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Sample records for aerosol backscatter cross

  1. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  2. Backscatter signatures of biological aerosols in the infrared.

    PubMed

    Thrush, Evan; Salciccioli, Nicolas; Brown, David M; Siegrist, Karen; Brown, Andrea M; Thomas, Michael E; Boggs, Nathan; Carter, Christopher C

    2012-04-20

    To develop a deeper understanding of the optical signatures of both biological aerosols and potential interferents, we made field measurements of optical cross sections and compared them to model-based predictions. We measured aerosol cross sections by conducting a hard-target calibration of a light detection and ranging system (LIDAR) based on the Frequency Agile Laser (FAL). The elastic backscatter cross sections are estimated at 19 long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths spanning the range from 9.23 to 10.696 μm. The theoretical modeling of the elastic backscatter cross sections is based on the measured refractive index and size distribution of the aerosols, which are used as inputs into Mie calculations. Both model calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement and also indicate the presence of spectral features based on single particle absorption in the backscatter cross sections that can be used as a basis for discrimination for both standoff and point sensors. PMID:22534887

  3. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  4. Design and performance measurements of an airborne aerosol backscatter lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.; Brothers, Alan M.; Dermenjian, Stephen H.; Esproles, Carlos

    1990-01-01

    The global winds measurement application of coherent Doppler lidar requires intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. An airborne backscatter lidar is discussed, which has been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. The instrument characteristics and representative flight measurement results are presented.

  5. Visible and near infrared observation on the Global Aerosol Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Chudamani, S.; Bufton, Jack L.; Sullivan, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Aerosol Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) was intended to provide data on prevailing values of atmospheric backscatter cross-section. The primary intent was predicting the performance of spaceborne lidar systems, most notably the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) for the Earth Observing System (EOS). The second and related goal was to understand the source and characteristics of atmospheric aerosol particles. From the GLOBE flights, extensive data was obtained on the structure of clouds and the marine planetary boundary layer. A notable result for all observations is the consistency of the large increases in the aerosol scattering ratio for the marine boundary layer. Other results are noted.

  6. Aerosol optical properties of the free troposphere: Tropospheric backscatter climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, James M.

    1994-12-01

    A unique ensemble of aerosol sensors (backscattersondes, nephelometers and particle counters) has been assembled during the course of this research to obtain new measurements relating to the optical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere, especially in the free troposphere. A knowledge of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio has been greatly enhanced as a result of this project and the inference of representative values along with the range of variation is now possible. Agreement between the optical model results and actual measurements appears to be quite satisfactory. An initial climatology of aerosol backscatter in the free troposphere has been developed and is in general agreement with results and inferences from global remote sensing instruments. However, the data from remote sensors may indicate a larger influence of volcanic aerosols on the upper troposphere than actually exists. Further work with high resolution soundings is needed to fully resolve this issue.

  7. Aerosol Lidar for the Relative Backscatter Amplification Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.; Nadeev, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter amplification presents only in a turbulent atmosphere, when the laser beam is propagates twice through the same inhomogeneities. We proposed technical solution to detect backscatter amplification. An aerosol micro pulse lidar with a beam expansion via receiving telescope was built to study this effect. Our system allows simultaneous detection of two returns from the same scattering volume: exactly on the axis of the laser beam and off the axis.

  8. Estimating the backscatter spectral dependence and relative concentration for multiple aerosol materials from lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.

    2004-08-01

    Detection and estimation of materials in the atmosphere by lidar has heretofore required that the spectral dependence of the relevant cross section coefficients -- backscatter in the case of aerosols and absorptivity for vapors -- be known in advance. While this typically is a reasonable assumption in the case of vapor, the aerosol backscatter coefficients are complicated functions of particle size, shape, and refractive index, and are therefore usually not well characterized a priori. Using incorrect parameters will give biased concentration estimates and impair discrimination ability. This paper describes an approach for estimating both the spectral dependence of the aerosol backscatter and relative concentration range-dependence of a set of materials using multi-wavelength lidar. The approach is based on state-space filtering that applies a Kalman filter in range for concentration, and updates the backscatter spectral estimates through a sequential least-squares algorithm at each time step. The method is illustrated on aerosol-release data of the bio-simulant ovalbumin collected by ECBC during field tests in 2002, as well as synthetic data sets.

  9. Comparison of Modeled Backscatter using Measured Aerosol Microphysics with Focused CW Lidar Data over Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1997-01-01

    During NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) II flight mission over the Pacific Ocean in May-June 1990, extensive aerosol backscatter data sets from two continuous wave, focused CO2 Doppler lidars and an aerosol microphysics data set from a laser optical particle counter (LOPC) were obtained. Changes in aerosol loading in various air masses with associated changes in chemical composition, from sulfuric acid and sulfates to dustlike crustal material, significantly affected aerosol backscatter, causing variation of about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Some of the significant backscatter features encountered in different air masses were the low backscatter in subtropical air with even lower values in the tropics near the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), highly variable backscatter in the ITCZ, mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode, and high backscatter in an Asian dust plume off the Japanese coast. Differences in aerosol composition and backscatter for northern and southern hemisphere also were observed. Using the LOPC measurements of physical and chemical aerosol properties, we determined the complex refractive index from three different aerosol mixture models to calculate backscatter. These values provided a well-defined envelope of modeled backscatter for various atmospheric conditions, giving good agreement with the lidar data over a horizontal sampling of approximately 18000 km in the mid-troposphere.

  10. Multiwavelength Comparison of Modeled and Measured Remote Tropospheric Aerosol Backscatter Over Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol concentrations and size distributions in the middle and upper troposphere over the remote Pacific Ocean were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. The FSSP size channels were recalibrated based on refractive index estimates from flight-level aerosol volatility measurements with a collocated laser optical particle counter (LOPC). The recalibrated FSSP size distributions were averaged over 100-s intervals, fitted with lo-normal distributions and used to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients at selected wavelengths. The FSSP-derived backscatter estimates were averaged over 300-s intervals to reduce large random fluctuations. The smoothed FSSP aerosol backscatter coefficients were then compared with LOPC-derived backscatter values and with backscatter measured at or near flight level from four lidar systems operating at 0.53, 1.06, 9.11, 9.25, and 10.59 micrometers. Agreement between FSSP-derived and lidar-measured backscatter was generally best at flight level in homogeneous aerosol fields and at high backscatter values. FSSP data often underestimated low backscatter values especially at the longer wavelengths due to poor counting statistics for larger particles (greater than 0.8 micrometers diameter) that usually dominate aerosol backscatter at these wavelengths. FSSP data also underestimated backscatter at shorter wavelengths when particles smaller than the FSSP lower cutoff diameter (0.35 micrometers) made significant contributions to the total backscatter.

  11. Ozone and Aerosol Retrieval from Backscattered Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the techniques to estimate total column ozone and aerosol absorption optical depth from the measurements of backscattered ultraviolet (buv) radiation. The total ozone algorithm has been used to create a unique record of the ozone layer, spanning more than 3 decades, from a series of instruments (BUV, SBUV, TOMS, SBUV/2) flown on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and Russian satellites. We will discuss how this algorithm can be considered a generalization of the well-known Dobson/Brewer technique that has been used to process data from ground-based instruments for many decades, and how it differs from the DOAS techniques that have been used to estimate vertical column densities of a host of trace gases from data collected by GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments. The BUV aerosol algorithm is most suitable for the detection of UV absorbing aerosols (smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash) and is the only technique that can detect aerosols embedded in clouds. This algorithm has been used to create a quarter century record of aerosol absorption optical depth using the BUV data collected by a series of TOMS instruments. We will also discuss how the data from the OM1 instrument launched on July 15,2004 will be combined with data from MODIS and CALIPSO lidar data to enhance the accuracy and information content of satellite-derived aerosol measurements. The OM1 and MODIS instruments are currently flying on EOS Aura and EOS Aqua satellites respectively, part of a constellation of satellites called the "A-train". The CALIPSO satellite is expected to join this constellation in mid 2005.

  12. Use of rotational Raman measurements in multiwavelength aerosol lidar for evaluation of particle backscattering and extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, I.; Whiteman, D. N.; Korenskiy, M.; Suvorina, A.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.

    2015-10-01

    Vibrational Raman scattering from nitrogen is commonly used in aerosol lidars for evaluation of particle backscattering (β) and extinction (α) coefficients. However, at mid-visible wavelengths, particularly in the daytime, previous measurements have possessed low signal-to-noise ratio. Also, vibrational scattering is characterized by a significant frequency shift of the Raman component, so for the calculation of α and β information about the extinction Ångström exponent is needed. Simulation results presented in this study demonstrate that ambiguity in the choice of Ångström exponent can be the a significant source of uncertainty in the calculation of backscattering coefficients when optically thick aerosol layers are considered. Both of these issues are addressed by the use of pure-rotational Raman (RR) scattering, which is characterized by a higher cross section compared to nitrogen vibrational scattering, and by a much smaller frequency shift, which essentially removes the sensitivity to changes in the Ångström exponent. We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.5 % in the 230-300 K range, making correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics are given.

  13. [Obtaining aerosol backscattering coefficient using pure rotational Raman-Mie scattering spectrum].

    PubMed

    Rong, Wei; Chen, Si-Ying; Zhang, Yin-Chao; Chen, He; Guo, Pan

    2012-11-01

    Both the traditional Klett and Fernald methods used to obtain atmospheric aerosol backscattering coefficient require the hypothesis of relationship between the extinction coefficient and backscattering coefficient, and this will bring error. According to the theory that the pure rotational Raman backscattering coefficient is only related to atmospheric temperature and pressure, a new method is presented for inverting aerosol backscattering coefficient, which needed the intensity of elastic scattering and rotational Raman combined with atmospheric temperature and pressure obtained with the sounding balloons in this article. This method can not only eliminate the errors of the traditional Klett and Fernald methods caused by the hypothesis, but also avoid the error caused by the correction of the overlap. Finally, the aerosol backscattering coefficient was acquired by using this method and the data obtained via the Raman-Mie scattering Lidar of our lab. And the result was compared with that of Klett and Fernald. PMID:23387171

  14. Vertical Aerosol Backscatter Variability from an Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a continuous wave focused Doppler lidar at 9.1 micron wavelength were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during 13 - 26 September, 1995 as part of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission on board the NASA DC8 aircraft. Backscatter variability was measured for approximately 52 flight hours, covering equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 25,000 km in the troposphere. Quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents which ranged between approximately 0.1 to 12.0 km altitude. Aerosol haze layers were encountered at different altitudes. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and over ocean were observed. A mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was found with modal value approximately 1O(exp -10)/m/sr, consistent with previous airborne and ground-based datasets.

  15. Powerful eyesafe infrared aerosol lidar: Application of stimulated Raman backscattering of 1.06 micron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnuth, W.; Trickl, T.

    1994-11-01

    Usually, lidar investigations of light backscattering and extinction by aerosols are most commonly carried out near infrared. In the study, the background noise from Rayleigh backscattering is substantially reduced, there is a sufficiently large number of wavelength windows with high atmospheric transmittance, powerful pulsed laser sources exist, and efficient detectors are available.

  16. Simulation of multistatic and backscattering cross sections for airborne radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Albert W.

    1986-07-01

    In order to determine susceptibilities of airborne radar to electronic countermeasures and electronic counter-countermeasures simulations of multistatic and backscattering cross sections were developed as digital modules in the form of algorithms. Cross section algorithms are described for prolate (cigar shape) and oblate (disk shape) spheroids. Backscattering cross section algorithms are also described for different categories of terrain. Backscattering cross section computer programs were written for terrain categorized as vegetation, sea ice, glacial ice, geological (rocks, sand, hills, etc.), oceans, man-made structures, and water bodies. PROGRAM SIGTERRA is a file for backscattering cross section modules of terrain (TERRA) such as vegetation (AGCROP), oceans (OCEAN), Arctic sea ice (SEAICE), glacial snow (GLASNO), geological structures (GEOL), man-made structures (MAMMAD), or water bodies (WATER). AGCROP describes agricultural crops, trees or forests, prairies or grassland, and shrubs or bush cover. OCEAN has the SLAR or SAR looking downwind, upwind, and crosswind at the ocean surface. SEAICE looks at winter ice and old or polar ice. GLASNO is divided into a glacial ice and snow or snowfields. MANMAD includes buildings, houses, roads, railroad tracks, airfields and hangars, telephone and power lines, barges, trucks, trains, and automobiles. WATER has lakes, rivers, canals, and swamps. PROGRAM SIGAIR is a similar file for airborne targets such as prolate and oblate spheroids.

  17. Retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction from airborne coherent Doppler wind lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Groß, S.; Rahm, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Toledano, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2015-07-01

    A novel method for calibration and quantitative aerosol optical property retrieval from Doppler wind lidars (DWLs) is presented in this work. Due to the strong wavelength dependence of the atmospheric molecular backscatter and the low sensitivity of the coherent DWLs to spectrally broad signals, calibration methods for aerosol lidars cannot be applied to coherent DWLs usually operating at wavelengths between 1.5 and 2 μm. Instead, concurrent measurements of an airborne DWL at 2 μm and the POLIS ground-based aerosol lidar at 532 nm are used in this work, in combination with sun photometer measurements, for the calibration and retrieval of aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles at 532 nm. The proposed method was applied to measurements from the SALTRACE experiment in June-July 2013, which aimed at quantifying the aerosol transport and change in aerosol properties from the Sahara desert to the Caribbean. The retrieved backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles from the airborne DWL are within 20 % of POLIS aerosol lidar and CALIPSO satellite measurements. Thus the proposed method extends the capabilities of coherent DWLs to measure profiles of the horizontal and vertical wind towards aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles, which is of high benefit for aerosol transport studies.

  18. Atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements using a tunable coherent CO2 lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Kavaya, M. J.; Flamant, P. H.; Haner, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscatter coefficients, using a coherent CO2 lidar at 9.25- and 10.6-micron wavelengths, are described. Vertical profiles of the volume backscatter coefficient beta have been measured to a 10-km altitude over the Pasadena, CA, region. These measurements indicate a wide range of variability in beta both in and above the local boundary layer. Certain profiles also indicate a significant enhancement in beta at the 9.25-micron wavelength compared with beta at the 10.6-micron wavelength, which possibly indicates a major contribution to the volume backscatter from ammonium sulfate aerosol particles.

  19. Aerosol Backscatter from Airborne Continuous Wave CO2 Lidars over Western North America and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter measurements using two continuous wave CO2 Doppler lidars were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during a 1995 NASA airborne mission. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/m.sr, consistent with previous lidar datasets.

  20. Comparison of Predicted and Measured 2 Micron Aerosol Backscatter from the 1998 ACLAIM Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Hannon, Stephen M.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    1999-01-01

    The 1998 Airborne Coherent Lidar for Advanced Inflight Measurements (ACLAIM) flight tests were conducted aboard a well-instrumented research aircraft. This paper presents comparisons of 2 micrometer aerosol backscatter coefficient predictions from aerosol sampling data and mie scattering codes with those produced by the ACLAIM instrument.

  1. Comparison of CO2 backscatter using Mie theory from aerosol measurements over Pacific Basin with lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John; Jarzembski, Maurice; Bowdle, David

    1991-01-01

    Results of a comparison of aerosol backscatter with measurements over the Pacific Basin obtained from the CW CO2 lidars are presented. Both the Laser Optical Particle Counter (POPC) and CW CO2 lidars performed measurements at the flight level close to the aircraft and measured the same air mass. From the number distributions measured during a flight over Tokyo in June 1990, the backscatter coefficient for each component is calculated by integrating the differential backscatter. Fifteen sets of number distributions measured by the LOPC during the flight are used to predict aerosol backscatter. The backscatter from microphysics of the aerosols obtained from the LOPC and from the lidar measurements are in good agreement. It is concluded that the size distribution and composition of the aerosols can change dramatically as a function of altitude and location. The magnitude of the aerosol backscatter can vary by over three orders of magnitude from clear air to an aerosol layer.

  2. On the Feasibility of Studying Shortwave Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Dual-Wavelength Aerosol Backscatter Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Winker, David M.; McCormick, M. Patrick; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The current low confidence in the estimates of aerosol-induced perturbations of Earth's radiation balance is caused by the highly non-uniform compositional, spatial and temporal distributions of tropospheric aerosols on a global scale owing to their heterogeneous sources and short lifetimes. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the inclusion of aerosol effects in climate model calculations can improve agreement with observed spatial and temporal temperature distributions. In light of the short lifetimes of aerosols, determination of their global distribution with space-borne sensors seems to be a necessary approach. Until recently, satellite measurements of tropospheric aerosols have been approximate and did not provide the full set of information required to determine their radiative effects. With the advent of active aerosol remote sensing from space (e.g., PICASSO-CENA), the applicability fo lidar-derived aerosol 180 deg -backscatter data to radiative flux calculations and hence studies of aerosol effects on climate needs to be investigated.

  3. Aerosol and cloud backscatter at 1.06, 1.54, and 0.53 mum by airborne hard-target-calibrated Nd:YAG /methane Raman lidar.

    PubMed

    Spinhirne, J D; Chudamani, S; Cavanaugh, J F; Bufton, J L

    1997-05-20

    A lidar instrument was developed to make simultaneous measurements at three distinct wavelengths in the visible and near infrared at 0.532, 1.064, and 1.54 mum with high cross-sectional calibration accuracy. Aerosol and cloud backscatter cross sections were acquired during November and December 1989 and May and June 1990 by the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Global Backscatter Experiment. The instrument, methodology, and measurement results are described. A Nd:YAG laser produced 1.064- and 0.532-mum energy. The 1.54-mum transmitted pulse was generated by Raman-shifted downconversion of the 1.064-mum pulse through a Raman cell pressured with methane gas. The lidar could be pointed in the nadir or zenith direction from the aircraft. A hard-target-based calibration procedure was used to obtain the ratio of the system calibration between the three wavelengths, and the absolute calibration was referenced to the 0.532-mum lidar molecular backscatter cross section for the clearest scattering regions. From the relative wavelength calibration, the aerosol backscatter cross sections at the longer wavelengths are resolved for values as small as 1% of the molecular cross section. Backscatter measurement accuracies are better than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) at 1.064 and 1.54 mum. Results from the Pacific Ocean region of the multiwavelength backscatter dependence are presented. Results show extensive structure and variation for the aerosol cross sections. The range of observed aerosol cross section is over 4 orders of magnitude, from less than 10(-9) (m sr)(-1) to greater than 10(-5) (m sr)(-1). PMID:18253366

  4. Phase function, backscatter, extinction, and absorption for standard radiation atmosphere and El Chichon aerosol models at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabular values of phase function, Legendre polynominal coefficients, 180 deg backscatter, and extinction cross section are given for eight wavelengths in the atmospheric windows between 0.4 and 2.2 microns. Also included are single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and refractive indices. These values are based on Mie theory calculations for the standard rediation atmospheres (continental, maritime, urban, unperturbed stratospheric, volcanic, upper atmospheric, soot, oceanic, dust, and water-soluble) assest measured volcanic aerosols at several time intervals following the El Chichon eruption. Comparisons of extinction to 180 deg backscatter for different aerosol models are presented and related to lidar data.

  5. Selection Algorithm for the CALIPSO Lidar Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The extinction-to-backscatter ratio (S(sub a)) is an important parameter used in the determination of the aerosol extinction and subsequently the optical depth from lidar backscatter measurements. We outline the algorithm used to determine Sa for the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) lidar. S(sub a) for the CALIPSO lidar will either be selected from a look-up table or calculated using the lidar measurements depending on the characteristics of aerosol layer. Whenever suitable lofted layers are encountered, S(sub a) is computed directly from the integrated backscatter and transmittance. In all other cases, the CALIPSO observables: the depolarization ratio, delta, the layer integrated attenuated backscatter, beta, and the mean layer total attenuated color ratio, gamma, together with the surface type, are used to aid in aerosol typing. Once the type is identified, a look-up-table developed primarily from worldwide observations, is used to determine the S(sub a) value. The CALIPSO aerosol models include desert dust, biomass burning, background, polluted continental, polluted dust, and marine aerosols.

  6. Improving the detection of wind fields from LIDAR aerosol backscatter using feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickel, Brady R.; Rotthoff, Eric R.; Walters, Gage S.; Kane, Timothy J.; Mayor, Shane D.

    2016-04-01

    The tracking of winds and atmospheric features has many applications, from predicting and analyzing weather patterns in the upper and lower atmosphere to monitoring air movement from pig and chicken farms. Doppler LIDAR systems exist to quantify the underlying wind speeds, but cost of these systems can sometimes be relatively high, and processing limitations exist. The alternative is using an incoherent LIDAR system to analyze aerosol backscatter. Improving the detection and analysis of wind information from aerosol backscatter LIDAR systems will allow for the adoption of these relatively low cost instruments in environments where the size, complexity, and cost of other options are prohibitive. Using data from a simple aerosol backscatter LIDAR system, we attempt to extend the processing capabilities by calculating wind vectors through image correlation techniques to improve the detection of wind features.

  7. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 1; Methods and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.0 1 5 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0. I and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  8. Raman lidar measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering: 1. Methods and comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Leifer, R.

    1998-08-01

    This paper examines the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured at night by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site in April 1994. These lidar data are used to derive aerosol profiles for altitudes between 0.015 and 5 km. Since this lidar detects Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen molecules as well as the elastic scattering from molecules and aerosols, it measures both aerosol backscattering and extinction simultaneously. The aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio varied between approximately 30 sr and 75 sr at 351 nm. Aerosol optical thicknesses derived by integrating the lidar profiles of aerosol extinction measured at night between 0.1 and 5 km are found to be about 10-40% lower than those measured by a Sun photometer during the day. This difference is attributed to the contribution by stratospheric aerosols not included in the lidar estimates as well as to diurnal differences in aerosol properties and concentrations. Aerosol profiles close to the surface were acquired by pointing the lidar nearly horizontally. Measurements of aerosol scattering from a tower-mounted nephelometer are found to be 40% lower than lidar measurements of aerosol extinction over a wide range of relative humidities even after accounting for the difference in wavelengths. The reasons for this difference are not clear but may be due to the inability of the nephelometer to accurately measure scattering by large particles.

  9. Backscatter measurements of aerosolized CB simulants with a frequency agile CO2 lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbeek, Richard; Gurton, Kristan

    2004-02-01

    A novel windowless chamber was developed to allow aerosol backscatter measurements with a frequency-agile CO2 lidar. The chamber utilizes curtains of air to contain the cloud, thus preventing the inevitable backscatter off of conventional windows from corrupting the desired measurements. This feature is critical because the CO2 lidar has a long (1 μs) pulse and the backscatter off the window cannot be temporally separated from the backscatter off the aerosol in the chamber. The chamber was designed for testing with a variety of CB simulants and interferents in both vapor and aerosol form and has been successfully shown to contain a cloud of known size, concentration, and particle size distribution for 10-15 minutes. This paper shows the results using Arizona road dust that was screened by the manufacturer into 0-3 μm and 5-10 μm particle size distributions. The measurements clearly show the effect of size distribution on the infrared backscatter coefficients as well as the dynamic nature of the size distribution for a population of aerosols. The test methodology and experimental results are presented.

  10. Coherent Backscattering in the Cross-Polarized Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the cross-polarized enhancement factor in the framework of the standard low-packing-density theory of coherent backscattering by discrete random media composed of spherically symmetric particles. It is shown that if the particles are strongly absorbing or if the smallest optical dimension of the particulate medium (i.e., the optical thickness of a plane-parallel slab or the optical diameter of a spherically symmetric volume) approaches zero, then the cross-polarized enhancement factor tends to its upper-limit value 2. This theoretical prediction is illustrated using direct computer solutions of the Maxwell equations for spherical volumes of discrete random medium.

  11. Aerosol speckle effects on atmospheric pulsed lidar backscattered signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Lidar systems using atmospheric aerosols as targets exhibit return signal amplitude and power fluctuations which indicate speckle effects. The effects of refractive turbulence along the path on the aerosol speckle field propagation and on the decorrelation time are studied for coherent pulsed lidar systems.

  12. Influence of enhanced backscattering phenomenon on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, J.; Kirkiewicz, J.; Kravtsov, Yu. A.

    2002-07-01

    Influence of enhanced backscattering effect on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere is discussed. It is shown that doubling of the backscattered light intensity, characteristic for enhanced backscattering leads to overestimating dust content in the air. To avoid undesirable effect of overestimation of dust and aerosols it is recommended to displace receiving aperture sidewise relatively to source and to use wider laser beam and extended receiving aperture as compared to coherence radius of the scattered wave field.

  13. Intercomparison of Remote and Flight Level Measured Aerosol Backscatter Coefficient During GLOBE 2 Pacific Survey Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhime, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data are examined from two local flights undertaken during NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May - June, 1990. During each of these two flights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provides an ideal opportunity to allow flight level measured or modeled aerosol backscafter to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscafter data that were obtained at these same altitudes either earlier or later than the flight level measurements. Aerosol backscafter comparisons were made at 1.06-, 9.11- and 9.25-mm wavelengths, using data from three lidar systems and two aerosol optical counters. The best agreement between all sensor's was found in the altitude region below 7 km where backscafter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscafter data at 1.06- and 9.25-mm wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters. Possible reasons are offered to explain this discrepancy. During the Japan local flight, microphysics analysis revealed: (1) evidence of a strong advected seasalt aerosol plume from the marine boundary layer, and (2) where backscatter was low, the large lidar sampling volume included many large particles which were of different chemical composition to the small particle category sampled by the particle counters.

  14. Estimation of multiple-aerosol concentration and backscatter using multi-wavelength range-resolved lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.

    2007-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has produced statistically based methods for detecting, estimating and classifying aerosol materials in the atmosphere using multiple-wavelength range-resolved CO2 lidar. This work has thus far been limited to the presence of a single aerosol material at a given time within the lidar line-of-sight. Practical implementation requires the ability to detect and discriminate multiple aerosol materials present simultaneously such as smoke and dust in addition to hazardous materials. Treating mixtures of materials necessitates fundamentally different approaches from the single-material case since neither the aerosol backscatter wavelength-dependence nor the concentrations as a function of range are known. Because of this, linear processing cannot resolve the mixture data into its components unambiguously, and non-linear methods must be considered. In this paper we describe an empirical Bayes (EB) approach for resolving mixtures of aerosol into their components. The basic idea of EB is to use the same data to estimate the prior distribution of a set of parameters as that used to estimate the parameters themselves. In our case the concentration and backscatter are the parameters that are estimated with the help of a prior distribution of the backscatter. We implement the EB estimator through the EM (Expectation Maximization) algorithm. The resulting processor is applied to injections of interferent dust into data sets collected by ECBC during JBSDS testing at Dugway Proving Ground, UT in 2006.

  15. Multi-wavelength profiles of aerosol backscatter over Lauder, New Zealand, 24 November 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, R. L.; Rosen, J. M.; Kjome, N. T.; McGee, T. J.; Gross, M. R.; Singh, U. N.; Ferrare, R. F.; Kimvilakani, P.; Uchino, O.; Nagai, T.

    1994-05-01

    Simultaneous profiles of aerosol backscatter ratio were measured over Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E) on the night of November 24, 1992. Instrumentation comprised two complementary lidar systems and a backscattersonde, to give measurements at wavelengths 351, 490, 532, and 940 nm. The data from the lidars and the backscattersonde were self-consistent, enabling the wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter to be determined as a function of altitude. This wavelength-dependence is a useful parameter in radiative transfer calculations. In the stratosphere, the average wavelength exponent between 351 and 940 nm was -1.23 +/- 0.1, which was in good agreement with values derived from measured physical properties of aerosols.

  16. Multi-wavelength profiles of aerosol backscatter over Lauder, New Zealand, 24 November 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Rosen, J. M.; Kjome, N. T.; Mcgee, T. J.; Gross, M. R.; Singh, U. N.; Ferrare, R. F.; Kimvilakani, P.; Uchino, O.; Nagai, T.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous profiles of aerosol backscatter ratio were measured over Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S, 170 deg E) on the night of November 24, 1992. Instrumentation comprised two complementary lidar systems and a backscattersonde, to give measurements at wavelengths 351, 490, 532, and 940 nm. The data from the lidars and the backscattersonde were self-consistent, enabling the wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter to be determined as a function of altitude. This wavelength-dependence is a useful parameter in radiative transfer calculations. In the stratosphere, the average wavelength exponent between 351 and 940 nm was -1.23 +/- 0.1, which was in good agreement with values derived from measured physical properties of aerosols.

  17. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  18. Ozone and Aerosol Retrieval from Backscattered Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the techniques to estimate total column ozone and aerosol absorption optical depth from the measurements of back scattered ultraviolet (buv) radiation. The total ozone algorithm has been used to create a unique record of the ozone layer, spanning more than 3 decades, from a series of instruments (BUV, SBUV, TOMS, SBUV/2) flown on NASA, NOAA, Japanese and Russian satellites. We will discuss how this algorithm can be considered a generalization of the well-known Dobson/Brewer technique that has been used to process data from ground-based instruments for many decades, and how it differs from the DOAS techniques that have been used to estimate vertical column densities of a host of trace gases from data collected by GOME and SCIAMACHY instruments. The buv aerosol algorithm is most suitable for the detection of UV absorbing aerosols (smoke, desert dust, volcanic ash) and is the only technique that can detect aerosols embedded in clouds. This algorithm has been used to create a quarter century record of aerosol absorption optical depth using the buv data collected by a series of TOMS instruments. We will also discuss how the data from the OMI instrument launched on July 15, 2004 will be combined with data from MODIS and CALIPSO lidar data to enhance the accuracy and information content of satellite-derived aerosol measurements. The OMI and MODIS instruments are currently flying on EOS Aura and EOS Aqua satellites respectively, part of a constellation of satellites called the "A-train".

  19. Laser remote sensing of tropospheric aerosol over Southern Ireland using a backscatter Raman LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Acheson, Karen; Apituley, Arnoud; Chaikovsky, Anatoli; Nicolae, Doina; Ortiz-Amezcua, Pablo; Stoyanov, Dimitar; Trickl, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Raman backscatter coefficients, extinction coefficients and lidar ratios were measured with a ground based Raman lidar system at University College Cork, Ireland, during the periods of July 2012 - August 2012, April 2013 - December 2013 and March 2014 - May 2014. Statistical analysis of these parameters in this time provided information about seasonal effects of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer. The mean of the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer over these time periods is 950 ± 302 m. The values are larger in summer, 1206 ± 367 m, than in winter, 735 m. The altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer measured at Cork is lower than most EARLINET stations. Raman backscatter coefficients above and altitude of 2 km are highest in summer and spring where the values are greater than 0.28 Mm‑1 sr‑1. Winter values of Raman backscatter coefficient are less than 0.06 Mm‑1 sr‑1. These seasonal effects are consistent with most EARLINET stations. Large aerosol loads were detected in July 2013 due to a Canadian forest fire event. HYSPLIT air-mass back trajectory models were used to trace the origin of the detected aerosol layers. The aerosol forecast model, MACC, was used to further investigate and verify the propagation of the smoke. The Lidar ratio values and Klett and Raman backscatter coefficients at Cork, for the 4th July, the 7th to 9th of July and the 11th July were compared with observations at Cabauw, Minsk, Granada, Bucharest, Sofia and Garmisch. Lidar ratio values for the smoke detected at Cork were determined to be between 33 sr and 62 sr. The poster will discuss the seasonal changes of Raman backscatter coefficients and the altitude of the top of the planetary boundary layer at Cork. An investigation of a Canadian forest fire event measured at Cork will be compared with other data from the EARLINET database.

  20. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  1. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  2. Sensitivity of Scattering and Backscattering Coefficients to Microphysical and Chemical Properties: Weakly Absorbing Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.; Pekour, M. S.; Berg, L. K.; Shilling, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Mei, F.; Jefferson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Scattering and backscattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosol are crucial parameters for numerous climate-relevant applications, including studies related to the Earth's radiation budget. Due to their strong connection to aerosol chemical and microphysical characteristics, in situ measurements have been commonly used for evaluating optical properties routines in global and regional scale models. However, these in situ measurements, including size distribution and chemical composition data, can be subject to uncertainties. Techniques for obtaining these data depend on particle size (submicron versus supermicron) and relative humidity range (dry versus wet conditions). In this study, we examine how the data uncertainties can impact the level of agreement between the calculated and measured optical properties (commonly known as optical closure). Moreover, we put forth a novel technique for inferring in parallel the effective density and real refractive index of weakly absorbing aerosols from simultaneously measured size distributions (with mobility and aerodynamic sizes), and two optical properties, namely the scattering coefficient and hemispheric backscatter fraction, measured by integrating nephelometer. We demonstrate the performance of our technique, which permits discrimination between the retrieved aerosol characteristics of sub-micron and sub-10-micron particles, using both a sensitivity study with synthetically generated inputs with random noise and a six-week case study with real measurements. These measurements cover a wide range of coastal summertime conditions observed during the recent Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP, http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/) and include periods with a wide range of aerosol loading and relative humidity. Finally, we discuss how in situ data and retrievals of aerosol characteristics can be applied for model evaluation.

  3. Aerosol Backscatter and Extinction Retrieval from Airborne Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Groß, S.; Rahm, S.; Freudenthaler, V.; Toledano, C.; Weinzierl, B.

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for coherent Doppler wind lidars (DWLs) calibration is shown in this work. Concurrent measurements of a ground based aerosol lidar operating at 532 nm and an airborne DWL at 2 μm are used in combination with sun photometer measurements for the retrieval of backscatter and extinction profiles. The presented method was successfully applied to the measurements obtained during the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace), which aimed to characterize the Saharan dust long range transport between Africa and the Caribbean.

  4. CART and GSFC raman lidar measurements of atmospheric aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles for EOS validation and ARM radiation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Turner, D. D.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Schwenner, G.; Evans, K. D.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.; Tooman, T.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol retrieval algorithms used by the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) sensors on the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) AM-1 platform operate by comparing measured radiances with tabulated radiances that have been computed for specific aerosol models. These aerosol models are based almost entirely on surface and/or column averaged measurements and so may not accurately represent the ambient aerosol properties. Therefore, to validate these EOS algorithms and to determine the effects of aerosols on the clear-sky radiative flux, we have begun to evaluate the vertical variability of ambient aerosol properties using the aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Raman Lidars. Using the procedures developed for the GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), we have developed and have begun to implement algorithms for the CART Raman Lidar to routinely provide profiles of aerosol extinction and backscattering during both nighttime and ,daytime operations. Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles are computed for both lidar systems using data acquired during the 1996 and 1997 Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). By integrating these aerosol extinction profiles, we derive measurements of aerosol optical thickness and compare these with coincident sun photometer measurements. We also use these measurements to measure the aerosol extinction/backscatter ratio S(sub a) (i.e. 'lidar ratio'). Furthermore, we use the simultaneous water vapor measurements acquired by these Raman lidars to investigate the effects of water vapor on aerosol optical properties.

  5. Potential of lidar backscatter data to estimate solar aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendisch, Manfred; Müller, Detlef; Mattis, Ina; Ansmann, Albert

    2006-02-01

    The potential to estimate solar aerosol radiative forcing (SARF) in cloudless conditions from backscatter data measured by widespread standard lidar has been investigated. For this purpose 132 days of sophisticated ground-based Raman lidar observations (profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients at 532 nm wavelength) collected during two campaigns [the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)] were analyzed. Particle extinction profiles were used as input for radiative transfer simulations with which to calculate the SARF, which then was plotted as a function of the column (i.e., height-integrated) particle backscatter coefficient (betac). A close correlation between the SARF and betac was found. SARF-betac parameterizations in the form of polynomial fits were derived that exhibit an estimated uncertainty of +/-(10-30)%. These parameterizations can be utilized to analyze data of upcoming lidar satellite missions and for other purposes. The EARLINET-based parameterizations can be applied to lidar measurements at mostly continental, highly industrialized sites with limited maritime influence (Europe, North America), whereas the INDOEX parameterizations rather can be employed in polluted maritime locations, e.g., coastal regions of south and east Asia.

  6. Potential of lidar backscatter data to estimate solar aerosol radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Wendisch, Manfred; Müller, Detlef; Mattis, Ina; Ansmann, Albert

    2006-02-01

    The potential to estimate solar aerosol radiative forcing (SARF) in cloudless conditions from backscatter data measured by widespread standard lidar has been investigated. For this purpose 132 days of sophisticated ground-based Raman lidar observations (profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients at 532 nm wavelength) collected during two campaigns [the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) and the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)] were analyzed. Particle extinction profiles were used as input for radiative transfer simulations with which to calculate the SARF, which then was plotted as a function of the column (i.e., height-integrated) particle backscatter coefficient (beta(c)). A close correlation between the SARF and beta(c) was found. SARF-beta(c) parameterizations in the form of polynomial fits were derived that exhibit an estimated uncertainty of +/-(10-30)%. These parameterizations can be utilized to analyze data of upcoming lidar satellite missions and for other purposes. The EARLINET-based parameterizations can be applied to lidar measurements at mostly continental, highly industrialized sites with limited maritime influence (Europe, North America), whereas the INDOEX parameterizations rather can be employed in polluted maritime locations, e.g., coastal regions of south and east Asia. PMID:16485690

  7. Vertical distribution of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficient measured by a CCD side-scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zongming; Liu, Dong; Ma, Xiaomin; Shi, Bo; Shan, Huihui; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Chenbo; Wang, Yingjian

    2015-09-01

    The near-ground aerosols have the most impact on the human beings. Its fine spatial and temporal distribution, with which the environmental and meteorological departments concern themselves most, has not been elaborated very well due to the unavailable measurement tools. We present the continuous observations of the vertical profile of near-ground aerosol backscattering coefficients by employing our self-developed side-scattering lidar system based on charge-coupled device camera. During the experimental period from April 2013 to August 2014, four catalogs of aerosol backscattering coefficient profiles are found in the near ground. The continuous measurement is revealed by the contour plots measured during the whole night. These experimental results indicate that the aerosol backscattering coefficients in near ground are inhomogeneous and vary with altitude and time, which are very useful for the model researchers to study the regional air pollution and its climate impact.

  8. Implementation of Rotational Raman Channel in Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar to Improve Measurements of Particle Extinction and Backscattering at 532 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.; Korenskiy, Michael; Suvorina, A.; Perez-Ramirez, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We describe a practical implementation of rotational Raman (RR) measurements in an existing Mie-Raman lidar to obtain measurements of aerosol extinction and backscattering at 532 nm. A 2.3 nm width interference filter was used to select a spectral range characterized by low temperature sensitivity within the anti-Stokes branch of the RR spectrum. Simulations demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the scattering cross section does not exceed 1.0% in the 230-300K range making accurate correction for this dependence quite easy. With this upgrade, the NASA/GSFC multiwavelength Raman lidar has demonstrated useful α532 measurements and was used for regular observations. Examples of lidar measurements and inversion of optical data to the particle microphysics will be given in presentation.

  9. Airborne high spectral resolution lidar for measuring aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients.

    PubMed

    Esselborn, Michael; Wirth, Martin; Fix, Andreas; Tesche, Matthias; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-20

    An airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on an iodine absorption filter and a high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser has been developed to measure backscatter and extinction coefficients of aerosols and clouds. The instrument was operated aboard the Falcon 20 research aircraft of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment in May-June 2006 to measure optical properties of Saharan dust. A detailed description of the lidar system, the analysis of its data products, and measurements of backscatter and extinction coefficients of Saharan dust are presented. The system errors are discussed and airborne HSRL results are compared to ground-based Raman lidar and sunphotometer measurements. PMID:18204721

  10. Theory of CW lidar aerosol backscatter measurements and development of a 2.1 microns solid-state pulsed laser radar for aerosol backscatter profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The performance and calibration of a focused, continuous wave, coherent detection CO2 lidar operated for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter coefficient, B(m), was examined. This instrument functions by transmitting infrared (10 micron) light into the atmosphere and collecting the light which is scattered in the rearward direction. Two distinct modes of operation were considered. In volume mode, the scattered light energy from many aerosols is detected simultaneously, whereas in the single particle mode (SPM), the scattered light energy from a single aerosol is detected. The analysis considered possible sources of error for each of these two cases, and also considered the conditions where each technique would have superior performance. The analysis showed that, within reasonable assumptions, the value of B(m) could be accurately measured by either the VM or the SPM method. The understanding of the theory developed during the analysis was also applied to a pulsed CO2 lidar. Preliminary results of field testing of a solid state 2 micron lidar using a CW oscillator is included.

  11. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  12. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  13. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-07-01

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle.

  14. Two-wavelength backscattering lidar for stand off detection of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Gawlikowski, Andrzej; Gietka, Andrzej; Kaszczuk, Miroslawa; Knysak, Piotr; Mlodzianko, Andrzej; Muzal, Michal; Piotrowski, Wiesław; Wojtanowski, Jacek

    2008-10-01

    Following article presents LIDAR for stand off detection of aerosols which was constructed in Institute of Optoelectronics in Military University of Technology. LIDAR is a DISC type system (DIfferential SCattering) and is based on analysis of backscattering signal for two wavelengths (λ1 = 1064 nm and λ2 = 532 nm) - the first and the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. Optical receiving system is consisted of aspherical mirror lens, two additional mirrors and a system of interference filters. In detection system of LIDAR a silicon avalanche photodiode and two different amplifiers were used. Whole system is mounted on a specialized platform designed for possibility of LIDAR scanning movements. LIDAR is computer controlled. The compiled software enables regulation of the scanning platform work, gain control, and control of data processing and acquisition system. In the article main functional elements of LIDAR are shown and typical parameters of system work and construction are presented. One presented also first results of research with use of LIDAR. The aim of research was to detect and characterize scattering aerosol, both natural and anthropogenic one. For analyses of natural aerosols, cumulus cloud was used. For analyses of anthropogenic aerosols one used three various pyrotechnic mixtures (DM11, M2, M16) which generate smoke of different parameters. All scattering centers were firstly well described and theoretical analyses were conducted. Results of LIDAR research were compared with theoretical analyses and general conclusions concerning correctness of LIDAR work and its application were drawn.

  15. Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratios of Lofted Aerosol Layers Observed During the First Three Months of CALIPSO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yongxiang; Reagan, John A.; Winker, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Case studies from the first three months of the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) measurements of lofted aerosol layers are analyzed using transmittance [Young, 1995] and two-wavelength algorithms [Vaughan et al., 2004] to determine the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratios at 532 and 1064 nm. The transmittance method requires clear air below the layer so that the transmittance through the layer can be determined. Suitable scenes are selected from the browse images and clear air below features is identified by low 532 nm backscatter signal and confirmed by low depolarization and color ratios. The transmittance and two-wavelength techniques are applied to a number of lofted layers and the extinction-to-backscatter ratios are compared with values obtained from the CALIPSO aerosol models [Omar et al., 2004]. The results obtained from these studies are used to adjust the aerosol models and develop observations based extinction-to-backscatter ratio look-up tables and phase functions. Values obtained by these techniques are compared to Sa determinations using other independent methods with a goal of developing probability distribution functions of aerosol type-specific extinction to backscatter ratios. In particular, the results are compared to values determined directly by the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) during the CALIPSO CloudSat Validation Experiments (CCVEX) and Sa determined by the application of the two-wavelength lidar Constrained Ratio Aerosol Model-fit (CRAM) retrieval approach [Cattrall et al., 2005; Reagan et al., 2004] to the HSRL data. The results are also compared to values derived using the empirical relationship between the multiple-scattering fraction and the linear depolarization ratio by using Monte Carlo simulations of water clouds [Hu et al., 2006].

  16. Relationships between Optical Extinction, Backscatter and Aerosol Surface and Volume in the Stratosphere following the Eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Wilson, James C.; Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Borrmann, Stephan; Pitts, Mike C.; Osborn, Mary T.; DeCoursey, Robert J.; Woods, David C.

    1993-01-01

    The eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines in June 1991 has resulted in increases in the surface and mass concentrations of aerosol particles in the lower stratosphere. Airborne measurements made at midlatitudes between 15 and 21 km from August 1991 to March 1992 show that, prior to December 1991, the Pinatubo aerosol cloud varied widely in microphysical properties such as size distribution, number, surface and volume concentrations and was also spatially variable. Aerosol surface area concentration was found to be highly correlated to extinction at visible and near-infrared wavelengths throughout the measurement period. Similarly, backscatter at common lidar wavelengths was a good predictor of aerosol volume concentrations. These results support the use of satellite extinction measurements to estimate aerosol surface and of lidar measurements to estimate aerosol volume or mass if temporal changes in the relationships between the variables are considered.

  17. Analysis of DIAL/HSRL aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles during the SEAC4RS campaign with an aerosol assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Randles, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    We retrieve aerosol concentrations and optical information from vertical profiles of airborne 532 nm extinction and 532 and 1064 nm backscatter measurements made during the SEAC4RS summer 2013 campaign. The observations are from the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) on board the NASA DC-8. Instead of retrieving information about aerosol microphysical properties such as indexes of refraction, we seek information more directly applicable to an aerosol transport model - in our case the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) module used in the GEOS-5 Earth modeling system. A joint atmosphere/aerosol mini-reanalysis was performed for the SEAC4RS period using GEOS-5. The meteorological reanalysis followed the MERRA-2 atmospheric reanalysis protocol, and aerosol information from MODIS, MISR, and AERONET provided a constraint on the simulated aerosol optical depth (i.e., total column loading of aerosols). We focus on the simulated concentrations of 10 relevant aerosol species simulated by the GOCART module: dust, sulfate, and organic and black carbon. Our first retrieval algorithm starts with the SEAC4RS mini-reanalysis and adjusts the concentration of each GOCART aerosol species so that differences between the observed and simulated backscatter and extinction measurements are minimized. In this case, too often we are unable to simulate the observations by simple adjustment of the aerosol concentrations. A second retrieval approach adjusts both the aerosol concentrations and the optical parameters (i.e., assigned mass extinction efficiency) associated with each GOCART species. We present results from DC-8 flights over smoke from forest fires over the western US using both retrieval approaches. Finally, we compare our retrieved quantities with in-situ observations of aerosol absorption, scattering, and mass concentrations at flight altitude.

  18. Aerosol measurements over the Pacific Ocean in support of the IR aerosol backscatter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Savoie, Dennis L.

    1995-01-01

    The major efforts under NASA contract NAG8-841 included: (1) final analyses of the samples collected during the first GLOBE survey flight that occurred in November 1989 and collections and analysis of aerosol samples during the second GLOBE survey flight in May and June 1990. During the first GLOBE survey flight, daily samples were collected at four stations (Midway, Rarotonga, American Samoa, and Norfolk Island) throughout the month of November 1989. Weekly samples were collected at Shemya, Alaska, and at Karamea, New Zealand. During the second GLOBE survey flight, daily samples were collected at Midway, Oahu, American Samoa, Rarotonga, and Norfolk Island; weekly samples were collected at Shemya. These samples were all analyzed for sodium (sea-salt), chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and methanesulfonate at the University of Miami and for aluminum at the University of Rhode Island (under a subcontract). (2) Samples continued to be collected on a weekly basis at all stations during the periods between and after the survey flights. These weekly samples were also analyzed at the University of Miami for the suite of water-soluble species. (3) In August 1990, the results obtained from the above studies were submitted to the appropriate personnel at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to become part of the GLOBE data base for comparison with data from instruments used aboard the aircraft. In addition, the data will be compared with data previously obtained at these stations as part of the Sea-Air Exchange (SEAREX) Program. This comparison will provide valuable information on the representativeness of the periods in terms of the longer term aerosol climatology over the Pacific Ocean. (4) Several publications have been written using data from this grant. The data will continue to be used in the future as part of a continuing investigation of the long-term trends and interannual variations in aerosol species concentrations over the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Use of Probability Distribution Functions for Discriminating Between Cloud and Aerosol in Lidar Backscatter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhaoyan; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, Davd M.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Poole, Lamont R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; McGill, Mathew

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the algorithm hat will be used during the upcoming Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission for discriminating between clouds and aerosols detected in two wavelength backscatter lidar profiles. We first analyze single-test and multiple-test classification approaches based on one-dimensional and multiple-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs) in the context of a two-class feature identification scheme. From these studies we derive an operational algorithm based on a set of 3-dimensional probability distribution functions characteristic of clouds and aerosols. A dataset acquired by the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) is used to test the algorithm. Comparisons are conducted between the CALIPSO algorithm results and the CPL data product. The results obtained show generally good agreement between the two methods. However, of a total of 228,264 layers analyzed, approximately 5.7% are classified as different types by the CALIPSO and CPL algorithm. This disparity is shown to be due largely to the misclassification of clouds as aerosols by the CPL algorithm. The use of 3-dimensional PDFs in the CALIPSO algorithm is found to significantly reduce this type of error. Dust presents a special case. Because the intrinsic scattering properties of dust layers can be very similar to those of clouds, additional algorithm testing was performed using an optically dense layer of Saharan dust measured during the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). In general, the method is shown to distinguish reliably between dust layers and clouds. The relatively few erroneous classifications occurred most often in the LITE data, in those regions of the Saharan dust layer where the optical thickness was the highest.

  20. Deriving capture and reaction cross sections from observed quasi-elastic and elastic backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2014-12-01

    Based on reaction theory, we suggest a useful method for extracting total and partial reaction and capture (complete fusion) cross sections from the experimental elastic and quasi-elastic backscattering excitation functions taken at a single angle. We also propose a method to predict the differential reaction cross section from the observed elastic-scattering angular distribution.

  1. Intercomparison of Pulsed Lidar Data with Flight Level CW Lidar Data and Modeled Backscatter from Measured Aerosol Microphysics Near Japan and Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter coefficient data were examined from two nights near Japan and Hawaii undertaken during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. During each of these two nights the aircraft traversed different altitudes within a region of the atmosphere defined by the same set of latitude and longitude coordinates. This provided an ideal opportunity to allow flight level focused continuous wave (CW) lidar backscatter measured at 9.11-micron wavelength and modeled aerosol backscatter from two aerosol optical counters to be compared with pulsed lidar aerosol backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths. The best agreement between all sensors was found in the altitude region below 7 km, where backscatter values were moderately high at all three wavelengths. Above this altitude the pulsed lidar backscatter data at 1.06- and 9.25-micron wavelengths were higher than the flight level data obtained from the CW lidar or derived from the optical counters, suggesting sample volume effects were responsible for this. Aerosol microphysics analysis of data near Japan revealed a strong sea-salt aerosol plume extending upward from the marine boundary layer. On the basis of sample volume differences, it was found that large particles were of different composition compared with the small particles for low backscatter conditions.

  2. S-193 scatterometer backscattering cross section precision/accuracy for Skylab 2 and 3 missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, K.; Pounds, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures for measuring the precision and accuracy with which the S-193 scatterometer measured the background cross section of ground scenes are described. Homogeneous ground sites were selected, and data from Skylab missions were analyzed. The precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the scatterometer-acquired backscattering cross section. In special cases, inference of the precision of measurement was made by considering the total range from the maximum to minimum of the backscatter measurements within a data segment, rather than the standard deviation. For Skylab 2 and 3 missions a precision better than 1.5 dB is indicated. This procedure indicates an accuracy of better than 3 dB for the Skylab 2 and 3 missions. The estimates of precision and accuracy given in this report are for backscattering cross sections from -28 to 18 dB. Outside this range the precision and accuracy decrease significantly.

  3. Relationships between optical extinction, backscatter and aerosol surface and volume in the stratosphere following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Wilson, James C.; Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Borrmann, Stephan; Pitts, Mike C.; Osborn, Mary T.; Decoursey, Robert J.; Woods, David C.

    1993-01-01

    The eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Philippines in June 1991 has resulted in increases in the surface and mass concentrations of aerosol particles in the lower stratosphere. Airborne measurements made at midlatitudes between 15 and 21 km from August 1991 to March 1992 show that, prior to December 1991, the Pinatubo aerosol cloud varied widely in microphysical properties such as size distribution, number, surface and volume concentrations and was also spatially variable. Aerosol surface area concentration was found to be highly correlated to extinction at visible and near-infrared wavelenghts throughout the measurement period. Similarly, backscatter at common lidar wavelengths was a good predictor of aerosol volume concentrations. These results support the use of satellite extinction measurements to estimate aerosol volume or mass if temporal changes in the relationships between the variables are considered.

