasteiger, Josef; Geiß, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years extended networks of ceilometers have been established by several national weather services. Based on improvements of the hardware performance of these single-wavelength backscatter lidars and their 24/7 availability they are increasingly used to monitor mixing layer heights and to derive profiles of the particle backscatter profile. As a consequence they are used for a wide range of applications including the dispersion of volcanic ash plumes, validation of chemistry transport models and air quality studies. In this context the development of automated schemes to detect aerosol layers and to identify the mixing layer are essential, in particular as the latter is often used as a proxy for air quality. Of equal importance is the calibration of ceilometer signals as a pre-requisite to derive quantitative optical properties. Recently, it has been emphasized that the majority of ceilometers are influenced by water vapor absorption as they operate in the spectral range of 905 - 910 nm. If this effect is ignored, errors of the aerosol backscatter coefficient can be as large as 50%, depending on the atmospheric water vapor content and the emitted wavelength spectrum. As a consequence, any other derived quantity, e.g. the extinction coefficient or mass concentration, would suffer from a significant uncertainty in addition to the inherent errors of the inversion of the lidar equation itself. This can be crucial when ceilometer derived profiles shall be used to validate transport models. In this presentation, the methodology proposed by Wiegner and Gasteiger (2015) to correct for water vapor absorption is introduced and discussed.

  15. Characterization of polycrystals with elongated duplex microstructure by inversion of ultrasonic backscattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.

    2010-04-19

    In this letter a simple analytical ultrasonic backscattering model is proposed for determination of characteristic microstructural scales in polycrystalline materials with elongated grains. The inversion methodology for microstructural parameters is based on backscattering coefficient ratios measured in different propagation directions. The ultrasonic backscattering measurements were performed on a Ti alloy sample with a duplex microstructure and the model was applied to experimental data inversion to size the material microtexture.

  16. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  17. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  18. A Framework for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Sarna, K.

    2014-12-01

    A broad range of strategies have been used to study Aerosol-Cloud Interactions (ACI). However, the wide scope of methods and scales used makes it difficult to quantitatively compare result from different studies. In this paper, we propose a method of aerosol-cloud interaction monitoring based on widely available remote sensing instruments and easily applicable at many different observatories. This method provides a way of identifying cases where a change in the aerosol environment causes a change in the cloud. In this scheme we attempt to use (as far as possible) the observed signal from lidar and radar. For an aerosol proxy we use the attenuated backscatter (sensitive to aerosol concentration) and to obtain information about changes in the cloud we use the radar reflectivity factor (sensitive to cloud droplet size and concentration). Assuming a positive dependence between the number concentration of cloud droplets and the number concentration of aerosol we expect that an increase of the attenuated backscatter coefficient will correspond to a small increase of the radar reflectivity factor (due to the increase of cloud droplets concentration). However, the slope of this correlation will vary. A number of factors, such as meteorology or cloud drop microphysical properties, can influence changes in a cloud. For that reason we put a constraint on the liquid water content using liquid water path information from microwave radiometers. This limitation ensures that the variability in the cloud will be primarily due to changes in microphysical properties associated with the variation in aerosols. Further, we limit the cases only to non-precipitating, low-level stratiform and stratocumulus clouds without drizzle. Although this method is based on a synergy of instruments, we use widely available systems for an efficient evaluation of the aerosol influence on the cloud. The main advantages of this scheme are the use of direct observables from widely spread remote sensing

  19. Visible and near IR lidar backscatter observations on the GLOBE Pacific Survey missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Chudamani, S.; Cavanaugh, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement techniques and initial results of the Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) performed in November 1989 and May-June 1990 to provide data on prevailing values of atmospheric backscatter cross section are presented. The upper troposphere aerosol scattering cross section was low in the Southern Hemisphere for the May-June flights and low in the Northern Hemisphere for the November flights. The initial results indicate that the instrumentation and calibration techniques applied for the near IR lidar measurements were successful.

  20. The effects of changes in loblolly pine biomass and soil moisture on ERS-1 SAR backscatter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Melack, J.M.; Davis, F.W. . Center for Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics); Kasischke, E.S.; Christensen, N.L. Jr. . School of the Environment)

    1994-07-01

    For young loblolly pine stands at Duke Forest (North Carolina, USA), when the ground was wet, the observed ERS-1 SAR backscatter from short-grass fields of 0.05 kg/m[sup 2] biomass was [ge] the backscatter from the stands, and there was no significant correlation between the backscatter and biomass. Under dry soil conditions, the backscatter increased about 2--3 dB as the biomass increased from 0.05 kg/m[sup 2] to about 0.5--1.5 kg/m[sup 2], and the backscatter may be saturated near a 0.5--1.5 kg/m[sup 2] biomass level. The correlation coefficient between the backscatter and biomass was r[sup 2] = 0.46. When the Santa Barbara microwave canopy backscatter model was applied to simulate the ERS-1 SAR backscatter from the stands over dry ground, modeled and observed backscatter had similar trends with increasing biomass. For these stands, sensitivity analyses using the model showed that as the surface-soil moisture increased, the major contributor to the total backscatter was changed from canopy volume scattering to surface backscatter between 0.4 kg/m[sup 2] and about 1 kg/m[sup 2]. Signal saturating at low standing biomass and high sensitivity to soil moisture conditions limit the value of a short-wave (C-band) and steep local incidence angle (23[degree]) microwave sensor such as the ERS-1 SAR for forest monitoring.

  1. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  2. Mediterranean aerosol typing by integrating three-wavelength lidar and sun photometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Perrone, M R; Burlizzi, P

    2016-07-01

    Backscatter lidar measurements at 355, 532, and 1064 nm combined with aerosol optical thicknesses (AOTs) from sun photometer measurements collocated in space and time were used to retrieve the vertical profiles of intensive and extensive aerosol parameters. Then, the vertical profiles of the Ångström coefficients for different wavelength pairs (Å(λ1, λ2, z)), the color ratio (CR(z)), the fine mode fraction (η(z)) at 532 nm, and the fine modal radius (R f (z)), which represent aerosol characteristic properties independent from the aerosol load, were used for typing the aerosol over the Central Mediterranean. The ability of the Ångström coefficients to identify the main aerosol types affecting the Central Mediterranean with the support of the backward trajectory analysis was first demonstrated. Three main aerosol types, which were designed as continental-polluted (CP), marine-polluted (MP), and desert-polluted (DP), were identified. We found that both the variability range and the vertical profile structure of the tested aerosol intensive parameters varied with the aerosol type. The variability range and the altitude dependence of the aerosol extinction coefficients at 355, 532, and 1064 nm, respectively, also varied with the identified aerosol types even if they are extensive aerosol parameters. DP, MP, and CP aerosols were characterized by the Å(532, 1064 nm) mean values ± 1 standard deviation equal to 0.5 ± 0.2, 1.1 ± 0.2, 1.6 ± 0.2, respectively. η(%) mean values ± 1SD were equal to 50 ± 10, 73 ± 7, and 86 ± 6 for DP, MP, and CP aerosols, respectively. The R f and CR mean values ± 1SD were equal to 0.16 ± 0.05 μm and 1.3 ± 0.3, respectively, for DP aerosols; to 0.12 ± 0.03 μm and 1.8 ± 0.4, respectively, for MP aerosols; and to 0.11 ± 0.02 μm and 1.7 ± 0.4, respectively, for CP aerosols. CP and DP aerosols were on average responsible for greater AOT and LR values, but

  3. 35 yr of stratospheric aerosol measurements at Garmisch-Partenkirchen: from Fuego to Eyjafjallajökull, and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, T.; Giehl, H.; Jäger, H.; Vogelmann, H.

    2013-05-01

    Lidar measurements at Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) have almost continually delivered backscatter coefficients of stratospheric aerosol since 1976. The time series is dominated by signals from the particles injected into or formed in the stratosphere due to major volcanic eruptions, in particular those of El Chichon (Mexico, 1982) and Mt Pinatubo (Philippines, 1991). Here, we focus more on the long-lasting background period since the late 1990s and 2006, in view of processes maintaining a residual lower-stratospheric aerosol layer in absence of major eruptions, as well as the period of moderate volcanic impact afterwards. During the long background period the stratospheric backscatter coefficients reached a level even below that observed in the late 1970s. This suggests that the predicted potential influence of the strongly growing air traffic on the stratospheric aerosol loading is very low. Some correlation may be found with single strong forest-fire events, but the average influence of biomass burning seems to be quite limited. No positive trend in background aerosol can be resolved over a period as long as that observed by lidar at Mauna Loa. We conclude that the increase of our integrated backscatter coefficients starting in 2008 is mostly due to volcanic eruptions with explosivity index 4, penetrating strongly into the stratosphere. Most of them occurred in the mid-latitudes. A key observation for judging the role of eruptions just reaching the tropopause region was that of the plume from the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull above Garmisch-Partenkirchen (April 2010) due to the proximity of that source. The top altitude of the ash above the volcano was reported just as 9.3 km, but the lidar measurements revealed enhanced stratospheric aerosol up to 14.3 km. Our analysis suggests for two or three of the four measurement days the presence of a stratospheric contribution from Iceland related to quasi-horizontal transport, differing from the strong descent

  4. Study of the Tropospheric Aerosol Structure Under Changing of the Air Mass Type from Lidar Observations in Tomsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilova, S. V.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. É.

    2016-04-01

    The aerosol optical characteristics in the main tropospheric layers are investigated based on joint interpretation of data of multi-frequency lidar sensing (110 sessions) and results of modeling of back air mass trajectories. Methodical problems for separating layers with different scattering properties and estimating their vertical boundaries are considered. Three optical criteria are simultaneously used to distinguish aerosol layers from cloud formations, including the gradient of the backscattering coefficient, optical depth, and the depolarization ratio. High values of the lidar ratio (66 sr) and of the Angstrom exponent (1.62) in the shortwavelength spectral range are observed in the boundary layer for Arctic transport. At the same time, low values of these optical parameters are characteristic for Asian transport: the lidar ratio is 54 sr and the Angstrom exponent is 1.1, which is explained by different relative contributions of the coarse and fine aerosol fractions to the air mass.

  5. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Marine Parameters in Coastal Areas Using a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Radiative Transfer Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yongzhen; Li, Wei; Stamnes, Knut; Stamnes, Jakob J.; Sorensen, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and marine parameters using inverse techniques based on a coupled atmosphere-ocean radiative transfer model (CRTM) and optimal estimation can yield considerably improved retrieval accuracy based on radiances measured by MERIS, MODIS, and future instruments like OLCI compared with traditional methods. As an example, we discuss simultaneous retrieval in a Norwegian coastal environment from MERIS and MODIS data using a one-step nonlinear optimal estimation method instead of the traditional two-step look up table approach. To increase retrieval speed without loss of accuracy we replace the forward CRTM by a radial basis function neural network. Five parameters are obtained from the retrieval: aerosol optical depth, aerosol bimodal fraction, chlorophyll concentration, absorption by colored dissolved organic matter, and backscattering coefficient. The water leaving radiance is provided as a by-product. We demonstrate the accuracy of this simultaneous retrieval approach through a comparison with match-ups from a Norwegian coastal area.

  6. Inclined lidar observations of boundary layer aerosol particles above the Kongsfjord, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Astrid; Ström, Johan; Ritter, Christoph; Neuber, Roland; Yoon, Young; Chae, Nam; Shiobara, Masataka

    2012-10-01

    An inclined lidar with vertical resolution of 0.4 m was used for detailed boundary layer studies and to link observations at Zeppelin Mountain (474 m) and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. We report on the observation of aerosol layers directly above the Kongsfjord. On 29 April 2007, a layer of enhanced backscatter was observed in the lowest 25 m above the open water surface. The low depolarization ratio indicated spherical particles. In the afternoon, this layer disappeared. The ultrafine particle concentration at Zeppelin and Corbel station (close to the Kongsfjord) was low. On 1 May 2007, a drying process in the boundary layer was observed. In the morning, the atmosphere up to Zeppelin Mountain showed enhanced values of the backscatter coefficient. Around noon, the top of the highly reflecting boundary layer decreased from 350 to 250 m. The top of the boundary layer observed by lidar was confirmed by radiosonde data.

  7. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  8. Backscattering of agglomerate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Ovcharenko, Andrey; Bondarenko, Sergey; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Scotto, Cathy S.; Merritt, Charles; Hart, Matthew B.; Eversole, Jay D.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2004-12-01

    We examine how aggregation affects the light-scattering signatures, especially the polarization in the near-backward-scattering direction. We use the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) to study the backscatter of agglomerate particles consisting of oblong monomers. We examine the effects of monomer number and packing structure on the resulting negative polarization branch at small phase angle. We find large a dependence on the orientation of the monomers within the agglomerate and a smaller dependence on the number of monomers, suggesting that the mechanism producing the negative polarization minimum depends strongly on the interactions between the individual monomers. We also examine experimental measurements of substrates composed of biological cells. We find that the light-scattering signatures in the backward direction are not only different for different spore species, but for spores that have been prepared using different methodologies. These signatures are reproducible in different substrates composed of the spores from the same batches.

  9. Seasonal variation of surface and vertical profile of aerosol properties over a tropical urban station Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P. R.; Manchanda, R. K.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kumar, Y. B.; Sreenivasan, S.

    2013-01-01

    One year measurement of vertical profiles of volume backscatter and extinction coefficient, aerosol optical depth (AOD), mass concentration of black carbon (BC) and composite aerosol along with thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere has been carried out over an urban tropical location of Hyderabad(17.47°N, 78.58°E), India, during April 2009 to March 2010. The mean mixing layer height (MLH) exhibits large seasonality exceeding 4 km in pre-monsoon period whereas in winter it comes down to ~1.5 km with an annual mean value of 2.35 ± 1.02 km. Surface BC mass fraction (FBC) shows marked seasonal variation from winter (13 ± 1.9%), pre-monsoon (8.19 ± 2.16%), monsoon (7.3 ± 1.8%) to post-monsoon (11.8 ± 0.18%). The profiles of volume backscatter and extinction coefficients reveal presence of elevated aerosol layers from 2 to 4 km and strong oscillations during pre-monsoon (March-May) and monsoon (June-September) seasons, respectively, while in post-monsoon (October-November) and winter (December-February), the aerosols are well within the lower boundary layer and also exhibit a drastic decrease with increasing altitude. These elevated aerosol layers and vertical distribution appear to be closely linked to the thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. The aerosol optical properties in conjunction with air mass back trajectory analysis indicate that the observed elevated aerosol layers during pre-monsoon and monsoon could contain significant fraction of coarse mode particles with a mix of dust and marine aerosols. Further analysis reveals that the aerosols within atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dominate the column aerosol loading with ABL-AOD contributing to ~77.7 ± 17.0%, with significant seasonal variation from winter (86.2 ± 13.1%), pre-monsoon (76.6 ± 12.8%), monsoon (54.2 ± 15.6%) to post monsoon (80.8 ± 14.8%). Seasonal variation of ABL-AOD and BC mass fraction follows similar pattern in the ABL indicating that BC may be an important contributor to

  10. Effects of soil and canopy characteristics on microwave backscattering of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency modulated continuous wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck and backscatter coefficients of corn were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  11. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness τ(λ) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent α were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of τ(0.50 μm) and α and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of α versus τ(0.50 μm) showed: (i) a considerable increase in τ(0.50 μm) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in α; and (ii) a marked increase in τ(0.50 μm) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas α decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of τ(λ) and α at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of τ(λ) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei

  12. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE PAGES

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; ...

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness τ(λ) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent α were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of τ(0.50 μm) and α and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of α versus τ(0.50 μm) showed: (i)more » a considerable increase in τ(0.50 μm) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in α; and (ii) a marked increase in τ(0.50 μm) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas α decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of τ(λ) and α at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of τ(λ) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei

  13. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness tau(lambda) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent alpha were calculated. Analyzing these data, the monthly mean values of tau(0.50 micrometers) and alpha and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter-spring and summer-autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of alpha versus tau(0.50 micrometers) showed: (i) a considerable increase in tau(0.50 micrometers) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter-spring, without marked changes in alpha; and (ii) a marked increase in tau(0.50 micrometer) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas alpha decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of tau(lambda) and alpha at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterize vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of tau(lambda) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were

  14. Multiwavelength In-Situ Aerosol Scattering and Absorption During the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification, Case Studies, and Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D.; Coffman, D.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T.

    2005-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption of the New York and Boston urban pollution outflow were carried out aboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 (New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Study) field campaign during July 2004 in the Gulf of Maine. Aerosol scattering, backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured using integrating nephelometers and multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at ~55-60% RH (nephelometers). Two data sets were collected, one for particles with diameters dp<10μm and one for particles <1μm. The purpose of the latter was to focus on the largely pollution related accumulation mode and to minimize the uncertainty due to highly variable near-surface sea salt aerosol. Combining the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients σsp and σap yields the derived, intensive parameters, single-scattering albedo, ω=σsp/(σsp+σap), Ångström exponents, å, for σsp, and σap, the hemispheric backscattering ratio, and the fine mode fraction of the aerosol, FMF =σsp(dp<1μm)/σsp(dp<10μm). These are key parameters in estimating aerosol direct radiative forcing and they provide constraints on model building and closure studies with physical and chemical aerosol properties. They are important for relating in-situ optical properties to those sensed remotely, e.g., optical depth from ground- or aircraft-based sun photometry or optical depth from satellite, and to the FMF retrieved from satellite data. The measured and derived data will be classified based on a trajectory analysis of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations and sources. Case studies describing the aging of pollution plumes are calculated and analyzed in context of other measurements and the prevailing meteorology and the upwind sources. The obtained relationship between in-situ Ångström and FMF will be compared

  15. The relationship between ultrasonic backscatter and trabecular anisotropic microstructure in cancellous bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ta, Dean; Fujita, Fuminori; Hachiken, Takuma; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between ultrasonic backscatter and trabecular microstructure, ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on cylindrical bovine cancellous bone samples in vitro. The backscatter signals from different specimen angles were obtained by rotating the specimen at various central frequencies. The backscatter signal varied a lot as the specimen angle changed. The main trabecular alignment (MTA) orientation was estimated by the maximum of signal energy and integrated reflection coefficient, or the minor axis of fitted ellipse for apparent integrated backscatter and the backscattered spectrum centroid frequency versus specimen angle. The degree of anisotropy (DA) was estimated by the eccentricity of the fitted ellipse with highly significant correlations. The MTA orientation and DA value estimation method proposed in this study is useful for ultrasonic cancellous bone assessment.

  16. L-Band SAR Backscatter Prospects for Burn Severity Estimation in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Mihai; Santoro, Maurizio; de la Riva, Juan; Kasischke, Eric; Korets, Michael A.

    2010-12-01

    L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been investigated to establish the relationship between backscatter and burn severity in boreal forests. Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array-type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) dual polarized images were available for the study of the backscattering coefficient at two locations. Statistical analysis was used to assess the average backscatter coefficient as a function of burn severity level after stratifying the data by local incidence angle. Determination coefficients were used to quantify the relationship between radar data and burn severity estimates. The analysis for a given range of local incidence angle showed that HH and HV polarized backscatter decreases with burn severity for both polarizations when images are acquired under dry environmental conditions. For data acquired under wet conditions HH polarized backscatter increased with burn severity. The higher backscatter of the severely burned areas was explained by the enhanced contribution of the ground component due to higher soil moisture content. Backscatter variation between burned and unburned forest was around 2-3 dB at HH polarization and around 3-6 dB at HV polarization. This study indicates that L- band SAR backscatter trend as a function of burn severity is not significantly different when compared to previously studied mediterranean forests.

