Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol challenge tests

  1. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  3. Paint spray tests for respirators: aerosol characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ackley, M W

    1980-05-01

    Liquid paint is sprayed from an atomizing nozzle to form an aerosol for testing paint spray respirators. The generated aerosol conditions are dependent upon liguid properties, spray-nozzle flow conditions and droplet evaporation. A technique was developed for controlling the aerosol concentrations reliably. Particle-size distributions of lacquer and enamel have been measured. The lacquer distribution was found to be multi-modal. Aerosol concentration dradients arise when the nozzle is not properly positioned. Filter loading resistance is significantly affected by these concentration variations. With regard to selection of standard aerosol test be improved by modifying the current NIOSH criteria to include a description of the particle-size distribution, a more precise definition of the paint and paint thinner chemical compositions, and a narrower concentration range. PMID:6932174

  4. Unique DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles for studying aerosol transport

    DOE PAGES

    Harding, Ruth N.; Hara, Christine A.; Hall, Sara B.; Vitalis, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Jones, A. Daniel; Day, James A.; Tur-Rojas, Vincent R.; Jorgensen, Trond; Herchert, Edwin; et al

    2016-03-22

    Data are presented for the first use of novel DNA-barcoded aerosol test particles that have been developed to track the fate of airborne contaminants in populated environments. Until DNATrax (DNA Tagged Reagents for Aerosol eXperiments) particles were developed, there was no way to rapidly validate air transport models with realistic particles in the respirable range of 1–10 μm in diameter. The DNATrax particles, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and tested with the assistance of the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, are the first safe and effective materials for aerosol transport studies that are identified by DNA molecules. The usemore » of unique synthetic DNA barcodes overcomes the challenges of discerning the test material from pre-existing environmental or background contaminants (either naturally occurring or previously released). The DNATrax particle properties are demonstrated to have appropriate size range (approximately 1–4.5 μm in diameter) to accurately simulate bacterial spore transport. As a result, we describe details of the first field test of the DNATrax aerosol test particles in a large indoor facility.« less

  5. The Multi-Dimensional Challenge of Validating Remote-Sensing Aerosol-Type Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Limbacher, J.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol type is required globally for climate-forcing calculations, constraining aerosol transport models, and other applications. However, validating satellite aerosol type retrievals is much more challenging than testing AOD results, because aerosol type is a more complex quantity, and ground-truth data are far less numerous and generally not as robust. We employ a combination of assessment relative to climatological expectation, statistical comparisons with surface-based observations, and near-coincident field campaign measurements, to evaluate MISR aerosol-type retrieval results. Although the retrievals are not constrained by a priori expectations, there is general regional coherence in the dominant retrieved aerosol types, indicating consistency in the retrieval process. Comparisons with expectation, on a regional, seasonal basis, demonstrate qualitative consistency with regard to particle size (three-to-five bins), shape (spherical vs. non-spherical), and single-scattering albedo (SSA; two-to-four bins) when mid-visible AOD exceeds about 0.15 or 0.2. Statistical comparisons with surface-based sun and sky-scanning photometer retrievals provide both qualitative and quantitative illustration of retrieval sensitivity, identifying strengths and limitations of the MISR Standard Version 22 aerosol product, and pointing to specific areas where improvements could be made. Field campaign results offer the most detailed and robust aerosol-type constraints. They allow us, with the help of the MISR Research aerosol retrieval algorithm, to test the limits of the MISR data information content, which in specific cases substantially exceeds the general sensitivity. This presentation will briefly review the statistical techniques employed and summarize the key MISR aerosol-type retrieval validation results of this work.

  6. The Challenge to Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, J. R. Bruce

    1977-01-01

    Critics of testing have raised relevant issues about the use of tests. Most concerns relate to abuses made in construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized tests. The educator could respond by deciding not to use tests. Unfortunately, this cure would be worse than the disease itself. (Author)

  7. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  8. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  9. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  10. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol test program :FY 2005-06 testing and aerosol data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Loiseau, O. (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Billone, M. C. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Lucero, Daniel A.; Burtseva, T.; Brucher, W (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

    2006-10-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This document focuses on an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, primarily during FY 2005 and about the first two-thirds of FY 2006. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of May 2006. We provide details on the significant findings on aerosol results and observations from the recently completed Phase 2 surrogate material tests using cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rodlets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants. Results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR (the ratio of respirable particles from real spent fuel/respirables from surrogate spent fuel, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber); and, measurements of enhanced volatile fission product species sorption onto respirable particles. We discuss progress and results for the first three, recently performed Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide, DUO{sub 2}, test rodlets. We will also review the status of preparations and the final Phase 4 tests in this program, using short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. These data plus testing results and design are tailored to support and guide, follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence

  11. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-05-03

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system`s fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system`s design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv.

  12. Challenges of CPAS Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.; Morris, Aaron L.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown via a series of Drogue, Pilot, and Main parachutes. Because Orion is considerably larger and heavier than Apollo, many of the flight test techniques developed during the Apollo program must be modified. The Apollo program had a dedicated C-133 aircraft, which was modified to allow a simple airdrop of "boilerplate" flight test vehicles. However, the CPAS program must use either commercial or military assets with minimal modifications to airframes or procedures. Conceptual envelopes from 2-Degree Of Freedom trajectories are presented for several existing and novel architectures. Ideally, the technique would deliver a representative capsule shape to the desired altitude and dynamic pressure at test initiation. However, compromises must be made on the characteristics of trajectories or the fidelity of test articles to production hardware. Most of the tests to date have used traditional pallet and weight tub or missile-shaped test vehicles. New test vehicles are being designed to better incorporate Orion structural components and deploy parachutes in a more representative fashion. The first attempt to test a capsule-shaped vehicle failed due to unexpected events while setting up the test condition through a series of complex procedures. In order to avoid the loss of another expensive test article which will delay the program, simpler deployment methods are being examined and more positive control of the vehicle will be maintained. Existing challenges include interfacing with parent aircraft, separating test vehicles, achieving test conditions, and landing within limited test ranges. All these challenges must be met within cost and schedule limits.

  13. Performance of conventional and antimicrobial-treated filtering facepiece respirators challenged with biological aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lore, Michael B; Sebastian, John M; Brown, TeAnne L; Viner, Andrew S; McCullough, Nicole V; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the filtration performance of four commercially available models of National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified filtering facepiece respirators (FFR) against both biological and inert aerosols at a flow rate of 85 L/min. Conventional N95 and P100 FFRs and two antimicrobial (AM)-treated FFRs (an N95 and a P95, both with iodine-based AM treatments) were tested for both physical penetration (PEN(P)) and viable penetration (PEN(V)) with three different bioaerosols, including MS2 bacteriophage virus, and the spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus atrophaeus bacteria, in addition to inert sodium chloride (NaCl) aerosol. For each FFR model, the PEN(P) measured with NaCl was predictive of its MS2 PEN(P), and it was observed that spores and bacteria aerosols were also filtered similarly to the inert aerosol. For both conventional FFRs, up to a 1-log reduction in PEN(V) in comparison with PEN(P) was observed and attributed to the experimental variability of the test system. For both models of AM-FFRs, no statistically significant differences between PEN(V) and PEN(P) for any of the three different bioaerosol challenges were observed. Thus, no bioaerosol filtration enhancement over the conventional FFRs was detected for either iodine-based AM-FFR. In the absence of any standardized test methods, we recommend that future studies evaluating the filtration performance of AM-treated FFRs incorporate the experimental best practices described herein. PMID:22206440

  14. Aerosol Retrievals under Partly Cloudy Conditions: Challenges and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.

    2011-06-01

    There are lots of interesting and intriguing features of aerosols near clouds – many of which can be quite engaging, as well being useful and climate-related. Exploring aerosol with the aid of the remote sensing, in situ observations and numerical modeling has piqued our curiosity and led to improve insights into the nature of aerosol and clouds and their complex relationship. This chapter conveys the outstanding issues of cloudy-sky aerosol retrievals of important climate properties and outlines their fruitful connections to other research areas such as in situ measurements and model simulations. The chapter focuses mostly on treating the inverse problems in the context of the passive satellite remote sensing and how they can improve our understanding of the cloud-aerosol interactions. The presentation includes a basis in the inverse problem theory, reviews available approaches and discusses their applications to partly cloudy situations. Potential synergy of observations and model simulations is described as well.

  15. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE (aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation) aerosol code validation: Test AB6 with two aerosol species. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J C; Muhlestein, L D

    1984-12-01

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The second large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB6, was performed in the 850-m/sup 3/ CSTF vessel with a two-species test aerosol. The test conditions simulated the release of a fission product aerosol, NaI, in the presence of a sodium spray fire. Five organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven computer codes. Three of the codes (QUICKM, MAEROS and CONTAIN) were discrete, multiple species codes, while four (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3 and SOFIA) were log-normal codes which assume uniform coagglomeration of different aerosol species. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for seven key aerosol behavior parameters.

  16. "Worst-case" aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle ("worst case") size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method. PMID:2543198

  17. Worst-case aerosol testing parameters: III. Initial penetration of charged and neutralized lead fume and silica dust aerosols through clean, unloaded respirator filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) tests and certifies respirator filter media according to Title 30, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 11 (30 CFR 11). Subpart K of those regulations specifies that a silica dust test, silica mist test, and/or lead fume test will be used to test and certify dust and mist; and dust, fume, and mist particulate air-purifying respirator filter media. NIOSH studies have shown that an aerosol particle of a certain size can be identified as the most penetrating particle (''worst case'') size. Commercial filter media of various types have been studied and the filter's performance against a worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol evaluated. This investigation was done to complement those previous studies by determining how one manufacturer's particulate filters performed against the existing certification aerosol challenges as compared with the worst-case size DOP and NaCl aerosols. Only initial penetration values were determined, and no loading effects were considered. Both neutralized (Boltzman charge distribution) and unneutralized aerosols were used in order to assess the contribution of charging. The results show the dramatic effect of particle size on filter efficiency, and they show that the present methods are not as sensitive as the worst-case aerosol method.

  18. Second Generation Inactivated Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine Candidates Protect Mice against a Lethal Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Honnold, Shelley P.; Bakken, Russell R.; Fisher, Diana; Lind, Cathleen M.; Cohen, Jeffrey W.; Eccleston, Lori T.; Spurgers, Kevin B.; Maheshwari, Radha K.; Glass, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no FDA-licensed vaccines or therapeutics for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) for human use. We recently developed several methods to inactivate CVEV1219, a chimeric live-attenuated eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Dosage and schedule studies were conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of three potential second-generation inactivated EEEV (iEEEV) vaccine candidates in mice: formalin-inactivated CVEV1219 (fCVEV1219), INA-inactivated CVEV1219 (iCVEV1219) and gamma-irradiated CVEV1219 (gCVEV1219). Both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 provided partial to complete protection against an aerosol challenge when administered by different routes and schedules at various doses, while iCVEV1219 was unable to provide substantial protection against an aerosol challenge by any route, dose, or schedule tested. When evaluating antibody responses, neutralizing antibody, not virus specific IgG or IgA, was the best correlate of protection. The results of these studies suggest that both fCVEV1219 and gCVEV1219 should be evaluated further and considered for advancement as potential second-generation inactivated vaccine candidates for EEEV. PMID:25116127

  19. Determination of Antibiotic Efficacy against Bacillus anthracis in a Mouse Aerosol Challenge Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Henry S.; Bassett, Jennifer; Miller, Lynda; Hartings, Justin M.; Ivins, Bruce E.; Pitt, M. Louise; Fritz, David; Norris, Sarah L.; Byrne, W. Russell

    2007-01-01

    An anthrax spore aerosol infection mouse model was developed as a first test of in vivo efficacy of antibiotics identified as active against Bacillus anthracis. Whole-body, 50% lethal dose (LD50) aerosol challenge doses in a range of 1.9 × 103 to 3.4 × 104 CFU with spores of the fully virulent Ames strain were established for three inbred and one outbred mouse strain (A/J, BALB/c, C57BL, and Swiss Webster). The BALB/c strain was further developed as a model for antibiotic efficacy. Time course microbiological examinations of tissue burdens in mice after challenge showed that spores could remain dormant in the lungs while vegetative cells disseminated to the mediastinal lymph nodes and then to the spleen, accompanied by bacteremia. For antibiotic efficacy studies, BALB/c mice were challenged with 50 to 100 LD50 of spores followed by intraperitoneal injection of either ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight (every 12 h [q12h]) or doxycycline at 40 mg/kg (q6h). A control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) q6h. Treatment was begun 24 h after challenge with groups of 10 mice for 14 or 21 days. The PBS-treated control mice all succumbed (10/10) to inhalation anthrax infection within 72 h. Sixty-day survival rates for ciprofloxacin and doxycycline-treated groups were 8/10 and 9/10, respectively, for 14-day treatment and 10/10 and 7/10 for 21-day treatment. Delayed treatment with ciprofloxacin initiated 36 and 48 h postexposure resulted in 80% survival and was statistically no different than early (24 h) postexposure treatment. Results using this mouse model correlate closely with clinical observations of inhalational anthrax in humans and with earlier antibiotic studies in the nonhuman primate inhalational anthrax model. PMID:17296745

  20. Challenges and Successes Using Nanomedicines for Aerosol Delivery to the Airways.

    PubMed

    Resnier, P; Mottais, A; Sibiril, Y; Le Gall, T; Montier, T

    2016-01-01

    Numerous diseases affect the respiratory tract and the aerosol administration has been widely considered as an adapted and non-invasive method for local delivery. This pathway induces a lung concentration and thus also limits, systemic side effects. However, aerosol delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients represents a real challenge, due to numerous obstacles such as the specific respiratory movement, the presence of mucus or surfactant, and the mucociliary clearance. Nanomedicines, such as liposomes, micelles or nanoparticles, offer the possibility to increase bioavailability and favor intracellular penetration of specific drugs into lung tissue. This review focuses on the description of aerosol formulations and cellular barriers including design, characteristics and progressive adaptation to airways anatomy. Then, aerosolized formulations currently clinically approved, or in clinical trial are summarized according to the encapsulated drug. In a final section, promising aerosol formulations in pre-clinical studies are detailed.

  1. An Aerosolized Brucella spp. Challenge Model for Laboratory Animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To characterize the optimal aerosol dosage of Brucella abortus strain 2308 (S2308) and B. melitensis (S16M) in a laboratory animal model of brucellosis, dosages of 10**3 to 10**10 CFU were nebulized to mice. Although tissue weights were minimally influenced, total colony-forming units (CFU) per tis...

  2. Aerosol tests conducted at Aberdeen Proving Grounds MD.

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hankins, Matthew Granholm

    2012-06-01

    Test data are reported that demonstrate the deposition from a spray dispersion system (Illinois Tool Works inductively charging rotary atomization nozzle) for application of decontamination solution to various surfaces in the passenger cabin of a Boeing 737 aircraft. The decontamination solution (EnviroTru) was tagged with a known concentration of fluorescein permitting determination of both airborne decontaminant concentration and surface deposited decontaminant solution so that the effective deposition rates and surface coverage could be determined and correlated with the amount of material sprayed. Six aerosol dispersion tests were conducted. In each test, aluminum foil deposition coupons were set out throughout the passenger area and the aerosol was dispersed. The aerosol concentration was measured with filter samplers as well as with optical techniques Average aerosol deposition ranged from 3 to 15 grams of decontamination solution per square meter. Some disagreement was observed between various instruments utilizing different measurement principles. These results demonstrate a potentially effective method to disperse decontaminant to interior surfaces of a passenger aircraft.

  3. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage : aerosol ratio test program and Phase 2 test results.

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III; Thompson, N. Slater; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Hibbs, R.S.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno; Young, F. I.; Koch, Wolfgang; Brochard, Didier; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Lange, Florentin

    2004-05-01

    A multinational test program is in progress to quantify the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device, HEDD, impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments; the program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the spent fuel ratio, SFR, the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are crucial for predicting radiological impacts. This document includes a thorough description of the test program, including the current, detailed test plan, concept and design, plus a description of all test components, and requirements for future components and related nuclear facility needs. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2003. All available test results, observations, and analyses - primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. This spent fuel sabotage - aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC, and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  4. Efficiency tests of samplers for microbiological aerosols, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, E.; Faengmark, I.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain comparable results from studies using a variety of samplers of microbiological aerosols with different collection performances for various particle sizes, methods reported in the literature were surveyed, evaluated, and tabulated for testing the efficiency of the samplers. It is concluded that these samplers were not thoroughly tested, using reliable methods. Tests were conducted in static air chambers and in various outdoor and work environments. Results are not reliable as it is difficult to achieve stable and reproducible conditions in these test systems. Testing in a wind tunnel is recommended.

  5. Interactions between biomass-burning aerosols and clouds over Southeast Asia: current status, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Loftus, Adrian M; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Hsu, N Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chantara, Somporn

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between aerosols, clouds, and precipitation remain among the largest sources of uncertainty in the Earth's energy budget. Biomass-burning aerosols are a key feature of the global aerosol system, with significant annually-repeating fires in several parts of the world, including Southeast Asia (SEA). SEA in particular provides a "natural laboratory" for these studies, as smoke travels from source regions downwind in which it is coupled to persistent stratocumulus decks. However, SEA has been under-exploited for these studies. This review summarizes previous related field campaigns in SEA, with a focus on the ongoing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) and results from the most recent BASELInE deployment. Progress from remote sensing and modeling studies, along with the challenges faced for these studies, are also discussed. We suggest that improvements to our knowledge of these aerosol/cloud effects require the synergistic use of field measurements with remote sensing and modeling tools. PMID:25085565

  6. Interactions between biomass-burning aerosols and clouds over Southeast Asia: current status, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Loftus, Adrian M; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Hsu, N Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chantara, Somporn

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between aerosols, clouds, and precipitation remain among the largest sources of uncertainty in the Earth's energy budget. Biomass-burning aerosols are a key feature of the global aerosol system, with significant annually-repeating fires in several parts of the world, including Southeast Asia (SEA). SEA in particular provides a "natural laboratory" for these studies, as smoke travels from source regions downwind in which it is coupled to persistent stratocumulus decks. However, SEA has been under-exploited for these studies. This review summarizes previous related field campaigns in SEA, with a focus on the ongoing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) and results from the most recent BASELInE deployment. Progress from remote sensing and modeling studies, along with the challenges faced for these studies, are also discussed. We suggest that improvements to our knowledge of these aerosol/cloud effects require the synergistic use of field measurements with remote sensing and modeling tools.