  4. Synergetic technique combining elastic backscatter lidar data and sunphotometer AERONET inversion for retrieval by layer of aerosol optical and microphysical properties.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Juan; Flamant, Pierre H; Flamant, Cyrille

    2008-09-01

    We present a so-called lidar and almucantar (LidAlm) algorithm that combines information provided by standard elastic backscatter lidar (i.e., calibrated attenuated backscatter coefficient profile at one or two wavelengths) and sunphotometer AERONET inversion of almucantar like measurements (i.e., column-integrated aerosol size distribution and refractive index). The purpose of the LidAlm technique is to characterize the atmospheric column by its different aerosol layers. These layers may be distinct or partially mixed, and they may contain different aerosol species (e.g., urban, desert, or biomass burning aerosols). The LidAlm synergetic technique provides the extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles, particle size distributions, and backscatter-to-extinction ratios for each aerosol layer. We present the LidAlm procedure and sensitivity studies. The applications are illustrated with examples of actual atmospheric conditions encountered in the Paris area. PMID:18758531

  5. Application of HARLIE Measurements in Mesoscale Studies: Measurements of Aerosol Backscatter and Winds During A Gust Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Miller, David; Schwemmer, Geary; Starr, David OC (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Lidar atmospheric systems have required large telescope for receiving atmospheric backscatter signals. Thus, the relative complexity in size and ease of operation has limited their wider use in the atmospheric science and meteorology community. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) uses a scanning holographic receiver and demonstrates that these issues can be overcome. HARLIE participated at the DOE-ARM Southern Great Plains site (CART) during the Water Vapor Intensive Operation Period (WVIOP2000) held September-October 2000. It provided exceptional high temporal and spatial resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three dimensions. HARLIE recorded over 110 hours of data were recorded on 16 days between 17 September and 6 October 2000. Placed in a ground-based trailer for upward looking scanning measurements of clouds and aerosols, HARLIE provided a unique record of time-resolved atmospheric backscatter at 1-micron wavelength. The conical scanning lidar measures atmospheric backscatter on the surface of an inverted 90 degree (full angle) cone up to an altitude of 20 km, 360-degree scans having spatial resolutions of 20 meters in the vertical and 1 degree in azimuth were obtained every 36 seconds during the daily, operating period. In this study we present highlights of HARLIE-based measurements of the boundary layer and cloud parameters as well as atmospheric wind vectors where there is sufficiently resolved structure in the backscatter. In particular we present data and discussions from a bore-front case observed on 23 September 2000.

  6. A three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for three-component wind profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Prasad, Coorg R.; Lee, Sangwoo; Achey, Alexander; Hwang, In Heon; Mehta, Nikhil; Yakshin, Mikhail; Novoselov, Konstantin; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a three-beam elastic lidar that utilizes aerosol backscatter correlation to measure three-component wind profiles for detecting and tracking aircraft wake vortices; turbulence intensity and wind shear profiles. High-resolution time-resolved wind information can currently be obtained with ultrasonic or hot-wire anemometers suitable for local point measurements, or with Doppler wind lidars that only measure line-of-sight wind speeds and have to be scanned over large measurement cone angles for obtaining three-component winds. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, our lidar obtains three-component wind speed profiles along the field of view (FOV) of the lidar beams. Our prototype lidar wind profiler (LWP) has three 8-inch transceiver modules placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner to measure winds up to 2km away. Passively q-switched near-infrared (1030nm) Yb:YAG lasers generate 12 - 18ns wide pulses at high repetition rate (about 10KHz) that are expanded and attenuated to eye-safe levels. Sensitive low noise detection is achieved even in daytime using a narrow FOV receiver, together with narrowband interference filters and single photoncounting Geiger-mode Si detectors. A multi-channel scaler retrieves the lidar return with 7.8ns bins (˜1.2m spatial resolution) and stores accumulated counts once every 50ms (20 profiles/sec). We adapted optical flow algorithms to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. The performance of our prototype LWP was validated using sonic anemometer measurements.

  7. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  8. Derivation of reaction cross sections from experimental elastic backscattering probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, P. R. S.

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between the backward elastic scattering probabilities and the reaction cross sections is derived. This is a very simple and useful method to extract reaction cross sections for heavy-ion systems. We compare the results of our method with those that use the traditional full elastic scattering angular distributions for several systems at energies near and above the Coulomb barrier. From the calculated reaction and capture cross sections that use the present method, we derive the cross sections of other mechanisms for weak nearly spherical systems.

  9. Calculation of aerosol backscatter from airborne continuous wave focused CO2 Doppler lidar measurements. I - Algorithm description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Bowdle, David A.; Vaughan, Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Woodfield, Alan A.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1981 the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment and the Royal Aircraft Establishment, United Kindom, have made vertical and horizontal sounding measurements of aerosol backscatter coefficients at 10.6 microns, using an airborne continuous-wave-focused CO2 Doppler lidar, the Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS). In this paper, the heterodyne signal from the LATAS detector is spectrally analyzed. Then, in conjunction with aircraft flight parameters, the data are processed in a six-stage computer algorithm: set search window, search for peak signal, test peak signal, measure total signal, calculate signal-to-noise ratio, and calculate backscatter coefficient.

  10. Aerosol Backscatter from Airborne Continuous Wave CO2 Lidars Over Western North America and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol backscatter, beta, variability gives a direct indication of aerosol loading. Since aerosol variability is governed by regional sources and sinks as well as affected by its transport due to meteorological conditions, it is important to characterize this loading at different locations and times. Lidars are sensitive instruments that can effectively provide high-resolution, large-scale sampling of the atmosphere remotely by measuring aerosol beta, thereby capturing detailed temporal and spatial variability of aerosol loading, Although vertical beta profiles are usually obtained by pulsed lidars, airborne-focused CW lidars, with high sensitivity and short time integration, can provide higher resolution sampling in the vertical, thereby revealing detailed structure of aerosol layers. During the 1995 NASA Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission, NASA MSFC airborne-focused CW CO2 Doppler lidars, operating at 9.1 and 10.6-micrometers wavelength, obtained high resolution in situ aerosol beta measurements to characterize aerosol variability. The observed variability in beta at 9.1-micrometers wavelength with altitude is presented as well as comparison with some pulsed lidar profiles.

  11. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Backscatter and Earth Surface Targets By Use of An Airborne Focused Continuous Wave CO2 Doppler Lidar Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Airborne lidar systems are used to determine wind velocity and to measure aerosol or cloud backscatter variability. Atmospheric aerosols, being affected by local and regional sources, show tremendous variability. Continuous wave (cw) lidar can obtain detailed aerosol loading with unprecedented high resolution (3 sec) and sensitivity (1 mg/cubic meter) as was done during the 1995 NASA Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) mission over western North America and the Pacific Ocean. Backscatter variability was measured at a 9.1 micron wavelength cw focused CO2 Doppler lidar for approximately 52 flight hours, covering an equivalent horizontal distance of approximately 30,000 km in the troposphere. Some quasi-vertical backscatter profiles were also obtained during various ascents and descents at altitudes that ranged from approximately 0.1 to 12 km. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/ms/r, consistent with previous lidar datasets. While these atmospheric measurements were made, the lidar also retrieved a distinct backscatter signal from the Earth's surface from the unfocused part of the focused cw lidar beam during aircraft rolls. Atmospheric backscatter can be highly variable both spatially and temporally, whereas, Earth-surface backscatter is relatively much less variant and can be quite predictable. Therefore, routine atmospheric backscatter measurements by an airborne lidar also give Earth surface backscatter which can allow for investigating the Earth terrain. In the case where the Earth's surface backscatter is coming from a well-known and fairly uniform region, then it can potentially offer lidar calibration opportunities during flight. These Earth surface measurements over varying Californian terrain during the mission were compared with laboratory backscatter measurements using the same lidar of various

  12. Developing a portable, autonomous aerosol backscatter lidar for network or remote operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2013-03-01

    Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols with high spatial and temporal resolution, making it well suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. Environment Canada has developed a portable, autonomous lidar system that can be monitored remotely and operated continuously except during precipitation events. The lidar, housed in a small trailer, simultaneously emits two wavelengths of laser light (1064 nm and 532 nm) at energies of approximately 150 mJ/pulse/wavelength and detects the backscatter signal at 1064 nm and both polarizations at 532 nm. For laser energies of this magnitude, the challenge resides in designing a system that meets the airspace safety requirements for autonomous operations. Through the combination of radar technology, beam divergence, laser cavity interlocks and using computer log files, this risk was mitigated. A Continuum Inlite small footprint laser is the backbone of the system because of three design criteria: requiring infrequent flash lamp changes compared to previous Nd : YAG Q-switch lasers, complete software control capability and a built-in laser energy monitoring system. A computer-controlled interface was designed to monitor the health of the system, adjust operational parameters and maintain a climate-controlled environment. Through an Internet connection, it also transmitted the vital performance indicators and data stream to allow the lidar profile data for multiple instruments from near ground to 15 km, every 10 s, to be viewed, in near real-time via a website. The details of the system design and calibration will be discussed and the success of the instrument as tested within the framework of a national lidar network dubbed CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network). In addition, the transport of a forest fire plume across the country will be shown as evidenced by the lidar

  13. Developing a portable, autonomous aerosol backscatter lidar for network or remote operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawbridge, K. B.

    2012-11-01

    Lidar has the ability to detect the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere and can therefore identify the existence and extent of aerosols with high spatial and temporal resolution, making it well-suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. Environment Canada has developed a portable, autonomous lidar system that can be monitored remotely and operate continuously except during precipitation events. The lidar, housed in a small trailer, simultaneously emits two wavelengths of laser light (1064 nm and 532 nm) at energies of approximately 150 mJ/pulse/wavelength and detects the backscatter signal at 1064 nm and both polarizations at 532 nm. For laser energies of this magnitude, the challenge resides in designing a system that meets the airspace safety requirements for autonomous operations. Through the combination of radar technology, beam divergence, laser cavity interlocks and using computer log files, this risk was mitigated. A Continuum Inlite small footprint laser is the backbone of the system because of three design criteria: requiring infrequent flash lamp changes compared to previous Nd:YAG Q-switch lasers, complete software control capability and a built-in laser energy monitoring system. A computer-controlled interface was designed to monitor the health of the system, adjust operational parameters and maintain a climate-controlled environment. Through an internet connection, it also transmitted the vital performance indicators and data stream to allow the lidar profile data for multiple instruments from near ground to 15 km, every 10 s, to be viewed, in near real-time via a website. The details of the system design and calibration will be discussed and the success of the instrument as tested within the framework of a national lidar network dubbed CORALNet (Canadian Operational Research Aerosol Lidar Network). In addition, the transport of a forest fire plume across the country will be shown as evidenced by the lidar network

  14. An Aerosol Extinction-to-Backscatter Ratio Database Derived from the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network: Applications for Space-based Lidar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Spinhime, James D.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Holben, Brent; Tsay, Si-Chee; Bucholtz, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Backscatter lidar signals are a function of both backscatter and extinction. Hence, these lidar observations alone cannot separate the two quantities. The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio, S, is the key parameter required to accurately retrieve extinction and optical depth from backscatter lidar observations of aerosol layers. S is commonly defined as 4*pi divided by the product of the single scatter albedo and the phase function at 180-degree scattering angle. Values of S for different aerosol types are not well known, and are even more difficult to determine when aerosols become mixed. Here we present a new lidar-sunphotometer S database derived from Observations of the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). MPLNET is a growing worldwide network of eye-safe backscatter lidars co-located with sunphotometers in the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Values of S for different aerosol species and geographic regions will be presented. A framework for constructing an S look-up table will be shown. Look-up tables of S are needed to calculate aerosol extinction and optical depth from space-based lidar observations in the absence of co-located AOD data. Applications for using the new S look-up table to reprocess aerosol products from NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will be discussed.

  15. Boundary Layer Aerosol Composition over Sierra Nevada Mountains using 9.11- and 10.59-micron CW Lidars and Modeled Backscatter from Size Distribution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Srivastava, V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Howard, S. D.; McCaul, E. W., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    An inversion technique has been developed to determine volume fractions of an atmospheric aerosol composed primarily of ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate and water combined with fixed concentration of elemental and organic carbon. It is based on measured aerosol backscatter obtained with 9.11 - and 10.59-micron wavelength continuous wave CO2 lidars and modeled backscatter from aerosol size distribution data. The technique is demonstrated during a flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft over the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range, California on 19 September, 1995. Volume fraction of each component and effective complex refractive index of the composite particle were determined assuming an internally mixed composite aerosol model. The volume fractions were also used to re-compute aerosol backscatter, providing good agreement with the lidar-measured data. The robustness of the technique for determining volume fractions was extended with a comparison of calculated 2.1,-micron backscatter from size distribution data with the measured lidar data converted to 2.1,-micron backscatter using an earlier derived algorithm, verifying the algorithm as well as the backscatter calculations.

  16. Reduced backscattering cross section (Sigma degree) data from the Skylab S-193 radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Backscattering cross section per unit scattering area data, reduced from measurements made by the Skylab S-193 radar altimeter over the ocean surface are presented. Descriptions of the altimeter are given where applicable to the measurement process. Analytical solutions are obtained for the flat surface impulse response for the case of a nonsymmetrical antenna pattern. Formulations are developed for converting altimeter AGC outputs into values for the backscattering cross section. Reduced data are presented for Missions SL-2, 3 and 4 for all modes of the altimeter where sufficient calibration existed. The problem of interpreting land scatter data is also discussed. Finally, a comprehensive error analysis of the measurement is presented and worst case random and bias errors are estimated.

  17. First results from the aerosol lidar and backscatter sonde intercomparison campaign STRAIT'1997 at table mountain facility during February-March 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M. R.; Haner, D. A.; Kjome, N. T.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Schaefer, H. - J.; Schrems, O.

    1998-01-01

    First results of an intercomparison measurement campaign between three aerosol lidar instruments and in-situ backscatter sondes performed at Table Mountain Facility (34.4 deg N, 117.7 deg E, 2280 m asl) in February-March 1997 are presented. During the campaign a total of 414 hours of lidar data were acquired by the Aerosol-Temperature-Lidar (ATL, Goddard Space Flight Center) the Mobile-aerosol-Raman-Lidar (MARL, Alfred Wegener Institute), and the TMF-Aerosol-Lidar (TAL, Jet Propulsion Laboratory), and four backscatter sondes were launched. From the data set altitude profiles of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization of stratospheric background aerosols at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and optically thin high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are derived. On the basis of a sulfuric acid aerosol model color ratio profiles obtained from two wavelength lidar data are compared to the corresponding profiles derived from the sonde observations. We find an excellent agreement between the in-situ and ATL lidar data with respect to backscatter and color ratio. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of 26 nights during the campaign. Lidar observations with 17 minute temporal and 120-300 m spatial resolution indicate high spatial and temporal variability of the cirrus layers. Qualitative agreement is found between concurrent lidar measurements of backscatter ratio and volume depolarization.

  18. A study on the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio with combination of micro-pulse LIDAR and MODIS over Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. S.; Li, C. C.; Mao, J. T.; Lau, A. K. H.; Li, P. R.

    2006-08-01

    The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio is an important parameter for inverting LIDAR signals in the LIDAR equation. It is a complicated function of the aerosol microphysical characteristics. In this paper, a method to retrieve the column-averaged aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio by constraining the aerosol optical depths (AOD) from a Micro-pulse LIDAR (MPL) by the AOD measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is presented. Both measurements were taken on cloud free days between 1 May 2003 and 30 June 2004 over Hong Kong, a coastal city in south China. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol scattering coefficients with a forward scattering visibility sensor are compared with the LIDAR retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficients. The data are then analyzed to determine seasonal trends of the aetrosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio. In addition, the relationships between the extinction-to-backscatter ratio and wind conditions as well as other aerosol microphysical parameters are presented. The mean aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio for the whole period was found to be 29.1±5.8 sr, with a minimum of 18 sr in July 2003 and a maximum of 44 sr in March 2004. The ratio is lower in summer because of the dominance of oceanic aerosols in association with the prevailing southwesterly monsoon. In contrast, relatively larger ratios are noted in spring and winter because of the increased impact of local and regional industrial pollutants associated with the northerly monsoon. The extended LIDAR measurements over Hong Kong provide not only a more accurate retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles, but also significant substantial information for air pollution and climate studies in the region.

  19. Determination of backscattering cross section of individual particles from cytometric measurements: a new methodology.

    PubMed

    Duforêt-Gaurier, Lucile; Moutier, William; Guiselin, Natacha; Thyssen, Mélilotus; Dubelaar, George; Mériaux, Xavier; Courcot, Lucie; Dessailly, David; Loisel, Hubert

    2015-11-30

    A methodology is developed to derive the backscattering cross section of individual particles as measured with the CytoSense (CytoBuoy b.v., NL). This in situ flow cytometer detects light scatter in forward and sideward directions and fluorescence in various spectral bands for a wide range of particles. First, the weighting functions are determined for the forward and sideward detectors to take into account their instrumental response as a function of the scattering angle. The CytoSense values are converted into forward and sideward scattering cross sections. The CytoSense estimates of uniform polystyrene microspheres from 1 to 90 μm are compared with Mie computations. The mean absolute relative differences ΔE are around 33.7% and 23.9% for forward and sideward scattering, respectively. Then, a theoretical relationship is developed to convert sideward scattering into backscattering cross section, from a synthetic database of 495,900 simulations including homogeneous and multi-layered spheres. The relationship follows a power law with a coefficient of determination of 0.95. To test the methodology, a laboratory experiment is carried out on a suspension of silica beads to compare backscattering cross section as measured by the WET Labs ECO-BB9 and derived from CytoSense. Relative differences are between 35% and 60%. They are of the same order of magnitude as the instrumental variability. Differences can be partly explained by the fact that the two instruments do not measure exactly the same parameter: the cross section of individual particles for the CytoSense and the bulk cross section for the ECO-BB9. PMID:26698775

  20. Backscatter Modeling at 2.1 Micron Wavelength for Space-Based and Airborne Lidars Using Aerosol Physico-Chemical and Lidar Datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, V.; Rothermel, J.; Jarzembski, M. A.; Clarke, A. D.; Cutten, D. R.; Bowdle, D. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1999-01-01

    Space-based and airborne coherent Doppler lidars designed for measuring global tropospheric wind profiles in cloud-free air rely on backscatter, beta from aerosols acting as passive wind tracers. Aerosol beta distribution in the vertical can vary over as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude. Thus, the design of a wave length-specific, space-borne or airborne lidar must account for the magnitude of 8 in the region or features of interest. The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment under development by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and scheduled for launch on the Space Shuttle in 2001, will demonstrate wind measurements from space using a solid-state 2 micrometer coherent Doppler lidar. Consequently, there is a critical need to understand variability of aerosol beta at 2.1 micrometers, to evaluate signal detection under varying aerosol loading conditions. Although few direct measurements of beta at 2.1 micrometers exist, extensive datasets, including climatologies in widely-separated locations, do exist for other wavelengths based on CO2 and Nd:YAG lidars. Datasets also exist for the associated microphysical and chemical properties. An example of a multi-parametric dataset is that of the NASA GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in 1990 in which aerosol chemistry and size distributions were measured concurrently with multi-wavelength lidar backscatter observations. More recently, continuous-wave (CW) lidar backscatter measurements at mid-infrared wavelengths have been made during the Multicenter Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) experiment in 1995. Using Lorenz-Mie theory, these datasets have been used to develop a method to convert lidar backscatter to the 2.1 micrometer wavelength. This paper presents comparison of modeled backscatter at wavelengths for which backscatter measurements exist including converted beta (sub 2.1).

  1. Measurements of aerosol properties needed to infer backscatter characteristics in support of the NASA Doppler Lidar program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, E. M.; Black, M. S.; Pollard, C. O.

    1989-01-01

    During the first year two areas of work were emphasized, analysis of aerosol data to provide improved estimates of backscatter over the Pacific ocean and development of a global model for backscatter at different wavelengths and preparation and planning for the aircraft flights of the GLOVE program. Significant progress was made in each of these areas. The analytical work is a continuation of the GAMETAG analysis, and was directed toward the development of a backscatter model for the Pacific Oceanic free troposphere. This has included a further evaluation of relationships between the optical effects at different wavelengths, a comparison of modeled optical effects at differing temporal resolutions, and an investigation of the effects of sampling on the modeled results. An initial investigation of the predictability of 9 to 10 micrometers Beta values from other data sets as well as some preliminary comparisons of the modeling results with experimental data. The comparison of the optical effects was extended to make the comparisons for different sets of time bases between 1 and 20 minutes.

  2. Quasi-analytical determination of noise-induced error limits in lidar retrieval of aerosol backscatter coefficient by the elastic, two-component algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sicard, Michaël; Comerón, Adolfo; Rocadenbosch, Francisco; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Constantino

    2009-01-10

    The elastic, two-component algorithm is the most common inversion method for retrieving the aerosol backscatter coefficient from ground- or space-based backscatter lidar systems. A quasi-analytical formulation of the statistical error associated to the aerosol backscatter coefficient caused by the use of real, noise-corrupted lidar signals in the two-component algorithm is presented. The error expression depends on the signal-to-noise ratio along the inversion path and takes into account "instantaneous" effects, the effect of the signal-to-noise ratio at the range where the aerosol backscatter coefficient is being computed, as well as "memory" effects, namely, both the effect of the signal-to-noise ratio in the cell where the inversion is started and the cumulative effect of the noise between that cell and the actual cell where the aerosol backscatter coefficient is evaluated. An example is shown to illustrate how the "instantaneous" effect is reduced when averaging the noise-contaminated signal over a number of cells around the range where the inversion is started. PMID:19137026

  3. High spectral resolution lidar to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols. I - Theory and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Tracy, D. H.; Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high spectral resolution lidar technique to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols is described. Light backscattered by the atmosphere from a narrowband optically pumped oscillator-amplifier dye laser is separated into its Doppler broadened molecular and elastically scattered aerosol components by a two-channel Fabry-Perot polyetalon interferometer. Aerosol optical properties, such as the backscatter ratio, optical depth, extinction cross section, scattering cross section, and the backscatter phase function, are derived from the two-channel measurements.

  4. A study on aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio with combination of micro-pulse lidar and MODIS over Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Q. S.; Li, C. C.; Mao, J. T.; Lau, A. K. H.

    2006-04-01

    The aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio is an important parameter for inverting LIDAR signals in the LIDAR equation. It is also a complicated function of aerosol microphysical characteristics depending on geographical and meteorological conditions. In this paper, a method to retrieve the column-averaged aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio by constraining the aerosol optical depths (AOD) recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to the ones measured by a Micro-pulse LIDAR (MPL) is presented. Both measurements were taken between 1 May 2003 and 30 June 2004 over Hong Kong, a coastal city in south China. Simultaneous scattering coefficients measured by a forward scattering visibility sensor are compared with the LIDAR retrieval. The data are then analyzed in terms of monthly and seasonal trends. In addition, the relationships between the extinction-to-backscatter ratio and wind conditions as well as other aerosol microphysical parameters are also presented. The mean aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio for the whole period is found to be 28.9±6.1 sr, with the minimum of 12 sr in August 2003 and the maximum of 44 sr in March 2004. The ratio is lower in the summer because of the dominance of oceanic aerosols in association with the prevailing southwesterly monsoon. In contrast, relatively larger ratios are noted in spring and winter because of the increased impact of local and regional industrial pollutants associated with the northerly monsoon. The extended LIDAR measurements over Hong Kong provide not only a more accurate retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles, but also significant information for air pollution and climate studies in the region.

  5. Extracting integrated and differential cross sections in low-energy heavy-ion reactions from backscattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Diaz-Torres, A.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2014-11-01

    We suggest new methods to extract elastic (quasi-elastic) scattering angular distribution and reaction (capture) cross sections from the experimental elastic (quasi-elastic) backscattering excitation function taken at a single angle. A novel Coulomb scattering relation between angular momentum and centrifugal energy is used. The methodology is developed for addressing complementary reaction observables, improving the description of elastic differential cross section.

  6. Retrievals of atmospheric CO2 from simulated space-borne measurements of backscattered near-infrared sunlight: accounting for aerosol effects.

    PubMed

    Butz, André; Hasekamp, Otto P; Frankenberg, Christian; Aben, Ilse

    2009-06-20

    Retrievals of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from space-borne measurements of backscattered near-infrared sunlight are hampered by aerosol and cirrus cloud scattering effects. We propose a retrieval approach that allows for the retrieval of a few effective aerosol parameters simultaneously with the CO2 total column by parameterizing particle amount, height distribution, and microphysical properties. Two implementations of the proposed method covering different spectral bands are tested for an ensemble of simulated nadir observations for aerosol (and cirrus) loaded scenes over low- and mid-latitudinal land surfaces. The residual aerosol-induced CO(2) errors are mostly below 1% up to aerosol optical thickness 0.5. The proposed methods also perform convincing for scenes where cirrus clouds of optical thickness 0.1 overlay the aerosol. PMID:19543338

  7. Evaluation of computational models and cross sections used by MCNP6 for simulation of electron backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poškus, Andrius

    2016-02-01

    This work evaluates the accuracy of the single-event (SE) and condensed-history (CH) models of electron transport in Monte Carlo simulations of electron backscattering from thick layers of Be, C, Al, Cu, Ag, Au and U at incident electron energies from 200 eV to 15 MeV. The CH method is used in simulations performed with MCNP6.1, and the SE method is used in simulations performed with an open-source single-event code MCNelectron written by the author of this paper. Both MCNP6.1 and MCNelectron use mainly ENDF/B-VI.8 library data, but MCNelectron allows replacing cross sections of certain types of interactions by alternative datasets from other sources. The SE method is evaluated both using only ENDF/B-VI.8 cross sections (the "SE-ENDF/B method", which is equivalent to using MCNP6.1 in SE mode) and with an alternative set of elastic scattering cross sections obtained from relativistic (Dirac) partial-wave (DPW) calculations (the "SE-DPW method"). It is shown that at energies from 200 eV to 300 keV the estimates of the backscattering coefficients obtained using the SE-DPW method are typically within 10% of the experimental data, which is approximately the same accuracy that is achieved using MCNP6.1 in CH mode. At energies below 1 keV and above 300 keV, the SE-DPW method is much more accurate than the SE-ENDF/B method due to lack of angular distribution data in the ENDF/B library in those energy ranges. At energies from 500 keV to 15 MeV, the CH approximation is roughly twice more accurate than the SE-DPW method, with the average relative errors equal 7% and 14%, respectively. The energy probability density functions (PDFs) of backscattered electrons for Al and Cu, calculated using the SE method with DPW cross sections when energy of incident electrons is 20 keV, have an average absolute error as low as 4% of the average PDF. This error is approximately twice less than the error of the corresponding PDF calculated using the CH approximation. It is concluded that the

  8. Imaginary refractive-index effects on desert-aerosol extinction versus backscatter relationships at 351 nm: numerical computations and comparison with Raman lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Maria Rita; Barnaba, Francesca; De Tomasi, Ferdinando; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Tafuro, Anna Maria

    2004-10-10

    A numerical model is used to investigate the dependence at 351 nm of desert-aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients on particle imaginary refractive index (mi). Three ranges (-0.005 < or = mi < or = -0.001, -0.01 < or = mi < or = -0.001, and -0.02 < or = mi < or = -0.001) are considered, showing that backscatter coefficients are reduced as /mi/ increases, whereas extinction coefficients are weakly dependent on mi. Numerical results are compared with extinction and backscatter coefficients retrieved by elastic Raman lidar measurements performed during Saharan dust storms over the Mediterranean Sea. The comparison indicates that a range of -0.01 to -0.001 can be representative of Saharan dust aerosols and that the nonsphericity of mineral particles must be considered. PMID:15508611

  9. Comparison of Aerosol Backscatter and Extinction Profiles Based on the Earlinet Database and the Single Calculus Chain for Thessaloniki Greece (2001-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouri, K.; Siomos, N.; Giannakaki, E.; Amiridis, V.; d'Amico, G.; Balis, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles derived by the Single Calculus Chain (SCC) algorithm, which was developed within the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) are compared with profiles derived by the operational inversion algorithm of Thessaloniki. Measurements performed during the period 2001-2014, that have already been uploaded in the EARLINET database, are considered in this study. The objective of this study is to verify, for the case of Thessaloniki, the consistency of the climatology of the aerosol profiles based on SCC and the EARLINET database data respectively. In this paper we show example comparisons for each lidar product submitted in the official database.

  10. Scanning Backscatter Lidar Observations for Characterizing 4-D Cloud and Aerosol Fields to Improve Radiative Transfer Parameterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Miller, David O.

    2005-01-01

    Clouds have a powerful influence on atmospheric radiative transfer and hence are crucial to understanding and interpreting the exchange of radiation between the Earth's surface, the atmosphere, and space. Because clouds are highly variable in space, time and physical makeup, it is important to be able to observe them in three dimensions (3-D) with sufficient resolution that the data can be used to generate and validate parameterizations of cloud fields at the resolution scale of global climate models (GCMs). Simulation of photon transport in three dimensionally inhomogeneous cloud fields show that spatial inhomogeneities tend to decrease cloud reflection and absorption and increase direct and diffuse transmission, Therefore it is an important task to characterize cloud spatial structures in three dimensions on the scale of GCM grid elements. In order to validate cloud parameterizations that represent the ensemble, or mean and variance of cloud properties within a GCM grid element, measurements of the parameters must be obtained on a much finer scale so that the statistics on those measurements are truly representative. High spatial sampling resolution is required, on the order of 1 km or less. Since the radiation fields respond almost instantaneously to changes in the cloud field, and clouds changes occur on scales of seconds and less when viewed on scales of approximately 100m, the temporal resolution of cloud properties should be measured and characterized on second time scales. GCM time steps are typically on the order of an hour, but in order to obtain sufficient statistical representations of cloud properties in the parameterizations that are used as model inputs, averaged values of cloud properties should be calculated on time scales on the order of 10-100 s. The Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE) provides exceptional temporal (100 ms) and spatial (30 m) resolution measurements of aerosol and cloud backscatter in three

  11. Ground truth methods for optical cross-section modeling of biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalter, J.; Thrush, E.; Santarpia, J.; Chaudhry, Z.; Gilberry, J.; Brown, D. M.; Brown, A.; Carter, C. C.

    2011-05-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems have demonstrated some capability to meet the needs of a fastresponse standoff biological detection method for simulants in open air conditions. These systems are designed to exploit various cloud signatures, such as differential elastic backscatter, fluorescence, and depolarization in order to detect biological warfare agents (BWAs). However, because the release of BWAs in open air is forbidden, methods must be developed to predict candidate system performance against real agents. In support of such efforts, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) has developed a modeling approach to predict the optical properties of agent materials from relatively simple, Biosafety Level 3-compatible bench top measurements. JHU/APL has fielded new ground truth instruments (in addition to standard particle sizers, such as the Aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) or GRIMM aerosol monitor (GRIMM)) to more thoroughly characterize the simulant aerosols released in recent field tests at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG). These instruments include the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), the Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS), and the Aspect Aerosol Size and Shape Analyser (Aspect). The SMPS was employed as a means of measuring smallparticle concentrations for more accurate Mie scattering simulations; the UVAPS, which measures size-resolved fluorescence intensity, was employed as a path toward fluorescence cross section modeling; and the Aspect, which measures particle shape, was employed as a path towards depolarization modeling.

  12. Study of MPLNET-Derived Aerosol Climatology over Kanpur, India, and Validation of CALIPSO Level 2 Version 3 Backscatter and Extinction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Amit; Tripathi, S. N.; Kaul, D. S.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2012-01-01

    The level 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles from the NASA Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) at Kanpur, India, have been studied from May 2009 to September 2010. Monthly averaged extinction profiles from MPLNET shows high extinction values near the surface during October March. Higher extinction values at altitudes of 24 km are observed from April to June, a period marked by frequent dust episodes. Version 3 level 2 Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol profile products have been compared with corresponding data from MPLNET over Kanpur for the above-mentioned period. Out of the available backscatter profiles, the16 profiles used in this study have time differences less than 3 h and distances less than 130 km. Among these profiles, four cases show good comparison above 400 m with R2 greater than 0.7. Comparison with AERONET data shows that the aerosol type is properly identified by the CALIOP algorithm. Cloud contamination is a possible source of error in the remaining cases of poor comparison. Another source of error is the improper backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which further affects the accuracy of extinction coefficient retrieval.

  13. Studying the vertical aerosol extinction coefficient by comparing in situ airborne data and elastic backscatter lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, Bernadette; Herrmann, Erik; Bucci, Silvia; Fierli, Federico; Cairo, Francesco; Gysel, Martin; Tillmann, Ralf; Größ, Johannes; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Di Liberto, Luca; Di Donfrancesco, Guido; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Weingartner, Ernest; Virtanen, Annele; Mentel, Thomas F.; Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol particle optical properties were explored in a case study near the San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) ground station during the PEGASOS Po Valley campaign in the summer of 2012. A Zeppelin NT airship was employed to investigate the effect of the dynamics of the planetary boundary layer at altitudes between ˜ 50 and 800 m above ground. Determined properties included the aerosol particle size distribution, the hygroscopic growth factor, the effective index of refraction and the light absorption coefficient. The first three parameters were used to retrieve the light scattering coefficient. Simultaneously, direct measurements of both the scattering and absorption coefficient were carried out at the SPC ground station. Additionally, a single wavelength polarization diversity elastic lidar system provided estimates of aerosol extinction coefficients using the Klett method to accomplish the inversion of the signal, for a vertically resolved comparison between in situ and remote-sensing results. Note, however, that the comparison was for the most part done in the altitude range where the overlap function is incomplete and accordingly uncertainties are larger. First, the airborne results at low altitudes were validated with the ground measurements. Agreement within approximately ±25 and ±20 % was found for the dry scattering and absorption coefficient, respectively. The single scattering albedo, ranged between 0.83 and 0.95, indicating the importance of the absorbing particles in the Po Valley region. A clear layering of the atmosphere was observed during the beginning of the flight (until ˜ 10:00 LT - local time) before the mixing layer (ML) was fully developed. Highest extinction coefficients were found at low altitudes, in the new ML, while values in the residual layer, which could be probed at the beginning of the flight at elevated altitudes, were lower. At the end of the flight (after ˜ 12:00 LT) the ML was fully developed, resulting in

  14. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) via atmospheric aerosol (cloud) backscattering: recent results of coherent CO2 lidar measurements conducted at the Maui Space Surveillance Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Benjamin C.; Kovacs, Mark A.

    2001-01-01

    Textron Systems, under the US Army Space and Missile Defense Command's Field Ladar Tactical Transition Demonstration program, has been evaluating coherently detected, atmospheric aerosol backscattering as a method to extend the utility of the DIAL technique. This paper present recently obtained long range, multi-wavelength DIAL measurements utilizing cloud formations and a laboratory positioned absorption test cell. Good agreement between cloud and continuous wave laboratory measurements of the absorption spectra of ammonia have been obtained.

  15. A mixed multiscale model better accounting for the cross term of the subgrid-scale stress and for backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiry, Olivier; Winckelmans, Grégoire

    2016-02-01

    In the large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flows, models are used to account for the subgrid-scale (SGS) stress. We here consider LES with "truncation filtering only" (i.e., that due to the LES grid), thus without regular explicit filtering added. The SGS stress tensor is then composed of two terms: the cross term that accounts for interactions between resolved scales and unresolved scales, and the Reynolds term that accounts for interactions between unresolved scales. Both terms provide forward- (dissipation) and backward (production, also called backscatter) energy transfer. Purely dissipative, eddy-viscosity type, SGS models are widely used: Smagorinsky-type models, or more advanced multiscale-type models. Dynamic versions have also been developed, where the model coefficient is determined using a dynamic procedure. Being dissipative by nature, those models do not provide backscatter. Even when using the dynamic version with local averaging, one typically uses clipping to forbid negative values of the model coefficient and hence ensure the stability of the simulation; hence removing the backscatter produced by the dynamic procedure. More advanced SGS model are thus desirable, and that better conform to the physics of the true SGS stress, while remaining stable. We here investigate, in decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and using a de-aliased pseudo-spectral method, the behavior of the cross term and of the Reynolds term: in terms of dissipation spectra, and in terms of probability density function (pdf) of dissipation in physical space: positive and negative (backscatter). We then develop a new mixed model that better accounts for the physics of the SGS stress and for the backscatter. It has a cross term part which is built using a scale-similarity argument, further combined with a correction for Galilean invariance using a pseudo-Leonard term: this is the term that also does backscatter. It also has an eddy-viscosity multiscale model part that

  16. Inline Modeling of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer and Backscatter in Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Michel, P.; Marinak, M. M.; Jones, O. S.

    2014-10-01

    NIF Ignition experiments with gas-filled hohlraums use significant cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) to control implosion symmetry. They also display substantial stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) from inner laser beams, and associated ``hot'' electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA has been extended to include inline models for CBET and SRS. Coupled-mode equations in the strong damping limit (with linear, kinetic gain rates) are solved along the entire path of incident laser rays. Driven ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves, and inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption, are treated. The inline model includes heating by CBET-driven ion waves, which reduces subsequent CBET. SRS developing inside the target leads to more heating of the underdense fill - and more depletion of the inner beams reaching the hohlraum wall - than removing the escaping SRS light from the incident laser. Thus, SRS also modifies the plasma conditions so as to limit CBET. We compare inline results with post-processing CBET calculations on plasma conditions from simulations that do not include CBET or SRS. Prepared by LLNSL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Aerosol backscatter measurements at 10.6 microns with airborne and ground-based CO2 Doppler lidars over the Colorado High Plains. I - Lidar intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Vaughan, J. Michael; Brown, Derek W.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    An airborne continuous-wave (CW) focused CO2 Doppler lidar and a ground-based pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar were to obtain seven pairs of comparative measurements of tropospheric aerosol backscatter profiles at 10.6-micron wavelength, near Denver, Colorado, during a 20-day period in July 1982. In regions of uniform backscatter, the two lidars show good agreement, with differences usually less than about 50 percent near 8-km altitude and less than a factor of 2 or 3 elsewhere but with the pulsed lidar often lower than the CW lidar. Near sharp backscatter gradients, the two lidars show poorer agreement, with the pulsed lidar usually higher than the CW lidar. Most discrepancies arise from a combination of atmospheric factors and instrument factors, particularly small-scale areal and temporal backscatter heterogeneity above the planetary boundary layer, unusual large-scale vertical backscatter structure in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and differences in the spatial resolution, detection threshold, and noise estimation for the two lidars.

  18. Estimation of sea-surface winds using backscatter cross-section measurements from airborne research weather radar

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, P.H. . Remote Sensing Facility)

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for estimation of sea-surface winds using backscatter cross-section measurements from an airborne research weather radar. The technique is based on an empirical relation developed for use with satellite-borne microwave scatterometers which derives sea-surface winds from radar backscatter cross-section measurements. Unlike a scatterometer, the airborne research weather radar is a Doppler radar designed to measure atmospheric storm structure and kinematics. Designed to scan the atmosphere, the radar also scans the ocean surface over a wide range of azimuths, with the incidence angle and polarization angle changing continuously during each scan. The new sea-surface wind estimation technique accounts for these variations in incidence angle and polarization and derives the atmospheric surface winds. The technique works well over the range of wind conditions over which the wind speed-backscatter cross-section relation holds, about 2--20 m/s. The problems likely to be encountered with this new technique are evaluated and it is concluded that most problems are those which are endemic to any microwave scatterometer wind estimation technique. The new technique will enable using the research weather radar to provide measurements which would otherwise require use of a dedicated scatterometer.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients by a combined vibrational pure-rotational Raman lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balin, I.; Serikov, I.; Bobrovnikov, S.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; Arshinov, Y.; van den Bergh, H.

    2004-10-01

    Implementation of the pure-rotational Raman (PRR) lidar method for simultaneous measurement of atmospheric temperature, humidity, and aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients is reported. The isolation of two wavelength domains of the PRR spectrum and the suppression of the elastically scattered light is carried out by a double-grating polychromator. Experiments involving elastic backscatter from dense clouds and a solid target confirm the high level of suppression of the elastic light in the corresponding acquisition channels of the two selected PRR domains. Calibration of the temperature channel was done both by comparison with an experimentally verified atmospheric temperature model profile and by inter-comparison with radiosondes. Night-time temperature profiles with high vertical resolution were obtained up to the lower stratosphere. The PRR temperature profile combined with the water vapor mixing ratio obtained from the ro-vibrational Raman channel is used to estimate the relative humidity.

  20. The modulation of the radar backscattering cross section by long ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpers, W.; Jones, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The modulation transfer function which relates the backscattered microwave power to the long ocean wave field was measured in the North Sea during JONSWAP 75. Results from this tower experiment with an X-band scatterometer are presented and compared with the two-scale wave model (relaxation-time model).

  1. Electron Backscattered Diffraction Analysis Of Narrow Copper Interconnects In Cross-View To Investigate Scale Effect On Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Galand, Romain; Clement, Laurent; Waltz, Patrice; Wouters, Yves

    2010-11-24

    In this article, we propose to use Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) to characterize microstructure of copper interconnects of thin metal level in top view and cross view. These two views give very complementary information about microstructure of copper and thus about recrystallization of copper during annealing. Moreover, for minimum width, as interconnect is two times thicker than wide; It will be easier to analyze smaller interconnect of 45 nm node technology in cross-section. We look for evolution of texture and microstructure of copper with line width in top view and in cross view. We highlight the presence of two recrystallization mechanisms and also the fact that transition from one to the other is progressive with competition of both mechanisms.

  2. Detecting cross-equatorial wind change as a fingerprint of climate response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Xie, Shang-Ping; Tokinaga, Hiroki; Liu, Qinyu; Kosaka, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are a major driver of the twetieth century climate change. In climate models, the aerosol forcing, larger in the Northern than Southern Hemispheres, induces an interhemispheric Hadley circulation. In support of the model result, we detected a robust change in the zonal mean cross-equatorial wind over the past 60 years from ship observations and reanalyses, accompanied by physically consistent changes in atmospheric pressure and marine cloud cover. Single-forcing experiments indicate that the observed change in cross-equatorial wind is a fingerprint of aerosol forcing. This zonal mean mode follows the evolution of global aerosol forcing that is distinct from regional changes in the Atlantic sector. Atmospheric simulations successfully reproduce this interhemispheric mode, indicating the importance of sea surface temperature mediation in response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. As societies awaken to reduce aerosol emissions, a phase reversal of this interhemispheric mode is expected in the 21st century.

  3. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Extinction and Backscattering. Report 2; Derivation of Aerosol Real Refractive Index, Single-Scattering Albedo, and Humidification Factor using Raman Lidar and Aircraft Size Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D. N.; Evans, K. D.; Poellot, M.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles measured by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) during the remote cloud sensing (RCS) intensive operations period (IOP) at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) southern Great Plains (SGP) site during two nights in April 1994 are discussed. These profiles are shown to be consistent with the simultaneous aerosol size distribution measurements made by a PCASP (Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe) optical particle counter flown on the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft. We describe a technique which uses both lidar and PCASP measurements to derive the dependence of particle size on relative humidity, the aerosol real refractive index n, and estimate the effective single-scattering albedo Omega(sub 0). Values of n ranged between 1.4-1.5 (dry) and 1.37-1.47 (wet); Omega(sub 0) varied between 0.7 and 1.0. The single-scattering albedo derived from this technique is sensitive to the manner in which absorbing particles are represented in the aerosol mixture; representing the absorbing particles as an internal mixture rather than the external mixture assumed here results in generally higher values of Omega(sub 0). The lidar measurements indicate that the change in particle size with relative humidity as measured by the PCASP can be represented in the form discussed by Hattel with the exponent gamma = 0.3 + or - 0.05. The variations in aerosol optical and physical characteristics captured in the lidar and aircraft size distribution measurements are discussed in the context of the meteorological conditions observed during the experiment.

  4. Convective boundary layer evolution from lidar backscatter and its relationship with surface aerosol concentration at a location of a central China megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Wei; Yi, Fan

    2015-08-01

    Based on the 1 min backscatter ratio R profiles from the all-day lidar measurements in Wuhan, China (30.5°N, 114.4°E), hourly convective boundary layer (CBL) height was calculated with the variance method. The calculated CBL height sequence displays the regular diurnal cycle of the CBL top. The prevalent mixing process within the CBL is also revealed. During the CBL growth period, the backscatter ratio R falls visibly with increasing altitude and has large variance within the CBL, suggesting that more abundant aerosol particles from lower altitudes are being transported upward and being mixed with the local background or advected aerosol layers. During the CBL quasistationary period, R tends to be vertically uniform, and its variance reaches a daytime minimum within the CBL, indicating that the vertical homogenization of aerosol particles produced by the convectively driven mixing reaches its maximum. During the afternoon and early evening transition period, the vertical uniformity of R weakens and the variance enlarges again, implying that the reduced convectively driven mixing fails to maintain a high vertical homogeneity. When the 1 min R profiles were plotted together in terms of each 1 h interval, the fluctuating R curves at heights around the CBL top looked like a "node", representing the structure of the entrainment zone between the CBL and the free troposphere. The moving node depicts the evolution of the entrainment zone. The diurnal variation of the CBL height shows an obvious seasonal dependence which coincides with the annual variation of the local surface temperature. The surface fine particle concentration generally has a more complex diurnal cycle than that expected from the CBL-dilution/CBL-accumulation effect. But, it shows a strong annual variation which is out of phase with respect to that of the monthly mean maximum CBL height. This tends to suggest that the seasonal behavior of the surface fine particle concentration mainly depends on the

  5. Electron backscatter diffraction study of deformation and recrystallization textures of individual phases in a cross-rolled duplex steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zaid, Md; Bhattacharjee, P.P.

    2014-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture during cross-rolling and annealing was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction in a ferritic–austenitic duplex stainless steel. For this purpose an alloy with nearly equal volume fraction of the two phases was deformed by multi-pass cross-rolling process up to 90% reduction in thickness. The rolling and transverse directions were mutually interchanged in each pass by rotating the sample by 90° around the normal direction. In order to avoid deformation induced phase transformation and dynamic strain aging, the rolling was carried out at an optimized temperature of 898 K (625 °C) at the warm-deformation range. The microstructure after cross warm-rolling revealed a lamellar structure with alternate arrangement of the bands of two phases. Strong brass and rotated brass components were observed in austenite in the steel after processing by cross warm-rolling. The ferrite in the cross warm-rolling processed steel showed remarkably strong RD-fiber (RD//< 011 >) component (001)< 011 >. The development of texture in the two phases after processing by cross warm-rolling could be explained by the stability of the texture components. During isothermal annealing of the 90% cross warm-rolling processed material the lamellar morphology was retained before collapse of the lamellar structure to the mutual interpenetration of the phase bands. Ferrite showed recovery resulting in annealing texture similar to the deformation texture. In contrast, the austenite showed primary recrystallization without preferential orientation selection leading to the retention of deformation texture. The evolution of deformation and annealing texture in the two phases of the steel was independent of one another. - Highlights: • Effect of cross warm-rolling on texture formation is studied in duplex steel. • Brass texture in austenite and (001)<110 > in ferrite are developed. • Ferrite shows recovery during annealing retaining the (001

  6. A Lidar and Backscatter Sonde Aerosol Measurement Campaign at Table Mountain During February-March 1997: Observations of Stratospheric Background Aerosols and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyerle, G.; Gross, M.; Haner, D.; Kjome, N.; McDermid, I.; McGee, T.; Rosen, J.; Schafer, H. J.; Schrems, O.

    1999-01-01

    Altitude profiles of backscater ratio of the stratospheric background aerosol layer at altitudes between 15 and 25 km and high-altitude cirrus clouds at altitudes below 13 km are analyzed and discussed. Cirrus clouds were present on 16 of the 26 campaign nights.

  7. Direct measurements of mass-specific optical cross sections of single-component aerosol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Ma, Xiaofei; Gillis, Keith A; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols vary widely, being dependent upon particle composition, morphology, and mixing state. This diversity and complexity of aerosols motivates measurement techniques that can discriminate and quantify a variety of single- and multicomponent aerosols that are both internally and externally mixed. Here, we present a new combination of techniques to directly measure the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections of laboratory-generated aerosols that are relevant to atmospheric studies. Our approach employs a tandem differential mobility analyzer, an aerosol particle mass analyzer, cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectrometers, and a condensation particle counter. This suite of instruments enables measurement of aerosol particle size, mass, extinction and absorption coefficients, and aerosol number density, respectively. Taken together, these observables yield the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections without the need to model particle morphology or account for sample collection artifacts. Here we demonstrate the technique in a set of case studies which involve complete separation of aerosol by charge, separation of an external mixture by mass, and discrimination between particle types by effective density and single-scattering albedo. PMID:23875772

  8. NOAA backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    In the past year, NOAA has measured and analyzed another year's worth of backscatter over Boulder, CO. The average profile was computed from 80 satellite observations of backscatter spread throughout the year, using NOAA's CO2 coherent lidar operating at a wavelength of 10.59 microns. The seasonal averages show a familiar trend (highest backscattering in spring, perhaps due to Asian dust or biomass burning, and lowest backscattering in fall). The 1990 average profile was not significantly different from the 1988 or 1989 profiles, except that it displays a slight increase in the upper troposphere, perhaps due to the Redoubt Volcano. The NOAA's backscatter processing program (BETA) was refined to enable the calculation of gaseous absorption effects based on rawinsonde measurements, as well as using atmospheric models. NOAA participated in two intercomparisons of aerosol measuring instruments near Boulder, called FRLAB (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon Experiment). Considerable effort was also put into developing a multiagency science proposal to NASA headquarters to work with both JPL and NASA-Marshall to produce an airborne Doppler lidar facility for the DC-8.

  9. North-south cross sections of the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean from multiwavelength Raman/polarization lidar during Polarstern cruises

    PubMed Central

    Kanitz, T; Ansmann, A; Engelmann, R; Althausen, D

    2013-01-01

    Shipborne aerosol lidar observations were performed aboard the research vessel Polarstern in 2009 and 2010 during three north-south cruises from about 50°N to 50°S. The aerosol data set provides an excellent opportunity to characterize and contrast the vertical aerosol distribution over the Atlantic Ocean in the polluted northern and relatively clean southern hemisphere. Three case studies, an observed pure Saharan dust plume, a Patagonian dust plume east of South America, and a case of a mixed dust/smoke plume west of Central Africa are exemplarily shown and discussed by means of their optical properties. The meridional transatlantic cruises were used to determine the latitudinal cross section of the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Profiles of particle backscatter and extinction coefficients are presented as mean profiles for latitudinal belts to contrast northern- and southern-hemispheric aerosol loads and optical effects. Results of lidar observations at Punta Arenas (53°S), Chile, and Stellenbosch (34°S), South Africa, are shown and confirm the lower frequency of occurrence of free-tropospheric aerosol in the southern hemisphere than in the northern hemisphere. The maximum latitudinal mean AOT of 0.27 was found in the northern tropics (0– 15°N) in the Saharan outflow region. Marine AOT is typically 0.05 ± 0.03. Particle optical properties are presented separately for the marine boundary layer and the free troposphere. Concerning the contrast between the anthropogenically influenced midlatitudinal aerosol conditions in the 30– 60°N belt and the respective belt in the southern hemisphere over the remote Atlantic, it is found that the AOT and extinction coefficients for the vertical column from 0–5km (total aerosol column) and 1–5km height (lofted aerosol above the marine boundary layer) are a factor of 1.6 and 2 higher at northern midlatitudes than at respective southern midlatitudes, and a factor of 2.5 higher than at the clean marine southern

  10. Vertical Resolved Dust Mass Concentration and Backscatter Coefficient Retrieval of Asian Dust Plume Using Quartz Raman Channel in Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young M.; Mueller, Detlef; Shin, Sungkyun

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a method for estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust immersed in Asian dust plume using Raman scattering of quartz (silicon dioxide, silica). During the Asian dust period of March 15, 16, and 21 in 2010, Raman lidar measurements detected the presence of quartz, and successfully showed the vertical profiles of the quartz backscatter coefficient. Since the Raman backscatter coefficient was connected with the Raman backscatter differential cross section and the number density of quartz molecules, the mass concentration of quartz in the atmosphere can be estimated from the quartz backscatter coefficient. The weight percentage from 40 to 70 % for quartz in the Asian dust was estimated from references. The vertical resolved mass concentration of dust was estimated by quartz mass concentration and weight percentage. We also present a retrieval method to obtain dust backscatter coefficient from the mixed Asian dust and pollutant layer. OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds) simulations were conducted to calculate dust backscatter coefficient. The retrieved dust mass concentration was used as an input parameter for the OPAC calculations. These approaches in the study will be useful for characterizing the quartz dominated in the atmospheric aerosols and estimating vertical resolved mass concentration of dust. It will be especially applicable for optically distinguishing the dust and non-dust aerosols in studies on the mixing state of Asian dust plume. Additionally, the presented method combined with satellite observations is enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring for Asian dust.