  17. Aerosol Classification using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Froyd, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of aerosol optical thickness and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion aerosol optical thickness to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  18. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 2: Consideration of phase separation effects by an X-UNIFAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Elsa I.; Pankow, James F.

    A thermodynamic model is presented for predicting the formation of particulate matter (PM) within an aerosol that contains organic compounds, inorganic salts, and water. Neutral components are allowed to partition from the gas phase to the PM, with the latter potentially composed of both a primarily aqueous ( α) liquid phase and a primarily organic ( β) liquid phase. Partitioning is allowed to occur without any artificial restraints: when both α and β PM phases are present, ionic constituents are allowed to partition to both. X-UNIFAC.2, an extended UNIFAC method based on Yan et al. (1999. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria in mixed-solvent electrolyte systems using the group contribution concept. Fluid Phase Equilibria 162, 97-113), was developed for activity coefficient estimation. X-UNIFAC.2 utilizes the standard UNIFAC terms, a Debye-Hückel term, and a virial equation term that represents the middle-range (MR) contribution to activity coefficient effects. A large number (234) of MR parameters are already available from Yan et al. (1999). Six additional MR parameters were optimized here to enable X-UNIFAC.2 to account for interactions between the carboxylic acid group and Na +, Cl -, and Ca 2+. Predictions of PM formation were made for a hypothetical sabinene/O 3 system with varying amounts of NaCl in the PM. Predictions were also made for the chamber experiments with α-pinene/O 3 (and CaCl 2 seed) carried out by Cocker et al. (2001. The effect of water on gas-particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol. Part I. α-pinene/ozone system. Atmospheric Environment 35, 6049-6072); good agreement between the predicted and chamber-measured PM mass concentrations was achieved.

  19. Relating multifrequency radar backscattering to forest biomass: Modeling and AIRSAR measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, significant efforts in microwave remote sensing were devoted to relating forest parameters to radar backscattering coefficients. These and other studies showed that in most cases, the longer wavelength (i.e. P band) and cross-polarization (HV) backscattering had higher sensitivity and better correlation to forest biomass. This research examines this relationship in a northern forest area through both backscatter modeling and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data analysis. The field measurements were used to estimate stand biomass from forest weight tables. The backscatter model described by Sun et al. was modified to simulate the backscattering coefficients with respect to stand biomass. The average number of trees per square meter or radar resolution cell, and the average tree height or diameter breast height (dbh) in the forest stand are the driving parameters of the model. The rest of the soil surface, orientation, and size distributions of leaves and branches, remain unchanged in the simulations.

  20. Comparison of SAGE II and lidar stratospheric aerosol extinction datasets after the Mt Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antuna Marrero, Juan Carlos

    midlatitudes, making the comparison representative geographically. The two sets of backscattering-to-extinction coefficients tested show good results. Comparison results show that the magnitude of the extinction differences between both instruments is in the same range that the aerosol extinction variability. The dataset I have produced will play an important role in future aerosol data assimilation.

  1. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  2. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  3. Lidar Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol Optical and Physical Properties over Central Asia

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Boris B.; Sverdlik, Leonid G.; Imashev, Sanjar A.; ...

    2013-01-01

    The vertical structure of aerosol optical and physical properties was measured by Lidar in Eastern Kyrgyzstan, Central Asia, from June 2008 to May 2009. Lidar measurements were supplemented with surface-based measurements of PM 2.5 and PM 10 mass and chemical composition in both size fractions. Dust transported into the region is common, being detected 33% of the time. The maximum frequency occurred in the spring of 2009. Dust transported to Central Asia comes from regional sources, for example, Taklimakan desert and Aral Sea basin, and from long-range transport, for example, deserts of Arabia, Northeast Africa, Iran, and Pakistan. Regionalmore » sources are characterized by pollution transport with maximum values of coarse particles within the planetary boundary layer, aerosol optical thickness, extinction coefficient, integral coefficient of aerosol backscatter, and minimum values of the Ångström exponent. Pollution associated with air masses transported over long distances has different characteristics during autumn, winter, and spring. During winter, dust emissions were low resulting in high values of the Ångström exponent (about 0.51) and the fine particle mass fraction (64%). Dust storms were more frequent during spring with an increase in coarse dust particles in comparison to winter. The aerosol vertical profiles can be used to lower uncertainty in estimating radiative forcing.« less

  4. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Ismail, Syed; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, and CALIPSO observations during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA). The NAMMA field experiment was conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. Using this method, we found dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa ratios at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile.

  5. Impact of North American intense fires on aerosol optical properties measured over the European Arctic in July 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, K. M.; Pakszys, P.; Ritter, C.; Zielinski, T.; Udisti, R.; Cappelletti, D.; Mazzola, M.; Shiobara, M.; Xian, P.; Zawadzka, O.; Lisok, J.; Petelski, T.; Makuch, P.; Karasiński, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper impact of intensive biomass burning (BB) in North America in July 2015, on aerosol optical and microphysical properties measured in the European Arctic, is discussed. This study was made within the framework of the Impact of Absorbing aerosols on Radiating forcing in the European Arctic project. During the BB event aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm exceeded 1.2 in Spitsbergen and 0.7 in Andenes (Norway). Angstrom exponent exceeded 1.4, while the absorbing Angstrom exponent varied between 1 and 1.25. BB aerosols were observed in humid atmosphere with a total water vapor column between 2 and 2.5 cm. In such conditions aerosols are activated and may produce clouds at different altitudes. Vertical structure of aerosol plumes over Svalbard, obtained from ceilometers and lidars, shows variability of range-corrected signal between surface and middle and upper troposphere. Aerosol backscattering coefficients show values up to 10-5 m-1 sr-1 at 532 nm. Aerosol surface observations indicate chemical composition typical for biomass burning particles and very high single scattering properties. Scattering and absorption coefficients at 530 nm were up to 130 and 15 Mm-1, respectively. Single scattering albedo at the surface varied from 0.9 to 0.94. The averaged values over the entire atmospheric column ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. Preliminary statistics of model and Sun photometer data as well as previous studies indicate that this event, in the Arctic region, must be considered extreme (such AOD was not observed in Svalbard since 2005) with a significant impact on energy budget.

  6. Seasonal variation of aerosol vertical distributions in the middle and lower troposphere in Beijing and surrounding area during haze periods based on CALIPSO observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Ma, Xiaojun; Jin, Hongchun; Chen, Yonghang; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Changjie; Wang, Yuhui; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    The data from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite was used to analyze the aerosol micro-physical properties over Beijing and surrounding area during haze periods from 2007 to 2008 in this paper. The results showed as follows. The values of TABC (total attenuated backscatter coefficient) for aerosols accounted for about 25% with varying altitudes. The aerosol scattering ability little changed from 0-4 km, showing that the aerosol layer evenly distribute. At different altitude ranges (0-1, 1-2, 2-3 and 3-4 km above ground level), values of TABC almost concentrate in the range of 2.5×10-3 -4.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1. In spring, summer and winter, aerosol scattering has the similar variation, with the maximum of TABC ranging from 3.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1 to 4.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1, while the maximum of TABC in autumn is from 1.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1 to 2.5×10-3 km-1.sr-1. Aerosol shape and size are characterized by VDR (volume depolarization ratio) and TACR (total attenuated color ratio). Aerosols with VDR greater than 10% were more than the ones with VDR less than 10% at the same altitude range. Notably, aerosols with smaller VDR (0-10%) appeared more frequently in autumn than those in the other three seasons. For each altitude range, aerosols with TACR ranging from 0-0.2 contributed much more than those with TACR ranging from 1.8-2.0. The size of aerosols in summer was the largest and that in autumn was the smallest in middle and lower troposphere.

  7. Observing wind, aerosol particles, cloud and precipitation: Finland's new ground-based remote-sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; O'Connor, E. J.; Komppula, M.; Korhonen, K.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Wood, C. R.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Poikonen, A.; Karppinen, T.; Lonka, H.; Kurri, M.; Heinonen, J.; Moisseev, D.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Nordbo, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laurila, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute, in collaboration with the University of Helsinki, has established a new ground-based remote-sensing network in Finland. The network consists of five topographically, ecologically and climatically different sites distributed from southern to northern Finland. The main goal of the network is to monitor air pollution and boundary layer properties in near real time, with a Doppler lidar and ceilometer at each site. In addition to these operational tasks, two sites are members of the Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS); a Ka band cloud radar at Sodankylä will provide cloud retrievals within CloudNet, and a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended), in Kuopio provides optical and microphysical aerosol properties through EARLINET (the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network). Three C-band weather radars are located in the Helsinki metropolitan area and are deployed for operational and research applications. We performed two inter-comparison campaigns to investigate the Doppler lidar performance, compare the backscatter signal and wind profiles, and to optimize the lidar sensitivity through adjusting the telescope focus length and data-integration time to ensure sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-aerosol-content environments. In terms of statistical characterization, the wind-profile comparison showed good agreement between different lidars. Initially, there was a discrepancy in the SNR and attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles which arose from an incorrectly reported telescope focus setting from one instrument, together with the need to calibrate. After diagnosing the true telescope focus length, calculating a new attenuated backscatter coefficient profile with the new telescope function and taking into account calibration, the resulting attenuated backscatter profiles all showed good agreement with each other. It was thought that harsh Finnish

  8. Quantitative broadband ultrasonic backscatter - An approach to nondestructive evaluation in acoustically inhomogeneous materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Miller, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a broadband backscatter technique to obtain the frequency dependence of the longitudinal-wave ultrasonic backscatter coefficient from a collection of scatterers in a solid is investigated. Measurements of the backscatter coefficient were obtained over the range of ultrasonic wave vector magnitude-glass sphere radius product between 0.1 and 3.0 from model systems consisting of dilute suspensions of randomly distributed crown glass spheres in hardened polyester resin. The results of these measurements were in good agreement with theoretical prediction. Consequently, broadband measurements of the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient may represent a useful approach toward characterizing the physical properties of scatterers in intrinsically inhomogeneous materials such as composites, metals, and ceramics, and may represent an approach toward nondestructive evaluation of these materials.

  9. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  10. Extinction and backscatter cross sections of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Hahn, D. V.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D.; Carter, C. C.; Boggs, N. T.; Jackman, J.

    2008-04-01

    Aerosol backscatter and extinction cross-sections are required to model and evaluate the performance of both active and passive detection systems. A method has been developed that begins with laboratory measurements of thin films and suspensions of biological material to obtain the complex index refraction of the biological material from the UV to the LWIR. Using that result with particle size distribution and shape information as inputs to T-matrix or discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations yields the extinction cross-section and backscatter cross section as a function of wavelength. These are important inputs to the lidar equation. In a continuing effort to provide validated optical cross-sections, measurements have been made on a number of high purity biological species in the laboratory as well as measurements of material released at recent field tests. The resulting observed differences between laboratory and field measurements aid in distinguishing between intrinsic and extrinsic effects, which can affect the characteristic signatures of important biological aerosols. A variety of biological and test aerosols are examined, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG), and Erwina, ovalbumin, silica and polystyrene.

  11. Lidar beams in opposite directions for quality assessment of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization spaceborne measurements.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H

    2010-04-20

    We present the "lidar beams in opposite directions" (LIBOD) technique and applications for quality assessment of spaceborne observations made by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation satellite. LIBOD is applicable to standard total backscatter lidar because it does not require a priori knowledge of the particle extinction-to-backscatter ratio. In this paper, we present (i) an objective assessment of the lidar signal quality and representativity of correlative ground-based lidar and CALIOP measurements only using normalized range-corrected lidar signals and (ii) a numerical filtering and optimization technique for reducing the spurious oscillations induced by noisy signal differentiation as needed for retrieval of particle extinction coefficients and extinction-to-backscatter ratio profiles. Numerical simulations and Monte Carlo tests are conducted for assessing the performance of the LIBOD technique. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual correlative 532 nm lidar profiles from CALIOP and a ground-based lidar deployed in Tamanrasset in the heart of Sahara in 2006 and near Strasbourg, France, in 2007.

  12. Aerosol and gamma background measurements at Basic Environmental Observatory Moussala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelov, Christo; Arsov, Todor; Penev, Ilia; Nikolova, Nina; Kalapov, Ivo; Georgiev, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Trans boundary and local pollution, global climate changes and cosmic rays are the main areas of research performed at the regional Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) station Moussala BEO (2925 m a.s.l., 42°10'45'' N, 23°35'07'' E). Real time measurements and observations are performed in the field of atmospheric chemistry and physics. Complex information about the aerosol is obtained by using a threewavelength integrating Nephelometer for measuring the scattering and backscattering coefficients, a continuous light absorption photometer and a scanning mobile particle sizer. The system for measuring radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols allows us to monitor a large scale radioactive aerosol transport. The measurements of the gamma background and the gamma-rays spectrum in the air near Moussala peak are carried out in real time. The HYSPLIT back trajectory model is used to determine the origin of the data registered. DREAM code calculations [2] are used to forecast the air mass trajectory. The information obtained combined with a full set of corresponding meteorological parameters is transmitted via a high frequency radio telecommunication system to the Internet.

  13. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  14. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. Clark (Inventor); Whitaker, Ross (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  15. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  16. Mie lidar observations of lower tropospheric aerosols and clouds.

    PubMed

    Veerabuthiran, S; Razdan, A K; Jindal, M K; Dubey, D K; Sharma, R C

    2011-12-15

    Mie lidar system is developed at Laser Science and Technology Centre, Delhi (28.38°N, 77.12°E) by using minimal number of commercially available off-the-shelf components. Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at 1064nm with variable pulse energies between 25 and 400 mJ with 10 Hz repetition rate and 7ns pulse duration is used as a transmitter and off-axis CASSEGRAIN telescope with 100mm diameter as a receiver. Silicon avalanche photodiode (Si-APD) module with built-in preamplifier and front-end optics is used as detector. This system has been developed for the studies of lower tropospheric aerosols and clouds. Some experiments have been conducted using this set up and preliminary results are discussed. The characteristics of backscattered signals for various transmitter pulse energies are also studied. Atmospheric aerosol extinction coefficient values are calculated using Klett lidar inversion algorithm. The extinction coefficient, in general, falls with range in the lower troposphere and the values lie typically in the range 7.5×10(-5) m(-1) to 1.12×10(-4) m(-1) in the absence of any cloud whereas this value shoots maximum up to 1.267×10(-3) m(-1) (peak extinction) in the presence of clouds.

  17. Light backscattering efficiency and related properties of some phytoplankters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Bricaud, Annick; Morel, André

    1992-11-01

    By using a set-up that combines an integrating sphere with a spectroradiometer LI-1800 UW, the backscattering properties of nine different phytoplankters grown in culture have been determined experimentally for the wavelengths domain ν = 400 up to 850 nm. Simultaneously, the absorption and attenuation properties, as well as the size distribution function, have been measured. This set of measurements allowed the spectral values of refractive index, and subsequently the volume scattering functions (VSF) of the cells, to be derived, by operating a scattering model previously developed for spherical and homogeneous cells. The backscattering properties, measured within a restricted angular domain (approximately between 132 and 174°), have been compared to theoretical predictions. Although there appear some discrepancies between experimental and predicted values (probably due to experimental errors as well as deviations of actual cells from computational hypotheses), the overall agreement is good; in particular the observed interspecific variations of backscattering values, as well as the backscattering spectral variation typical of each species, are well accounted for by theory. Using the computed VSF, the measured backscattering properties can be converted (assuming spherical and homogeneous cells) into efficiency factors for backscattering ( overlineQbb) . Thhe spectral behavior of overlineQbb appears to be radically different from that for total scattering overlineQb. For small cells, overlineQ (λ) is practically constant over the spectrum, whereas overlineQb(λ) varies approximately according to a power law (λ -2). As the cell size increases, overlineQbb conversely, becomes increasingly featured, whilst overlineQb becomes spectrally flat. The chlorophyll-specific backscattering coefficients ( b b∗ appear highly variable and span nearly two orders of magnitude. The chlorophyll-specific absorption and scattering coefficients, a ∗ and b ∗, are mainly ruled by

  18. Photoelectron backscattering in vacuum phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Vasiliev, R. V.; Vyatchin, Y. E.; Shaibonov, B. A. J.

    2006-11-01

    In this article we describe results of studies of a photoelectron backscattering effect in vacuum phototubes: classical photomultipliers (PMT) and hybrid phototubes (PH). Late pulses occurring in PMTs are attributed to the photoelectron backscattering and distinguished from pulses due to an anode glow effect. The late pulses are measured in a number of PMTs and HPs with various photocathode sizes covering 1 50 cm range and different types of the first dynode materials and construction designs. It is shown that the late pulses are a generic feature of all vacuum photodetectors—PMTs and PHs—and they do not deteriorate dramatically amplitude and timing responses of vacuum phototubes.

  19. Requirements For Lidar Aerosol and Ozone Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, S.; Woeste, L.

    Laser remote sensing is the preferable method, when spatial-temporal resolved data is required. Data from stationary laser remote sensing devices at the earth surface give a very good impression about daily, annual and in general time trends of a measurand and can be compared sometimes to airborne instruments to get a direct link between optical and other methods. Space borne measurements on the other hand are the only possibility for obtaining as much data, as modeller wish to have to initialise, compare or validate there computation. But in this case it is very difficult to get the input in- formation, which is necessary for good quantitative analysis as well as to find points for comparison. In outer space and other harsh field environments only the simplest and most robust equipment for the respective purpose should be applied, to ensure a long-term stable operation. The first question is: what do we have to know about the properties of the atmosphere to get reliable data from instruments, which are just simple enough?, and secondly: how to set-up the instruments? Even for the evaluation of backscatter coefficients a density profile and the so-called Lidar-ratio, the ratio of backscatter to total volume scatter intensity, is necessary. Raman Lidar is a possibility to handle this problem by measuring aerosol extinction profiles. But again a density profile and in addition a guess about the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinc- tion between the Raman and laser wavelength are required. Unfortunately the tech- nique for Raman measurements is much more sensible and less suited for space borne measurements, because of the much smaller back scatter cross sections and the result- ing weak signals. It becomes worth, when we will have to maintain special laser with colours at molecular absorption bands in outer space, to measure gas concentration. I want to present simulation of optical systems for laser remote sensing, experimental experiences and compare air

  20. Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Amy L; Hansen, Matthew N; Zweifel, Daniel A; Wei, Alexander; Boppart, Stephen A

    2006-07-24

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods are demonstrated as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography (OCT). We define the backscattering albedo, a', as the ratio of the backscattering to extinction coefficient. Contrast agents which modify a' within the host tissue phantoms are detected with greater sensitivity by the differential OCT measurement of both a' and extinction. Optimum sensitivity is achieved by maximizing the difference between contrast agents and tissue, |a'(ca) - a'(tiss)|. Low backscattering albedo gold nanorods (14x 44 nm; lambda(max) = 780 nm) within a high backscattering albedo tissue phantom with an uncertainty in concentration of 20% (randomized 2+/-0.4% intralipid) were readily detected at 82 ppm (by weight) in a regime where extinction alone could not discriminate nanorods. The estimated threshold of detection was 30 ppm.