  7. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  8. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called direct effect , aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called indirect effects, whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will discuss

  9. Aerosol-Water Cycle Interaction: A New Challenge in Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global climate. It has been estimated that aerosol may reduce by up to 10% of the seasonal mean solar radiation reaching the earth surface, producing a global cooling effect that opposes global warming (Climate Change 2001). This means that the potential perils that humans have committed to global warming may be far greater than what we can detect at the present. As a key component of the Earth climate system, the water cycle is profoundly affected by the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere. Through the so-called "direct effect", aerosol scatters and/or absorbs solar radiation, thus cooling the earth surface and changing the horizontal and vertical radiational heating contrast in the atmosphere. The heating contrast drives anomalous atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes in convection, clouds, and rainfall. Another way aerosol can affect the water cycle is through the so-called "indirect effects", whereby aerosol increases the number of cloud condensation nuclei, prolongs life time of clouds, and inhibits the growth of cloud drops to raindrops. This leads to more clouds, and increased reflection of solar radiation, and further cooling at the earth surface. In monsoon regions, the response of the water cycle to aerosol forcing is especially complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. In this talk, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon based on preliminary results from satellite observations and climate model experiments. Specifically, I will

  10. 1,5-Iodonaphthyl azide-inactivated V3526 protects against aerosol challenge with virulent venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Sharma, Anuj; Spurgers, Kevin B; Bakken, Russell R; Eccleston, Lori T; Cohen, Jeffrey W; Honnold, Shelley P; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-05-27

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a New World alphavirus. VEEV is highly infectious in aerosolized form and has been identified as a bio-terrorism agent. There is no licensed vaccine for prophylaxis against VEEV. The current IND vaccine is poorly immunogenic and does not protect against an aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. We have previously shown that VEEV inactivated by 1,5-iodonaphthyl azide (INA) protects against footpad challenge with virulent VEEV. In this study, we inactivated an attenuated strain of VEEV, V3526, with INA and evaluated its protective efficacy against aerosol challenge with wild type VEEV. We demonstrated that among three routes of immunization, intramuscular immunization with INA-inactivate V3526 (INA-iV3526) provided complete protection against aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. Our data suggests that INA-iV3526 can be explored further for development as an effective vaccine candidate against aerosol challenge of virulent VEEV. PMID:27129427

  11. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  12. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  13. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  14. PHEBUS on-line aerosol monitor development test program

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, M.H.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1992-03-01

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. developed an on-line aerosol monitor (OLAM) for the French PHEBUS Fission Product Project. Part of the development was to manufacture and test an OLAM prototype. This report presents the results of the testing which determined the mechanical integrity of the monitor at operating temperature and pressure and performed a preliminary test of the optical system. A series of twenty different tests was conducted during the prototype testing sequence. Since no leaks were detected, the OLAM demonstrated that it could provide a pressure boundary at required test conditions. The optical and electrical system also proved its integrity by exceeding the design requirement of less than 105 optical signal drift during an actual two-hour test sequence.

  15. PHEBUS on-line aerosol monitor development test program

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, M.H.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1992-03-01

    EG G Idaho, Inc. developed an on-line aerosol monitor (OLAM) for the French PHEBUS Fission Product Project. Part of the development was to manufacture and test an OLAM prototype. This report presents the results of the testing which determined the mechanical integrity of the monitor at operating temperature and pressure and performed a preliminary test of the optical system. A series of twenty different tests was conducted during the prototype testing sequence. Since no leaks were detected, the OLAM demonstrated that it could provide a pressure boundary at required test conditions. The optical and electrical system also proved its integrity by exceeding the design requirement of less than 105 optical signal drift during an actual two-hour test sequence.

  16. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  17. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  18. Using global aerosol models and satellite data for air quality studies: Challenges and data needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles, also known as PM2.5 (particle diameter less than 2.5 pm) and PM10 (particle diameter less than 10 pm), are one of the key atmospheric components that determines air quality. Yet, air quality forecasts for PM are still in their infancy and remain a challenging task. It is difficult to simply relate PM levels to local meteorological conditions, and large uncertainties exist in regional air quality model emission inventories and initial and boundary conditions. Especially challenging are periods when a significant amount of aerosol comes from outside the regional modeling domain through long-range transport. In the past few years, NASA has launched several satellites with global aerosol measurement capabilities, providing large-scale chemical weather pictures. NASA has also supported development of global models which simulate atmospheric transport and transformation processes of important atmospheric gas and aerosol species. I will present the current modeling and satellite capabilities for PM2.5 studies, the possibilities and challenges in using satellite data for PM2.5 forecasts, and the needs of future remote sensing data for improving air quality monitoring and modeling.

  19. Challenges of studying viral aerosol metagenomics and communities in comparison with bacterial and fungal aerosols.

    PubMed

    Prussin, Aaron J; Marr, Linsey C; Bibby, Kyle J

    2014-08-01

    Despite the obvious importance of viral transmission and ecology to medicine, epidemiology, ecology, agriculture, and microbiology, the study of viral bioaerosols and community structure has remained a vastly underexplored area, due to both unresolved technical challenges and unrecognized importance. High-throughput, culture-independent techniques such as viral metagenomics are beginning to revolutionize the study of viral ecology. With recent developments in viral metagenomics, characterization of viral bioaerosol communities provides an opportunity for high-impact future research. However, there remain significant challenges for the study of viral bioaerosols compared with viruses in other matrices, such as water, the human gut, and soil. Collecting enough biomass is essential for successful metagenomic analysis, but this is a challenge with viral bioaerosols. Herein, we provide a perspective on the importance of studying viral bioaerosols, the challenges of studying viral community structure, and the potential opportunities for improvements in methods to study viruses in indoor and outdoor air.

  20. Chimeric Plantibody Passively Protects Mice against Aerosolized Ricin Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Whaley, Kevin J.; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H.; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J.; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  1. Chimeric plantibody passively protects mice against aerosolized ricin challenge.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Whaley, Kevin J; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do H; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Hiatt, Ernie; Morton, Josh; Swope, Kelsi; Roy, Chad J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-05-01

    Recent incidents in the United States and abroad have heightened concerns about the use of ricin toxin as a bioterrorism agent. In this study, we produced, using a robust plant-based platform, four chimeric toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that were then evaluated for the ability to passively protect mice from a lethal-dose ricin challenge. The most effective antibody, c-PB10, was further evaluated in mice as a therapeutic following ricin exposure by injection and inhalation. PMID:24574537

  2. Advantages and Challenges in using Multi-Sensor Data for Studying Aerosols from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptoukh, Gregory

    We are living now in the golden era of numerous sensors measuring aerosols from space, e.g., MODIS, MISR, MERIS, OMI, POLDER, etc. Data from multiple sensors provide a more complete coverage of physical phenomena than data from a single sensor. These sensors are rather different from each other, are sensitive to various parts of the atmosphere, use different aerosol models and treat surface differently when retrieving aerosols. However, they complement each other thus providing more information about spatial, vertical and temporal distribution of aerosols. In addition to differences in instrumentation, retrieval algorithms and calibration, there are quite substantial differences in processing algorithms from Level 0 up to Level 3 and 4. Some of these differences in processing steps, at times not well documented and not widely known by users, can lead to quite significant differences in final products. Without documenting all the steps leading to the final product, data users will not trust the data and/or may use data incorrectly. Data by themselves without quality assessment and provenance are not sufficient to make accurate scientific conclusions. In this paper we provide examples of striking differences between aerosol optical depth data from MODIS, MISR, and MERIS that can be attributed to differences in a certain threshold, aggregation methods, and the dataday definition. We talk about challenges in developing processing provenance. Also, we address issues of harmonization of data, quality and provenance that is needed to guide the multi-sensor data usage and avoid apples-to-oranges comparison and fusion.

  3. Radiation Test Challenges for Scaled Commerical Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ladbury, Ray L.; Cohn, Lewis M.; Oldham, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    As sub-100nm CMOS technologies gather interest, the radiation effects performance of these technologies provide a significant challenge. In this talk, we shall discuss the radiation testing challenges as related to commercial memory devices. The focus will be on complex test and failure modes emerging in state-of-the-art Flash non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs), which are volatile. Due to their very high bit density, these device types are highly desirable for use in the natural space environment. In this presentation, we shall discuss these devices with emphasis on considerations for test and qualification methods required.

  4. The design of an aerosol test tunnel for occupational hygiene investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, D. B.; Heighington, K.

    An aerosol test tunnel which provides large working sections is described and its performance evaluated. Air movement within the tunnel is achieved with a powerful D.C. motor and centrifugal fan. Test dusts are dispersed and injected into the tunnel by means of an aerosol generator. A unique divertor valve allows aerosol laden air to be either cleaned by a commercial pulse jet filtration unit or recycled around the tunnel to obtain a high aerosol concentration. The tunnel instrumentation is managed by a microcomputer which automatically controls the airspeed and aerosol concentration.

  5. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges)

    PubMed Central

    Dye, John M.; Warfield, Kelly L.; Wells, Jay B.; Unfer, Robert C.; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K.; Aman, M. Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV. PMID:27070636

  6. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models So Elusive? Challenges and Strategies From Dust Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. L.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency,while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set ofphysical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects ofclimate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertainand resistent to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particleslofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasingmodel sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturbthe energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as icenuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marinephotosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take placeacross scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to theplanetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of itsparent soil. Representing this range leads to several modelingchallenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumescomputer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if aprocess involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Canwe identify a minimal representation of a complex process that isefficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answeringthese questions about the appropriate degree of representation isguided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges.How do we proceed if the available observations do not directlyconstrain our process of interest? (This could result from competingprocesses that influence the observed variable and obscure thesignature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presentedfrom dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadlyapplicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or thereassuring promise of continued gainful employment as the communityconfronts these challenges.

  7. Challenge of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators with Viable H1N1 Influenza Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Harnish, Delbert A.; Heimbuch, Brian K.; Husband, Michael; Lumley, April E.; Kinney, Kimberly; Shaffer, Ronald E.; Wander, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Specification of appropriate personal protective equipment for respiratory protection against influenza is somewhat controversial. In a clinical environment, N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are often recommended for respiratory protection against infectious aerosols. This study evaluates the ability of N95 FFRs to capture viable H1N1 influenza aerosols. METHODS Five N95 FFR models were challenged with aerosolized viable H1N1 influenza and inert polystyrene latex particles at continuous flow rates of 85 and 170 liters per minute. Virus was assayed using Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine the median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50). Aerosols were generated using a Collison nebulizer containing H1N1 influenza virus at 1 × 108 TCID50/mL. To determine filtration efficiency, viable sampling was performed upstream and downstream of the FFR. RESULTS N95 FFRs filtered 0.8-µm particles of both H1N1 influenza and inert origins with more than 95% efficiency. With the exception of 1 model, no statistically significant difference in filtration performance was observed between influenza and inert particles of similar size. Although statistically significant differences were observed for 2 models when comparing the 2 flow rates, the differences have no significance to protection. CONCLUSIONS This study empirically demonstrates that a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health–approved N95 FFR captures viable H1N1 influenza aerosols as well as or better than its N95 rating, suggesting that a properly fitted FFR reduces inhalation exposure to airborne influenza virus. This study also provides evidence that filtration efficiency is based primarily on particle size rather than the nature of the particle’s origin. PMID:23571366

  8. Challenges to producing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology for chemistry and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomason, Larry; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Bourassa, Adam; Rieger, Landon; Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Arfeuille, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosol data sets are key inputs for climate models (GCMs, CCMs) particularly for understanding the role of volcanoes on climate and as a surrogate for understanding the potential of human-derived stratospheric aerosol as mitigation for global warming. In addition to supporting activities of individual climate models, the data sets also act as a historical input to the activities of SPARC's Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) and the World Climate Research Programme's Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). One such data set was produced in 2004 as a part of the SPARC Assessment of Stratospheric Aerosol Properties (ASAP), extending from 1979 and 2004. It was primarily constructed from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment series of instruments but supplemented by data from other space-based sources and a number of ground-based and airborne instruments. Updates to this data set have expanded the timeframe to span from 1850 through 2014 through the inclusion of data from additional sources, such as photometer data and ice core analyses. Fundamentally, there are limitations to the reliability of the optical properties of aerosol inferred from even the most complete single instrument data sets. At the same time, the heterogeneous nature of the underlying data to this historical data set produces considerable challenges to the production of a climate data set which is both homogeneous and reliable throughout its timespan. In this presentation, we will discuss the impact of this heterogeneity showing specific examples such as the SAGE II to OSIRIS/CALIPSO transition in 2005. Potential solutions to these issues will also be discussed.

  9. A chimeric Sindbis-based vaccine protects cynomolgus macaques against a lethal aerosol challenge of eastern equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Chad J.; Adams, A. Paige; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Seymour, Robert L.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Mega, William; Frolov, Ilya; Didier, Peter J.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes sporadic, often fatal disease outbreaks in humans and equids, and is also a biological threat agent. Two chimeric vaccine candidates were constructed using a cDNA clone with a Sindbis virus (SINV) backbone and structural protein genes from either a North (SIN/NAEEEV) or South American (SIN/SAEEEV) strain of EEEV. The vaccine candidates were tested in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). Cynomolgus macaques were either sham-vaccinated, or vaccinated with a single dose of either SIN/NAEEEV or SIN/SAEEEV. After vaccination, animals were challenged by aerosol with a virulent North American strain of EEEV (NA EEEV). The SIN/NAEEEV vaccine provided significant protection, and most vaccinated animals survived EEEV challenge (82%) with little evidence of disease, whereas most SIN/SAEEEV-vaccinated (83%) and control (100%) animals died. Protected animals exhibited minimal changes in temperature and cardiovascular rhythm, whereas unprotected animals showed profound hyperthermia and changes in heart rate post-exposure. Acute inflammation and neuronal necrosis were consistent with EEEV-induced encephalitis in unprotected animals, whereas no encephalitis-related histopathologic changes were observed in the SIN/NAEEEV-vaccinated animals. These results demonstrate that the chimeric SIN/NAEEEV vaccine candidate protects against an aerosol EEEV exposure. PMID:23333212

  10. "Worst case" aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Moyer, E S; Stevens, G A

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, "worst case" aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change. PMID:2729102

  11. Worst case aerosol testing parameters: II. Efficiency dependence of commercial respirator filters on humidity pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, E.S.; Stevens, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that relative humidity has a degrading effect on the performance of commercially available particulate air-purifying respirator filters. That degradation results from a reduction of charge within the filter. This study was done to evaluate the time-dependent effects of relative humidity pretreatment and the reduction of charge on filter penetration against a most penetrating, ''worst case'' aerosol challenge. Filters of the dust and mist; dust, fume, and mist; paint, lacquer, and enamel mist; and high efficiency types were tested after being pretreated in an environment of 38 degrees C and 85% relative humidity for periods up to 42 days. After various intervals of pretreatment (1, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days), the filters were tested against neutralized worst-case sodium chloride (NaCl) and dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols for percent penetration. The results showed a drop in filter efficiency of approximately 2%-6% depending on preconditioning time, except for the high efficiency filters tested which showed no detectable change.

  12. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models so Elusive? Challenges and Strategies from Dust Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald L.; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Perlwitz, Jan; Ginoux, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency, while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set of physical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects of climate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertain and resistant to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particles lofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasing model sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturb the energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as ice nuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marine photosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take place across scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to the planetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of its parent soil. Representing this range leads to several modeling challenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumes computer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if a process involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Can we identify a minimal representation of a complex process that is efficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answering these questions about the appropriate degree of representation is guided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges. How do we proceed if the available observations do not directly constrain our process of interest? (This could result from competing processes that influence the observed variable and obscure the signature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presented from dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadly applicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or there assuring promise of continued gainful employment as the community confronts these challenges.

  13. [Testing of vaccines. The challenge of testing complex combination vaccines].

    PubMed

    Merkle, A; Lechner, H; Oppling, V; Meyer, H

    2014-10-01

    Vaccines are biologicals. This group of medicinal products is produced with a predefined variability based on the biological starting materials used. Vaccines are subject to official control authority batch release performed by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI). To release batches to the market, experimental testing has to be conducted by an official medicines control laboratory as the PEI. It is the aim of this independent testing to demonstrate the conformity of quality criteria with conditions set in the marketing authorization for each lot produced. The testing is performed on the basis of vaccine specific batch release guideline and due to the difficult and time consuming testing procedures often run in parallel with manufacturers testing. If test results comply with the predefined criteria, the lot in question is released. This article describes the challenge of official control authority batch release testing of two complex combination vaccines.

  14. The challenge of validating genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersson, U

    2000-01-01

    Validation of genetic testing is a multidisciplinary task that involves medical/clinical geneticists, other medical specialists, legislative authorities and the public. It is an area in which many issues are unresolved. Validation should not focus on the laboratory process alone, but should also include the prerequisites for service delivery, such as education and staffing, data collection and banking and information transfer, as well as pre- and post-test genetic counselling in a cost-effective perspective. It must thus be seen as an ongoing process at laboratory, familial and societal levels which involves many different actors. The challenges for the near future are to continue to develop technical standards for the laboratory and counselling procedures, and, in collaboration among professionals, lay persons and state authorities, to define a legal framework for the actions of the various players. This chapter discusses some problems related to the validation process for genetic testing, broadly defined. PMID:11878342

  15. IRES-Containing VEEV Vaccine Protects Cynomolgus Macaques from IE Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Aerosol Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E.; Killeen, Stephanie Z.; Wang, Eryu; Leal, Grace; Bergren, Nicholas A.; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Weaver, Scott C.; Roy, Chad J.