  11. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  12. Atmospheric Backscatter Model Development for CO Sub 2 Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Kent, G.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the problems of modeling atmospheric backscatter from aerosols, in the lowest 20 km of the atmosphere, at CO2 wavelengths are presented, along with a summary of the relevant aerosol characteristics and their variability, and a discussion of the measurement techniques and errors involved. The different methods of calculating the aerosol backscattering function, both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, and limits are placed on the accuracy of these methods. The effects of changing atmospheric humidity and temperature on the backscatter are analyzed and related to the actual atmosphere. Finally, the results of modeling CO2 backscatter in the atmosphere are presented and the variation with height and geographic location discussed, and limits placed on the magnitude of the backscattering function. Conclusions regarding modeling techniques and modeled atmospheric backscatter values are presented in tabular form.

  13. High spectral resolution lidar to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols. II - Calibration and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroga, J. T.; Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Tryon, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    The high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measures optical properties of atmospheric aerosols by interferometically separating the elastic aerosol backscatter from the Doppler broadened molecular contribution. Calibration and data analysis procedures developed for the HSRL are described. Data obtained during flight evaluation testing of the HSRL system are presented with estimates of uncertainties due to instrument calibration. HSRL measurements of the aerosol scattering cross section are compared with in situ integrating nephelometer measurements.

  14. Cross-Characterization of Aerosol Properties from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors Facilitated by Regional Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol observations from space have become a standard source for retrieval of aerosol properties on both regional and global scales. Indeed, the large number of currently operational spaceborne sensors provides for unprecedented access to the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever to be available. Nonetheless, this resource remains under-utilized, largely due to the discrepancies and differences existing between the sensors and their aerosol products. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have designed and implemented an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) that facilitates the joint sampling of aerosol data from multiple sensors. MAPSS consistently samples aerosol products from multiple spaceborne sensors using a unified spatial and temporal resolution, where each dataset is sampled over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations together with coincident AERONET data samples. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between aerosol products from multiple sensors. Moreover, the well-characterized co-located ground-based AERONET data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products.

  15. Particle backscatter and extinction profiling with the spaceborne high-spectral-resolution Doppler lidar ALADIN: methodology and simulations.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, Albert; Wandinger, Ulla; Le Rille, Olivier; Lajas, Dulce; Straume, Anne Grete

    2007-09-10

    The European Space Agency will launch the Atmospheric Laser Doppler Instrument (ALADIN) for global wind profile observations in the near future. The potential of ALADIN to measure the optical properties of aerosol and cirrus, as well, is investigated based on simulations. A comprehensive data analysis scheme is developed that includes (a) the correction of Doppler-shifted particle backscatter interference in the molecular backscatter channels (cross-talk effect), (b) a procedure that allows us to check the quality of the cross-talk correction, and (c) the procedures for the independent retrieval of profiles of the volume extinction and backscatter coefficients of particles considering the height-dependent ALADIN signal resolution. The error analysis shows that the particle backscatter and extinction coefficients, and the corresponding extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio), can be obtained with an overall (systematic+statistical) error of 10%-15%, 15%-30%, and 20%-35%, respectively, in tropospheric aerosol and dust layers with extinction values from 50 to 200 Mm(-1); 700-shot averaging (50 km horizontal resolution) is required. Vertical signal resolution is 500 m in the lower troposphere and 1000 m in the free troposphere. In cirrus characterized by extinction coefficients of 200 Mm(-1) and an optical depth of >0.2, backscatter coefficients, optical depth, and column lidar ratios can be obtained with 25%-35% relative uncertainty and a horizontal resolution of 10 km (140 shots). In the stratosphere, only the backscatter coefficient of aerosol layers and polar stratospheric clouds can be retrieved with an acceptable uncertainty of 15%-30%. Vertical resolution is 2000 m. PMID:17846655

  16. Lidar determination of the composition of atmosphere aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the feasibility of using DIfferential SCatter (DISC) lidar to measure the composition of atmospheric aerosols are described. This technique involves multiwavelength measurements of the backscatter cross section of aerosols in the middle infrared, where a number of materials display strong restrahlen features that significantly modulate the backscatter spectrum. The theoretical work indicates that a number of materials of interest, including sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, and silicates, can be discriminated among with a CO2 lidar. An initial evaluation of this procedure was performed in which cirrus clouds and lower altitude tropospheric aerosols were developed. The observed ratio spectrum of the two types of aerosol displays structure that is in crude accord with theoretical expectations.

  17. Determination of the Ce142(γ,n) cross section using quasi-monoenergetic Compton backscattered γ rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Fritzsche, M.; Glorius, J.; Kwan, E.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Rusev, G.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Weller, H. R.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Knowing the energy dependence of the (γ,n) cross section is mandatory to predict the abundances of heavy elements using astrophysical models. The data can be applied directly or used to constrain the cross section of the inverse (n,γ) reaction. Purpose: The measurement of the reaction Ce142(γ,n)141Ce just above the reaction threshold amends the existing experimental database in that mass region for p-process nucleosynthesis and helps to understand the s-process branching at the isotope Ce141. Method: The quasi-monoenergetic photon beam of the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS), TUNL, USA, is used to irradiate naturally composed Ce targets. The reaction yield is determined afterwards with high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. Results: The experimental data are in agreement with previous measurements at higher energies. Since the cross-section prediction of the Ce142(γ,n) reaction is exclusively sensitive to the γ-ray strength function, the resulting cross-section values were compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations using different γ-ray strength functions. A microscopic description within the framework of the Hartree-Fock-BCS model describes the experimental values well within the measured energy range. Conclusions: The measured data show that the predicted (γ,n) reaction rate is correct within a factor of 2 even though the closed neutron shell N =82 is approached. This agreement allows us to constrain the (n,γ) cross section and to improve the understanding of the s-process branching at Ce141.

  18. Separating Dust Mixtures and Other External Aerosol Mixtures Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Vaughan, M.; Hostetler, C. A.; Rogers, R. R.; Hair, J. W.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol type is important for source attribution and for determining the magnitude and assessing the consequences of aerosol radiative forcing. The NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) has acquired considerable datasets of both aerosol extensive parameters (e.g. aerosol optical depth) and intensive parameters (e.g. aerosol depolarization ratio, lidar ratio) that can be used to infer aerosol type. An aerosol classification methodology has been used extensively to classify HSRL-1 aerosol measurements of different aerosol types including dust, smoke, urban pollution, and marine aerosol. However, atmospheric aerosol is frequently not a single pure type, but instead occurs as a mixture of types, and this mixing affects the optical and radiative properties of the aerosol. Here we present a comprehensive and unified set of rules for characterizing external mixtures using several key aerosol intensive parameters: extinction-to-backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio), backscatter color ratio, and depolarization ratio. Our mixing rules apply not just to the scalar values of aerosol intensive parameters, but to multi-dimensional normal distributions with variance in each measurement dimension. We illustrate the applicability of the mixing rules using examples of HSRL-1 data where mixing occurred between different aerosol types, including advected Saharan dust mixed with the marine boundary layer in the Caribbean Sea and locally generated dust mixed with urban pollution in the Mexico City surroundings. For each of these cases we infer a time-height cross section of mixing ratio along the flight track and we partition aerosol extinction into portions attributed to the two pure types. Since multiple aerosol intensive parameters are measured and included in these calculations, the techniques can also be used for cases without significant depolarization (unlike similar work by earlier researchers), and so a third example of a

  19. Chamber LIDAR measurements of aerosolized biological simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Siegrist, Karen M.; Baldwin, Kevin; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2009-05-01

    A chamber aerosol LIDAR is being developed to perform well-controlled tests of optical scattering characteristics of biological aerosols, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT), for validation of optical scattering models. The 1.064 μm, sub-nanosecond pulse LIDAR allows sub-meter measurement resolution of particle depolarization ratio or backscattering cross-section at a 1 kHz repetition rate. Automated data acquisition provides the capability for real-time analysis or recording. Tests administered within the refereed 1 cubic meter chamber can provide high quality near-field backscatter measurements devoid of interference from entrance and exit window reflections. Initial chamber measurements of BG depolarization ratio are presented.

  20. Impacts of Cross-Platform Vicarious Calibration on the Deep Blue Aerosol Retrievals for Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aboard Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hsu, N. Christina; Kwiatkowska, Ewa J.; Franz, Bryan A.; Meister, Gerhard; Salustro, Clare E.

    2012-01-01

    The retrieval of aerosol properties from spaceborne sensors requires highly accurate and precise radiometric measurements, thus placing stringent requirements on sensor calibration and characterization. For the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spedroradiometer (MODIS), the characteristics of the detectors of certain bands, particularly band 8 [(B8); 412 nm], have changed significantly over time, leading to increased calibration uncertainty. In this paper, we explore a possibility of utilizing a cross-calibration method developed for characterizing the Terral MODIS detectors in the ocean bands by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ocean Biology Processing Group to improve aerosol retrieval over bright land surfaces. We found that the Terra/MODIS B8 reflectance corrected using the cross calibration method resulted in significant improvements for the retrieved aerosol optical thickness when compared with that from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer, Aqua/MODIS, and the Aerosol Robotic Network. The method reported in this paper is implemented for the operational processing of the Terra/MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products.

  1. Effective absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of anthropogenic and biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Ali, Nujhat N.; Saiduddin, Mariyah N.; Wu, Michael; Lee, Hyun Ji (Julie); Aiona, Paige K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass absorption coefficient (MAC) values were measured for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples produced by flow tube ozonolysis and smog chamber photooxidation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically: α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, farnesene, guaiacol, imidazole, isoprene, linalool, ocimene, p-xylene, 1-methylpyrrole, and 2-methylpyrrole. Both low-NOx and high-NOx conditions were employed during the chamber photooxidation experiments. MAC values were converted into effective molecular absorption cross sections assuming an average molecular weight of 300 g/mol for SOA compounds. The upper limits for the effective photolysis rates of SOA compounds were calculated by assuming unity photolysis quantum yields and convoluting the absorption cross sections with a time-dependent solar spectral flux. A more realistic estimate for the photolysis rates relying on the quantum yield of acetone was also obtained. The results show that condensed-phase photolysis of SOA compounds can potentially occur with effective lifetimes ranging from minutes to days, suggesting that photolysis is an efficient and largely overlooked mechanism of SOA aging.

  2. Analyses of scattering characteristics of chosen anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaszczuk, Miroslawa; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Muzal, Michal

    2008-10-01

    In the work, analyses of scattering profile of chosen anthropogenic aerosols for two wavelengths (λ1 = 1064 nm and λ2 = 532 nm) were made. As an example of anthropogenic aerosol three different pyrotechnic mixtures (DM11, M2, M16) were taken. Main parameters of smoke particles were firstly analyzed and well described, taking particle shape and size into special consideration. Shape of particles was analyzed on the basis of SEM pictures, and particle size was measured. Participation of particles in each fixed fraction characterized by range of sizes was analyzed and parameters of smoke particles of characteristic sizes and function describing aerosol size distribution (ASD) were determinated. Analyses of scattering profiles were carried out on the basis of both model of scattering on spherical and nonspherical particles. In the case of spherical particles Rayleigh-Mie model was used and for nonspherical particles analyses firstly model of spheroids was used, and then Rayleigh-Mie one. For each characteristic particle one calculated value of four parameters (effective scattering cross section σSCA, effective backscattering cross section σBSCA, scattering efficiency QSCA, backscattering efficiency QBSCA) and value of backscattering coefficient β for whole particles population. Obtained results were compared with the same parameters calculated for natural aerosol (cirrus cloud).

  3. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  4. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  5. Cross-over study of the efficacy of four beta 2-sympathomimetic bronchodilator aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, B W; Tandon, M K; Paterson, J W

    1979-01-01

    1 Bronchodilator efficacy of four beta 2-sympathomimetic aerosols, fenoterol, orciprenaline, salbutamol and terbutaline has been compared in nine patients with chronic stable reversible airways obstruction using a double-blind placebo controlled cross-over design. Two puffs of each agent were given on two separate occasions to each of the patients and the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and the vital capacity (VC) were measured before and 30, 90, 150 and 210 min after administration. 2 Multivariate analysis of the data at 30 min showed FEV1 and VC in these patients to be so highly correlated that they could be considered as a single variable. 3 When absolute change in VC at 30 min was used as the response criterion, efficacy of the four drugs was significantly better than placebo (P < 0.01). It was not possible to rank all four drugs in order of effectiveness; fenoterol and salbutamol were significantly better than terbutaline and orciprenaline (P < 0.01) but this was complicated by a significant interaction effect between drugs and patients (P < 0.01). 4 Similar results were obtained when absolute and relative changes in FEV1 and VC and area under the curve were used as response variables. 5 The study demonstrates that important individual differences in patient response may be concealed if only average drug effects are considered. PMID:45195

  6. Aerosol retrieval from two-wavelength backscatter and one-wavelength polarization lidar measurement taken during the MR01K02 cruise of the R/V Mirai and evaluation of a global aerosol transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Okamoto, Hajime; Takemura, Toshihiko; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi

    2008-11-01

    Using two-wavelength lidar with one-wavelength depolarization measurement installed on the research vessel Mirai, we retrieved vertical distributions of extinction coefficients of water-soluble, sea-salt, and dust particles at 532 nm. In the retrieval, the mode radii, standard deviations, and refractive indexes for each aerosol component are prescribed; the retrieval uncertainties due to spherical assumption in our dust model are estimated to be 30-50%. The ship-based measurements were conducted in the western Pacific Ocean near Japan from 14 to 27 May 2001. For the analysis, we applied two-wavelength lidar algorithms to the three-channel lidar data, i.e., for signal strengths at 532 and 1064 nm and the total depolarization ratio at 532 nm. Water-soluble and sea-salt particles occurred below 1 km, whereas air masses dominated by water-soluble and dust particles were sometimes found above 1 km. We also investigated the correlation of sea-salt extinction coefficient with surface wind velocity for various altitudes. A positive correlation was found at low altitude, but no correlation was indicated at high altitude. We also compared the extinction coefficients of water-soluble and sea-salt particles directly under cloud bottom with those in clear-sky. Below clouds, the extinction coefficients of water-soluble and sea-salt particles were 1.6 and 1.4 times larger, respectively, than those in clear sky; this could be explained by hygroscopic growth using Hänel theory. Finally, we evaluated the global aerosol transport model SPRINTARS using the retrieved aerosol properties and measured lidar signals. The model underestimated sea salt and overestimated dust, although the general patterns agreed with the observed patterns.

  7. On observing acoustic backscattering from salinity turbulence.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Louis; Sastre-Cordova, Marcos M

    2011-08-01

    It has been hypothesized that at sufficiently high levels of oceanic salinity turbulence it should be possible to observe acoustic backscattering. However, there have been limited in situ measurements to confirm this hypothesis. Using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with upward and downward looking 1.2 MHz acoustic Doppler current profilers and with turbulence and fine scale sensors, measurements were performed in a region of intense turbulence and a strong salinity gradient. The approach taken was to correlate variations in the backscattered acoustic intensity, I, with a theoretical acoustic backscattering cross section per volume for salinity turbulence, σ(s), to obtain an estimated scattering cross section per volume, σ(e). Results indicated that of order 50% of the observed region was characterized by salinity turbulence induced backscattering. PMID:21877785

  8. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of methoxyphenols involved as atmospheric secondary organic aerosol precursors: Gas-phase vibrational cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, A.; Coeur, C.; Mouret, G.; Ahmad, W.; Tomas, A.; Pirali, O.

    2016-08-01

    Methoxyphenols are emitted in the atmosphere from biomass burning and recent works have shown the potential role of these oxygenated aromatic species in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. IR spectroscopic data that would enable their remote measurement in the atmosphere remain scarce in the literature. Room temperature Far-IR cross-sections of 4 methoxyphenols (2-methoxyphenol or guaiacol, 3-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol or syringol) have been determined using the THz synchrotron radiation available at SOLEIL. Mid- and near-IR regions have also been investigated with a conventional Fourier transform IR setup and allowed to provide a set of vibrational cross-sections of the studied methoxyphenols. Finally, gas-phase cross sections of two nitroguaiacol isomers (4-nitroguaiacol and 5-nitroguaiacol), two intermediate products involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols have been measured in the mid- and near-IR with a heated multi-pass cell. Harmonic and anharmonic density functional theory calculations were carried out for all the studied compounds and allowed a full assignment of the recorded rovibrational bands.

  10. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  11. Detector for high-energy photon backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Michael D.; Erker, Joseph W.; Duncan, Michael Z.; Hartford, Thomas J.; Sivers, E. A.; Hopkinson, James F.

    1993-12-01

    High energy photon backscatter uses pair production to probe deep beneath surfaces with single side accessibility or to image thick, radiographically opaque objects. At the higher photon energies needed to penetrate thick and/or highly attenuating objects, Compton backscatter becomes strongly forward peaked with relatively little backscatter flux. Furthermore, the downward energy shift of the backscattered photon makes it more susceptible to attenuation on its outbound path. Above 1.022 MeV, pair production is possible; at about 10 MeV, pari production crosses over Compton scatter as the dominant x-ray interaction mechanism. The backscattered photons can be hard x rays from the bremsstrahlung of the electrons and positrons or 0.511 MeV photons from the annihilation of the positron. Monte Carlo computer simulations of such a backscatter system were done to characterize the output signals and to optimize a high energy detector design. This paper touches on the physics of high energy backscatter imaging and describes at some length the detector design for tomographic and radiographic imaging.

  12. YAG aerosol lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Atmospheric Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Mission, using the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform, is designed to provide the magnitude and statistical distribution of atmospheric backscatter cross section at lidar operating wavelengths. This is a fundamental parameter required for the Doppler lidar proposed to be used on a spacecraft platform for global wind field measurements. The prime measurements will be made by a CO2 lidar instrument in the 9 to 10 micron range. These measurements will be complemented with the Goddard YAG Aerosol Lidar (YAL) data in two wavelengths, 0.532 and 1.06 micron, in the visible and near-infrared. The YAL, is being designed to utilize as much existing hardware, as feasible, to minimize cost and reduce implementation time. The laser, energy monitor, telescope and detector package will be mounted on an optical breadboard. The optical breadboard is mounted through isolation mounts between two low boy racks. The detector package will utilize a photomultiplier tube for the 0.532 micron channel and a silicon avalanche photo detector (APD) for the 1.06 micron channel.

  13. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  14. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  15. Estimation of the Mass Absorption Cross Section of the Organic Carbon Component of Aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

    2008-11-19

    Data taken from the MCMA-2003 and the 2006 MILAGRO field campaigns are used to examine the absorption of solar radiation by the organic component of aerosols. Using irradiance data from an Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and an actinic flux spectroradiometer, we find aerosol single scattering albedo, ω-0,λ, as a function of wavelength, λ. We find that in near-UV spectral range (defined here as 250 nm to 400 nm) ω-0,λ is much lower compared to ω-0,λ at 500 nm suggesting enhanced absorption in the near-UV range. Absorption by elemental carbon, dust, or gas cannot account for this enhanced absorption leaving only the organic part of the aerosol to account for it. We use data from a surface deployed Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) along with the inferred ω-0,λ to estimate the Mass Absorption Cross-section (MAC) for the organic carbon. We find that the MAC is about 10.5 m2/g at 300 nm and falls close to zero at about 500 nm; values that are roughly consistent with other estimates of organic carbon MAC. These MAC values can be considered as “radiatively correct” because when used in radiative transfer calculations the calculated irradiances match the measured irradiances at the wavelengths considered here. The uncertainties of individual estimates are quite large, ±30% at 300 nm for the random error, and even larger for a worst-case estimate of the systematic error, ±80%. The error represents the unusual circumstance where no error cancellation is permitted, and is unlikely ever to be realized.

  16. Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

  17. Atmospheric backscatter vertical profiles at 9.2 and 10.6 microns - A comparative study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard M.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reports a series of atmospheric aerosol backscatter measurements at two widely spaced CO2 laser wavelengths: 9.25 and 10.6 microns. Comparisons are made between backscatter coefficient profiles at these two wavelengths up to 20-km altitude. Measurements such as those reported here can be used to assess the feasibility of coherent CO2 lidar for wind measurements, and they also provide a partial test of backscatter model predictions.

  18. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the backscatter cross section of a dihedral corner reflector, using Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), is completed in the azimuthal plane, and very good agreement with experimental results is obtained. The advantages and limitations of the GTD and PTD techniques are discussed specifically for radar cross section applications. The utilization of GTD and PTD in oblique incidence diffraction from conducting targets is discussed. Results for equivalent current off-axis diffraction from the flat rectangular plate are presented using the equivalent currents of Knott, Senior, and Michaeli. The rectangular subdivision technique of Sikta, and its extension by Sunatara, alleviate some of the limitations of the equivalent techniques. As yet, neither technique can be used in bistatic scattering or for multiple scattering of a complex target.

  19. Use of a rapid-scanning backscatter LIDAR to validate dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Michael

    2001-04-01

    We review the history and capabilities of UMIST's Rapid- scanning Lidar (RASCAL). This is a backscatter Lidar designed to study aerosol dispersion from industrial plant. The system is fully computer-controlled and is based around a frequency- doubled Nd-YAG laser having a pulse repetition rate of 30 Hz. The signal is measured with a 10-bit, 60 MHz digitizer. Overall, a plume cross-section can be obtained in < 2 s and repeated every approximately 4 s. Such scanning can continue for several hours. Range resolution is typically 5 m with sensitivity down two a few (mu) g m-3 of aerosol. Over 10 years we have developed software to analyze the returns to estimate plume height, spread and intermittency; wind speed at plume height; and mixing layer depth. The backscatter from combustion plant plumes appears to be well enough conserved to allow point measurements within the plume to be interpreted as concentration/flux ratios, (c/Q) for comparison with dispersion models. This technique has recently been successfully tested using a chemical tracer. A substantial dataset acquired with the system has been used to test the predictions of various regulatory models. We present recent comparisons of modelled and measured c/Q at a small power station: the ensemble values show impressive agreement.

  20. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  1. Space Borne Cloud and Aerosol Measurements by the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System: Initial Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Steven P.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Mahesh, Ashwin; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    In January 2003 the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was successfully launched into orbit. Beginning in March 2003 GLAS will provide global coverage lidar measurement of the height distribution of clouds and aerosol in the atmosphere for up to five years. The characteristic and value of the unique data will be presented. The instrument is a basic backscatter lidar that operates at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. The mission data products for atmospheric observations include the calibrated, observed, attenuated backscatter cross section for cloud and aerosol; height detection for multiple cloud layers; planetary boundary layer height; cirrus and aerosol optical depth and the height distribution of aerosol and cloud scattering cross section profiles. The data is expected to significantly enhance knowledge in several areas of atmospheric science, in particular the distribution, transport and influence of atmospheric aerosol and thin clouds. Measurements of the coverage and height of polar and cirrus cloud should be significantly more accurate than previous global observations. In March and April 2003, airborne and ground based data verification experiments will be carried out. Initial results from the verification experiments and the first several months of operation will be presented.

  2. Initial assessment of space-based lidar CALIOP aerosol and cloud layer structures through inter-comparison with a ground-based back-scattering lidar and CloudSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Chung, E.-S.; Sohn, B.-J.; Berthier, S.; Raut, J.-C.; Chazette, P.; Dulac, F.

    2009-03-01

    This study presents results of the intercomparison of aerosol/cloud top and bottom heights obtained from a space-borne active sensor Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) onboard CALIPSO, and the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat, and the space-borne passive sensor Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Aqua, and ground-based 2-wavelenght polarization lidar system (532 and 1064 nm) at Seoul National University (SNU), Seoul, South Korea. This result confirms that the CALIPSO science team algorithms for the discrimination of cloud and aerosol as well as for the detection of layer top and base altitude provide reliable information both under cloud-free conditions and in cases of multiple aerosol layers underlying semi-transparent cirrus clouds. Simultaneous space-borne CALIOP, CPR and ground-based SNU lidar (SNU-L) measurements complement each other and can be combined to provide full information on the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, especially for thick opaque clouds. The aerosol extinction profiles from both lidars show good agreement for aerosols within the planetary boundary layer under cloud-free conditions and for the night-time CALIOP flight.

  3. Scattering directionality parameters of fractal black carbon aerosols and comparison with the Henyey-Greenstein approximation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-07-15

    Current radiation transfer schemes employ the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function to connect three single parameter representations of aerosol scattering directionality-the hemispherical upscatter fraction (β), the backscatter fraction (b), and the asymmetry parameter (g). The HG phase function does not account for particle morphology, which could lead to significant errors. In this Letter, we compute these single parameters for fractal black carbon (BC) aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The variations in β, g, and b as a function of aerosol morphology are examined. Corrected empirical relationships connecting these parameters are proposed. We find that the HG phase function could introduce up to a 35% error in β and g estimates. Interestingly, these errors are suppressed by the large mass absorption cross-sections of BC aerosols in radiative transfer calculations and contribute to ≤8% error in direct forcing efficiencies. PMID:27420533

  4. Estimation of black carbon content for biomass burning aerosols from multi-channel Raman lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Marmureanu, Luminita; Nicolae, Doina

    2015-04-01

    Biomass burning due to natural processes (forest fires) or anthropical activities (agriculture, thermal power stations, domestic heating) is an important source of aerosols with a high content of carbon components (black carbon and organic carbon). Multi-channel Raman lidars provide information on the spectral dependence of the backscatter and extinction coefficients, embedding information on the black carbon content. Aerosols with a high content of black carbon have large extinction coefficients and small backscatter coefficients (strong absorption), while aerosols with high content of organic carbon have large backscatter coefficients (weak absorption). This paper presents a method based on radiative calculations to estimate the black carbon content of biomass burning aerosols from 3b+2a+1d lidar signals. Data is collected at Magurele, Romania, at the cross-road of air masses coming from Ukraine, Russia and Greece, where burning events are frequent during both cold and hot seasons. Aerosols are transported in the free troposphere, generally in the 2-4 km altitude range, and reaches the lidar location after 2-3 days. Optical data are collected between 2011-2012 by a multi-channel Raman lidar and follows the quality assurance program of EARLINET. Radiative calculations are made with libRadTran, an open source radiative model developed by ESA. Validation of the retrievals is made by comparison to a co-located C-ToF Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, biomass burning, radiative model, black carbon Acknowledgment: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project no. 39/2012 - SIAFIM, and by Romanian Partnerships in priority areas PNII implemented with MEN-UEFISCDI support, project no. 309/2014 - MOBBE

  5. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  6. Implications of the In-Situ Measured Mass Absorption Cross Section of Organic Aerosols in Mexico City on the Atmospheric Energy Balance, Satellite Retrievals, and Photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, B.; Volkamer, R.; Barnard, J. C.

    2009-03-11

    The absorption of short wave incoming solar radiation by the organic component of aerosols has been examined by using data from the MCMA-2003 and the 2006 MILAGRO field campaigns. Both field efforts took place in and around Mexico City. Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) was derived as a function of wavelength (300-870 nm) by combining irradiance measurements from a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and spectrally resolved actinic flux measurements by spectroradiometry with a radiative transfer model (TUV). In addition, organic aerosol mass measured by a surface deployed aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was used to estimate the Mass Absorption Cross-section (MAC) of Organic Carbon (OC). It was found that the MAC for OC is about 10.5 m{sup 2}/g at 300 nm and falls close to zero at about 500 nm; these values are roughly consistent with previous MAC estimates of OC, and present first in-situ observations of this quantity.

  7. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  8. Measurements at 13.9 GHz of the radar backscattering cross section of the North Sea covered with an artificial surface film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huehnerfuss, H.; Alpers, W.; Jones, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The reduction of the Ku-band (13.9 GHz) normalized radar cross section (NRCS) by an artificial monomolecular surface film (oleyl alcohol) on the sea surface was measured in the North Sea during the 1975 Joint North Sea Wave Project, JONSWAP 75 experiment. The aim of the surface film experiment was to simulate natural surface films which often occur on the ocean surface and are produced by plankton or fish. NRCS measurements were obtained from an aircraft at incidence angles of 41 deg and 47 deg at vertical and horizontal polarizations. For winds between 3.5 and 4.4 m/sec the maximum measured reduction was 7.3 plus or minus 3.5 dB relative to the mean. In-situ measurements showed that the oleyl alcohol film reduced the surface tension from 74 to 43 dyne/cm.

  9. Radar backscatter modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Kozak, R. C.; Gurule, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The terrain analysis software package was restructured and documentation was added. A program was written to test Johnson Space Center's four band scatterometer data for spurious signals data. A catalog of terrain roughness statistics and calibrated four frequency multipolarization scatterometer data is being published to support the maintenance of Death Valley as a radar backscatter calibration test site for all future airborne and spacecraft missions. Test pits were dug through sand covered terrains in the Eastern Sahara to define the depth and character of subsurface interfaces responsible for either backscatter or specular response in SIR-A imagery. Blocky sandstone bedrock surfaces at about 1 m depth were responsible for the brightest SIR-A returns. Irregular very dense CaCO3 cemented sand interfaces were responsible for intermediate grey tones. Ancient river valleys had the weakest response. Reexamination of SEASAT l-band imagery of U.S. deserts continues.

  10. Development of a global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    The variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micrometers within the free troposphere was investigated and a model to describe this variation was developed. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets used were obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series, and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained that describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season.

  11. Development of global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1985-03-01

    The improvement of an understanding of the variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micron within the free troposphere and the development model to describe this was undertaken. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets are obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained, which describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season. Most data are available and greatest consistency is found inside the Northern Hemisphere.

  12. Development of global model for atmospheric backscatter at CO2 wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Wang, P. H.; Farrukh, U.; Deepak, A.; Patterson, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The improvement of an understanding of the variation of the aerosol backscattering at 10.6 micron within the free troposphere and the development model to describe this was undertaken. The analysis combines theoretical modeling with the results contained within three independent data sets. The data sets are obtained by the SAGE I/SAM II satellite experiments, the GAMETAG flight series and by direct backscatter measurements. The theoretical work includes use of a bimodal, two component aerosol model, and the study of the microphysical and associated optical changes occurring within an aerosol plume. A consistent picture is obtained, which describes the variation of the aerosol backscattering function in the free troposphere with altitude, latitude, and season. Most data are available and greatest consistency is found inside the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols Over Northeastern South Africa During the ARREX and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the ARREX-1999 and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season experiments a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The Mar was collocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI-2000 the processed Mar data yields a daytime time-series of layer mean/derived aerosol optical properties, including extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profile. Combined with 523 run aerosol optical depth and spectral Angstrom exponent calculations from available CIMEL sun-photometer data and normalized broadband flux measurements the temporal evolution of the near surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For the densest smoke/haze events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is found to be between 60-80/sr, and corresponding Angstrom exponent calculations near and above 1.75. The optical characteristics of an evolving smoke event from SAFARI-2000 are extensively detailed. The advecting smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers, causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of its occurrence. Surface broadband flux forcing due to the smoke is calculated, as is the evolution in the vertical aerosol extinction profile as measured by the Han Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol during ARREX-1999 are presented and discussed. The lack of corroborating observations the following year makes these observation; both unique and noteworthy in the scope of regional aerosol transport over southern Africa.

  14. A microwave backscattering model for precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermis, Seda

    A geophysical microwave backscattering model for space borne and ground-based remote sensing of precipitation is developed and used to analyze backscattering measurements from rain and snow type precipitation. Vector Radiative Transfer (VRT) equations for a multilayered inhomogeneous medium are applied to the precipitation region for calculation of backscattered intensity. Numerical solution of the VRT equation for multiple layers is provided by the matrix doubling method to take into account close range interactions between particles. In previous studies, the VRT model was used to calculate backscattering from a rain column on a sea surface. In the model, Mie scattering theory for closely spaced scatterers was used to determine the phase matrix for each sublayer characterized by a set of parameters. The scatterers i.e. rain drops within the sublayers were modelled as spheres with complex permittivities. The rain layer was bounded by rough boundaries; the interface between the cloud and the rain column as well as the interface between the sea surface and the rain were all analyzed by using the integral equation model (IEM). Therefore, the phase matrix for the entire rain column was generated by the combination of surface and volume scattering. Besides Mie scattering, in this study, we use T-matrix approach to examine the effect of the shape to the backscattered intensities since larger raindrops are most likely oblique in shape. Analyses show that the effect of obliquity of raindrops to the backscattered wave is related with size of the scatterers and operated frequency. For the ground-based measurement system, the VRT model is applied to simulate the precipitation column on horizontal direction. Therefore, the backscattered reflectivities for each unit range of volume are calculated from the backscattering radar cross sections by considering radar range and effective illuminated area of the radar beam. The volume scattering phase matrices for each range interval

  15. Thermal structure and radar backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topliss, B. J.; Stepanczak, M.; Guymer, Trevor H.; Cotton, David P.

    1994-12-01

    Infrared (IR) remote sensing from satellites is a well-proven technique for measuring sea surface temperature (SST) and for detecting and monitoring oceanographic features which have strong thermal contrast. Unfortunately, cloud cover often limits the continuity of the datasets and therefore their usefulness. There is some evidence that radar backscatter can be modified by sea surface temperature structure which raises the possibility that sensors such as synthetic aperture radar, scatterometers and altimeters could provide an all-weather complement to those operating in the IR. As a background, the results of a project which used coincident airborne radar and IR measurements of an eddy system in the Tyrrhenian Sea during October 1989 are briefly described. During a 5-day period, variations in radar backscatter of several dB occurred in a region where SST varied by 2 - 3 degree(s)C. The correlation between normalized radar cross section, sigma naught ((sigma) 0 or sigma-0) and SST appeared to depend on the ambient wind. Unfortunately, no satellite radar data were available during the experiment, since Geosat had just failed and ERS-1 was not due for launch until 1991. Building on this work, a study has commenced in which preliminary analyses of ERS-1 altimeter data, from tracks which repeat every 3 days, have been conducted for a section of the Gulf Stream after it has separated from the US coast. The along track variation of sigma naught has been compared with contemporaneous NOAA AVHRR-2 imagery and the relationship between SST structure and sigma naught for individual passes is discussed in terms of environmental parameters such as the local wind field and ocean currents. The possibility of the interaction of environmental parameters such as waves and currents are explored and some evidence for both wave enhancement and attenuation at the north wall of the Gulf Stream is illustrated. Tentative explanations for relationships observed by the various analysis

  16. Identification of aerosol composition from multi-wavelength lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper seeks to develop the potential of lidar for the identification of the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. Available numerical computations suggest that aerosols can be identified by the wavelength dependence of aerosol optical properties. Since lidar can derive the volume backscatter coefficient as a function of wavelength, a multi-wavelength lidar system may be able to provide valuable information on the composition of aerosols. This research theoretically investigates the volume backscatter coefficients for the aerosol classes, sea-salts, and sulfates, as a function of wavelength. The results show that these aerosol compositions can be characterized and identified by their backscatter wavelength dependence. A method to utilize multi-wavelength lidar measurements to discriminate between compositionally different thin aerosol layers is discussed.

  17. Evolution of wavelength-dependent mass absorption cross sections of carbonaceous aerosols during the 2010 DOE CARES campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Subramanian, R.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Jobson, B. T.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing require process level optical property models that are built on precise and accurate field observations. Evolution of aerosol optical properties for urban influenced carbonaceous aerosol undergoing transport and mixing with rural air masses was a focal point of the DOE Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects (CARES) campaign near Sacramento, CA in summer 2010. Urban aerosol was transported from Sacramento, CA (T0) to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to a rural site located near Cool, CA (T1). Aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were measured at the T0 and T1 sites using integrated photoacoustic acoustic/nephelometer instruments (PASS-3 and PASS-UV) at 781, 532, 405, and 375 nm. Single particle soot photometry (SP2) instrumentation was used to monitor black carbon (BC) mass at both sites. Combining data from these sensors allows estimate of the wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficient (MAC(λ)) and partitioning of MAC(λ) into contributions from the BC core and from enhancements from coating of BC cores. MAC(λ) measured in this way is free of artifacts associated with filter-based aerosol absorption measurements and takes advantage of the single particle sensitivity of the SP2 instrument, allowing observation of MAC(λ) on 10 minute and faster time scales. Coating was observed to enhance MAC(λ) by 20 - 30 % and different wavelength dependence for MAC(λ) was observed for urban and biomass burning aerosol. Further, T0 - T1 evolution of MAC(λ) was correlated with separately measured NO/NOy ratios and CO/CO2 ratios to understand the effects of aging & transport on MAC(λ) and the implications of aerosol processing that links air quality to radiative forcing on a regional scale. Aircraft observations made from the Gulfstream-1 during CARES are also analyzed to enhance process level understanding of the optical properties of fresh and aged carbonaceous aerosol in the urban-rural interface.

  18. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  19. Broadband stimulated Raman backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, B.; Aurand, B.; Lehmann, G.; Gangolf, T.; Schnell, M.; Kühl, T.; Spielmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Broadband amplification employing stimulated Raman backscattering is demonstrated. Using seed pulses with a bandwidth of about 200 nm, we study the amplification in a wide spectral range in a single laser shot. With chirped pump pulses and a Ne gas jet, we observed under optimized conditions, amplification in a range of about 80 nm, which is sufficient to support the amplification of sub-20 fs pulses. This broad amplification range is also in excellent agreement with PIC simulations. The conversion efficiency is at certain wavelengths as high as 1.2% and was measured to be better than 6 × 10‑3 on average.

  20. Laser-based air data system for aircraft control using Raman and elastic backscatter for the measurement of temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter coefficient.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2012-01-10

    Flight safety in all weather conditions demands exact and reliable determination of flight-critical air parameters. Air speed, temperature, density, and pressure are essential for aircraft control. Conventional air data systems can be impacted by probe failure caused by mechanical damage from hail, volcanic ash, and icing. While optical air speed measurement methods have been discussed elsewhere, in this paper, a new concept for optically measuring the air temperature, density, pressure, moisture, and particle backscatter is presented, being independent on assumptions on the atmospheric state and eliminating the drawbacks of conventional aircraft probes by providing a different measurement principle. The concept is based on a laser emitting laser pulses into the atmosphere through a window and detecting the signals backscattered from a fixed region just outside the disturbed area of the fuselage flows. With four receiver channels, different spectral portions of the backscattered light are extracted. The measurement principle of air temperature and density is based on extracting two signals out of the rotational Raman (RR) backscatter signal of air molecules. For measuring the water vapor mixing ratio-and thus the density of the moist air-a water vapor Raman channel is included. The fourth channel serves to detect the elastic backscatter signal, which is essential for extending the measurements into clouds. This channel contributes to the detection of aerosols, which is interesting for developing a future volcanic ash warning system for aircraft. Detailed and realistic optimization and performance calculations have been performed based on the parameters of a first prototype of such a measurement system. The impact and correction of systematic error sources, such as solar background at daytime and elastic signal cross talk appearing in optically dense clouds, have been investigated. The results of the simulations show the high potential of the proposed system for

  1. Measurements of Stratospheric Pinatubo Aerosol Extinction Profiles by a Raman Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abo, Makoto; Nagasawa, Chikao

    1992-01-01

    The Raman lidar has been used for remote measurements of water vapor, ozone and atmospheric temperature in the lower troposphere because the Raman cross section is three orders smaller than the Rayleigh cross section. We estimated the extinction coefficients of the Pinatubo volcanic aerosol in the stratosphere using a Raman lidar. If the precise aerosol extinction coefficients are derived, the backscatter coefficient of a Mie scattering lidar will be more accurately estimated. The Raman lidar has performed to measure density profiles of some species using Raman scattering. Here we used a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for transmitter and received nitrogen vibrational Q-branch Raman scattering signal. Ansmann et al. (1990) derived tropospherical aerosol extinction profiles with a Raman lidar. We think that this method can apply to dense stratospheric aerosols such as Pinatubo volcanic aerosols. As dense aerosols are now accumulated in the stratosphere by Pinatubo volcanic eruption, the error of Ramen lidar signal regarding the fluctuation of air density can be ignored.

  2. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  3. Coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kuz'min, V. L.; Romanov, V. P.

    2009-03-15

    Multiple light scattering by director fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals is considered. A uniform director orientation is assumed to be specified by an applied magnetic field. The coherent backscattering effect, which consists in the presence of a sharp light backscattering peak, is studied. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is used to calculate the multiple scattering intensity taking into account the contributions of ladder and cyclic diagrams. An analytical expression for the angular and polarization dependences of the coherent backscattering intensity is obtained in terms of the diffusion approximation. The calculation and experimental results are compared. The developed theory is shown to qualitatively describe the elliptical shape of the backscattering cone, to explain the absence of a coherent contribution for crossed polarizations, and to calculate the relative peak height.

  4. Modeling LIDAR Detection of Biological Aerosols to Determine Optimum Implementation Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; Aker, Pam M.

    2007-09-19

    This report summarizes work performed for a larger multi-laboratory project named the Background Interferent Measurement and Standards project. While originally tasked to develop algorithms to optimize biological warfare agent detection using UV fluorescence LIDAR, the current uncertainties in the reported fluorescence profiles and cross sections the development of any meaningful models. It was decided that a better approach would be to model the wavelength-dependent elastic backscattering from a number of ambient background aerosol types, and compare this with that generated from representative sporulated and vegetative bacterial systems. Calculations in this report show that a 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic backscatter LIDAR experiment will allow an operator to immediately recognize when sulfate, VOC-based or road dust (silicate) aerosols are approaching, independent of humidity changes. It will be more difficult to distinguish soot aerosols from biological aerosols, or vegetative bacteria from sporulated bacteria. In these latter cases, the elastic scattering data will most likely have to be combined with UV fluorescence data to enable a more robust categorization.

  5. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  6. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  7. Effect of curvature on the backscattering from a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Senior, T. B. A.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    Using a model previously developed for the backscattering cross section of a planar leaf at X-band frequencies and above, the effect of leaf curvature is examined. For normal incidence on a rectangular section of a leaf curved in one and two dimensions, an integral expression for the backscattered field is evaluated numerically and by a stationary phase approximation, leading to a simple analytical expression for the cross-section reduction produced by the curvature. Numerical results based on the two methods are virtually identical, and in excellent agreement with measured data for rectangular sections of coleus leaves applied to the surfaces of styrofoam cylinders and spheres of different radii.

  8. Conditions for observation of the enhanced backscattering phenomenon in a turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Janusz; Kirkiewicz, Jozef; Kravtsov, Yuri A.

    2003-11-01

    Influence of enhanced backscattering effect on laser measurements of dust and aerosols content in a turbulent atmosphere is discussed. It is shown that doubling of the backscattered light intensity, characteristic for enhanced backscattering, leads to overestimating dust content in the air. To avoid undesirable effect of overestimation, it is recommended to displace receiving aperture sidewise relatively to laser source. Other method to eliminate overestimation is to use wider laser beam and extended receiving aperture as compared to coherence radius of the scattered wave field.

  9. Eye safe short range standoff aerosol cloud finder.

    SciTech Connect

    Bambha, Ray P.; Schroder, Kevin L.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2005-02-01

    Because many solid objects, both stationary and mobile, will be present in an indoor environment, the design of an indoor aerosol cloud finding lidar (light detection and ranging) instrument presents a number of challenges. The cloud finder must be able to discriminate between these solid objects and aerosol clouds as small as 1-meter in depth in order to probe suspect clouds. While a near IR ({approx}1.5-{micro}m) laser is desirable for eye-safety, aerosol scattering cross sections are significantly lower in the near-IR than at visible or W wavelengths. The receiver must deal with a large dynamic range since the backscatter from solid object will be orders of magnitude larger than for aerosol clouds. Fast electronics with significant noise contributions will be required to obtain the necessary temporal resolution. We have developed a laboratory instrument to detect aerosol clouds in the presence of solid objects. In parallel, we have developed a lidar performance model for performing trade studies. Careful attention was paid to component details so that results obtained in this study could be applied towards the development of a practical instrument. The amplitude and temporal shape of the signal return are analyzed for discrimination of aerosol clouds in an indoor environment. We have assessed the feasibility and performance of candidate approaches for a fieldable instrument. With the near-IR PMT and a 1.5-{micro}m laser source providing 20-{micro}J pulses, we estimate a bio-aerosol detection limit of 3000 particles/l.

  10. Strain Determination Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.; Graff, A.; Altmann, F.

    2010-11-24

    In the present paper we demonstrate the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for high resolution elastic strain determination. Here, we focus on analysis methods based on determination of small shifts in EBSD pattern with respect to a reference pattern using cross-correlation algorithms. Additionally we highlight the excellent spatial and depth resolution of EBSD and introduce the use of simulated diffraction patterns based on dynamical diffraction theory for sensitivity estimation. Moreover the potential of EBSD for strain analysis of strained thin films with particular emphasis on appropriate target preparation which respect to occurring lattice defects is demonstrated.

  11. Relationship between the fraction of backscattered light and the asymmetry parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Helmuth

    2015-04-01

    The fraction of backscattered light is defined as the ratio of the integral of the volume scattering function over the backward half solid angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function over the full solid angle. It can be measured with an integrating nephelometer. On the other hand the asymmetry parameter is the integral over the full solid angle of the volume scattering function weighted with the cosine of the scattering angle divided by the integral of the volume scattering function. To determine the asymmetry parameter the measurement of the angular dependence of the volume scattering function is needed, which can be obtained e.g. with a polar nephelometer. The asymmetry parameter is an important input parameter for radiative transfer calculations in order to obtain information of effects of the atmospheric aerosol effects (climate, screening, visibility, and others). Unfortunately measurements of the asymmetry parameter of the atmospheric aerosol are scarce. It is obvious, that a relation between the asymmetry parameter and the backscattered fraction should exist: the smaller the backscattered fraction, the more asymmetric the scattering, thus the larger the asymmetry parameter. A large set of 6500 angular scattering data have been obtained at various locations of the world: Vienna (Austria), Kyoto (Japan), Granada (Spain) and Palencia (Spain). The aerosols in these locations were considerably different, ranging from continental, urban, maritime, to desert dust. The volume scattering function has been measured between 5° and 175° , the values for 0° to 5° and 175° to 180° have been obtained by extrapolation of the shape of the curve, thus the whole range of scattering angles was available for calculating the backscattered fraction and the asymmetry parameter of the aerosol. PIC A summary of all data is shown in figure 1. The majority of the data points suggest an unanimous relation between backscattering and asymmetry parameter. The

  12. Ultrasonic Backscattering from Suspended Erythrocytes: Dependence on Frequency and Size.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ihyuan

    The ultrasonic scattering properties of blood have been intensively investigated since the echo signal from red blood cells carries abundant diagnostic information for the study of blood flow and blood properties in the vessels. Recently, ultrasound of frequency higher than 20 MHz has been implemented in intravascular imaging to obtain better images of the vessel wall. In this research measurements were extended to 30 MHz to better understand the effect of blood on the operation of these intravascular devices. The experimentally measured backscatter of saline suspended porcine erythrocytes for frequency up to 30 MHz agrees very well with the theoretical analysis which indicate that Rayleigh scattering is still valid below this frequency. The analysis utilize the T-matrix method to calculate the backscattering cross section of an erythrocyte modeled as a fluid sphere, disk, and biconcave disk. Measurements on the backscattering coefficients of porcine, bovine, and lamb erythrocytes reveal that the backscatter has a square dependence on cell volume. The cell size dependent backscatter is also analyzed via a continuum approach. It is found that the echo intensity of high frequency ultrasound suffers greatly from the attenuation. The dilemma may be solved by using a spherically focused transducer. An analysis of the focused beam reflected from a perfect planar reflector leads to the modification of the standard substitution method for the backscatter measurement since the "image source" theory is found to be inappropriate for the focused beam. Reflection of the focused beam near the focal point is described based on Huygens' principle. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that the backscatter is dependent upon the position of the scatterer and the geometry of the transducer if a focused beam is used. Since ultrasound velocity information is needed for scattering measurements, an innovative method for measuring the acoustic speed and the attenuation coefficient

  13. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  14. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  15. Enhancement of backscattering by a conducting cylinder coated with gradient metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yuping; Shen, Zhongxiang; Feng, Keming

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a highly effective method for enhancing the backscattering by a conducting cylinder that is coated with a gradient metasurface. The employed metasurface exhibits a phase gradient continuously varying along the circumferential direction of the cylinder so that in-phase retroreflection can be produced to enhance the backscattering. It is demonstrated that the cylinder coated with the proposed gradient metasurface can generate backscattering very close to that from a conducting plate with the same dimensions as the cylinder's cross-section perpendicular to the incident plane wave. Compared with a bare conducting cylinder, the backscattering is significantly enhanced by the gradient metasurface made of conducting strips printed on a grounded dielectric substrate. Effects of cell numbers along the cylinder axis, incident angle, and polarization of the incoming electromagnetic wave on the backscattering enhancement are examined and discussed. A good agreement between simulated and measured backscattering results validates the observations.

  16. The detection and interpretation of long-term atmospheric change: Tasks in association with the shuttle solar backscatter ultraviolet spectral radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, John E.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives are to develop techniques to detect and remove long-term instrument drifts from the operational Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) data base using periodic measurements made by the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectral Radiometer and to evaluate the potential effects of scattering by atmospheric aerosols on our ability to detect trends in ozone using SBUV-class instruments.

  17. Micropulse lidar observations of tropospheric aerosols over northeastern South Africa during the ARREX and SAFARI 2000 dry season experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-07-01

    During the Aerosol Recirculation and Rainfall Experiment (ARREX 1999) and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dry season experiments, a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The lidar was colocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI 2000, a daytime time series of layer mean aerosol optical properties, including layer mean extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profiles are derived from the synthesis of the lidar data and aerosol optical depths from available AERONET Sun photometer data. Combined with derived spectral Angstrom exponents, normalized broadband flux measurements, and calculated air mass back-trajectories, the temporal evolution of the surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For dense biomass smoke events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is between 50 and 90 sr, and corresponding spectral Angstrom exponent values are between 1.50 and 2.00. Observations of an advecting smoke event during SAFARI 2000 are shown. The smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of 1 September 2000. Significant surface broadband flux forcing of over -50 W/m2 was measured in this event. The evolution of the vertical aerosol extinction profile is profiled using the lidar data. Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol layers during ARREX 1999 are presented and discussed. Back-trajectory analyses combined with lidar and Sun photometer measurements indicate the likelihood for these aerosols being the result of long-range particulate transport from the southern and central South America.