  1. LASE Measurements of Water Vapor, Aerosol, and Cloud Distributions in Saharan Air Layers and Tropical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Browell, Edward V.; Kooi, Susan A.; Dunion, Jason P.; Heymsfield, Gerry; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn F.; Burton, Sharon; Fenn, Marta; Krishnamurti, T. N.; Chen, Gao; Anderson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) on-board the NASA DC-8 measured high resolution profiles of water vapor and aerosols, and cloud distributions in 14 flights over the eastern North Atlantic during the NAMMA (NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) field experiment. These measurements were used to study African easterly waves (AEWs), tropical cyclones (TCs), and the Saharan Air Layer(s) (SAL). Interactions between the SAL and tropical air were observed during the early stages of the TC development. These LASE measurements represent the first simultaneous water vapor and aerosol lidar measurements to study the SAL and its impact on AEWs and TCs. Examples of profile measurements of aerosol scattering ratios, aerosol extinction coefficients, aerosol optical thickness, water vapor mixing ratios, RH, and temperature are presented to illustrate their characteristics in SAL, convection, and clear air regions. LASE data suggest that the SAL suppresses low-altitude convection at the convection-SAL interface region. Mid-level convection associated with the AEW and transport are likely responsible for high water vapor content observed in the southern regions of the SAL on August 20, 2008. This interaction is responsible for the transfer of about 7 x 10(exp 15) J latent heat energy within a day to the SAL. Measurements of lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratios in the range 36+/-5 to 45+/-5 are within the range of measurements from other lidar measurements of dust. LASE aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles are validated by comparison with onboard in situ aerosol measurements and GPS dropsonde water vapor soundings, respectively.

  2. Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    acoustic multiple scattering from two- and now three-dimensional aggregations of omni-directional point scatterers to determine the parametric realms in...given by the sum in (1), N is the number of scatterers , gn is the scattering coefficient of the nth scatterer , ψn(rn) is the field incident on the nth...SUBTITLE Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  3. Long-term Observation of Aerosol Optical Properties at the SORPES station in Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yicheng; Ding, Aijun; Virkkula, Aki; Wang, Jiaping; Chi, Xuguang; Qi, Ximeng; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Longfei; Xie, Yuning

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence the earth's radiation budget by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and contribute substantial uncertainty in the estimation of climate forcing. Thorough and comprehensive measurements on different parameters including absorption and scattering coefficient, wavelength dependence and angular dependence along with their daily and seasonal variation help to understand the influence of aerosol on radiation. 2-years continuous measurement of aerosol optical properties has been conducted from June 2013 to May 2015 at the Station for Observing Regional Process of Earth System (SORPES) station, which is a regional background station located in downwind direction of Yangtze River Delta (YRD) urban agglomeration in China. A 7-wavelenths aethalometer and a 3-wavelenths nephelometer were used to measure absorption and scattering coefficient, and also other parameters like single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption angstrom Exponent (AAE), scattering angstrom exponent (SAE) and back-scattering refraction. In addtion, simultaneous measurements on chemical composition and particle size distribution were performed so as to investigate the dependencies of aerosol optical properties on chemical composition and size distribution. To get further insight on the influencing factors, Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling (LPDM) was employed for source identification in this study. The averages of absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and SSA are 26.0±18.7 Mm-1, 426±327 Mm-1 , 0.936±0.3 at 520nm respectively for whole period. SAE between 450 and 635nm is 1.299±0.34 and have strong negative correlation with particle Surface Mean Diameter (SMD). AAE between 370 and 950nm is 1.043±0.15 for whole period but growth to more than 1.6 in all identified Biomass Burning (BB) events.

  4. Observations of Smoke Aerosol from Biomass Burning in Mexico: Effect of Particle Aging on Radiative Forcing and Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Bruintjes, Roelof; Holben, Brent N.; Christopher, Sundar

    1999-01-01

    We take advantage of the May 1998 biomass burning event in Southern Mexico to test the global applicability of a smoke aerosol size model developed from data observed in South America. The Mexican event is an unique opportunity to observe well-aged, residual smoke. Observations of smoke aerosol size distribution made from vertical profiles of airborne in situ measurements show an inverse relationship between concentration and particle size that suggests the aging process continues more than a week after the smoke is separated from its fire sources. The ground-based radiometer retrievals show that the column-averaged, aged, Mexican smoke particles are larger (diameter = 0.28 - 0.33 micrometers) than the mean smoke particles in South America (diameter = 0.22 - 0.30 micrometers). However, the difference (delta - 0.06 micrometer) translates into differences in backscattering coefficient of only 4-7% and an increase of direct radiative forcing of only 10%.

  5. Measuring Ultrasonic Backscatter in the Presence of Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Timothy; Guerrero, Quinton

    2011-11-01

    A goal of medical ultrasound is the formation of quantitative ultrasound images in which contrast is determined by acoustic or physical properties of tissue rather than relative echo amplitude. Such images could greatly enhance early detection of many diseases, including breast cancer and liver cirrhosis. Accurate determination of the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient from patients remains a difficult task. One reason for this difficulty is the inherent nonlinear propagation of ultrasound at high intensities used for medical imaging. The backscatter coefficient from several tissue-mimicking samples were measured using the planar reflector method. In this method, the power spectrum from a sample is compared to the power spectrum of an optically flat sample of quartz. The results should be independent of incident pressure amplitude. Results demonstrate that backscatter coefficients can vary by more than an order of magnitude when ultrasound pressure varies from 0.1 MPa to 1.5 MPa at 5.0 MHz. A new method that incorporates nonlinear propagation is proposed to explain these discrepancies.

  6. [Characteristics and Parameterization for Atmospheric Extinction Coefficient in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-na; Zhao, Pu-sheng; He, Di; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Xiao-ling

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the characteristics of atmospheric extinction coefficient in Beijing, systematic measurements had been carried out for atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 concentration, scattering coefficient, black carbon, reactive gases, and meteorological parameters from 2013 to 2014. Based on these data, we compared some published fitting schemes of aerosol light scattering enhancement factor [ f(RH)], and discussed the characteristics and the key influence factors for atmospheric extinction coefficient. Then a set of parameterization models of atmospheric extinction coefficient for different seasons and different polluted levels had been established. The results showed that aerosol scattering accounted for more than 94% of total light extinction. In the summer and autumn, the aerosol hygroscopic growth caused by high relative humidity had increased the aerosol scattering coefficient by 70 to 80 percent. The parameterization models could reflect the influencing mechanism of aerosol and relative humidity upon ambient light extinction, and describe the seasonal variations of aerosol light extinction ability.

  7. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Saharan Dust Layers Derived from In-Situ Measurements and CALIPSO Overflights During NAMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Thornhill, Kenneth L., II; Kittaka, Chieko; Ismail, Syed; Chen, Gao; Powell, Kathleen A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.; Trepte, Charles R.; Winstead, Edward L.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    We determine the extinction-to-backscatter (Sa) ratios of dust using (1) airborne in-situ measurements of microphysical properties, (2) modeling studies, and (3) the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) observations recorded during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA) field experiment conducted from Sal, Cape Verde during Aug-Sept 2006. Using CALIPSO measurements of the attenuated backscatter of lofted Saharan dust layers, we apply the transmittance technique to estimate dust Sa ratios at 532 nm and a 2-color method to determine the corresponding 1064 nm Sa. This method yielded dust Sa ratios of 39.8 plus or minus 1.4 sr and 51.8 plus or minus 3.6 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Secondly, Sa at both wavelengths is independently calculated using size distributions measured aboard the NASA DC-8 and estimates of Saharan dust complex refractive indices applied in a T-Matrix scheme. We found Sa ratios of 39.1 plus or minus 3.5 sr and 50.0 plus or minus 4 sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, using the T-Matrix calculations applied to measured size spectra. Finally, in situ measurements of the total scattering (550 nm) and absorption coefficients (532 nm) are used to generate an extinction profile that is used to constrain the CALIPSO 532 nm extinction profile and thus generate a stratified 532 nm Sa. This method yielded an Sa ratio at 532 nm of 35.7 sr in the dust layer and 25 sr in the marine boundary layer consistent with a predominantly seasalt aerosol near the ocean surface. Combinatorial simulations using noisy size spectra and refractive indices were used to estimate the mean and uncertainty (one standard deviation) of these Sa ratios. These simulations produced a mean (plus or minus uncertainty) of 39.4 (plus or minus 5.9) sr and 56.5 (plus or minus 16.5) sr at 532 nm and 1064 nm, respectively, corresponding to percent uncertainties of 15% and 29%. These results will provide a measurements

  8. UV-VIS backscattering measurements on atmospheric particles mixture using polarization lidar coupled with numerical simulations and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miffre, Alain; Francis, Mirvatte; Anselmo, Christophe; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    As underlined by the latest IPCC report [1], tropospheric aerosols are nowadays recognized as one of the main uncertainties affecting the Earth's climate and human health. This issue is not straightforward due to the complexity of these nanoparticles, which present a wide range of sizes, shapes and chemical composition, which vary as a function of altitude, especially in the troposphere, where strong temperature variations are encountered under different water vapour content (from 10 to 100 % relative humidity). During this oral presentation, I will first present the scientific context of this research. Then, the UV-VIS polarimeter instrument and the subsequent calibration procedure [2] will be presented, allowing quantitative evaluation of particles backscattering coefficients in the atmosphere. In this way, up to three-component particles external mixtures can be partitioned into their spherical and non-spherical components, by coupling UV-VIS depolarization lidar measurements with numerical simulations of backscattering properties specific to non-spherical particles, such as desert dust or sea-salt particles [3], by applying the T-matrix numerical code [4]. This combined methodology is new, as opposed to the traditional approach using the lidar and T-matrix methodologies separately. In complement, recent laboratory findings [5] and field applications [6] will be presented, enhancing the sensitivity of the UV-VIS polarimeter. References [1] IPCC report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC, (2013). [2] G. David, A. Miffre, B. Thomas, and P. Rairoux: "Sensitive and accurate dual-wavelength UV-VIS polarization detector for optical remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols," Appl. Phys. B 108, 197-216 (2012). [3] G. David, B. Thomas, T. Nousiainen, A. Miffre and P. Rairoux: "Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust, and sea-salt particle properties from two / three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization Lidar and T-matrix," Atmos. Chem Phys

  9. Rayleigh-backscattering doppler broadening correction for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lanlan; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    The spectral broadening by Rayleigh backscattering can cause large changes in water vapor echo signals, causing errors when the water vapor concentration is inversed by differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A correction algorithm is proposed to revise the errors due to the effect of laser spectral broadening. The relative errors of water vapor are calculated in cases of different aerosol distribution and temperature changes before and after correction. The results show that measurement errors due to the Doppler broadening are more than 5% before correction and a 2% measurement error after corrected for the case of a smooth, background aerosol distribution. However, due to the high aerosol gradients and strong temperature inversion, errors can be up to 40% and 10% with no corrections for this effect, respectively. The relative errors can reduce to less than 2% after correction. Hence, the correction algorithm for Rayleigh Doppler broadening can improve detection accuracy in H2O DIAL measurements especially when it is applied to high aerosol concentration or strong temperature inversion.

  10. Mobile multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar for water vapor, cloud and aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songhua; Song, Xiaoquan; Liu, Bingyi; Dai, Guangyao; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Qin, Shengguang; Hua, Dengxin; Gao, Fei; Liu, Liping

    2015-12-28

    Aiming at the detection of atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio, depolarization ratio, backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and cloud information, the Water vapor, Cloud and Aerosol Lidar (WACAL) is developed by the lidar group at Ocean University of China. The lidar consists of transmitter, receiver, data acquisition and auxiliary system. For the measurement of various atmospheric physical properties, three channels including Raman channel, polarization channel and infrared channel are integrated in WACAL. The integration and working principle of these channels are introduced in details. The optical setup, the housekeeping of the system and the data retrieval routines are also presented. After the completion of the construction of the lidar, the WACAL system was installed in Ocean University of China (36.165°N, 120.5°E), Qingdao for the measurement of atmosphere during 2013 and 2014. The measurement principles and some case studies corresponding to various atmospheric physical properties are provided. Finally, the result of one continuous measurement example operated on 13 June 2014 is presented. The WACAL can measure the aerosol and cloud optical properties as well as the water vapor mixing ratio. It is useful for studying the direct and indirect effects of the aerosol on the climate change.

  11. Backscatter LIDAR signal simulation applied to spacecraft LIDAR instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, J.; Ristori, P.; Flamant, P.; Machado, M. E.; Singh, U.; Quel, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the scientific cooperation between the CEILAP laboratory (Argentina) and IPSL Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (France), devoted to the development of LIDAR techniques for Atmospheric sciences, a new area of scientific research, involving LIDARs, is starting in Argentine space technology. This new research area is under consideration at CEILAP in a joint effort with CONAE, the Argentine space agency, responsible for the development of future space missions. The LIDAR technique is necessary to improve our knowledge of meteorological, dynamic, and radiative processes in the South American region, for the whole troposphere and the lower stratosphere. To study this future mission, a simple model for the prediction of backscatter LIDAR signal from a spacecraft platform has been used to determine dimensions and detection characteristics of the space borne LIDAR instrument. The backscatter signal was retrieved from a modeled atmosphere considering its molecular density profile and taking into account different aerosols and clouds conditions. Signal-to-noise consideration, within the interval of possible dimension of the instrument parameters, allows us to constrain the telescope receiving area and to derive maximum range achievable, integration time and the final spatial and temporal resolutions of backscatter profiles.

  12. Effective Lidar Ratios of Dense Dust Aerosol Layers over North Africa Observed by the CALIPSO Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Winker, D. M.; Omar, A. H.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Hu, Y.; Hostetler, C. A.; Sun, W.; Lin, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, a joint US and French mission, was launched three years ago to provide new insight into the role that clouds and aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. A key instrument on board the CALIPSO payload is a two-wavelength, polarization-sensitive backscatter lidar. With its capabilities of depolarization ratio measurement and high resolution profiling, the CALIPSO lidar provides a unique opportunity to study the dust aerosol globally. Currently, a cloud and aerosol discrimination (CAD) algorithm that incorporates five-dimensional probability distribution function (5D-PDF) is being developed for implementation in future data releases. This new 5D-PDF approach allows nearly unambiguous identification of dense dust layers over/near their source regions and therefore enables the study of these layers using a large amount of the CALIPSO data. Lidar ratio (i.e., extinction-to-backscatter ratio) is an intrinsic optical property of aerosols and a key parameter necessary in the lidar signal inversion to retrieve profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients, which are two primary products of the CALIPSO level 2 data. This parameter is usually selected in the CALIPSO lidar level 2 data processing based on the aerosol type identified. (Six types of aerosols have been modeled: dust, polluted dust, marine, continental, polluted continental, and smoke.) As more data is being collected by the CALIPSO lidar, validation studies with the CALIPSO measurements are being performed and are now becoming available. For opaque dust layers, the effective lidar ratio (the product of lidar ratio and multiple scattering factor) can be determined easily from integrated attenuated backscatter over the layer top and apparent base. We have performed an extensive analysis based on the first two and a half years (June 2006 - December 2008) of the CALIPSO lidar nighttime

  13. Comparison of the aerosol optical properties and size distribution retrieved by sun photometer with in situ measurements at midlatitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvigné, Aurélien; Sellegri, Karine; Hervo, Maxime; Montoux, Nadège; Freville, Patrick; Goloub, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth radiative budget through scattering and absorption of solar radiation. Several methods are used to investigate aerosol properties and thus quantify their direct and indirect impacts on climate. At the Puy de Dôme station, continuous high-altitude near-surface in situ measurements and low-altitude ground-based remote sensing atmospheric column measurements give the opportunity to compare the aerosol extinction measured with both methods over a 1-year period. To our knowledge, it is the first time that such a comparison is realised with continuous measurements of a high-altitude site during a long-term period. This comparison addresses to which extent near-surface in situ measurements are representative of the whole atmospheric column, the aerosol mixing layer (ML) or the free troposphere (FT). In particular, the impact of multi-aerosol layers events detected using lidar backscatter profiles is analysed. A good correlation between in situ aerosol extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer is observed with a correlation coefficient around 0.80, indicating that the in situ measurements station is representative of the overall atmospheric column. After filtering for multilayer cases and correcting for each layer optical contribution (ML and FT), the atmospheric structure seems to be the main factor influencing the comparison between the two measurement techniques. When the site lies in the ML, the in situ extinction represents 45 % of the sun photometer ML extinction while when the site lies within the FT, the in situ extinction is more than 2 times higher than the FT sun photometer extinction. Moreover, the assumption of a decreasing linear vertical aerosol profile in the whole atmosphere has been tested, significantly improving the instrumental agreement. Remote sensing retrievals of the aerosol particle size distributions (PSDs) from the sun photometer

  14. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  15. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  16. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  18. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Hair, J.; Cook, A.; Harper, D.; Kleinman, L.; Clarke, A.; Russell, P.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Szykman, J.; Al-Saadi, J.