    2015-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is an arbovirus endemic to the Americas that is responsible for severe, sometimes fatal, disease in humans and horses. We previously described an IRES-based VEE vaccine candidate based up the IE serotype that offers complete protection against a lethal subtype IE VEEV challenge in mice. Here we demonstrate the IRES-based vaccine’s ability to protect against febrile disease in cynomolgus macaques. Vaccination was well tolerated and elicited robust neutralizing antibody titers noticed as early as day 14. Moreover, complete protection from disease characterized by absence of viremia and characteristic fever following aerosolized IE VEEV challenge was observed in all vaccinees compared to control animals, which developed clinical disease. Together, these results highlight the safety and efficacy of IRES-based VEEV vaccine to protect against an endemic, pathogenic VEEV IE serotype. PMID:26020513

  16. Developments of aerosol retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environmental Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) and the retrieval accuracy test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, M.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Ahn, C.; Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning UV-Visible spectrometer, the GEMS (Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer) onboard the GEO-KOMPSAT2B (Geostationary Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite) is planned to be launched in geostationary orbit in 2018. The GEMS employs hyper-spectral imaging with 0.6 nm resolution to observe solar backscatter radiation in the UV and Visible range. In the UV range, the low surface contribution to the backscattered radiation and strong interaction between aerosol absorption and molecular scattering can be advantageous in retrieving aerosol optical properties such as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). By taking the advantage, the OMI UV aerosol algorithm has provided information on the absorbing aerosol (Torres et al., 2007; Ahn et al., 2008). This study presents a UV-VIS algorithm to retrieve AOD and SSA from GEMS. The algorithm is based on the general inversion method, which uses pre-calculated look-up table with assumed aerosol properties and measurement condition. To obtain the retrieval accuracy, the error of the look-up table method occurred by the interpolation of pre-calculated radiances is estimated by using the reference dataset, and the uncertainties about aerosol type and height are evaluated. Also, the GEMS aerosol algorithm is tested with measured normalized radiance from OMI, a provisional data set for GEMS measurement, and the results are compared with the values from AERONET measurements over Asia. Additionally, the method for simultaneous retrieve of the AOD and aerosol height is discussed.

  17. The X-33 Flight Test Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borden, David; Ramiscal, Ermin; Howell, John

    1999-01-01

    Low cost access to space has eluded present launch system technologies. Our objective is to reduce the cost of putting a payload into space from $10,000 per pound to $1000 per pound. In July 1996, a cooperative agreement was initiated between the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works and NASA to help accomplish this goal. The X-33 is the first step in the process to make low cost space access a reality. The X-33 is a suborbital, hypersonic lifting body, proof of concept of a reusable launch vehicle. The X-33 flight test program will validate technologies such as a metallic thermal protection system, Linear Aerospike Engines, use of tanks and struts as fundamental structural elements, as well as quick turnaround time. Flight testing will begin in July 2000, with launches originating from Edwards Air Force Base and initial landings at Michael Army Airfield in Utah. Data collected from these flight tests will aid in the decision to build an economically viable single stage to orbit reusable launch vehicle. This paper will explore the technical challenges facing the X-33 Flight Test Team.

  18. Natural History of Francisella tularensis in Aerosol-Challenged BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chuvala, Lara; Riggins, Renaldo; Cirz, Ryan; Cass, Robert; Louie, Arnold; Drusano, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the natural history and pathogenesis of Francisella tularensis in a murine model of inhalational tularemia with the SchuS4 strain. Before the efficacy of antimicrobials could be assessed in this model, further model development was required to determine the optimal time to start therapy. This study helped define the time course of infection after aerosol challenge by quantifying the presence of bacteria in lung, blood, and spleen at multiple harvest points. In this study, mice were infected via a targeted inhaled dose of 100 50% lethal doses (LD50s) (LD50 = 300 CFU) of F. tularensis by whole-body aerosol. At 1, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 75, 78, 81, 84, 87, and 90 h postchallenge, groups of 15 animals were sacrificed and blood, lung, and splenic tissue samples were harvested, homogenized, plated, and incubated to evaluate the bacterial load in those tissues. It was determined that of the 3 sample types harvested, splenic tissue provided the most consistent bacterial counts, which steadily increased with the progressing infection. Further, it was determined that lung samples from all (15/15) animals were positive for infection at 75 h postaerosolization and that 14/15 animals had positive splenic tissue counts. Bacterial levels in blood were not predictive of treatment initiation. For future therapeutic evaluation studies in this model using F. tularensis (SchuS4), it was determined that therapy should be initiated at 75 h postchallenge and validated by spleen involvement. PMID:26824958

  19. Stimulation of interferons and endorphins/enkephalins by electro-aerosol inhalation? An experimental approach for testing an expanded hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, A. P.

    1984-03-01

    The biological effects of endorphins/enkephalins and of interferons closely resemble those attributed to air ions and electro-aerosols. Air ions/electro-aerosols have been reported to affect brain functions and feelings of “well-being”; to have sedative and analgesic effects; to be therapeutically effective in certain viral (e.g., upper respiratory) infections; and to have tumor-attenuating effects. It is, therefore, conceivable that endorphins/enkephalins and interferons might be the mediators of these air ion/electro-aerosol effects. An experimental approach for testing this hypothesis is described. It calls for mice to be challenged with a suitable agent and to be exposed under appropriate conditions to a negatively charged aerosol of physiological saline 6 hours/day for up to 3 weeks; for the serial sacrifice of subgroups of these mice; for collecting blood and brains of the sacrificed animals; for the bioassay of the sera for interferon; and for radioimmunoassays of brains for endorphins/enkephalins. Special considerations, necessitated by the nature of the experiment, are discussed.

  20. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    SciTech Connect

    Brucher, Wenzel; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Loiseau, Olivier; Mo, Tin; Billone, Michael C.; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Young, F. I.; Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana; Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver; Thompson, Nancy Slater; Hibbs, Russell S.; Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin; Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung

    2005-07-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of

  1. Results and code predictions for ABCOVE aerosol code validation - Test AB5

    SciTech Connect

    Hilliard, R K; McCormack, J D; Postma, A K

    1983-11-01

    A program for aerosol behavior code validation and evaluation (ABCOVE) has been developed in accordance with the LMFBR Safety Program Plan. The ABCOVE program is a cooperative effort between the USDOE, the USNRC, and their contractor organizations currently involved in aerosol code development, testing or application. The first large-scale test in the ABCOVE program, AB5, was performed in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel using a sodium spray as the aerosol source. Seven organizations made pretest predictions of aerosol behavior using seven different computer codes (HAA-3, HAA-4, HAARM-3, QUICK, MSPEC, MAEROS and CONTAIN). Three of the codes were used by more than one user so that the effect of user input could be assessed, as well as the codes themselves. Detailed test results are presented and compared with the code predictions for eight key parameters.

  2. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  3. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  4. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Anthony C; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A; Gooch, Karen E; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M; Hiscox, Julian A; Stewart, James P; Carroll, Miles W

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections.

  5. Influenza A Virus Challenge Models in Cynomolgus Macaques Using the Authentic Inhaled Aerosol and Intra-Nasal Routes of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Anthony C.; Dennis, Mike; Kane, Jennifer A.; Gooch, Karen E.; Hatch, Graham; Sharpe, Sally; Prevosto, Claudia; Leeming, Gail; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; Staples, Karl J.; Hall, Graham; Ryan, Kathryn A.; Bate, Simon; Moyo, Nathifa; Whittaker, Catherine J.; Hallis, Bassam; Silman, Nigel J.; Lalvani, Ajit; Wilkinson, Tom M.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Stewart, James P.; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates are the animals closest to humans for use in influenza A virus challenge studies, in terms of their phylogenetic relatedness, physiology and immune systems. Previous studies have shown that cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) are permissive for infection with H1N1pdm influenza virus. These studies have typically used combined challenge routes, with the majority being intra-tracheal delivery, and high doses of virus (> 107 infectious units). This paper describes the outcome of novel challenge routes (inhaled aerosol, intra-nasal instillation) and low to moderate doses (103 to 106 plaque forming units) of H1N1pdm virus in cynomolgus macaques. Evidence of virus replication and sero-conversion were detected in all four challenge groups, although the disease was sub-clinical. Intra-nasal challenge led to an infection confined to the nasal cavity. A low dose (103 plaque forming units) did not lead to detectable infectious virus shedding, but a 1000-fold higher dose led to virus shedding in all intra-nasal challenged animals. In contrast, aerosol and intra-tracheal challenge routes led to infections throughout the respiratory tract, although shedding from the nasal cavity was less reproducible between animals compared to the high-dose intra-nasal challenge group. Intra-tracheal and aerosol challenges induced a transient lymphopaenia, similar to that observed in influenza-infected humans, and greater virus-specific cellular immune responses in the blood were observed in these groups in comparison to the intra-nasal challenge groups. Activation of lung macrophages and innate immune response genes was detected at days 5 to 7 post-challenge. The kinetics of infection, both virological and immunological, were broadly in line with human influenza A virus infections. These more authentic infection models will be valuable in the determination of anti-influenza efficacy of novel entities against less severe (and thus more common) influenza infections. PMID

  6. Development and testing of an aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, P.Q.; Meyers, M.P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/microphysics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number concentrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the droplet spectrum, so that the aerosol population directly affects the cloud formation and microphysics. Second, we plan to couple the aerosol model to the gas and aqueous-chemistry module that will drive the aerosol formation and growth. We begin by exploring the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations of Arctic stratus clouds over the North Slope CART site. These simulations using Colorado State University`s regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) will be useful in designing the structure of the cloud-resolving model and in interpreting data acquired at the North Slope site.

  7. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  8. Surrogate/spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio testing:phase 1 summary and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Manuel Gilbert; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Lange, F. , Germany); Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Dickey, Roy R.; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire , France); Young, F. I.; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und reaktorsicherheit , Germany)

    2005-10-01

    This multinational test program is quantifying the aerosol particulates produced when a high energy density device (HEDD) impacts surrogate material and actual spent fuel test rodlets. The experimental work, performed in four consecutive test phases, has been in progress for several years. The overall program provides needed data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This program also provides significant political benefits in international cooperation for nuclear security related evaluations. The spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC), and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report summarizes the preliminary, Phase 1 work performed in 2001 and 2002 at Sandia National Laboratories and the Fraunhofer Institute, Germany, and documents the experimental results obtained, observations, and preliminary interpretations. Phase 1 testing included: performance quantifications of the HEDD devices; characterization of the HEDD or conical shaped charge (CSC) jet properties with multiple tests; refinement of the aerosol particle collection apparatus being used; and, CSC jet-aerosol tests using leaded glass plates and glass pellets, serving as representative brittle materials. Phase 1 testing was quite important for the design and performance of the following Phase 2 test program and test apparatus.

  9. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particle Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates from Intramuscular and Aerosol Challenge with Ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Andrew S.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Barth, James F.; Ortiz, Ramon A.; Nichols, Donald K.; Zak, Samantha E.; Stonier, Spencer W.; Muhammad, Majidat A.; Bakken, Russell R.; Prugar, Laura I.; Olinger, Gene G.; Groebner, Jennifer L.; Lee, John S.; Pratt, William D.; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I.; Smith, Jonathan F.; Hart, Mary Kate

    2013-01-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine. PMID:23408633

  10. Large Liquid Rocket Testing: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim A.; Hebert, Bartt J.

    2005-01-01

    Rocket propulsion development is enabled by rigorous ground testing in order to mitigate the propulsion systems risks that are inherent in space flight. This is true for virtually all propulsive devices of a space vehicle including liquid and solid rocket propulsion, chemical and non-chemical propulsion, boost stage and in-space propulsion and so forth. In particular, large liquid rocket propulsion development and testing over the past five decades of human and robotic space flight has involved a combination of component-level testing and engine-level testing to first demonstrate that the propulsion devices were designed to meet the specified requirements for the Earth to Orbit launchers that they powered. This was followed by a vigorous test campaign to demonstrate the designed propulsion articles over the required operational envelope, and over robust margins, such that a sufficiently reliable propulsion system is delivered prior to first flight. It is possible that hundreds of tests, and on the order of a hundred thousand test seconds, are needed to achieve a high-reliability, flight-ready, liquid rocket engine system. This paper overviews aspects of earlier and recent experience of liquid rocket propulsion testing at NASA Stennis Space Center, where full scale flight engines and flight stages, as well as a significant amount of development testing has taken place in the past decade. The liquid rocket testing experience discussed includes testing of engine components (gas generators, preburners, thrust chambers, pumps, powerheads), as well as engine systems and complete stages. The number of tests, accumulated test seconds, and years of test stand occupancy needed to meet varying test objectives, will be selectively discussed and compared for the wide variety of ground test work that has been conducted at Stennis for subscale and full scale liquid rocket devices. Since rocket propulsion is a crucial long-lead element of any space system acquisition or

  11. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sandra; Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph; Nappier, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  12. Unique Challenges Testing SDRs for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Downey, Joseph A.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Nappier, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the approach used by the Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed team to qualify three Software Defined Radios (SDR) for operation in space and the characterization of the platform to enable upgrades on-orbit. The three SDRs represent a significant portion of the new technologies being studied on board the SCAN Testbed, which is operating on an external truss on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN Testbed provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms and applications for communication, networking, and navigation concepts and advance the understanding of developing and operating SDRs in space. Qualifying a Software Defined Radio for the space environment requires additional consideration versus a hardware radio. Tests that incorporate characterization of the platform to provide information necessary for future waveforms, which might exercise extended capabilities of the hardware, are needed. The development life cycle for the radio follows the software development life cycle, where changes can be incorporated at various stages of development and test. It also enables flexibility to be added with minor additional effort. Although this provides tremendous advantages, managing the complexity inherent in a software implementation requires a testing beyond the traditional hardware radio test plan. Due to schedule and resource limitations and parallel development activities, the subsystem testing of the SDRs at the vendor sites was primarily limited to typical fixed transceiver type of testing. NASA s Glenn Research Center (GRC) was responsible for the integration and testing of the SDRs into the SCaN Testbed system and conducting the investigation of the SDR to advance the technology to be accepted by missions. This paper will describe the unique tests that were conducted at both the subsystem and system level, including environmental testing, and present results. For example, test

  13. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream...

  14. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream...

  15. Respirator Testing Using Virus Aerosol: Comparison between Viability Penetration and Physical Penetration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2015-07-01

    Viability, fluorescence (particle volume), photometric, viral RNA, and particle number penetration of MS2 bacteriophage through filter media used in three different models of respirators were compared to better understand the correlation between viability and physical penetration. Although viability and viral RNA penetration were better represented by particle volume penetration than particle number penetration, they were several-fold lower than photometric penetration, which was partially due to the difference in virus survival between upstream and downstream aerosol samples. Results suggest that the current NIOSH photometer-based test method can be used as a quick means to roughly differentiate respirators with different performance against virus aerosols.

  16. Respirator Testing Using Virus Aerosol: Comparison between Viability Penetration and Physical Penetration.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhili; Kuehn, Thomas H; Pui, David Y H

    2015-07-01

    Viability, fluorescence (particle volume), photometric, viral RNA, and particle number penetration of MS2 bacteriophage through filter media used in three different models of respirators were compared to better understand the correlation between viability and physical penetration. Although viability and viral RNA penetration were better represented by particle volume penetration than particle number penetration, they were several-fold lower than photometric penetration, which was partially due to the difference in virus survival between upstream and downstream aerosol samples. Results suggest that the current NIOSH photometer-based test method can be used as a quick means to roughly differentiate respirators with different performance against virus aerosols. PMID:25846360

  17. Open-Ended Test Items Pose Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Most experts in the testing community have presumed that the $350 million promised by the U.S. Department of Education to support common assessments would promote those that made greater use of open-ended items capable of measuring higher-order critical-thinking skills. But as measurement experts consider the multitude of possibilities for an…

  18. Validity in Language Testing: The Challenge of Sam Messick's Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The thought of Samuel Messick has influenced language testing in 2 main ways: in proposing a new understanding of how inferences made based on tests must be challenged, and in drawing attention to the consequences of test use. The former has had a powerful impact on language-testing research, most notably in Bachman's work on validity and the…

  19. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  20. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2009-07-01

    This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

  1. Aerosol behavior during SIC control rod failure in QUENCH-13 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Csordás, Anna Pintér; Nagy, Imre; Stuckert, Juri

    2010-02-01

    In a nuclear reactor severe accident, radioactive fission products as well as structural materials are released from the core by evaporation, and the released gases form particles by nucleation and condensation. In addition, aerosol particles may be generated by droplet formation and fragmentation of the core. In pressurized water reactors (PWR), a commonly used control rod material is silver-indium-cadmium (SIC) covered with stainless steel cladding. The control rod elements, Cd, In and Ag, have relatively low melting temperatures, and especially Cd has also a very low boiling point. Control rods are likely to fail early on in the accident due to melting of the stainless steel cladding which can be accelerated by eutectic interaction between stainless steel and the surrounding Zircaloy guide tube. The release of the control rod materials would follow the cladding failure thus affecting aerosol source term as well as fuel rod degradation. The QUENCH experimental program at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe investigates phenomena associated with reflood of a degrading core under postulated severe accident conditions. QUENCH-13 test was the first in this program to include a silver-indium-cadmium control rod of prototypic PWR design. To characterize the extent of aerosol release during the control rod failure, aerosol particle size distribution and concentration measurements in the off-gas pipe of the QUENCH facility were carried out. For the first time, it was possible to determine on-line the aerosol concentration and size distribution released from the core. These results are of prime importance for model development for the proper calculation of the source term resulting from control rod failure. The on-line measurement showed that the main aerosol release started at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1570 K at hottest bundle elevation. A very large burst of aerosols was detected 660 s later at the bundle temperature maximum of T ˜ 1650 K, followed by a relatively

  2. The Third Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing (GREAT3) Challenge Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, Barnaby; Bosch, James; Chang, Chihway; Courbin, Frederic; Gill, Mandeep; Jarvis, Mike; Kannawadi, Arun; Kacprzak, Tomasz; Lackner, Claire; Leauthaud, Alexie; Miyatake, Hironao; Nakajima, Reiko; Rhodes, Jason; Simet, Melanie; Zuntz, Joe; Armstrong, Bob; Bridle, Sarah; Coupon, Jean; Dietrich, Jörg P.; Gentile, Marc; Heymans, Catherine; Jurling, Alden S.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kirkby, David; Margala, Daniel; Massey, Richard; Melchior, Peter; Peterson, John; Roodman, Aaron; Schrabback, Tim

    2014-05-01

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 3 (GREAT3) challenge is the third in a series of image analysis challenges, with a goal of testing and facilitating the development of methods for analyzing astronomical images that will be used to measure weak gravitational lensing. This measurement requires extremely precise estimation of very small galaxy shape distortions, in the presence of far larger intrinsic galaxy shapes and distortions due to the blurring kernel caused by the atmosphere, telescope optics, and instrumental effects. The GREAT3 challenge is posed to the astronomy, machine learning, and statistics communities, and includes tests of three specific effects that are of immediate relevance to upcoming weak lensing surveys, two of which have never been tested in a community challenge before. These effects include many novel aspects including realistically complex galaxy models based on high-resolution imaging from space; a spatially varying, physically motivated blurring kernel; and a combination of multiple different exposures. To facilitate entry by people new to the field, and for use as a diagnostic tool, the simulation software for the challenge is publicly available, though the exact parameters used for the challenge are blinded. Sample scripts to analyze the challenge data using existing methods will also be provided. See http://great3challenge.info and http://great3.projects.phys.ucl.ac.uk/leaderboard/ for more information.