  18. The dose from Compton backscatter screening.

    PubMed

    Rez, Peter; Metzger, Robert L; Mossman, Kenneth L

    2011-04-01

    Systems based on the detection of Compton backscattered X rays have been deployed for screening personnel for weapons and explosives. Similar principles are used for screening vehicles at border-crossing points. Based on well-established scattering cross sections and absorption coefficients in conjunction with reasonable estimates of the image contrast and resolution, the entrance skin dose and the dose at a depth of 1 cm can be calculated. The effective dose can be estimated using the same conversion coefficients as used to convert exposure measurements to the effective dose. It is shown that the effective dose is highly dependent on image resolution (i.e. pixel size).The effective doses for personnel screening systems are unlikely to be in compliance with the American National Standards Institute standard NS 43.17 unless the pixel sizes are >4 mm. Nevertheless, calculated effective doses are well below doses associated with health effects. PMID:21068018

  19. Ultrasonic backscatter from cancellous bone: the apparent backscatter transfer function.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Mcpherson, Joseph A; Smathers, Morgan R; Spinolo, P Luke; Sellers, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques are being developed to detect changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis. Many techniques are based on measurements of the apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF), which represents the backscattered power from bone corrected for the frequency response of the measurement system. The ABTF is determined from a portion of the backscatter signal selected by an analysis gate of width τw delayed by an amount τd from the start of the signal. The goal of this study was to characterize the ABTF for a wide range of gate delays (1 μs ≤ τd ≤ 6 μs) and gate widths (1 μs ≤ τw ≤ 6 μs). Measurements were performed on 29 specimens of human cancellous bone in the frequency range 1.5 to 6.0 MHz using a broadband 5-MHz transducer. The ABTF was found to be an approximately linear function of frequency for most choices of τd and τw. Changes in τd and τw caused the frequency-averaged ABTF [quantified by apparent integrated backscatter (AIB)] and the frequency dependence of the ABTF [quantified by frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB)] to change by as much as 24.6 dB and 6.7 dB/MHz, respectively. τd strongly influenced the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of AIB with bone density (-0.95 ≤ R ≤ +0.68). The correlation of FSAB with bone density was influenced less strongly by τd (-0.97 ≤ R ≤ -0.87). τw had a weaker influence than τd on the measured values of AIB and FSAB and the correlation of these parameters with bone density. PMID:26683412

  20. Backscattering peak of hexagonal ice columns and plates.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, A; Grishin, I; Naats, E; Oppel, U

    2000-09-15

    The backward cross section of hexagonal ice crystals of arbitrary orientation is calculated for visible light by means of a ray-tracing code. It is shown that backscattering of the tilted crystals is caused by a corner-reflector-like effect. A very large peak of backscattering is found for a tilt of 32.5 degrees between the principal particle axis and the incidence direction. This peak is caused by multiple total internal reflections for part of the rays that are incident upon the skewed rectangular faces. Slant lidar measurements for remote sensing of cirrus clouds are proposed. PMID:18066226

  1. Satellite Lidar Data Assimilation For Improved Global Aerosol Forecasting: Lessons Learned From CALIOP, With an Eye Toward EarthCARE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. R.; Reid, J. S.; Tackett, J. L.; Westphal, D. L.; Winker, D. M.; Zhang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Active satellite-based aerosol profiling with lidar instruments represents a critical component of advanced global transport modeling and visibility forecasting applications. Parameterized aerosol source functions alone are limited in representing injection scenarios within a model. Two-dimensional variational (2D-VAR; x, y) assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from passive satellite radiance observations significantly improves the forecast system. However, this procedure does not compensate for any vertical redistribution of mass necessary. The expense of an inaccurate vertical profile of aerosol structure is corresponding errors downwind, since trajectory paths within successive model time steps typically diverge with height. Recent improvements to the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) include a newly-designed 3D-VAR assimilation system based on NASA/CNES satellite-borne Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aerosol backscatter profiles. NAAPS forecast skill improves with the benefit of 3D-VAR. However, it has proven considerably more challenging to implement this step than its 2D-VAR AOD counterpart. In this paper, we describe the process of assimilating satellite lidar measurements for aerosol applications, the development of model-friendly datasets, including a new NASA-disseminated product designed specifically for aerosol modeling applications, the importance of optimizing cross-track correlation in order to broaden the limited nadir-retrieved profile relative to the model grid and the potential for the near real-time/operational processing of ESA/JAXA Earth Clouds, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) high spectral resolution lidar datasets planned for late 2013. Lessons learned optimizing CALIOP datasets for modeling applications will not only improve performance in the short term, but ensure that developers are duly prepared for the coming EarthCARE data stream.

  2. Ku-band ocean radar backscatter observations during SWADE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Lou, S. H.; Neumann, G.

    1993-01-01

    We present results obtained by an airborne Ku-band scatterometer during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE). The specific objective of this study is to improve our understanding of the relationship between ocean radar backscatter and near surface winds. The airborne scatterometer, NUSCAT, was flown on the NASA Ames C-130 over an instrumented oceanic area near 37 deg N and 74 deg W. A total of 10 flights from 27 Feb. to 9 Mar. 1991 were conducted. Radar backscatter at incidence angles of 0 to 60 deg were obtained. For each incidence angle, the NUSCAT antenna was azimuthally scanned in multiple complete circles to measure the azimuthal backscatter modulations. Both horizontal and vertical polarization backscatter measurements were made. In some of the flights, the cross-polarization backscatter was measured as well. Internal calibrations were carried out throughout each of the flights. Preliminary results indicate that the radar was stable to +/-0.3 dB for each flight. In this paper, we present studies of the backscatter measurements over several crossings of the Gulf Stream. In these crossings, large air-sea temperature differences were encountered and substantial changes in the radar cross section were observed. We summarize the observations and compare them to the changes of several wind variables across the Gulf Stream boundary. In one of the flights, the apparent wind near the cold side of the Gulf Stream was very low (less than 3 m/s). The behavior of the radar cross sections at such low wind speeds and a comparison with models are presented. A case study of the effects of swell on the absolute cross section and the azimuthal modulation pattern is presented. Significant wave heights larger than m were observed during SWADE. The experimentally observed effects of the swell on the radar backscatter are discussed. The effects are used to assess the uncertainties in wind retrieval due to underlying waves. A summary of azimuthal modulation from our ten

  3. Probabilities and statistics for backscatter estimates obtained by a scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Willard J., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for the recovery of winds near the surface of the ocean from measurements of the normalized radar backscattering cross section must recognize and make use of the statistics (i.e., the sampling variability) of the backscatter measurements. Radar backscatter values from a scatterometer are random variables with expected values given by a model. A model relates backscatter to properties of the waves on the ocean, which are in turn generated by the winds in the atmospheric marine boundary layer. The effective wind speed and direction at a known height for a neutrally stratified atmosphere are the values to be recovered from the model. The probability density function for the backscatter values is a normal probability distribution with the notable feature that the variance is a known function of the expected value. The sources of signal variability, the effects of this variability on the wind speed estimation, and criteria for the acceptance or rejection of models are discussed. A modified maximum likelihood method for estimating wind vectors is described. Ways to make corrections for the kinds of errors found for the Seasat SASS model function are described, and applications to a new scatterometer are given.

  4. Aerosol in the Pacific troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.

    1989-01-01

    The use of near real-time optical techniques is emphasized for the measurement of mid-tropospheric aerosol over the Central Pacific. The primary focus is on measurement of the aerosol size distribution over the range of particle diameters from 0.15 to 5.0 microns that are essential for modeling CO2 backscatter values in support of the laser atmospheric wind sounder (LAWS) program. The measurement system employs a LAS-X (Laser Aerosol Spectrometer-PMS, Boulder, CO) with a custom 256 channel pulse height analyzer and software for detailed measurement and analysis of aerosol size distributions. A thermal preheater system (Thermo Optic Aerosol Descriminator (TOAD) conditions the aerosol in a manner that allows the discrimination of the size distribution of individual aerosol components such as sulfuric acid, sulfates and refractory species. This allows assessment of the relative contribution of each component to the BCO2 signal. This is necessary since the different components have different sources, exhibit independent variability and provide different BCO2 signals for a given mass and particle size. Field activities involve experiments designed to examine both temporal and spatial variability of these aerosol components from ground based and aircraft platforms.

  5. X-ray backscatter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, Dan-Cristian; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Callerame, J.

    2008-04-01

    In contrast to transmission X-ray imaging systems where inspected objects must pass between source and detector, Compton backscatter imaging allows both the illuminating source as well as the X-ray detector to be on the same side of the target object, enabling the inspection to occur rapidly and in a wide variety of space-constrained situations. A Compton backscatter image is similar to a photograph of the contents of a closed container, taken through the container walls, and highlights low atomic number materials such as explosives, drugs, and alcohol, which appear as especially bright objects by virtue of their scattering characteristics. Techniques for producing X-ray images based on Compton scattering will be discussed, along with examples of how these systems are used for both novel security applications and for the detection of contraband materials at ports and borders. Differences between transmission and backscatter images will also be highlighted. In addition, tradeoffs between Compton backscatter image quality and scan speed, effective penetration, and X-ray source specifications will be discussed.

  6. Ceilometer calibration for retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2015-03-01

    Ceilometers are durable compact backscatter lidars widely used to detect cloud base height. They are also useful for measuring aerosols. We introduced a ceilometer (CL51) for observing dust in a source region in Mongolia. For retrieving aerosol profiles with a backscatter lidar, the molecular backscatter signal in the aerosol free heights or system constant of the lidar is required. Although the system constant of the ceilometer is calibrated by the manufacturer, it is not necessarily accurate enough for the aerosol retrieval. We determined a correction factor, which is defined as the ratio of true attenuated backscattering coefficient to the measured attenuated backscattering coefficient, for the CL51 ceilometer using a dual-wavelength Mie-scattering lidar in Tsukuba, Japan before moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, Mongolia. The correction factor determined by minimizing the difference between the ceilometer and lidar backscattering coefficients was approximately 1.2±0.1. Applying the correction to the CL51 signals, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky-radiometer AOD during the observation period (13-17 February 2013) in Tsukuba (9 ×10-3 of mean square error). After moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, however, the AOD observed with the CL51 (calibrated by the correction factor determined in Tsukuba) was approximately 60% of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer AOD. The possible causes of the lower AOD results are as follows: (1) the limited height range of extinction integration (< 3 km); (2) change in the correction factor during the ceilometer transportation or with the window contamination in Mongolia. In both cases, on-site calibrations by dual-wavelength lidar are needed. As an alternative method, we showed that the backward inversion method was useful for retrieving extinction coefficients if the AOD was larger than 1.5. This retrieval method does not require the system constant and molecular backscatter signals

  7. Anomalous oscillations in the spectra of light backscattered by inhomogeneous microparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2007-03-01

    We report anomalous oscillatory features in the spectra of cross-polarized backscattered light from inhomogeneous dielectric microparticles. Numerical experiments based on the finite-difference-time-domain method demonstrate that cross-polarized backscattered spectra exhibit oscillation frequencies with two a priori surprising features. First, the oscillation frequencies decrease as the correlation length (Lc) of the particle's refractive index increases. Second, high-frequency oscillations exist even for Lc much smaller than the optical wavelength. These findings are exactly opposite to what is observed in co-polarized backscattering spectra, and are not expected from conventional optical scattering theory. We explain this anomalous behavior by examining the path-length distributions of the backscattered photons in the cross polarization. PMID:17500837

  8. ATLID: the European backscatter lidar development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueber, Martin F.

    1994-12-01

    ATLID (ATmospheric LIDar) is the ESA backscatter lidar instrument, prime candidate to be flown on a future European Earth observation mission. It will provide information on features of the Earth's atmosphere, such as top height of all cloud types and Planetary Boundary Layer aerosols, thin cloud extent, optical depth and depolarization. Based on the results of a pre- phase-A and two subsequent parallel phase-A studies, ESA decided in 1991 to initiate the ATLID Instrument Technology Predevelopment Program. It is broken into two stages: The first stage is devoted to concept selection, instrument design and breadboarding of critical technologies. The second stage will cover the design, development, assembly and testing of an advanced ATLID demonstration model. The first stage is further divided into a Phase 1, concept selection and preliminary design, which has been finished end of 1993, and a Phase 2, currently in progress, comprising the breadboarding of critical technologies and a final instrument design update. The selected instrument architecture is based on a one-axis scanning 60 cm telescope and a pulsed diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser transmitter. The estimated instrument volume, mass and power are 1.4 m X 1.6 m X 1.1 m, 200 kg and 450 W, respectively.

  9. Spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections of aerosolized biological live agents and simulants using five excitation wavelengths in a BSL-3 laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C; Santarpia, Joshua L; Brinkley, Kelly; Sickler, Todd; Coleman, Mark; Williamson, Chatt; Gurton, Kris; Felton, Melvin; Pinnick, Ronald G; Baker, Neal; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Hahn, Jerry; Smith, Emily; Alvarez, Ben; Prugh, Amber; Gardner, Warren

    2014-04-01

    A system for measuring spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections of single bioaerosol particles has been developed and employed in a biological safety level 3 (BSL-3) facility at Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC). It is used to aerosolize the slurry or solution of live agents and surrogates into dried micron-size particles, and to measure the fluorescence spectra and sizes of the particles one at a time. Spectrally-resolved fluorescence cross sections were measured for (1) bacterial spores: Bacillus anthracis Ames (BaA), B. atrophaeus var. globigii (BG) (formerly known as Bacillus globigii), B. thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), B. thuringiensis kurstaki (Btk), B. anthracis Sterne (BaS); (2) vegetative bacteria: Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pantoea agglomerans (Eh) (formerly known as Erwinia herbicola), Yersinia rohdei (Yr), Yersinia pestis CO92 (Yp); and (3) virus preparations: Venezuelan equine encephalitis TC83 (VEE) and the bacteriophage MS2. The excitation wavelengths were 266 nm, 273 nm, 280 nm, 365 nm and 405 nm. PMID:24718194

  10. Two-component wind fields from single scanning aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Derian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Hamada, Masaki

    2015-09-01

    An overview of recent research results on the performance of two motion estimation algorithms used to deduce two-component horizontal wind fields from ground-based scanning elastic backscatter lidar is presented. One motion estimation algorithm is a traditional cross-correlation method optimized for atmospheric lidar data. The second algorithm is a recently-developed wavelet-based optical flow. An intercomparison of experimental results with measurements from an independent Doppler lidar over an agricultural area in Chico, California, during daytime convective conditions in 2013-14 are presented. Finally, early results from application of the algorithms to data collected over the ocean from a compact and portable aerosol lidar that was deployed on the northern California coast in March of 2015 are presented.

  11. Raman backscatter measurement research on water vapor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    Raman backscatter techniques proved to be a useful remote sensing tool, whose full potential has not been realized. The types of information available from laser probes in atmospheric studies are reviewed. Detection levels for known Raman cross sections are calculated using the laser radar equation. Laboratory experiments performed for H2O, N2, SO2, O2 and HCL indicate that accurate wavelength cross sections need to be obtained, as well as more emphasis on obtaining accurate Raman cross sections of molecular species at wavelengths in the ultraviolet spectra.

  12. Rayleigh-backscattering doppler broadening correction for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lanlan; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    The spectral broadening by Rayleigh backscattering can cause large changes in water vapor echo signals, causing errors when the water vapor concentration is inversed by differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A correction algorithm is proposed to revise the errors due to the effect of laser spectral broadening. The relative errors of water vapor are calculated in cases of different aerosol distribution and temperature changes before and after correction. The results show that measurement errors due to the Doppler broadening are more than 5% before correction and a 2% measurement error after corrected for the case of a smooth, background aerosol distribution. However, due to the high aerosol gradients and strong temperature inversion, errors can be up to 40% and 10% with no corrections for this effect, respectively. The relative errors can reduce to less than 2% after correction. Hence, the correction algorithm for Rayleigh Doppler broadening can improve detection accuracy in H2O DIAL measurements especially when it is applied to high aerosol concentration or strong temperature inversion.

  13. Optical Modeling and Interpretation of TRACE-P Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, W. B.; Anderson, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Butler, C. F.; Brackett, V. G.; Jordan, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    The NASA Langley airborne UV Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system participated in the NASA-sponsored Transport and Atmospheric Chemistry near the Equator-Pacific (TRACE-P) mission, designed to study transport and transformation of emissions from Asia, from February 26 to April 9, 2001. The UV DIAL system measures backscatter in both nadir and zenith at 1064, 600, and 300 nm and depolarization ratio in the nadir at 600 nm. From the lidar backscatter measurement, the aerosol scattering ratio (ASR) is determined. The ASR is the ratio of aerosol backscatter to molecular backscatter and is derived by dividing the total backscatter by a standard atmosphere molecular density profile then normalizing in some low-aerosol region of the atmosphere. The wavelength dependence of aerosol backscatter, which is related to aerosol size, is determined from the ASRs at 1064 and 600 nm. The depolarization ratio, which is sensitive to irregularly shaped particles, is used to determine the presence of dust. Dust encountered during this mission originated primarily in China, but also in India and Africa. In situ instruments onboard the DC-8 provide additional information such as meteorological parameters, aerosol size distributions and chemical composition, and gas concentrations. These in situ data are being used along with the ASRs to help determine the aerosol optical properties. These optical properties will then enable the use of the extensive lidar profiles to achieve the goal of estimating the effects of aerosols on radiative forcing of the atmosphere over the western Pacific as well as over Asia near the coast.

  14. Relating multifrequency radar backscattering to forest biomass: Modeling and AIRSAR measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, significant efforts in microwave remote sensing were devoted to relating forest parameters to radar backscattering coefficients. These and other studies showed that in most cases, the longer wavelength (i.e. P band) and cross-polarization (HV) backscattering had higher sensitivity and better correlation to forest biomass. This research examines this relationship in a northern forest area through both backscatter modeling and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data analysis. The field measurements were used to estimate stand biomass from forest weight tables. The backscatter model described by Sun et al. was modified to simulate the backscattering coefficients with respect to stand biomass. The average number of trees per square meter or radar resolution cell, and the average tree height or diameter breast height (dbh) in the forest stand are the driving parameters of the model. The rest of the soil surface, orientation, and size distributions of leaves and branches, remain unchanged in the simulations.

  15. Particle scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients: An in situ closure and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Neusüß, Christian; Wendisch, Manfred; Stratmann, Frank; Koziar, Christian; Keil, Andreas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ebert, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Comparisons between measured and calculated aerosol scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients were made based on in situ, ground-based measurements during the Melpitz INTensive (MINT) and Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) field studies. Furthermore, airborne measurements made with the same type of instruments are reviewed and compared with the ground-based measurements. Agreement between measured and calculated values is on the order of ±20% for scattering and backscattering coefficients. A sensitivity analysis showed a large influence on the calculated particle scattering and backscattering coefficients resulting from sizing uncertainties in the measured number size distributions. Measured absorption coefficients were significantly smaller than the corresponding calculated values. The largest uncertainty for the calculated absorption coefficients resulted from the size-dependent fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the aerosol. A correction for the measured fractions of EC could significantly improve the agreement between measured and calculated absorption coefficients. The overall uncertainty of the calculated values was investigated with a Monte Carlo method by simultaneously and randomly varying the input parameters of the calculations, where the variation of each parameter was bounded by its uncertainty. The measurements were mostly found to be within the range of uncertainties of the calculations, with uncertainties for the calculated scattering and backscattering coefficients of about ±20% and for the absorption coefficients of about ±30%. Thus, to increase the accuracy of calculated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, it is crucial to further reduce the error in particle number size distribution measurement techniques. In addition, further improvement of the techniques for measuring absorption coefficients and further investigation of the measurement of the fraction of EC of the aerosol is

  16. Requirements For Lidar Aerosol and Ozone Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, S.; Woeste, L.

    Laser remote sensing is the preferable method, when spatial-temporal resolved data is required. Data from stationary laser remote sensing devices at the earth surface give a very good impression about daily, annual and in general time trends of a measurand and can be compared sometimes to airborne instruments to get a direct link between optical and other methods. Space borne measurements on the other hand are the only possibility for obtaining as much data, as modeller wish to have to initialise, compare or validate there computation. But in this case it is very difficult to get the input in- formation, which is necessary for good quantitative analysis as well as to find points for comparison. In outer space and other harsh field environments only the simplest and most robust equipment for the respective purpose should be applied, to ensure a long-term stable operation. The first question is: what do we have to know about the properties of the atmosphere to get reliable data from instruments, which are just simple enough?, and secondly: how to set-up the instruments? Even for the evaluation of backscatter coefficients a density profile and the so-called Lidar-ratio, the ratio of backscatter to total volume scatter intensity, is necessary. Raman Lidar is a possibility to handle this problem by measuring aerosol extinction profiles. But again a density profile and in addition a guess about the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinc- tion between the Raman and laser wavelength are required. Unfortunately the tech- nique for Raman measurements is much more sensible and less suited for space borne measurements, because of the much smaller back scatter cross sections and the result- ing weak signals. It becomes worth, when we will have to maintain special laser with colours at molecular absorption bands in outer space, to measure gas concentration. I want to present simulation of optical systems for laser remote sensing, experimental experiences and compare air

  17. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D.; Datte, P.; Krauter, K.; Bond, E.; Michel, P. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Divol, L.; Suter, L.; Meezan, N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Hibbard, R.; London, R.; Kilkenny, J.; Wallace, R.; Knittel, K.; Frieders, G.; Golick, B.; Ross, G.; Widmann, K.; Jackson, J.; and others

    2010-10-15

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of {approx}15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  18. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie. PMID:21033953

  19. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  20. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  1. Strong Bragg backscattering in reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Heuraux, S.; Popov, A. Yu

    2009-06-01

    The reflection of the probing microwave occurring in the vicinity of the backscattering Bragg resonance point (far from the cut-off) at a high enough density fluctuation level and leading to a large jump of the reflected wave phase and a corresponding time delay is described analytically using a 1D model. Explicit expressions for the reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and compared against results of numerical modelling. The criteria for transition to the nonlinear regime of strong Bragg backscattering (BBS) is obtained for both O-mode and X-mode reflectometry. It is shown that a strong nonlinear regime of BBS may occur in ITER at the 0.5-2% relative density perturbation level both for the ordinary and extraordinary mode probing. The possibility of probing wave trapping leading to strong enhancement of the electric field and associated high phase variation of the reflected wave due to BBS is demonstrated.

  2. CALIOP near-real-time backscatter products compared to EARLINET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigas, T.; Hervo, M.; Gimmestad, G.; Forrister, H.; Schneider, P.; Preißler, J.; Tarrason, L.; O'Dowd, C.

    2015-03-01

    The expedited near-real-time Level 1.5 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) products were evaluated against data from the ground-based European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET). Over a period of three years, lidar data from 48 CALIOP overpasses with ground tracks within a 100 km distance from an operating EARLINET station were deemed suitable for analysis and they included a valid aerosol classification type (e.g. dust, polluted dust, clean marine, clean continental, polluted continental, mixed and/or smoke/biomass burning). For the complete dataset comprising both PBL and FT data, the correlation coefficient was 0.86, and when separated into separate layers, the PBL and FT correlation coefficients were 0.6 and 0.85 respectively. The presence of FT layers with high attenuated backscatter led to poor agreement in PBL backscatter profiles between the CALIOP and EARLINET measurements and prompted a further analysis filtering out such cases. However, the correlation coefficient value for the complete dataset decreased marginally from 0.86 to 0.84 while the PBL coefficient increased from 0.6 up to 0.65 and the FT coefficient also decreased from 0.85 to 0.79. For specific aerosol types, the correlation coefficient between CALIOP backscatter profiles and ground-based lidar data ranged from 0.37 for polluted continental aerosol in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) to 0.57 for dust in the free troposphere (FT). The results suggest different levels of agreement based on the location of the dominant aerosol layer and the aerosol type.

  3. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  4. Post-volcanic stratospheric aerosol decay as measured by lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Fuller, W. H., Jr.; Swissler, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper summarizes and discusses results of lidar observations, at Hampton (Virginia), of the stratospheric aerosol vertical distribution for a period of 22 months (October 1974 to July 1976) after the volcanic eruption of the Volcan de Fuego in Guatemala. Data are presented in terms of lidar scattering ratio, vertically integrated aerosol backscattering, layer structure and location, and rawinsonde temperature profiles as a function of time. The results reveal a sudden increase in the stratospheric aerosol content after the volcanic eruption as well as its subsequent decline. There exists a high degree of correlation between the integrated aerosol backscattering and the tropopause height such that as one decreases the other increases and vice versa. Rapid decay of the stratospheric aerosol is found to occur over the late winter to early spring period.

  5. CALIOP near-real-time backscatter products compared to EARLINET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigas, T.; Hervo, M.; Gimmestad, G.; Forrister, H.; Schneider, P.; Preißler, J.; Tarrason, L.; O'Dowd, C.

    2015-11-01

    The expedited near-real-time Level 1.5 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) version 3 products were evaluated against data from the ground-based European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET). The statistical framework and results of the three-year evaluation of 48 CALIOP overpasses with ground tracks within a 100 km distance from operating EARLINET stations are presented and include analysis for the following CALIOP classifications of aerosol type: dust, polluted dust, clean marine, clean continental, polluted continental, mixed and/or smoke/biomass burning. For the complete data set comprising both the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the free troposphere (FT) data, the correlation coefficient (R) was 0.86. When the analysis was conducted separately for the PBL and FT, the correlation coefficients were R = 0.6 and R = 0.85, respectively. From analysis of selected specific cases, it was initially thought that the presence of FT layers, with high attenuated backscatter, led to poor agreement of the PBL backscatter profiles between the CALIOP and EARLINET and prompted a further analysis to filter out such cases; however, removal of these layers did not improve the agreement as R reduced marginally from R = 0.86 to R = 0.84 for the combined PBL and FT analysis, increased marginally from R = 0.6 up to R = 0.65 for the PBL on its own, and decreased marginally from R = 0.85 to R = 0.79 for the FT analysis on its own. This suggests considerable variability, across the data set, in the spatial distribution of the aerosol over spatial scales of 100 km or less around some EARLINET stations rather than influence from elevated FT layers. For specific aerosol types, the correlation coefficient between CALIOP backscatter profiles and the EARLINET data ranged from R = 0.37 for polluted continental aerosol in the PBL to R = 0.57 for dust in the FT.

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Classification from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Omar, A. H.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1) on the NASA B200 aircraft has acquired large datasets of aerosol extinction (532nm), backscatter (532 and 1064nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064nm) profiles during 349 science flights in 19 field missions across North America since 2006. The extinction-to-backscatter ratio ("lidar ratio"), aerosol depolarization ratios, and backscatter color ratio measurements from HSRL-1 are scale-invariant parameters that depend on aerosol type but not concentration. These four aerosol intensive parameters are combined to qualitatively classify HSRL aerosol measurements into eight separate composition types. The classification methodology uses models formed from "training cases" with known aerosol type. The remaining measurements are then compared with these models using the Mahalanobis distance. Aerosol products from the CALIPSO satellite include aerosol type information as well, which is used as input to the CALIPSO aerosol retrieval. CALIPSO aerosol types are inferred using a mix of aerosol loading-dependent parameters, estimated aerosol depolarization, and location, altitude, and surface type information. The HSRL instrument flies beneath the CALIPSO satellite orbit track, presenting the opportunity for comparisons between the HSRL aerosol typing and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask Aerosol Subtype product, giving insight into the performance of the CALIPSO aerosol type algorithm. We find that the aerosol classification from the two instruments frequently agree for marine aerosols and pure dust, and somewhat less frequently for pollution and smoke. In addition, the comparison suggests that the CALIPSO polluted dust type is overly inclusive, encompassing cases of dust combined with marine aerosol as well as cases without much evidence of dust. Qualitative classification of aerosol type combined with quantitative profile measurements of aerosol backscatter and extinction has many useful

  7. Development of a global backscatter model for NASA's laser atmospheric wind sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David; Collins, Laurie; Mach, Douglas; Mcnider, Richard; Song, Aaron

    1992-01-01

    During the Contract Period April 1, 1989, to September 30, 1992, the Earth Systems Science Laboratory (ESSL) in the Research Institute at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) conducted a program of basic research on atmospheric backscatter characteristics, leading to the development of a global backscatter model. The ESSL research effort was carried out in conjunction with the Earth System Observing Branch (ES43) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, as part of NASA Contract NAS8-37585 under the Atmospheric Dynamics Program at NASA Headquarters. This research provided important inputs to NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program, especially in the understanding of global aerosol life cycles, and to NASA's Doppler Lidar research program, especially the development program for their prospective space-based Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS).

  8. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kittaka, C.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.; Cook, A. L.; Haper, D. B.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol extinction profiles are derived from backscatter data by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), for example from coincident MODIS observations and without reliance on a priori assumptions about aerosol type or optical properties. The backscatter data were acquired with the NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The HSRL also simultaneously measures extinction independently, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the constrained retrieval of extinction from backscatter. We will show constrained extinction retrievals using various sources of column AOT, and examine comparisons with the HSRL extinction measurements and with a similar retrieval using data from the CALIOP lidar on the CALIPSO satellite.

  9. Averaging of Backscatter Intensities in Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, John J.; Pingitore, Nicholas E.; Westphal, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    Low uncertainty measurements on pure element stable isotope pairs demonstrate that mass has no influence on the backscattering of electrons at typical electron microprobe energies. The traditional prediction of average backscatter intensities in compounds using elemental mass fractions is improperly grounded in mass and thus has no physical basis. We propose an alternative model to mass fraction averaging, based of the number of electrons or protons, termed “electron fraction,” which predicts backscatter yield better than mass fraction averaging.

  10. Predicting reaction observables from back-scattering measurements in low-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified, reliable and useful method, based on reaction theory, for calculating a number of integrated and differential cross sections in low-energy heavy-ion collisions is presented. Simplified formulae provide predictions of reaction, capture and elastic-scattering differential cross sections, using experimental information about elastic and quasi-elastic back-scattering excitation functions.

  11. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  12. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and in vivo efficacy of shell cross-linked nanoparticle formulations carrying silver antimicrobials as aerosolized therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth N; Lin, Lily Yun; Smolen, Justin A; Tagaev, Jasur A; Gunsten, Sean P; Han, Daniel S; Heo, Gyu Seong; Li, Yali; Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Wright, Brian D; Panzner, Matthew J; Youngs, Wiley J; Brody, Steven L; Wooley, Karen L; Cannon, Carolyn L

    2013-06-25

    The use of nebulizable, nanoparticle-based antimicrobial delivery systems can improve efficacy and reduce toxicity for treatment of multi-drug-resistant bacteria in the chronically infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Nanoparticle vehicles are particularly useful for applying broad-spectrum silver-based antimicrobials, for instance, to improve the residence time of small-molecule silver carbene complexes (SCCs) within the lung. Therefore, we have synthesized multifunctional, shell cross-linked knedel-like polymeric nanoparticles (SCK NPs) and capitalized on the ability to independently load the shell and core with silver-based antimicrobial agents. We formulated three silver-loaded variants of SCK NPs: shell-loaded with silver cations, core-loaded with SCC10, and combined loading of shell silver cations and core SCC10. All three formulations provided a sustained delivery of silver over the course of at least 2-4 days. The two SCK NP formulations with SCC10 loaded in the core each exhibited excellent antimicrobial activity and efficacy in vivo in a mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. SCK NPs with shell silver cation-load only, while efficacious in vitro, failed to demonstrate efficacy in vivo. However, a single dose of core SCC10-loaded SCK NPs (0.74 ± 0.16 mg Ag) provided a 28% survival advantage over sham treatment, and administration of two doses (0.88 mg Ag) improved survival to 60%. In contrast, a total of 14.5 mg of Ag(+) delivered over 5 doses at 12 h intervals was necessary to achieve a 60% survival advantage with a free-drug (SCC1) formulation. Thus, SCK NPs show promise for clinical impact by greatly reducing antimicrobial dosage and dosing frequency, which could minimize toxicity and improve patient adherence. PMID:23718195

  14. Detection and classification of atmospheric aerosols using multi-wavelength CO II lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent work by ECBC in algorithm development for parameter estimation, detection, and classification of localized aerosols in the atmosphere using information provided by multiple-wavelength rangeresolved lidar. The motivation for this work is the need to detect, locate, and identify potentially toxic atmospheric aerosols at safe standoff ranges using time-series data collected at a discrete set of CO II laser wavelengths. The goals of the processing are to use the digitized transmitted and received backscatter array data to (1) decide if significant aerosol is present, (2) provide estimates of the range and size of the aerosol cloud, (3) produce estimates of the backscatter spectral dependence, and (4) use the backscatter signatures as feature vectors for training and implementation of a support vector machine aerosol classifier. The paper describes examples this processing derived from an extensive set of data collected by ECBC during JBSDS field-testing at Dugway Proving Ground.

  15. Measurements of backscattering phase matrices of crystalline clouds with a lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, Bruno V.; Kuznetsov, A. L.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.

    1995-09-01

    Backscattering phase matrices (BPM) have been measured by a polarization lidar with controllable polarization of output laser radiation for measuring all the Stokes parameters at (lambda) equals 532 nm. The degree of orientation and the preferred orientation of particles are determined. To this end, the properties of BPM for the model of axisymmetric prolate particel (APP) ensemble are used. It has been suggested that scattering anisotropy of an aeosol layer, whose BPM is not described by the APP model, is caused by birefringence. In laser sensing of the atmosphere ensembles of aerosol particles being sounded are characterized by the backscattering coefficient. Very often, in addition to this parameter, the intensities of polarized and crosspolarized components of backscattered radiation are determined provided that lineraly polarized laser radiation is used. The ratio of these components is called depolarization and it is assumed a measure of the particle nonsphericity. Use of the above characteristics is based on the concept that atmospheric aerosols are ensembles of spherical or nonspherical randomly oriented particles. An experience of optical studies has shown that such a concept is quite justifiable for the majority of atmospheric aerosols. However, these exists quite a wide class of natural aerosols in the atmosphere, namely, the crystalline clouds, for which the lidar equation in scalar form is insufficient since such aerosol ensembles should be described with a backscattering phase matrix. Below we shall demonstrate this by an example. Of course, the necessity of using the BPM to describe such aerosols is, in certain sense, obvious because anomalous optical phenomena resulting from a pronounced anisotropy of light scattering by crystal clouds have been known long ago. Nevertheless, such phenomena are too rare and it is not a proiri clear how often essential deviations from the scalar approximation occur. Thus, the experimental material available for our

  16. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  17. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  18. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  19. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  20. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  1. Analysis and interpretation of lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Data obtained with a 48 in. telescope lidar system are compared with results obtained using a one-dimensional stratospheric aerosol model to analyze various microphysical processes influencing the formation of this aerosol. Special attention is given to the following problems: (1) how lidar data can help determine the composition of the aerosol particles and (2) how the layer corresponds to temperature profile variations. The lidar record during the period 1974 to 1979 shows a considerable decrease of the peak value of the backscatter ratio. Seasonal variations in the aerosol layer and a gradual decrease in stratospheric loading are observed. The aerosol model simulates a background stratospheric aerosol layer, and it predicts stratospheric aerosol concentrations and compositions. Numerical experiments are carried out by using the model and by comparing the theoretical results with the experimentally obtained lidar record. Comparisons show that the backscatter profile is consistent with the composition when the particles are sulfuric acid and water; it is not consistent with an ammonium sulfate composition. It is shown that the backscatter ratio is not sensitive to the composition or stratospheric loading of condensation nuclei such as meteoritic debris.

  2. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  3. A pulsed-laser calibration system for the laser backscatter diagnostics at the Omega laser

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Sorce, C; Froula, D H; Rekow, V; Loughman, K; Knight, R; Glenzer, S H; Bahr, R; Seka, W

    2009-10-09

    A calibration system has been developed that allows a direct determination of the sensitivity of the laser backscatter diagnostics at the Omega laser. A motorized mirror at the target location redirects individual pulses of a mJ-class laser onto the diagnostic to allow the in-situ measurement of the local point response of the backscatter diagnostics. Featuring dual wavelength capability at the 2nd and 3rd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser, both spectral channels of the backscatter diagnostics can be directly calibrated. In addition, channel cross-talk and polarization sensitivity can be determined. The calibration system has been employed repeatedly over the last two years and has enabled precise backscatter measurements of both stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering in gas-filled hohlraum targets that emulate conditions relevant to those in inertial confinement fusion targets.

  4. Low Arabian dust extinction-to-backscatter ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamouri, R. E.; Ansmann, A.; Nisantzi, A.; Kokkalis, P.; Schwarz, A.; Hadjimitsis, D.

    2013-09-01

    Compared to typical values of 50-60 sr of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) at 532 nm of western Saharan mineral dust, low dust lidar ratios from 33.7±6.7 to 39.1±5.1 sr were derived from polarization lidar observations at Limassol, Cyprus (34°N, 33°E) during an outbreak of Arabian dust mainly from Syria in September 2011, indicated by particle linear depolarization ratios up to 28%-35%. The applied new polarization-lidar/photometer method for the extraction of the dust-related lidar-ratio information from the lidar data is outlined, and the results of the dust outbreak which lasted over several days are discussed. The results confirm an Aerosol Robotic Network photometer study on Arabian dust lidar ratios.

  5. Estimating slash pine biomass using radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Reich, Robin M.; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1991-01-01

    L-band HV multiple-incidence-angle aircraft synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were analyzed in relation to average stand biomass, basal area, and tree height for 55 slash pine plantations located in northern Florida. This information was used to develop a system of equations to predict average stand biomass as a function of L-band (24.5-cm) radar backscatter. The system of equations developed in this study using three-stage least-squares and combinatorial screening accounted for 97 percent of the variability observed in average stand biomass per hectare. When applied to an independent data set, the biomass equations had an average bias of less than 1 percent with a standard error of approximately 3 percent. These results indicate that future Shuttle Imaging Radar Systems (e.g., SIR-C, which will have cross-polarized radar sensors) should be able to obtain better estimates of forest biomass than were obtained with previous satellite radar missions, which utilized only HH-polarized SAR data.

  6. Performance of the Lidar Design and Data Algorithms for the GLAS Global Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.

    2007-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) launched in early 2003 is the first polar orbiting satellite lidar. The instrument design includes high performance observations of the distribution and optical scattering cross sections of atmospheric clouds and aerosol. The backscatter lidar operates at two wavelengths, 532 and 1064 nm. For the atmospheric cloud and aerosol measurements, the 532 nm channel was designed for ultra high efficiency with solid state photon counting detectors and etalon filtering. Data processing algorithms were developed to calibrate and normalize the signals and produce global scale data products of the height distribution of cloud and aerosol layers and their optical depths and particulate scattering cross sections up to the limit of optical attenuation. The paper will concentrate on the effectiveness and limitations of the lidar channel design and data product algorithms. Both atmospheric receiver channels meet and exceed their design goals. Geiger Mode Avalanche Photodiode modules are used for the 532 nm signal. The operational experience is that some signal artifacts and non-linearity require correction in data processing. As with all photon counting detectors, a pulse-pile-up calibration is an important aspect of the measurement. Additional signal corrections were found to be necessary relating to correction of a saturation signal-run-on effect and also for daytime data, a small range dependent variation in the responsivity. It was possible to correct for these signal errors in data processing and achieve the requirement to accurately profile aerosol and cloud cross section down to 10-7 llm-sr. The analysis procedure employs a precise calibration against molecular scattering in the mid-stratosphere. The 1064 nm channel detection employs a high-speed analog APD for surface and atmospheric measurements where the detection sensitivity is limited by detector noise and is over an order of magnitude less than at 532 nm. A unique feature of

  7. Feasibility of using Backscattered Mueller Matrix Images for Bioaerosol Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhui; Kattawar, George W.

    2006-03-01

    It has been shown that by looking at the backscattered radiance from an object illuminated by a laser beam one could effectively distinguish different morphologies from one another. However, if one wants to obtain all the information possible from elastic scattering either from a single particle or an ensemble of particles then one must use the Mueller matrix which contains all the polarization and radiance information available. In this talk, we will show that if we take advantage of the polarization information of the object, many more images related to the overall morphology as well as the internal structure of the object can be obtained. We will present images of the complete Mueller matrix to show the sensitivity of its sixteen components to both external and internal particle properties. We will also show that by using only one or two elements of this matrix one might be able to distinguish bioaerosols such as anthrax from more benign aerosols. We also show that the backscattering Mueller images contain more information than the forward scattering ones.

  8. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  9. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, P H; McCormick, M P; McMaster, L R; Chu, W P; Swissler, T J; Osborn, M T; Russell, P B; Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J; Rosen, J M; Hofmann, D J; Grams, G W; Fuller, W H; Yue, G K

    1989-06-20

    This paper describes an investigation of the comprehensive aerosol correlative measurement experiments conducted between November 1984 and July 1986 for satellite measurement program of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The correlative sensors involved in the experiments consist of the NASA Ames Research Center impactor/laser probe, the University of Wyoming dustsonde, and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne 14-inch (36 cm) lidar system. The approach of the analysis is to compare the primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments with the calculated ones based on the aerosol size distributions retrieved from the SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. The analysis shows that the aerosol size distributions derived from the SAGE II observations agree qualitatively with the in situ measurements made by the impactor/laser probe. The SAGE II-derived vertical distributions of the ratio N0.15/N0.25 (where Nr is the cumulative aerosol concentration for particle radii greater than r, in micrometers) and the aerosol backscatter profiles at 0.532- and 0.6943-micrometer lidar wavelengths are shown to agree with the dustsonde and the 14-inch (36-cm) lidar observations, with the differences being within the respective uncertainties of the SAGE II and the other instruments. PMID:11539801

  10. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Evaluating the Ratios for Water Vapor and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.

    2003-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman and Rayleigh-Mie lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here those results are used to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the water vapor mixing ratio, aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, and extinction to backscatter ratio (Sa). The error equations are developed, the influence of differential transmission is studied and different laser sources are considered in the analysis. The results indicate that the temperature functions become significant when using narrowband detection. Errors of 5% and more can be introduced in the water vapor mixing ratio calculation at high altitudes and errors larger than 10% are possible for calculations of aerosol scattering ratio and thus aerosol backscatter coefficient and extinction to backscatter ratio.

  11. Relationships between multipolarized radar backscatter and slash pine stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussin, Yousif Ali; Hoffer, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized L-band (24.5 cm) aircraft radar data was obtained for a primarily forested area in northern Florida. Based on the results of previous studies by Hoffer and Hussin (1989), a swath of medium incidence angle (35-25 deg) data was defined. Three groups of slash pine stands were located in the data: 4- to 17-year-old plantations, 18- to 48-year-old plantations, and 16- to 53-year-old natural stands. Stand data obtained from the forest-products companies operating in the area include age, tree height, diameter-at-breast height, basal area, volume (cords/acre), and density (trees/acre). Each of these stand parameters were compared to each of the four polarizations (HH, VV, VH, and HV) of the radar data for each group of stands. Statistically significant relationships were found between the radar backscatter and the forest stand parameters only for the 4- to 17-year-old slash pine plantation stands. In general, the cross-polarized radar backscatter was more highly correlated with the various stand parameters than the like-polarized backscatter, and the VV-polarized data were more highly correlated than the HH-polarized data.

  12. The effect of leaf size on the microwave backscattering by corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Attema and Ulaby (1978) proposed the cloud model to predict the microwave backscattering properties of vegetation. This paper describes a modification in which the biophysical properties and microwave properties of vegetation are related at the level of the individual scatterer (e.g., the leaf or the stalk) rather than at the level of the aggregated canopy (e.g., the green leaf area index). Assuming that the extinction cross section of an average leaf was proportional to its water content, that a power law relationship existed between the backscattering cross section of an average green corn leaf and its area, and that the backscattering coefficient of the surface was a linear function of its volumetric soil moisture content, it is found that the explicit inclusion of the effects of corn leaf size in the model led to an excellent fit between the observed and predicted backscattering coefficients. Also, an excellent power law relationship existed between the backscattering cross section of a corn leaf and its area.

  13. Initial Verification of GEOS-4 Aerosols Using CALIPSO and MODIS: Scene Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Colarco, Peter R.; Hlavka, Dennis; Levy, Robert C.; Vaughan, Mark A.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2007-01-01

    A-train sensors such as MODIS and MISR provide column aerosol properties, and in the process a means of estimating aerosol type (e.g. smoke vs. dust). Correct classification of aerosol type is important because retrievals are often dependent upon selection of the right aerosol model. In addition, aerosol scene classification helps place the retrieved products in context for comparisons and analysis with aerosol transport models. The recent addition of CALIPSO to the A-train now provides a means of classifying aerosol distribution with altitude. CALIPSO level 1 products include profiles of attenuated backscatter at 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization at 532 nm. Backscatter intensity, wavelength ratio, and depolarization provide information on the vertical profile of aerosol concentration, size, and shape. Thus similar estimates of aerosol type using MODIS or MISR are possible with CALIPSO, and the combination of data from all sensors provides a means of 3D aerosol scene classification. The NASA Goddard Earth Observing System general circulation model and data assimilation system (GEOS-4) provides global 3D aerosol mass for sulfate, sea salt, dust, and black and organic carbon. A GEOS-4 aerosol scene classification algorithm has been developed to provide estimates of aerosol mixtures along the flight track for NASA's Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar. GLAS launched in 2003 and did not have the benefit of depolarization measurements or other sensors from the A-train. Aerosol typing from GLAS data alone was not possible, and the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier has been used to identify aerosol type and improve the retrieval of GLAS products. Here we compare 3D aerosol scene classification using CALIPSO and MODIS with the GEOS-4 aerosol classifier. Dust, smoke, and pollution examples will be discussed in the context of providing an initial verification of the 3D GEOS-4 aerosol products. Prior model verification has only been attempted with surface mass

  14. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. New Examination of the Traditional Raman Lidar Technique II: Temperature Dependence Aerosol Scattering Ratio and Water Vapor Mixing Ratio Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, David N.; Abshire, James B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a companion paper, the temperature dependence of Raman scattering and its influence on the Raman water vapor signal and the lidar equations was examined. New forms of the lidar equation were developed to account for this temperature sensitivity. Here we use those results to derive the temperature dependent forms of the equations for the aerosol scattering ratio, aerosol backscatter coefficient, extinction to backscatter ratio and water vapor mixing ratio. Pertinent analysis examples are presented to illustrate each calculation.

  16. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  17. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  18. Backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2013-08-01

    Light backscattering by randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is considered within the framework of the physical-optics approximation. The fine angular structure of all elements of the Mueller matrix in the vicinity of the exact backward direction is first calculated and discussed. In particular, an approximate equation for the differential scattering cross section is obtained. Its simple spectral dependence is discussed. Also, a hollow of the linear depolarization ratio around the exact backward direction inherent to the long hexagonal columns is revealed. PMID:23903169

  19. Estimating and Modeling S-Band Lunar Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Tommy; Ustinov, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the estimates and modeling for S-band Lunar radar backscatter. By way of basic review it shows the average lunar radar behavior, the average lunar radar cross-section at 3.8-cm, 23-cm and 68-cm wavelengths. It also reviews the equations for estimating 13 cm scattering from 3.8 and 23 cm data. Charts show the inferred 13-cm average scattering derived from interpolation of the 1960's observations and the modeled 13-cm average scattering. It also reviews the scattering differences: between linear polarizations from slopes from roughness.

  20. Retrieval of integral parameters of tropospheric aerosol from two-wavelength lidar sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, V. A.

    2007-10-01

    A scheme of interpreting the data of two-wavelength lidar sounding is proposed. The scheme is based on functional relationships between the lidar ratios and between some integral characteristics of aerosol and the ratio of the backscattering coefficients at the sounding wavelengths. The AERONET data, results of contact aerosol measurements and multiwavelength lidar sounding, and the OPAC aerosol model are used to find these functional relationships, which are statistical in character. Analysis of data is made separately for continental, dust, oceanic, and smoke aerosols. Backscattering for mineral aerosol fractions are calculated for a model of randomly oriented spheroids. A numerical experiment shows that the errors in determining a number of integral parameters of aerosol (extinction coefficient, characteristic radius of particles, volume concentrations) that are due to the statistical straggling of lidar ratios and other specified integral characteristics are no greater than 32% if the optical thickness of the sounding layer is no greater than 1.

  1. Vertical aerosol structure and aerosol mixed layer heights determined with scanning shipborne lidars during the TexAQS II study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, B. J.; Senff, C. J.; Tucker, S. C.; Eberhard, W. L.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Machol, J.; Brewer, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    The NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory (ESRL) deployed the Ozone Profiling Atmospheric LIDAR (OPAL) on the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the summer of 2006 for the Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS II). Calibrated aerosol backscatter profiles were determined from data collected at the 355 nm wavelength using a modified Klett retrieval method. OPAL employs a unique scan sequence that consists of staring at multiple elevation angles between 2 and 90 degrees, which is repeated approx. every 90 sec. Blending the data from the various elevation angles allows to extend the aerosol backscatter profiles down to near the surface (approximately 10 meters ASL), while maintaining a high spatial resolution (5 meters). Successful application of this technique requires the aerosol distribution to be sufficiently horizontally homogeneous over several kilometers. Estimates of aerosol mixed layer height were determined by applying a Haar wavelet transform method to detect the gradient that is often present at the top of the boundary layer. Co-located on the R/V Ronald H. Brown, was NOAA/ESRL's High Resolution Doppler LIDAR (HRDL). Aerosol mixed layer heights were also estimated using the data from the 2 micron Doppler LIDAR. A comparison of the mixed layer heights as determined from each LIDAR's observations was used to choose the height of the layer likely connected with the surface. The vertical structure of aerosols in the lower troposphere, in particular the presence of aerosol layers above the boundary layer, is important in understanding radiative effects of aerosols. We will present aerosol backscatter structure in the lower troposphere encountered during the TexAQS II study as well as a comparison of relative aerosol content in the free troposphere compared to that within the boundary layer.

  2. Radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jeff

    1998-11-01

    The effect of aerosols and clouds on Earth's shortwave radiation budget is studied in this thesis. An expression for the global annual mean radiative forcing due to sulfate aerosols is extended for absorbing aerosols using a two-stream approximation. This expression depends on the backscattering fraction of the aerosol which varies with the effective radius of the aerosol size distribution. This variation leads to a factor of 2.0 variation in the radiative forcing of slightly absorbing aerosols. Water vapor condenses onto hygroscopic aerosols which results in a change in size and a change in the concentration of the chemical components of the aerosol. The original Köhler equation accurately describes the equilibrium size of a hygroscopic aerosol. Use of the modified Köhler equation leads to errors due to its thermodynamically inconsistent nature. On a global annual average, the direct radiative forcing of hygroscopic sulfate aerosol is -0.69 W m-2. Over highly polluted regions, the local radiative forcing can be as high as -7 W m-2 which is comparable to the forcing due to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. Using a plane-parallel model, an analytical expression is derived for the cloud radiative forcing ratio which is used as a measure of enhanced shortwave radiation absorption of clouds. With this model, high values of this ratio can be achieved by thick clouds with absorptances of approximately 0.3. High values of the ratio can also be obtained with low level clouds if the transmittance of the atmosphere above the cloud is reduced to approximately 0.8. This can be achieved by a high concentration of strongly absorbing aerosols.

  3. C-band backscattering from corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  4. Santa Barbara microwave backscattering model for woodlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y.; Day, J.; Sun, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Santa Barbara microwave backscattering model for woodland vegetation with discontinuous tree canopies is described, with an emphasis on the construction of the model from probability-weighted sub-components. The modelling approach is to treat individual tree crowns as scatterers and attenuators, using the probabilities of scattering and attenuation to compute total backscatter. Four major model components are defined: surface backscattering, crown volume scattering, multi-path interactions between crown and ground, and double-bounce trunk-ground interactions. Each component is divided into subcomponents having distinct scattering and attenuation paths. The scattering of each subcomponent is computed and weighted by the probability of its occurrence. Total backscatter from a simulated woodland stand is computed by incoherent summation of the components. Recent revisions to the model have modified the subcomponent definitions and improved the probability formulation.

  5. Coherent microwave backscatter of natural snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.; Angelakos, D. J.; Clapp, F. D.; Smith, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The backscatter of natural snowpacks was measured using a swept-frequency system operating from 5.8 to 8.0 GHz. Snow layering produced sequences of maxima and minima in backscatter intensity, with typical peak-to-valley ratios of 15 db. Wetness produced in the upper portion of the snowpack by solar heat input enhanced the effect of layering. The layer response persisted for incidence exhibits predominantly coherent properties. Frequency modulation of the incident signal masked the layer response by averaging the unmodulated response over the bandwidth represented by the modulation. Further changes in backscatter were attributed to changes in wetness in the surface regions of the snowpack; for a fixed frequency of 13.5 GHz and incidence angle of 39 deg, the backscatter decreased typically 15 db between 11 A.M. and noon, and returned to approximately its initial level of overnight.