    2007-05-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) recently developed an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to measure aerosol distributions and optical properties. The HSRL technique takes advantage of the spectral distribution of the lidar return signal to discriminate aerosol and molecular signals and thereby measure aerosol extinction and backscatter independently. The LaRC instrument employs the HSRL technique to measure aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles at 532 nm and the standard backscatter lidar technique to measure aerosol backscatter profiles at 1064 nm. Depolarization profiles are measured at both wavelengths. Since March 2006, the airborne HSRL has acquired over 215 flight hours of data deployed on the NASA King Air B200 aircraft during several field experiments. Most of the flights were conducted during two major field experiments. The first major experiment was the joint Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX-MEX)/Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX B) experiment that was conducted during March 2006 to investigate the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The second major experiment was the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) that was conducted during August and September 2006 to investigate climate and air quality in the Houston/Gulf of Mexico region. Several flights were also conducted to help validate the Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) satellite. In February 2007, several flights were carried out as part of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) experiment to assess air quality in central California. Airborne HSRL data acquired during these missions were used to quantify aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by various aerosol types

  19. A dynamic localization model with stochastic backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, Daniele; Ghosal, Sandip

    1994-01-01

    The modeling of subgrid scales in large-eddy simulation (LES) has been rationalized by the introduction of the dynamic localization procedure. This method allows one to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients in the subgrid-scale model. Formally, the LES equations are supposed to be obtained by applying to the Navier-Stokes equations a 'grid filter' operation. Though the subgrid stress itself is unknown, an identity between subgrid stresses generated by different filters has been derived. Although preliminary tests of the Dynamic Localization Model (DLM) with k-equation have been satisfactory, the use of a negative eddy viscosity to describe backscatter is probably a crude representation of the physics of reverse transfer of energy. Indeed, the model is fully deterministic. Knowing the filtered velocity field and the subgrid-scale energy, the subgrid stress is automatically determined. We know that the LES equations cannot be fully deterministic since the small scales are not resolved. This stems from an important distinction between equilibrium hydrodynamics and turbulence. In equilibrium hydrodynamics, the molecular motions are also not resolved. However, there is a clear separation of scale between these unresolved motions and the relevant hydrodynamic scales. The result of molecular motions can then be separated into an average effect (the molecular viscosity) and some fluctuations. Due to the large number of molecules present in a box with size of the order of the hydrodynamic scale, the ratio between fluctuations and the average effect should be very small (as a result of the 'law of large numbers'). For that reason, the hydrodynamic balance equations are usually purely deterministic. In turbulence, however, there is no clear separation of scale between small and large eddies. In that case, the fluctuations around a deterministic eddy viscosity term could be significant. An eddy noise would then appear through a stochastic term in the subgrid

  20. GAS-PARTICLE PARTITIONING OF SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANICS ON ORGANIC AEROSOLS USING A PREDICTIVE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENT MODEL: ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECTS OF PARAMETER CHOICES ON MODEL PERFORMANCE. (R826771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The partitioning of a diverse set of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on a variety of organic aerosols was studied using smog chamber experimental data. Existing data on the partitioning of SOCs on aerosols from wood combustion, diesel combustion, and the

  1. Surface tensions, viscosities, and diffusion constants in mixed component single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan; Marshall, Frances; Song, Young-Chul; Haddrell, Allen; Reid, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Surface tension and viscosity are important aerosol properties but are challenging to measure on individual particles owing to their small size and mass. Aerosol viscosity impacts semivolatile partitioning from the aerosol phase, molecular diffusion in the bulk of the particle, and reaction kinetics. Aerosol surface tension impacts how particles activate to serve as cloud condensation nuclei. Knowledge of these properties and how they change under different conditions hinders accurate modelling of aerosol physical state and atmospheric impacts. We present measurements made using holographic optical tweezers to directly determine the viscosity and surface tension of optically trapped droplets containing ~1-4 picolitres of material (corresponding to radii of ~5-10 micrometres). Two droplets are captured in the experimental setup, equilibrated to a relative humidity, and coalesced through manipulation of the relative trap positions. The moment of coalescence is captured using camera imaging as well as from elastically backscattered light connected to an oscilloscope. For lower viscosity droplets, the relaxation in droplet shape to a sphere follows the form of a damped oscillator and gives the surface tension and viscosity. For high viscosity droplets, the relaxation results in a slow merging of the two droplets to form a sphere and the timescale of that process permits determination of viscosity. We show that droplet viscosity and surface tension can be quantitatively determined to within <10% of the expected value for low viscosity droplets and to better than 1 order of magnitude for high viscosity droplets. Examples illustrating how properties such as surface tension can change in response to environmental conditions will be discussed. Finally, a study of the relationship between viscosity, diffusion constants, vapour pressures, and reactive uptake coefficients for a mixed component aerosol undergoing oxidation and volatilisation will be discussed.

  2. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  3. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  4. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kittaka, C.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.; Cook, A. L.; Haper, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol extinction profiles are derived from backscatter data by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), for example from coincident MODIS observations and without reliance on a priori assumptions about aerosol type or optical properties. The backscatter data were acquired with the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The HSRL also simultaneously measures extinction independently, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the constrained retrieval of extinction from backscatter. We will show constrained extinction retrievals using various sources of column AOT, and examine comparisons with the HSRL extinction measurements and with a similar retrieval using data from the CALIOP lidar on the CALIPSO satellite.

  5. Replacing backscattering with reduced scattering. A better formulation of reflectance function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskozub, Jacek; McKee, David; Freda, Wlodzimierz

    2014-05-01

    Modern reflectance formulas all involve backscattering coefficient divided by absorption coefficient (bb/a). The backscattering (or backward scattering) coefficient describes how much of the incident radiation is scattered at angles between 90 and 180 deg. However, water leaving photons are not necessarily backscattered because it is possible for a variable fraction to exit after multiple forward scattering events. Therefore the whole angular function of scattering probability (phase function) influences the reflectance signal. This is the reason why phase functions of identical backscattering ratio may result in different reflectance values, contrary to the universally used formula. This creates the question whether there may exist a better formula using a parameter better describing phase function shape than backscattering ratio. The asymmetry parameter g (the average scattering cosine) is commonly used to parametrize phase functions. A replacement for backscattering should decrease with increasing g. Therefore, the simplest candidate to replace backscattering has the form of b(1-g), where b is the scattering coefficient. Such a parameter is well known in biomedical optics under the name of reduced scattering (sometimes transport scattering). It has even been used in parametrizing reflectance in (highly turbid) human tissues. However no attempt has been made to check its usefulness in marine optics. We perform Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations of reflectance for multiple combinations of inherent optical properties, including different phase functions. The results are used to create a new reflectance formula as a function of reduced scattering and absorption and test its robustness to changes in phase function shape compared to the traditional bb/a formula. We discuss its usefulness as well as advantages and disadvantages compared to the traditional formulation.

  6. Aerosol optical properties measurement by recently developed cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Xu, Xuezhe; Zhang, Qilei; Fang, Bo; Qian, Xiaodong; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun

    2015-04-01

    Development of appropriate and well-adapted measurement technologies for real-time in-situ measurement of aerosol optical properties is an important step towards a more accurate and quantitative understanding of aerosol impacts on climate and the environment. Aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA, ω), the ratio between the scattering (αscat) and extinction (αext) coefficients, is an important optical parameter that governs the relative strength of the aerosol scattering and absorption capacity. Since the aerosol extinction coefficient is the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients, a commonly used method for the determination of SSA is to separately measure two of the three optical parameters - absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients - with different instruments. However, as this method involves still different instruments for separate measurements of extinction and absorption coefficients under different sampling conditions, it might cause potential errors in the determination of SSA value, because aerosol optical properties are very sensitive to the sampling conditions such as temperature and relative humidity (RH). In this paper, we report on the development of a cavity-enhanced aerosol single scattering albedometer incorporating incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and an integrating sphere (IS) for direct in-situ measurement of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients on the exact same sample volume. The cavity-enhanced albedometer holds great promise for high-sensitivity and high-precision measurement of ambient aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients (hence absorption coefficient and SSA determination) and for absorbing trace gas concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering and extinction coefficients enable a potential application for the retrieval of particle number size distribution and for faster retrieval of aerosols' complex RI. The albedometer was deployed to

  7. A simulation algorithm for ultrasound liver backscattered signals.

    PubMed

    Zatari, D; Botros, N; Dunn, F

    1995-11-01

    In this study, we present a simulation algorithm for the backscattered ultrasound signal from liver tissue. The algorithm simulates backscattered signals from normal liver and three different liver abnormalities. The performance of the algorithm has been tested by statistically comparing the simulated signals with corresponding signals obtained from a previous in vivo study. To verify that the simulated signals can be classified correctly we have applied a classification technique based on an artificial neural network. The acoustic features extracted from the spectrum over a 2.5 MHz bandwidth are the attenuation coefficient and the change of speed of sound with frequency (dispersion). Our results show that the algorithm performs satisfactorily. Further testing of the algorithm is conducted by the use of a data acquisition and analysis system designed by the authors, where several simulated signals are stored in memory chips and classified according to their abnormalities.

  8. Measurement of backscattering from sea with an airborne radar at L band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianyun; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Yin, Zhiying; Sun, Fang; Kang, Shifeng; Wang, Laibu; Yu, Yunchao; Wen, Fangru

    1998-08-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic backscattering from sea surface at L band have been done with airborne side-looking radar system. Several flights are made for various sea states. Coherent radar data ta HH polarization and some truth data such as wave height, wind velocity and direction, temperature of sea water are recorded. Corner reflectors and active backscattering coefficient can be derived from the radar data and the cinematic data. The result presented in this paper include scattering coefficient and statistical analysis of radar echo with typical probability distribution functions such as Rayleigh, Weibull, Log-normal and K distribution.

  9. Multi-temporal RADARSAT-1 and ERS backscattering signatures of coastal wetlands in southeastern Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Using multi-temporal European Remote-sensing Satellites (ERS-1/-2) and Canadian Radar Satellite (RADARSAT-1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data over the Louisiana coastal zone, we characterize seasonal variations of radar backscat-tering according to vegetation type. Our main findings are as follows. First, ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1 require careful radiometric calibration to perform multi-temporal backscattering analysis for wetland mapping. We use SAR backscattering signals from cities for the relative calibration. Second, using seasonally averaged backscattering coefficients from ERS-1/-2 and RADARSAT-1, we can differentiate most forests (bottomland and swamp forests) and marshes (freshwater, intermediate, brackish, and saline marshes) in coastal wetlands. The student t-test results support the usefulness of season-averaged backscatter data for classification. Third, combining SAR backscattering coefficients and an optical-sensor-based normalized difference vegetation index can provide further insight into vegetation type and enhance the separation between forests and marshes. Our study demonstrates that SAR can provide necessary information to characterize coastal wetlands and monitor their changes.

  10. Overview of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Ogren, John A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Andrews, Elizabeth; Coulter, Richard L.; Hair, John; Hubbe, John M.; Lee, Yin-Nan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Olfert, Jason N.; Springston, Stephen R.

    2009-11-30

    The primary goal of the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) was to characterize and contrast freshly emitted aerosols below, above, and within fields of cumuli, and to study changes to the cloud microphysical structure within these same cloud fields. The CHAPS is one of very few studies that have had an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) sampling downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) inlet on an aircraft, allowing the examination of the chemical composition of the nucleated aerosols within the cumuli. The results from the CHAPS will provide insights into changes in the aerosol chemical and optical properties as aerosols move through shallow cumuli downwind of a moderately sized city. Three instrument platforms were employed during the CHAPS, including the U.S. Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft, which was equipped for in situ sampling of aerosol optical and chemical properties; the NASA-Langley King Air B200, which carried the downward looking NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) to measure profiles of aerosol backscatter, extinction, and depolarization between the King Air and the surface; and a surface site equipped for continuous in situ measurements of aerosol properties, profiles of aerosol backscatter, and meteorological conditions including total sky cover and thermodynamic profiles of the atmosphere. In spite of record precipitation over central Oklahoma, a total of eight research flights were made by the G-1, and eighteen by the B200, including special satellite verification flights timed to coincide with NASA satellite A-Train overpasses.

  11. Development of a global backscatter model for NASA's laser atmospheric wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David; Collins, Laurie; Mach, Douglas; Mcnider, Richard; Song, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    During the Contract Period April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1992, the Earth Systems Science Laboratory (ESSL) in the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) conducted a program of basic research on atmospheric backscatter characteristics, leading to the development of a global backscatter model. The ESSL research effort was carried out in conjunction with the Earth System Observing Branch (ES43) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, as part of NASA Contract NAS8-37585 under the Atmospheric Dynamics Program at NASA Headquarters. This research provided important inputs to NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program, especially in the understanding of global aerosol life cycles, and to NASA's Doppler Lidar research program, especially the development program for their prospective space-based Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS).

  12. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  13. Recommendations for processing atmospheric attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotthaus, Simone; O'Connor, Ewan; Münkel, Christoph; Charlton-Perez, Cristina; Haeffelin, Martial; Gabey, Andrew M.; Grimmond, C. Sue B.

    2016-08-01

    Ceilometer lidars are used for cloud base height detection, to probe aerosol layers in the atmosphere (e.g. detection of elevated layers of Saharan dust or volcanic ash), and to examine boundary layer dynamics. Sensor optics and acquisition algorithms can strongly influence the observed attenuated backscatter profiles; therefore, physical interpretation of the profiles requires careful application of corrections. This study addresses the widely deployed Vaisala CL31 ceilometer. Attenuated backscatter profiles are studied to evaluate the impact of both the hardware generation and firmware version. In response to this work and discussion within the CL31/TOPROF user community (TOPROF, European COST Action aiming to harmonise ground-based remote sensing networks across Europe), Vaisala released new firmware (versions 1.72 and 2.03) for the CL31 sensors. These firmware versions are tested against previous versions, showing that several artificial features introduced by the data processing have been removed. Hence, it is recommended to use this recent firmware for analysing attenuated backscatter profiles. To allow for consistent processing of historic data, correction procedures have been developed that account for artefacts detected in data collected with older firmware. Furthermore, a procedure is proposed to determine and account for the instrument-related background signal from electronic and optical components. This is necessary for using attenuated backscatter observations from any CL31 ceilometer. Recommendations are made for the processing of attenuated backscatter observed with Vaisala CL31 sensors, including the estimation of noise which is not provided in the standard CL31 output. After taking these aspects into account, attenuated backscatter profiles from Vaisala CL31 ceilometers are considered capable of providing valuable information for a range of applications including atmospheric boundary layer studies, detection of elevated aerosol layers, and model

  14. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  15. Mixtures of pollution, dust, sea salt, and volcanic aerosol during ACE-Asia: Radiative properties as a function of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Kus, Pinar; Rood, Mark J.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2003-12-01

    The Ron Brown cruise during ACE-Asia (March-April 2001) encountered complex aerosol that at times was dominated by marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust aerosols. Average total light scattering coefficients (σsp for Dp <10 μm, relative humidity (RH) = 19%, and λ = 550 nm) ranged from 23 (marine) to 181 Mm-1 (dust). Aerosol hygroscopicity ranged from deliquescent with hysteresis (marine frequently and polluted variably) to hygroscopic without hysteresis (volcanic) to nearly hygrophobic (dust-dominated). Average deliquescence and crystallization RH were 77 ± 2% and 42 ± 3%, respectively. The ambient aerosol was typically on the upper branch of the hysteresis loop for marine and polluted air masses and the lower branch for dust-dominated aerosols. Average f(RH = ambient), defined as σsp (RH = ambient)/σsp (RH = 19%), ranged from 1.25 (dust) to 2.88 (volcanic). Average h(RH ˜60%), defined as f(RH)upper branch/f(RH)lower branch, were 1.6, 1.3, 1, and 1.25 for marine, polluted, volcanic, and dust, demonstrating an importance of hysteresis to optical properties. Hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) at ambient RH ranged from 0.077 (marine) to 0.111 (dust), while single scattering albedo (ω) at ambient RH ranged from 0.94 (dust and polluted) to 0.99 (marine).

  16. A self-directing elastic backscatter lidar system for debris cloud tracking and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Dighe, K.A.; Tunnell, T.W.

    1996-06-01

    An elastic backscatter lidar that utilizes the lidar signal itself to direct the system towards fast moving isolated aerosol clouds has been developed. However, detecting and tracking invisible transient effluents from unknown locations, though conceptually straightforward, has still remained experimentally challenging. Accurate cloud volume, cloud density distribution, and track information have been obtained on small, fast moving, subvisible debris clouds resulting from above ground tests in which conventional explosives were detonated.

  17. HAB detection based on absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hui; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The coastal area of East China Sea (ECS) suffers from the harmful algal blooms (HAB) frequently every year in the warm season. The most common causative phytoplankton algal species of HAB in the ECS in recent years are Prorocentrum donghaiense (dinoflagellates), Karenia mikimotoi (dinoflagellates which could produce hemolytic and ichthyotoxins) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). The discrimination between the dinoflagellates and diatom HAB through ocean color remote sensing approach can add the knowledge of HAB events in ECS and help to the precaution. A series of in-situ measurement consisted of absorption coefficient, total scattering and particulate backscattering coefficient was conducted in the southern coast of Zhejiang Province in May 2009, and the estuary of Changjiang River in August 2009 and December 2010, which encountered two HAB events and a moderate bloom. The Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) of the bloom waters have significant difference between phytoplankton species in absorption and backscattering properties. The chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient (a*phy(λ)) for the bloom patches (chlorophyll a concentration >6mg m-3) differ greatly from the adjacent normal seawater, with the a*phy(λ) of bloom water lower than 0.03 m2 mg-1 while the a*phy(λ) of the adjacent normal seawater is much higher (even up to 0.06 m2 mg-1). Meanwhile, the backscattering coefficients at 6 wavebands (420, 442, 470, 510, 590 and 700nm) are also remarkably lower for bloom waters (<0.01 m-1) than the normal seawater (> 0.02 m-1). The backscattering coefficient ratio (Rbp(λ)) is much lower for diatom bloom waters than for dinoflagellates types (0.01079 vs. 0.01227). A discrimination model based on IOPs is established, and several typical dinoflagellates and diatom bloom events including Prorocentrum donghaiense, Karenia mikimotoi and Skeletonema costatum in the ECS are picked out for testing with the MODIS-L2 and L3 ocean color remote sensing products from NASA

  18. Ground-based network observation using Mie-Raman lidars and multi-wavelength Raman lidars and algorithm to retrieve distributions of aerosol components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hara, Yukari; Itsushi, Uno; Yasunaga, Kazuaki; Kudo, Rei; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2017-02-01

    We improved two-wavelength polarization Mie-scattering lidars at several main sites of the Asian dust and aerosol lidar observation network (AD-Net) by adding a nitrogen Raman scatter measurement channel at 607 nm and have conducted ground-based network observation with the improved Mie-Raman lidars (MRL) in East Asia since 2009. This MRL provides 1α+2β+1δ data at nighttime: extinction coefficient (α532), backscatter coefficient (β532), and depolarization ratio (δ532) of particles at 532 nm and an attenuated backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm (βat,1064). Furthermore, we developed a Multi-wavelength Mie-Raman lidar (MMRL) providing 2α+3β+2δ data (α at 355 and 532 nm; β at 355 and 532; βat at 1064 nm; and δ at 355 and 532 nm) and constructed MMRLs at several main sites of the AD-Net. We identified an aerosol-rich layer and height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using βat,1064 data, and derived aerosol optical properties (AOPs, for example, αa, βa, δa, and lidar ratio (Sa)). We demonstrated that AOPs cloud be derived with appropriate accuracy. Seasonal means of AOPs in the PBL were evaluated for each MRL observation site using three-year data from 2010 through 2012; the AOPs changed according to each season and region. For example, Sa,532 at Fukue, Japan, were 44±15 sr in winter and 49±17 in summer; those at Seoul, Korea, were 56±18 sr in winter and 62±15 sr in summer. We developed an algorithm to estimate extinction coefficients at 532 nm for black carbon, dust, sea-salt, and air-pollution aerosols consisting of a mixture of sulfate, nitrate, and organic-carbon substances using the 1α532+2β532 and 1064+1δ532 data. With this method, we assume an external mixture of aerosol components and prescribe their size distributions, refractive indexes, and particle shapes. We applied the algorithm to the observed data to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm and determined the vertical structure for each aerosol component.

  19. Hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosol particles based on lidar, radiosonde, and in situ measurements: Case studies from the Xinzhou field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Min; Liu, Dong; Li, Zhanqing; Mao, Jietai; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zhenzhu; Wang, Yingjian; Xie, Chenbo

    2017-02-01

    Lidar, radiosonde, and ground-based in situ nephelometer measurements made during an intensive field campaign carried out from July to September 2014 at the Xinzhou meteorological station were used to determine the aerosol hygroscopic growth effect in a cloud-capped, well-mixed boundary layer. Aerosol hygroscopic properties at 355 and 532 nm were examined for two cases with distinct aerosol layers. Lidar-derived maximum enhancement factors in terms of aerosol backscatter coefficient derived using a relative humidity (RH) reference value of 85% were 1.19 at 532 nm and 1.10 at 355 nm for Case I and 2.32 at 532 nm and 1.94 at 355 nm for Case II. To derive the aerosol particle hygroscopic growth factor at specific RH values, the Kasten and Hänel models were used. A comparison of the goodness of fit for the two models showed that the Kasten model performed better. The hygroscopic growth curve for RH>90% was much steeper than that for RH in the range of 85-90%. The slopes of the lidar-derived enhancement factor curve (measured from 85% to 95% RH) and the nephelometer-derived enhancement factor curve (measured from 40% to 62% RH) in Case I show similar trends, which lends confidence to using lidar measurements for studying aerosol particle hygroscopic growth. Data from a ground aerosol chemical speciation monitor showed that the larger values of aerosol hygroscopic enhancement factor in Case II corresponded to greater mass concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in the atmosphere.