  3. Development of an aerosol dispersion test to detect early changes in lung function

    SciTech Connect

    McCawley, M.; Lippmann, M.

    1988-07-01

    The dispersion of a 0.5 micron aerosol bolus during tidal breathing differs significantly (p less than 0.0001) between a group of smokers (with approximately 20 pack-years average exposure) and a comparable group of nonsmokers. Their mean differences in standard respiratory function indexes from spirometry (forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC (FEF25-75)) were smaller and not statistically significant. The test is simple to perform and may be done as quickly as spirometry but without using a forced exhalation. Comparison of the coefficients of variation for the dispersion test and FEV1 indicate that the aerosol dispersion test may be useful in epidemiologic investigations either by reducing the required population size or increasing the level of confidence.

  4. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    PubMed

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing.

  5. SEMI-VOLATILE SECONDARY AEROSOLS IN URBAN ATMOSPHERES: MEETING A MEASURED CHALLENGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation compares the results from various particle measurement methods as they relate to semi-volatile secondary aerosols in urban atmospheres. The methods include the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method; Particle Concentrator - BYU Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS); the Re...

  6. GREAT3: The Third Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie; Mandelbaum, R.; Rowe, B.; Great3 Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We describe the ongoing weak lensing community data challenge, GREAT3, and the associated open-source image simulation software, GalSim. The GREAT3 challenge tests the impact on weak lensing measurements of (a) realistic galaxy morphologies, (b) realistic uncertainty in the point-spread function estimation, and (c) the need to combine multiple exposures when estimating the galaxy shape. It includes simulated ground- and space-based data. The tests of realistic galaxy morphologies rely on a training set of galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope, a subset of which has been publicly released for community use, with the remainder to be released at the end of the challenge. We describe some technical considerations for generating the challenge data and for testing weak lensing measurements with the next generation of weak lensing surveys, such as DES, HSC, KIDS, and Pan-STARRS.

  7. GREAT3: The Third Gravitational Lensing Accuracy Testing Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Rowe, B.; GREAT3 Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    We describe the upcoming weak lensing community data challenge, GREAT3, and the associated open-source image simulation software, GalSim. The GREAT3 challenge will test the impact on weak lensing measurements of (a) realistic galaxy morphologies, (b) realistic uncertainty in the point-spread function estimation, and (c) the need to combine multiple exposures when estimating the galaxy shape. It will include simulated ground- and space-based data, and the tests of realistic galaxy morphologies will rely on a training set of galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope which will be publicly released at the start of the challenge. We describe some technical considerations for generating the challenge data and for testing weak lensing measurements with the next generation of weak lensing surveys, such as DES, HSC, KIDS, and Pan-STARRS.

  8. Challenge tests to assess airway hyperresponsiveness and efficacy of drugs used in the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S D

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial provocation tests are useful to diagnose and assess severity of asthma and to follow response to treatment. The tests used include those stimuli that act "directly" on receptors causing contraction of airway smooth muscle, e.g., pharmacological agents, and those stimuli that act "indirectly" by causing release of endogenous mediators that cause the airways to narrow. These "indirect" stimuli include physical ones such as airway drying from hyperpnea and changes in airway osmolarity from inhaling aerosols of water and hyperosmolar saline. Indirect stimuli cause the airways to narrow in response to endogenously released substances from inflammatory cells or nerves and responses are thought to reflect the presence and severity of inflammation of asthma. Challenge with hyperosmolar saline is now being used as an indirect test because it also identifies persons with exercise-induced asthma and is appropriate to assess suitability for diving with SCUBA. Hyperosmolar challenge is also useful to assess the effect of both the acute and chronic treatment with antiinflammatory drugs. This, combined with the potential to collect inflammatory cells in sputum induced by the same stimulus should result in this challenge being more widely used, not only in the hospital laboratory but also in epidemiology and occupational asthma.

  9. Correlation of in vitro challenge testing with consumer use testing for cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Brannan, D K; Dille, J C; Kaufman, D J

    1987-08-01

    An in vitro microbial challenge test has been developed to predict the likelihood of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. The challenge test involved inoculating product at four concentrations (30, 50, 70, and 100%) with microorganisms known to contaminate cosmetics. Elimination of these microorganisms at each concentration was followed over a 28-day period. The test was used to classify products as poorly preserved, marginally preserved, or well preserved. Consumer use testing was then used to determine whether the test predicted the risk of actual consumer contamination. Products classified by the challenge test as poorly preserved returned 46 to 90% contaminated after use. Products classified by the challenge test as well preserved returned with no contamination. Marginally preserved products returned with 0 to 21% of the used units contaminated. As a result, the challenge test described can be accurately used to predict the risk of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. PMID:3662517

  10. Correlation of in vitro challenge testing with consumer use testing for cosmetic products.

    PubMed Central

    Brannan, D K; Dille, J C; Kaufman, D J

    1987-01-01

    An in vitro microbial challenge test has been developed to predict the likelihood of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. The challenge test involved inoculating product at four concentrations (30, 50, 70, and 100%) with microorganisms known to contaminate cosmetics. Elimination of these microorganisms at each concentration was followed over a 28-day period. The test was used to classify products as poorly preserved, marginally preserved, or well preserved. Consumer use testing was then used to determine whether the test predicted the risk of actual consumer contamination. Products classified by the challenge test as poorly preserved returned 46 to 90% contaminated after use. Products classified by the challenge test as well preserved returned with no contamination. Marginally preserved products returned with 0 to 21% of the used units contaminated. As a result, the challenge test described can be accurately used to predict the risk of consumer contamination of cosmetic products. PMID:3662517

  11. Live attenuated mutants of Francisella tularensis protect rabbits against aerosol challenge with a virulent type A strain.

    PubMed

    Reed, Douglas S; Smith, Le'kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Barry, Eileen M

    2014-05-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection.

  12. A Yersinia pestis tat mutant is attenuated in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic challenge models of infection but not as attenuated by intranasal challenge.

    PubMed

    Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher K; Chance, Taylor; Kugelman, Jeffrey; Kern, Steven J; Kijek, Todd K; Jenkins, Amy; Mou, Sherry; Moody, Krishna; Fritz, David; Robinson, Camenzind G; Bell, Todd; Worsham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial proteins destined for the Tat pathway are folded before crossing the inner membrane and are typically identified by an N-terminal signal peptide containing a twin arginine motif. Translocation by the Tat pathway is dependent on the products of genes which encode proteins possessing the binding site of the signal peptide and mediating the actual translocation event. In the fully virulent CO92 strain of Yersinia pestis, the tatA gene was deleted. The mutant was assayed for loss of virulence through various in vitro and in vivo assays. Deletion of the tatA gene resulted in several consequences for the mutant as compared to wild-type. Cell morphology of the mutant bacteria was altered and demonstrated a more elongated form. In addition, while cultures of the mutant strain were able to produce a biofilm, we observed a loss of adhesion of the mutant biofilm structure compared to the biofilm produced by the wild-type strain. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed a partial disruption of the F1 antigen on the surface of the mutant. The virulence of the ΔtatA mutant was assessed in various murine models of plague. The mutant was severely attenuated in the bubonic model with full virulence restored by complementation with the native gene. After small-particle aerosol challenge in a pneumonic model of infection, the mutant was also shown to be attenuated. In contrast, when mice were challenged intranasally with the mutant, very little difference in the LD50 was observed between wild-type and mutant strains. However, an increased time-to-death and delay in bacterial dissemination was observed in mice infected with the ΔtatA mutant as compared to the parent strain. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an essential role for the Tat pathway in the virulence of Y. pestis in bubonic and small-aerosol pneumonic infection but less important role for intranasal challenge.

  13. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability

    PubMed Central

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing. PMID:26921324

  14. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    PubMed

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing. PMID:26921324

  15. Aerosol exposure of pigs to viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces antibodies in bronchoalveolar lining fluids and serum, and protects against homologous challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Ganter, M; Petzoldt, K

    1995-11-01

    A dose-defined nose-only inhalation system for pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of a single aerosol application of viable or killed Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9. Respiratory volumes were measured for each pig to calculate inhaled individual doses. Eight pigs inhaled 107 CFU A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261 reference strain for serotype 9. Another eight pigs received an identical dose of killed actinobacilli. After three weeks the pigs and nonexposed controls were challenged with 108 CFU of the homologous strain by aerosol. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in serum and BAL fluids were measured by ELISAs based on whole-cell antigens. The protective efficacy of aerosol immunization was evaluated by clinical and post-mortem examinations. The controls developed fever and severe pleuropneumonia, whereas previously exposed pigs had less fever and less extensive gross pulmonary lesions. After the first aerosol exposure pulmonary IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae increased significantly in both aerosol exposed groups. IgA in BALF and serum concentrations of each Ig class were significantly increased in the group exposed to viable bacteria when compared to the non-exposed controls. After aerosol challenge a pronounced increase of systemic and pulmonary IgA, IgM, and IgG antibodies was detected in both exposure groups. Aerosol application of whole-cell A. pleuropneumoniae bacterins induced similar protective effects against aerosol challenge infection as administration of an identical dose of viable bacteria. Inhalation of A. pleuropneumoniae may lead to asymptomatic carriers in some pigs that could spread the disease under field conditions.

  16. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1992-04-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  17. Aerosols released during large-scale integral MCCI tests in the ACE Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W. ); Sehgal, B.R. )

    1992-01-01

    As part of the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) program, seven large-scale experiments on molten core concrete interactions (MCCIs) have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the objectives of these experiments is to collect and characterize all the aerosols released from the MCCIs. Aerosols released from experiments using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/common sand, serpentine, and limestone/limestone) and a range of metal oxidation for both BWR and PWR reactor core material have been collected and characterized. Release fractions were determined for UO{sup 2}, Zr, the fission-products: BaO, SrO, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, MoO{sub 2}, Te, Ru, and control materials: Ag, In, and B{sub 4}C. Release fractions of UO{sub 2} and the fission products other than Te were small in all tests. However, release of control materials was significant.

  18. The Messy Aerosol Submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): Description and a Box Model Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl)chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealized marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HClCl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse particles. MADE3 and PartMC- MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes about 2 micrometers) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distribution, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for application within a global model.

  19. Early skin and challenge testing after rocuronium anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Schulberg, E M; Webb, A R; Kolawole, H

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of early skin and challenge testing in a patient following severe anaphylaxis to rocuronium. The patient presented for semi-elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and developed anaphylaxis with severe cardiovascular collapse after induction of anaesthesia. Surgery was cancelled but was considered necessary before the recommended four to six weeks for formal allergy testing. Limited skin and challenge testing was performed to rocuronium and cisatracurium while the patient was in the intensive care unit to identify a safe neuromuscular blocking drug for subsequent early surgery. The subsequent surgery, 48 hours after the initial reaction, was uneventful. The case highlights the difficulties when anaesthetising patients with recent anaphylaxis who have not yet had formal allergy testing and presents a potential management strategy involving early skin testing. PMID:27246945

  20. Temporal Characterization of Marburg Virus Angola Infection following Aerosol Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kenny L.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Connor, John H.; Cashman, Kathleen A.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Donnelly, Ginger C.; Esham, Heather L.; Wlazlowski, Carly B.; Johnson, Joshua C.; Honko, Anna N.; Botto, Miriam A.; Yen, Judy; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marburg virus (MARV) infection is a lethal hemorrhagic fever for which no licensed vaccines or therapeutics are available. Development of appropriate medical countermeasures requires a thorough understanding of the interaction between the host and the pathogen and the resulting disease course. In this study, 15 rhesus macaques were sequentially sacrificed following aerosol exposure to the MARV variant Angola, with longitudinal changes in physiology, immunology, and histopathology used to assess disease progression. Immunohistochemical evidence of infection and resulting histopathological changes were identified as early as day 3 postexposure (p.e.). The appearance of fever in infected animals coincided with the detection of serum viremia and plasma viral genomes on day 4 p.e. High (>107 PFU/ml) viral loads were detected in all major organs (lung, liver, spleen, kidney, brain, etc.) beginning day 6 p.e. Clinical pathology findings included coagulopathy, leukocytosis, and profound liver destruction as indicated by elevated liver transaminases, azotemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Altered cytokine expression in response to infection included early increases in Th2 cytokines such as interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-5 and late-stage increases in Th1 cytokines such as IL-2, IL-15, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). This study provides a longitudinal examination of clinical disease of aerosol MARV Angola infection in the rhesus macaque model. IMPORTANCE In this study, we carefully analyzed the timeline of Marburg virus infection in nonhuman primates in order to provide a well-characterized model of disease progression following aerosol exposure. PMID:26202230

  1. Strain-dependent CNS dissemination in guinea pigs after Mycobacterium tuberculosis aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Be, Nicholas A; Klinkenberg, Lee G; Bishai, William R; Karakousis, Petros C; Jain, Sanjay K

    2011-09-01

    Clinical reports suggest an association of distinct Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains with CNS disease. We therefore examined CNS dissemination by different laboratory strains (two M. tuberculosis H37Rv, one CDC1551) in a guinea pig aerosol infection model. Although all strains grew exponentially in lungs, with similar bacterial burdens at the time of extrapulmonary dissemination, M. tuberculosis CDC1551 disseminated to the CNS significantly more than the H37Rv strains. No CNS lesions were observed throughout the study, with only a modest cytokine response. These data suggest that M. tuberculosis may have virulence factors that promote CNS dissemination, distinct from those required for pulmonary TB.

  2. Prognostic value of acetylcholine challenge test: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Q T; Mur, J M; Chau, N; Gabiano, M; Henquel, J C; Teculescu, D

    1984-01-01

    Eleven hundred and nine iron mine workers aged 35 to 55 with normal chest radiographs were submitted to a pulmonary examination consisting of a questionnaire, a clinical examination, and pulmonary function testing including an acetylcholine challenge test. A positive response (decrease of FEV1 of more than 10%) was observed in 210 subjects (Ace+). The remaining 899 had a negative response (Ace-). Bronchitis, asthma, dyspnoea, and obstructive syndrome were more frequent in the Ace+ group. Five years later, 820 subjects were reexamined: occasional cough and sputum and chronic bronchitis appeared more frequently among subjects without symptoms at the first examination but with a positive acetylcholine challenge test. The obstructive syndrome was more often observed and regressed more rarely in the Ace+ group. The results confirm the use of a test of bronchial hyperreactivity as a means of identifying subjects at risk from chronic obstructive lung disease. PMID:6722054

  3. Efficacy and Immunogenicity of Single-Dose AdVAV Intranasal Anthrax Vaccine Compared to Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed in an Aerosolized Spore Rabbit Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H.; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S.; Tordoff, Kevin P.; Stark, Gregory V.; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 107, 1.5 × 109, or 3.5 × 1010 viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 1010 viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA. PMID:25673303

  4. Efficacy and immunogenicity of single-dose AdVAV intranasal anthrax vaccine compared to anthrax vaccine absorbed in an aerosolized spore rabbit challenge model.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vyjayanthi; Andersen, Bo H; Shoemaker, Christine; Sivko, Gloria S; Tordoff, Kevin P; Stark, Gregory V; Zhang, Jianfeng; Feng, Tsungwei; Duchars, Matthew; Roberts, M Scot

    2015-04-01

    AdVAV is a replication-deficient adenovirus type 5-vectored vaccine expressing the 83-kDa protective antigen (PA83) from Bacillus anthracis that is being developed for the prevention of disease caused by inhalation of aerosolized B. anthracis spores. A noninferiority study comparing the efficacy of AdVAV to the currently licensed Anthrax Vaccine Absorbed (AVA; BioThrax) was performed in New Zealand White rabbits using postchallenge survival as the study endpoint (20% noninferiority margin for survival). Three groups of 32 rabbits were vaccinated with a single intranasal dose of AdVAV (7.5 × 10(7), 1.5 × 10(9), or 3.5 × 10(10) viral particles). Three additional groups of 32 animals received two doses of either intranasal AdVAV (3.5 × 10(10) viral particles) or intramuscular AVA (diluted 1:16 or 1:64) 28 days apart. The placebo group of 16 rabbits received a single intranasal dose of AdVAV formulation buffer. All animals were challenged via the inhalation route with a targeted dose of 200 times the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of aerosolized B. anthracis Ames spores 70 days after the initial vaccination and were followed for 3 weeks. PA83 immunogenicity was evaluated by validated toxin neutralizing antibody and serum anti-PA83 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). All animals in the placebo cohort died from the challenge. Three of the four AdVAV dose cohorts tested, including two single-dose cohorts, achieved statistical noninferiority relative to the AVA comparator group, with survival rates between 97% and 100%. Vaccination with AdVAV also produced antibody titers with earlier onset and greater persistence than vaccination with AVA.

  5. Drug-Free Schools: A National Challenge. Drug Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The ERIC Review, 1990

    1990-01-01

    "The ERIC Review" announces research results, publications, and new programs relevant to each issue's theme topic. This inaugural issue contains two principal articles: "Drug-Free Schools: A National Challenge," by Samuel Y. Fustukjian, and "Drug Testing," by Amy Klauke and Margaret Hadderman. In addition, the following major features concerned…

  6. A challenge to fitness testing in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Naughton, G A; Carlson, J S; Greene, D A

    2006-05-01

    We challenge the tradition of fitness testing in schools on the basis of purpose, procedures and outcomes. A number of assumptions about validity of selected tests are raised. The need to be able to track fitness through childhood into adulthood is challenged with limited scientific evidence of longitudinal tracking. Supporters of wide-scale fitness testing of children in schools include researchers whose intention is to promote public health awareness and policy. But a variety of confounding factors can affect field-based testing and lower the confidence in intra and inter group comparisons. Confounders include variability in motivation, familiarisation, external conditions, group dynamics, self-efficacy in testing, and perceived value of testing and likely outcomes. With acknowledged limitations, a more appropriate context for fitness testing for young people who have a strong commitment to physical activity may lie more in a professionally delivered sports-specific setting rather than in large-scale school-based testing. Given the less than desirable participation in activity outside of school and the distressing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity, it is unlikely that fitness testing experiences will provide children with much needed positive encouragement for lifelong physical activity. Alternative strategies for school-based assessment of the promotion of child health through physical activity are proposed.