  6. Aerosol Products from The Future Space Lidar AEOLUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, Pauline; Dabas, Alain; Lever, Vincent; Flamant, Pierre; Huber, Dorit

    2016-06-01

    Ready for launch by the end of 2016, the Doppler lidar mission AEOLUS from the European Space Agency (ESA) will be the first High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) in space. Operating in the UV, it implements two detection channels for aerosol and molecular backscatter. The system is primarily designed for the measurement of winds, but the HSRL capability enables the measurement of the particulate backscatter and extinction coefficients without any a priori assumption on the aerosol type. The level-2A (L2A) processor has been developed for these measurements and tested with synthetic data. The results show good aerosol backscatter profiles can be retrieved. Extinction coefficients are reasonable but do not reach the quality of backscatter coefficients. A precise, full, radiometric calibration of the lidar is required. A major limitation of the system is a single polarization component of the light is detected leading to an underestimation of backscatter coefficients when the atmospheric particles are depolarizing. The vertical resolution goes from 250 meters in the lowest part of the atmosphere, to 2 km in the lower stratosphere. The maximum altitude can reach above 20km. The basic horizontal averaging is 90km. Averaging on shorter distances (down to a few km) are possible but require a sufficient signal to noise ratio.

  7. Temporal evolution of aerosol derived from N2-Raman lidar at a Mediterranean coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Following the temporal variability of the aerosols in the atmospheric column on coastal areas is challenging. In situ ground-based or integrated column properties are not enough to understand the sea-continent exchange processes and identify the sources of particles. Now classical approach using the synergy between passive (e.g. sunphotometer) and active (e.g. backscatter lidar) instruments gives only a partial view of the aerosol properties, because they could be highly heterogeneous in the lower and middle troposphere. On June-July 2014, an automatic N2-Raman lidar (355 nm) was installed at a coastal site close to Toulon in the South of France. Using the coupling between cross-polarized elastic and N2-Raman channels, various aerosol natures are identified all along the time and against the altitude. Specific regularization algorithms have been tested to improve the aerosol classification. The results of these tests will be presented in terms of sensitivity studies based on the Monte Carlo approach. Selecting the most appropriate inversion method of the lidar profiles, the aerosol types encountered during the field campaign will be presented. We will also discuss their origin and the sea-continent exchanges including the sea breeze effect. We will see that a proper identification of particles passes through analyses coupling satellite observations and air mass trajectory studies. Acknowledgments: The experiments have been funded by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and the Centre national de la recherchescientifique (CNRS). We thank Université de Toulon (SeaTech Engineering School) for their hosts. The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Labex IPSL, is also acknowledged for its support in the data simulations and analyses.

  8. Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging Using Acoustic Backscatter Coefficients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boote, Evan Jeffery

    Current clinical ultrasound scanners render images which have brightness levels related to the degree of backscattered energy from the tissue being imaged. These images offer the interpreter a qualitative impression of the scattering characteristics of the tissue being examined, but due to the complex factors which affect the amplitude and character of the echoed acoustic energy, it is difficult to make quantitative assessments of scattering nature of the tissue, and thus, difficult to make precise diagnosis when subtle disease effects are present. In this dissertation, a method of data reduction for determining acoustic backscatter coefficients is adapted for use in forming quantitative ultrasound images of this parameter. In these images, the brightness level of an individual pixel corresponds to the backscatter coefficient determined for the spatial position represented by that pixel. The data reduction method utilized rigorously accounts for extraneous factors which affect the scattered echo waveform and has been demonstrated to accurately determine backscatter coefficients under a wide range of conditions. The algorithms and procedures used to form backscatter coefficient images are described. These were tested using tissue-mimicking phantoms which have regions of varying scattering levels. Another phantom has a fat-mimicking layer for testing these techniques under more clinically relevant conditions. Backscatter coefficient images were also formed of in vitro human liver tissue. A clinical ultrasound scanner has been adapted for use as a backscatter coefficient imaging platform. The digital interface between the scanner and the computer used for data reduction are described. Initial tests, using phantoms are presented. A study of backscatter coefficient imaging of in vivo liver was performed using several normal, healthy human subjects.

  9. The standoff aerosol active signature testbed (SAAST) at MIT Lincoln Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Jonathan M.; Aldridge, John C.

    2005-11-01

    Standoff LIDAR detection of BW agents depends on accurate knowledge of the infrared and ultraviolet optical elastic scatter (ES) and ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF) signatures of bio-agents and interferents. MIT Lincoln Laboratory has developed the Standoff Aerosol Active Signature Testbed (SAAST) for measuring ES cross sections from BW simulants and interferents at all angles including 180º (direct backscatter). Measurements of interest include the dependence of the ES and UVF signatures on several spore production parameters including growth medium, sporulation protocol, washing protocol, fluidizing additives, and degree of aggregation. Using SAAST, we have made measurements of the ES signature of Bacillus globigii (atropheaus, Bg) spores grown under different growth methods. We have also investigated one common interferent (Arizona Test Dust). Future samples will include pollen and diesel exhaust. This paper presents the details of the SAAST apparatus along with the results of recent measurements.

  10. A Multi-Instrument Approach for Characterizing the Vertical Structure of Aerosol Properties: Case Studies in the Pacific Basin Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Pueschel, R. F.; Fenn, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    During February/March 1994, a series of aircraft-based aerosol measurements were carried out in the Pacific Basin troposphere using a differential absorption lidar system deployed by NASA Langley, and optical spectrometer probes and a wire-impactor system operated by NASA Ames. A modified Klett inversion algorithm was applied to extract altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering from the IR lidar signal. The algorithm that we have designed for this purpose utilizes the in situ aerosol measurements to normalize the lidar profile at the aircraft altitude and to supply the lidar ratio as a function of height. The lidar-derived aerosol backscattering coefficients were then compared to the backscattering coefficients calculated from the in situ measurements. During several local aircraft descents, we found good agreement between the remote lidar and in situ results for the absolute value of the aerosol backscattering coefficient and its altitude variation only when we allowed for several layers with different aerosol refractive indices. The agreement validates our lidar calibration method and provides an indication of the variation in aerosol refractive index as a function of altitude. Two of the three case studies performed in this paper reveal layers of anthropogenic aerosols transported long distances into the Pacific Basin troposphere. A third case implies the existence of a layer of dustlike aerosol particles in the lower troposphere, most likely of Asian origin.

  11. Investigating the backscattering characteristics of individual normal and cancerous cells based on experimentally determined three-dimensional refractive index distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Chen; Su, Jing-Wei; Chang, Chih-Chiang; Sung, Kung-Bin

    2012-12-01

    The progression of epithelial dysplasia is accompanied by changes of sub-cellular structures which alter light scattering, particularly backscattering, properties of epithelial cells. In this study, we quantified the refractive index (RI) distributions of normal and cancerous epithelial cells of skin and oral cavity using digital holographic microtomography and investigated the backscattering characteristics of the cells using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results show that cancerous cells present higher average values of nuclear and nucleolar RI and a higher standard deviation of cytoplasmic RI than normal cells. Both the total scattering and backscattering cross-sections of the cancerous cells are significantly higher than those of the normal cells.

  12. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have

  13. Tropical and Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Extinction and Backscatter From Multiyear Raman Lidar Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Lidars have the capability to provide unparalleled range-resolved observations of particulate extinction. However, lidars fundamentally measure backscattered energy, not extinction, and for widely prevalent single-channel elastic backscatter lidars extinction must be obtained by assuming a backscatter-extinction relationship. Our knowledge of this relationship, known as the lidar ratio, mainly consists values determined via the transmission-loss method: which can only provide layer-averaged values and is only applicable to a subset of all cloud layers. Directly-retrieved, vertically resolved extinction coefficients and lidar ratios are obtainable through the use of more advance high spectral resolution lidars (HSRL) or Raman lidars (RL). However, the complexity of operating a HSRL or RL has limited their use for cloud observations to very limited time periods: typical only a few months or less. In this work, we present a newly developed retrieval for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars for Feature detection and EXtinction retrieval (FEX). FEX improves upon existing ARM products by using multiple, complimentary quantities to identify both clouds and aerosols and retrieve their extinction and backscatter profiles. Multiple years of data are examined at both the Lamont, Oklahoma and Darwin, Australia ARM sites; providing the most comprehensive climatology to date of cirrus extinction and lidar ratios. Variations in these optical properties with classification of the synoptic state and their relationship with microphysical parameters (temperature, relative humidity and depolarization) are examined.

  14. Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Ignatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    ; http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/sod/sst/aquam/) was set up, to check AVHRR (and later, VIIRS) AOD retrievals for self-consistency, and check them for cross-consistency with MOD04_L2 and MYD04_L2 from well-calibrated MODIS sensor. Also, adding in-situ AOD data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is currently under way. Finally, GOCART and NAAPS data will be added to AQUAM, and satellite, AERONET, and model AODs will all be checked for cross-consistency. Next step will be comparison of CRTM simulations (with GOCART or NAAPS input) with top-of-atmosphere sensor reflectances. Once consistency in solar reflectance bands is achieved, we will check the effect of aerosols on the thermal bands and correct its effect on SST.

  15. Particle backscatter, extinction, and lidar ratio profiling with Raman lidar in south and north China

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, Matthias; Ansmann, Albert; Mueller, Detlef; Althausen, Dietrich; Engelmann, Ronny; Hu Min; Zhang Yuanghang

    2007-09-01

    Aerosol Raman lidar observations of profiles of the particle extinction and backscatter coefficients and the respective extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) were performed under highly polluted conditions in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China in October 2004 and at Beijing during a clear period with moderately polluted to background aerosol conditions in January 2005. The anthropogenic haze in the PRD is characterized by volume light-extinction coefficients of particles ranging from approximately 200 to800 Mm-1 and lidar ratios mostly between 40 and 55 sr (average of47{+-}6 sr). Almost clean air masses were observed throughout the measurements of the Beijing campaign. These air masses originated from arid desert-steppe-like regions (greater Gobi area).Extinction values usually varied between 100 and300 Mm-1, and the lidar ratios were considerably lower (compared with PRD values) with values mostly from 30 to 45 sr (average of38{+-}7 sr). Gobi dust partly influenced the observations. Unexpectedly low lidar ratios of approximately 25 sr were found for a case of background aerosol with a low optical depth of 0.05. The low lidar ratios are consistent with Mie-scattering calculations applied to ground-based observations of particle size distributions.

  16. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  17. Raman backscatter as a remote laser power sensor in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Strozzi, D J; Divol, L; Michel, P; Robey, H F; LePape, S; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Kirkwood, R K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Nikroo, A; Williams, E A

    2013-07-12

    Stimulated Raman backscatter is used as a remote sensor to quantify the instantaneous laser power after transfer from outer to inner cones that cross in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) gas-filled hohlraum plasma. By matching stimulated Raman backscatter between a shot reducing outer versus a shot reducing inner power we infer that about half of the incident outer-cone power is transferred to inner cones, for the specific time and wavelength configuration studied. This is the first instantaneous nondisruptive measure of power transfer in an indirect drive NIF experiment using optical measurements. PMID:23889410

  18. Analysis of the intensity correlation functions of gas ring lasers with backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesquera, L.; Blanco, R.

    1989-12-01

    It is shown that in an inhomogeneously broadened ring laser without detuning symmetric backscattering induces damped harmonic oscillations in the auto- and cross-correlation functions of the two-mode light intensities. The exact value of the oscillation frequency is derived. When the complex backscattering coefficients, R1, R2, satisfy the condition R1 + R2(asterisk) = 0 (off-phase backcoupling), the relaxation time of the correlation functions above threshold is obtained. The oscillations of the correlation functions are shown to decay more and more slowly as pump parameter increases. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Defining Electron Backscatter Diffraction Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Rollett, A D

    2005-02-07

    Automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping systems have existed for more than 10 years [1,2], and due to their versatility in characterizing multiple aspects of microstructure, they have become an important tool in microscale crystallographic studies. Their increasingly widespread use however raises questions about their accuracy in both determining crystallographic orientations, as well as ensuring that the orientation information is spatially correct. The issue of orientation accuracy (as defined by angular resolution) has been addressed previously [3-5]. While the resolution of EBSD systems is typically quoted to be on the order of 1{sup o}, it has been shown that by increasing the pattern quality via acquisition parameter adjustment, the angular resolution can be improved to sub-degree levels. Ultimately, the resolution is dependent on how it is identified. In some cases it can be identified as the orientation relative to a known absolute, in others as the misorientation between nearest neighbor points in a scan. Naturally, the resulting values can be significantly different. Therefore, a consistent and universal definition of resolution that can be applied to characterize any EBSD system is necessary, and is the focus of the current study. In this work, a Phillips (FEI) XL-40 FEGSEM coupled to a TexSEM Laboratories OIM system was used. The pattern capturing hardware consisted of both a 512 by 512 pixel SIT CCD camera and a 1300 by 1030 pixel Peltier cooled CCD camera. Automated scans of various sizes, each consisting of 2500 points, were performed on a commercial-grade single crystal silicon wafer used for angular resolution measurements. To adequately quantify angular resolution for all possible EBSD applications we define two angular values. The first is {omega}{sub center}, the mean of the misorientation angle distribution between all scan points and the scan point coincident to the calibration source (typically the scan center). The {omega

  20. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  1. Signal Processing and Calibration of Continuous-Wave Focused CO2 Doppler Lidars for Atmospheric Backscatter Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Chambers, Diana M.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Bowdle, David A.; Jones, William D.

    1996-01-01

    Two continuous-wave(CW)focused C02 Doppler lidars (9.1 and 10.6 micrometers) were developed for airborne in situ aerosol backscatter measurements. The complex path of reliably calibrating these systems, with different signal processors, for accurate derivation of atmospheric backscatter coefficients is documented. Lidar calibration for absolute backscatter measurement for both lidars is based on range response over the lidar sample volume, not solely at focus. Both lidars were calibrated with a new technique using well-characterized aerosols as radiometric standard targets and related to conventional hard-target calibration. A digital signal processor (DSP), a surface acoustic and spectrum analyzer and manually tuned spectrum analyzer signal analyzers were used. The DSP signals were analyzed with an innovative method of correcting for systematic noise fluctuation; the noise statistics exhibit the chi-square distribution predicted by theory. System parametric studies and detailed calibration improved the accuracy of conversion from the measured signal-to-noise ratio to absolute backscatter. The minimum backscatter sensitivity is approximately 3 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 9.1 micrometers and approximately 9 x 10(exp -12)/m/sr at 10.6 micrometers. Sample measurements are shown for a flight over the remote Pacific Ocean in 1990 as part of the NASA Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) survey missions, the first time to our knowledge that 9.1-10.6 micrometer lidar intercomparisons were made. Measurements at 9.1 micrometers, a potential wavelength for space-based lidar remote-sensing applications, are to our knowledge the first based on the rare isotope C-12 O(2)-18 gas.

  2. Aerosol profiling by calibrated ceilometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiß, Alexander; Wiegner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Recently, networks of automated single-wavelength backscatter lidars ("ceilometers") were implemented, primarily by weather services. As a consequence, the potential of ceilometers to quantitatively determine the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric aerosols was investigated, to derive mixing layer heights for air quality studies and to assess optical properties. The main issues are the limited signal-to-noise ratio and the inherent problems of the calibration. We have studied several approaches for calibrating ceilometers, based on different numerical solutions and on auxiliary data of different remote sensing techniques. As a result, the backscatter coefficient can be determined with a relative accuracy of typically 10% and a time resolution in the order of 5 minutes. This parameter is used to estimate the mixing layer height by applying different techniques of averaging and pattern recognition. In this context, it is assumed that aerosols are a good tracer for the thermodynamic stratification of the troposphere. Our algorithm is fully automated and was tested for several commercially available ceilometers. For this purpose, a simplified version for non-calibrated ceilometers, based on the so called range corrected signal, was additionally developed. We used data of the CHM15k-x ceilometer (manufactured by Jenoptik) from more than 5 years of continuous operation by the LMU-MIM in Munich (Germany) to establish climatologies of mixing layer heights (MLH), cloud cover, cloud heights and vertical profiles of the backscatter coefficient. Among others, the mean diurnal cycle and the interannual variability of the MLH for different months were determined. Ceilometer derived MLH were also used to validate different parameterization of chemistry transport models and to validate forecasts of the dispersion of aerosol layers. For the latter applications backscatter coefficients are required. That means, a calibration of the ceilometers is mandatory.

  3. LASE measurements of aerosols and water vapor during TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard A.; Ismail, Syed; Browell, Edward V.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Kooi, Susan A.; Clayton, Marian B.; Melfi, Harvey; Whiteman, David N.; Schwenner, Geary; Evans, Keith D.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Veefkind, J. Pepijn; Russell, Philip B.; Livingston, John M.; Hignett, Philip; Holben, Brent N.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    The TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment) intensive field campaign was designed to reduce uncertainties in estimates of the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate by measuring direct radiative effects and the optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosols [1]. TARFOX was conducted off the East Coast of the United States between July 10-31, 1996. Ground, aircraft, and satellite-based sensors measured the sensitivity of radiative fields at various atmospheric levels to aerosol optical properties (i.e., optical thickness, phase function, single-scattering albedo) and to the vertical profile of aerosols. The LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument, which was flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft, measured vertical profiles of total scattering ratio and water vapor during a series of 9 flights. These profiles were used in real-time to help direct the other aircraft to the appropriate altitudes for intensive sampling of aerosol layers. We have subsequently used the LASE aerosol data to derive aerosol backscattering and extinction profiles. Using these aerosol extinction profiles, we derived estimates of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and compared these with measurements of AOT from both ground and airborne sun photometers and derived from the ATSR-2 (Along Track and Scanning Radiometer 2) sensor on ERS-2 (European Remote Sensing Satellite-2). We also used the water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured simultaneously by LASE to derive precipitable water vapor and compare these to ground based measurements.

  4. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  5. Second order distorted born approximation for backscattering from a layer of discrete random medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in scattering and depolarization characteristics of the vegetation canopies. Scattering models applied to the microwave remote sensing of vegetation canopies showed that multiple scattering effects can be important in simulating the backscattering coefficients correctly. In particular, in most applications, the cross-polarized backscattering coefficients are often underestimated by single scattering models. Recently, there have been concerted efforts to include the second order terms in the radiative transfer models of vegetation canopies in order to account for multiple scattering within the canopy. The coherent wave theory approach is extended to include multiple scattering effects to predict the coherent and incoherent backscattering contributions from a layer of vegetation canopy. The problem is initially formulated in terms of the exact equation for the correlation function of the field, i.e., the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Using fractional volume as a small parameter, a Foldy type approximation is made to obtain a more manageable correlation equation. This equation is iterated to obtain first and second order solutions. The iteration procedure assumes the variance of the field fluctuations are small compared to the coherent intensity. This assumption proved to be particularly successful in computing backscattering coefficients. First and second order backscattering coefficients are calculated from the iterants of the correlation equation. It is shown that the first order coefficients are the same as the distorted Born results used previously by the authors. These results contained enhancement terms in the direct-reflected contributions. The important contributions to second order backscattering are examined and interpreted in terms of scattering diagrams. Examples of situations in which second order backscattering coefficients are important are given.

  6. Relationship between gas exchange, wind speed, and radar backscatter in a large wind-wave tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Richard H.; Bliven, L. F.

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between the gas exchange, wind speed, friction velocity, and radar backscatter from the water surface was investigated using data obtained in a large water tank in the Delft (Netherlands) wind-wave tunnel, filled with water supersaturated with SF6, N2O, and CH4. Results indicate that the gas-transfer velocities of these substances were related to the wind speed with a power law dependence. Microwave backscatter from water surface was found to be related to gas transfer velocities by a relationship in the form k(gas) = a 10 exp (b A0), where k is the gas transfer velocity for the particular gas, the values of a and b are obtained from a least squares fit of the average backscatter cross section and gas transfer at 80 m, and A0 is the directional (azimuthal) averaged return.

  7. Positron backscattering from solid targets: Modeling of scattering processes via various approaches.

    PubMed

    Kribaa, B; Rouabah, Z; Loirec, C Le; Champion, C; Bouarissa, N

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of 1-4keV positron backscattering from semi-infinite solid targets ranging from Be (z=4) to Au (z=79) with normal angle of incidence is here reported. In our study, the elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections are modeled by using various approaches based on either a classical or a quantum mechanical treatment. Calculations of positron backscattering coefficient are then reported for the solid targets of interest. The results obtained show a fairly good agreement with the data available in the literature. The dependence of the positron backscattering coefficient versus the atomic number of the solid target of interest has been investigated. In this respect, polynomial functions are proposed which does not require any recourse to Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27200485

  8. Backscattering enhancement of light by nanoparticles positioned in localized optical intensity peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Li, Xu; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2006-02-01

    We report what we believe to be a novel backscattering phenomenon associated with localized optical intensity peaks (spanning as little as 43 nm) arising at the shadow-side surfaces of plane-wave-illuminated dielectric microcylinders of noncircular cross sections. Namely, for nanometer-scale dielectric particles positioned within the localized intensity peaks, their backscattering of visible light is enhanced by several orders of magnitude relative to the case of isolated nanoparticles (i.e., Rayleigh scattering). The positions of the localized intensity peaks can be quickly scanned along the microcylinder surface by changing either the incident wavelength or angle. This combination of giant backscattering enhancement of nanoparticles and ease and rapidity of scanning may present advantages relative to the use of fragile, mechanically scanned, near-field probes. Potential applications include visible-light detection, characterization, and manipulation of nanoparticles.

  9. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  10. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  11. Signal processor architecture for backscatter radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, W. E.; Johnston, P.

    1983-01-01

    Real time signal processing for backscatter radars which requires computational throughput and I/O rates is discussed. The operations that are usually performed in real time are highly repetitive simple accumulations of samples or of products of samples. The control logic does not depend on the values of the data and general purpose computers are not required for the initial high speed processing. The implications of these facts on the architectures of preprocessors for backscatter radars are explored and applied to the design of the Radar Signal Compender.

  12. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, the aerosol scattering coefficients at RH in the range of 40 to ~ 90 % were measured using a humidified nephelometer system in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation (SD) of enhancement factors at RH = 85 % for the scattering coefficient (f(85 %)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85 %)), and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85 %)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07, and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e., aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25 % as the RH increased from 40 to 85 %. Concurrently, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21 %. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) or inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH). The highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of OM, and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated with f(85 %), which suggests that NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass fraction of nitrate also had a close relationship to the curvature of the humidograms; higher mass fractions of nitrate were associated with humidograms that had the least curvature. Aerosol hygroscopic growth caused a 47 % increase in the calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing at 85 % RH, compared to the forcing at 40 % RH.

  13. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  14. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  15. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  16. Coherent Effects in Microwave Backscattering Models for Forrest Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; McDonald, Kyle C.

    1997-01-01

    In modeling forest canopies, several scattering mechanisms are taken into account: (1) volume scattering; (2) surface-volume interaction; and (3) surface scattering from forest floor. Depending on the structural and dielectric characteristics of forest canopies, the relative contribution of each mechanism in the total backscatter signal of an imaging radar can vary. In this paper, two commonly used first-order discrete scattering models, distorted born approximation (DBA) and radiative transfer (RT) are used to simulate the backscattered power received by polarimetric radars at P-, L-, and C-bands over coniferous and deciduous forests. The difference between the two models resides on the coherent effect in the surface-volume interaction terms. To demonstrate this point, the models are first compared based on their underlying theoretical assumptions and then according to simulation results over coniferous and deciduous forests. It is shown that by using the same scattering functions for various components of trees (i.e., leaf, branch, stem), the radiative transfer and distorted Born models are equivalent, except in low frequencies, where surface-volume interaction terms may become important, and the coherent contribution may be significant. In this case, the difference between the two models can reach up to 3 dB in both co-polarized and cross-polarized channels, which can influence the performance of retrieval algorithms.

  17. The detection of clouds, aerosols and marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics from simulated GLAS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Spinhirne, James D.

    1998-01-01

    Scheduled for launch in 2001 as part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) will provide continuous laser sounding of the earth's atmosphere from space for the first time. From its polar orbit about 600 km above the surface, GLAS will employ a 40 Hz solid state laser operating at 1064 nm to measure topography to an accuracy of 10 cm. Simultaneously, the atmospheric channels (1064 and 532 nm) of GLAS will provide profiles of atmospheric backscatter from 40 km to the ground with 75 meter vertical resolution (Spinhirne and Palm, 1996). These measurements will give scientists an unprecedented global data set on the vertical structure of clouds and aerosols which will greatly aid research efforts aimed at understanding their effects on climate and their role in climate change (Hartman, 1994). To better understand and predict the performance of the GLAS atmospheric channels, a computer model was developed to simulate the type of signal that the instrument would likely produce. The model uses aircraft lidar data and provides realistic simulated GLAS data sets over large areas spanning a wide range of atmospheric conditions. These simulated GLAS datasets are invaluable for designing and testing algorithms for the retrieval of parameters such as cloud and aerosol layer height, optical depth and extinction cross section. This work is currently proceeding and in this paper we will present results of the cloud and aerosol detection algorithm with emphasis on the detection of Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) aerosol. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to ascertain the feasability of estimating MABL moisture and temperature structure from spaceborne systems such as GLAS.

  18. A new constituting lidar network for global aerosol observation and monitoring: Leone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolli, Simone; Sauvage Laurent, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In order to observe and monitoring the direct and indirect impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the radiative transfer and climate changing, it is necessary a continuous worldwide observation of the microphysical aerosol properties. A global observation it is of great support to the actual research in climate and it is a complement in the effort of monitoring trans-boundary pollution, and satellite validation, valorizing the use of lidar and passive sensors networks. In this framework, we have created the LEONET program, a new constituting worldwide network of EZ Lidar™ instruments. These lidars, developed by the French company LEOSPHERE, are compact and rugged eye safe UV Lidars with cross-polarisation detection capabilities, designed to monitor and study the atmospheric vertical structure of aerosols and clouds in a continuous way, night and day, over long time period in order to investigate and contribute to the climate change studies. LEONET output data, in hdf format, have the same architecture of those of NASA Micro Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) and will be soon available to the scientific community through the AERONET data synergy tool which provides ground-based, satellite, and model data products to characterize aerosol optical and microphysical properties, spatial and temporal distribution, transport, and chemical and radiative properties. In this work, it is presented an overview of the LEONET products and methodologies as the backscattering and extinction coefficients; the depolarization ratio, cloud layer heights and subsequent optical depths, provided to the limit of detection capability from a range of 100 m up to 20 km as well as the recent automatic height retrieval method of the different Planetary Boundary Layers (PBL). The retrieval algorithm in the future will be improved integrating, when possible, a measured Lidar ratio by a co-located sun photometer Further are presented some data examples from several diverse sites in the

  19. Intercomparison of aerosol extinction profiles retrieved from MAX-DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieß, U.; Klein Baltink, H.; Beirle, S.; Clémer, K.; Hendrick, F.; Henzing, B.; Irie, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Li, A.; Moerman, M. M.; van Roozendael, M.; Shaiganfar, R.; Wagner, T.; Wang, Y.; Xie, P.; Yilmaz, S.; Zieger, P.

    2016-07-01

    A first direct intercomparison of aerosol vertical profiles from Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations, performed during the Cabauw Intercomparison Campaign of Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) in summer 2009, is presented. Five out of 14 participants of the CINDI campaign reported aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) as deduced from observations of differential slant column densities of the oxygen collision complex (O4) at different elevation angles. Aerosol extinction vertical profiles and AOT are compared to backscatter profiles from a ceilometer instrument and to sun photometer measurements, respectively. Furthermore, the near-surface aerosol extinction coefficient is compared to in situ measurements of a humidity-controlled nephelometer and dry aerosol absorption measurements. The participants of this intercomparison exercise use different approaches for the retrieval of aerosol information, including the retrieval of the full vertical profile using optimal estimation and a parametrised approach with a prescribed profile shape. Despite these large conceptual differences, and also differences in the wavelength of the observed O4 absorption band, good agreement in terms of the vertical structure of aerosols within the boundary layer is achieved between the aerosol extinction profiles retrieved by the different groups and the backscatter profiles observed by the ceilometer instrument. AOTs from MAX-DOAS and sun photometer show a good correlation (R>0.8), but all participants systematically underestimate the AOT. Substantial differences between the near-surface aerosol extinction from MAX-DOAS and from the humidified nephelometer remain largely unresolved.

  20. Visualization of x-ray backscatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Greenawald, E.C.; Ham, Y.S.; Poranski, C.F. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Of the several processes which occur when x-rays interact with matter, Compton scattering is dominant in the range of energies commonly used in industrial radiography. The Compton interaction between an x-ray photon and a free or outer shell electron causes the electron to recoil and the photon to be propagated in a new direction with a reduced energy. Regardless of the incident beam energy, some photons are always scattered in the backwards direction. The potential for determining material properties by the detection of x-ray backscatter has been recognized for years. Although work in this area has been eclipsed by the rapid development of computerized tomography (CT), a variety of industrial backscatter imaging techniques and applications have been demonstrated. Backscatter inspection is unique among x-ray methods in its applicability with access to only one side of the object. The authors are currently developing the application of x-ray backscatter tomography (XBT) to the inspection of steel-reinforced rubber sonar domes on US Navy vessels. In this paper, the authors discuss the visualization methods they use to interpret the XBT data. They present images which illustrate the capability of XBT as applied to sonar domes and a variety of other materials and objects. They also demonstrate and discuss the use of several data visualization software products.

  1. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  2. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  3. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  4. Statistical Parameter Estimation in Ultrasound Backscattering from Tissue Mimicking Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Feng

    Several tissue characterization parameters, including the effective scatterer number density and the backscatter coefficient, were derived from the statistical properties of ultrasonic echo signals. The effective scatterer number density is the actual scatterer number density in a medium multiplied by a frequency-dependent factor that depends on the differential scattering cross-sections of all scatterers. The method described in this thesis for determining the scatterer number density explicitly retains both the temporal nature of the data acquisition and the properties of the ultrasound field in the data reduction. Moreover, it accounts for the possibility that different sets of scatterers may dominate the echo signal at different frequencies. The random processes involved in forming ultrasound echo signals from random media give rise to an uncertainty in the estimated effective scatterer number density. This uncertainty is evaluated using error propagation. The statistical uncertainty depends on the effective number of scatterers contributing to the segmented echo signal, increasing when the effective number of scatterers increases. Tests of the scatterer number density data reduction method and the statistical uncertainty estimator were done using phantoms with known ultrasound scattering properties. Good agreement was found between measured values and those calculated from first-principles. The properties of the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters of ultrasound echo signals are also studied. Both parameters depend on the measurement system, including the transducer field and pulse frequency content, as well as on the medium's properties. The latter is expressed in terms of the scatterer number density and the second and fourth moments of the medium's scattering function. A simple relationship between the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters is derived and verified experimentally. Finally, a reference phantom method is proposed for measuring the

  5. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L; Fullwood, David

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of approximately 0.04 degrees and an elastic strain resolution of approximately 7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy. PMID:19520512

  6. Airborne Lidar measurements of aerosols, mixed layer heights, and ozone during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS summer field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Shipley, S. T.; Butler, C. F.; Ismail, S.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed summary of the NASA Ultraviolet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) data archive obtained during the EPA Persistent Elevated Pollution Episode/Northeast Regional Oxidant Study (PEPE/NEROS) Summer Field Experiment Program (July through August 1980) is presented. The UV dial data set consists of remote measurements of mixed layer heights, aerosol backscatter cross sections, and sequential ozone profiles taken during 14 long-range flights onboard the NASA Wallops Flight Center Electra aircraft. These data are presented in graphic and tabular form, and they have been submitted to the PEPE/NEROS data archive on digital magnetic tape. The derivation of mixing heights and ozone profiles from UV Dial signals is discussed, and detailed intercomparisons with measurements obtained by in situ sensors are presented.

  7. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  9. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    the aerosol constituents. We have also demonstrated that LW aerosol radiative forcing is somewhat sensitive to the water vapor content in the atmosphere, and increases with the dryness of the atmosphere. This evidence supports our argument that the Great Basin area of the USA, which usually has extremely dry atmospheric conditions, can be an appropriate place to study the dry-desert aerosol climate forcing in a regional scale. An analysis of aerosol IR backscattering shows that the effect significantly contributes to both the BOA and TOA IR forcings, even if the aerosols do not exhibit absorption at all in the thermal IR. The general LW radiative forcing is, therefore, associated with both the absorption and scattering effects of the aerosols. Neglecting LW scattering will result in an underestimation of LW radiative forcing by aerosols. Finally, the discrepancy between the FTIR-observed and modeled radiance with aerosols indicates a significant uncertainty, which demands further research on the LW optical properties of fine and coarse mode aerosol.

  10. Coherent beam combining in atmospheric channels using gated backscatter.

    PubMed

    Naeh, Itay; Katzir, Abraham

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces the concept of atmospheric channels and describes a possible approach for the coherent beam combining of lasers of an optical phased array (OPA) in a turbulent atmosphere. By using the recently introduced sparse spectrum harmonic augmentation method, a comprehensive simulative investigation was performed and the exceptional properties of the atmospheric channels were numerically demonstrated. Among the interesting properties are the ability to guide light in a confined manner in a refractive channel, the ability to gather different sources to the same channel, and the ability to maintain a constant relative phase within the channel between several sources. The newly introduced guiding properties combined with a suggested method for channel probing and phase measurement by aerosol backscattered radiation allows coherence improvement of the phased array's elements and energy refocusing at the location of the channel in order to increase power in the bucket without feedback from the target. The method relies on the electronic focusing, electronic scanning, and time gating of the OPA, combined with elements of the relative phase measurements. PMID:26836092

  11. Evidence of seasonally dependent stratosphere-troposphere exchange and purging of lower stratospheric aerosol from a multiyear lidar data set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol backscatter data obtained from a calibrated backscatter lidar at Pasadena, California (34 deg N latitude) over the 1984-1993 period clearly indicate tightly coupled aerosol optical properties in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the winter and early spring, due to the active midlatitude stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) exchange processes occurring at this time of year. Lidar data indicate that during pre-Pinaturbo background conditions, the subsequent purging of the aerosol in the upper troposphere caused a significant reduction in the aerosol content throughout the 8 - 18 km altitude region in the early spring period. The post-Pinatubo evidence of intense exchange in the winter and early spring is a significant increase in the upper tropospheric aerosol content, such that the backscatter levels reach values nearly equivalent to the enhanced backscatter levels existing in the lower stratosphere. The calculated stratospheric mass extrusion rate is consistent with a 45-day lifetime of lower stratospheric aerosol during this part of the year, which implies that midlatitude ST exchange is a significant sink for stratospheric aerosol.

  12. Evidence of seasonally dependent stratosphere-troposphere exchange and purging of lower stratospheric aerosol from a multiyear lidar data set

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, R.T.; Tratt, D.M.

    1995-02-01

    Tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol backscatter data obtained from a calibrated backscatter lidar at Pasadena, California (34 deg N latitude) over the 1984-1993 period clearly indicate tightly coupled aerosol optical properties in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the winter and early spring, due to the active midlatitude stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) exchange processes occurring at this time of year. Lidar data indicate that during pre-Pinaturbo background conditions, the subsequent purging of the aerosol in the upper troposphere caused a significant reduction in the aerosol content throughout the 8 - 18 km altitude region in the early spring period. The post-Pinatubo evidence of intense exchange in the winter and early spring is a significant increase in the upper tropospheric aerosol content, such that the backscatter levels reach values nearly equivalent to the enhanced backscatter levels existing in the lower stratosphere. The calculated stratospheric mass extrusion rate is consistent with a 45-day lifetime of lower stratospheric aerosol during this part of the year, which implies that midlatitude ST exchange is a significant sink for stratospheric aerosol.

  13. Use of ceilometers for aerosol profile measurements: a comment from AD-Net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Shimizu, Atsushi; Batdorj, Dashdondog

    2014-11-01

    Ceilometer instruments are simple backscatter lidar systems and are usually set in airports for detecting the base of clouds. The instrument can also measure aerosol vertical distribution. Since ceilometers barely detect the molecular backscatter signals, retrieval of aerosol optical properties is an issue. This study investigates applicability of ceilometers to retrieval of optical properties. We make an idealized signal profile with the lidar ratio of 50 sr and calculate the retrieval errors caused by 30% errors of lidar ratio. In the forward inversion, useable (small error) optical properties are backscattering coefficients and the retrieval errors are less than 15% if the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is less than 0.2. The initial backscattering coefficients must be determined from other instruments (e.g., multi-wavelength lidar). Whereas in the backward inversion, if the AOD of idealized signals is larger than 1.5, extinction coefficients converge to the true value (within 5% errors), regardless of lidar ratios and initial conditions. Since there is no need for the system constant or molecular backscatter in this method, ceilometers can be an effective tool for retrieving extinction coefficients of dense aerosols in East Asia.

  14. Impact of Tropospheric Aerosol Absorption on Ozone Retrieval from buv Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    The impact of tropospheric aerosols on the retrieval of column ozone amounts using spaceborne measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation is examined. Using radiative transfer calculations, we show that uv-absorbing desert dust may introduce errors as large as 10% in ozone column amount, depending on the aerosol layer height and optical depth. Smaller errors are produced by carbonaceous aerosols that result from biomass burning. Though the error is produced by complex interactions between ozone absorption (both stratospheric and tropospheric), aerosol scattering, and aerosol absorption, a surprisingly simple correction procedure reduces the error to about 1%, for a variety of aerosols and for a wide range of aerosol loading. Comparison of the corrected TOMS data with operational data indicates that though the zonal mean total ozone derived from TOMS are not significantly affected by these errors, localized affects in the tropics can be large enough to seriously affect the studies of tropospheric ozone that are currently undergoing using the TOMS data.

  15. Final Technical Report. Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Raman Lidar measurement of atmospheric aerosols for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrare, Richard A.

    2002-08-19

    Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are required for determination of the effects of aerosols on the clear-sky radiative flux. Since recent studies have demonstrated the inability to compute these profiles on surface aerosol measurements alone, vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties must be acquired to compute aerosol radiative effects throughout the entire atmospheric column. Following the recommendation of the ARM Aerosol Working Group, the investigator developed, evaluated, and implemented algorithms for the CART Raman Lidar to provide profiles of aerosol extinction and backscattering. By virtue of its ability to measure vertical profiles of both aerosol extinction and water vapor simultaneously in the same scattering volume, we used the resulting profiles from the CART Raman Lidar to investigate the impact of water vapor and relative humidity on aerosol extinction throughout the column on a continuous and routine basis. The investigator used these the CART Raman Lidar aerosol extinction and backscattering profiles to evaluate the vertical variability of aerosol extinction and the extinction/backscatter ratio over the ARM SGP site.

  16. Retrieval of Aerosol Parameters from Continuous H24 Lidar-Ceilometer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisi, D.; Barnaba, F.; Costabile, F.; Di Liberto, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Wille, H.

    2016-06-01

    Ceilometer technology is increasingly applied to the monitoring and the characterization of tropospheric aerosols. In this work, a method to estimate some key aerosol parameters (extinction coefficient, surface area concentration and volume concentration) from ceilometer measurements is presented. A numerical model has been set up to derive a mean functional relationships between backscatter and the above mentioned parameters based on a large set of simulated aerosol optical properties. A good agreement was found between the modeled backscatter and extinction coefficients and the ones measured by the EARLINET Raman lidars. The developed methodology has then been applied to the measurements acquired by a prototype Polarization Lidar-Ceilometer (PLC). This PLC instrument was developed within the EC- LIFE+ project "DIAPASON" as an upgrade of the commercial, single-channel Jenoptik CHM15k system. The PLC run continuously (h24) close to Rome (Italy) for a whole year (2013-2014). Retrievals of the aerosol backscatter coefficient at 1064 nm and of the relevant aerosol properties were performed using the proposed methodology. This information, coupled to some key aerosol type identification made possible by the depolarization channel, allowed a year-round characterization of the aerosol field at this site. Examples are given to show how this technology coupled to appropriate data inversion methods is potentially useful in the operational monitoring of parameters of air quality and meteorological interest.

  17. A Compact Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar for Observations of Aerosol and Cloud Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John W.; Cook, Anthony L.

    2002-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a nadir-viewing, aircraft-based high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) at NASA Langley Research Center. The system is designed to measure backscatter and extinction of aerosols and tenuous clouds. The primary uses of the instrument will be to validate spaceborne aerosol and cloud observations, carry out regional process studies, and assess the predictions of chemical transport models. In this paper, we provide an overview of the instrument design and present the results of simulations showing the instrument's capability to accurately measure extinction and extinction-to-backscatter ratio.

  18. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  19. An investigation of backscatter factors for kilovoltage x-rays: a comparison between Monte Carlo simulations and Gafchromic EBT film measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Hill, R.; Claridge Mackonis, E.; Kuncic, Z.

    2010-02-01

    Backscatter factors are important parameters in the determination of dose for kilovoltage x-ray beams. However, backscatter factors are difficult to measure experimentally, and tabulated values are based largely on Monte Carlo calculations. In this study we have determined new backscatter factors by both experimental and Monte Carlo methods, and compared them with existing backscatter factors published in the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The purpose of this study is twofold: (1) to evaluate the overall effectiveness of using Gafchromic EBT film for backscatter factor measurements and (2) to determine whether existing Monte Carlo-calculated backscatter factors need to be updated. We measured backscatter factors using Gafchromic EBT film for three field sizes (2, 4 and 6 cm diameter cones) and three kilovoltage beam qualities, including 280 kVp for which similar measurements have not previously been reported. We also present new Monte Carlo-calculated backscatter factors obtained using the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code system to simulate the Pantak kilovoltage x-ray unit used in our measurements. The results were compared with backscatter factors tabulated in the AAPM TG-61 protocol for kilovoltage x-ray dosimetry. The largest difference between our measured and calculated backscatter factors and the AAPM TG-61 values was found to be 2.5%. This agreement is remarkably good, considering that the AAPM TG-61 values consist of a combination of experimental and Monte Carlo calculations obtained over 20 years ago using different measurement techniques, as well as older Monte Carlo code and cross-section data. Furthermore, our Monte Carlo-calculated backscatter factors agree within 1% with the AAPM TG-61 values for all beam qualities and field sizes. Our Gafchromic film measurements had slightly larger differences with the AAPM TG-61 backscatter factors, up to approximately 2% for the 6 cm diameter cone at a beam quality of 50 kVp. The largest difference in backscatter factors, of 2.5%, was

  20. On-the-fly cross flow laser guided separation of aerosol particles based on size, refractive index and density-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lall, A A; Terray, A; Hart, S J

    2010-12-20

    Laser separation of particles is achieved using forces resulting from the momentum exchange between particles and photons constituting the laser radiation. Particles can experience different optical forces depending on their size and/or optical properties, such as refractive index. Thus, particles can move at different speeds in the presence of an optical force, leading to spatial separations. In this paper, we present a theoretical analysis on laser separation of non-absorbing aerosol particles moving at speeds (1-10 cm/sec) which are several orders of magnitude greater than typical particle speeds used in previous studies in liquid medium. The calculations are presented for particle deflection by a loosely focused Gaussian 1064 nm laser, which simultaneously holds and deflects particles entrained in flow perpendicular to their direction of travel. The gradient force holds the particles against the viscous drag for a short period of time. The scattering force simultaneously pushes the particles, perpendicular to the flow, during this period. Our calculations show particle deflections of over 2500 µm for 15 µm aerosol particles, and a separation of over 1500 µm between 5 µm and 10 µm particles when the laser is operated at 10 W. We show that a separation of about 421 µm can be achieved between two particles of the same size (10 µm) but having a refractive index difference of 0.1. Density based separations are also possible. Two 10 µm particles with a density difference of 600 kg/m3 can be separated by 193 µm. Examples are shown for separation distances between polystyrene, poly(methylmethacrylate), silica and water particles. These large laser guided deflections represent a novel achievement for optical separation in the gas phase. PMID:21196954

  1. Measurement of tropospheric aerosol in São Paulo area using a new upgraded Raman LIDAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Patrícia F.; da Silva Lopes, Fábio Juliano; Bourayou, Riad

    2012-11-01

    Elastic backscatter LIDAR systems have been used to determine aerosol profile concentration in several areas such as weather, pollution and air quality monitoring. In order to determine the aerosol extinction and backscattering profiles, the Klett inversion method is largely used, but this method suffers from lack of information since there are two unknown variables to be determined using only one measured LIDAR signal, and assumption of the LIDAR ratio (the relation between the extinction and backscattering coefficients) is needed. When a Raman LIDAR system is used, the inelastic backscattering signal is affected by aerosol extinction but not by aerosol backscatter, which allows this LIDAR to uniquely determine extinction and backscattering coefficients without any assumptions or any collocated instruments. The MSP-LIDAR system, set-up in a highly dense suburban area in the city of São Paulo, has been upgraded to a Raman LIDAR, and in its actual 6-channel configuration allows it to monitor elastic backscatter at 355 and 532 nm together with nitrogen and water vapor Raman backscatters at 387nm and 608 nm and 408nm and 660 nm, respectively. Thus, the measurements of aerosol backscattering, extinction coefficients and water vapor mixing ratio in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) are becoming available. The system will provide the important meteorological parameters such as Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and will be used for the study of aerosol variations in lower troposphere over the city of São Paulo, air quality monitoring and for estimation of humidity impact on the aerosol optical properties, without any a priori assumption. This study will present the first results obtained with this upgraded LIDAR system, demonstrating the high quality of obtained aerosol and water vapor data. For that purpose, we compared the data obtained with the new MSP-Raman LIDAR with a mobile Raman LIDAR collocated at the Center for Lasers and Applications, Nuclear and Energy Research

  2. Ice cloud backscatter study and comparison with CALIPSO and MODIS satellite data.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiachen; Yang, Ping; Holz, Robert E; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry G; Vaughan, Mark A; Hu, Yongxiang; King, Michael D

    2016-01-11

    An invariant imbedding T-matrix (II-TM) method is used to calculate the single-scattering properties of 8-column aggregate ice crystals. The II-TM based backscatter values are compared with those calculated by the improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) to refine the backscattering properties of the ice cloud radiative model used in the MODIS Collection 6 cloud optical property product. The integrated attenuated backscatter-to-cloud optical depth (IAB-ICOD) relation is derived from simulations using a CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite) lidar simulator based on a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. By comparing the simulation results and co-located CALIPSO and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations, the non-uniform zonal distribution of ice clouds over ocean is characterized in terms of a mixture of smooth and rough ice particles. The percentage of the smooth particles is approximately 6% and 9% for tropical and midlatitude ice clouds, respectively. PMID:26832292

  3. Ice Cloud Backscatter Study and Comparison with CALIPSO and MODIS Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jiachen; Yang, Ping; Holz, Robert E.; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry G.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Hu, Yongxiang; King, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    An invariant imbedding T-matrix (II-TM) method is used to calculate the single-scattering properties of 8-column aggregate ice crystals. The II-TM based backscatter values are compared with those calculated by the improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) to refine the backscattering properties of the ice cloud radiative model used in the MODIS Collection 6 cloud optical property product. The integrated attenuated backscatter-to-cloud optical depth (IAB-ICOD) relation is derived from simulations using a CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite) lidar simulator based on a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model. By comparing the simulation results and co-located CALIPSO and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) observations, the non-uniform zonal distribution of ice clouds over ocean is characterized in terms of a mixture of smooth and rough ice particles. The percentage of the smooth particles is approximately 6 percent and 9 percent for tropical and mid-latitude ice clouds, respectively.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation studies of backscatter factors in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, H.P.; Doi, K.

    1981-04-01

    Experimentally determined backscatter factors in mammography can contain significant systematic errors due to the energy response, dimensions, and location of the dosimeter used. In this study, the Monte Carlo method was applied to simulate photon scattering in tissue-equivalent media and to determine backscatter factors without the interference of a detector. The physical processes of measuring backscatter factors with a lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) and an ideal tissue-equivalent detector were also simulated. Computed results were compared with the true backscatter factors and with measured values reported by other investigators. It was found that the TLD method underestimated backscatter factors in mammography by as much as 10% at high energies.

  5. Microwave backscattering from an anisotropic soybean canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Saatchi, S.; Levine, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a soybean canopy is modeled in the L band region of the spectrum. Mature soybean plants are taken as an ensemble of leaves and stems which are represented by lossy dielectric disks and rods respectively. Field data indicated that leaves and stems are not distributed uniformly in the azimuth coordinate. The plant has a tendency to grow out into the area between the rows. The effects on backscattered radar waves was computed by the distorted Born approximation. Results for look directions along the rows and perpendicular to the rows show that only a modest difference occurs in the L band frequency range. The use of another nonuniform distribution, different from those observed experimentally, results in a significant effect due to vegetation asymmetry.

  6. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  7. Sensitivity of Particle Extinction and Backscattering Calculation from Mie-Raman Lidar Measurements to the Choice of Ångström Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorina, Anastasia; Veselovskii, Igor; Whiteman, David N.; Korenskiy, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Vibrational Raman scattering from nitrogen is commonly used in Mie-Raman lidars for evaluation of particle backscattering (β) and extinction (α) coefficients. However, vibrational scattering is characterized by significant frequency shift of the Raman component, so for the calculation of α and β the assumption about the extinction Ångström exponent is needed. Simulation results presented in this study demonstrate that ambiguity in the choice of this exponent can be the significant source of uncertainty in the calculation of backscattering coefficients when optically thick aerosol layers are considered. Examples of lidar measurements and optical data calculated for different values of Ångström exponent are given.

  8. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Delande, D; Miniatura, C; Cherroret, N

    2015-11-13

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition. PMID:26613427

  9. Coherent Backscattering Reveals the Anderson Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.; Cherroret, N.

    2015-11-01

    We develop an accurate finite-time scaling analysis of the angular width of the coherent backscattering (CBS) peak for waves propagating in 3D random media. Applying this method to ultracold atoms in optical speckle potentials, we show how to determine both the mobility edge and the critical exponent of the Anderson transition from the temporal behavior of the CBS width. Our method could be used in experiments to fully characterize the 3D Anderson transition.

  10. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  11. Connecting forest ecosystem and microwave backscatter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is outlined to connect data obtained from active microwave remote sensing systems with forest ecosystem models. The hierarchy of forest ecosystem models is discussed, and the levels at which microwave remote sensing data can be used as inputs are identified. In addition, techniques to utilize forest ecosystem models to assist in the validation of theoretical microwave backscatter models are identified. Several examples to illustrate these connecting processes are presented.

  12. Backscattering Measurement From a Single Microdroplet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Chang, Jin Ho; Jeong, Jong Seob; Lee, Changyang; Teh, Shia-Yen; Lee, Abraham; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Backscattering measurements for acoustically trapped lipid droplets were undertaken by employing a P[VDF-TrFE] broadband transducer of f-number = 1, with a bandwidth of 112%. The wide bandwidth allowed the transmission of the 45 MHz trapping signal and the 15 MHz sensing signal using the same transducer. Tone bursts at 45 MHz were first transmitted by the transducer to hold a single droplet at the focus (or the center of the trap) and separate it from its neighboring droplets by translating the transducer perpendicularly to the beam axis. Subsequently, 15 MHz probing pulses were sent to the trapped droplet and the backscattered RF echo signal received by the same transducer. The measured beam width at 15 MHz was measured to be 120 μm. The integrated backscatter (IB) coefficient of an individual droplet was determined within the 6-dB bandwidth of the transmit pulse by normalizing the power spectrum of the RF signal to the reference spectrum obtained from a flat reflector. The mean IB coefficient for droplets with a 64 μm average diameter (denoted as cluster A) was −107 dB, whereas it was −93 dB for 90-μm droplets (cluster B). The standard deviation was 0.9 dB for each cluster. The experimental values were then compared with those computed with the T-matrix method and a good agreement was found: the difference was as small as 1 dB for both clusters. These results suggest that this approach might be useful as a means for measuring ultrasonic backscattering from a single microparticle, and illustrate the potential of acoustic sensing for cell sorting. PMID:21507767

  13. Bomb detection using backscattered x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockwood, Grant J.; Shope, Steve L.; Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Selph, Michael M.; Jacobs, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sites of the package. This poses a problem if the package is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to personnel and property since explosive devices may be 'booby trapped.' We have developed a method to x-ray a package using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them are scattered back toward the source. The backscattering of x-rays is proportional to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This Z4.1 dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Backscatter experiments at Sandia National Laboratories have been conducted on mock bombs in packages. We are able to readily identify the bomb components. The images that are obtained in this procedure are done in real time and the image is displayed on a computer screen.