  20. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  1. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  2. Interrelationships Between Aerosol Characteristics and Light Scattering During Late-winter in a Eastern Mediterranean Arid Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Meixner, F. X.; Schebeske, G.; Formenti, P.; Maenhaut, W.; Cafmeyer, J.; Ptasinski, J.; Karnieli, A.; Orlovsky, L.

    1999-01-01

    An intensive field campaign involving measurement of various aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative properties was conducted at Sde Boker in the Negev Desert of Israel, from 18 February to 15 March 1997. Nephelometer measurements gave average background scattering coefficient values of about 25 M/m at 550 nm wavelength, but strong dust events caused the value of this parameter to rise up to about 800 M/m Backscattering fractions did not depend on aerosol loading, and generally fell in the range of 0.1 to 0.25, comparable to values reported for marine and Arctic environments. Chemical analysis of the aerosol revealed that, in the coarse size range (2 - 10 micrometer equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD)), calcium (Ca) was by far the most abundant element followed by silicon (Si), both of which are indicators for mineral dust. In the fine size fraction (< 2 micrometers EAD), sulfur (S) generally was the dominant element, except during high dust episodes when Ca and Si were again the most abundant. Furthermore, fine black carbon (BC) correlates with S, suggesting that they may have originated from the same sources or source regions. An indication of the short-term effect of aerosol loading on radiative forcing was provided by measurements of global and diffuse solar radiation, which showed that during high turbidity periods (strong dust events) almost all of the solar radiation reaching the area is scattered or absorbed.

  3. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, Elina; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Müller, Detlef; Balis, Dimitris; Komppula, Mika

    2016-07-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type are available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol properties, i.e. effective radius and single-scattering albedo, were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the lidar ratio at 532 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr, 41 ± 13 sr, 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively, for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr, 75 ± 14 sr, 3.2 ± 1.3 % and 1.7 ± 0.3, respectively, for biomass burning aerosol layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 µm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed aerosols, respectively, while the single-scattering albedo at 532 nm was 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532

  4. Optical and microphysical characterization of aerosol layers over South Africa by means of multi-wavelength depolarization and Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakaki, E.; van Zyl, P. G.; Müller, D.; Balis, D.; Komppula, M.

    2015-12-01

    Optical and microphysical properties of different aerosol types over South Africa measured with a multi-wavelength polarization Raman lidar are presented. This study could assist in bridging existing gaps relating to aerosol properties over South Africa, since limited long-term data of this type is available for this region. The observations were performed under the framework of the EUCAARI campaign in Elandsfontein. The multi-wavelength PollyXT Raman lidar system was used to determine vertical profiles of the aerosol optical properties, i.e. extinction and backscatter coefficients, Ångström exponents, lidar ratio and depolarization ratio. The mean microphysical aerosol proper ties, i.e. effective radius and single scattering, albedo were retrieved with an advanced inversion algorithm. Clear differences were observed for the intensive optical properties of atmospheric layers of biomass burning and urban/industrial aerosols. Our results reveal a wide range of optical and microphysical parameters for biomass burning aerosols. This indicates probable mixing of biomass burning aerosols with desert dust particles, as well as the possible continuous influence of urban/industrial aerosol load in the region. The lidar ratio at 355 nm, the linear particle depolarization ratio at 355 nm and the extinction-related Ångström exponent from 355 to 532 nm were 52 ± 7 sr; 0.9 ± 0.4 % and 2.3 ± 0.5, respectively for urban/industrial aerosols, while these values were 92 ± 10 sr; 3.2 ± 1.3 %; 2.0 ± 0.4 respectively for biomass burning aerosols layers. Biomass burning particles are larger and slightly less absorbing compared to urban/industrial aerosols. The particle effective radius were found to be 0.10 ± 0.03, 0.17 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03 μm for urban/industrial, biomass burning, and mixed biomass burning and desert dust aerosols, respectively, while the single scattering albedo at 532 nm were 0.87 ± 0.06, 0.90 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.07 (at 532 nm), respectively for

  5. Role of the tail of high-energy secondary electrons in the Monte Carlo evaluation of the fraction of electrons backscattered from polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This work describes a Monte Carlo algorithm which appropriately takes into account the stochastic behavior of electron transport in solids and the simulation of the energy distributions of the secondary and backscattered electrons from polymethylmethacrylate irradiated by an electron beam. The simulation of the backscattered and secondary electron spectra also allows calculating the backscattering coefficient and the secondary electron yield of polymethylmethacrylate as a function of the initial energy of the incident electrons. Results of the simulation are compared with the available experimental data. The importance of considering all the electrons emerging form the surface in calculating the secondary electron yield and the backscattering coefficient is highlighted. In particular, we will discuss the importance of taking into account the tail of high energy secondary electrons in the spectrum for the simulation of the backscattering coefficient.

  6. Evaluation of a compact sensor for backscattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainusa Bogdan, Alina; Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2011-07-01

    Seawater inherent optical properties (IOPs) are key parameters in a wide range of applications in environmental studies and oceanographic research. In particular, the absorption coefficient (a) is the typical IOP used to obtain the concentration of chlorophyll-a in the water---a critical parameter in biological oceanography studies and the backscattering coefficient (bb) is used as a measure of turbidity. In this study, we test a novel instrument concept designed to obtain both the absorption and backscattering coefficients. The instrument would emit a collimated monochromatic light beam into the water retrieving the backscattered light intensity as a function of distance from the center of illumination. We use Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation to create an inversion algorithm that translates the signal from such an instrument into values of a and bb. Our results, based on simulations spanning the bulk of natural values of seawater IOP combinations, indicate that a 6.2cm diameter instrument with a radial resolution of 1cm would be capable of predicting bb within less than 13.4% relative difference and a within less than 57% relative difference (for 90% of the inverted a values, the relative errors fall below 29.7%). Additionally, these errors could be further reduced by constraining the inversion algorithm with information from concurrent measurements of other IOPs. Such a compact and relatively simple device could have multiple applications for in situ optical measurements, including a and bb retrievals from instrumentation mounted on autonomous underwater vehicles. Furthermore, the same methodology could possibly be used for an out-of-water sensor.

  7. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  8. Shipborne measurements with a modular multipurpose mobile lidar system for tropospheric and stratospheric aerosol observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Juergen; Schrems, Otto; Beyerle, Georg; Hofer, Bernd; Mildner, Wolfgang; Theopold, Felix A.

    1997-05-01

    In our contribution water vapor and aerosol measurements with a new modular two wavelength Rayleigh Raman lidar instrument are described. A comparison of the data with radiosonde data are shown and the results discussed. The new mobile aerosol Raman lidar (MARL) is able to measure aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient as well as depolarization in the altitude range 5 to 50 km. The system is operational since July 1996 and participated at the ALBATROSS (atmospheric chemistry and lidar studies above the Atlantic Ocean related to ozone and other trace gases in the tropo and stratosphere) campaign aboard the German research vessel Polarstern on a cruise from Bremerhaven, Germany to Punta Quilla, Argentina in October/November 1996. Key parts of the lidar system include a frequency doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser, a large receiving telescope mirror (1.15 m diameter) and a sophisticated polychromator. The system's power aperture product is more than 9 Wm2 on each wavelength (532 nm and 355 nm). The instrument is installed in a standard 20 ft ISO container and is operational in polar as well as tropical environments wherever a supply with electrical power is available.

  9. Laser transmission-backscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Ou, Szu-Cheng; Takano, Yoshihide; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Lefevre, Randy J; Johnson, Michael W

    2002-09-20

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) model for inhomogeneous cirrus clouds in plane-parallel and spherical geometries for the analysis of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective ice-crystal size fields for cirrus clouds can be determined from a combination of the remote sensing of cirrus clouds by use of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites and the vertical profiling of ice-crystal size distributions available from limited measurements. We demonstrate that satellite remote sensing of the position and the composition of high cirrus can be incorporated directly in the computer model developed for the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission, forward scattering, and backscattering are analyzed carefully with respect to aircraft height, cirrus cloud optical depth, and ice-crystal size and orientation. Uncertainty in laser transmission that is due to errors in the retrieved ice-crystal size is negligible. But uncertainty of the order of 2% can be produced if the retrieved optical depth has errors of +/-0.05. With both the aircraft and the target near the cloud top, the direct transmission decreases, owing to the propagation of the laser beam through the curved portion of the cloud top. This effect becomes more pronounced as the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target increases.

  10. Dependence of radar backscatter on coniferous forest biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, M.C.; Ulaby, F.T. ); LeToan, T.; Beaudoin, A. ); Kasischke, E.S. ); Christensen, N. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses two independent experimental efforts which have examined the dependence of radar backscatter on aboveground biomass of mono specie conifer forests using polarimetric airborne SAR data at P-, L- and C-bands. Plantations of maritime pines near Landes, France range in age from 8 to 46 years with aboveground biomass between 5 and 105 tons/ha. Loblolly pine stands established on abandoned agricultural fields near Duke, NC range in age from 4 to 90 years and extend the range of aboveground biomass to 560 tons/ha for the older stands. These two experimental forests are largely complementary with respect to biomass. Radar backscatter is found to increase approximately linearly with increasing biomass until it saturates at a biomass level that depends on the radar frequency. The biomass saturation level is about 200 tons/ha at P-band and 100 tons/ha at L-band, and the C-band backscattering coefficient shows much less sensitivity to total aboveground biomass.

  11. A case study of dust aerosol radiative properties over Lanzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cao, X.; Bao, J.; Zhou, B.; Huang, J.; Shi, J.; Bi, J.

    2010-02-01

    The vertical distribution of dust aerosol and its radiative properties are analysed using the data measured by the micropulse lidar, profiling microwave radiometer, sunphotometer, particulate monitor, and nephelometer at the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL) during a dust storm from 27 March to 29 March 2007. The analysis shows that the dust aerosol mainly exists below 2 km in height, and the dust aerosol extinction coefficient decreases with height. The temporal evolution of aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the dust storm is characterized by a sub-maximum at 22:00 (Beijing Time) on 27 March and a maximum at 12:00 on 28 March. The AOD derived by lidar is compared with that obtained by sunphotometer, and shows a good consistency. The PM10 concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient share identical variation trends, and their maximums both appear at 22:00 on 27 March. The aerosol extinction coefficient and relative humidity have the same trends and their maximums appear at identical heights, showing a correlation between extinction coefficient and relative humidity known as aerosol hygroscopicity. Nevertheless, the correlation between aerosol extinction coefficient and temperature cannot be obviously seen. The aerosol extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and PM10 concentration present good linear correlations. The correlation coefficients of the aerosol scattering coefficient and PM10 concentration, of aerosol extinction coefficient and PM10 concentration, and of aerosol extinction and scattering coefficient are respectively 0.98, 0.94, and 0.96.

  12. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  13. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  14. Lidar determination of the composition of atmosphere aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the feasibility of using DIfferential SCatter (DISC) lidar to measure the composition of atmospheric aerosols are described. This technique involves multiwavelength measurements of the backscatter cross section of aerosols in the middle infrared, where a number of materials display strong restrahlen features that significantly modulate the backscatter spectrum. The theoretical work indicates that a number of materials of interest, including sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, and silicates, can be discriminated among with a CO2 lidar. An initial evaluation of this procedure was performed in which cirrus clouds and lower altitude tropospheric aerosols were developed. The observed ratio spectrum of the two types of aerosol displays structure that is in crude accord with theoretical expectations.

  15. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-20

    pressure, I,, of 1 /iPa, corresponds to 0.67 x 10- 8 Wim2. Assuming spherical spreading, the one meter distance reference frame, and the definition of dB (Eq...then be approximated by an infinite series Fundamentals ofAcoustic Backscatter Imagery 11 W(r) = Wm (r) + X Fjsc (r) j=O where "tic(r) is the incident...f( x ,y, Z)Iz=h(xy) = 0 f( x , y, z)I z=h( x ,y)= f( x , y, Z) I z o + h di+ h 2 d2f +zz z= The function ftx,y,z) can represent, for example, the stress

  16. Aerosol classification using airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements - methodology and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical depth (AOD) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, and spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of AOD and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion AOD to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  17. Aerosol classification using airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar measurements - methodology and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.

    2011-09-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired extensive datasets of aerosol extinction (532 nm), aerosol optical thickness (AOT) (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 18 field missions that have been conducted over North America since 2006. The lidar measurements of aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratio, depolarization, backscatter color ratio, and spectral depolarization ratio) are shown to vary with location and aerosol type. A methodology based on observations of known aerosol types is used to qualitatively classify the extensive set of HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate types. Several examples are presented showing how the aerosol intensive parameters vary with aerosol type and how these aerosols are classified according to this new methodology. The HSRL-based classification reveals vertical variability of aerosol types during the NASA ARCTAS field experiment conducted over Alaska and northwest Canada during 2008. In two examples derived from flights conducted during ARCTAS, the HSRL classification of biomass burning smoke is shown to be consistent with aerosol types derived from coincident airborne in situ measurements of particle size and composition. The HSRL retrievals of AOT and inferences of aerosol types are used to apportion AOT to aerosol type; results of this analysis are shown for several experiments.

  18. YAG aerosol lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Atmospheric Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Mission, using the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform, is designed to provide the magnitude and statistical distribution of atmospheric backscatter cross section at lidar operating wavelengths. This is a fundamental parameter required for the Doppler lidar proposed to be used on a spacecraft platform for global wind field measurements. The prime measurements will be made by a CO2 lidar instrument in the 9 to 10 micron range. These measurements will be complemented with the Goddard YAG Aerosol Lidar (YAL) data in two wavelengths, 0.532 and 1.06 micron, in the visible and near-infrared. The YAL, is being designed to utilize as much existing hardware, as feasible, to minimize cost and reduce implementation time. The laser, energy monitor, telescope and detector package will be mounted on an optical breadboard. The optical breadboard is mounted through isolation mounts between two low boy racks. The detector package will utilize a photomultiplier tube for the 0.532 micron channel and a silicon avalanche photo detector (APD) for the 1.06 micron channel.

  19. Feasibility of using Backscattered Mueller Matrix Images for Bioaerosol Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhui; Kattawar, George W.

    2006-03-01

    It has been shown that by looking at the backscattered radiance from an object illuminated by a laser beam one could effectively distinguish different morphologies from one another. However, if one wants to obtain all the information possible from elastic scattering either from a single particle or an ensemble of particles then one must use the Mueller matrix which contains all the polarization and radiance information available. In this talk, we will show that if we take advantage of the polarization information of the object, many more images related to the overall morphology as well as the internal structure of the object can be obtained. We will present images of the complete Mueller matrix to show the sensitivity of its sixteen components to both external and internal particle properties. We will also show that by using only one or two elements of this matrix one might be able to distinguish bioaerosols such as anthrax from more benign aerosols. We also show that the backscattering Mueller images contain more information than the forward scattering ones.

  20. Simulation of L-band and HH microwave backscattering from coniferous forest stands - A comparison with SIR-B data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    SIR-B images of the Mt. Shasta region of northern California are used to evaluate a composite L-band HH backscattering model of coniferous forest stands. It is found that both SIR-B and simulated backscattering coefficients for eight stands studied have similar trends and relations to average tree height and average number of trees per pixel. Also, the dispersion and distribution of simulated backscattering coefficients from each stand broadly match SIR-B data from the same stand. Although the limited quality and quantity of experimental data makes it difficult to draw any strong conclusions, the comparisons indicate that a stand-based L-band HH composite model seems promising for explaining backscattering features.

  1. Simulation of positron backscattering and implantation profiles using Geant4 code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shi-Juan; Pan, Zi-Wen; Liu, Jian-Dang; Han, Rong-Dian; Ye, Bang-Jiao

    2015-10-01

    For the proper interpretation of the experimental data produced in slow positron beam technique, the positron implantation properties are studied carefully using the latest Geant4 code. The simulated backscattering coefficients, the implantation profiles, and the median implantation depths for mono-energetic positrons with energy range from 1 keV to 50 keV normally incident on different crystals are reported. Compared with the previous experimental results, our simulation backscattering coefficients are in reasonable agreement, and we think that the accuracy may be related to the structures of the host materials in the Geant4 code. Based on the reasonable simulated backscattering coefficients, the adjustable parameters of the implantation profiles which are dependent on materials and implantation energies are obtained. The most important point is that we calculate the positron backscattering coefficients and median implantation depths in amorphous polymers for the first time and our simulations are in fairly good agreement with the previous experimental results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175171 and 11105139).

  2. Determination of light absorption, scattering and anisotropy factor of a highly scattering medium using backscattered circularly polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Alrubaiee, M.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    2007-02-01

    The absorption coefficient, the scattering coefficient and the anisotropy factor of a highly scattering medium are determined using the diffuse reflectance of an obliquely incident beam of circularly polarized light. This approach determines both the anisotropy factor and the cutoff size parameter for the fractal continuous scattering medium such as biological tissue and tissue phantoms from depolarization of the backscattered light.

  3. Initial Verification of GEOS-4 Aerosols Using CALIPSO and MODIS: Scene Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Colarco, Peter R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Levy, Robert C.; Vaughan, Mark A.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2007-01-01

    A-train sensors such as MODIS and MISR provide column aerosol properties, and in the process a means of estimating aerosol type (e.g. smoke vs. dust). Correct classification of aerosol type is important because retrievals are often dependent upon selection of the right aerosol model. In addition, aerosol scene classification helps place the retrieved products in context for comparisons and analysis with aerosol transport models. The recent addition of CALIPSO to the A-train now provides a means of classifying aerosol distribution with altitude. CALIPSO level 1 products include profiles of attenuated backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization at 532 nm. Backscatter intensity, wavelength ratio, and depolarization provide information on the vertical profile of aerosol concentration, size, and shape. Thus similar estimates of aerosol type using MODIS or MISR are possible with CALIPSO, and the combination of data from all sensors provides a means of 3D aerosol scene classification. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-4) provides global 3D aerosol mass for sulfate, sea salt, dust, and black and organic carbon. A GEOS-4 aerosol scene classification algorithm has been developed to provide estimates of aerosol mixtures along the flight track for NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar. GLAS launched in 2003 and did not have the benefit of depolarization measurements or other sensors from the A-train. Aerosol typing from GLAS data alone was not possible, and the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier has been used to identify aerosol type and improve the retrieval of GLAS products. Here we compare 3D aerosol scene classification using CALIPSO and MODIS with the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier. Dust, smoke, and pollution examples will be discussed in the context of providing an initial verification of the 3D GEOS-4 aerosol products. Prior model verification has only been attempted with surface mass

  4. Simultaneous Retrieval of Effective Refractive Index and Density from Size Distribution and Light Scattering Data: Weakly-Absorbing Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Shilling, John E.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mei, Fan; Jefferson, Anne

    2014-10-01

    We propose here a novel approach for retrieving in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosol from optical and size distribution measurements. Here we define “weakly absorbing” as aerosol single-scattering albedos that exceed 0.95 at 0.5 um.The required optical measurements are the scattering coefficient and the hemispheric backscatter fraction, obtained in this work from an integrating nephelometer. The required size spectra come from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer. The performance of this approach is first evaluated using a sensitivity study with synthetically generated but measurement-related inputs. The sensitivity study reveals that the proposed approach is robust to random noise; additionally the uncertainties of the retrieval are almost linearly proportional to the measurement errors, and these uncertainties are smaller for the real refractive index than for the effective density. Next, actual measurements are used to evaluate our approach. These measurements include the optical, microphysical, and chemical properties of weakly absorbing aerosol which are representative of a variety of coastal summertime conditions observed during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/). The evaluation includes calculating the root mean square error (RMSE) between the aerosol characteristics retrieved by our approach, and the same quantities calculated using the conventional volume mixing rule for chemical constituents. For dry conditions (defined in this work as relative humidity less than 55%) and sub-micron particles, a very good (RMSE~3%) and reasonable (RMSE~28%) agreement is obtained for the retrieved real refractive index (1.49±0.02) and effective density (1.68±0.21), respectively. Our approach permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10micron particles. The evaluation results also reveal that the

  5. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  6. Chamber LIDAR measurements of aerosolized biological simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Siegrist, Karen M.; Baldwin, Kevin; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2009-05-01

    A chamber aerosol LIDAR is being developed to perform well-controlled tests of optical scattering characteristics of biological aerosols, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT), for validation of optical scattering models. The 1.064 μm, sub-nanosecond pulse LIDAR allows sub-meter measurement resolution of particle depolarization ratio or backscattering cross-section at a 1 kHz repetition rate. Automated data acquisition provides the capability for real-time analysis or recording. Tests administered within the refereed 1 cubic meter chamber can provide high quality near-field backscatter measurements devoid of interference from entrance and exit window reflections. Initial chamber measurements of BG depolarization ratio are presented.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Venus Radar Backscatter Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, S. M.; Grosfils, E. B.