  7. HIV and Hepatitis Testing: Global Progress, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Easterbrook, Philippa; Johnson, Cheryl; Figueroa, Carmen; Baggaley, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection and viral hepatitis due to HBV and HCV infection are major causes of chronic disease worldwide, and share some common routes of transmission, epidemiology, initial barriers faced in treatment access, and in strategies for a global public health response. Testing and diagnosis of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection is the gateway for access to both care and treatment and prevention services, and crucial for an effective HIV and hepatitis epidemic response. In this review article, we first summarize the common goals and guiding principles in a public health approach to HIV and hepatitis testing. We summarize the impressive global progress in HIV testing scale-up and evolution of approaches, with expansion of provider-initiated testing and counseling in clinical settings (particularly antenatal and tuberculosis clinics), the introduction of more community based testing services, and use of rapid diagnostic tests enabling provision of same-day test results. However, 46% of all people living with HIV are still unaware of their serostatus, and many continue to be diagnosed and start antiretroviral therapy late. As testing and treatment scale-up accelerates for an "treat all" approach, other challenges to address include how to better focus testing and reach those yet undiagnosed and most at risk, especially key populations, men, adolescents, and children. We summarize future directions in HIV testing to speed scale-up and close gaps that are addressed in the WHO 2015 consolidated HIV testing guidelines. In contrast to HIV, action in hepatitis testing and treatment has been fragmented and limited to a few countries, and there remains a large burden of undiagnosed cases globally. We summarize key challenges in the hepatitis testing response, including lack of simple, reliable, and low-cost diagnostic tests, laboratory capacity, and testing facilities; inadequate data to guide country specific hepatitis testing approaches and who to screen; stigmatization and social

  8. The Neonatal calf Tuberculosis Vaccine Model: Immune Responses to Protective and Non-protective Vaccines after Aerosol Challenge with Virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis delta RD1 knockout and pantothenate auxotroph (mc**2 6030) vaccine failed to protect neonatal calves from a low dose, aerosol M. bovis challenge. In contrast, M. bovis bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG)-vaccinates had reduced tuberculosis-associated pathology as c...

  9. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-05-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s(-1)) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins-Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s(-1)) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  10. Performance of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Challenged with Mineral Aerosols of Different Particle Size Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Peter; Thorpe, Andrew; Echt, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that the performance of respirable samplers may vary when exposed to dust aerosols with different particle sizes and wind speeds. This study investigated the performance of the GK 4.16 (RASCAL), GK 2.69, PPI 8, and FSP 10, high flow rate personal samplers when exposed to aerosols of mineral dust in a wind tunnel at two different wind speeds (1 and 2 m s−1) and orientations (towards and side-on to the source of emission). The mass median aerodynamic diameter of four aerosolized test dusts ranged from 8 to 25 µm with geometric standard deviations from 1.6 to 2 µm. The performance of each sampler type was compared with that of the SIMPEDS (Higgins–Dewell design) sampler. There was slight evidence to suggest that the performance of the FSP 10 is affected by the direction of the inlet relative to the air flow, although this was not significant when most respirable dust concentrations were compared, possibly due to the variability of paired dust concentration results. The GK 2.69, RASCAL, and PPI 8 samplers had similar performances, although the results when side-on to the emission source were generally slightly lower than the SIMPEDS. Despite slight differences between respirable dust concentrations the respirable crystalline silica values were not significantly different from the SIMPEDS. The GK family of cyclones obtained most precise results and more closely matched the SIMPEDS. A comparison with dust concentration results from previous calm air chamber studies (where wind speeds were < 0.4 m s−1) found that the relative performance between samplers was similar to those observed in this work indicating consistent performance relative to the SIMPEDS in both calm and moving air. PMID:26865560

  11. Pigs aerogenously immunized with genetically inactivated (ghosts) or irradiated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae are protected against a homologous aerosol challenge despite differing in pulmonary cellular and antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Katinger, A; Lubitz, W; Szostak, M P; Stadler, M; Klein, R; Indra, A; Huter, V; Hensel, A

    1999-08-20

    Aerosol immunization is a safe way to induce complete protection against pleuropneumonia in pigs caused by the lung pathogenic bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. In order to determine the local immune responses of vaccinees in concomitant with protection, lung lining fluid before and 3 weeks after immunization from pigs immunized three times with aerosols of either genetically inactivated ghosts which represent whole cell envelope preparations, or irradiated bacteria were examined following an homologous aerosol challenge. Specific antibody isotypes in the bronchoalveolar lavage were assayed by whole cell ELISAs. Total and relative numbers of cells including lymphocyte subsets were determined. In both vaccinated groups a net influx of plasma cells and lymphocytes, as well as a significant increase of specific IgG occurred. Concurrently, the CD4+/CD8+ ratio was found to increase after aerosol immunization. The lymphocyte subsets of IgG+ and IgA+ cells were found significantly higher in the group immunized with irradiated bacteria when compared to pigs immunized with bacterial ghosts. The latter group showed a significant increase of IgA, IgM, and a net influx of lymphoid blasts and granulocytes in the bronchoalveolar lining fluid. Although differences between the local immune responses of both immunized groups occurred, a significant increase of specific IgG and a net influx of plasma cells and lymphocytes were found to be associated with complete protection against a homologous aerosol challenge infection.

  12. Modeling aerosol activation in a tropical, orographic, island setting: Sensitivity tests and comparison with observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Storelvmo, T.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol, updraft and cloud droplet observations from the 2011 Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) field campaign provide an interesting opportunity to investigate the process of cloud droplet activation in a tropical, orographic, convective setting. This study involves adiabatic parcel model simulations with a state-of-the-art parameterization of droplet activation, which we run with aerosol size distributions and updraft velocities based on DOMEX data. We compare the cloud droplet concentrations predicted by the parameterization with the observations from DOMEX, and run various sensitivity tests to changes in model inputs on the order of their uncertainty, in order to gain insights into what factors are most important in determining the aerosol activation fraction in this setting. Our control simulations overestimated the observed droplet concentrations, especially for the days with strong trade winds, but in most cases these discrepancies could be eliminated by realistic changes in our assumptions. The remaining error could be the result of entrainment of sub-saturated air, precipitation, or advection of pre-existing clouds from upwind. We found strong sensitivities to the mean updraft velocity and to the size distribution and composition of particles in the Aitken mode, the smallest mode including particles below 100 nm. The Aitken mode accounted for 42% to 68% of the simulated droplet concentration in our control simulations, and simulations excluding the Aitken mode underestimated the observed droplet concentrations under realistic assumptions. Droplets from the Aitken mode dominated the changes in the simulated droplet concentrations in our sensitivity tests. The precision of our simulations, and our ability to constrain the role of the Aitken mode, were limited by our lack of knowledge of the composition and size distribution of Aitken mode particles, highlighting the importance of measuring these variables in field campaigns in similar settings.

  13. Caffeine challenge test and panic disorder: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Vilarim, Marina Machado; Rocha Araujo, Daniele Marano; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to examine the results of studies that have investigated the induction of panic attacks and/or the anxiogenic effect of the caffeine challenge test in patients with panic disorder. The literature search was performed in PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde and the ISI Web of Knowledge. The words used for the search were caffeine, caffeine challenge test, panic disorder, panic attacks and anxiety disorder. In total, we selected eight randomized, double-blind studies where caffeine was administered orally, and none of them controlled for confounding factors in the analysis. The percentage of loss during follow-up ranged between 14.3% and 73.1%. The eight studies all showed a positive association between caffeine and anxiogenic effects and/or panic disorder.

  14. SIM instrument integration and test challenges: PKT & FAST testbed influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosdat, Helmuth; Duncan, Alan L.

    2003-02-01

    At first glance the SIM concept seems deceptively simple. After all, its primary task is just to lock two interferometers on to a couple of bright guide stars and let the third integrate photons from a dim 'science' star to gather astrometric data. The difficulty is of course in the details of the performance requirements and overall integration and test risk associated with their verification. The challenge is to provide a meaningful verification of the SIM functionality on the ground that can be extrapolated to show satisfaction of the on-orbit performance requirements. The associated difficulties relate to the ability to provide a reasonable simulation of (1) the space environment with all the implications and (2) the creation of simulated target stars for each interferometer input optics that meet the associated wave front characteristic and star position knowledge requirements. The difficulty and complexity of the simulation of target stars itself is a major development challenge and program risk. In order to reduce this risk early development test beds are created to evolve the optical verification concept and build the actual devices needed for the flight system performance evaluation. The role of the PKT and FAST (Flight System Astrometric Test bed) test beds and their influence on flight integration risk reduction and test process is presented.

  15. Challenges to Integrating Pharmacogenetic Testing into Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Some have proposed the integration of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing into medication therapy management (MTM) to enable further refinement of treatment(s) to reduce risk of adverse responses and improve efficacy. PGx testing involves the analysis of genetic variants associated with therapeutic or adverse response and may be useful in enhancing the ability to identify ineffective and/or harmful drugs or drug combinations. This “enhanced” MTM might also reduce patient concerns about side effects and increase confidence that the medication is effective, addressing two key factors that impact patient adherence - concern and necessity. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of PGx testing into MTM in clinical practice has not yet been determined. Objectives In this paper, we consider some of the challenges to the integration and delivery of PGx testing in MTM services. What is already known about this subject While the addition of pharmacogenetic testing has been suggested, little literature exists exploring the challenges or feasibility of doing so. PMID:25803768

  16. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  17. Verification Challenges of Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a test facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas for performing dynamic verification of space structures and hardware. Some examples of past and current tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility is able to integrate a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or demating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is utilized for input to the simulation during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents many unique challenges, one particular area of interest is with respect to the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. There are many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) measurement systems available on the market, and the test facility measurement systems have evolved over time to include two separate COTS systems. The first system incorporates infra-red sensing cameras, while the second system employs a laser interferometer to determine position and orientation data. The specific technical challenges with the measurement systems in a large dynamic environment include changing thermal and humidity levels, operational area and measurement volume, dynamic tracking, and data synchronization. The facility is located in an expansive high-bay area that is occasionally exposed to outside temperature when large retractable doors at each end of the building are opened. The laser interferometer system, in particular, is vulnerable to the environmental changes in the building. The operational area of the test facility itself is sizeable, ranging from seven meters wide and five meters deep to as much as seven meters high. Both facility measurement systems have desirable measurement volumes and the accuracies vary

  18. Construction, Modeling and Testing of a Low-Flow, Large-Diameter Aerosol Flow System for the Study of the Formation and Reactions of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezell, M. J.; Johnson, S. N.; Yu, Y.; Pokkunuri, P.; Perraud, V.; Bruns, E.; Alexander, M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Dabdub, D.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A unique, high-volume, low-flow, stainless steel aerosol flow system for the study of the formation and reactions of aerosols relevant to the troposphere has been constructed, modeled and experimentally tested. The total flow tube length is 7.3 m which includes a 1.2 m section used for mixing. The flow tube is equipped with ultraviolet lamps for photolysis. The diameter of 0.45 m results in a smaller surface to volume ratio than is found in many other flow systems and reduces the contribution of wall reactions. The latter is also reduced by frequent cleaning of the flow tube walls which is feasible due to the ease of disassembly of the flow tube. Flow systems present a major advantage over chamber studies in that continuous sampling under stable conditions over long periods of time is possible, increasing the amount of sample available for analysis and permitting a wide variety of analytical techniques to be applied simultaneously. In this system, the large volume (1000 L) and low flow speed (2 cm/minute) result in a residence time of nearly an hour; and equally spaced sampling ports allow for time-resolved measurements of aerosol and gas-phase products. The central features of this system have been modeled using computational fluid dynamics software and experimentally probed using inert gases and aerosols. Instrumentation attached directly to this flow system includes a NOx analyzer, an ozone analyzer, relative humidity and temperature probes, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) spectrometer, an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) spectrometer, GC-MS, integrating nephelometer, and FTIR. Particles are collected using impactors and filters, and analyzed by a variety of techniques including FTIR, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS), GC-MS, HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS. In addition, for selected studies, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), a single particle mass spectrometer (SPLAT II) and

  19. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl) / chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm), and also in terms of aerosol composition. Finally, considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems

  20. Challenges of the Cassini Test Bed Simulating the Saturnian Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Juan C.; Badaruddin, Kareem S.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a joint NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) mission to collect scientific data of the Saturnian system and is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). After having arrived in Saturn orbit and releasing the ESA's Huygens probe for a highly successful descent and landing mission on Saturn's moon Titan, the Cassini orbiter continues on its tour of Saturn, its satellites, and the Saturnian environment. JPL's Cassini Integrated Test laboratory (ITL) is a dedicated high fidelity test bed that verifies and validates command sequences and flight software before upload to the Cassini spacecraft. The ITL provides artificial stimuli that allow a highly accurate hardware-in-the-loop test bed model that tests the operation of the Cassini spacecraft on the ground. This enables accurate prediction and recreation of mission events and flight software and hardware behavior. As we discovered more about the Saturnian environment, a combination of creative test methods and simulation changes were necessary to simulate the harmful effect that the optical and physical environment has on the pointing performance of Cassini. This paper presents the challenges experienced and overcome in that endeavor to simulate and test the post Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) and Probe Relay tour phase of the Cassini mission.

  1. Characterization of atmospheric aerosols from infrared measurements: simulations, testing, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zasetsky, Alexander Yu; Khalizov, Alexei F; Sloan, James J

    2004-10-10

    An inversion method for the characterization of atmospheric condensed phases from infrared (IR) spectra is described. The method is tested with both synthetic IR spectra and the spectra of particles that flow in a cryogenic flow tube. The method is applied to the IR spectra recorded by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy instrument carried by the Space Shuttle during three missions in 1992, 1993, and 1994. The volume density and particle size distribution for sulfate aerosol are obtained as a function of altitude. The density and size distribution of ice particles in several cirrus clouds are also retrieved. The probable radius of the ice particles in the high-altitude (10-15-km) cirrus clouds is found to be approximately 6-7 microm.

  2. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  3. Genetic testing in nephrotic syndrome--challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed A; Winn, Michelle P; Smoyer, William E

    2013-03-01

    Monogenic nephrotic syndrome (nephrotic syndrome caused by a single gene defect) is responsible for only a small percentage of cases of nephrotic syndrome, but information from studies of the unique cohort of patients with this form of the disease has dramatically improved our understanding of the disease pathogenesis. The use of genetic testing in the management of children and adults with nephrotic syndrome poses unique challenges for clinicians in terms of who to test and how to use the information obtained from testing in the clinical setting. In our view, not enough data exist at present to justify the routine genetic testing of all patients with nephrotic syndrome. Testing is warranted, however, in patients with congenital nephrotic syndrome (onset at 0-3 months), infantile nephrotic syndrome (onset at 3-12 months), a family history of nephrotic syndrome, and those in whom nephrotic syndrome is associated with other congenital malformations. The family and/or the patient should be given complete and unbiased information on the potential benefits and risks associated with therapy, including the reported outcomes of treatment in patients with similar mutations. Based on the data available in the literature so far, intensive immunosuppressive treatment is probably not indicated in monogenic nephrotic syndrome if complete or partial remission has not been achieved within 6 weeks of starting treatment. We advocate that family members of individuals with genetic forms of nephrotic syndrome undergo routine genetic testing prior to living-related kidney transplantation. Prospective, multicentre studies are needed to more completely determine the burden of disease caused by monogenic nephrotic syndrome, and randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the presence or absence of clinical responses of monogenic nephrotic syndrome to available therapies.

  4. Results of the "carbon conference" international aerosol carbon round robin test stage I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Heidrun; Laskus, Lothar; Jürgen Abraham, Hans; Baltensperger, Urs; Lavanchy, Vincent; Bizjak, Mirko; Burba, Peter; Cachier, Helene; Crow, Dale; Chow, Judith; Gnauk, Thomas; Even, Arja; ten Brink, H. M.; Giesen, Klaus-Peter; Hitzenberger, Regina; Hueglin, Christoph; Maenhaut, Willy; Pio, Casimiro; Carvalho, Abel; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Toom-Sauntry, Desiree; Puxbaum, Hans

    An international round robin test on the analysis of carbonaceous aerosols on quartz fiber filters sampled at an urban site was organized by the Vienna University of Technology. Seventeen laboratories participated using nine different thermal and optical methods. For the analysis of total carbon (TC), a good agreement of the values obtained by all laboratories was found (7 and 9% r.s.d.) with only two outliers in the complete data set. In contrast the results of the determination of elemental carbon (EC) in two not pre-extracted samples were highly variable ranging over more than one order of magnitude and the relative standard deviations (r.s.d.) of the means were 36.6 and 45.5%. The laboratories that obtained similar results by using methods which reduce the charring artifact were put together to a new data set in order to approach a "real EC" value. The new data set consisting of the results of 10 laboratories using seven different methods showed 16 and 24% lower averages and r.s.d. of 14 and 24% for the two not pre-extracted samples. Taking the current filters as "equivalents" for urban aerosol samples we conclude that the following methods can be used for the analysis of EC in carbonaceous aerosols: thermal methods with an optical feature to correct for charring during pyrolysis, two-step thermal procedures reducing charring during pyrolysis, the VDI 2465/1 method (removal of OC by solvent extraction and thermodesorption in nitrogen) and the VDI 2465/2 method (combustion of OC and EC at different temperatures) with an additional pre-extraction with a dimethyl formamide (DMF)/toluene mixture. Only thermal methods without any correction for charring during pyrolysis and the VDI 2465/2 method were outside the range of twice the standard deviation of the new data set. For a filter sample pre-extracted with the DMF/toluene mixture the average and r.s.d. from all laboratories (20.7 μgC; 24.4% r.s.d.) was very similar as for the laboratory set reduced to 10

  5. Organotypic liver culture models: Meeting current challenges in toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    LeCluyse, Edward L.; Witek, Rafal P.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Powers, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment. PMID:22582993

  6. New challenge of field testing dense WDM systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Lynn

    1998-09-01

    Dense wavelength-division multiplexing fiber-optic techniques hold great promise as tools to address many of the challenges facing communication system operators. This new technical solution can increase the capacity of existing networks without the need for expensive re-cabling and is also an open door toward all optical network design. But the many advantages they offer come at a price: optical component properties and cable characteristics must be addressed that could safely be neglected in systems using simpler transmission techniques. The new spectral dimension brought by testing capabilities must now be provided to the field, capabilities that are usable by maintenance personnel working in conditions that are very different from those in the stable, controlled laboratory environment.