  14. SuperDARN backscatter during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. L.; Waters, C. L.; Menk, F. W.; Sciffer, M. D.; Bristow, W. A.

    2016-06-01

    It is often stated that high-frequency radars experience a loss of backscatter during geomagnetic storm events. The occurrence of backscatter during 25 intense geomagnetic storms was examined using data from the Bruny Island and Kodiak radars and a superposed epoch analysis. It was found that while a reduction of backscatter occurred in the middle to far ranges, there was an increase in the amount of backscatter from close range following storm onset. Ray tracing showed that an enhanced charge density in the E region can reduce the chance of F region and increase the chance of E region backscatter. It was also shown that reduction in backscatter cannot be explained by D region absorption. Using a normalized SYM-H value, percentage time through recovery phase can be estimated during storm progression which allows a prediction of backscatter return in real time that accounts for varying storm recovery phase duration.

  15. Urban Aerosol Optical Properties Measurement by Elastic Counter-Look Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Boselli, A.; He, Y.; Sannino, A.; Song, C.; Spinelli, N.

    2016-06-01

    The new developed elastic lidar system utilizes two identical elastic lidars, in counter-look configuration, to measure aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficients without any hypotheses. Compared to elastic-Raman lidar and high spectral resolution lidar, the proposed counter-look elastic lidar can use low power eyesafe laser and all available wavelengths. With this prototype lidar system, urban aerosol optical properties and their spatial distribution have been directly measured, including backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient and lidar ratio. The preliminary results show that the low cost and eye-safe counter-look configured elastic lidar system can be used to measure the aerosol optical properties distribution and give the hint of aerosol type.

  16. Simulated lidar return from a one-dimensional stratospheric aerosol model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.; Swissler, T. J.; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for theoretical calculations of lidar backscatter at wavelengths of 0.6943 and 1.06 microns from the stratospheric aerosol. The computations are based on the size distribution, particle number density, and particle composition predicted by a one-dimensional model of the stratospheric aerosol layer that assumes that the primary source of sulfur to the stratosphere is biogenic OCS released at ground level. The aerosol particles are taken to be spherical liquid H2SO4-H2O solution droplets with solid cores, which undergo condensation, evaporation, coagulation, sedimentation, and vertical eddy mixing. The theoretical backscatter profiles are compared with experimental results obtained from actual lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer before and after the eruption of Volcan de Fuego in October 1974. The model predictions are shown to be in good agreement with the average of a number of observations.

  17. An investigation of the observability of ocean-surface parameters using GEOS-3 backscatter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. S.; Priester, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    The degree to which ocean surface roughness can be synoptically observed through use of the information extracted from the GEOS-3 backscattered waveform data was evaluated. Algorithms are given for use in estimating the radar sensed waveheight distribution or ocean-surface impulse response. Other factors discussed include comparisons between theoretical and experimental radar cross section values, sea state bias effects, spatial variability of significant waveheight data, and sensor-related considerations.

  18. Backscatter and attenuation characterization of ventricular myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Allyson Ann

    2009-12-01

    This Dissertation presents quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the myocardium in fetal hearts and adult human hearts with the goal of studying the physics of sound waves incident upon anisotropic and inhomogeneous materials. Ultrasound has been used as a clinical tool to assess heart structure and function for several decades. The clinical usefulness of this noninvasive approach has grown with our understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the myocardium. In this Dissertation, integrated backscatter and attenuation analyses were performed on midgestational fetal hearts to assess potential differences in the left and right ventricular myocardium. The hearts were interrogated using a 50 MHz transducer that enabled finer spatial resolution than could be achieved at more typical clinical frequencies. Ultrasonic data analyses demonstrated different patterns and relative levels of backscatter and attenuation from the myocardium of the left ventricle and the right ventricle. Ultrasonic data of adult human hearts were acquired with a clinical imaging system and quantified by their magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter. The results were analyzing using Bayes Classification and ROC analysis to quantify potential advantages of using a combination of two features of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter over using only one or the other feature to distinguish between groups of subjects. When the subjects were classified based on hemoglobin A1c, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, differences in the magnitude and normalized time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter were observed. The cyclic variation results also suggested a trend toward a larger area under the ROC curve when information from magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation is combined using Bayes classification than when

  19. Aerosol-cloud interaction using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. The interactions between aerosol particles and cloud drops is critical to identifying how much they reflect solar radiation. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2013). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show

  20. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  1. Initial Results Using a Depolarization and Backscatter Unattended Lidar (DABUL2) System Operating at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkoff, T.; Rogers, R.; McCann, K.; Evans, K.; McMillan, W.; Hoff, R.; Alvarez, R.; Richter, R.; Intrieri, J.; Eberhard, W.

    2006-05-01

    In early 2005, the University of Maryland at Baltimore County Atmospheric Physics Group (http://alg.umbc.edu) took possession of a Depolarization and Backscatter Unattended Lidar (DABUL2) system. This instrument is the second version of this style lidar developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL). Over the past 10 years, the original NOAA DABUL lidar has collected data from a variety of locations all over the world from the Western Pacific tropics to the Arctic Ocean. This type of system is capable of continuous, unattended profiling of cloud and aerosol layers throughout the troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. The DABUL2 lidar consists of a pulsed laser source emitting at a wavelength of 532 nm, that is expanded to a 35 cm diameter beam before exiting the instrument. The large diameter beam maximizes eye-safety, resulting in a power density less than commercially available laser pointers and making the system more practical for unattended operations. Adequate signal-to-noise performance is achieved using a receiver with a narrow field- of-view (FOV), 0.4 nm bandpass filtering, and a high laser pulse repetition rate (2 kHz) to maximize signal averaging for a given time interval. Backscatter polarization properties are obtained by pulse-to-pulse alternating the polarization state of the outgoing laser beam with a Pockels cell and synchronously detecting the range-gated backscatter intensity from the atmosphere. The first measurements obtained at UMBC with the DABUL2 system occurred during spring of 2005. Data were recorded over several days during a variety of cloud and no-cloud conditions, both during day and nighttime background levels. Time coincident lidar data were also compared to a Micro-Pulse Lidar (MPL) system operating 40 km to the southwest, at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The MPL system did not have depolarization capability, but provided elastic scattering measurements

  2. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  3. Measurement of aerosol profiles using high-spectral-resolution Rayleigh-Mie lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, D. A.; Alvarez, R. J., II; Caldwell, L. M.; She, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    High-spectral-resolution Rayleigh-Mie lidar measurements of vertical profiles (1 to 5 km) of atmospheric pressure and density, as well as aerosol profiles, including backscatter ratio and extinction ratio are reported. These require simultaneous measurement of temperature. Use of the technique does not require any assumptions about the aerosol but does require that the pressure at one altitude is known and that the gas law of the air is known (e.g., an ideal gas).

  4. Aerosol and Cloud Interaction Observed From High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wenying; Schuster, Gregory L.; Loeb, Norman G.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies utilizing satellite retrievals have shown a strong correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud cover. However, these retrievals from passive sensors are subject to many limitations, including cloud adjacency (or 3D) effects, possible cloud contamination, uncertainty in the AOD retrieval. Some of these limitations do not exist in High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) observations; for instance, HSRL observations are not a ected by cloud adjacency effects, are less prone to cloud contamination, and offer accurate aerosol property measurements (backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, backscatter Angstrom exponent,and aerosol optical depth) at a neospatial resolution (less than 100 m) in the vicinity of clouds. Hence, the HSRL provides an important dataset for studying aerosol and cloud interaction. In this study, we statistically analyze aircraft-based HSRL profiles according to their distance from the nearest cloud, assuring that all profile comparisons are subject to the same large-scale meteorological conditions. Our results indicate that AODs from HSRL are about 17% higher in the proximity of clouds (approximately 100 m) than far away from clouds (4.5 km), which is much smaller than the reported cloud 3D effect on AOD retrievals. The backscatter and extinction coefficients also systematically increase in the vicinity of clouds, which can be explained by aerosol swelling in the high relative humidity (RH) environment and/or aerosol growth through in cloud processing (albeit not conclusively). On the other hand, we do not observe a systematic trend in lidar ratio; we hypothesize that this is caused by the opposite effects of aerosol swelling and aerosol in-cloud processing on the lidar ratio. Finally, the observed backscatter Angstrom exponent (BAE) does not show a consistent trend because of the complicated relationship between BAE and RH. We demonstrate that BAE should not be used as a surrogate for Angstrom

  5. CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects: Bias estimates using ground-based Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e., the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study, uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE are estimated using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars at midlatitude and tropical sites. We find that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50% at the two ARM sites. The undetected aerosol is likely the consequence of random noise in CALIPSO measurements and therefore will affect global observations as well. This suggests that the global aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak. Also examined is the impact of the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e., the lidar ratio) whose value CALIPSO retrievals must assume to obtain the aerosol extinction profile. It is shown that if CALIPSO can reproduce the climatological value of the lidar ratio at a given location, then the aerosol DRE there can be accurately calculated (within about 3%).

  6. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  7. Estimation and discrimination of aerosols using multiple wavelength LWIR lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ahl, Jeffrey L.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent work by the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) in algorithm development for parameter estimation and classification of localized atmospheric aerosols using data from rapidly tuned multiple-wavelength range-resolved LWIR lidar. The motivation for this work is the need to detect, locate, and discriminate biological threat aerosols in the atmosphere from interferent materials such as dust and smoke at safe standoff ranges using time-series data collected at a discrete set of CO2 laser wavelengths. The goals of the processing are to provide real-time aerosol detection, localization, and discrimination. Earlier work by the authors has produced an efficient Kalman filter-based algorithm for estimating the range-dependent aerosol concentration and wavelength-dependent backscatter signatures. The latter estimates are used as feature vectors for training support vector machines classifiers for performing the discrimination. Several years of field testing under the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System program at Dugway Proving Ground, UT, Eglin Air Force Base, FL, and other locations have produced data and backscatter estimates from a broad range of biological and interferent aerosol materials for the classifier development. The results of this work are summarized in our presentation.

  8. Aerosol studies in mid-latitude coastal environments in Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. A.; Cutten, D.; Lynch, M. J.; Davies, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The results of the evaluation of several inversion procedures that were used to select one which provides the most accurate atmospheric extinction profiles for small aerosol extinction coefficients (that often predominate in the maritime airmass) are presented. Height profiles of atmospheric extinction calculated by a two component atmospheric solution to the LIDAR equation will be compared with corresponding in-situ extinction profiles based on the size distribution profiles obtained in Western Australia. Values of the aerosol backscatter to extinction ratio obtained from multi-angle LIDAR measurements will be used in this solution.

  9. Using Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data to Evaluate Combined Active Plus Passive Retrievals of Aerosol Extinction Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Kittaka, C.; Vaughn, M. A.; Remer, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    We derive aerosol extinction profiles from airborne and space-based lidar backscatter signals by constraining the retrieval with column aerosol optical thickness (AOT), with no need to rely on assumptions about aerosol type or lidar ratio. The backscatter data were acquired by the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite. The HSRL also simultaneously measures aerosol extinction coefficients independently using the high spectral resolution lidar technique, thereby providing an ideal data set for evaluating the retrieval. We retrieve aerosol extinction profiles from both HSRL and CALIOP attenuated backscatter data constrained with HSRL, Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer column AOT. The resulting profiles are compared with the aerosol extinction measured by HSRL. Retrievals are limited to cases where the column aerosol thickness is greater than 0.2 over land and 0.15 over water. In the case of large AOT, the results using the Aqua MODIS constraint over water are poorer than Aqua MODIS over land or Terra MODIS. The poorer results relate to an apparent bias in Aqua MODIS AOT over water observed in August 2007. This apparent bias is still under investigation. Finally, aerosol extinction coefficients are derived from CALIPSO backscatter data using AOT from Aqua MODIS for 28 profiles over land and 9 over water. They agree with coincident measurements by the airborne HSRL to within +/-0.016/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of land points and within +/-0.028/km +/- 20% for at least two-thirds of ocean points.

  10. Light Scattering by Aerosols Over the Remote Ocean: Clear-Sky Point and Column Radiative Closure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2001-12-01

    Field data gathered by ship and aircraft during leg 2 of the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) were used to study clear-sky radiative closure over the remote Southern Ocean. Closure was evaluated by comparing observations with modeled values of: (i) aerosol light scattering coefficients in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere, (ii) total aerosol optical depth, and (iii) total solar radiation at the ocean surface. Point modeling using the ship data benefited from an existing study of closure on the ship, expanding the number of data points considered in that study from 22 to 887. Point and column modeling using the aircraft data provide the first such studies to date. Aerosol light scattering coefficients were calculated from size-distributed measurements of aerosol chemical composition and number concentration, and were compared with observations at three wavelengths (450, 550, and 700 nm) on both ship and aircraft. Point closure on the ship could be achieved at all wavelengths for both total and hemispheric backscattering coefficients if the model accounted for experimental uncertainties in aerosol chemistry, nephelometer nonidealities, and the likely nonsphericity of dried sea salt aerosols. Point closure on the aircraft could be achieved at most wavelengths for total scattering coefficients, but could not be achieved at any wavelengths for hemispheric backscattering coefficients. Deviations between predicted and observed backscattering coefficients on the aircraft were widely scattered rather than biased, indicating that a low signal to noise ratio in observed backscattering coefficients was the likely cause for lack of closure. Aerosol optical depth and solar radiation at the ocean surface were calculated for the two days with clear-sky periods when the aircraft measured aerosol profiles near the ship. Input gas and meteorological data were the observed profiles of ozone, water vapor, temperature, and pressure from the surface to

  11. Retrieval and analysis of a polarized high-spectral-resolution lidar for profiling aerosol optical properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yang, Yongying; Cheng, Zhongtao; Huang, Hanlu; Zhang, Bo; Ling, Tong; Shen, Yibing

    2013-06-01

    Taking advantage of the broad spectrum of the Cabannes-Brillouin scatter from atmospheric molecules, the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) technique employs a narrow spectral filter to separate the aerosol and molecular scattering components in the lidar return signals and therefore can obtain the aerosol optical properties as well as the lidar ratio (i.e., the extinction-to-backscatter ratio) which is normally selected or modeled in traditional backscatter lidars. A polarized HSRL instrument, which employs an interferometric spectral filter, is under development at the Zhejiang University (ZJU), China. In this paper, the theoretical basis to retrieve the aerosol lidar ratio, depolarization ratio and extinction and backscatter coefficients, is presented. Error analyses and sensitivity studies have been carried out on the spectral transmittance characteristics of the spectral filter. The result shows that a filter that has as small aerosol transmittance (i.e., large aerosol rejection rate) and large molecular transmittance as possible is desirable. To achieve accurate retrieval, the transmittance of the spectral filter for molecular and aerosol scattering signals should be well characterized. PMID:23736562

  12. [A floating-dust case study based on the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Deng, Jun-Ying; Shi, Lan-Hong; Chen, Yong-Hang; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-03-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties of a typical floating-dust event on October 19, 2009 in Shanghai was analyzed by using Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL) and the CALIPSO satellite. The results showed that the floating-dust aerosol mainly existed below 2 km of height. The floating-dust aerosol backscatter coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.015 km(-1) x sr(-1), and the MPL extinction coefficient ranged from 0 to 0.32 km(-1). The MPL data showed that the aerosol extinction coefficient first increased and then decreased during the floating-dust event. At the same time, the aerosol layer was constantly lifting. The CALIPSO data showed that a large number of small particles were suspended in air at a height of below 2 km, while the big particles always stayed near the ground (0-0.5 km). At the height of 2-10 km, there was only few aerosols; in the range of 4-6 km, there was a mixture of particles with regular and irregular shapes. The vertical distribution of CALIPSO 532 nm total attenuated backscatter coefficient and MPL normalized relative backscatter signal was basically the same, but the extinction coefficient values gained by them were different. Observations by CALIPSO and MPL together could be more comprehensive and objective for monitoring floating-dust in Shanghai. PMID:24881367

  13. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  14. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite

  15. LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Balin, Yu S; Bairashin, G S; Kokhanenko, G P; Penner, I E; Samoilova, S V

    2011-10-31

    The scanning LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar, which is aimed at probing atmosphere at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm, is described. The backscattered light is received simultaneously in two regimes: analogue and photon-counting. Along with the signals of elastic light scattering at the initial wavelengths, a 607-nm Raman signal from molecular nitrogen is also recorded. It is shown that the height range of atmosphere probing can be expanded from the near-Earth layer to stratosphere using two (near- and far-field) receiving telescopes, and analogue and photon-counting lidar signals can be combined into one signal. Examples of natural measurements of aerosol stratification in atmosphere along vertical and horizontal paths during the expeditions to the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) and Lake Baikal areas are presented.

  16. Development the EarthCARE aerosol classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandinger, Ulla; Baars, Holger; Hünerbein, Anja; Donovan, Dave; van Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan; Fischer, Jürgen; von Bismarck, Jonas; Eisinger, Michael; Lajas, Dulce; Wehr, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is a joint ESA/JAXA mission planned to be launched in 2018. The multi-sensor platform carries a cloud-profiling radar (CPR), a high-spectral-resolution cloud/aerosol lidar (ATLID), a cloud/aerosol multi-spectral imager (MSI), and a three-view broad-band radiometer (BBR). Three out of the four instruments (ATLID, MSI, and BBR) will be able to sense the global aerosol distribution and contribute to the overarching EarthCARE goals of sensor synergy and radiation closure with respect to aerosols. The high-spectral-resolution lidar ATLID obtains profiles of particle extinction and backscatter coefficients, lidar ratio, and linear depolarization ratio as well as the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 355 nm. MSI provides AOT at 670 nm (over land and ocean) and 865 nm (over ocean). Next to these primary observables the aerosol type is one of the required products to be derived from both lidar stand-alone and ATLID-MSI synergistic retrievals. ATLID measurements of the aerosol intensive properties (lidar ratio, depolarization ratio) and ATLID-MSI observations of the spectral AOT will provide the basic input for aerosol-type determination. Aerosol typing is needed for the quantification of anthropogenic versus natural aerosol loadings of the atmosphere, the investigation of aerosol-cloud interaction, assimilation purposes, and the validation of atmospheric transport models which carry components like dust, sea salt, smoke and pollution. Furthermore, aerosol classification is a prerequisite for the estimation of direct aerosol radiative forcing and radiative closure studies. With an appropriate underlying microphysical particle description, the categorization of aerosol observations into predefined aerosol types allows us to infer information needed for the calculation of shortwave radiative effects, such as mean particle size, single-scattering albedo, and spectral conversion factors. In order to ensure

  17. Variation in daytime troposphereic aerosol via LIDAR and sunphotometer measurements in Penang, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, F. Y.; Hee, W. S.; Hwee, S. L.; Abdullah, K.; Tiem, L. Y.; Matjafri, M. Z.; Lolli, S.; Holben, B.; Welton, E. J.

    2014-03-01

    Aerosol is one of the important factors that will influence the air quality, visibility, clouds, and precipitation processes in the troposphere. In this work, we investigated the variation of aerosol during daytime in Penang, Malaysia in certain days within July 2013. Vertical LIDAR scattering ratio and backscattering profiles, and columnar optical properties (optical depth, Angström exponent) of aerosols were measured using Raymetrics LIDAR and a CIMEL sunphotometer respectively. Specifically, we have determined the daytime variation of intensity and distribution level of aerosol, as well as the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and cloud classification. Subsequently, the data of columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) and size distribution in the atmospheric were used to quantify the properties of aerosol variation during daytime over Penang, Malaysia.

  18. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): Demonstrating New Techniques for Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Selmer, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar that provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CATS payload has been operating since early February 2015 from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS was designed to operate for six months, and up to three years, providing a combination of operational science, in-space technology demonstration, and technology risk reduction for future Earth Science missions. One of the primary project goals of CATS is to demonstrate technology in support of future space-based lidar mission development. The CATS instrument has been demonstrating the high repetition rate laser and photon counting detection approach to lidar observations, in contrast to the low repetition rate, high energy technique employed by CALIPSO. Due to this technique, cloud and aerosol profile data exhibit high spatial and temporal resolution, which was never before possible from a space-based platform. Another important science goal of the CATS-FO project is accurate determination of aerosol type on a global scale. CATS provided the first space-based depolarization measurements at multiple wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm), and first measurements at 1064 nm from space. The ratio of the depolarization measurements at these two wavelengths enables significant improvement in aerosol typing. The CATS retrievals at 1064 nm also provide improvements to detecting aerosols above clouds. The CATS layer identification algorithm is a threshold-based layer detection method that uses the 1064 nm attenuated scattering ratio and also includes a routine to identify clouds embedded within aerosol layers. This technique allows CATS to detect the full extent of the aerosol layers above the cloud, and differentiate these two layers so that the optical properties can be more accurately determined.

  19. Microwave backscattering and emission model for grass canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Saatchi, S.S. ); Le Vine, D.M. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Lang, R.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Microwave radar and radiometer measurements of grasslands indicate a substantial reduction in sensor sensitivity to soil moisture in the presence of a thatch layer. When this layer is wet it masks changes in the underlying soil, making the canopy appear warm in the case of passive sensors (radiometer) and decreasing backscatter in the active case (scatterometer). A model for a grass canopy with thatch will be presented in this paper to explain this behavior and to compare with observations. The canopy model consists of three layers: grass, thatch, and the underlying soil. The grass blades are modeled by elongated elliptical discs and the thatch is modeled as a collection of disk shaped water droplets (i.e., the dry matter is neglected). The ground is homogeneous and flat. The distorted Born approximation is used to compute the radar cross section of this three layer canopy and the emissivity is computed from the radar cross section using the Peake formulation for the passive problem. Results are computed at L-band (1.4 GHz) and C-band (4.75 GHz) using canopy parameters (i.e., plant geometry, soil moisture, plant moisture, etc.) representative of Konza Prairie grasslands. The results are compared to C-band scatterometer measurements and L-band radiometer measurements at these grasslands.

  20. High Resolution Sapphire Bragg Backscattering Monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, P. van der; Wille, H.-C.; Shvyd'ko, Yu. V.

    2007-01-19

    We present a temperature stabilised high resolution sapphire backscattering monochromator. The device consists of a sapphire crystal inside a cold nitrogen gas cooled, temperature stabilised chamber with a passively temperature stabilised screen. The achieved temperature stability of {+-}2mK allows for an energy resolution of {delta}E/E {<=} 10-7 at energies in the range of 30-70 keV. The device was developed for nuclear resonant scattering above 30 keV, where appropriate solutions did not exist until now.

  1. Determination of Backscattering Sources in Various Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to identify the primary contributors to 10 GHz radar backscatter from various natural and man-made surfaces and objects, and to use this information in developing new and better models for the scatter. When the true sources are known for the scattering that leads to variation in intensity on radar images, the images (and sets of them) may be interpreted more meaningfully in terms of the variation of parameters of interest for science or application. For example, better interpretation of vegetation images may be possible for yield forecasting and stress detection.

  2. Modeling canopy reflectance and microwave backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, N. S.

    1985-01-01

    Various approaches to model canopy reflectance (CR) in the visible/infrared region and backscattering coefficient (BSC) in the microwave region are compared and contrasted. It is noted that BSC can be related to CR in the source direction (the 'hot spot' direction). By assuming a frequency dependent leaf reflectance and transmittance it is shown that the observed dependence of BSC on leaf area index, leaf angle distribution, angle of incidence, soil moisture content, and frequency can be simulated by a CR model. Thus both BSC and CR can, in principle, be calculated using a single model which has essentially the same parameters as many CR models do.

  3. On the stratospheric aerosol budget at Northern mid-latitudes from 21 years of ground-based lidar and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Hauchecorne, Alain; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Jumelet, Julien; Keckhut, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a new high-quality 21-year series of continuous stratospheric aerosol observations at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, 44° N, 6° E) in Southern France using two powerful and well-maintained lidar systems. In contrast to previous studies making use of the observations by aerosol-dedicated lidars operating within the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), we exploit the backscatter measurements from the off-line 355 nm channel of stratospheric ozone lidar (LiO3S) and low-gain 532 nm channel of stratospheric temperature lidar (LTA). The presented series of stratospheric aerosol backscatter and extinction at 532 nm, spanning from January 1994 through 2016, include on average 10-11 lidar acquisitions per month after careful quality screening. The OHP lidar observations are compared with global space-borne measurements of zonal-mean stratospheric extinction by SAGE II, GOMOS, OSIRIS and CALIOP instruments, altogether covering the time span of OHP lidar data sets. Both ground-based and satellite monthly-mean stratospheric Aerosol Optical Depth between 17 and 30 km altitude (sAOD1730km) series are in good cross-agreement with discrepancies well below the measurement errors, thereby ensuring the quality and coherency of all data sets exploited for our study. The global satellite observations are then used to identify the drivers of stratospheric aerosol variability observed locally by the OHP lidars. The 21-year aerosol series reflect two essential periods in the global volcanic activity over the past two decades. The first one, a long volcanically-quiescent period of low aerosol burden (0.002aerosol in late 1996 and extends until late 2003. This 'background' period is followed by a volcanically-active one, dominated by several moderate and strong sAOD1730km enhancements up to 0.008 after tropical and Northern mid-latitude volcanic eruptions of VEI 4. We note

  4. Spatial patterns in backscatter strength across the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the physical properties of the Greenland ice sheet and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data collected from aircraft and from ERS-1 is addressed. Limited aircraft data are combined with a description of the glacier surface to predict qualitatively the spatial and seasonal variation in backscatter strength across the ice sheet. In particular the model predicts relatively low backscatter near the ice edge where scattering is dominated by rough surface effects. Backscatter increases through the lake zone as volume scattering becomes important. Strongest backscatter is found in the percolation facies where volume scatter from snow grains and volume scatter from large, buried ice bodies becomes important. Backscatter weakens in the interior ice sheet where fine grained snow is the only mechanism producing backscatter.

  5. An intercomparison of SAGE and SBUV ozone observations for March and April 1979. [stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment solar backscatterd ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Trepte, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-eight latitudinal cross sections of stratospheric ozone observed by the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) and SBUV (Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet) satellite instruments on the same days in March and April 1979 and at approximately the same latitude are compared. Differences in the zonal-mean mixing ratios are found. At pressures less than 5 mbar, SAGE gives approximately 20 percent larger mixing ratios at tropical latitudes (after a correction has been applied for the expected diurnal variation of ozone). The uncorrelated portion of the SBUV variances are smaller than the SAGE noise variances at altitudes above 10 mbar, which indicates that the SBUV experiment should provide excellent detectability of longitudinal ozone variations.

  6. Lidar Ratios for Dust Aerosols Derived From Retrievals of CALIPSO Visible Extinction Profiles Constrained by Optical Depths from MODIS-Aqua and CALIPSO/CloudSat Ocean Surface Reflectance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Stuart A.; Josset, Damien B.; Vaughan, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    CALIPSO's (Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) analysis algorithms generally require the use of tabulated values of the lidar ratio in order to retrieve aerosol extinction and optical depth from measured profiles of attenuated backscatter. However, for any given time or location, the lidar ratio for a given aerosol type can differ from the tabulated value. To gain some insight as to the extent of the variability, we here calculate the lidar ratio for dust aerosols using aerosol optical depth constraints from two sources. Daytime measurements are constrained using Level 2, Collection 5, 550-nm aerosol optical depth measurements made over the ocean by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) on board the Aqua satellite, which flies in formation with CALIPSO. We also retrieve lidar ratios from night-time profiles constrained by aerosol column optical depths obtained by analysis of CALIPSO and CloudSat backscatter signals from the ocean surface.

  7. Retrieval of Aerosol information from UV measurement by using optimal estimation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Kim, W. V.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. D.; Moon, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    An algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and aerosol loading height is developed for GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) measurement. The GEMS is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018, and employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol information such as AOD and SSA [Torres et al., 2007; Torres et al., 2013; Ahn et al., 2014]. However, the large contribution of atmospheric scattering results in the increase of the sensitivity of the backward radiance to aerosol loading height. Thus, the assumption of aerosol loading height becomes important issue to obtain accurate result. Accordingly, this study focused on the simultaneous retrieval of aerosol loading height with AOD and SSA by utilizing the optimal estimation method. For the RTM simulation, the aerosol optical properties were analyzed from AERONET inversion data (level 2.0) at 46 AERONET sites over ASIA. Also, 2-channel inversion method is applied to estimate a priori value of the aerosol information to solve the Lavenberg Marquardt equation. The GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with OMI level-1B dataset, a provisional data for GEMS measurement, and the result is compared with OMI standard aerosol product and AERONET values. The retrieved AOD and SSA show reasonable distribution compared with OMI products, and are well correlated with the value measured from AERONET. However, retrieval uncertainty in aerosol loading height is relatively larger than other results.

  8. Increase in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol levels and its potential connection with Asian pollution

    PubMed Central

    Vernier, J-P; Fairlie, T D; Natarajan, M; Wienhold, F G; Bian, J; Martinsson, B G; Crumeyrolle, S; Thomason, L W; Bedka, K M

    2015-01-01

    Satellite observations have shown that the Asian Summer Monsoon strongly influences the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) aerosol morphology through its role in the formation of the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL). Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II solar occultation and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations show that summertime UTLS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) between 13 and 18 km over Asia has increased by three times since the late 1990s. Here we present the first in situ balloon measurements of aerosol backscatter in the UTLS from Western China, which confirm high aerosol levels observed by CALIPSO since 2006. Aircraft in situ measurements suggest that aerosols at lower altitudes of the ATAL are largely composed of carbonaceous and sulfate materials (carbon/sulfur elemental ratio ranging from 2 to 10). Back trajectory analysis from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization observations indicates that deep convection over the Indian subcontinent supplies the ATAL through the transport of pollution into the UTLS. Time series of deep convection occurrence, carbon monoxide, aerosol, temperature, and relative humidity suggest that secondary aerosol formation and growth in a cold, moist convective environment could play an important role in the formation of ATAL. Finally, radiative calculations show that the ATAL layer has exerted a short-term regional forcing at the top of the atmosphere of −0.1 W/m2 in the past 18 years. Key Points Increase of summertime upper tropospheric aerosol levels over Asia since the 1990s Upper tropospheric enhancement also observed by in situ backscatter measurements Significant regional radiative forcing of −0.1 W/m2 PMID:26691186

  9. The stratospheric aerosol content above Spitsbergen during winter 1991/92

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, G.; Neuber, R. )

    1994-06-22

    This paper summarizes the lidar measurements made at Spitsbergen (79[degrees]N) during the period of EASOE. The lidar can see backscatter and depolarization effects from the tropopause to 30 km. No aerosols were detected above 20 km until the breakup of the polar vortex. Stratospheric loading from the Pinatubo eruption were clearly visible at lower altitudes.

  10. Acoustic Microscopy and Polar Backscatter Broadband Ultrasonic Investigations of Anisotropic Inhomogeneous Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridal, Sharon Lorraine

    This thesis presents measurements of the frequency dependence of backscatter and attenuation from anisotropic cardiovascular tissue and composite materials and seeks to describe the physics underlying the interaction of ultrasound with these specimens. The effects of anisotropy and formalin fixation on the measured ultrasonic parameters in the 30 to 45 MHz bandwidth are examined in canine papillary muscle. Lower frequency work by this laboratory in canine myocardium is presented for side-by-side comparison with the higher frequency results in order to delineate long range frequency dependent behavior. Uniaxial graphite epoxy composite materials are examined at lower frequencies (5 to 10 MHz) using a technique known as polar backscatter. The frequency dependence of the spurious signals from the surface pattern of the composite is compared to the frequency dependence of the scattered field predicted from a 1-D diffraction grating model. Using this interpretation of the scattering from the surface, some separation of the surface effects and the useful scattering from the interior of the composite is achieved. The amplitude and frequency dependence of the differential backscatter cross section for isotropic scattering standards were predicted using the accurate scattering theory of Faran and compared with the results of experimental measurements in order to test the data acquisition and reduction methods used in the measurements of cardiovascular tissue. The backscatter coefficient was measured from anisotropic biological tissue (canine papillary muscles) both parallel and perpendicular to the predominant direction of myocardial fibers in a relatively high frequency bandwidth (30 to 45 MHz). Results from a simple diffraction grating model were compared to the spectra reflected from periodic surfaces of graphite/epoxy composites (5 to 10 MHz), and potential ways to reduce the impact of such surface effects on polar backscatter measurements were explored.

  11. Rotational Raman scattering (Ring effect) in satellite backscatter ultraviolet measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Joiner, Joanna; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; McPeters, Richard D.; Park, Hongwoo

    1995-07-01

    A detailed radiative transfer calculation has been carried out to estimate the effects of rotational Raman scattering (RRS) on satellite measurements of backscattered ultraviolet radiation. Raman-scattered light is shifted in frequency from the incident light, which causes filling in of solar Fraunhofer lines in the observed backscattered spectrum (also known as the Ring effect). The magnitude of the rotational Raman scattering filling in is a function of wavelength, solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, surface pressure, and instrument spectral resolution. The filling in predicted by our model is found to be in agreement with observations from the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer and the Nimbus-7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer.

  12. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  13. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  14. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  15. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lundgren, Bo; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pedersen, Tina Bock; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fish to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fish species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments, a cod (Gadus morhua) was scanned with both a BK Medical ProFocus 2202 ultrasound scanner and a Toshiba Aquilion ONE computed tomography (CT) scanner. The US images of the fish were compared with US images created using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The center frequency of the transducer is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fish converted to simulated scatter maps. The positions of the point scatterers were assumed to be uniformly distributed. The scatter amplitudes were generated with a new method based on the segmented CT data in Hounsfield Units and backscatter data for the different types of tissues from the literature. The simulated US images reproduce most of the important characteristics of the measured US image.

  16. CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects: Bias estimates using ground-based Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Observational constraints on the change in radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detection all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO are likely too weak.

  17. Aerosol characteristics in the UTLS region: A satellite-based study over north India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Misra, A.; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Devara, P. C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Vertical profiles of aerosol backscatter coefficient and depolarization ratio, obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite, were studied in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region over North India (21-30° N and 72-90° E), covering the highly polluted Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) for one-year period from December 2011 to November 2012. An enhanced aerosol layer was observed between 15 and 18 km altitude, in the vicinity of tropopause, with a broad layer depth of about 2 km. The aerosol layer showed strong seasonal, monthly as well as day and night time variability, with a peak value of backscatter coefficient during monsoon season (˜5.54 × 10-3 sr-1 in September). The corresponding depolarization ratio indicates anisotropic (non-spherical) nature of particles. The aerosol layer was found to be highly linked with the variability in tropopause height, showing a positive correlation between tropopause height and the height of maximum backscatter coefficient (correlation coefficient of 0.8). However, it was found to be negatively correlated with the integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC), with a correlation coefficient of 0.3. We further analyzed outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) data during the study period to investigate the link between the observed enhanced aerosol layer in the UTLS region and prevailing deep convective activities over the study region. Low values of OLR during monsoon (about 214 W m-2) indicate the occurrence of deep convection over this region, which may cause a large-scale circulation-driven vertical transport of boundary-layer pollution into the atmosphere of UTLS region. Results may have potential implications for better understanding and assessing the chemical and radiative impacts of these aerosols in the tropical UTLS region.

  18. Lidar data assimilation for improved analyses of volcanic aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Anne Caroline; Elbern, Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    Observations of hazardous events with release of aerosols are hardly analyzable by today's data assimilation algorithms, without producing an attenuating bias. Skillful forecasts of unexpected aerosol events are essential for human health and to prevent an exposure of infirm persons and aircraft with possibly catastrophic outcome. Typical cases include mineral dust outbreaks, mostly from large desert regions, wild fires, and sea salt uplifts, while the focus aims for volcanic eruptions. In general, numerical chemistry and aerosol transport models cannot simulate such events without manual adjustments. The concept of data assimilation is able to correct the analysis, as long it is operationally implemented in the model system. Though, the tangent-linear approximation, which describes a substantial precondition for today's cutting edge data assimilation algorithms, is not valid during unexpected aerosol events. As part of the European COPERNICUS (earth observation) project MACC II and the national ESKP (Earth System Knowledge Platform) initiative, we developed a module that enables the assimilation of aerosol lidar observations, even during unforeseeable incidences of extreme emissions of particulate matter. Thereby, the influence of the background information has to be reduced adequately. Advanced lidar instruments comprise on the one hand the aspect of radiative transfer within the atmosphere and on the other hand they can deliver a detailed quantification of the detected aerosols. For the assimilation of maximal exploited lidar data, an appropriate lidar observation operator is constructed, compatible with the EURAD-IM (European Air Pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) system. The observation operator is able to map the modeled chemical and physical state on lidar attenuated backscatter, transmission, aerosol optical depth, as well as on the extinction and backscatter coefficients. Further, it has the ability to process the observed discrepancies with lidar

  19. Backscattering from small-scale breaking wave turbulence structure generated by FLUENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gen; Zhang, Min

    2014-12-01

    A breaking wave can exert a great influence on the electromagnetic (EM) scattering result from sea surfaces. In this paper, the process of small-scale wave breaking is simulated by the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT, and the backscattering radar cross section (RCS) of the turbulence structure after breaking is calculated with the method of moments. The scattering results can reflect the turbulent intensities of the wave profiles and can indicate high polarization ratios at moderate incident angles, which should be attributed to the incoherent backscatter from surface disturbance of turbulence structure. Compared with the wave profile before breaking, the turbulence structure has no obvious geometrical characteristic of a plunging breaker, and no sea spikes are present at large incident angles either. In summary, the study of EM scattering from turbulence structure can provide a basis to explain the anomalies of EM scattering from sea surfaces and help us understand the scattering mechanism about the breaking wave more completely.

  20. Microwave Backscatter and Attenuation Dependence of Leaf Area Index for Flooded Rice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Livingston, Gerald P.

    1995-01-01

    Wetlands are important for their role in global climate as a source of methane and other reduced trace gases. As part of an effort to determine whether radar is suitable for wetland vegetation monitoring, we have studied the dependence of microwave backscatter and attenuation on leaf area index (LAI) for flooded rice fields. We find that the radar return from a flooded rice field does show dependence on LAI. In particular, the C-band VV cross section per unit area decreases with increasing LAI. A simple model for scattering from rice fields is derived and fit to the observed HH and VV data. The model fit provides insight into the relation of backscatter to LAI and is also used to calculate the canopy path attenuation as a function of LAI.

  1. Species-Independent Modeling of High-Frequency Ultrasound Backscatter in Hyaline Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Männicke, Nils; Schöne, Martin; Liukkonen, Jukka; Fachet, Dominik; Inkinen, Satu; Malo, Markus K; Oelze, Michael L; Töyräs, Juha; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Raum, Kay

    2016-06-01

    Apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) is a common ultrasound parameter used to assess cartilage matrix degeneration. However, the specific contributions of chondrocytes, proteoglycan and collagen to AIB remain unknown. To reveal these relationships, this work examined biopsies and cross sections of human, ovine and bovine cartilage with 40-MHz ultrasound biomicroscopy. Site-matched estimates of collagen concentration, proteoglycan concentration, collagen orientation and cell number density were employed in quasi-least-squares linear regression analyses to model AIB. A positive correlation (R(2) = 0.51, p < 10(-4)) between AIB and a combination model of cell number density and collagen concentration was obtained for collagen orientations approximately perpendicular (>70°) to the sound beam direction. These findings indicate causal relationships between AIB and cartilage structural parameters and could aid in more sophisticated future interpretations of ultrasound backscatter. PMID:27038804

  2. New algorithm to derive the microphysical properties of the aerosols from lidar measurements using OPAC aerosol classification schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talianu, Camelia; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to retrieve the aerosol complex refractive index and effective radius from multiwavelength lidar data, using an integrated model-measurement approach. In the model, aerosols are assumed to be a non-spherical ensemble of internally mixed components, with variable proportions. OPAC classification schemes and basic components are used to calculate the microphysical properties, which are then fed into the T-matrix calculation code to generate the corresponding optical parameters. Aerosol intensive parameters (lidar ratios, extinction and backscatter Angstrom coefficients, and linear particle depolarization ratios) are computed at the altitude of the aerosol layers determined from lidar measurements, and iteratively compared to the values obtained by simulation for a certain aerosol type, for which the critical component's proportion in the overall mixture is varied. Microphysical inversion based on the Truncated Singular Value Decomposition (TSVD) algorithm is performed for selected cases of spherical aerosols, and comparative results of the two methods are shown. Keywords: Lidar, aerosols, Data inversion, Optical parameters, Complex Refractive Index Acknowledgments: This work has been supported by grants of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research, Programme for Research- Space Technology and Advanced Research - STAR, project numbers 38/2012 - CAPESA and 55/2013 - CARESSE, and by the European Community's FP7-INFRASTRUCTURES-2010-1 under grant no. 262254 - ACTRIS and by the European Community's FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN under grant no. 289923 - ITARS

  3. Local - Air Project: Tropospheric Aerosol Monitoring by CALIPSO Lidar Satellite and Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarli, V.; Trippetta, S.; Bitonto, P.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Caggiano, R.; Donvito, A.; Mona, L.

    2016-06-01

    A new method for the detection of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) height from CALIPSO space-borne lidar data was developed and the possibility to infer the sub-micrometric aerosol particle (i.e., PM1) concentrations at ground level from CALIPSO observations was also explored. The comparison with ground-based lidar measurements from an EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar Network) station showed the reliability of the developed method for the PBL. Moreover, empirical relationships between integrated backscatter values from CALIPSO and PM1 concentrations were found thanks to the combined use of the retrieved PBL heights, CALIPSO aerosol profiles and typing and PM1 insitu measurements.

  4. Multiwavelength lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosols above Spitsbergen during winter 1992/93

    SciTech Connect

    Beyerle, G.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O. ); Wittrock, F. ); Knudsen, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Using a multiwavelength lidar the authors measured aerosols from the tropopause to altitudes of 30 km in the period December 1992 to March 1993. They analyzed backscatter and depolarization measurements to infer information on aerosol size and phase. During most of this period they saw evidence of a liquid drop aerosol layer in the lower stratosphere which was of a volcanic origin. In January they observed polar stratospheric clouds on numerous occasions, and particle size was found to depend strongly on the cooling rate.

  5. Light beam attenuation and backscattering properties of particles in the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea with relation to biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengqiang; Qiu, Zhongfeng; Sun, Deyong; Shen, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the first results of the variability in light beam attenuation and the backscattering properties of particles and their controlling factors during the summer in the Bohai Sea (BS) and Yellow Sea (YS), which are two typical shallow and semienclosed seas. We observe large variations in the particulate beam attenuation (cp) and backscattering coefficients (bbp); such variations are mainly attributed to changes in the total suspended matter, while the cross-sectional area concentration shows tighter relationships with both cp and bbp. The mass-specific beam attenuation (cp*) and backscattering coefficients (bbp*) vary more widely over about two orders of magnitude. The attenuation (Qce) and backscattering efficiencies (Qbbe) are important factors that control cp* and bbp*, which clearly separate all the samples into two types. Type 1 samples show low Qce and Qbbe and contain relatively high proportions of organic or large particles, while type 2 samples have high Qce and Qbbe and mainly contain relatively small mineral particles. The majority of the variability in cp* and bbp* within each type is related to the inverse of the product of particle apparent density (ρa) and mean diameter (DA); ρa plays a major role, while DA exerts only a slight impact. Overall, this study provides general knowledge of particulate beam attenuation and the backscattering properties in the BS and YS, which may improve our understanding of underwater radiative transfer processes, marine biogeochemical processes and ocean color algorithms.

  6. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  7. Aerosol and cloud retrieval using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2012). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has recently been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick

  8. Global Aerosol Remote Sensing from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Levy, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Jose V.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, spatial distribution and dynamics of global aerosols are still very poorly known, and new data from satellite sensors have long been awaited to improve current understanding and to give a boost to the effort in future climate predictions. The derivation of aerosol parameters from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensors aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua polar-orbiting satellites ushers in a new era in aerosol remote sensing from space. Terra and Aqua were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002 respectively, with daytime equator crossing times of approximately 10:30 am and 1:30 pm respectively. Several aerosol parameters are retrieved at 10-km spatial resolution (level 2) from MODIS daytime data. The MODIS aerosol algorithm employs different approaches to retrieve parameters over land and ocean surfaces, because of the inherent differences in the solar spectral radiance interaction with these surfaces. The parameters retrieved include: aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.47, 0.55 and 0.66 micron wavelengths over land, and at 0.47, 0.55, 0.66, 0.87, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 micron over ocean; Angstrom exponent over land and ocean; and effective radii, and the proportion of AOT contributed by the small mode aerosols over ocean. To ensure the quality of these parameters, a substantial part of the Terra-MODIS aerosol products were validated globally and regionally, based on cross correlation with corresponding parameters derived from ground-based measurements from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun photometers. Similar validation efforts are planned for the Aqua-MODIS aerosol products. The MODIS level 2 aerosol products are operationally aggregated to generate global daily, eight-day (weekly), and monthly products at one-degree spatial resolution (level 3). MODIS aerosol data are used for the detailed study of local, regional, and global aerosol concentration

  9. Comparative Study of Aerosol and Cloud Detected by CALIPSO and OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhong; Torres, Omar; McCormick, M. Patrick; Smith, William; Ahn, Changwoo

    2012-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura Satellite detects the presence of desert dust and smoke particles (also known as aerosols) in terms of a parameter known as the UV Aerosol Index (UV AI). The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) mission measures the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds. Aerosols and clouds play important roles in the atmosphere and climate system. Accurately detecting their presence, altitude, and properties using satellite radiance measurements is a very important task. This paper presents a comparative analysis of the CALIPSO Version 2 Vertical Feature Mask (VFM) product with the (OMI) UV Aerosol Index (UV AI) and reflectivity datasets for a full year of 2007. The comparison is done at regional and global scales. Based on CALIPSO arid OMI observations, the vertical and horizontal extent of clouds and aerosols are determined and the effects of aerosol type selection, load, cloud fraction on aerosol identification are discussed. It was found that the spatial-temporal correlation found between CALIPSO and OMI observations, is strongly dependent on aerosol types and cloud contamination. CALIPSO is more sensitivity to cloud and often misidentifies desert dust aerosols as cloud, while some small scale aerosol layers as well as some pollution aerosols are unidentified by OMI UV AI. Large differences in aerosol distribution patterns between CALIPSO and OMI are observed, especially for the smoke and pollution aerosol dominated areas. In addition, the results found a significant correlation between CALIPSO lidar 1064 nm backscatter and the OMI UV AI over the study regions.

  10. Nabro aerosol evolution observed jointly by lidars at a mid-latitude site and CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J.; Yi, F.

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of the Nabro volcanic aerosols from initially-localized plumes to a decaying hemispherically-covered layer was jointly observed by ground-based lidars at Wuhan (30.5°N, 114.4°E), China and CALIPSO. During the aerosol plume formation period, from the Nabro eruption to early July 2011, the lidar backscatter ratio related to the Nabro aerosols above Wuhan varied strongly both in vertical structure and intensity, suggesting that the Nabro aerosol distribution was horizontally inhomogeneous. The stratospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) from CALIPSO shows that the Nabro plume first circled around the Asian monsoon anticyclone and then gradually fulfilled the whole anticyclone area with a net aerosol enhancement, which may reflect a gas-particle conversion (from sulfur dioxide gas) and/or particle injection from the upper troposphere. During the horizontal dispersion period, from early July to mid-August 2011, the stratospheric AOD over Wuhan declined rapidly since the Nabro particles were transported throughout the northern hemisphere. A nearly horizontally-uniform volcanic aerosol layer was formed. During the local cleansing period, from mid-August to the end of 2011, the Nabro aerosol layer over Wuhan had a single-peak structure and decayed uniformly. The corresponding e-folding decay time for the layer AOD is ∼130 days. The lidar measurements at Wuhan gave a small depolarization ratio and large backscatter-related Ångström exponent for the Nabro aerosols on 8 July, suggesting that the majority of these aerosols were spherical and small. The effective radius and total mass for the Nabro aerosol particles were estimated to be ∼0.26 μm and ∼0.32 Tg respectively.

  11. CALIPSO Observations of Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wood, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses spaceborne lidar data to study how near-cloud aerosol statistics of attenuated backscatter depend on cloud fraction. The results for a large region around the Azores show that: (1) far-from-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with lower cloud fractions, while near-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with higher cloud fractions; (2) near-cloud enhancements of attenuated backscatter occur for any cloud fraction but are most pronounced for higher cloud fractions; (3) the difference in the enhancements for different cloud fractions is most significant within 5km from clouds; (4) near-cloud enhancements can be well approximated by logarithmic functions of cloud fraction and distance to clouds. These findings demonstrate that if variability in cloud fraction across the scenes used to composite aerosol statistics are not considered, a sampling artifact will affect these statistics calculated as a function of distance to clouds. For the Azores-region dataset examined here, this artifact occurs mostly within 5 km from clouds, and exaggerates the near-cloud enhancements of lidar backscatter and color ratio by about 30. This shows that for accurate characterization of the changes in aerosol properties with distance to clouds, it is important to account for the impact of changes in cloud fraction.

  12. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  13. Electron Backscatter Diffraction in Low Vacuum Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Torres, S G

    2008-07-17

    Most current scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) have the ability to analyze samples in a low vacuum mode, whereby a partial pressure of water vapor is introduced into the SEM chamber, allowing the characterization of nonconductive samples without any special preparation. Although the presence of water vapor in the chamber degrades electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns, the potential of this setup for EBSD characterization of nonconductive samples is immense. In this chapter we discuss the requirements, advantages and limitations of low vacuum EBSD (LV-EBSD), and present how this technique can be applied to a two-phase ceramic composite as well as hydrated biominerals as specific examples of when LV-EBSD can be invaluable.

  14. Quantifying recrystallization by electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Jazaeri, H; Humphreys, F J

    2004-03-01

    The use of high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope to quantify the volume fraction of recrystallization and the recrystallization kinetics is discussed. Monitoring the changes of high-angle grain boundary (HAGB) content during annealing is shown to be a reliable method of determining the volume fraction of recrystallization during discontinuous recrystallization, where a large increase in the percentage of high-angle boundaries occurs during annealing. The results are shown to be consistent with the standard methods of studying recrystallization, such as quantitative metallography and hardness testing. Application of the method to a highly deformed material has shown that it can be used to identify the transition from discontinuous to continuous recrystallization during which there is no significant change in the percentage of HAGB during annealing. PMID:15009691

  15. Quantitative metallography by electron backscattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Humphreys

    1999-09-01

    Although electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope is used mainly to investigate the relationship between local textures and microstructures, the technique has now developed to the stage where it requires serious consideration as a tool for routine quantitative characterization of microstructures. This paper examines the application of EBSD to the characterization of phase distributions, grain and subgrain structures and also textures. Comparisons are made with the standard methods of quantitative metallography and it is shown that in many cases EBSD can produce more accurate and detailed measurements than the standard methods and that the data may sometimes be obtained more rapidly. The factors which currently limit the use of EBSD for quantitative microstructural characterization, including the speed of data acquisition and the angular and spatial resolutions, are discussed, and future developments are considered. PMID:10460682

  16. Electron backscatter diffraction: applications for nuclear materials.

    PubMed

    Medevielle; Hugon; Dugne

    1999-09-01

    The diffraction of electrons was first observed in 1928 by Kikuchi. The phenomenon results in the formation of characteristic diagrams of the crystalline lattice and the orientation of the phase. Backscattered electrons are diffracted by the different crystallographic planes (hkl) according to the Bragg angle thetab. These describe, by symmetry, two cones of axes normal to the diffracting plane. Information is collected on a phosphor screen, leading to the acquisition of a diffraction pattern called a Kikuchi diagram. Several improvements now give a wide range of applications such as phase identification (carbides or complex compounds in a (U,Zr,O) structure), analysis of materials interfaces (ZrO2/UO2), as well as solidification studies and local texture determination (molybdenum sheets). In these applications, EBSD, as a type of quantitative metallography, is a powerful tool. PMID:10460689

  17. Rutherford backscattering analysis of contaminants in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D. E.; Pfeffer, R. L.; Sadler, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to understand the sorption and desorption of organic contaminants in the polymer Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET. Samples were exposed to a range of organics to simulate contamination of PET that can take place in the post-consumer waste stream. From RBS analysis, concentration depth profiles were shown to vary from a monolayer regime surface layer to a saturation level, depending on the contaminant. Heat treatments were also applied to contaminated polymer to simulate thermal processing steps in the recycling of PET. Heating caused a dramatic decrease in contaminants and in some cases a complete removal of contamination was achieved to the limit of RBS detectability.