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing mapping of the Ganiki Planitia (V14) quadrangle of Venus and definition of material units has involved an integrated but qualitative analysis of Magellan radar backscatter images and topography using standard geomorphological mapping techniques. However, such analyses do not take full advantage of the quantitative information contained within the images. Analysis of the backscatter coefficient allows a much more rigorous statistical comparison between mapped units, permitting first order selfsimilarity tests of geographically separated materials assigned identical geomorphological labels. Such analyses cannot be performed directly on pixel (DN) values from Magellan backscatter images, because the pixels are scaled to the Muhleman law for radar echoes on Venus and are not corrected for latitudinal variations in incidence angle. Therefore, DN values must be converted based on pixel latitude back to their backscatter coefficient values before accurate statistical analysis can occur. Here we present a method for performing the conversions and analysis of Magellan backscatter data using commonly available ArcGIS software and illustrate the advantages of the process for geological mapping.

  8. The effect of leaf size on the microwave backscattering by corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attema and Ulaby (1978) proposed the cloud model to predict the microwave backscattering properties of vegetation. This paper describes a modification in which the biophysical properties and microwave properties of vegetation are related at the level of the individual scatterer (e.g., the leaf or the stalk) rather than at the level of the aggregated canopy (e.g., the green leaf area index). Assuming that the extinction cross section of an average leaf was proportional to its water content, that a power law relationship existed between the backscattering cross section of an average green corn leaf and its area, and that the backscattering coefficient of the surface was a linear function of its volumetric soil moisture content, it is found that the explicit inclusion of the effects of corn leaf size in the model led to an excellent fit between the observed and predicted backscattering coefficients. Also, an excellent power law relationship existed between the backscattering cross section of a corn leaf and its area.

  9. Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water—Part 1: Organic compounds and water by consideration of short- and long-range effects using X-UNIFAC.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdakos, Garnet B.; Asher, William E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Pankow, James F.

    The semi-empirical group contribution method (GCM) of Kikic et al. [Chem. Eng. Sci. 46 (1991) 2775-2780] for estimating activity coefficient ( ζ) values of neutral organic compounds and water in solutions composed of organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water is adapted for application to atmospheric particulate matter (PM). It is assumed that ζ values are determined by a combination of short- and long-range interactions. The ζ expression involves conventional UNIFAC terms and a Debye-Hückel term, with the former computed using group-group interaction parameters. Organic-organic interaction parameters are assigned the values from the UNIFAC-LLE model of Magnussen et al. [Ind. Eng. Chem. Process Design Develop. 20 (1981) 331-339]. Forty interaction parameters (ion-solvent group and anion-cation) were obtained from Kikic et al. [Chem. Eng. Sci. 46 (1991) 2775-2780], Achard et al. [Fluid Phase Equilibria 98 (1994) 71-89], and Ming and Russell [Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. J. 48 (2002) 1331-1348]. Twenty additional interaction parameters (ion-solvent group) are estimated based on 879 UNIQUAC-fitted ζ values for organic compounds and water. The fitted ζ values are based on liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE) data for a range of ternary and quaternary organic/inorganic salt/water mixtures at 293-308 K. The UNIQUAC fits are analogous to those described by Fredenslund et al. [Vapor-Liquid Equilibria Using UNIFAC: A Group-Contribution Method, Elsevier Scientific Publishing, New York, 1977]. The LLE mixture compositions range from primarily organic solutions to primarily aqueous solutions with maximum ionic strengths of ˜5 mol kg -1. The groups characteristic of organic compounds found in atmospheric PM considered here include: CH 3-, -CH 2-, -CH|-, -C||-, -OH, -CH 2CO-, and -COOH. These are: single bonded carbon with three, two, one, and zero hydrogens, respectively, hydroxyl, -CH 2-carbonyl, and carboxyl, respectively. The inorganic salts

  10. Evaluation of vegetation fire smoke plume dynamics and aerosol load using UV scanning lidar and fire-atmosphere modelling during the Mediterranean Letia 2010 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy-Cancellieri, V.; Augustin, P.; Filippi, J. B.; Mari, C.; Fourmentin, M.; Bosseur, F.; Morandini, F.; Delbarre, H.

    2013-08-01

    Vegetation fires emit large amount of gases and aerosols which are detrimental to human health. Smoke exposure near and downwind of fires depends on the fire propagation, the atmospheric circulations and the burnt vegetation. A better knowledge of the interaction between wildfire and atmosphere is a primary requirement to investigate fire smoke and particle transport. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the usefulness of an UV scanning lidar to characterize the fire smoke plume and consequently validate fire-atmosphere model simulations. An instrumented burn was conducted in a Mediterranean area typical of ones frequently concern by wildfire with low dense shrubs. Using Lidar measurements positioned near the experimental site, fire smoke plume was thoroughly characterized by its optical properties, edge and dynamics. These parameters were obtained by combining methods based on lidar inversion technique, wavelet edge detection and a backscatter barycenter technique. The smoke plume displacement was determined using a digital video camera coupled with the Lidar. The simulation was performed using a meso-scale atmospheric model in a large eddy simulation configuration (Meso-NH) coupled to a fire propagation physical model (ForeFire) taking into account the effect of wind, slope and fuel properties. A passive numerical scalar tracer was injected in the model at fire location to mimic the smoke plume. The simulated fire smoke plume width remained within the edge smoke plume obtained from lidar measurements. The maximum smoke injection derived from lidar backscatter coefficients and the simulated passive tracer was around 200 m. The vertical position of the simulated plume barycenter was systematically below the barycenter derived from the lidar backscatter coefficients due to the oversimplified properties of the passive tracer compared to real aerosols particles. Simulated speed and horizontal location of the plume compared well with the observations derived from

  11. Long-term measurements of aerosols and carbon monoxide at the ZOTTO tall tower to characterize polluted and pristine air in the Siberian Taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, X.; Winderlich, J.; Mayer, J.-C.; Panov, A. V.; Heimann, M.; Birmili, W.; Heintzenberg, J.; Cheng, Y.; Andreae, M. O.

    2013-07-01

    Siberia is one of few background regions in the Northern Hemisphere where the atmosphere may sometimes approach pristine conditions. We present the time series of aerosol and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements between September~2006 and December 2010 at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 90° E). We investigate the seasonal, weekly and diurnal variations of aerosol properties (including absorption and scattering coefficients and derived parameters, like equivalent black carbon (BCe), Ångström exponent, single scattering albedo, and backscattering ratio) and the CO mixing ratios. Criteria were established to distinguish polluted and near-pristine air masses and characterize them separately. Depending on the season, 15-47% of the sampling time at ZOTTO was representative of a clean atmosphere. The summer pristine data indicates that primary biogenic and/or secondary organic aerosol formation are quite strong particle sources in the Siberian Taiga. The summer seasons 2007-2008 are dominated by an Aitken mode of 80 nm size, whereas the summer 2009 with prevailing easterly winds produced aerosols in the accumulation mode around 200 nm size. We found these differences mainly related to air temperature, in parallel with production rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC). In winter, the footprint and aerosol size distribution (with a peak at 160 nm) of the clean background air are characteristic for aged aerosols from anthropogenic sources at great distances from ZOTTO and diluted biofuel burning emissions from heating. The wintertime polluted air originates from the large cities to the south and southwest of the site; these aerosols have a dominant mode around 100 nm, and the Δ BCe/Δ CO ratio of 7-11 ng m-3 ppb-1 suggests dominant contributions from coal and biofuel burning for heating. During summer, anthropogenic emissions are the dominant contributor to the pollution aerosols at ZOTTO, while only 12% of the polluted

  12. [Backscattering spectrum analysis of nonspheroid soot particle].

    PubMed

    Xing, Jian; Sun, Xiao-gang; Yuan, Gui-bin; Qi, Xu; Tang, Hong

    2010-08-01

    In the process of measuring soot concentration and grain diameter, the backscattering spectrum of soot particle model was calculated to ascertain and analyze main effective factor of backscattering intensity. In the present paper, ellipsoid, column and generalized Chebyshev, three nonspheroid models, were selected according to micrograph of practical soot particle, which aims to simulate practical soot particle with equivalent diameter of about 1 microm. T-matrix method was used to calculate backscattering spectrum of the three nonspheriod models, and the main effective factor curves of intensity were obtained, too. Both numerical computer simulations and experimental results illustrate that nonspheroid particle backscattering intensity is stronger than that of spheroid particle in the visible/infrared spectrum band, especially for generalized Chebyshev model, whose backscattering intensity can be even 3.5 times higher than that of forward scattering. Meanwhile, the absorbency non-spheroid particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.56i) backscattering intensity is stronger than that of non-absorbency nonspheriod particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.001i). Furthermore, with the increase in particle equivalent radius, the light source wavelength also needs to be increase to obtain more light intensity information. The backscattering light spectrum information provides a reasonable basis for selecting light source and measure angle.

  13. Snow backscatter in the 1-8 GHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    The 1-8 GHz microwave active spectrometer system was used to measure the backscatter response of snow covered ground. The scattering coefficient was measured for all linear polarization combinations at angles of incidence between nadir and 70 deg. Ground truth data consisted of soil moisture, soil temperature profile, snow depth, snow temperature profile, and snow water equivalent. The radar sensitivity to snow water equivalent increased in magnitude with increasing frequency and was almost angle independent for angles of incidence higher than 30 deg, particularly at the higher frequencies. In the 50 deg to 70 deg angular range and in the 6 to 8 GHz frequency range, the sensitivity was typically between -0.4 dB/.1 g/sq cm and -0.5 dB/,1 g/sq cm, and the associated linear correlation coefficient had a magnitude of about 0.8.

  14. Haze event monitoring and investigation in Penang Island, Malaysia using a ground-based backscatter Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, W. S.; Tan, F.; Lim, H. S.; Matjafri, M. Z.

    2014-06-01

    During 24th July 2013 to 1st August 2013, a haze event struck Penang Island, causing the visibility to decrease and increase in Air Pollution Index (API). A ground-based backscatter Lidar, operate at 355 nm which was setup at the roof top of the School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia. It was used to monitor and investigate the haze event. For this work, we studied the daytime variation of the aerosol intensity, distribution, planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) values during these days. We found that the aerosol are very intense during the first two days of the haze event and slowly decline as time passed. Finally the haze event died off on 1st August 2013. As for daily aerosol distribution, aerosols are generally more intense during the afternoon. Its intensity is slightly lower in the morning and evening. Similar trends were observed for AOD values as they increase from morning to afternoon and slowly decrease in the evening. Most aerosols are found contained below the PBL which generally found at around 1000 - 2000 m in height.

  15. Iterative method to determine an averaged backscatter-to-extinction ratio in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Elouragini, S; Flamant, P H

    1996-03-20

    An iterative method to determine an average backscatter-to-extinction ratio and extinction coefficient simultaneously in cirrus clouds is proposed. The method is based on Klett's inversion, which is constrained by the total optical depth. A signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 at the cloud top is required for an error in the backscatter-to-extinction ratio lower than 20% to result. The method has been tested with simulated lidar signals. An application to an experimental lidar signal is discussed.

  16. Backscatter and extinction measurements in cloud and drizzle at CO2 laser wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, S. G.

    1986-01-01

    The backscatter and extinction of laboratory generated cloud and drizzle sized water drops were measured at carbon dioxide laser wavelengths (predominately at lambda = 10.591 micrometers). Two distinctly different drop size regimes were studied: one which covers the range normally encompassed by natural cloud droplets and the other representative of mist or drizzle sized drops. The derivation and verification of the relation between extinction and backscatter at carbon dioxide laser wavelengths should allow the determination of large cloud drop and drizzle extinction coefficient solely from a lidar return signal without requiring knowledge of the drop size distribution. This result will also apply to precipitation sized drops so long as they are spherical.

  17. Lidar effective multiple-scattering coefficients in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, F O; Bissonnette, L R; Flamant, P H

    1997-05-20

    We delimit a regime, valid for most ground-based lidar probings of cirrus clouds, in which the field-of-view dependence of multiple scattering reaches a plateau. In this regime and assuming the phase function to be constant around pi, we formally demonstrate Platt's modification of the single-scattering lidar equation, with a parameter eta(P) accounting for the reduction of the effective scattering coefficient defined so that (1 - eta(P)) is the amount of energy scattered in the forward peak. Then, to cope with nonconstant backscattering functions, we discuss the introduction of an effective backscattering coefficient that is an average of the scattering probabilities around pi.

  18. Cyclone diagnostics. [rainfall estimation, backscatter, and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A GOES IR rainfall estimation algorithm was completed and verified. The technique was applied to the South Pacific convergent zone. The NASA earth observation mission series is discussed briefly. Backscatter was investigated using 10.6 micron coherent lidar.

  19. Coherent microwave backscatter of natural snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.; Angelakos, D. J.; Clapp, F. D.; Smith, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The backscatter of natural snowpacks was measured using a swept-frequency system operating from 5.8 to 8.0 GHz. Snow layering produced sequences of maxima and minima in backscatter intensity, with typical peak-to-valley ratios of 15 db. Wetness produced in the upper portion of the snowpack by solar heat input enhanced the effect of layering. The layer response persisted for incidence exhibits predominantly coherent properties. Frequency modulation of the incident signal masked the layer response by averaging the unmodulated response over the bandwidth represented by the modulation. Further changes in backscatter were attributed to changes in wetness in the surface regions of the snowpack; for a fixed frequency of 13.5 GHz and incidence angle of 39 deg, the backscatter decreased typically 15 db between 11 A.M. and noon, and returned to approximately its initial level of overnight.

  20. Backscatter correction factor for megavoltage photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yida; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: For routine clinical dosimetry of photon beams, it is often necessary to know the minimum thickness of backscatter phantom material to ensure that full backscatter condition exists. Methods: In case of insufficient backscatter thickness, one can determine the backscatter correction factor, BCF(s,d,t), defined as the ratio of absorbed dose measured on the central-axis of a phantom with backscatter thickness of t to that with full backscatter for square field size s and forward depth d. Measurements were performed in SAD geometry for 6 and 15 MV photon beams using a 0.125 cc thimble chamber for field sizes between 10 x 10 and 30 x 30 cm at depths between d{sub max} (1.5 cm for 6 MV and 3 cm for 15 MV) and 20 cm. Results: A convolution method was used to calculate BCF using Monte-Carlo simulated point-spread kernels generated for clinical photon beams for energies between Co-60 and 24 MV. The convolution calculation agrees with the experimental measurements to within 0.8% with the same physical trend. The value of BCF deviates more from 1 for lower energies and larger field sizes. According to our convolution calculation, the minimum BCF occurs at forward depth d{sub max} and 40 x 40 cm field size, 0.970 for 6 MV and 0.983 for 15 MV. Conclusions: The authors concluded that backscatter thickness is 6.0 cm for 6 MV and 4.0 cm for 15 MV for field size up to 10 x 10 cm when BCF = 0.998. If 4 cm backscatter thickness is used, BCF is 0.997 and 0.983 for field size of 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 6 MV, and is 0.998 and 0.990 for 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 15 MV, respectively.

  1. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have

  2. Characterizing the Vertical Profile of Aerosol Particle Extinction and Linear Depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 View from CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; Winker, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 µm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging Spectro- Radiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio") necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolvesmore smoke overwater than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of Bengal

  3. Characterizing the vertical profile of aerosol particle extinction and linear depolarization over Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent: The 2007-2009 view from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Jianglong; Tackett, Jason L.; Chew, Boon Ning; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Aoki, Kazuma; Winker, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Vertical profiles of 0.532 μm aerosol particle extinction coefficient and linear volume depolarization ratio are described for Southeast Asia and the Maritime Continent. Quality-screened and cloud-cleared Version 3.01 Level 2 NASA Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) 5-km Aerosol Profile datasets are analyzed from 2007 to 2009. Numerical simulations from the U.S. Naval Aerosol Analysis and Predictive System (NAAPS), featuring two-dimensional variational assimilation of NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer quality-assured datasets, combined with regional ground-based lidar measurements, are considered for assessing CALIOP retrieval performance, identifying bias, and evaluating regional representativeness. CALIOP retrievals of aerosol particle extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth (AOD) are high over land and low over open waters relative to NAAPS (0.412/0.312 over land for all data points inclusive, 0.310/0.235 when the per bin average is used and each is treated as single data points; 0.102/0.151 and 0.086/0.124, respectively, over ocean). Regional means, however, are very similar (0.180/0.193 for all data points and 0.155/0.159 when averaged per normalized bin), as the two factors offset one another. The land/ocean offset is investigated, and discrepancies attributed to interpretation of particle composition and a-priori assignment of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (“lidar ratio”) necessary for retrieving the extinction coefficient from CALIOP signals. Over land, NAAPS indicates more dust present than CALIOP algorithms are identifying, indicating a likely assignment of a higher lidar ratio representative of more absorptive particles. NAAPS resolves more smoke over water than identified with CALIOP, indicating likely usage of a lidar ratio characteristic of less absorptive particles to be applied that biases low AOD there. Over open waters except within the Bay of

  4. A composite L-band HH radar backscattering model for coniferous forest stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoquing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The radar backscattering model developed by Richards et al. (1987), has been improved and further tested in this research. The trunk term may now be calculated from the exact solution to the electromagnetic wave equations instead of the corner reflector equation. Rough surface models have been introduced into the radar model, so that the forward reflectance and the backscattering from the ground surface are now calculated from the same model and, thus, are consistent. The number of trees in an individual pixel is assumed to be Poisson distributed, with tree height in a stand log-normally distributed. The simulated results show that the match of backscattering coefficients for eight forest stands between SIR-B image data and the simulated results are satisfying, and that the trunk term now seems to be convincingly established as the dominant term in the L-band HH radar return from coniferous forest stands.