  7. Rapid HIV testing for developing countries: the challenge of false-negative tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogev, Ram

    2012-06-01

    It is a common practice in resource-constrained countries to accept two positive rapid HIV antibody test results as diagnostic for HIV infection. Because these tests are inexpensive and results are obtained quickly, they are recommended by the WHO to "scale-up" HIV testing to increase the number of people tested. The negative predictive value of rapid HIV tests is so high that negative results are considered conclusive despite the fact that false-negative results can occur in several situations. While the specificity and sensitivity of rapid HIV tests in resource-rich countries is acceptable, there are only limited data about their performance in resource-constrained countries. The challenges of rapid HIV testing in these situations will be discussed.

  8. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Oral immunization of pigs with viable or inactivated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 induces pulmonary and systemic antibodies and protects against homologous aerosol challenge.

    PubMed

    Hensel, A; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N; Petzoldt, K; Lubitz, W

    1995-08-01

    A dose-defined aerosol infection of pigs was used to study the immunogenic and protective potentials of oral immunization with dead or live Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 9 reference strain CVI 13261 against an aerogenic challenge. Pigs were vaccinated with a single dose of 10(11) CFU of viable (n = 8) or inactivated (n = 8) A. pleuropneumoniae given orally in a gelatin capsule. After 3 weeks, vaccinated pigs and nonvaccinated controls were challenged aerogenically with a dose of 10(8) CFU of A. pleuropneumoniae CVI 13261. The protective efficacy of oral immunization was evaluated by clinical and postmortem examinations. Bronchoalveolar lavage in pigs was performed during the experiment to obtain lavage samples for assessment of local antibodies. Isotype-specific antibody responses in sera and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on whole-cell antigen. Oral immunization did not induce clinical side effects. After aerosol challenge, two animals of both vaccinated groups (25% in each case) showed a moderate fever for 2 days, whereas all four pigs (100%) of the nonvaccinated control group developed severe fever. In contrast to the controls, which developed severe pleuropneumonia, the vaccinated pigs had only mild pulmonary lesions. Three weeks after challenge, 13 of 16 vaccinated pigs (81%) were found to be free of pathomorphological changes of the lungs. From two of these pigs immunized with live bacteria we were able to reisolate A. pleuropneumoniae. A significant systemic and pulmonary increase in the concentrations of immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG antibodies reactive with A. pleuropneumoniae was detectable after aerosol challenge in both vaccinated groups. Immunization with viable bacteria was found to induce significantly higher concentrations of each Ig isotype in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and sera than immunization with inactivated A. pleuropneumoniae. These serological findings were

  10. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  11. Aerosol properties from multi-spectral and multi-angular aircraft 4STAR observations: expected advantages and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Flynn, Connor; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and synthetic 4STAR-like data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband radiative fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or +/-0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or +/-0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  12. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or ±0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  13. Optical properties of urban aerosols in the region Bratislava-Vienna I. Methods and tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.; Horvath, H.; Jovanović, O.; Gangl, M.

    Aerosol optical data obtained by means of ground-based methods are applied to determine microphysical properties of aerosols in the atmosphere of Vienna-city. The measured aerosol extinction coefficient σA serves as a source of information on the ambient aerosols. A large database of extinction efficiency factors for a set of irregularly shaped as well as the spherical particles of various sizes is pre-calculated and employed in the inversion procedure. The assumed particle models differ in chemical composition and are representative for most typical aerosol systems in the urban atmospheres. All database records are taken into a regularization scheme to solve the inverse problem for aerosol size distribution using measured extinction data. In addition, subsidiary data on spectral sky radiance are successfully incorporated into the mathematical model to retrieve the information on aerosol effective refractive index in the visible. As for Vienna, the aerosol extinction is a decreasing function of wavelength in visible spectrum—it indicates the predominance of sub-micrometer-sized particles in the atmosphere. The surface distribution function s( r)=d S/d r of aerosol particles customarily peaks at radii r≈0.2-0.3 μm, while the volume distribution function v( r)=d V/d r˜ rs( r) has a mode at radii about 0.3-0.4 μm. Analysing size distributions d V/d log( r) for irregularly shaped particles it is shown that the daily profile of this function is smoothly evolving and almost typically accounts for a first mode at radii between 0.8 and 0.9 μm.

  14. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    PubMed

    Matthys, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea) an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient.Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST), which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil) or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists) including mechanical aids to reduce periodical or

  15. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea) an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient. Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST), which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil) or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists) including mechanical aids to reduce periodical or

  16. Fit for high altitude: are hypoxic challenge tests useful?

    PubMed

    Matthys, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Altitude travel results in acute variations of barometric pressure, which induce different degrees of hypoxia, changing the gas contents in body tissues and cavities. Non ventilated air containing cavities may induce barotraumas of the lung (pneumothorax), sinuses and middle ear, with pain, vertigo and hearing loss. Commercial air planes keep their cabin pressure at an equivalent altitude of about 2,500 m. This leads to an increased respiratory drive which may also result in symptoms of emotional hyperventilation. In patients with preexisting respiratory pathology due to lung, cardiovascular, pleural, thoracic neuromuscular or obesity-related diseases (i.e. obstructive sleep apnea) an additional hypoxic stress may induce respiratory pump and/or heart failure. Clinical pre-altitude assessment must be disease-specific and it includes spirometry, pulsoximetry, ECG, pulmonary and systemic hypertension assessment. In patients with abnormal values we need, in addition, measurements of hemoglobin, pH, base excess, PaO2, and PaCO2 to evaluate whether O2- and CO2-transport is sufficient.Instead of the hypoxia altitude simulation test (HAST), which is not without danger for patients with respiratory insufficiency, we prefer primarily a hyperoxic challenge. The supplementation of normobaric O2 gives us information on the acute reversibility of the arterial hypoxemia and the reduction of ventilation and pulmonary hypertension, as well as about the efficiency of the additional O2-flow needed during altitude exposure. For difficult judgements the performance of the test in a hypobaric chamber with and without supplemental O2-breathing remains the gold standard. The increasing numbers of drugs to treat acute pulmonary hypertension due to altitude exposure (acetazolamide, dexamethasone, nifedipine, sildenafil) or to other etiologies (anticoagulants, prostanoids, phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists) including mechanical aids to reduce periodical or

  17. The MICROSCOPE mission: a challenging free fall test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touboul, Pierre; Metris, Gilles; Robert, Alain; Levy, Agnes; Campergue, Gerard

    The electrostatic inertial sensors which compose the payload of the dedicated MICROSCOPE space mission include cylindrical test masses, made of different materials. Their orbital motion will be observed for the accurate test of the Universality of Free Fall, so performed with an ac-curacy of at least 10-15 . These Titanium and Platinum alloys concentric masses are maintained motion less at the center of a very accurate silica cage by means of electrostatic actuators which manage the electrical fields surrounding permanently the masses. Same gold coated electrodes are not only used for generating these electrical fields but also to measure any mass displace-ment with an accuracy better than 10-11 m by means of a well arranged set of capacitive sensors. The MICROSCOPE drag free satellite is controlled Earth pointing or rotating about the normal to the orbital plane with a very stable angular velocity. A very stringent control of the residual accelerations seen by the scientific payload itself is applied thanks to the drag free system, except the Earth common gravity field. At the selected circular orbit, with 810 km altitude and less than 5.10-3 eccentricity, the effects of the gravity gradients are carefully managed by mass centring and data corrections. On board thermal environment is also a key element of the detection of any violation of Einstein Equivalence Principle as most attempts of Grand Unification theories seem to conduct. An overview of the prepared mission is presented with the established strategies to deal with the space experiment specific challenges.

  18. Dopamine challenge tests as an indicator of psychological traits.

    PubMed

    Netter, P

    2006-03-01

    After discussing some introductory considerations about the value of challenge tests in general for discriminating personality dimensions which are considered extrapolations of psychopathological diseases, the present paper outlines the matter of responsivity to agonistic and antagonistic dopaminergic drugs or drugs of different mechanisms of action in the dopaminergic system, and elucidates that different hormones elicited by dopaminergic substances (prolactin, growth hormone) may indicate personality related differences in susceptibility of different brain areas. A further point was to demonstrate not only the well known relationship of dopaminergic hyperactivity with reward seeking and motivational factors associated with extraversion and novelty seeking, but also the relationship of dopaminergic hypofunction with the personality dimension of depression which had already been reported in studies on animals and psychiatric patients. A final point was to demonstrate that besides size of hormone responses additional parameters like time of response onset and initial prolactin increase can be used as biochemical indicators for identifying certain personality types, like highly depressive neurotic persons characterized by lower and later dopamine responses as compared to low depressives, and extraverted sensation-seeking types responding by an initial prolactin peak as opposed to low sensation seekers.

  19. Challenges of genetic testing in adolescents with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lilian Liou; Stolerman, Marina; Walsh, Christine; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2012-03-01

    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and prevent others from occurring. This genetic knowledge, discovered posthumously in many cases, has implications for clinical care for surviving family members who might carry the same mutations. The information obtained from genetic testing, in the context of personal and family history, can guide individually tailored interventions that reduce risk and save lives. At the same time, obtaining and disclosing genetic information raises difficult issues about confidentiality and decision making within families. We draw on the experience of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics, which has played a leading role in the genetic diagnosis and clinical management of cardiac channel diseases, to explore some of the challenging ethical questions arising in affected families with adolescent children. We focus on the related issues of (1) family confidentiality, privacy and disclosure and (2) adolescent decision making about genetic risk, and argue for the value of interdisciplinary dialogue with affected families in resolving these issues.

  20. Challenges of genetic testing in adolescents with cardiac arrhythmia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lilian Liou; Stolerman, Marina; Walsh, Christine; Wasserman, David; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to sequence individual genomes is leading to the identification of an increasing number of genetic risk factors for serious diseases. Knowledge of these risk factors can often provide significant medical and psychological benefit, but also raises complex ethical and social issues. This paper focuses on one area of rapid progress: the identification of mutations causing long QT syndrome and other cardiac channel disorders, which can explain some previously unexplained deaths in infants (SIDS) and children and adults (SUDS) and prevent others from occurring. This genetic knowledge, discovered posthumously in many cases, has implications for clinical care for surviving family members who might carry the same mutations. The information obtained from genetic testing, in the context of personal and family history, can guide individually tailored interventions that reduce risk and save lives. At the same time, obtaining and disclosing genetic information raises difficult issues about confidentiality and decision making within families. We draw on the experience of the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cardiogenetics, which has played a leading role in the genetic diagnosis and clinical management of cardiac channel diseases, to explore some of the challenging ethical questions arising in affected families with adolescent children. We focus on the related issues of (1) family confidentiality, privacy and disclosure and (2) adolescent decision making about genetic risk, and argue for the value of interdisciplinary dialogue with affected families in resolving these issues. PMID:21955955

  1. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products.

  2. Selectivity Across the Interface: A Test of Surface Activity in the Composition of Organic-Enriched Aerosols from Bubble Bursting.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Richard E; Jayarathne, Thilina; Stone, Elizabeth A; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-05-01

    Although theories have been developed that describe surface activity of organic molecules at the air-water interface, few studies have tested how surface activity impacts the selective transfer of molecules from solution phase into the aerosol phase during bubble bursting. The selective transfer of a series of organic compounds that differ in their solubility and surface activity from solution into the aerosol phase is quantified experimentally for the first time. Aerosol was produced from solutions containing salts and a series of linear carboxlyates (LCs) and dicarboxylates (LDCs) using a bubble bursting process. Surface activity of these molecules dominated the transport across the interface, with enrichment factors of the more surface-active C4-C8 LCs (55 ± 8) being greater than those of C4-C8 LDCs (5 ± 1). Trends in the estimated surface concentrations of LCs at the liquid-air interface agreed well with their relative concentrations in the aerosol phase. In addition, enrichment of LCs was followed by enrichment of calcium with respect to other inorganic cations and depletion of chloride and sulfate. PMID:27093579

  3. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air–liquid interface cytotoxicity test

    PubMed Central

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  4. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  5. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  6. EDITORIAL: Aerosol cloud interactions—a challenge for measurements and modeling at the cutting edge of cloud climate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2008-04-01

    Research in aerosol properties and cloud characteristics have historically been considered two separate disciplines within the field of atmospheric science. As such, it has been uncommon for a single researcher, or even research group, to have considerable expertise in both subject areas. The recent attention paid to global climate change has shown that clouds can have a considerable effect on the Earth's climate and that one of the most uncertain aspects in their formation, persistence, and ultimate dissipation is the role played by aerosols. This highlights the need for researchers in both disciplines to interact more closely than they have in the past. This is the vision behind this focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Certain interactions between aerosols and clouds are relatively well studied and understood. For example, it is known that an increase in the aerosol concentration will increase the number of droplets in warm clouds, decrease their average size, reduce the rate of precipitation, and extend the lifetime. Other effects are not as well known. For example, persistent ice super-saturated conditions are observed in the upper troposphere that appear to exceed our understanding of the conditions required for cirrus cloud formation. Further, the interplay of dynamics versus effects purely attributed to aerosols remains highly uncertain. The purpose of this focus issue is to consider the current state of knowledge of aerosol/cloud interactions, to define the contemporary uncertainties, and to outline research foci as we strive to better understand the Earth's climate system. This focus issue brings together laboratory experiments, field data, and model studies. The authors address issues associated with warm liquid water, cold ice, and intermediate temperature mixed-phase clouds. The topics include the uncertainty associated with the effect of black carbon and organics, aerosol types of anthropogenic interest, on droplet and ice formation. Phases

  7. Development and Testing of the New Surface LER Climatology for OMI UV Aerosol Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Pawan; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Ahn, Changwoo

    2014-01-01

    Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard Aura satellite retrieved aerosols properties using UV part of solar spectrum. The OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) is a global inversion scheme which retrieves aerosol properties both over ocean and land. The current version of the algorithm makes use of TOMS derived Lambertian Equivalent Reflectance (LER) climatology. A new monthly climatology of surface LER at 354 and 388 nm have been developed. This will replace TOMS LER (380 nm and 354nm) climatology in OMI near UV aerosol retrieval algorithm. The main objectives of this study is to produce high resolution (quarter degree) surface LER sets as compared to existing one degree TOMS surface LERs, to product instrument and wavelength consistent surface climatology. Nine years of OMI observations have been used to derive monthly climatology of surface LER. MODIS derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used to make aerosol corrections on OMI wavelengths. MODIS derived BRDF adjusted reflectance product has been also used to capture seasonal changes in the surface characteristics. Finally spatial and temporal averaging techniques have been used to fill the gaps around the globes, especially in the regions with consistent cloud cover such as Amazon. After implementation of new surface data in the research version of algorithm, comparisons of AOD and single scattering albedo (SSA) have been performed over global AERONET sites for year 2007. Preliminary results shows improvements in AOD retrievals globally but more significance improvement were observed over desert and bright locations. We will present methodology of deriving surface data sets and will discuss the observed changes in retrieved aerosol properties with respect to reference AERONET measurements.

  8. An analysis of global aerosol type as retrieved by MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Gaitley, Barbara J.

    2015-05-01

    In addition to aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol type is required globally for climate forcing calculations, constraining aerosol transport models and other applications. However, validating satellite aerosol-type retrievals is more challenging than testing AOD results, because aerosol type is a more complex quantity, and ground truth data are far less numerous and generally not as robust. We evaluate the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) Version 22 aerosol-type retrievals by assessing product self-consistency on a regional basis and by making comparisons with general expectation and with the Aerosol Robotic Network aerosol-type climatology, as available. The results confirm and add detail to the observation that aerosol-type discrimination improves dramatically where midvisible AOD exceeds about 0.15 or 0.2. When the aerosol-type information content of the observations is relatively low, increased scattering-angle range improves particle-type sensitivity. The MISR standard, operational product discriminates among small, medium, and large particles and exhibits qualitative sensitivity to single-scattering albedo (SSA) under good aerosol-type retrieval conditions, providing a categorical aerosol-type classification. MISR Ångström exponent deviates systematically from ground truth where particle types missing from the algorithm climatology are present, or where cloud contamination is likely to occur, and SSA tends to be overestimated where absorbing particles are found. We determined that the number of mixtures passing the algorithm acceptance criteria (#SuccMix) represents aerosol-type retrieval quality effectively, providing a useful aerosol-type quality flag.

  9. [A simple testing installation for the production of aerosols with constant bacteria-contaminated concentrations].

    PubMed

    Herbst, M; Lehmhus, H; Oldenburg, B; Orlowski, C; Ohgke, H

    1983-04-01

    A simple experimental set for the production and investigation of bacterially contaminated solid-state aerosols with constant concentration is described. The experimental set consists mainly of a fluidized bed-particle generator within a modified chamber for formaldehyde desinfection. The special conditions for the production of a defined concentration of particles and microorganisms are to be found out empirically. In a first application aerosol-sizing of an Andersen sampler is investigated. The findings of Andersen (1) are confirmed with respect to our experimental conditions.

  10. Demonstration of the Applicability of Novel Photoacoustic Aerosol Monitor for Optical Absorption Coefficient Determination. Laboratory and Field Test.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Schnaiter, M.; Linke, C.; Vragel, M.; Filep, Á.; Fődi, L.; Motika, G.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2009-04-01

    apportionment studies. The present system was successfully tested both under the laboratory and field circumstances. The results of these studied, demonstrated here, is shown excellent agreements with reference methods and presents the main characteristic performances of the system verifying the potential of Wasul-MuWaPas to characterizing the spectral properties of atmospheric aerosols. These researches were funded by Hungarian Ministry of Economy and Transport NKFP_07_A4_AEROS_EU.