  18. Relating P-band AIRSAR backscatter to forest stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yong; Melack, John M.; Davis, Frank W.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    As part of research on forest ecosystems, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and collaborating research teams have conducted multi-season airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) experiments in three forest ecosystems including temperate pine forest (Duke, Forest, North Carolina), boreal forest (Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest, Alaska), and northern mixed hardwood-conifer forest (Michigan Biological Station, Michigan). The major research goals were to improve understanding of the relationships between radar backscatter and phenological variables (e.g. stand density, tree size, etc.), to improve radar backscatter models of tree canopy properties, and to develop a radar-based scheme for monitoring forest phenological changes. In September 1989, AIRSAR backscatter data were acquired over the Duke Forest. As the aboveground biomass of the loblolly pine forest stands at Duke Forest increased, the SAR backscatter at C-, L-, and P-bands increased and saturated at different biomass levels for the C-band, L-band, and P-band data. We only use the P-band backscatter data and ground measurements here to study the relationships between the backscatter and stand density, the backscatter and mean trunk dbh (diameter at breast height) of trees in the stands, and the backscatter and stand basal area.

  19. Near-Nadir Radar Backscatter From Ocean Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1992-01-01

    Paper discusses aspects of theory of near-nadir radar backscatter from well-developed sea. Study contributed to development of new technique for determination of sea-state bias in satellite altimeter measurements. Paper questions assumptions, bringing accepted interpretation of nadir and near-nadir radar backscattering into doubt.

  20. AMALi - the Airborne Mobile Aerosol Lidar for Arctic research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachlewska, I. S.; Neuber, R.; Lampert, A.; Ritter, C.; Wehrle, G.

    2010-03-01

    The Airborne Mobile Aerosol Lidar (AMALi) is an instrument developed at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research for reliable operation under the challenging weather conditions at the Earth's polar regions. Since 2003 the AMALi has been successfully deployed for measurements in ground-based installation and zenith- or nadir-pointing airborne configurations during several scientific campaigns in the Arctic. The lidar provides backscatter profiles at two wavelengths (355/532 nm or 1064/532 nm) together with the linear depolarization at 532 nm, from which aerosol and cloud properties can be derived. This paper presents the characteristics and capabilities of the AMALi system and gives examples of its usage for airborne and ground-based operations in the Arctic. As this backscatter lidar normally does not operate in aerosol-free layers special evaluation schemes are discussed, the nadir-pointing iterative inversion for the case of an unknown boundary condition and the two-stream approach for the extinction profile calculation if a second lidar system probes the same air mass. Also an intercomparison of the AMALi system with an established ground-based Koldewey Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) is given.

  1. A dynamic localization model with stochastic backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, Daniele; Ghosal, Sandip

    1994-12-01

    The modeling of subgrid scales in large-eddy simulation (LES) has been rationalized by the introduction of the dynamic localization procedure. This method allows one to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients in the subgrid-scale model. Formally, the LES equations are supposed to be obtained by applying to the Navier-Stokes equations a 'grid filter' operation. Though the subgrid stress itself is unknown, an identity between subgrid stresses generated by different filters has been derived. Although preliminary tests of the Dynamic Localization Model (DLM) with k-equation have been satisfactory, the use of a negative eddy viscosity to describe backscatter is probably a crude representation of the physics of reverse transfer of energy. Indeed, the model is fully deterministic. Knowing the filtered velocity field and the subgrid-scale energy, the subgrid stress is automatically determined. We know that the LES equations cannot be fully deterministic since the small scales are not resolved. This stems from an important distinction between equilibrium hydrodynamics and turbulence. In equilibrium hydrodynamics, the molecular motions are also not resolved. However, there is a clear separation of scale between these unresolved motions and the relevant hydrodynamic scales. The result of molecular motions can then be separated into an average effect (the molecular viscosity) and some fluctuations. Due to the large number of molecules present in a box with size of the order of the hydrodynamic scale, the ratio between fluctuations and the average effect should be very small (as a result of the 'law of large numbers'). For that reason, the hydrodynamic balance equations are usually purely deterministic. In turbulence, however, there is no clear separation of scale between small and large eddies. In that case, the fluctuations around a deterministic eddy viscosity term could be significant. An eddy noise would then appear through a stochastic term in the subgrid

  2. Combining VIS and MIR lidars to separate aerosol modes in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen Meei; Corrigan, Paul; Gross, Barry; Wu, YongHua; Moshary, Fred

    2010-04-01

    Indentifying and quantifying ambient aerosols are important for air-quality applications. Unlike trace gases where chemical spectral signatures are sharp and well defined, aerosol spectral signatures are broader and highly overlapping. Therefore separation of aerosols into different size classes requires very broad spectral coverage from the visible (VIS) to mid-infrared (MIR). In this paper, we investigate the feasibility in using a VIS (0.65μm) diode laser combined with a suitable pulsed high power Quantum Cascade Laser (4.6μm) to obtain backscatter measurements that can be used to isolate fine and coarse mode aerosol fractions. Based on realistic source characteristics, we study the information content in the spectral extinction using different combinations of extinction measurements using Least Squares Minimization applied to a wide range of aerosol multimode mixtures obtained using realistic models obtained from the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC) model. This model is especially convenient since the optical spectral extinction and backscatter spectra are evaluated over a wide wavelength range from 250nm to 40μm. In particular, we find that with the latest QCL systems, it is possible to achieve signal to noise ratio (SNR) values ~10 with suitable temporal and spatial averaging for aerosol layers ~1.5km making it suitable for PBL layer studies.

  3. A method for removing arm backscatter from EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for removing the support arm backscatter from images acquired using current Varian electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs).Methods: The effect of arm backscatter on EPID images was modeled using a kernel convolution method. The parameters of the model were optimized by comparing on-arm images to off-arm images. The model was used to develop a method to remove the effect of backscatter from measured EPID images. The performance of the backscatter removal method was tested by comparing backscatter corrected on-arm images to measured off-arm images for 17 rectangular fields of different sizes and locations on the imager. The method was also tested using on- and off-arm images from 42 intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields.Results: Images generated by the backscatter removal method gave consistently better agreement with off-arm images than images without backscatter correction. For the 17 rectangular fields studied, the root mean square difference of in-plane profiles compared to off-arm profiles was reduced from 1.19% (standard deviation 0.59%) on average without backscatter removal to 0.38% (standard deviation 0.18%) when using the backscatter removal method. When comparing to the off-arm images from the 42 IMRT fields, the mean {gamma} and percentage of pixels with {gamma} < 1 were improved by the backscatter removal method in all but one of the images studied. The mean {gamma} value (1%, 1 mm) for the IMRT fields studied was reduced from 0.80 to 0.57 by using the backscatter removal method, while the mean {gamma} pass rate was increased from 72.2% to 84.6%.Conclusions: A backscatter removal method has been developed to estimate the image acquired by the EPID without any arm backscatter from an image acquired in the presence of arm backscatter. The method has been shown to produce consistently reliable results for a wide range of field sizes and jaw configurations.

  4. Backscattering at a pulsed neutron source, the MUSICAL instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alefeld, B.

    1995-02-01

    In the first part the principles of the neutron backscattering method are described and some simple considerations about the energy resolution and the intensity are presented. A prototype of a backscattering instrument, the first Jülich instrument, is explained in some detail and a representative measurement is shown which was performed on the backscattering instrument IN10 at the ILL in Grenoble. In the second part a backscattering instrument designed for a pulsed neutron source is proposed. It is shown that a rather simple modification, which consists in the replacement of the Doppler drive of the conventional backscattering instrument by a multi silicon monochromator cryst al (MUSICAL) leads to a very effective instrument, benefitting from the peak flux of the pulsed source.

  5. Physical parameter effects on radar backscatter using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Hean T.; Teh, K. B.

    1994-12-01

    This paper contains a sensitivity analysis of the effects of physical parameters on radar backscatter coefficients from a vegetation canopy using the method of principal component analysis. A Monte Carlo forward scattering model is used to generate the necessary data set for such analysis. The vegetation canopy is modeled as a layer of randomly distributed circular disks bounded below by a Kirchhoff rough surface. Data reduction is accomplished by the statistical principal component analysis technique in which only three principal components are found to be sufficient, containing 97% of the information in the original set. The first principal component can be interpreted as volume-volume backscatter, while the second and the third as surface backscatter and surface-volume backscatter, respectively. From the correlation matrix obtained, the sensitivity of radar backscatter due to various physical parameters is investigated. These include wave frequency, moisture content, scatterer's size, volume fraction, ground permittivity and surface roughness.

  6. Investigation of radar backscattering from second-year sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Guang-Tsai; Moore, Richard K.; Gogineni, S. P.

    1988-01-01

    The scattering properties of second-year ice were studied in an experiment at Mould Bay in April 1983. Radar backscattering measurements were made at frequencies of 5.2, 9.6, 13.6, and 16.6 GHz for vertical polarization, horizontal polarization and cross polarizations, with incidence angles ranging from 15 to 70 deg. The results indicate that the second-year ice scattering characteristics were different from first-year ice and also different from multiyear ice. The fading properties of radar signals were studied and compared with experimental data. The influence of snow cover on sea ice can be evaluated by accounting for the increase in the number of independent samples from snow volume with respect to that for bare ice surface. A technique for calculating the snow depth was established by this principle and a reasonable agreement has been observed. It appears that this is a usable way to measure depth in snow or other snow-like media using radar.

  7. Vacuum birefringence by Compton backscattering through a strong field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wistisen, Tobias N.; Uggerhøj, Ulrik I.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a novel scheme to measure nonlinear effects in electrodynamics arising from QED corrections. Our theoretical starting point is the Heisenberg-Euler-Schwinger effective Lagrangian which predicts that a vacuum with a strong static electromagnetic field turns birefringent. We propose to employ a pulsed laser to create Compton backscattered photons off a high energy electron beam. These photons will pass through a strong static magnetic field, which according to the QED prediction changes the state of polarization of the radiation—an effect proportional to the photon energy. This change will be measured by using an aligned single crystal, since a large difference in the pair production cross sections at high energies can be achieved with proper orientation of the crystal. As an example we will consider the machine, LHeC, under consideration at CERN as the source of these electrons, and an LHC dipole magnet as the source of the strong static magnetic field. In the proposed experimental setup the birefringence effect will be manifested in a difference in the number of pairs created in the polarizer crystal as the initial laser light has a varying state of polarization, achieved with a rotating quarter wave plate. This will be seen as a clear peak in the Fourier transform spectrum of the pair-production rate signal, which can be obtained with 3 hours of measurement. We also comment on the sensitivity of the experiment, to the existence of an axion, a hypothetical spin-0 particle that couples to two photons.

  8. Radar response to vegetation. [soil moisture mapping via microwave backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Active microwave measurements of vegetation backscatter were conducted to determine the utility of radar in mapping soil moisture through vegetation and mapping crop types. Using a truck-mounted boom, spectral response data were obtained for four crop types (corn, milo, soybeans, and alfalfa) over the 4-8 GHz frequency band, at incidence angles of 0 to 70 degrees in 10-degree steps, and for all four linear polarization combinations. Based on a total of 125 data sets covering a wide range of soil moisture, content, system design criteria are proposed for each of the aforementioned objectives. Quantitative soil moisture determination was best achieved at the lower frequency end of the 4-8 GHz band using HH polarized waves in the 5- to 15-degree incidence angle range. A combination of low and high frequency measurements are suggested for classifying crop types. For crop discrimination, a dual-frequency dual-polarization (VV and cross) system operating at incidence angles above 40 degrees is suggested.

  9. Advanced characterization of twins using automated electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. I.; Bingert, J. F.; Mason, T. A.; Larson, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained using an automated, crystallographically-based technique for twin identification. The technique is based on the automated collection of spatially specific orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The key features of the analysis are identification of potential twin boundaries by their misorientation character, identification of the distinct boundary planes among the symmetrically equivalent candidates, and validation of these boundaries through comparison with the boundary and twin plane traces in the sample cross section. Results on the application of this technique to deformation twins in zirconium are analyzed for the effect of twin type and amount and sense of uniaxial deformation. The accumulation of strain tends to increase the misorientation deviation at least to the degree of the trace deviation compared with recrystallization twins in nickel. In addition to the results on characterizing the twin character, results on extending the twin analysis to automated identification of parent and daughter material for structures exhibiting twin deformation are reported as well.

  10. Observations of Enhanced Radar Backscatter (ERB) from Millstone Hill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Intense enhancements of the incoherent radar backscatter spectrum from the topside ionosphere were observed with the Millstone Hill UHF radar. Enhancements occurring at the local ion acoustic frequency causing large asymmetries in the measured ion line may be produced by current driven instabilities. These enhancements pose a practical problem for space surveillance systems because their cross section and spectral width are characteristic of satellites. Conversely, their hard target signature complicates the study of naturally occurring ERB events; it is nearly impossible to distinguish them from satellites based on a single measurement. Statistical comparisons of observed coherent echo distributions with predictions from a satellite catalog were used to broadly identify periods of ERB activity. A series of experiments using multiple diagnostics, including satellite instruments, for simultaneous observations have established the association of ERB with large fluxes of soft suprathermal electrons carrying field aligned currents. Zenith data are also presented which show the asymmetric growth of ion acoustic waves directly above Millstone Hill. Details of these results are presented.

  11. Coherent light backscattering by refractive turbulence in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopilevich, Yurij I.

    1994-12-01

    A sharp peak is shown theoretically to exist in angular distribution of light scattered by a layer of ran- dom medium with weak refractive index fluctuations in the vicinity of backward direction. The peak width may be estimated by the ratio of incident radiation wavelength and the turbulence correlation scale. The effect is found to be formed by coherent addition of contributions from elementary layers, and may be considered as an analogue to 'weak photon localisation' phenomena in random media. When the width of scattering layer is large enough compared with the correlation scale of refractive index inhomogeneities, the differential scattering cross-section is composed by the 'coherent' component and 'incoherent' one, obtained earlier by V. I. Tatarski. In the case of visible or IR radiation (in contrast to microwaves) the 'coherent' constituent determines the scattering for large angles close to 180 deg. Quantitative estimates show the backscattering by turbulent layers in atmosphere to produce noticeable contributions to signal registered in remote sensing monostatic lidar experiments, and thus the effect under consideration has to be taken into account when interpretation of laser remote sounding data is carried out.

  12. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the first two years of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this two-year grant consisted in the development and deployment of a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180' backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Measurements were made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with targeted in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator and radiative transfer modeling by the University of Lille, France.

  13. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the third year of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this one-year grant consisted in analysis and publication of field studies using a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180 deg backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Analyzed data consisted of measurements made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with target in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator.

  14. Comparison of Lidar and In-Situ Measurements of Stratospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melfi, S. H.; Northam, G. B.; Rosen, J. M.; Pepin, T. J.; Hofmann, D. H.; McCormick, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    This paper will present the results of a comparative study conducted in Laramie, Wyoming, during the summer and fall of 1972, as part of the Department of Transportation's Climatic Impact Assessment Program (ClAP). The study included independent, and nearly simultaneous, measurements of stratospheric aerosols using a LIDAR system and a balloon-borne in-situ particle counter. The LIDAR provides a remote measurement of volume backscatter (aerosols and molecules) in a narrow wavelength region centered at the ruby wavelength (6943R); whereas the balloon-borne in-situ counter measures aerosol concentration by counting aerosols greater than approx. 0.30 microns in diameter as they are pumped through a chamber and scatter white light forward into photo-detectors. The comparison of measurements that will be discussed using the two techniques involves formulating the LIDAR data so that it is compatible with the counter data. The formulation includes separation of the scattering due to aerosols from the total and displaying this in terms of aerosol scattering function. Aerosol scattering function is proportional to aerosol concentration if the aerosol parameters, such as size distribution and composition, are constant with altitude. In separating the aerosol scattering from the total, the need for real atmospheric number density over the Standard Atmosphere is also discussed.

  15. Determination of nocturnal aerosol properties from a combination of lunar photometer and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Kaitao; Xu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol plays a key role in the assessment of global climate change and environmental health, while observation is one of important way to deepen the understanding of aerosol properties. In this study, the newly instrument - lunar photometer is used to measure moonlight and nocturnal column aerosol optical depth (AOD, τ) is retrieved. The AOD algorithm is test and verified with sun photometer both in high and low aerosol loading. Ångström exponent (α) and fine/coarse mode AOD (τf, τc) 1 is derived from spectral AOD. The column aerosol properties (τ, α, τf, τc) inferred from the lunar photometer is analyzed based on two month measurement in Beijing. Micro-pulse lidar has advantages in retrieval of aerosol vertical distribution, especially in night. However, the typical solution of lidar equation needs lidar ratio(ratio of aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient) assumed in advance(Fernald method), or constrained by AOD2. Yet lidar ratio is varied with aerosol type and not easy to fixed, and AOD is used of daylight measurement, which is not authentic when aerosol loading is different from day and night. In this paper, the nocturnal AOD measurement from lunar photometer combined with mie scattering lidar observations to inverse aerosol extinction coefficient(σ) profile in Beijing is discussed.

  16. Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar Aerosol Measurements during MILAGRO and TEXAQS/GOMACCS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Cook Anthony; Harper, David; Burton, Sharon; Clayton, Marian; Clarke, Antony; Russell, Phil; Redemann, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Two1 field experiments conducted during 2006 provided opportunities to investigate the variability of aerosol properties near cities and the impacts of these aerosols on air quality and radiative transfer. The Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) /Megacity Aerosol Experiment in Mexico City (MAX-MEX)/Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-B (INTEX-B) joint experiment conducted during March 2006 investigated the evolution and transport of pollution from Mexico City. The Texas Air Quality Study (TEXAQS)/Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) (http://www.al.noaa.gov/2006/) conducted during August and September 2006 investigated climate and air quality in the Houston/Gulf of Mexico region. During both missions, the new NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed on the NASA Langley B200 King Air aircraft and measured profiles of aerosol extinction, backscattering, and depolarization to: 1) characterize the spatial and vertical distributions of aerosols, 2) quantify aerosol extinction and optical thickness contributed by various aerosol types, 3) investigate aerosol variability near clouds, 4) evaluate model simulations of aerosol transport, and 5) assess aerosol optical properties derived from a combination of surface, airborne, and satellite measurements.

  17. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  18. Preliminary analysis of ground based lidar backscattered signal and performance evaluation in Penang Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Fuyi; Beh, Boon Chun; Tan, Chun Ho; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Mat Jafri, Mohamad Zubir; Welton, Ellsworth Judd; Lolli, Simone

    2013-05-01

    Lidar is a widely used instrument by scientists around the world because of its high temporal and spatial resolution. With these characteristics, the interpretation of lower atmosphere behavior is improved, especially for the structure of the boundary layer, strongly related to air quality in the region. For the first time a backscattering lidar with wavelength 355 nm and Raman capabilities produced by Raymetrics was operated in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) in Penang Island. Due to operational constraints, this study will only discuss backscattering signal at 60 degrees zenithal angle shooting. From this study, we found that the lidar signal was extinguished very quickly and with maximum range of 3 kilometers for 30 seconds temporal resolution. The signal was extremely noisy in this study and even after subtracting the backgrounds such as solar radiation in the range corrected signal. Dead-time correction was then applied to improve the lidar signal. The better signal for the near and far ranges of this angle shooting, gluing both analog and photon is necessary. Temporal evolution was plotted to determine the planetary boundary layer (PBL) structure and the altitude of PBL also can be identified. Moreover, cloud distribution and aerosol concentration pattern can be structured from the temporal evolution graph. However, for identifying the tendency of PBL structure in Penang Island, longer period and continuous data acquisition were needed.

  19. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing. PMID:26698808

  20. Aircraft studies of size-dependent aerosol sampling through inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. N.; Clarke, A. D.; Ferry, G.; Pueschel, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Representative measurement of aerosol from aircraft-aspirated systems requires special efforts in order to maintain near isokinetic sampling conditions, estimate aerosol losses in the sample system, and obtain a measurement of sufficient duration to be statistically significant for all sizes of interest. This last point is especially critical for aircraft measurements which typically require fast response times while sampling in clean remote regions. This paper presents size-resolved tests, intercomparisons, and analysis of aerosol inlet performance as determined by a custom laser optical particle counter. Measurements discussed here took place during the Global Backscatter Experiment (1988-1989) and the Central Pacific Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (1988). System configurations are discussed including (1) nozzle design and performance, (2) system transmission efficiency, (3) nonadiabatic effects in the sample line and its effect on the sample-line relative humidity, and (4) the use and calibration of a virtual impactor.

  1. Cloud and Aerosol Interaction Observed in SKYNET Hefei Site in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingjian; Sun, Lu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Wang, Zhenzhu; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-06-01

    The interaction relationship between cloud and aerosol is studied via their optical depth and cloud effective radius based on ground-based remote sensors. By attenuated backscatter obtained by lidar the optical depth of cloud and aerosol is retrieved. Combing with liquid water path observed by microwave radiometer, the cloud number concentration and cloud effective radius is also retrieved based on the adiabatic hypothesis Cases studies shows that during the stable stratocumulus with interval precipitation period and aerosol with vertical motion, the cloud effective radius shows both negative and positive relationship with aerosol optical depth. It may be due to the difference of liquid water path of the cloud properties and shows complex interaction with aerosol.

  2. Raman Lidar Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties Performed at CNR- IMAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, L.; Amodeo, A.; Cornacchia, C.; D'Amico, G.; Madonna, F.; Pandolfi, M.; Pappalardo, G.

    2005-12-01

    The lidar system for tropospheric aerosol study, located at CNR-IMAA in Tito Scalo, Potenza (40 °36'N, 15°44' E, 760 m above sea level), is a Raman/elastic lidar system operational since May 2000 in the framework of EARLINET (European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork), the first lidar network for tropospheric aerosol study on continental scale. It provides independent measurements of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficient profiles at 355 nm and aerosol backscatter profiles at 532 nm. Both the IMAA aerosol lidar system and the used algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol optical parameters have been successfully tested with different intercomparison exercises in the frame of the EARLINET quality assurance program. In the frame of EARLINET, regular measurements are performed three times per week, allowing to study the aerosol content typically present in the planetary boundary layer over Potenza. Particular attention is devoted to Saharan dust intrusions in Europe, and Saharan dust forecasts are distributed to all EARLINET stations. The large dataset of Saharan dust optical properties profiles collected at IMAA allowed to study the contribution of dust particles to the aerosol load typically present in our area as well as to investigate transformations of aerosol optical properties during the transport. Several intensive measurement campaigns have been performed at IMAA with this system to study optical properties of different types of aerosol, and how the transport and modification mechanisms and the water content affect these optical properties. In particular, direct transport of volcanic aerosol emitted in 2002 during the Etna eruptions was observed, and in summer 2004, aerosol layers related to forest fires smoke or pollution plume transported from Alaska, Canada and North America were observed at IMAA during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field campaign. Moreover, this system has been used

  3. Humidity Dependent Extinction of Clay Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, M. E.; Attwood, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the Earth’s radiative balance by directly scattering and absorbing radiation. The magnitude of aerosol forcing can be altered by changes in relative humidity which cause aerosol size, shape and refractive index to vary. To quantify these effects, a custom cavity ring down instrument operated at 532 nm with two sample channels measures aerosols extinction under dry conditions and at elevated humidity. The optical growth, fRH(ext), is determined as a ratio of the extinction cross section at high relative humidity to that under dry conditions. Three key clay components of mineral dust and mixtures of clay components with ammonium sulfate are investigated using this method. Experimentally obtained optical growth is compared with physical growth factors from the literature and our work determined using several different techniques. Further, Mie theory calculations based on published optical constants are compared with experimental results. Differences between theory and experiment will be discussed.

  4. Volcanic Aerosols from Satellites: Current and Emerging Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; McCormick, M. P.; Loughman, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    There are 5 instruments currently operating in space with capability to measure stratospheric aerosols. Two of these are lidar backscatter instruments (CALIOP & ISS/CATS) that provide high vertical resolution, day/night coverage, and polarization information to separate ice clouds from sulfate aerosols. Two are limb scattering instruments (OSIRIS & OMPS-LP) with high sensitivity to aerosols and provide extensive spatial coverage of the sunlit globe. And a Canadian solar occultation instrument (ACE-MAESTRO) measures aerosol extinction twice per orbit. Next year we are expecting the launch of the SAGE III instrument on ISS with capability to measure aerosol extinction and Angstrom Exponent (AE) at multiple wavelengths by solar and lunar occultation techniques. It also has limb scattering capability to provide spatial coverage between solar occultations. The 51.6˚ inclination of the ISS orbit will allow SAGE III to measure aerosol scattering across the gobe for a wide range of scattering angles. Therefore, ISS SAGE III has the capability to provide vertically resolved information about a wide variety of aerosol properties, potentially including aerosol extinction, size distribution, refractive index, and particle shape parameters, similar to the one provided by the ground-based almucantar technique. In our talk we will focus primarily on the synergy between the OMPS LP instrument that has been flying on the Suomi NPP satellite since October 2011 and ISS SAGE III. We will show how these measurements can be combined together to capture spatial and temporal evolution of aerosols and ozone in large volcanic plumes to validate models and to support field campaigns.

  5. Stratospheric Aerosols for Solar Radiation Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben

    SRM in the context of this entry involves placing a large amount of aerosols in the stratosphere to reduce the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface, thereby cooling the surface and counteracting some of the warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The way this is accomplished depends on the specific aerosol used, but the basic mechanism involves backscattering and absorbing certain amounts of solar radiation aloft. Since warming from greenhouse gases is due to longwave (thermal) emission, compensating for this warming by reduction of shortwave (solar) energy is inherently imperfect, meaning SRM will have climate effects that are different from the effects of climate change. This will likely manifest in the form of regional inequalities, in that, similarly to climate change, some regions will benefit from SRM, while some will be adversely affected, viewed both in the context of present climate and a climate with high CO2 concentrations. These effects are highly dependent upon the means of SRM, including the type of aerosol to be used, the particle size and other microphysical concerns, and the methods by which the aerosol is placed in the stratosphere. SRM has never been performed, nor has deployment been tested, so the research up to this point has serious gaps. The amount of aerosols required is large enough that SRM would require a major engineering endeavor, although SRM is potentially cheap enough that it could be conducted unilaterally. Methods of governance must be in place before deployment is attempted, should deployment even be desired. Research in public policy, ethics, and economics, as well as many other disciplines, will be essential to the decision-making process. SRM is only a palliative treatment for climate change, and it is best viewed as part of a portfolio of responses, including mitigation, adaptation, and possibly CDR. At most, SRM is insurance against dangerous consequences that are directly due to increased surface air

  6. Backscattering of linearly polarized light from turbid tissue-like scattering medium with rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronin, Alexander; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Markhvida, Igor; Lee, Tim K.; Meglinski, Igor

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of further development of a unified computational tool for the needs of biomedical optics, we introduce an electric field Monte Carlo (MC) model for simulation of backscattering of coherent linearly polarized light from a turbid tissue-like scattering medium with a rough surface. We consider the laser speckle patterns formation and the role of surface roughness in the depolarization of linearly polarized light backscattered from the medium. The mutual phase shifts due to the photons' pathlength difference within the medium and due to reflection/refraction on the rough surface of the medium are taken into account. The validation of the model includes the creation of the phantoms of various roughness and optical properties, measurements of co- and cross-polarized components of the backscattered/reflected light, its analysis and extensive computer modeling accelerated by parallel computing on the NVIDIA graphics processing units using compute unified device architecture (CUDA). The analysis of the spatial intensity distribution is based on second-order statistics that shows a strong correlation with the surface roughness, both with the results of modeling and experiment. The results of modeling show a good agreement with the results of experimental measurements on phantoms mimicking human skin. The developed MC approach can be used for the direct simulation of light scattered by the turbid scattering medium with various roughness of the surface.

  7. Electron range-energy relationships for calculating backscattering coefficients in elemental and compound semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouabah, Z.; Bouzid, A.; Champion, C.; Bouarissa, N.

    2011-06-01

    Backscattering coefficients for electrons normally impinging on Si, Ge, GaN, GaAs and InSb targets have been calculated by using the Vicanek and Urbassek theory [M. Vicanek, H.M. Urbassek, Phys. Rev. B 44 (1991) 7234] for incident energies ≤5 keV. Electron range has been calculated from various semi-empirical analytical expressions. The cross-sections used to describe the electron transport are determined via the appropriate analytical expression given by Jablonski [A. Jablonski, Phys. Rev. B 58 (1998) 16470] whose new improved version has been recently reported by Rouabah et al. [Z. Rouabah, N. Bouarissa, C. Champion, N. Bouaouadja, Appl. Surf. Sci. 255 (2009) 6217]. The results may be seen as the first predictions for low-energy electron backscattering coefficients impinging on GaN, GaAs and InSb semiconductors. The models used in the calculation of the electron range affect both the accuracy and behaviour of the electron backscattering coefficients.

  8. In situ phytoplankton absorption, fluorescence emission, and particulate backscattering spectra determined from reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roesler, Collin S.; Pery, Mary Jane

    1995-01-01

    An inverse model was developed to extract the absortion and scattering (elastic and inelastic) properties of oceanic constituents from surface spectral reflectance measurements. In particular, phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients, solar-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence spectra, and particle backscattering spectra were modeled. The model was tested on 35 reflectance spectra obtained from irradiance measurements in optically diverse ocean waters (0.07 to 25.35 mg/cu m range in surface chlorophyll a concentrations). The universality of the model was demonstrated by the accurate estimation of the spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficents over a range of 3 orders of magnitude (rho = 0.94 at 500 nm). Under most oceanic conditions (chlorophyll a less than 3 mg/cu m) the percent difference between measured and modeled phytoplankton absorption coefficents was less than 35%. Spectral variations in measured phytoplankton absorption spectra were well predicted by the inverse model. Modeled volume fluorescence was weakly correlated with measured chl a; fluorescence quantum yield varied from 0.008 to 0.09 as a function of environment and incident irradiance. Modeled particle backscattering coefficients were linearly related to total particle cross section over a twentyfold range in backscattering coefficents (rho = 0.996, n = 12).

  9. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  10. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  11. Statistical variations of ultrasound signals backscattered from flowing blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2007-12-01

    The statistical distributions of ultrasonic signals backscattered from blood have recently been used to characterize hemodynamic properties, such as red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and blood coagulation. However, a thorough understanding of the relationship between blood properties and the statistical behavior of signals backscattered from flowing blood is still lacking. This prompted us to use the statistical parameter to characterize signals backscattered from both whole blood and RBC suspensions at different flow velocities (from 10 to 60 cm/s) and hematocrits (from 20% to 50%) under a steady laminar flow condition. The Nakagami parameter, scaling parameter, backscatter amplitude profile and flow velocity profile across a flow tube were acquired using a 10 MHz focused ultrasonic transducer. The backscattered signal peaked approximately at the centerline of the flow tube due to the effects of RBC aggregation, with the peak value increasing as the flow velocity of whole blood decreased. The Nakagami parameter increased from 0.45 to 0.78 as the flow velocity increased from 10 to 60 cm/s. The probability density function (PDF) of signals backscattered from flowing whole blood conformed with a pre-Rayleigh distribution. The Nakagami parameter was close to 1 for signals backscattered from RBC suspensions at all the flow velocities and hematocrits tested, for which the PDF was Rayleigh distributed. These differences in the statistical distributions of backscattered signals between whole blood and RBC suspensions suggest that variations in the size of dynamic scatterers in the flow affect the shape of the backscattered signal envelope, which should be considered in future statistical models used to characterize blood properties. PMID:17673357

  12. Using Raman-lidar-based regularized microphysical retrievals and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements for the characterization of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Stefanos; Nicolae, Doina; Böckmann, Christine; Vasilescu, Jeni; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Labzovskii, Lev; Toanca, Florica; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2015-10-01

    In this work we extract the microphysical properties of aerosols for a collection of measurement cases with low volume depolarization ratio originating from fire sources captured by the Raman lidar located at the National Institute of Optoelectronics (INOE) in Bucharest. Our algorithm was tested not only for pure smoke but also for mixed smoke and urban aerosols of variable age and growth. Applying a sensitivity analysis on initial parameter settings of our retrieval code was proved vital for producing semi-automatized retrievals with a hybrid regularization method developed at the Institute of Mathematics of Potsdam University. A direct quantitative comparison of the retrieved microphysical properties with measurements from a Compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (CToF-AMS) is used to validate our algorithm. Microphysical retrievals performed with sun photometer data are also used to explore our results. Focusing on the fine mode we observed remarkable similarities between the retrieved size distribution and the one measured by the AMS. More complicated atmospheric structures and the factor of absorption appear to depend more on particle radius being subject to variation. A good correlation was found between the aerosol effective radius and particle age, using the ratio of lidar ratios (LR: aerosol extinction to backscatter ratios) as an indicator for the latter. Finally, the dependence on relative humidity of aerosol effective radii measured on the ground and within the layers aloft show similar patterns.

  13. Stratospheric aerosol change in the early stage of volcanic disturbance by the Pinatubo eruption observed over Tsukuba, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Sachiko; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1993-04-09

    An increase in the amount of stratospheric aerosol due to the Pinatubo eruption (June 12-15, 1991, 15.14[degree]N, 120.35[degree]E) was observed from the end of June by a lidar in NIES, Tsukuba (36[degree]N, 140[degree]E). The first arrival of volcanic aerosol layers was observed just above the tropopause on June 28, 1991, only two weeks after the eruption. Aerosol layers higher than 20 km appeared sporadically in July and August, reflecting the inhomogeneity of aerosol distribution. After the change in the wind system from summer easterlies to winter westerlies, the main body of the volcanic aerosol layer made its appearance over Tsukuba. The integrated backscattering coefficient (IBC) increased in winter as a result of transportation of aerosols from the tropical region. The IBC, which can be converted to optical thickness, exceeded the level of the value observed after the El Chichon eruption. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Evolution of stratospheric sulfate aerosol from the 1991 Pinatubo eruption: Roles of aerosol microphysical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, T.; Sudo, K.; Nagai, T.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the role of aerosol microphysics in stratospheric sulfate aerosol changes after the 1991 Mount Pinatubo eruption using an atmospheric general circulation model that is coupled interactively with a chemistry module and a modal aerosol microphysical module with three modes. Our model can reproduce the global mean stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD) observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II during June 1991 to January 1993. The model underestimates the observed SAOD before the eruption and after January 1993. The model also underestimates the integrated backscatter coefficient observed by ground-based lidar at Tsukuba, Naha, and Lauder. The modeled effective radius becomes larger (about 0.5 μm) and agrees with the balloon-borne measurements at Laramie, Wyoming (41°N, 105°W). We further investigate effects of the inclusion of evaporation along with the condensation processes and the inclusion of van der Waals and viscous forces in the coagulation processes. The inclusion of evaporation along with the condensation processes reduces the global mean effective radius by up to 0.04 μm and increases the global burden of stratospheric sulfate aerosols (about 15% in late 1993). The inclusion of van der Waals and viscous forces in the coagulation processes increases the global mean effective radius by up to 0.06-0.07 μm and decreases the global burden (15-30% in late 1993). The effects of van der Waals and viscous forces differ between two schemes. However, we do not conclude which simulation is superior because all simulations fall within error bars.

  15. In Situ Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosol Surfaces using Direct Analysis in Real Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, M.; Nah, T.; Wilson, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Obtaining in situ information on the molecular composition of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding the sources, formation mechanisms, aging and physiochemical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Most recently, we have used Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART), which is a "soft" atmospheric pressure ionization technique, for in situ chemical characterization of a variety of laboratory generated organic aerosol and heterogeneous processing oleic acid aerosol. A stream of aerosol particles is crossed with a thermal flow of metastable He atoms (produced by the DART source) in front of an inlet of a mass spectrometer. The thermally desorbed analytes are subsequently ionized with minimal fragmentation by reactive species in the DART ionization source (e.g., metastable He atoms). The ion signal scales with the aerosol surface area rather than aerosol volume, suggesting that aerosol particles are not completely vaporized in the ionization region. The DART can thus measure the chemical composition as a function of aerosol depth. Probing aerosol depth is determined by the thermal desorption rates of aerosol particles. Here, we investigate how the experimental parameters (e.g., DART gas temperature and residence time) and the physiochemical properties of aerosol particles (e.g., enthalpy of vaporization) affect the probing aerosol depth and the desorption-ionization mechanism of aerosol particles in the DART using a series of model organic compounds. We also demonstrate the potential application of DART for in situ chemically analyzing wet aerosol particles undergoing oxidation reactions.

  16. Characterization of the backscattered radiation from petawatt laser matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, Edwina D.; Musgrave, Ian O.; Green, James; Heathcote, Robert; Lancaster, Kate L.; Mendes, Cedric; Hawkes, Steve J.; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Pepler, Dave A

    2008-06-20

    The development of high peak power and energy laser systems require the assurance that any backscattered radiation will not lead to damage of the laser system. We present the characterization of the backscattered radiation for different target types and conditions at petawatt power levels and intensities (>10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2}). We observe that radiation is generated between 700 and 900 nm, as well as the expected self emission and laser fundamental. The percentage of the incident light backscattered reduces as a function of the incident energy and is typically <1% for petawatt laser interactions.

  17. Backscattering measurements of micron-sized spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Brendan M; Heinson, Yuli W; Maughan, Justin B; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2016-04-20

    An apparatus was designed and assembled to measure scattered light in the range of 180°±6° where enhanced backscattering, the cause of a glory, occurs. The apparatus was calibrated and tested using Fraunhofer circular aperture diffraction, angle of incidence correction, and a diffuse reflector. Theory indicates that backscattering is strongly dependent on particle size, refractive index, and shape. Experimental measurements from polystyrene latex spheres of two sizes and water droplets showed good agreement with Mie theory, but also indicated the extreme sensitivity of the backscattering to particle parameters. The results presented should have use in the fields of particle scattering, particle metrology, and LIDAR. PMID:27140090

  18. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  19. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals. PMID:26406659

  20. Regression models for vegetation radar-backscattering and radiometric emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eom, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    Simple regression estimation of radar backscatter and radiometric emission from vegetative terrain is proposed, based on the exact radiative transfer models. A vegetative canopy is modeled as a Rayleigh scattering layer above an irregular Kirchhoff surface. The rms errors between the exact and the estimated ones are found to be less than 5 percent for emission, and 1 dB for the backscattering case, in most practical uses. The proposed formulas are useful in quickly estimating backscattering and emission from the vegetative terrain.

  1. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  2. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  3. Statistical simulation of multiple Compton backscattering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potylitsyn, A. P.; Kolchuzhkin, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    A number of laboratories are currently developing monochromatic sources of X-rays and gamma quanta based on the Compton backscattering (CBS) of laser photons by relativistic electrons. Modern technologies are capable of providing a concentration of electrons and photons in the interaction point such that each primary electron can emit several hard photons. In contrast to the well-known nonlinear CBS process, in which an initial electron "absorbs" a few laser photons and emits a single hard one, the above-mentioned process can be called a multiple CBS process and is characterized by a mean number of emitted photons. The present paper is devoted to simulating the parameters of a beam of back scattered quanta based on the Monte Carlo technique. It is shown that, even in the case of strong collimation of a resulting photon beam, the radiation monochromaticity may deteriorate because of the contribution coming from the multiple photon emission, which is something that must be considered while designing new CBS sources.

  4. Radar backscatter from the sea controlled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Richard K.

    1990-11-01

    This is the final report on ONR Grant N00014-89-J-3022. Since most of the work was in journal articles, conference proceedings, and reports, this report is brief. Work continued, and was largely concluded, on analysis of the TOWARD, SAXON-CLT, and NILDEX data sets. Comparison between optical and radio measurements of ripple spectra at TOWARD showed favorable results. Although the wind direction was usually unfavorable for SAXON-CLT, useful data was obtained on modulation in the crosswind direction. It was also demonstated that a vector slope gauge can work, but for logistic reasons its deployment made its footprint close to the tower. Hence, the data are useful only for proof of concept, not for oceanographic application. A new theory of SAR imaging of the ocean was developed. It incorporates elements of previous theories, but shows an improved way to find out the effects of signal modulations on the observed spectra. It confirms, by a different method, the results from several other theoretical and experimental studies on processor focus adjustment. These show optimum image contrast occurs for along-track wave motion when the processor is set to (phase velocity)/2. The method of analysis used allowed closer examination of the basis for the two-scale (Bragg resonance with slope modulation) model for ocean backscatter. The results cast some doubt on the validity of the Bragg-scatter model for explaining many observed phenomena.

  5. X-Ray Backscatter Machine Support Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    This summer at Kennedy Space Center, I spent 10 weeks as an intern working at the Prototype Development Lab. During this time I learned about the design and machining done here at NASA. I became familiar with the process from where a design begins in Pro/Engineer and finishes at the hands of the machinists. As an intern I was given various small jobs to do and then one project of my own. My personal project was a job for the Applied Physics Lab; in their work they use an X-Ray Backscatter machine. Previously it was resting atop a temporary frame that limited the use of the machine. My job was to design a frame for the machine to rest upon that would allow a full range of sample sizes. The frame was required to support the machine and provide a strain relief for the cords attached to the machine as it moved in the x and y directions. Calculations also had to be done to be sure the design would be able to withstand any loads or outside sources of stress. After the calculations proved the design to be ready to withstand the requirements, the parts were ordered or fabricated, as required. This helped me understand the full process of jobs sent to the Prototype Development Lab.

  6. Behavior of atmospheric ozone determined from Nimbus satellite backscatter ultraviolet data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    A substantial global data base on the spatial and temporal variations of high level atmospheric ozone distribution and total ozone amount for the time period 1970 through 1973 was obtained by the Backscatter Ultraviolet (BUV) instrument onboard the Nimbus 4 satellite. BUV total ozone data from all available orbits on each day of the period were processed to obtain zonal mean ozone amounts. Northern Hemisphere ozone and Southern Hemisphere ozone values are given, and the interhemispheric relationships identified. Vertical ozone profile information is interpreted to furnish data on seasonal total ozone changes. Selected ozone mixing ratio cross sections were analyzed, and the resulting zonally-symmetric patterns are presented.

  7. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H. C.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, a field campaign was carried out in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation of enhancement factors at RH=85% for the scattering coefficient (f(85%)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85%)) and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85%)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07 and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e. aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25% as the RH increased from 40 to 85%. Meanwhile, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21%. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) and inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH), the highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of organic matter (OM), and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated to f(85%), which suggests NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass percentage of nitrate also had a close relation to the curvature of humidograms, namely, the higher the nitrate concentration is, the straighter the humidogram will be. Air masses that arrived at LinAn in March can be classified into northerly-polluted, locally-polluted and dust-influenced types, the scattering enhancement factors at 85% RH were 1.52 ± 0.10, 1.64 ± 0.09 and 1.48 ± 0.05, respectively. The sensitivity of the aerosol radiative forcing to f(RH) at the measured mean ambient RH 67% for various aerosol types was also estimated. The direct radiative forcing increased by 11.8, 19.5, and 10.5%, respectively, for locally-polluted, northerly-polluted and dust-influenced aerosols due to aerosol

  8. The effect of artificial rain on backscattered acoustic signal: first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titchenko, Yuriy; Karaev, Vladimir; Meshkov, Evgeny; Goldblat, Vladimir

    The problem of rain influencing on a characteristics of backscattered ultrasonic and microwave signal by water surface is considered. The rain influence on backscattering process of electromagnetic waves was investigated in laboratory and field experiments, for example [1-3]. Raindrops have a significant impact on backscattering of microwave and influence on wave spectrum measurement accuracy by string wave gauge. This occurs due to presence of raindrops in atmosphere and modification of the water surface. For measurements of water surface characteristics during precipitation we propose to use an acoustic system. This allows us obtaining of the water surface parameters independently on precipitation in atmosphere. The measurements of significant wave height of water surface using underwater acoustical systems are well known [4, 5]. Moreover, the variance of orbital velocity can be measure using these systems. However, these methods cannot be used for measurements of slope variance and the other second statistical moments of water surface that required for analyzing the radar backscatter signal. An original design Doppler underwater acoustic wave gauge allows directly measuring the surface roughness characteristics that affect on electromagnetic waves backscattering of the same wavelength [6]. Acoustic wave gauge is Doppler ultrasonic sonar which is fixed near the bottom on the floating disk. Measurements are carried out at vertically orientation of sonar antennas towards water surface. The first experiments were conducted with the first model of an acoustic wave gauge. The acoustic wave gauge (8 mm wavelength) is equipped with a transceiving antenna with a wide symmetrical antenna pattern. The gauge allows us to measure Doppler spectrum and cross section of backscattered signal. Variance of orbital velocity vertical component can be retrieved from Doppler spectrum with high accuracy. The result of laboratory and field experiments during artificial rain is presented

  9. Optical properties of Southern Hemisphere aerosols: Report of the joint CSIRO/NASA study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gras, John L.; Platt, C. Martin; Huffaker, R. Milton; Jones, William D.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Gras, John L.

    1988-01-01

    This study was made in support of the LAWS and GLOBE programs, which aim to design a suitable Doppler lidar system for measuring global winds from a satellite. Observations were taken from 5 deg S to 45 deg S along and off the E and SE Australian coast, thus obtaining representative samples over a large latitude range. Observations were made between 0 and 6 km altitude of aerosol physical and chemical properties in situ from the CSIRO F-27 aircraft; of lidar backscatter coefficients at 10.6 micron wavelength from the F-27 aircraft; of lidar backscatter profiles at 0.694 microns at Sale, SE Australia; and of lidar backscatter profiles at 0.532 microns at Cowley Beach, NE Australia. Both calculations and observations in the free troposphere gave a backscatter coefficient of 1-2 x 10 to the -11/m/sr at 10.6 microns, although the accuracies of the instruments were marginal at this level. Equivalent figures were 2-8 x 10 to the -9/m/sr (aerosol) and 9 x 10 to the -9 to 2 x 10 to the -8/m/sr (lidar) at 0.694 microns wavelength at Sale; and 3.7 x 10 to the -9/m/sr (aerosol) and 10 to the -8 to 10 to the -7/m/sr (lidar) at 0.532 microns wavelength at Cowley Beach. The measured backscatter coefficients at 0.694 and 0.532 microns were consistently higher than the values calculated from aerosol size distributions by factors of typically 2 to 10.

  10. Measuring Aerosol Optical Properties with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veefkind, J. P.; Torres, O.; Syniuk, A.; Decae, R.; deLeeuw, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is the Dutch-Finnish contribution to the NASA EOS-Aura mission scheduled for launch in January 2004. OM1 is an imaging spectrometer that will measure the back-scattered Solar radiance between 270 an 500 nm. With its relatively high spatial resolution (13x24 sq km at nadir) and daily global coverage. OM1 will make a major contribution to our understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to climate research. OM1 will provide data continuity with the TOMS instruments. One of the pleasant surprises of the TOMS data record was its information on aerosol properties. First, only the absorbing aerosol index, which is sensitive to elevated lay- ers of aerosols such as desert dust and smoke aerosols, was derived. Recently these methods were further improved to yield aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo over land and ocean for 19 years of TOMS data (1979-1992,1997-2002), making it one of the longest and most valuable time series for aerosols presently available. Such long time series are essential to quantify the effect of aerosols on the Earth& climate. The OM1 instrument is better suited to measure aerosols than the TOMS instruments because of the smaller footprint, and better spectral coverage. The better capabilities of OMI will enable us to provide an improved aerosol product, but the knowledge will also be used for further analysis of the aerosol record from TOMS. The OM1 aerosol product that is currently being developed for OM1 combines the TOMS experience and the multi-spectral techniques that are used in the visible and near infrared. The challenge for this new product is to provide aerosol optical thickness and single scattering albedo from the near ultraviolet to the visible (330-500 nm) over land and ocean. In this presentation the methods for deriving the OM1 aerosol product will be presented. Part of these methods developed for OM1 can already be applied to TOMS data and results of such analysis will be shown.

  11. A New Approach to Inverting and De-Noising Backscatter from Lidar Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Willem; Hen Hu, Yu; Holz, Robert; Eloranta, Edwin

    2016-06-01

    Atmospheric lidar observations provide a unique capability to directly observe the vertical profile of cloud and aerosol scattering properties and have proven to be an important capability for the atmospheric science community. For this reason NASA and ESA have put a major emphasis on developing both space and ground based lidar instruments. Measurement noise (solar background and detector noise) has proven to be a significant limitation and is typically reduced by temporal and vertical averaging. This approach has significant limitations as it results in significant reduction in the spatial information and can introduce biases due to the non-linear relationship between the signal and the retrieved scattering properties. This paper investigates a new approach to de-noising and retrieving cloud and aerosol backscatter properties from lidar observations that leverages a technique developed for medical imaging to de-blur and de-noise images; the accuracy is defined as the error between the true and inverted photon rates. Hence non-linear bias errors can be mitigated and spatial information can be preserved.

  12. Determination by spaceborne backscatter lidar of the structural parameters of atmospheric scattering layers.

    PubMed

    Chazette, P; Pelon, J; Mégie, G

    2001-07-20

    Spaceborne active lidar systems are under development to give new insight into the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere and to provide new information on variables required for improvement of forecast models and for understanding the radiative and dynamic processes that are linked to the dynamics of climate change. However, when they are operated from space, lidar systems are limited by atmospheric backscattered signals that have low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) on optically thin targets. Therefore specific methods of analysis have to be developed to ensure accurate determination of the geometric and optical properties of scattering layers in the atmosphere. A first approach to retrieving the geometric properties of semitransparent cloud and aerosol layers is presented as a function of false-alarm and no-detection probabilities for a given SNR. Simulations show that the geometric properties of thin cirrus clouds and the altitude of the top of the unstable atmospheric boundary layer can be retrieved with standard deviations smaller than 150 m for a vertical resolution of the lidar system in the 50-100-m range and a SNR of 3. The altitudes of the top of dense clouds are retrieved with a precision in altitude of better than 50 m, as this retrieval corresponds to a higher SNR value. Such methods have an important potential application to future spaceborne lidar missions. PMID:18360368

  13. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  14. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  15. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  16. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  17. Composition and spectral characteristics of ambient aerosol at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R. )

    1991-03-20

    Ambient aerosol particles were sampled continuously with a time resolution of {approximately}4 hours for a period of 8 days at the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, in August 1986. The samples were analyzed on-site for their chemical composition by attenuated total internal reflection infrared spectroscopy. The infrared absorption spectra of the samples also provided data on aerosol light absorbance characteristics at 9.1 and 10.6 {mu}m - wavelengths of interest in determining aerosol backscatter coefficients for CO{sub 2} lidars. The chemical species in the ambient aerosol varied considerably during this 8-day period. The aerosol was acidic ((NH{sub 4}){sub 3}H(SO{sub 4}){sub 2},NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) rather than neutral ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}) for a major fraction of the sampling time. The samples generally showed much higher absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m than at 10.6 {mu}m. Changes in the chemical composition between (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and the more acidic forms were accompanied by substantial changes in the sample's absorbance at 9.1 {mu}m but lesser changes in the absorbance at 10.6 {mu}m. These variations could have a profound effect on backscatter coefficients of atmospheric aerosol particles at CO{sub 2} wavelengths.