  5. Measured backscatter and attenuation properties, including polarization effects, of various dispersions at 0.9 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. H.; Flaherty, M. I.; Partin, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The optical properties of a wide variety of atmospheric dispersions were studied using a 0.9-micron lidar system which included a GaAs laser stack transmitter emitting a horizontally polarized beam of 4 milliradians vertical divergence and 1.5 milliradians horizontal divergence. A principal means for assessing optical properties was the polarization ratio, that is, the backscattered radiation power perpendicular to the transmitter beam divided by the backscattered radiation power parallel to the beam polarization. The ratio of the backscattered fraction to the attenuation coefficient was also determined. Data on the dispersion properties of black carbon smoke, road dust, fog, fair-weather cumulus clouds, snow and rain were obtained; the adverse effects of sunlight-induced background noise on the readings is also discussed.

  6. North-south cross sections of the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean from multiwavelength Raman/polarization lidar during Polarstern cruises

    PubMed Central

    Kanitz, T; Ansmann, A; Engelmann, R; Althausen, D

    2013-01-01

    Shipborne aerosol lidar observations were performed aboard the research vessel Polarstern in 2009 and 2010 during three north-south cruises from about 50°N to 50°S. The aerosol data set provides an excellent opportunity to characterize and contrast the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean in the polluted northern and relatively clean southern hemisphere. Three case studies, an observed pure Saharan dust plume, a Patagonian dust plume east of South America, and a case of a mixed dust/smoke plume west of Central Africa are exemplarily shown and discussed by means of their optical properties. The meridional transatlantic cruises were used to determine the latitudinal cross section of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Profiles of particle backscatter and extinction coefficients are presented as mean profiles for latitudinal belts to contrast northern- and southern-hemispheric aerosol loads and optical effects. Results of lidar observations at Punta Arenas (53°S), Chile, and Stellenbosch (34°S), South Africa, are shown and confirm the lower frequency of occurrence of free-tropospheric aerosol in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere. The maximum latitudinal mean AOT of 0.27 was found in the northern tropics (0– 15°N) in the Saharan outflow region. Marine AOT is typically 0.05 ± 0.03. Particle optical properties are presented separately for the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere. Concerning the contrast between the anthropogenically influenced midlatitudinal aerosol conditions in the 30– 60°N belt and the respective belt in the southern hemisphere over the remote Atlantic, it is found that the AOT and extinction coefficients for the vertical column from 0–5km (total aerosol column) and 1–5km height (lofted aerosol above the marine boundary layer) are a factor of 1.6 and 2 higher at northern midlatitudes than at respective southern midlatitudes, and a factor of 2.5 higher than at the clean marine southern

  7. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical properties were observed from 21 to 27 September 2009 over Bozeman, Montana, during a transitional period in which background polluted rural continental aerosols and well-aged biomass-burning aerosols were the dominant aerosol types of extremely fresh biomass-burning aerosols resulting from forest fires burning in the northwestern United States and Canada. Aerosol optical properties and relative humidity profiles were retrieved using an eye-safe micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) (MP-DIAL), a single-channel backscatter lidar, a CIMEL solar radiometer as part of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), a ground-based integrating nephelometer, and aerosol products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua. Aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured during the case study ranged between 0.03 and 0.17 (0.015 and 0.075) at 532 nm (830 nm) as episodic combinations of fresh and aged biomass-burning aerosols dominated the optical depth of the pristinely clean background air. Here, a pristinely clean background refers to very low AOD conditions, not that the aerosol scattering and absorption properties are necessarily representative of a clean aerosol type. Diurnal variability in the aerosol extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa) of the background atmosphere derived from the two lidars, which ranged between 55 and 95 sr (50 and 90 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm), showed good agreement with retrievals from AERONET sun and sky measurements over the same time period but were consistently higher than some aerosol models had predicted. Sa measured during the episodic smoke events ranged on average from 60 to 80 sr (50 to 70 sr) at 532 nm (830 nm) while the very fresh biomass-burning aerosols were shown to exhibit significantly lower Sa ranging between 20 and 40 sr. The shortwave direct radiative forcing that was due to the intrusion of biomass-burning aerosols was calculated to be on average -10 W/m2 and was

  8. Photothermal spectroscopy of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-04-01

    In situ aerosol absorption spectroscopy was performed using two novel photothermal detection schemes. The first, based on a photorefractive effect and coherent detection, called phase fluctuation optical heterodyne (PFLOH) spectroscopy, could, depending on the geometry employed, yield particle specific or particle and gas absorption data. Single particles of graphite as small as 1 ..mu..m were detected in the particle specific mode. In another geometrical configuration, the total absorption (both gas and particle) of submicron sized aerosols of ammonium sulfate particles in equilibrium with gaseous ammonia and water vapor were measured at varying CO/sub 2/ laser frequencies. The specific absorption coefficient for the sulfate ion was measured to be 0.5 m/sup 2//g at 1087 cm/sup -1/. The absorption coefficient sensitivity of this scheme was less than or equal to 10/sup -8/ cm/sup -1/. The second scheme is a hybrid visible Mie scattering scheme incorporating photothermal modulation. Particle specific data on ammonium sulfate droplets were obtained. For chemically identical species, the relative absorption spectrum versus laser frequency can be obtained for polydisperse aerosol distributions directly from the data without the need for complex inverse scattering calculations.

  9. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Q.; Han, Y. X.; Zhao, Q.; Li, J.

    2014-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols.

  10. Dust aerosol radiative effect and forcing over West Africa : A case study from the AMMA SOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, C.; Flamant, C.; Pelon, J.; Cuesta, J.; Chazette, P.; Raut, J. C.

    2009-04-01

    The massive transport of arid dust by the African easterly jet (AEJ) can impact the dynamic of the AEJ and modify the development of westerly African waves through modifications of horizontal temperature gradient. Hence, it is important to evaluate the radiative impact of dust and their effect on thermodynamical properties of the AEJ. In this presentation, the impact of aerosol on solar and infra-red fluxes and the heating rate due to dust over West Africa are investigated using the radiative code STREAMER, as well as space-borne and airborne lidars (CALIPSO and LEANDRE 2, respectively) as well as dropsonde observations acquired during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis Special Observing Period. Aircraft operations were conducted on 13 and 14 June 2006, over Benin and Niger. On these days the dust observed over Benin and Niger originated from the Bodélé depression and from West Sudan. In this study, we use aerosol extinction coefficient derived from lidar, as well as temperature, pressure and water vapour profiles derived from dropsondes as inputs to STREAMER. The surface albedo is obtained with MODIS. A series of runs was carried out on 13 and 14 June 2006, around mid-day, to investigate the dust radiative forcing as a function of latitude, from 6°N to 15°N, i.e. between the vegetated coast of the Guinea Gulf and the arid Sahel. In the solar spectrum, the maximum heating rate associated with the dust plume on these days was comprised between 1.5 K/day and 3 K/day, depending on the aerosol load, over the entire Sudanian and Sahel regions as inferred from CALIPSO. Sensitivity studies to surface albedo, aerosol backscatter-to-extinction ratio, temperature and water vapor mixing ratio profiles were also conducted.

  11. A new constituting lidar network for global aerosol observation and monitoring: Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Sauvage Laurent, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In order to observe and monitoring the direct and indirect impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the radiative transfer and climate changing, it is necessary a continuous worldwide observation of the microphysical aerosol properties. A global observation it is of great support to the actual research in climate and it is a complement in the effort of monitoring trans-boundary pollution, and satellite validation, valorizing the use of lidar and passive sensors networks. In this framework, we have created the LEONET program, a new constituting worldwide network of EZ Lidar™ instruments. These lidars, developed by the French company LEOSPHERE, are compact and rugged eye safe UV Lidars with cross-polarisation detection capabilities, designed to monitor and study the atmospheric vertical structure of aerosols and clouds in a continuous way, night and day, over long time period in order to investigate and contribute to the climate change studies. LEONET output data, in hdf format, have the same architecture of those of NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) and will be soon available to the scientific community through the AERONET data synergy tool which provides ground-based, satellite, and model data products to characterize aerosol optical and microphysical properties, spatial and temporal distribution, transport, and chemical and radiative properties. In this work, it is presented an overview of the LEONET products and methodologies as the backscattering and extinction coefficients; the depolarization ratio, cloud layer heights and subsequent optical depths, provided to the limit of detection capability from a range of 100 m up to 20 km as well as the recent automatic height retrieval method of the different Planetary Boundary Layers (PBL). The retrieval algorithm in the future will be improved integrating, when possible, a measured Lidar ratio by a co-located sun photometer Further are presented some data examples from several diverse sites in the

  12. C-band backscatter signatures of old sea ice in the central Arctic during freeze-up

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstroem, A.; Ulander, L.M.H. . Dept. of Radio and Space Science)

    1993-07-01

    Radar backscatter signatures of old sea ice in the central Arctic have been measured and analyzed. A ship-mounted scatterometer was used to acquire backscattering coefficients at 5.4 GHz in the four linear polarization states and at incidence angles between 20[degree] and 60[degree]. Detailed in situ characterizations of the snow and ice were also made to enable comparison with theoretical backscatter models. Freeze-up conditions were prevalent during the experiments period with air temperatures a few degrees below the freezing point and decreasing. The average backscattering coefficient was found to increase when the temperature of the ice surface layer decreased. The semiempirical backscatter model is used to evaluate the measurements and shows that the backscatter increase is due to an increasing penetration depth causing the volume scattering to increase. In the paper, model predictions also show that both surface and volume scattering contribute significantly for the incidence angles of the ERS-1 SAR, i.e., 20[degree] to 26[degree]. At these incidence angles, the dominating scattering mechanism changes from surface to volume scattering as the ice surface temperature decreases during freeze-up.

  13. Airborne lidar measurements of El Chichon stratospheric aerosols, January 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick; Osborn, M. T.

    1987-01-01

    A lidar-equipped NASA Electra aircraft was flown in January 1984 between the latitude of 38 and 90 deg N. One of the primary purposes of this mission was to determine the spatial distribution and aerosol characteristics of El Chichon produced stratospheric material. Lidar data from that portion of the flight mission between 38 deg N and 77 deg N is presented. Representative profiles of lidar backscatter ratio, a plot of the integral backscattering function versus latitude, and contours of backscatter mixing ratio versus altitude and latitude are given. In addition, tables containing numerical values of the backscatter ratio and backscattering function versus altitude are applied for each profile. These data clearly show that material produced by the El Chichon eruptions of late March-early April 1982 had spread throughout the latitudes covered by this mission, and that the most massive portion of the material resided north of 55 deg N and was concentrated below 17 km in a layer that peaked at 13 to 15 km. In this latitude region, peak backscatter ratios at a wavelength of 0.6943 microns were approximately 3 and the peak integrated backscattering function was about 15 X 10 to the -4/sr corresponding to a peak optical depth of approximately 0.07. This report presents the results of this mission in a ready-to-use format for atmospheric and climatic studies.

  14. Airborne lidar measurements of El Chichon stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1985-01-01

    A NASA Electra airplane, outfitted with a lidar system, was flown in January to February 1983 between the latitudes of 27 deg N and 76 deg N. One of the primary purposes of this mission was to determine the spatial distribution and aerosol characteristics of the El Chichon-produced stratospheric material. This report presents the lidar data from that flight mission. Representative profiles of lidar backscatter ratio, plots of the integrated backscattering function versus latitude, and contours of backscatter mixing ratio versus altitude and latitude are given. It addition, tables containing numerical values of the backscatter ratio and backscattering function versus altitude are supplied for each profile. The largest amount of material produced by the El Chichon eruptions of late March to early April 1982, which was measured by this flight, resided between 35 deg N and 52 deg N. Peak backscatter ratios at a wavelength of 0.6943 micro m decreased from 8 to 10 at the lower latitudes to 3 at the higher latitudes. Backscatter ratio profiles taken while crossing the polar vortex show that the high-altitude material from El Chichon arrived at the north polar region sometime after the winter polar vortex was established. This report presents the results of this mission in a ready-to-use format for atmospheric and climatic studies.

  15. Aerosol profiles determined with lidar and sun-photometer over the Pearl River Delta, China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heese, B.; Althausen, D.; Bauditz, M.; Deng, R.; Bao, R.; Li, Z.

    2012-04-01

    The priority program "Megacities-Megachallenge - Informal Dynamics of Global Change" is a large interdisciplinary project funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). One of the subproject deals with mega-urbanisation in the Pearl River Delta, South-China, with special respect to particulate air pollution and public health. In the frame of this subproject the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties are investigated by measurements with the multiwavelength-Raman-polarization lidar PollyXT of the IfT. The instrument can measure the particle backscatter coefficient at 355 nm, 532 nm, and 1064 nm, the particle extinction coefficients at 355 nm and 532 nm, and the particle linear depolarization ratio at 532 nm. These measurements are supported by a dual-polar sun photometer that provides height integrated data as the aerosol optical depth and the degree of linear depolarization. These instruments are placed at the East campus of the Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. Guangzhou and the Pearl River Delta is a developing area with currently around 11 Million inhabitants. The measurements started in November 2011 and are supposed to continue for at least half a year covering the late autumn and winter season and parts of the spring season. Extensions of the measurements towards a whole seasonal cycle are planned. Thus, different meteorological conditions will lead to particle transport from several source regions. Different aerosol types are expected to be observed during the measurement period: urban particles from local and regional sources as well as dust from the deserts in Central Asia. The observed particles can be distinguished by analyzing their optical properties at several wavelengths. In particular, the depolarization measurements from both instruments promise a better determination of the particle shape.

  16. Effect of species structure and dielectric constant on C-band forest backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Landry, R.; Kilic, O.; Chauhan, N.; Khadr, N.; Leckie, D.

    1993-01-01

    A joint experiment between Canadian and USA research teams was conducted early in Oct. 1992 to determine the effect of species structure and dielectric variations on forest backscatter. Two stands, one red pine and one jack pine, in the Petawawa National Forestry Institute (PNFI) were utilized for the experiment. Extensive tree architecture measurements had been taken by the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) several months earlier by employing a Total Station surveying instrument which provides detailed information on branch structure. A second part of the experiment consisted of cutting down several trees and using dielectric probes to measure branch and needle permittivity values at both sites. The dielectric and the tree geometry data were used in the George Washington University (GWU) Vegetation Model to determine the C band backscattering coefficients of the individual stands for VV polarization. The model results show that backscatter at C band comes mainly from the needles and small branches and the upper portion of the trunks acts only as an attenuator. A discussion of variation of backscatter with specie structure and how dielectric variations in needles for both species may affect the total backscatter returns is provided.

  17. Concentration measurement of yeast suspensions using high frequency ultrasound backscattering.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Luis; Vera, Pedro; Cañadas, Francisco Jesús; Shukla, Shiva Kant; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes the use of an ultrasound based technique to measure the concentration of yeasts in liquid suspension. This measurement was achieved by the detection and quantification of ultrasonic echoes backscattered by the cells. More specifically, the technique was applied to the detection and quantification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A theoretical approach was proposed to get the average density and sound speed of the yeasts, which were found to be 1116 kg/m(3) and 1679 m/s, respectively. These parameters were needed to model the waves backscattered by each single cell. A pulse-echo arrangement working around 50 MHz, being able to detect echoes from single yeasts was used to characterize experimentally yeast solutions from 10(2) to 10(7)cells/ml. The Non-negative Matrix Factorization denoising technique was applied for data analysis. This technique required a previous learning of the spectral patterns of the echoes reflected from yeasts in solution and the base noise from the liquid medium. Comparison between pulse correlation (without denoising) and theoretical and experimental pattern learning was made to select the best signal processing. A linear relation between ultrasound output and concentration was obtained with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.996 for the experimental learning. Concentrations from 10(4) to 10(7)cells/ml were detected above the base noise. These results show the viability of using the ultrasound backscattering technique to detect yeasts and measure their concentration in liquid cultures, improving the sensitivity obtained using spectrophotometric methods by one order of magnitude.

  18. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  19. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  20. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  1. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, P H; Ylärinne, J H; Lammi, M J; Saarakkala, S; Tiitu, V; Kröger, H; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-11-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT.

  2. The effect of inhomogeneous roughness on radar backscattering from slightly deformed sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Dierking, W.; Carlstroem, A.; Ulander, L.M.H.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the spatially varying backscattering signature of an area of refrozen brash ice observed by a ship based scatterometer. The measurements were carried out as part of the Baltic Experiment for ERS-1 in 1994. The scatterometer was operated at 5.4 GHz at different incidence angles and polarizations. By analyzing the scatterometer data over azimuth scans, it was found that the backscattering variabilities are not only due to fading but also contain a textural component. Surface height profiles were measured using a laser. The observed ice surface roughness was nonstationary over the measurement area. The ice surface can be approximated by adjacent patches of stationary roughness with patch dimensions of about 4.5 m. From the roughness spectra of different stationary patches, two roughness classes can be distinguished. The implications of estimating the roughness parameters from relatively short profile lengths is discussed and the effect on theoretical predictions of the backscattering coefficient is investigated. The texture variance is evaluated theoretically on the basis of the simulated backscattering coefficients of the two observed roughness classes and is found to compare with the scatterometer data.

  3. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  4. Control of collective FSBS and backscatter SRS through plasma composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Harvey; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Nominal NIF parameters are near the collective forward SBS (FSBS) threshold (P. M. Lushnikov and H. A. Rose, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255003 (2004), ``L&R''). It will be shown that being on this instability edge can be used as a control lever: a small amount of high Z dopant may lead to qualitative change in FSBS regime at fixed laser intensity, possibly reducing backscatter instability losses (Such results have already been observed, but absent SSD, a key aspect of our theory: R. M. Stevenson et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2709 (2004); L. J. Suter et al., 2738, ib.). Ponderomotive FSBS regimes are determined by the parameter I=F^2( vosc / vosc ve . - ve )^2( ne / ne nc . - nc ) / ( ne / ne nc . - nc ) ν . - ν, with ν the dimensionless ion acoustic damping coefficient and F the optic f/#. Analytical results will be presented which show a decrease of I1pt's threshold value through the addition of high Z dopant to low Z plasma, owing to increased thermal contribution to FSBS. Alternatively, one may raise the threshold by managing the value of νby, e.g., adding He to SiO2. For nominal NIF parameters, a range of He fraction in SiO2 plasma is predicted to suppress backscatter SRS while maintaining control of forward SBS.

  5. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing Based on Combined A-Train Observations: Towards All-sky Estimates and Attribution to Aerosol Type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Russell, P.; Vaughan, M.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, C.; Rogers, R.; Burton, S.; Livingston, J.; Torres, O.; Remer, L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a technique for combining CALIOP aerosol backscatter, MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), and OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) measurements for the purpose of estimating full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately for calculating the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative forcing. We present results using one year of data collected in 2007 and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. Initial calculations of seasonal clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing based on our multi-sensor aerosol retrievals compare well with over-ocean and top of the atmosphere IPCC-2007 model-based results, and with more recent assessments in the "Climate Change Science Program Report: Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts" (2009). We discuss some of the challenges that exist in extending our clear-sky results to all-sky conditions. On the basis of comparisons to suborbital measurements, we present some of the limitations of the MODIS and CALIOP retrievals in the presence of adjacent or underlying clouds. Strategies for meeting these challenges are discussed. We also discuss a methodology for using the multi-sensor aerosol retrievals for aerosol type classification based on advanced clustering techniques. The combination of research results permits conclusions regarding the attribution of aerosol radiative forcing to aerosol type.