  11. EMC Test Challenges for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloskey, John

    2016-01-01

    This presentation describes the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests performed on the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM), the science payload of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in August 2015. By its very nature of being an integrated payload, it could be treated as neither a unit level test nor an integrated spacecraft observatory test. Non-standard test criteria are described along with non-standard test methods that had to be developed in order to evaluate them. Results are presented to demonstrate that all test criteria were met in less than the time allocated.

  12. Development of a fungal spore aerosol generator: test with Cladosporium cladosporioides and Penicillium citrinum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Uk; Kim, Young Joong; Lee, Chang Ho; Yun, Sun Hwa; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Ji, Jun-Ho

    2008-04-01

    As the first step to develop efficient means to control fungal spore bioaerosols, we designed, manufactured, and evaluated a fungal spore aerosol generator. We studied the physical and biological properties of the fungal spore bioaerosols on two common fungal species. The results demonstrated that the fungal spore bioaerosol generator effectively produces fungal spore bioaerosols.

  13. Basophil activation test: food challenge in a test tube or specialist research tool?

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandra F; Lack, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Oral food challenge (OFC) is the gold-standard to diagnose food allergy; however, it is a labour and resource-intensive procedure with the risk of causing an acute allergic reaction, which is potentially severe. Therefore, OFC are reserved for cases where the clinical history and the results of skin prick test and/or specific IgE do not confirm or exclude the diagnosis of food allergy. This is a significant proportion of patients seen in Allergy clinics and results in a high demand for OFC. The basophil activation test (BAT) has emerged as a new diagnostic test for food allergy. With high diagnostic accuracy, it can be particularly helpful in the cases where skin prick test and specific IgE are equivocal and may allow reducing the need for OFC. BAT has high specificity, which confers a high degree of certainty in confirming the diagnosis of food allergy and allows deferring the performance of OFC in patients with a positive BAT. The diagnostic utility of BAT is allergen-specific and needs to be validated for different allergens and in specific patient populations. Standardisation of the laboratory methodology and of the data analyses would help to enable a wider clinical application of BAT. PMID:26981234

  14. Basophil activation test: food challenge in a test tube or specialist research tool?

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandra F; Lack, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Oral food challenge (OFC) is the gold-standard to diagnose food allergy; however, it is a labour and resource-intensive procedure with the risk of causing an acute allergic reaction, which is potentially severe. Therefore, OFC are reserved for cases where the clinical history and the results of skin prick test and/or specific IgE do not confirm or exclude the diagnosis of food allergy. This is a significant proportion of patients seen in Allergy clinics and results in a high demand for OFC. The basophil activation test (BAT) has emerged as a new diagnostic test for food allergy. With high diagnostic accuracy, it can be particularly helpful in the cases where skin prick test and specific IgE are equivocal and may allow reducing the need for OFC. BAT has high specificity, which confers a high degree of certainty in confirming the diagnosis of food allergy and allows deferring the performance of OFC in patients with a positive BAT. The diagnostic utility of BAT is allergen-specific and needs to be validated for different allergens and in specific patient populations. Standardisation of the laboratory methodology and of the data analyses would help to enable a wider clinical application of BAT.

  15. [Non-invasive prenatal testing: challenges for future implementation].

    PubMed

    Henneman, Lidewij; Page-Chrisiaens, G C M L Lieve; Oepkes, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) is an accurate and safe test in which blood from the pregnant woman is used to investigate if the unborn child possibly has trisomy 21 (Down's syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards' syndrome) or trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome). Since April 2014 the NIPT has been available in the Netherlands as part of the TRIDENT implementation project for those in whom the first trimester combined test showed an elevated risk (> 1:200) of trisomy, or on medical indication, as an alternative to chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis. Since the introduction of the NIPT the use of these invasive tests, which are associated with a risk of miscarriage, has fallen steeply. The NIPT may replace the combined test. Also the number of conditions that is tested for can be increased. Modification of current prenatal screening will require extensive discussion, but whatever the modification, careful counseling remains essential to facilitate pregnant women's autonomous reproductive decision making. PMID:26530119

  16. The challenge of realistic testing of multiphase flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Sten-Halvorsen, V.

    1995-12-31

    Multiphase flowmeters is new technology for the oil industry, and needs to be tested under realistic conditions to prove their performance. The complex nature of multiphase flow, means that test conditions in a laboratory may not necessarily represent the real flow conditions at a field installation. As a consequence, severe field testing is also required to gain experience with the meters and qualify them for field applications.

  17. Design, Development and Test Challenges: Separation Mechanisms for the Orion Pad Abort-1 Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinsel, Alison; Morrey, Jeremy M.; OMalley, Patrick; Park, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    On May 6, 2010, NASA launched the first successful integrated flight test, Pad Abort-1, of the Orion Project from the White Sands Missile Range in Las Cruces, New Mexico. This test demonstrated the ability to perform an emergency pad abort of a full-scale 4.8 m diameter, 8200 kg crew capsule. During development of the critical separation mechanisms for this flight test, various challenges were overcome related to environments definition, installation complications, separation joint retraction speed, thruster ordnance development issues, load path validation and significant design loads increases. The Launch Abort System retention and release (LAS R&R) mechanism consisted of 6 discrete structural connections between the LAS and the crew module (CM) simulator, each of which had a preloaded tension tie, Superbolt torque-nut and frangible nut. During the flight test, the frangible nuts were pyrotechnically split, permitting the CM to separate from the LAS. The LAS separation event was the driving case in the shock environment for many co-located hardware items. During development testing, it was necessary to measure the source shock during the separation event so the predicted shock environment could be validated and used for certification testing of multiple hardware items. The Lockheed Martin test team measured the source separation shock due to the LAS R&R function, which dramatically decreased the predicted environment by 90% at 100 Hz. During development testing a hydraulic tensioner was used to preload the joint; however, the joint relaxation with the tensioner proved unsatisfactory so the design was modified to include a Superbolt torque-nut. The observed preload creep during lab testing was 4% after 30 days, with 2.5% occurring in the first 24 hours. The conversion of strain energy (preload) to kinetic energy (retraction) was measured to be 50-75%. Design features and careful monitoring of multiple strain gauges on each tension tie allowed a pure tensile load

  18. A Technical and Cost Perspective on Radiation Testing Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohen, Lewis M.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation detailing costs and technical perspectives on radiation testing is shown. The topics include: 1) Introduction - a Changing Microelectronics World; 2) Sample Technology Changes and Related Impacts on Radiation Testing; 3) Perspective on the "New" Cost or Doing Business; and 4) Considerations.

  19. The Math Challenge: Preparing for the GED Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanthournout, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Significant changes in the General Educational Development Math Test require a change in teaching methods. A structured problem-solving approach focused on applying principles and interpreting abstract data will stress process as well as content as required by the test. (SK)

  20. A proposed optical test for Popper's challenge to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reintjes, J.; Bashkansky, Mark

    2016-05-01

    We describe an optical configuration that is predicted to exhibit the behavior described by Popper in his challenge to conventional quantum mechanics. Popper rejected this behavior on the grounds that it was unphysical because it relied on observer knowledge as a causative agent. We offer an interpretation in which the behavior arises simply out of the mode properties of an entangled system. In this interpretation the observer knowledge reveals in which mode an excitation occurs, but does not affect future behavior as asserted by Popper. We also discuss the relation of our system to the quantum eraser.

  1. The Challenges of Meeting the "Standards": A Perspective from the Test Publishing Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, William G.

    2006-01-01

    Some of the challenges that test publishers face in constructing educational assessments that meet high technical quality as prescribed in the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" (AERA, APA, NCME, 1999) are examined. Federal educational initiatives are used to illustrate demands on technical quality that challenge the efforts of…

  2. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  3. Characterizing particulate matter emissions from vehicles: chassis-dynamometer tests using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, S.; Zhang, Q.; Forestieri, S.; Kleeman, M.; Cappa, C. D.; Kuwayama, T.

    2012-12-01

    During September of 2011 a suite of real-time instruments was used to sample vehicle emissions at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Schmidt facility in El Monte, CA. A representative fleet of 8 spark ignition gasoline vehicles, a diesel passenger vehicle, a gasoline direct-injection vehicle and an ultra-low emissions vehicle were tested on a chassis dynamometer. The emissions were sampled into the facility's standard CVS tunnel and diluted to atmospherically relevant levels (5-30 μg/m3) while controlling other factors such as relative humidity or background black carbon particulate loading concentrations. An Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-MS) was among the real-time instruments used and sampled vehicle emissions at 10 second time resolution in order to characterize the non-refractory organic and inorganic particulate matter (PM). PM composition and concentration were tracked throughout the cold start driving cycle which included periods of fast acceleration and high velocity cruise control, meant to recreate typical commuter driving behavior. Variations in inorganic and organic PM composition for a given vehicle throughout the driving cycle as well as for various vehicles with differing emissions loading were characterized. Differences in PM composition for a given vehicle whose emissions are being exposed to differing experimental conditions such as varying relative humidity will also be reported. In conjunction with measurements from a Multi Wavelength Photoacoustic Black Carbon Spectrometer (MWPA-BC) and real-time gas measurements from the CARB facility, we determine the real-time emission ratios of primary organic aerosols (POA) with respect to BC and common combustion gas phase pollutants and compared to different vehicle driving conditions. The results of these tests offer the vehicle emissions community a first time glimpse at the real-time behavior of vehicle PM emissions for a variety of conditions and

  4. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Hatch, Courtney D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-07-01

    Aerosols represent an important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Because aerosols are composed of solid and liquid particles of varying chemical complexity, size, and phase, large challenges exist in understanding how they impact climate, health, and the chemistry of the atmosphere. Only through the integration of field, laboratory, and modeling analysis can we begin to unravel the roles atmospheric aerosols play in these global processes. In this article, we provide a brief review of the current state of the science in the analysis of atmospheric aerosols and some important challenges that need to be overcome before they can become fully integrated. It is clear that only when these areas are effectively bridged can we fully understand the impact that atmospheric aerosols have on our environment and the Earth's system at the level of scientific certainty necessary to design and implement sound environmental policies.

  5. Aerosol Delivery of a Candidate Universal Influenza Vaccine Reduces Viral Load in Pigs Challenged with Pandemic H1N1 Virus

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Sophie B.; Hemmink, Johanneke D.; Porter, Emily; Harley, Ross; Shelton, Holly; Aramouni, Mario; Everett, Helen E.; Brookes, Sharon M.; Bailey, Michael; Townsend, Alain M.; Charleston, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are a major health threat to livestock and humans, causing considerable mortality, morbidity, and economic loss. Current inactivated influenza vaccines are strain specific and new vaccines need to be produced at frequent intervals to combat newly arising influenza virus strains, so that a universal vaccine is highly desirable. We show that pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in which the hemagglutinin signal sequence has been suppressed (S-FLU), when administered to pigs by aerosol can induce CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Neutralizing Ab was not produced. Detection of a BAL response correlated with a reduction in viral titer in nasal swabs and lungs, following challenge with H1N1 pandemic virus. Intratracheal immunization with a higher dose of a heterologous H5N1 S-FLU vaccine induced weaker BAL and stronger tracheobronchial lymph node responses and a lesser reduction in viral titer. We conclude that local cellular immune responses are important for protection against influenza A virus infection, that these can be most efficiently induced by aerosol immunization targeting the lower respiratory tract, and that S-FLU is a promising universal influenza vaccine candidate. PMID:27183611

  6. Aerosol Delivery of a Candidate Universal Influenza Vaccine Reduces Viral Load in Pigs Challenged with Pandemic H1N1 Virus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Sophie B; Hemmink, Johanneke D; Porter, Emily; Harley, Ross; Shelton, Holly; Aramouni, Mario; Everett, Helen E; Brookes, Sharon M; Bailey, Michael; Townsend, Alain M; Charleston, Bryan; Tchilian, Elma

    2016-06-15

    Influenza A viruses are a major health threat to livestock and humans, causing considerable mortality, morbidity, and economic loss. Current inactivated influenza vaccines are strain specific and new vaccines need to be produced at frequent intervals to combat newly arising influenza virus strains, so that a universal vaccine is highly desirable. We show that pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in which the hemagglutinin signal sequence has been suppressed (S-FLU), when administered to pigs by aerosol can induce CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and tracheobronchial lymph nodes. Neutralizing Ab was not produced. Detection of a BAL response correlated with a reduction in viral titer in nasal swabs and lungs, following challenge with H1N1 pandemic virus. Intratracheal immunization with a higher dose of a heterologous H5N1 S-FLU vaccine induced weaker BAL and stronger tracheobronchial lymph node responses and a lesser reduction in viral titer. We conclude that local cellular immune responses are important for protection against influenza A virus infection, that these can be most efficiently induced by aerosol immunization targeting the lower respiratory tract, and that S-FLU is a promising universal influenza vaccine candidate. PMID:27183611

  7. Digynic triploidy: utility and challenges of noninvasive prenatal testing

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, Julie; Shenoy, Archana; Goetzinger, Katherine; Cottrell, Catherine E; Baldridge, Dustin; White, Frances V; Shinawi, Marwan

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Low fraction fetal DNA in noninvasive prenatal testing in the context of fetal growth restriction and multiple congenital anomalies should alert medical professionals to the possibility of digynic triploidy. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray can detect the parental origin of triploidy and explain its mechanism. PMID:26185638

  8. Opting Out: Parents Creating Contested Spaces to Challenge Standardized Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Dana; Mann, Bryan; Hlavacik, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We explore how the opt-out movement has responded to the combination of a stringent federal policy with weak and often variable implementation among the states. Gaps between federal expectations and states' understandings of just how to make NCLB's demands a reality have created policy ambiguity. Parents who oppose standardized testing have…

  9. The development of a test system for investigating the performances of personal aerosol samplers under actual workplace conditions.

    PubMed

    Botham, R A; Hughson, G W; Vincent, J H; Mark, D

    1991-10-01

    The performances of new "total" aerosol samplers for use in workplaces are required to match the inhalability criteria as contained in the latest recommendations of the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In the past, practical evaluations have been carried out under idealized conditions in wind tunnels, and there is now the need to extend these to more realistic workplace conditions. This paper describes a new test system that was designed and built for this purpose. It consisted of a life-size mannequin mounted on a trolley so that it can be taken to and wheeled around in workplaces. The mannequin itself incorporated a robotic arm so that, under joystick control, it can be made to simulate a range of worker movements, orientations, and attitudes. An electronically controlled, compact breathing machine provided a range of typical breathing parameters for the mannequin. The pump also provided air movement for a number of personal samplers that were mounted on the torso of the mannequin and tested in that position. Sampler performance should be assessed by comparing directly the aerosol collected by the sampler with that inhaled by the mannequin (and collected on filters inside the head).

  10. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  11. Skin testing and food challenges for the evaluation of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Williams, L W

    2001-01-01

    Skin testing by prick technique has an excellent safety record in the evaluation of food hypersensitivity. Skin prick tests for the common food allergens are excellent tools for identifying those at very low risk of reaction on eating the food but are of variable value in identifying patients who will be positive on challenge. Intradermal skin tests to foods are less safe and appear to add no predictive information. Skin tests to less common food allergens, especially fruits, are less well characterized and may require use of the food item itself as the source of allergen rather than a commercial extract. For a few foods, the CAP system fluorescent enzyme immunoassay (Pharmacia, Peapack, NJ) recently has been shown to have good ability to identify patients at very high probability of reaction on oral challenge. Oral challenge remains the definitive method of demonstrating sensitivity or tolerance to a food. The double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge is the gold standard of diagnosis, but in many situations, simpler open or single-blind challenge procedures may be substituted. With careful, incremental dosing and a low starting dose, oral challenges for food hypersensitivity have an excellent safety record. Skin prick tests are of little value in the evaluation of adverse food reactions not mediated by IgE. Oral challenge is relied upon in this situation for definitive diagnosis, but challenges may be cumbersome if the time course of the presumed reaction is not rapid.

  12. Assessing Perceived Challenges to Laboratory Testing at a Malawian Referral Hospital.

    PubMed

    Petrose, Lia G; Fisher, Arielle M; Douglas, Gerald P; Terry, Martha A; Muula, Adamson; Chawani, Marlen S; Limula, Henry; Driessen, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Adequate laboratory infrastructure in sub-Saharan Africa is vital for tackling the burden of infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome, malaria, and tuberculosis, yet laboratories are ill-integrated into the diagnostic and care delivery process in low-resource settings. Although much of the literature focuses on disease-specific challenges around laboratory testing, we sought to identify horizontal challenges to the laboratory testing process through interviews with clinicians involved in the diagnostic process. Based on 22 interviews with physicians, nurses, clinical officers, medical students, and laboratory technicians, technologists and supervisors, we identified 12 distinct challenges in the areas of staff, materials, workflow, and the blood bank. These challenges underscore the informational challenges that compound more visible resource shortages in the laboratory testing process, which lend themselves to horizontal strengthening efforts around the diagnostic process. PMID:27022150

  13. Design and testing of Electrostatic Aerosol in Vitro Exposure System (EAVES): an alternative exposure system for particles.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, K; Ebersviller, S; Sexton, K G; Lake, S; Leith, D; Goodman, R; Jetters, J; Walters, G W; Doyle-Eisele, M; Woodside, R; Jeffries, H E; Jaspers, I

    2009-02-01

    Conventional in vitro exposure methods for cultured human lung cells rely on prior suspension of particles in a liquid medium; these have limitations for exposure intensity and may modify the particle composition. Here electrostatic precipitation was used as an effective method for such in vitro exposures. An obsolete electrostatic aerosol sampler was modified to provide a viable environment within the deposition field for human lung cells grown on membranous support. Particle deposition and particle-induced toxicological effects for a variety of particles including standardized polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and diesel exhaust emission particle mixtures are reported. The Electrostatic Aerosol in Vitro Exposure System (EAVES) efficiently deposited particles from an air stream directly onto cells. Cells exposed to the electric field of the EAVES in clean air or in the presence of charged PSL spheres exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, and their release of inflammatory cytokines was indistinguishable from that of the controls. For the responses tested here, there are no significant adverse effects caused neither by the electric field alone nor by the mildly charged particles. Exposure to diesel exhaust emissions using the EAVES system induced a threefold increase in cytokines and cytotoxicity as compared to the control. Taken together, these data show that the EAVES can be used to expose human lung cells directly to particles without prior collection in media, thereby providing an efficient and effective alternative to the more conventional particle in vitro exposure methods.