  18. Comparison of aerosol extinction between lidar and SAGE II over Gadanki, a tropical station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, P.; Ramachandran, S.

    2015-03-01

    An extensive comparison of aerosol extinction has been performed using lidar and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II data over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E), a tropical station in India, following coincident criteria during volcanically quiescent conditions from 1998 to 2005. The aerosol extinctions derived from lidar are higher than SAGE II during all seasons in the upper troposphere (UT), while in the lower-stratosphere (LS) values are closer. The seasonal mean percent differences between lidar and SAGE II aerosol extinctions are > 100% in the UT and < 50% above 25 km. Different techniques (point and limb observations) played the major role in producing the observed differences. SAGE II aerosol extinction in the UT increases as the longitudinal coverage is increased as the spatial aerosol extent increases, while similar extinction values in LS confirm the zonal homogeneity of LS aerosols. The study strongly emphasized that the best meteorological parameters close to the lidar measurement site in terms of space and time and Ba (sr-1), the ratio between aerosol backscattering and extinction, are needed for the tropics for a more accurate derivation of aerosol extinction.

  19. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  20. Rayleigh backscattering theory for single-mode optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, M.

    1983-09-01

    The theory of backscattering in single-mode optical fibers is described through use of a correlation function for the refractive-index fluctuation in the fiber. A simple formula for the backscattered power is derived using two correlation functions for the Booker-Gordon and Gaussian models. The zeroth-order approximation of the formula, in which the correlation length is much smaller than the spot size of the waveguide mode, coincides with Brinkmeyer's model. The backscattered power at the input end of single-mode fiber is compared with that for multi-mode fiber. It is also shown that the backscattered power level at the input end is lower by approximately 55 dB than the input power level.

  1. Comparison of radar backscatter from Antarctic and Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosseinmostafa, R.; Lytle, V.

    1992-01-01

    Two ship-based step-frequency radars, one at C-band (5.3 GHz) and one at Ku-band (13.9 GHz), measured backscatter from ice in the Weddell Sea. Most of the backscatter data were from first-year (FY) and second-year (SY) ice at the ice stations where the ship was stationary and detailed snow and ice characterizations were performed. The presence of a slush layer at the snow-ice interface masks the distinction between FY and SY ice in the Weddell Sea, whereas in the Arctic the separation is quite distinct. The effect of snow-covered ice on backscattering coefficients (sigma0) from the Weddell Sea region indicates that surface scattering is the dominant factor. Measured sigma0 values were compared with Kirchhoff and regression-analysis models. The Weibull power-density function was used to fit the measured backscattering coefficients at 45 deg.

  2. Detection of buried landmine with X-ray backscatter technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yi, Yun

    2006-11-01

    We describe a continuously operating scanning X-ray imaging system developed for landmine detection based on a backscatter X-ray principle, thus detection is done from the same side as the source. The source operates at 120 kV p and 3 mA. To study the physics of Compton X-ray backscattering, the photon transport factor, backscatter factor (BSF) and backscatter probability (BSP) were simulated using Monte-Carlo calculations using the generalized particle transport program MCNP. Based on the Monte-Carlo analyses results, a mine detecting system has been designed. It potentially has a low false alarm rate and a high detection probability, and a direct imaging facility.

  3. Automatic scaling of HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huan; Hu, Yaogai; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a method for automatically scaling HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms, which can be applied to a low-power oblique backscatter sounding system. Based on the information of vertical echo in the ionogram, propagation mode is recognized from the amplitude differences between E layer and F layer echoes. Points on the leading edge are extracted by using minimum group path delay theory. The spurious points are removed by using residual analysis. A multiple linear polynomial was adopted to fit the extracted leading edge points. Smooth fitting curves can then be obtained. Automatic scaling results from 362 ionograms show that the proposed method can efficiently recognize propagation modes and extract leading edge curves by taking full advantages of echo characteristics and echo amplitudes in the ionograms. This novel method can be applied into real-time backscatter ionogram scaling, which facilitates the extensive usage of oblique backscatter soundings.

  4. Preliminary Lidar Experiment to Study the Backscatter Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.

    2016-06-01

    Long-term continuous measurements for detection relative backscatter amplification on a horizontal path of 2 km long are performed by using a specific micro pulse lidar. The laser beam path is limited by a solid obstacle. The lidar is located next to an ultrasonic anemometer that measures 3D wind velocity and temperature; the laser spot on the obstacle is observed by using a telephoto lens. The results showed that the backscatter amplification has a clear diurnal variation. Moreover, the backscatter amplification was completely absent in the morning and evening under neutral stratification in the atmospheric surface layer. At night and in the daytime there was a significant increase of the backscatter amplification coefficient.

  5. Interaction-induced backscattering in short quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M.-T.; Micklitz, T.; Levchenko, A.; Matveev, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study interaction-induced backscattering in clean quantum wires with adiabatic contacts exposed to a voltage bias. Particle backscattering relaxes such systems to a fully equilibrated steady state only on length scales exponentially large in the ratio of bandwidth of excitations and temperature. Here we focus on shorter wires in which full equilibration is not accomplished. Signatures of relaxation then are due to backscattering of hole excitations close to the band bottom which perform a diffusive motion in momentum space while scattering from excitations at the Fermi level. This is reminiscent to the first passage problem of a Brownian particle and, regardless of the interaction strength, can be described by an inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck equation. From general solutions of the latter we calculate the hole backscattering rate for different wire lengths and discuss the resulting length dependence of interaction-induced correction to the conductance of a clean single channel quantum wire.

  6. Simulation of coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kokorin, D. I. Romanov, V. P.

    2012-08-15

    Multiple scattering of light by the fluctuations of the director in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) aligned by a magnetic field is considered. A peak of coherent backscattering is calculated by numerical simulation. Since the indicatrix of single scattering for a liquid crystal (LC) is known exactly, the calculations are carried out without any simplifying assumptions on the parameters of the liquid crystal. Multiple scattering is simulated as a random walk of photons in the medium. A peak of coherent backscattering in such a medium is very narrow; therefore, the so-called semianalytical method is applied. The parameters of the backscattering peak obtained by numerical simulation are compared with the available experimental data and with the results of analytical approximations. It turns out that the experimental data are in good agreement with the results of simulation. The results of numerical simulation adequately describe the anisotropy and the width of the backscattering peak.

  7. Backscattering by very small particles in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Gray, Deric J.

    2015-10-01

    The volume scattering and backscattering by very small particles (VSPs) of sizes <0.2 µm in four coastal waters in U.S. (Chesapeake Bay, Monterey Bay, Mobile Bay, and the LEO-15 site) were estimated by inverting the measured volume scattering functions (VSFs) at 532 nm. The measured VSFs are consistent with concurrent measurements of total scattering coefficients by the ac-meters and angular scattering at 100, 125, and 150° by the ECO-VSF sensor and at 140° by the HydroScat-6 sensor. The inferred backscattering coefficients by the VSPs correlate strongly with the absorption coefficients measured for the colored dissolved organic matter, indicating that the dissolved portion of particles do scatter light. In the coastal waters that we studied, the backscattering by VSPs dominate over larger particles (of sizes >0.2 µm), accounting for 40-80% of total backscattering at 532 nm, while only account for <5% of total scattering.

  8. Diurnal Thermal Cycling Effects on Backscatter of Thin Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Yueh, S. H.; Gow, A. J.; Perovich, D. K.; Hsu, C. C.; Ding, K. H.; Kong, J. A.; Grenfell, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    To invesigate effects on polarimetric backscatter of sea ice grown under diurnal cycling conditions, we carried out an experiment inJanuary 1994 at the outdoor Geophysical Research Facility in the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory.

  9. BASIS: A New Backscattering Spectrometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Zamponi, Michaela M; Hammons, Stephanie E; Keener, Wylie S; Hagen, Mark E; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2008-01-01

    A new spectrometer named BASIS has recently entered the general user program at the Spallation Neutron Source. BASIS is an acronym for Backscattering Silicon Spectrometer. While there are several operational reactor-based spectrometers that utilize backscattering reflection from silicon single crystals, such as IN10 and IN16 [1] at the ILL, France; HFBS [2] at the NCNR, USA; and SPHERES [3] at the FRM-II, JCNS, Germany, BASIS is the first silicon backscattering spectrometer built on a spallation neutron source. Conceptually, it is similar to previously built time-of-flight backscattering spectrometers that utilize reflections from pyrolytic graphite or mica, such as IRIS [4] and OSIRIS [5] at the ISIS, UK; LAM-80 [6] at the KENS, Japan; or MARS [7] at the SINQ, Switzerland.

  10. HSRL-2 Observations of Aerosol Variability During an Aerosol Build-up Event in Houston and Comparisons With WRF-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Saide, Pablo; Sawamura, Patricia; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Rich; Scarino, Amy Jo; Berkoff, Tim; Harper, David; Cook, Tony; Rogers, Ray; Carmichael, Greg

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley airborne multi-wavelength High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) provides vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties as curtains of aerosol extinction, backscatter and depolarization along the flight track, plus intensive properties that are used to infer aerosol type and external mixing of types. Deployed aboard the NASA Langley King Air on the DISCOVER-AQ field mission in Houston in September 2013, HSRL-2 flew a pattern that included 18 ground sites, repeated four times a day, coordinated with a suite of airborne in situ measurements. The horizontally and vertically resolved curtains of HSRL-2 measurements give an unparalleled view of the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol, which provide broad context for interpreting other measurements and models. Detailed comparisons of aerosol extinction are made with the WRF-Chem chemical transport model along the HSRL-2 flight path. The period from Sept. 11-14 is notable for a large aerosol build-up and persistent smoke layers. We investigate the aerosol properties using the vertically resolved HSRL-2 measurements and aerosol typing analysis plus WRFChem model tracers and back trajectories, and modeling of humidification effects.

  11. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm Attenuated Backscatter Calibration Using the NASA LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Obland, Michael D.; Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony L.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter) using an internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that average HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% +/- 2.1% (CALIOP lower) at night and within 2.9 % +/- 3.9% (CALIOP lower) during the day., demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential systematic uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 3.7% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared to those from prior assessments of CALIOP calibration and attenuated backscatter.

  12. Statistical properties of gas ring lasers with backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesquera, L.; Blanco, R.; Rodriguez, M. A.

    1989-06-01

    The statistical properties of two-mode gas ring lasers with backscattering are studied using the exact steady probability density obtained by Christian and Mandel (1986). It is shown that the intensity of both modes grows with increasing pump power and that the intensity fluctuations of both modes die out significantly above threshold. It is concluded that the two modes obey laser statistics when the backscattering is symmetric.

  13. Study of aerosol hygroscopic events over the Cabauw experimental site for atmospheric research (CESAR) using the multi-wavelength Raman lidar Caeli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, A. J.; Apituley, A.; Veselovskii, I.; Suvorina, A.; Henzing, J.; Pujadas, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2015-11-01

    This article presents a study of aerosol optical and microphysical properties under different relative humidity (RH) but well mixed layer conditions using optical and microphysical aerosol properties from multi-wavelength (MW) Raman lidar and in-situ aerosol observations collected at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research (CESAR). Two hygroscopic events are described through 3 backscatter (β) and 2 extinction (α) coefficients which in turn provide intensive parameters such as the backscatter-related Ångström exponent (åβ) and the lidar ratio (LR). Along with it, profiles of RH were inferred from Raman lidar observations and therefore, as a result of varying humidity conditions, a shift on the aerosol optical properties can be described. Thus, it is observed that as RH increases, aerosols uptake water vapour, augment their size and consequently the åβ diminishes whereas the LR increases. The enhancement factor based on the backscatter coefficient at 532 nm, which characterizes the aerosol from hygroscopic standpoint, is also estimated. Finally, microphysical properties that are necessary for aerosol radiative forcing estimates - such as volume, effective radii, refractive index and size distribution, all vertically resolved - are retrieved using the inversion with regularization. Using this method, two hygroscopic events are described in detail.

  14. Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, J.; Lockwood, G.; Selph, M; Shope, S.; Wehlburg, J.

    1998-10-01

    Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-rays* Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sides of the package. This poses a problem if the pachge is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to persomel and property since exTlosive devices may be "booby trapped." We have developed a method to x-ray a paclage using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them iare scattered back towards the source. The backscattenng of x-rays is propordoml to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This 24"' dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Using transmission radiography-to image the contents of an unknown package poses some undesirable risks. The object must have an x-ray film placed on the side opposite the x-ray source; this cannot be done without moving the package if it has been placed firmly against a wall or pillar. Therefore it would be extremely usefid to be able to image the contents of a package from only one side, without ever having to disturb the package itself. where E is the energy of the incoming x-ray. The volume of x-rays absorbed is important because it is, of course, directly correlated to the intensity of x-mys that will be scattered. Most of the x-rays that scatter will do so in a genemlly forward direction; however, a small percentage do scatter in a backward direction. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the various fates of x-rays directed into an object. The package that was examined in this ex~enment was an attache case made of pressed fiberboardwith a vinyl covering. It was

  15. Long-term trends in aerosol optical characteristics in the Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putaud, J. P.; Cavalli, F.; Martins dos Santos, S.; Dell'Acqua, A.

    2014-09-01

    Aerosol properties have been monitored by ground-based in situ and remote sensing measurements at the station for atmospheric research located in Ispra, on the edge of the Po Valley, for almost one decade. In situ measurements are performed according to Global Atmosphere Watch recommendations, and quality is assured through the participation in regular inter-laboratory comparisons. Sun-photometer data are produced by the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Data show significant decreasing trends over the 2004-2010 period for a number of variables, including particulate matter (PM) mass concentration, aerosol scattering, backscattering and absorption coefficients, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT). In situ measurement data show no significant trends in the aerosol backscatter ratio, but they do show a significant decreasing trend of about -0.7 ± 0.3% yr-1 in the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA) in the visible light range. Similar trends are observed in the SSA retrieved from sun-photometer measurements. Correlations appear between in situ PM mass concentration and aerosol scattering coefficient, on the one hand, and elemental carbon (EC) concentration and aerosol absorption coefficient, on the other hand. However, no increase in the EC / PM ratio was observed, which could have explained the decrease in SSA. The application of a simple approximation to calculate the direct radiative forcing by aerosols suggests a significant diminution in their cooling effect, mainly due to the decrease in AOT. Applying the methodology we present to those sites, where the necessary suite of measurements is available, would provide important information to inform future policies for air-quality enhancement and fast climate change mitigation.

  16. Statistical parameter estimation in ultrasound backscattering from tissue mimicking media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Several tissue characterization parameters, including the effective scatterer number density and the backscatter coefficient, were derived from the statistical properties of ultrasonic echo signals. The effective scatterer number density is the actual scatterer number density in a medium multiplied by a frequency-dependent factor that depends on the differential scattering cross-sections of all scatterers. The method described in this thesis for determining the scatterer number density explicitly retains both the temporal nature of the data acquisition and the properties of the ultrasound field in the data reduction. Moreover, it accounts for the possibility that different sets of scatterers may dominate the echo signal at different frequencies. The random processes involved in forming ultrasound echo signals from random media give rise to an uncertainty in the estimated effective scatterer number density. This uncertainty is evaluated using error propagation. The statistical uncertainty depends on the effective number of scatterers contributing to the segmented echo signal, increasing when the effective number of scatterers increases. Tests of the scatterer number density data reduction method and the statistical uncertainty estimator were done using phantoms with known ultrasound scattering properties. Good agreement was found between measured values and those calculated from first-principles. The properties of the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters of ultrasound echo signals are also studied. Both parameters depend on the measurement system, including the transducer field and pulse frequency content, as well as on the medium`s properties. The latter is expressed in terms of the scatterer number density and the second and fourth moments of the medium`s scattering function. A simple relationship between the non-Gaussian and non-Rayleigh parameters is derived and verified experimentally.

  17. Shortwave Radiative Fluxes, Solar-Beam Transmissions, and Aerosol Properties: TARFOX and ACE-2 Find More Absorption from Flux Radiometry than from Other Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) made simultaneous measurements of shortwave radiative fluxes, solar-beam transmissions, and the aerosols affecting those fluxes and transmissions. Besides the measured fluxes and transmissions, other obtained properties include aerosol scattering and absorption measured in situ at the surface and aloft; aerosol single scattering albedo retrieved from skylight radiances; and aerosol complex refractive index derived by combining profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution. These measurements of North Atlantic boundary layer aerosols impacted by anthropogenic pollution revealed the following characteristic results: (1) Better agreement among different types of remote measurements of aerosols (e.g., optical depth, extinction, and backscattering from sunphotometers, satellites, and lidars) than between remote and in situ measurements; 2) More extinction derived from transmission measurements than from in situ measurements; (3) Larger aerosol absorption inferred from flux radiometry than from other measurements. When the measured relationships between downwelling flux and optical depth (or beam transmission) are used to derive best-fit single scattering albedos for the polluted boundary layer aerosol, both TARFOX and ACE-2 yield midvisible values of 0.90 +/- 0.04. The other techniques give larger single scattering albedos (i.e. less absorption) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of 0.95 +/- 0.04. Although the flux-based results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., unknown gas absorption). Current uncertainties in aerosol single scattering albedo are large in terms of climate effects. They also have an important influence on aerosol optical depths retrieved from satellite radiances

  18. Global transport of Asian dust revealed by NASA/CALIPSO and a global aerosol transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguchi, K.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Takemura, T.

    2009-12-01

    Trans-Pacific transport of mineral dust and air pollutants originating from Asia to North America is well known. Eguchi et al. (2009, ACP) pointed out that the Taklimakan Desert supplies mineral dust for upper troposphere and can play an important role in intercontinental-scale dust transport. Asian dust is also detected from ice cores on Greenland and French Alps. The effects of Asian dust on cloud systems and the associated radiative forcing can extend over the Northern Hemisphere. In this study, we report the detailed structure of Asian dust during the global transport using integrated analysis of observations by CALIOP on-boarded NASA/CALIPSO satellite and a glocal aerosol transport model. We used the CALIOP Level 1B data products (ver. 2.01), containing the total attenuated backscatter coefficients at 532/1064 nm and the volume depolarization ratio at 532 nm. Dust extinction coefficients are then derived from the Fernald’s inversion method by setting the lidar ratio to S1=50 sr. As for a global aerosol transport model, we used the Spectral Radiation Transport Model for the Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., 2005, JGR). We performed a sensitivity experiment that aims at an analysis specified for a single dust event originating from the Taklimakan. The simulation was performed over May 2007. A sever dust storm occurred on 8-9 May 2007 in Taklimakan Desert. Dust cloud emitted during this dust storm is uplifted to altitude of 8-10 km and starts the travel of full circuit around the globe. It has a meridional width of 100-200 km. About one tenth of the original uplifted dust mass (8.1 Gg) is encircling the globe taking about 2 weeks. Because of its high transport height, the dust cloud almost unaffected by wet removal so that the decay of its concentration level is small. Over the western North Pacific of 2nd circuit, the dust cloud pulls down to the lower troposphere by anticyclonic down draft, and finally it settles on North Pacific because of wet

  19. Multiwavelength In-situ Aerosol Absorption, Scattering, and Hygroscopic Properties During the TEXAQS 2006 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength-measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption of the regional aerosol near the coast of Texas, i.e. Houston and the Houston ship channel, as well as the Gulf of Mexico were carried out onboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the 2006 TEXAQS/GoMACCS field campaign in July through September 2006. Aerosol scattering, hemispheric backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured for particles with diameters dp<10μm and dp<1μm using multiwavelength integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at 60% RH (nephelometers). Light scattering was measured as a function of RH at two additional humidities, (ca. 25%, and 85% RH). Together with the 60% RH data, this enabled determination of the hygroscopic growth curve of scattering. The extensive and intensive optical properties were used to characterize the aerosol in the Houston, TX area and the Coastal Gulf of Mexico region and to provide information critical to understanding the climatic and air quality impacts of those aerosols. Analysis focuses on how these properties change during the chemical processing of sources within the project area and how they are affected by changes in atmospheric relative humidity that accompany transport, diurnal cycles and vertical mixing. The results are relevant to radiation transfer, visibility, air quality, and interpretation of remote sensing data from lidar and satellite. The results will be presented based on a regional classification of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations and sources and to show the temporal and spatial variability of the measured parameters. Special emphasize will be given to the physico-chemical properties of aerosols measured during extensive Saharan dust periods encountered during the cruise and several air pollution episodes and industrial plumes. Scattering hygroscopic growth will be analyzed along with the chemical composition of the aerosol and its

  20. Aerosol content survey by mini N 2 -Raman lidar: Application to local and long-range transport aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Chazette, Patrick; Lardier, Melody; Sauvage, Laurent

    2011-12-01

    This study shows an aerosol content survey in the low and middle troposphere over Paris with a compact and light Nitrogen-Raman lidar which has been recently developed by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) and LEOSPHERE company. This eye-safe and wide field-of-view system (full overlap between 150 and 200 m) is particularly well-adapted to air pollution survey in the vicinity of Megalopolis. Extinction-to-backscatter coefficient (so-called Lidar Ratio LR) profiles obtained with a Tikhonov regularization scheme are presented for long-range transport events of aerosols (volcanic ash plume LR = 48 ± 10 sr, and desert dust, LR = 45 ± 8 sr) which may contribute to the local load of aerosols emitted by traffic and industries in Megalopolis. Due to an insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR < 30), a new dichotomous algorithm has been developed to perform daytime inversions every hour which is in accordance with the typical time evolution of aerosols within the planetary boundary layer. This inversion scheme is based on the constraint of the elastic channel with the aerosol optical depth (between typically 0.2 and 0.7 km) determined with the N 2-Raman channel and thus only gives access to an equivalent LR between 0.2 and 0.7 km with a relative uncertainty lower than 15%. This approach has been applied to retrieve diurnal cycle of LR for polluted continental aerosols over Paris and is compared with Tikhonov regularization applied during the night. We found a mean value of 85 ± 18 sr for polluted continental aerosols which is in agreement with other studies performed around the Paris urban area. Results for aerosol optical properties are presented and the error sources are discussed for each approach.

  1. Studies of the dependence of L-band backscatter on sea surface winds using the synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Thompson, T. W.; Gonzalez, F. I.; Jones, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Airborne and Seasat-1 SAR measurements of over-ocean winds through the use of L-band frequencies is described. A consistent dependence has been found between the wind speeds and the microwave backscattering coefficient. Measurements were obtained for cells a few kilometers across and at an incidence angle of 20 deg from nadir. Surface measurements were included in the analyses whenever possible, including data for surface temperatures and current variations, such as in the Gulf Stream. Higher radar cross-sections have been observed from the Gulf Stream than in nearby continental shelf waters. The eye-wall of Hurricane Gloria in Sept. 1976 displayed the largest backscatter of the storm. Wind speed backscatter exponents of 0.5 for winds below 18 m/sec, and 0.58 for winds above 20 m/sec have been determined for the Seasat L-band backscatter. The same wind speeds hold true for 0.05 and 0.50, respectively, for the wind direction component.

  2. Interlinking backscatter, grain size and benthic community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGonigle, Chris; Collier, Jenny S.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between acoustic backscatter, sediment grain size and benthic community structure is examined using three different quantitative methods, covering image- and angular response-based approaches. Multibeam time-series backscatter (300 kHz) data acquired in 2008 off the coast of East Anglia (UK) are compared with grain size properties, macrofaunal abundance and biomass from 130 Hamon and 16 Clamshell grab samples. Three predictive methods are used: 1) image-based (mean backscatter intensity); 2) angular response-based (predicted mean grain size), and 3) image-based (1st principal component and classification) from Quester Tangent Corporation Multiview software. Relationships between grain size and backscatter are explored using linear regression. Differences in grain size and benthic community structure between acoustically defined groups are examined using ANOVA and PERMANOVA+. Results for the Hamon grab stations indicate significant correlations between measured mean grain size and mean backscatter intensity, angular response predicted mean grain size, and 1st principal component of QTC analysis (all p < 0.001). Results for the Clamshell grab for two of the methods have stronger positive correlations; mean backscatter intensity (r2 = 0.619; p < 0.001) and angular response predicted mean grain size (r2 = 0.692; p < 0.001). ANOVA reveals significant differences in mean grain size (Hamon) within acoustic groups for all methods: mean backscatter (p < 0.001), angular response predicted grain size (p < 0.001), and QTC class (p = 0.009). Mean grain size (Clamshell) shows a significant difference between groups for mean backscatter (p = 0.001); other methods were not significant. PERMANOVA for the Hamon abundance shows benthic community structure was significantly different between acoustic groups for all methods (p ≤ 0.001). Overall these results show considerable promise in that more than 60% of the variance in the mean grain size of the Clamshell grab

  3. MGS TES Measurements of Dust and Ice Aerosol Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Wolff, M. J.; Christensen, P. R.

    2000-10-01

    The Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES, Christensen et al., Science, v279, 1692-1697, 1998) on board the Mars Global Surveyor obtains simultaneous solar band and thermal IR spectral emission-phase-function (EPF) observations with global spatial coverage and continuous seasonal sampling. These measurements allow the first comprehensive study of the coupled visible scattering and thermal IR absorption properties of Mars atmospheric aerosols, a fundamental requirement towards defining opacities, particle sizes, and particle shapes for separable dust and water ice aerosol components. Furthermore, TES limb sounding at solar band and IR wavelengths may be analyzed in the context of these EPF column determinations to constrain the distinctive vertical profile behaviors of dust and ice clouds. We present initial radiative transfer analyses of TES visible and IR EPFs, which indicate surprisingly complex dust and ice aerosol behaviors over all latitudes and seasons. Distinctive backscattering peaks of variable intensity are observed for several types of water ice clouds, along with evidence for ice-coated dust aerosols. We will present a broad spatial and temporal sampling of solar band and spectral IR results for Mars atmospheric ice and dust aerosols observed over the 1998-2000 period. This research is supported by the MGS Participating Scientist and MED Science Data Analysis programs.

  4. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness tau(lambda) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent alpha were calculated. Analyzing these data, the monthly mean values of tau(0.50 micrometers) and alpha and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter-spring and summer-autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of alpha versus tau(0.50 micrometers) showed: (i) a considerable increase in tau(0.50 micrometers) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter-spring, without marked changes in alpha; and (ii) a marked increase in tau(0.50 micrometer) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas alpha decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of tau(lambda) and alpha at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterize vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of tau(lambda) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were

  5. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph; et al

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness τ(λ) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent α were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of τ(0.50 μm) and α and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of α versus τ(0.50 μm) showed: (i)more » a considerable increase in τ(0.50 μm) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in α; and (ii) a marked increase in τ(0.50 μm) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas α decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of τ(λ) and α at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of τ(λ) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei

  6. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-year sets of ground-based sun-photometer measurements conducted at 12 Arctic sites and 9 Antarctic sites were examined to determine daily mean values of aerosol optical thickness τ(λ) at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, from which best-fit values of Ångström's exponent α were calculated. Analysing these data, the monthly mean values of τ(0.50 μm) and α and the relative frequency histograms of the daily mean values of both parameters were determined for winter–spring and summer–autumn in the Arctic and for austral summer in Antarctica. The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of α versus τ(0.50 μm) showed: (i) a considerable increase in τ(0.50 μm) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter–spring, without marked changes in α; and (ii) a marked increase in τ(0.50 μm) passing from the Antarctic Plateau to coastal sites, whereas α decreased considerably due to the larger fraction of sea-salt aerosol. Good agreement was found when comparing ground-based sun-photometer measurements of τ(λ) and α at Arctic and Antarctic coastal sites with Microtops measurements conducted during numerous AERONET/MAN cruises from 2006 to 2013 in three Arctic Ocean sectors and in coastal and off-shore regions of the Southern Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans, and the Antarctic Peninsula. Lidar measurements were also examined to characterise vertical profiles of the aerosol backscattering coefficient measured throughout the year at Ny-Ålesund. Satellite-based MODIS, MISR, and AATSR retrievals of τ(λ) over large parts of the oceanic polar regions during spring and summer were in close agreement with ship-borne and coastal ground-based sun-photometer measurements. An overview of the chemical composition of mode particles is also presented, based on in-situ measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites. Fourteen log-normal aerosol number size-distributions were defined to represent the average features of nuclei

  7. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Aerosols Over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ferrare, Connor Flynn, David Turner

    2009-05-05

    . Analysis of the aerosol and water vapor data collected by the Raman lidar during the 2003 Aerosol IOP indicated that the sensitivity of the lidar was significantly lower than when the lidar was initially deployed. A detailed analysis after the IOP of the long-term dataset demonstrated that the lidar began degrading in early 2002, and that it lost approximately a factor of 4 in sensitivity between 2002 and 2004. We participated in the development of the remediation plan for the system to restore its initial performance. We conducted this refurbishment and upgrade from May- September 2004. This remediation lead to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of 10 and 30 for the Raman lidar's water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol backscatter coefficient data, respectively as compared to the signal strengths when the system was first deployed. The DOE ARM Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE), which was conducted during September 2005, evaluated the impact of these modifications and upgrades on the SGP Raman lidar measurements of aerosol extinction and optical thickness. The CARL modifications significantly improved the accuracy and temporal resolution of the aerosol measurements. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by the Raman lidar were also used to evaluate aerosol extinction profiles and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) simulated by aerosol models as part of the Aerosol module inter-Comparison in global models (AEROCOM) (http://nansen.ipsl.jussieu.fr/AEROCOM/aerocomhome.html) project. There was a wide range in how the models represent the aerosol extinction profiles over the ARM SGP site, even though the average annual AOT represented by the various models and measured by CARL and the Sun photometer were in general agreement, at least within the standard deviations of the averages. There were considerable differences in the average vertical distributions among the models, even among models that had similar average aerosol optical thickness. Deviations between mean

  9. Using ADV backscatter strength for measuring suspended cohesive sediment concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, H. K.; Hsu, W.-Y.; Maa, J. P.-Y.; Shao, Y. Y.; Holland, C. W.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted at two institutes to reveal the relationship between acoustic backscatter strength and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). In total, three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) with different frequencies (5, 10 and 16 MHz) were tested. Two different commercial clays and one natural sediment from Clay Bank site in the York River were checked for acoustic responses. The SSCs of selected sediments were artificially changed between a selected low and a high value in tap or de-ion water. Each ADV showed quite different backscatter responses depending on the sediment type and SSC. Not all devices had a good linear relationship between backscatter strength and SSC. Within a limited range of SSC, however, the backscatter strength can be well correlated with the SSC. Compared with optical backscattering sensor (OBS), the fluctuation of ADV backscatter signals was too noisy to be directly converted to the instantaneous changes of SSC due to high amplification ratio and small sampling volume. For the more accurate signal conversion for finding the fluctuation of SSC, the ensemble average should be applied to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. There are unexpected responses for the averaged backscatter wave strength: (1) high signals from small particles but low signals from large particles; and (2) two linear segments in calibration slope. These phenomena would be most likely caused by the different gain setting built in ADVs. The different acoustic responses to flocculation might also contribute somewhat if flocs are tightly packed. This study suggests that an ADV could be a useful instrument to estimate suspended cohesive sediment concentration and its fluctuation if the above concerns are clarified.

  10. Vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Junxia; Liu, Xingang; Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Li, Zhanqing; Li, Peiren; Ren, Gang; Jin, Lijun; Li, Runjun; Dong, Zipeng; Li, Yiyu; Yang, Junmei

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties based on aircraft measurements over the Loess Plateau were measured for the first time during a summertime aircraft campaign, 2013 in Shanxi, China. Data from four flights were analyzed. The vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties including aerosol scattering coefficients (σsc), absorption coefficients (σab), Angström exponent (α), single scattering albedo (ω), backscattering ratio (βsc), aerosol mass scattering proficiency (Qsc) and aerosol surface scattering proficiency (Qsc(')) were obtained. The mean statistical values of σsc were 77.45 Mm(-1) (at 450 nm), 50.72 Mm(-1) (at 550n m), and 32.02 Mm(-1) (at 700 nm). The mean value of σab was 7.62 Mm(-1) (at 550 nm). The mean values of α, βsc and ω were 1.93, 0.15, and 0.91, respectively. Aerosol concentration decreased with altitude. Most effective diameters (ED) of aerosols were less than 0.8 μm. The vertical profiles of σsc,, α, βsc, Qsc and Qsc(') showed that the aerosol scattering properties at lower levels contributed the most to the total aerosol radiative forcing. Both α and βsc had relatively large values, suggesting that most aerosols in the observational region were small particles. The mean values of σsc, α, βsc, Qsc, Qsc('), σab and ω at different height ranges showed that most of the parameters decreased with altitude. The forty-eight hour backward trajectories of air masses during the observation days indicated that the majority of aerosols in the lower level contributed the most to the total aerosol loading, and most of these particles originated from local or regional pollution emissions. PMID:26257345

  11. Concept Design of a Multiwavelength Aerosol Lidar System With Mitigated Diattenuation Effects and Depolarization-Measurement Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comerón, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Vidal, Eric; Barragán, Rubén; Muñoz, Constantino; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Tiana-Alsina, Jordi; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; García-Vizcaíno, David

    2016-06-01

    It is known that the retrieval of aerosol extinction and backscatter coefficients from lidar data acquired through so-called total-power channels - intended to measure the backscattered power irrespective of the polarization - can be adversely affected by varying depolarization effects produced by the aerosol under measurement. This effect can be particularly noticeable in advanced multiwavelength systems, where different wavelengths are separated using a system of dichroic beam splitters, because in general the reflection and transmission coefficients of the beam splitters will be different for fields with polarization parallel or perpendicular to the incidence plane. Here we propose a setup for multiwavelength aerosol lidars alleviating diattenuation effects due to changing depolarization conditions while allowing measure linear depolarization.

  12. A Framework for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Sarna, K.

    2014-12-01

    A broad range of strategies have been used to study Aerosol-Cloud Interactions (ACI). However, the wide scope of methods and scales used makes it difficult to quantitatively compare result from different studies. In this paper, we propose a method of aerosol-cloud interaction monitoring based on widely available remote sensing instruments and easily applicable at many different observatories. This method provides a way of identifying cases where a change in the aerosol environment causes a change in the cloud. In this scheme we attempt to use (as far as possible) the observed signal from lidar and radar. For an aerosol proxy we use the attenuated backscatter (sensitive to aerosol concentration) and to obtain information about changes in the cloud we use the radar reflectivity factor (sensitive to cloud droplet size and concentration). Assuming a positive dependence between the number concentration of cloud droplets and the number concentration of aerosol we expect that an increase of the attenuated backscatter coefficient will correspond to a small increase of the radar reflectivity factor (due to the increase of cloud droplets concentration). However, the slope of this correlation will vary. A number of factors, such as meteorology or cloud drop microphysical properties, can influence changes in a cloud. For that reason we put a constraint on the liquid water content using liquid water path information from microwave radiometers. This limitation ensures that the variability in the cloud will be primarily due to changes in microphysical properties associated with the variation in aerosols. Further, we limit the cases only to non-precipitating, low-level stratiform and stratocumulus clouds without drizzle. Although this method is based on a synergy of instruments, we use widely available systems for an efficient evaluation of the aerosol influence on the cloud. The main advantages of this scheme are the use of direct observables from widely spread remote sensing

  13. Aerosol and cloud typing with an automated 24/7 aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Holger; Seifert, Patric; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Modern sophisticated multi-wavelength Raman polarization lidars have the ability to measure autonomous and unattended in 24/7 mode. These aerosol lidars can deliver backscatter, extinction, and depolarization profiles of the atmosphere which can be used for a target categorization, i.e. the determination of different aerosol and cloud types. However, to derive the optical particle properties a calibration of the lidar signals in the free atmosphere, where only Rayleigh scattering occurs, is needed. This calibration is usually done manually case by case and thus prohibits automatic data analysis and particle typing. To overcome this limitation, the mobile EARLINET lidar PollyXT of TROPOS was deployed continuously without changes in the instrumental setup during two field campaigns in the framework of the German HD(CP)2 project to obtain temporally stable lidar signals. The temporal stability together with the high performance and good characterization of the lidar lead to the possibility of an absolute lidar calibration. The corresponding calibration constant was derived in two ways: first by using manually Raman and Klett retrievals for selected periods and second by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) from co-located AERONET sun photometer measurements. The derived calibration constants show a high temporal stability and a good agreement between both methods and thus allowed the continuous calibration of the lidar and the retrieval of the attenuated backscatter coefficient at three wavelengths. In addition, the calibrated volume depolarization ratio, obtained following EARLINET recommendations, is continuously available. After correction for the molecular contribution, these four quantities were used for an aerosol and cloud typing in terms of particle size and shape. The final categorization leads to 11 categories, e.g. clean atmosphere, small spherical particles, large non-spherical particles, water droplets, ice crystals and corresponding mixtures. In this

  14. An Accuracy Assessment of the CALIOP/CALIPSO Version 2/Version 3 Daytime Aerosol Extinction Product Based on a Detailed Multi-Sensor, Multi-Platform Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Vaughan, M. A.; Redemann, J.; Hoff, R. M.; Rogers, R. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Russell, P. B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), on board the CALIPSO platform, has measured profiles of total attenuated backscatter coefficient (level 1 products) since June 2006. CALIOP s level 2 products, such as the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient profiles, are retrieved using a complex succession of automated algorithms. The goal of this study is to help identify potential shortcomings in the CALIOP version 2 level 2 aerosol extinction product and to illustrate some of the motivation for the changes that have been introduced in the next version of CALIOP data (version 3, released in June 2010). To help illustrate the potential factors contributing to the uncertainty of the CALIOP aerosol extinction retrieval, we focus on a one-day, multi-instrument, multiplatform comparison study during the CALIPSO and Twilight Zone (CATZ) validation campaign on 4 August 2007. On that day, we observe a consistency in the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values recorded by four different instruments (i.e. spaceborne MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS: 0.67 and POLarization and Directionality of Earth s Reflectances, POLDER: 0.58, airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, HSRL: 0.52 and ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork, AERONET: 0.48 to 0.73) while CALIOP AOD is a factor of two lower (0.32 at 532 nm). This case study illustrates the following potential sources of uncertainty in the CALIOP AOD: (i) CALIOP s low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leading to the misclassification and/or lack of aerosol layer identification, especially close to the Earth s surface; (ii) the cloud contamination of CALIOP version 2 aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles; (iii) potentially erroneous assumptions of the aerosol extinction-to-backscatter ratio (Sa) used in CALIOP s extinction retrievals; and (iv) calibration coefficient biases in the CALIOP daytime attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles. The use of version 3 CALIOP extinction retrieval for our case

  15. Retrieval of aerosol properties from combined multiwavelength lidar and sunphotometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlow, Markus; Müller, Detlef; Tesche, Matthias; Eichler, Heike; Feingold, Graham; Eberhard, Wynn L.; Cheng, Ya-Fang

    2006-10-01

    Simulation studies were carried out with regard to the feasibility of using combined observations from sunphotometer (SPM) and lidar for microphysical characterization of aerosol particles, i.e., the retrieval of effective radius, volume, and surface-area concentrations. It was shown that for single, homogeneous aerosol layers, the aerosol parameters can be retrieved with an average accuracy of 30% for a wide range of particle size distributions. Based on the simulations, an instrument combination consisting of a lidar that measures particle backscattering at 355 and 1574 nm, and a SPM that measures at three to four channels in the range from 340 to 1020 nm is a promising tool for aerosol characterization. The inversion algorithm has been tested for a set of experimental data. The comparison with the particle size distribution parameters, measured with in situ instrumentation at the lidar site, showed good agreement.

  16. Aerosol profiling using the ceilometer network of the German Meteorological Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flentje, H.; Heese, B.; Reichardt, J.; Thomas, W.

    2010-08-01

    The German Meteorological Service (DWD) operates about 52 lidar ceilometers within its synoptic observations network, covering Germany. These affordable low-power lidar systems provide spatially and temporally high resolved aerosol backscatter profiles which can operationally provide quasi 3-D distributions of particle backscatter intensity. Intentionally designed for cloud height detection, recent significant improvements allow following the development of the boundary layer and to detect denser particle plumes in the free tropospere like volcanic ash, Saharan dust or fire smoke. Thus the network builds a powerful aerosol plume alerting and tracking system. If auxiliary aerosol information is available, the particle backscatter coefficient, the extinction coefficient and even particle mass concentrations may be estimated, with however large uncertainties. Therefore, large synergistic benefit is achieved if the ceilometers are linked to existing lidar networks like EARLINET or integrated into WMO's envisioined Global Aerosol Lidar Observation Network GALION. To this end, we demonstrate the potential and limitations of ceilometer networks by means of three representative aerosol episodes over Europe, namely Sahara dust, Mediterranean fire smoke and, more detailed, the Icelandic Eyjafjoll volcano eruption from mid April 2010 onwards. The DWD (Jenoptik CHM15k) lidar ceilometer network tracked the Eyjafjoll ash layers over Germany and roughly estimated peak extinction coefficients and mass concentrations on 17 April of 4-6(± 2) 10-4 m-1 and 500-750(± 300) μg/m-3, respectively, based on co-located aerosol optical depth, nephelometer (scattering coefficient) and particle mass concentration measurements. Though large, the uncertainties are small enough to let the network suit for example as aviation advisory tool, indicating whether the legal flight ban threshold of presently 2 mg/m3 is imminent to be exceeded.

  17. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol layer through satellite and balloon-borne measurements combined with modelling approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernier, J. P.; Fairlie, T. D.; Natarajan, M.; Crawford, J. H.; Baker, N. C.; Wegner, T.; Deshler, T.; Gadhavi, H. S.; Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Jayaraman, A.; Raj, A.; Alladi, H.; Ratnam, M. V.; Pandit, A.; Vignelles, D.; Wienhold, F.; Liu, H.; Kumar, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Asian tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) is a seasonal aerosol feature occurring in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) above Asia during the Summer Asian Monsoon. Vertically resolved aerosol backscatter profiles from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission and extinction profiles from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) have been used to infer the spatial and temporal distributions of the ATAL since the late 90's. We found that aerosol optical thickness between 13-18km have increased by a factor of 2-3 over the past 16 years likely related to raising pollution levels in South East Asia occuring during the same period. Modelling studies of the ATAL using WACCAM 3 and GEOS-Chem have provided conflicting information on its origin and a better representation of in-cloud SO2 and aerosol lifetime in GOES-Chem seems to be key to obtain consistent results with the few SO2 measurements available in the UTLS during the Asian Monsoon. In situ measurements of aerosol and trace gases in the UTLS from several balloon campaigns which took place in summer 2014 and 2015 in Asia will be presented and discussed with combined satellite and modelling analysis.

  18. Stratospheric aerosol acidity, density, and refractive index deduced from SAGE 2 and NMC temperature data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Poole, L. R.; Wang, P.-H.; Chiou, E. W.

    1994-01-01

    Water vapor concentrations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 2 (SAGE 2) and collocated temperatures provided by the National Meteorological Center (NMC) from 1986 to 1990 are used to deduce seasonally and zonally averaged acidity, density, and refractive index of stratospheric aerosols. It is found that the weight percentage of sulfuric acid in the aerosols increases from about 60 just above the tropopause to about 86 at 35 km. The density increases from about 1.55 to 1.85 g/cu cm between the same altitude limits. Some seasonal variations of composition and density are evident at high latitudes. The refractive indices at 1.02, 0.694, and 0.532 micrometers increase, respectively, from about 1.425, 1.430, and 1.435 just above the tropopause to about 1.445, 1.455, and 1.458 at altitudes above 27 km, depending on the season and latitude. The aerosol properties presented can be used in models to study the effectiveness of heterogeneous chemistry, the mass loading of stratospheric aerosols, and the extinction and backscatter of aerosols at different wavelengths. Computed aerosol surface areas, rate coefficients for the heterogeneous reaction ClONO2 + H2O yields HOCl + HNO3 and aerosol mass concentrations before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 are shown as sample applications.

  19. Scanning tropospheric ozone and aerosol lidar with double-gated photomultipliers.

    PubMed

    Machol, Janet L; Marchbanks, Richard D; Senff, Christoph J; McCarty, Brandi J; Eberhard, Wynn L; Brewer, William A; Richter, Ronald A; Alvarez, Raul J; Law, Daniel C; Weickmann, Ann M; Sandberg, Scott P

    2009-01-20

    The Ozone Profiling Atmospheric Lidar is a scanning four-wavelength ultraviolet differential absorption lidar that measures tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Derived profiles from the lidar data include ozone concentration, aerosol extinction, and calibrated aerosol backscatter. Aerosol calibrations assume a clear air region aloft. Other products include cloud base heights, aerosol layer heights, and scans of particulate plumes from aircraft. The aerosol data range from 280 m to 12 km with 5 m range resolution, while the ozone data ranges from 280 m to about 1.2 km with 100 m resolution. In horizontally homogeneous atmospheres, data from multiple-elevation angles is combined to reduce the minimum altitude of the aerosol and ozone profiles to about 20 m. The lidar design, the characterization of the photomultiplier tubes, ozone and aerosol analysis techniques, and sample data are described. Also discussed is a double-gating technique to shorten the gated turn-on time of the photomultiplier tubes, and thereby reduce the detection of background light and the outgoing laser pulse. PMID:19151820

  20. Vertical variations of aerosols and the effects responded to the emission control: application of lidar ceilometer in Beijing during APEC, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Zhu, X.; Hu, B.; Xin, J.; Wang, L.; Münkel, C.; Mao, G.; Wang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    During the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, a reduction of air pollution sources was coordinated to ensure good air quality in Beijing and the surrounding provinces and cities. By investigating variations in air pollution during this period, the effects of local emissions and regional transport can be better understood and the information can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of emission reduction strategies and provide a theoretical basis to guide future emission reduction strategies. From 15 October to 30 November 2014, the height of the atmospheric mixing layer and the aerosol attenuated backscattering coefficient profile were observed online using a lidar ceilometer. By investigating the correlation between fine particulate matter (PM2.5) data near the surface and attenuated backscattering coefficients measured by the lidar ceilometer as well as the correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and attenuated backscattering coefficients of the 0 to 4500 m column, we found that the attenuated backscattering coefficient measured by the lidar ceilometer is highly correlated with the PM2.5 concentration and AOD (correlation coefficients of 0.89 and 0.86, respectively). This result demonstrates the reliability of the vertical profile of aerosols measured by the lidar ceilometer. By analyzing the atmospheric backscattering profile, we found that during the initial stage of pollution accumulation, which is affected by transport of southerly jet flows at low altitude, the attenuated backscattering coefficient of atmospheric aerosols from 0 to 1500 m was greatly enhanced by approximately 1.4 Mm-1 sr-1 (140%). At the peak pollution stage, the height of the mixing layer gradually decreased, the ratio of CO/SO2 gradually increased and emissions were dominated by local emissions. The attenuated backscattering coefficient of aerosols from 0 to 300 m suddenly increased, and the aerosols near surface had the highest value (approximately 14 Mm-1 sr-1

  1. A backscatter difference technique for ultrasonic bone assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmeister, Brent K.; Wilson, Anne R.; Gilbert, Matthew J.; Sellers, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques may offer a useful approach for detecting changes in cancellous bone caused by osteoporosis and other diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate the utility of a backscatter difference technique for ultrasonic bone assessment. Measurements were performed on 22 cube-shaped specimens of human cancellous bone using four broadband transducers with center frequencies 2.25, 5, 7.5, and 10 MHz. The backscatter difference spectrum D(f) was obtained by subtracting power spectra (in dB) from two different portions of the same backscatter signal. D(f) was found to be a monotonically increasing, quasi-linear function of frequency when averaged over multiple measurement sites on multiple specimens. The frequency slope of D(f) demonstrated weak to moderate correlations with specimen density (R = 0.21–0.80). The frequency averaged mean of D(f) demonstrated moderate to good correlations with density (R = 0.70–0.95). These results suggest that parameters based on the frequency averaged mean of the backscatter difference spectrum may be useful for bone assessment purposes. PMID:23231136

  2. Remarks on the definition of the backscattering factor in AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    2002-03-01

    It has been shown that the backscattering factor in AES can be defined as an integral of the product of the excitation depth distribution function and the emission depth distribution function. First function describes the number of ionizations as a function of depth while the second function describes the escape probability of Auger electrons created at different depths. The backscattering factor calculated from such definition is found to depend on the Auger electron emission angle. For emission angles up to 40° with respect to surface normal, this dependence is not pronounced. However, influence of the emission angle on the backscattering factor may be substantial at glancing emission angles. Values of the backscattering factor calculated from the proposed algorithm assuming the emission angle equal to 40° differ noticeably from values resulting from the Shimizu expression. The deviation may reach 18% at primary electron energy of 2000 eV. Furthermore, the backscattering factor may become smaller than unity at primary energies close to the ionization energy. This effect has been suggested in earlier studies.

  3. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  4. Experimental results on the enhanced backscatter phenomenon and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Enhanced backscatter effects have long been predicted theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The reciprocity of a turbulent channel generates a group of paired rays with identical trajectory and phase information that leads to a region in phase space with double intensity and scintillation index. Though simulation work based on phase screen models has demonstrated the existence of the phenomenon, few experimental results have been published describing its characteristics, and possible applications of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon are still unclear. With the development of commercially available high powered lasers and advanced cameras with high frame rates, we have successfully captured the enhanced backscatter effects from different reflection surfaces. In addition to static observations, we have also tilted and pre-distorted the transmitted beam at various frequencies to track the dynamic properties of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon to verify its possible application in guidance and beam and image correction through atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, experimental results will be described, and discussions on the principle and applications of the phenomenon will be included. Enhanced backscatter effects are best observed in certain levels of turbulence (Cn 2≍10-13 m-2/3), and show significant potential for providing self-guidance in beam correction that doesn't introduce additional costs (unlike providing a beacon laser). Possible applications of this phenomenon include tracking fast moving object with lasers, long distance (>1km) alignment, and focusing a high-power corrected laser beam over long distances.

  5. Coupling aerosol optics to the chemical transport model MATCH (v5.5.0) and aerosol dynamics module SALSA (v1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    Modelling aerosol optical properties is a notoriously difficult task due to the particles' complex morphologies and compositions. Yet aerosols and their optical properties are important for Earth system modelling and remote sensing applications. Operational optics models often make drastic and non realistic approximations regarding morphological properties, which can introduce errors. In this study a new aerosol optics model is implemented, in which more realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon aerosols. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey shell" model. Simulated results of radiative fluxes, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent from the new optics model are compared with results from another model simulating particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. To gauge the impact on the optical properties from the new optics model, the known and important effects from using aerosol dynamics serves as a reference. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing states influences the optical properties to the same degree as aerosol dynamics. This is an important finding suggesting that over-simplified optics models coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors; this can strongly effect simulations of radiative fluxes in Earth-system models, and it can compromise the use of remote sensing observations of aerosols in model evaluations and chemical data assimilation.

  6. An improved Monte-Carlo model of the Varian EPID separating support arm and rear-housing backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monville, M. E.; Kuncic, Z.; Greer, P. B.

    2014-03-01

    Previous investigators of EPID dosimetric properties have ascribed the backscatter, that contaminates dosimetric EPID images, to its supporting arm. Accordingly, Monte-Carlo (MC) EPID models have approximated the backscatter signal from the layers under the detector and the robotic support arm using either uniform or non-uniform solid water slabs, or through convolutions with back-scatter kernels. The aim of this work is to improve the existent MC models by measuring and modelling the separate backscatter contributions of the robotic arm and the rear plastic housing of the EPID. The EPID plastic housing is non-uniform with a 11.9 cm wide indented section that runs across the cross-plane direction in the superior half of the EPID which is 1.75 cm closer to the EPID sensitive layer than the rest of the housing. The thickness of the plastic h