  6. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  7. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  8. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction,more » it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.« less

  9. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  10. A comparison of measured and calculated optical properties of atmospheric aerosols at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of 10.6-micron lidar backscatter were compared with calculated backscatter based on nearly simultaneous observations of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol size distributions. It was found that there is better agreement in the troposphere, even though the uncertainties of the calculation are greater for this region due to the variables in both the spatial concentration and the physical makeup of the aerosol. A second comparison study was made to test the consistency of the mean tropospheric extinction values at 1.02 micron (as reported by the SAGE satellite) with the values calculated from an ensemble of 400 measured size distributions thought to be representative of midcontinental tropospheric aerosol. The two methods produce consistent results within the expected degree of uncertainty. The ensemble of 400 'proven' size distributions is then used to calculate a statistical relationship between the 1.02-micron extinction and the 10.6-micron backscatter.

  11. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  12. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  13. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  14. Microwave backscattering and emission model for grass canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Lang, Roger H.; Levine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-layer model is developed that treats the grass canopy as a collection of randomly oriented elliptical dielectric discs over a layer of thatch with underlying soil surface. The distorted Born approximation in conjunction with the Peake formulation is used to calculate the backscattering coefficient and the emissivity from the canopy. Two particular features of this model which are unique for grass canopies are the variation of the canopy structure and the presence of the thatch layer. The basic parameters in the model such as the size and orientation of grass blades, dielectric constant of soil and vegetation, and thickness and water content of the thatch layer have been obtained from ground truth data. To interpret the available experimental observations of grasslands, numerical results from both passive and active models at L-band (1.4 GHz) are generated and various scattering and emission properties of the grass canopies are discussed.

  15. Light Absorption in the Stratosphere: Trend, Soot Aerosol Concentration and Contribution by...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Verma, S.; Strwwa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Hamill, P.; Vay, S.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The light absorption coefficient, Beta(a) of the stratospheric aerosol is an important quantity that determines its radiative effects. When combined with the aerosol scattering coefficient, Beta(a) it becomes possible to evaluate the aerosol single scatter albedo, omega = Beta(s)/(Beta(s) + Beta(a)) which is essential for modeling the overall radiative effects of the stratospheric aerosol. Pollack1 determined that omega = 0.98 is a critical value that separates stratospheric cooling from warming.

  16. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  17. Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2001-06-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

  18. A three-part geometric model to predict the radar backscatter from wheat, corn, and sorghum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Eger, G. W., III; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1982-01-01

    A model to predict the radar backscattering coefficient from crops must include the geometry of the canopy. Radar and ground-truth data taken on wheat in 1979 indicate that the model must include contributions from the leaves, from the wheat head, and from the soil moisture. For sorghum and corn, radar and ground-truth data obtained in 1979 and 1980 support the necessity of a soil moisture term and a leaf water term. The Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an appropriate input for the leaf contribution to the radar response for wheat and sorghum, however the LAI generates less accurate values for the backscattering coefficient for corn. Also, the data for corn and sorghum illustrate the importance of the water contained in the stalks in estimating the radar response.

  19. A backscatter model for a randomly perturbed periodic surface. [furrowed soils in agricultural fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Kouyate, F.; Fung, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    A backscatter model for a randomly perturbed periodic surface has been developed to explain backscatter measurements from a bare soil surface with row structure. It is assumed that the row-direction effect can be included by integrating the scattering coefficient due to the random roughness component over the underlying periodic component of the soil surface. It is found that the row-direction effect is strongly dependent upon the rate of change of this scattering coefficient with the local angle, and that the maximum difference between looking parallel and perpendicular to the row direction occurs around an incidence angle whose tangent is equal to the slope of the periodic surface at the inflection point.

  20. Backscattering and vegetation water content response of paddy crop at C-band using RISAT-1 satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Prasad, Rajendra; Choudhary, Arti; Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Narayan Mishra, Varun; Srivastava, Prashant K.

    2016-04-01

    The study about the temporal behaviour of vegetation water content (VWC) is essential for monitoring the growth of a crop to improve agricultural production. In agriculture, VWC could possibly provide information that can be used to infer water stress for irrigation decisions, vegetation health conditions, aid in yield estimation and assessment of drought conditions (Penuelas et al., 1993). The VWC is an important parameter for soil moisture retrieval in microwave remote sensing (Srivastava et al., 2014). In the present study, the backscattering and VWC response of paddy crop has been investigated using medium resolution (MRS) radar imaging satellite-1 (RISAT-1) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in Varanasi, India. The VWC of paddy crop was measured at its five different growth stages started from 15 July 2013 to 23 October 2013 from the transplanting to maturity stage during Kharif season. The whole life of paddy crop was divided into three different major growth stages like vegetative stage, reproductive stage and ripening stage. During vegetative stage, the backscattering coefficients were found increasing behaviour until the leaves became large and dense due to major contribution of stems and the interaction between the stems and water underneath the paddy crop. During reproductive stage, the backscattering coefficients were found to increase slowly due to random scattering by vertical leaves. The increase in the size of leaves cause to cover most of the spaces between plants resulted to quench the contributions from the stems and the water underneath. At the maturity stage, the backscattering showed its decreasing behaviour. The VWC of paddy crop was found increasing up to vegetative to reproductive stages (28 September 2013) and then started decreasing during the ripening (maturity) stage. Similar behaviour was obtained between backscattering coefficients and VWC that showed an increasing trend from vegetative to reproductive stage and then lowering down at

  1. Evidence of seasonally dependent stratosphere-troposphere exchange and purging of lower stratospheric aerosol from a multiyear lidar data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol backscatter data obtained from a calibrated backscatter lidar at Pasadena, California (34 deg N latitude) over the 1984-1993 period clearly indicate tightly coupled aerosol optical properties in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the winter and early spring, due to the active midlatitude stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) exchange processes occurring at this time of year. Lidar data indicate that during pre-Pinaturbo background conditions, the subsequent purging of the aerosol in the upper troposphere caused a significant reduction in the aerosol content throughout the 8 - 18 km altitude region in the early spring period. The post-Pinatubo evidence of intense exchange in the winter and early spring is a significant increase in the upper tropospheric aerosol content, such that the backscatter levels reach values nearly equivalent to the enhanced backscatter levels existing in the lower stratosphere. The calculated stratospheric mass extrusion rate is consistent with a 45-day lifetime of lower stratospheric aerosol during this part of the year, which implies that midlatitude ST exchange is a significant sink for stratospheric aerosol.

  2. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    the aerosol constituents. We have also demonstrated that LW aerosol radiative forcing is somewhat sensitive to the water vapor content in the atmosphere, and increases with the dryness of the atmosphere. This evidence supports our argument that the Great Basin area of the USA, which usually has extremely dry atmospheric conditions, can be an appropriate place to study the dry-desert aerosol climate forcing in a regional scale. An analysis of aerosol IR backscattering shows that the effect significantly contributes to both the BOA and TOA IR forcings, even if the aerosols do not exhibit absorption at all in the thermal IR. The general LW radiative forcing is, therefore, associated with both the absorption and scattering effects of the aerosols. Neglecting LW scattering will result in an underestimation of LW radiative forcing by aerosols. Finally, the discrepancy between the FTIR-observed and modeled radiance with aerosols indicates a significant uncertainty, which demands further research on the LW optical properties of fine and coarse mode aerosol.

  3. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  4. Study of diffusion of indocyanine green as a photodynamic dye into skin using backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2014-07-01

    One of the lines of development of modern medicine is theranostics consisting in simultaneous diagnosis and laser treatment with the use of multifunctional agents such as fluorescent indocyanine green that has photodynamic and photothermal properties. Diffusion of indocyanine green dissolved in water and aqueous solutions of alcohols (glycerol, propylene glycol and ethanol) into the dermis is studied by using backscattering spectroscopy. The coefficients of the dye diffusion into the dermis are obtained for the first time by using these solvents.

  5. Study of diffusion of indocyanine green as a photodynamic dye into skin using backscattering spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Genina, E A; Bashkatov, A N; Tuchin, V V

    2014-07-31

    One of the lines of development of modern medicine is theranostics consisting in simultaneous diagnosis and laser treatment with the use of multifunctional agents such as fluorescent indocyanine green that has photodynamic and photothermal properties. Diffusion of indocyanine green dissolved in water and aqueous solutions of alcohols (glycerol, propylene glycol and ethanol) into the dermis is studied by using backscattering spectroscopy. The coefficients of the dye diffusion into the dermis are obtained for the first time by using these solvents. (laser biophotonics)

  6. Impact of Tropospheric Aerosol Absorption on Ozone Retrieval from buv Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of tropospheric aerosols on the retrieval of column ozone amounts using spaceborne measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation is examined. Using radiative transfer calculations, we show that uv-absorbing desert dust may introduce errors as large as 10% in ozone column amount, depending on the aerosol layer height and optical depth. Smaller errors are produced by carbonaceous aerosols that result from biomass burning. Though the error is produced by complex interactions between ozone absorption (both stratospheric and tropospheric), aerosol scattering, and aerosol absorption, a surprisingly simple correction procedure reduces the error to about 1%, for a variety of aerosols and for a wide range of aerosol loading. Comparison of the corrected TOMS data with operational data indicates that though the zonal mean total ozone derived from TOMS are not significantly affected by these errors, localized affects in the tropics can be large enough to seriously affect the studies of tropospheric ozone that are currently undergoing using the TOMS data.

  7. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Cermak, Jan

    2014-05-01

    This study determines the spatial and temporal distribution of regions with frequent aerosol-cloud interactions (aci) and identifies their meteorological determinants based on CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) data products. Atmospheric aerosols influence the microphysical structure of clouds, while both also respond to meteorological conditions. The potential radiative adjustments to changes in a cloud system associated with aerosol-cloud interactions are grouped and termed as effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions (ERFaci). It is difficult to distinguish, to what extent radiative forcing and precipitation patterns of clouds are a result of cloud feedbacks to aerosols or the existing meteorological conditions. A complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-meteorology interactions is crucial as the uncertainty range of ERFaci in climate change modeling could be significantly reduced. In the present study it is suggested that presence of hydrated aerosols is an implication for aci. Knowledge of their vertical and horizontal distribution and frequency over the globe would be important for understanding ERFaci. To identify regions with aerosol-cloud transitions the CAD score (cloud-aerosol discrimination) of the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is used. It separates aerosols and clouds according to the probability distribution functions of 5 parameters (attenuated backscatter, total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, altitude and latitude) and assigns the likelihood of cloud or aerosol presence. This parameter is used to calculate relative frequencies of aci on a global scale from 2006 to 2013.

  8. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  9. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  10. Visualization of x-ray backscatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Greenawald, E.C.; Ham, Y.S.; Poranski, C.F. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Of the several processes which occur when x-rays interact with matter, Compton scattering is dominant in the range of energies commonly used in industrial radiography. The Compton interaction between an x-ray photon and a free or outer shell electron causes the electron to recoil and the photon to be propagated in a new direction with a reduced energy. Regardless of the incident beam energy, some photons are always scattered in the backwards direction. The potential for determining material properties by the detection of x-ray backscatter has been recognized for years. Although work in this area has been eclipsed by the rapid development of computerized tomography (CT), a variety of industrial backscatter imaging techniques and applications have been demonstrated. Backscatter inspection is unique among x-ray methods in its applicability with access to only one side of the object. The authors are currently developing the application of x-ray backscatter tomography (XBT) to the inspection of steel-reinforced rubber sonar domes on US Navy vessels. In this paper, the authors discuss the visualization methods they use to interpret the XBT data. They present images which illustrate the capability of XBT as applied to sonar domes and a variety of other materials and objects. They also demonstrate and discuss the use of several data visualization software products.

  11. Laser Forward and Backscattering in Particulate Media,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    puissance jdoit Itre beaucoup plus petite qua l’unitG. Tor T ~ ~ ITI GRa vTT TPS’~ UNCLASSIFIED TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF SYMBOLS...ktnown effects of the mltiple-scattering phenomenon, in parti- cular its greater influence on the backscatter than on the transmission measurements

  12. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  13. Laissez-Faire : Fully Asymmetric Backscatter Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan; Zhang, Pengyu; Ganesan, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Backscatter provides dual-benefits of energy harvesting and low-power communication, making it attractive to a broad class of wireless sensors. But the design of a protocol that enables extremely power-efficient radios for harvesting-based sensors as well as high-rate data transfer for data-rich sensors presents a conundrum. In this paper, we present a new fully asymmetric backscatter communication protocol where nodes blindly transmit data as and when they sense. This model enables fully flexible node designs, from extraordinarily power-efficient backscatter radios that consume barely a few micro-watts to high-throughput radios that can stream at hundreds of Kbps while consuming a paltry tens of micro-watts. The challenge, however, lies in decoding concurrent streams at the reader, which we achieve using a novel combination of time-domain separation of interleaved signal edges, and phase-domain separation of colliding transmissions. We provide an implementation of our protocol, LF-Backscatter, and show that it can achieve an order of magnitude or more improvement in throughput, latency and power over state-of-art alternatives. PMID:28286885

  14. A Compact Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar for Observations of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John W.; Cook, Anthony L.

    2002-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a nadir-viewing, aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) at NASA Langley Research Center. The system is designed to measure backscatter and extinction of aerosols and tenuous clouds. The primary uses of the instrument will be to validate spaceborne aerosol and cloud observations, carry out regional process studies, and assess the predictions of chemical transport models. In this paper, we provide an overview of the instrument design and present the results of simulations showing the instrument's capability to accurately measure extinction and extinction-to-backscatter ratio.

  15. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  16. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  17. Coherent beam combining in atmospheric channels using gated backscatter.

    PubMed

    Naeh, Itay; Katzir, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces the concept of atmospheric channels and describes a possible approach for the coherent beam combining of lasers of an optical phased array (OPA) in a turbulent atmosphere. By using the recently introduced sparse spectrum harmonic augmentation method, a comprehensive simulative investigation was performed and the exceptional properties of the atmospheric channels were numerically demonstrated. Among the interesting properties are the ability to guide light in a confined manner in a refractive channel, the ability to gather different sources to the same channel, and the ability to maintain a constant relative phase within the channel between several sources. The newly introduced guiding properties combined with a suggested method for channel probing and phase measurement by aerosol backscattered radiation allows coherence improvement of the phased array's elements and energy refocusing at the location of the channel in order to increase power in the bucket without feedback from the target. The method relies on the electronic focusing, electronic scanning, and time gating of the OPA, combined with elements of the relative phase measurements.

  18. Vertical profiling of Asian dust with multi-wavelength aerosol depolarization Raman lidar in Gwangju, Korea during DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Mueller, D.; Noh, Y.; Shin, S.; Kim, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) campaign, which was carried out in Korea from March to May 2013, aimed at validating satellite remote sensing data of aerosol optical and microphysical parameters. Anthropogenic pollution and Asian dust from the East Asian Mainland prevailed over the Korean peninsula during the DRAGON campaign. Validation of the data products requires knowledge on the vertical distribution of aerosol pollution and the knowledge of aerosol types, e.g., urban haze and dust. For this purpose we operated a multi-wavelength aerosol depolarization Raman lidar on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) in Gwangju, Korea (35.10° N, 126.53° E). The system provides us with particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, and the linear particle depolarization ratio at 532nm. Two upgraded sun photometers of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) with improved capabilities for dust measurements were also deployed. In our contribution we will present optical properties of Asian dust on the basis of lidar and sun photometer observations. One sun photometer was equipped with a measurement channel at 1640 nm channel and the second sun photometer carried out polarization measurements. Data could be collected on thirty-eight days We analyzed the geometrical and optical properties of Asian dust on the basis of backward trajectories in order to identify the main source regions of the observed dust layers. The height resolved statistical analysis of the DRAGON dataset reveals that the geometrical depth of the Asian dust layers was between 1 km and 4 km in 72% of all cases. Geometrical depths above 4 km were found in 20% of all cases. We found geometrical depths of 10 km in 3.3% of all cases. The vertical distribution of the dust layers was typically located in two different heights. In 51.5% of the measurements we observed Asian dust between 4 and 11km

  19. Exploring a geophysical process-based attribution technique for the determination of the atmospheric boundary layer depth using aerosol lidar and near-surface meteorological measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sandip; Haeffelin, Martial; Batchvarova, Ekaterina

    2013-08-01

    A new objective method for the determination of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depth using routine vertically pointing aerosol lidar measurements is presented. A geophysical process-based analysis is introduced to improve the attribution of the lidar-derived aerosol gradients, which is so far the most challenging part in any gradient-based technique. Using micrometeorological measurements of Obukhov length scale, both early morning and evening transition periods are determined which help separate the turbulence regimes during well-mixed convective ABL and nocturnal/stable ABL. The lidar-derived aerosol backscatter signal intensity is used to determine the hourly-averaged vertical profiles of variance of the fluctuations of particle backscatter signal providing the location of maximum turbulent mixing within the ABL; thus, obtained mean ABL depth guides the attribution by searching for the appropriate minimum of the gradients. An empirical classification of the ABL stratification patterns into three different types is proposed by determining the changes in the near-surface stability scenarios. First results using the lidar observations obtained between March and July in 2011 at SIRTA atmospheric observatory near Palaiseau (Paris suburb) in France demonstrate that the new attribution technique makes the lidar estimations of ABL depth more physically reliable under a wide spectrum of meteorological conditions. While comparing lidar and nearby radiosonde measurements of ABL depths, an excellent concordance was found with a correlation coefficient of 0.968 and 0.927 for daytime and nighttime measurements, respectively. A brief climatology of the characteristics of the ABL depth, its diurnal cycle, a detailed discussion of the morning and evening transitions are presented.

  20. Aerosols and lightning activity: The effect of vertical profile and aerosol type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Price, C.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite has been utilized for the first time in a study regarding lightning activity modulation due to aerosols. Lightning activity observations, obtained by the ZEUS long range Lightning Detection Network, European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) data and Cloud Fraction (CF) retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite have been combined with CALIPSO CALIOP data over the Mediterranean basin and for the period March to November, from 2007 to 2014. The results indicate that lightning activity is enhanced during days characterized by higher Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values, compared to days with no lightning. This study contributes to existing studies on the link between lightning activity and aerosols, which have been based just on columnar AOD satellite retrievals, by performing a deeper analysis into the effect of aerosol profiles and aerosol types. Correlation coefficients of R = 0.73 between the CALIPSO AOD and the number of lightning strikes detected by ZEUS and of R = 0.93 between ECMWF CAPE and lightning activity are obtained. The analysis of extinction coefficient values at 532 nm indicates that at an altitudinal range exists, between 1.1 km and 2.9 km, where the values for extinction coefficient of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases are statistically significantly different. Finally, based on the CALIPSO aerosol subtype classification, we have investigated the aerosol conditions of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases. According to the results polluted dust aerosols are more frequently observed during non-lightning-active days, while dust and smoke aerosols are more abundant in the atmosphere during the lightning-active days.