  14. Ice nucleation onto Arizona test dust at cirrus temperatures: effect of temperature and aerosol size on onset relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Z A; Abbatt, J P D

    2010-01-21

    The University of Toronto Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (UT-CFDC) was used to study ice formation onto monodisperse Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. The onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(i)) was measured as a function of temperature in the range 251-223 K for 100 nm ATD particles. It was found that for 0.1% of the particles to freeze, water saturation was required at all temperatures except 223 K where particles activated at RH(i) below water saturation. At this temperature, where deposition mode freezing is occurring, we find that the larger the particle size, the lower the onset RH(i). We also demonstrate that the total number of particles present may influence the onset RH(i) observed. The surface area for ice activation, aerosol size, and temperature must all be considered when reporting onset values of ice formation onto ATD mineral dust particles. In addition, we calculate nucleation rates and contact angles of ice germs with ATD aerosols which indicate that there exists a range of active sites on the surface with different efficiencies for activating ice formation. PMID:19888714

  15. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  16. Effects of parabens and isothiazolinone on the microbiological quality of baby shampoo: the challenge test.

    PubMed

    Smaoui, Slim; Hlima, Hajer Ben

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro microbial challenge test has been developed to predict the likelihood of consumer contamination of baby shampoo. Four preservatives were tested in our study: the parbens Medcide D, Medcide PB, Sepicide HB. and isothiazolinone Methylisothiazolinone/Chloromethylisothiazolinone [MI/MCI]. These preservatives were tested separately and in combination. The challenge test involved inoculating the product with Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Aspergillus brasiliensis and Candida albicans. Inhibition growth of these microorganisms at each preservative concentration was followed over a 28 d period. The test was used to classify products as poorly preserved, marginally preserved, or well-preserved. Interestingly, it was the combination (0.1% Isothiazolinone [MI/MCI] and 0.1% Sepicide HB) which inhibited most the microbial growth of microorganims while preserving the physicochemical properties of the product. As a result, the challenge test described can be accurately used to predict the risk of consumer contamination of cosmetic products.

  17. Geometrical Optics of Dense Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, Michael J.; Valeo, Ernest J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-04-24

    Assembling a free-standing, sharp-edged slab of homogeneous material that is much denser than gas, but much more rare ed than a solid, is an outstanding technological challenge. The solution may lie in focusing a dense aerosol to assume this geometry. However, whereas the geometrical optics of dilute aerosols is a well-developed fi eld, the dense aerosol limit is mostly unexplored. Yet controlling the geometrical optics of dense aerosols is necessary in preparing such a material slab. Focusing dense aerosols is shown here to be possible, but the nite particle density reduces the eff ective Stokes number of the flow, a critical result for controlled focusing. __________________________________________________

  18. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Massoli, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Brooks, S.; Lefer, B.

    2009-08-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006), the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep) were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT). An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD). The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep), a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η) and the fine mode effective radius (Reff f). These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend) and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation=28 nm).

  19. Comparison of in situ and columnar aerosol spectral measurements during TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006: testing parameterizations for estimating aerosol fine mode properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. B.; Massoli, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Brooks, S. D.; Lefer, B.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study and Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (TexAQS-GoMACCS 2006), the optical, chemical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols were measured on multiple mobile platforms and at ground based stations. In situ measurements of the aerosol light extinction coefficient (σep) were performed by two multi-wavelength cavity ring-down (CRD) instruments, one located on board the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown (RHB) and the other located at the University of Houston, Moody Tower (UHMT). An AERONET sunphotometer was also located at the UHMT to measure the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD). The σep data were used to extract the extinction Ångström exponent (åep), a measure of the wavelength dependence of σep. There was general agreement between the åep (and to a lesser degree σep) measurements by the two spatially separated CRD instruments during multi-day periods, suggesting a regional scale consistency of the sampled aerosols. Two spectral models are applied to the σep and AOD data to extract the fine mode fraction of extinction (η) and the fine mode effective radius (Reff,f). These two parameters are robust measures of the fine mode contribution to total extinction and the fine mode size distribution, respectively. The results of the analysis are compared to Reff,f values extracted using AERONET V2 retrievals and calculated from in situ particle size measurements on the RHB and at UHMT. During a time period when fine mode aerosols dominated the extinction over a large area extending from Houston/Galveston Bay and out into the Gulf of Mexico, the various methods for obtaining Reff,f agree qualitatively (showing the same temporal trend) and quantitatively (pooled standard deviation = 28 nm).

  20. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  1. Radiation Testing on State-of-the-Art CMOS: Challenges, Plans, and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007 and 2008, we discussed a variety of challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices and technologies [1, 2]. In this presentation, we provide more specific details in this on-going investigation focusing on out-of-the-box lessons observed for providing radiation effects assurances as well as preliminary test results.

  2. Repeated Challenge Studies: A Comparison of Union-Intersection Testing with Linear Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Richard A.; Ohman, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    Challenge studies can be used to see whether there is a causal relationship between an agent of interest and a response. An approach based on union-intersection testing is presented that allows researchers to examine observations on a single subject and test the hypothesis of interest. An application using psychological data is presented. (SLD)

  3. Advanced Electronics Technologies: Challenges for Radiation Effects Testing, Modeling, and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    Emerging Electronics Technologies include: 1) Changes in the commercial semiconductor world; 2) Radiation Effects Sources (A sample test constraint); and 3) Challenges to Radiation Testing and Modeling: a) IC Attributes-Radiation Effects Implication b) Fault Isolation c) Scaled Geometry d) Speed e) Modeling Shortfall f) Knowledge Status

  4. Challenger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Close-up view of the liftoff of the Shuttle Challenger on mission STS-51L taken from camera site 39B-2/T3. From this camera position, a cloud of grey-brown smoke can be seen on the right side of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) on a line directly across from the letter 'U' in United States. This was the first visible sign that an SRB joint breach may have occured. On January 28, 1986 frigid overnight temperatures caused normally pliable rubber O-ring seals and putty that are designed to seal and establish joint integrity between the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) joint segments, to become hard and non- flexible. At the instant of SRB ignition, tremendous stresses and pressures occur within the SRB casing and especially at the joint attachmentment points. The failure of the O-rings and putty to 'seat' properly at motor ignition, caused hot exhaust gases to blow by the seals and putty. During Challenger's ascent, this hot gas 'blow by' ultimately cut a swath completely through the steel booster casing; and like a welder's torch, began cutting into the External Tank (ET). It is believed that the ET was compromised in several locations starting in the aft at the initial point where SRB joint failure occured. The ET hydrogen tank is believed to have been breached first, with continuous rapid incremental failure of both the ET and SRB. A chain reaction of events occurring in milliseconds culminated in a massive explosion. The orbiter Challenger was instantly ejected by the blast and went askew into the supersonic air flow. These aerodynamic forces caused structural shattering and complete destruction of the orbiter. Though it was concluded that the G-forces experienced during orbiter ejection and break-up were survivable, impact with the ocean surface was not. Tragically, all seven crewmembers perished.

  5. A TEST OF THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM MODELS AND 3-D AIR QUALITY MODELS FOR PREDICTIONS OF AEROSOL NO3-

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inorganic species of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium constitute a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols. The behavior of nitrate is one of the most intriguing aspects of inorganic atmospheric aerosols because particulate nitrate concentrations depend not only on the amount of ...

  6. Evaluation of intolerance to analgesics, preservatives and food colorants with challenge tests.

    PubMed

    Rosenhall, L

    1982-09-01

    In 504 patients with asthma or rhinitis 1,868 oral challenge tests with analgesics, preservatives and food colorants were performed. Sodium benzoate and other benzoic compounds, as well as tartrazine and other azo dyes, were found to give similar but milder adverse reactions than acetylsalicylic acid. No patients reacted to potassium sorbate, another preservative, or to Patent Blue, which is not an azo dye. Intolerance was demonstrated most frequently in patients with a history of adverse reactions to analgesics or food, but also in 6% of patients investigated for other reasons. There are obvious risks for false positive or false negative results with a challenge test. Examples of these are given. The need for repeated tests and the clinical importance of all reproducible challenge reactions is stressed. PMID:7140873

  7. Microbiological Challenge Testing for Listeria Monocytogenes in Ready-to-Eat Food: A Practical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Scarano, Christian; Ibba, Michela; Pala, Carlo; Spanu, Vincenzo; De Santis, Enrico Pietro Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Food business operators (FBOs) are the primary responsible for the safety of food they place on the market. The definition and validation of the product’s shelf-life is an essential part for ensuring microbiological safety of food and health of consumers. In the frame of the Regulation (EC) No 2073/2005 on microbiological criteria for foodstuffs, FBOs shall conduct shelf-life studies in order to assure that their food does not exceed the food safety criteria throughout the defined shelf-life. In particular this is required for ready-to-eat (RTE) food that supports the growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Among other studies, FBOs can rely on the conclusion drawn by microbiological challenge tests. A microbiological challenge test consists in the artificial contamination of a food with a pathogen microorganism and aims at simulating its behaviour during processing and distribution under the foreseen storage and handling conditions. A number of documents published by international health authorities and research institutions describes how to conduct challenge studies. The authors reviewed the existing literature and described the methodology for implementing such laboratory studies. All the main aspects for the conduction of L. monocytogenes microbiological challenge tests were considered, from the selection of the strains, preparation and choice of the inoculum level and method of contamination, to the experimental design and data interpretation. The objective of the present document is to provide an exhaustive and practical guideline for laboratories that want to implement L. monocytogenes challenge testing on RTE food. PMID:27800369

  8. HEV dynamometer testing with state-of-charge corrections in the 1995 HEV challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Duoba, M.; Larsen, R.

    1996-03-01

    In the 1995 HEV Challenge competition, 17 prototype Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) were tested by using special HEV test procedures. The contribution of the batteries during the test, as measured by changes in battery state-of-charge (SOC), were accounted for by applying SOC corrections to the test data acquired from the results of the HEV test. The details of SOC corrections are described and two different HEV test methods are explained. The results of the HEV test methods are explained. The results of the HEV tests and the effects on the test outcome of varying HEV designs and control strategies are examined. Although many teams had technical problems with their vehicles, a few vehicles demonstrated high fuel economy and low emissions. One vehicle had emissions lower than California`s ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) emissions rates, and two vehicles demonstrated higher fuel economy and better acceleration than their stock counterparts.

  9. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a sample filter through which no sample air is intended to flow during performance of this test. (4) A channel is... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures...

  10. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II... sample collection filter) differs significantly from that specified for reference method samplers as specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and...

  11. Adenosine dry powder inhalation for bronchial challenge testing, part 2: proof of concept in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; van der Wiel, Erica; Hagedoorn, Paul; Bult, Wouter; Frijlink, Henderik W; ten Hacken, Nick H T; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine is an indirect stimulus to assess bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR(2)) in asthma. Bronchial challenge tests are usually performed with nebulised solutions of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP(3)). The nebulised AMP test has several disadvantages, like long administration times and a restrictive maximum concentration that does not result in BHR in all patients. In this study, we investigated the applicability of dry powder adenosine for assessment of BHR in comparison to nebulised AMP. Dry powder adenosine was prepared in doubling doses (0.01-80 mg) derived from the nebulised AMP test with addition of two higher doses. Five asthmatic subjects performed two bronchial challenge tests, one with nebulised AMP following the 2-min tidal breathing method; the second with dry powder adenosine administered with an investigational inhaler and single slow inhalations (inspiratory flow rate 30-40 L/min). All subjects reached a 20% fall in FEV₁(4) with the new adenosine test (PD20(5)) compared to four subjects with the AMP test (PC₂₀(6)). Dry powder adenosine was well tolerated by all subjects and better appreciated than nebulised AMP. In conclusion, this new bronchial challenge test appears to be a safe and convenient alternative to the nebulised AMP test to assess BHR in asthmatic subjects.

  12. SUBMERGED GRAVEL SCRUBBER DEMONSTRATION AS A PASSIVE AIR CLEANER FOR CONTAINMENT VENTING AND PURGING WITH SODIUM AEROSOLS -- CSTF TESTS AC7 - AC10

    SciTech Connect

    HILLIARD, R K.; MCCORMACK, J D.; POSTMA, A K.

    1981-11-01

    Four large-scale air cleaning tests (AC7 - AC10) were performed in the Containment Systems Test Facility (CS'lF) to demonstrate the performance of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber for cleaning the effluent gas from a vented and purged breeder reactor containment vessel. The test article, comprised of a Submerged Gravel Scrubber (SGS) followed by a high efficiency fiber demister, had a design gas flow rate of 0.47 m{sup 3}/s (1000 ft{sup 3}/min) at a pressure drop of 9.0 kPa (36 in. H{sub 2}O). The test aerosol was sodium oxide, sodium hydroxide, or sodium carbonate generated in the 850-m{sup 3} CSTF vessel by continuously spraying sodium into the air-filled vessel while adding steam or carbon dioxide. Approximately 4500 kg (10,000 lb) of sodium was sprayed over a total period of 100 h during the tests. The SGS/Demister system was shown to be highly efficient (removing ~99.98% of the entering sodium aerosol mass), had a high mass loading capacity, and operated in a passive manner, with no electrical requirement. Models for predicting aerosol capture, gas cooling, and pressure drop are developed and compared with experimental results.

  13. New challenges for BRCA testing: a view from the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Increased demand for BRCA testing is placing pressures on diagnostic laboratories to raise their mutation screening capacity and handle the challenges associated with classifying BRCA sequence variants for clinical significance, for example interpretation of pathogenic mutations or variants of unknown significance, accurate determination of large genomic rearrangements and detection of somatic mutations in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Many diagnostic laboratories are adopting next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to increase their screening capacity and reduce processing time and unit costs. However, migration to NGS introduces complexities arising from choice of components of the BRCA testing workflow, such as NGS platform, enrichment method and bioinformatics analysis process. An efficient, cost-effective accurate mutation detection strategy and a standardised, systematic approach to the reporting of BRCA test results is imperative for diagnostic laboratories. This review covers the challenges of BRCA testing from the perspective of a diagnostics laboratory.

  14. New challenges for BRCA testing: a view from the diagnostic laboratory.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Increased demand for BRCA testing is placing pressures on diagnostic laboratories to raise their mutation screening capacity and handle the challenges associated with classifying BRCA sequence variants for clinical significance, for example interpretation of pathogenic mutations or variants of unknown significance, accurate determination of large genomic rearrangements and detection of somatic mutations in DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumour samples. Many diagnostic laboratories are adopting next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to increase their screening capacity and reduce processing time and unit costs. However, migration to NGS introduces complexities arising from choice of components of the BRCA testing workflow, such as NGS platform, enrichment method and bioinformatics analysis process. An efficient, cost-effective accurate mutation detection strategy and a standardised, systematic approach to the reporting of BRCA test results is imperative for diagnostic laboratories. This review covers the challenges of BRCA testing from the perspective of a diagnostics laboratory. PMID:27514839

  15. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  16. Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

    1985-08-13

    A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At an earlier conference we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art CMOS technologies. In this presentation, we extend this discussion focusing on the following areas: (1) Device packaging, (2) Evolving physical single even upset mechanisms, (3) Device complexity, and (4) the goal of understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  18. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small, Multiple Satellite Missions: Experiences From The Space Technology 5 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This brief presentation describes the mechanical and electrical integration activities and environmental testing challenges of the Space Technology 5 (ST5) Project. Lessons learned during this process are highlighted, including performing mechanical activities serially to gain efficiency through repetition and performing electrical activities based on the level of subsystem expertise available.

  19. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable. The test requirements and performance... specified for a reference method sampler in 40 CFR part 50, appendix L or appendix O, as applicable, such as... electroless nickel coated as specified in § 53.64(d)(2). (6) Filters that are appropriate for use...

  20. Phenols and hydroxy-PAHs (arylphenols) as tracers for coal smoke particulate matter: source tests and ambient aerosol assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd R.T. Simoneit; Xinhui Bi; Daniel R. Oros; Patricia M. Medeiros; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu

    2007-11-01

    Source tests were conducted to analyze and characterize diagnostic key tracers for emissions from burning of coals with various ranks. Coal samples included lignite from Germany, semibituminous coal from Arizona, USA, bituminous coal from Wales, UK and sample from briquettes of semibituminous coal, bituminous coal and anthracite from China. Ambient aerosol particulate matter was also collected in three areas of China and a background area in Corvallis, OR (U.S.) to confirm the presence of tracers specific for coal smoke. The results showed a series of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and phenolic compounds, including PAHs and hydroxy-PAHs as the major tracers, as well as a significant unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of compounds. The tracers that were found characteristic of coal combustion processes included hydroxy-PAHs and PAHs. Atmospheric ambient samples from Beijing and Taiyuan, cities where coal is burned in northern China, revealed that the hydroxy-PAH tracers were present during the wintertime, but not in cities where coal is not commonly used (e.g., Guangzhou, South China). Thus, the mass of hydroxy-PAHs can be apportioned to coal smoke and the source strength modeled by summing the proportional contents of EC (elemental carbon), PAHs, UCM and alkanes with the hydroxy-PAHs. 36 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Overview of status and challenges of system testing on chip with embedded DRAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falter, T.; Richter, D.

    2000-05-01

    The combination of logic together with DRAM as a system on chip (SOC) has many advantages for a large variety of computing and network applications. The goal of testing a system is to detect the fabrication caused faults in order to guarantee the defined quality. The increasing size of memories, shrinking dimensions, higher demands on application (frequency and temperature range) and quality cause new problems and higher costs of testing. On the other hand the pressure to serve the market with low cost products forces the test engineer to reduce test costs by reducing test times and using low cost test equipment. Different solutions are discussed in this paper in order to meet these challenges. The variety of test approaches for testing SOC with embedded DRAMs reaches from testing with completely chip external test logic, a simple on-chip test logic up to a full blown built-in self test (BIST) on chip. Which choice is the right one depends on different criteria e.g. memory size, quality demands and application of the product. As an example the modular embedded DRAM core concept from Infineon Technologies is discussed, which includes a dedicated modular test concept based on on-chip integration of a test controller.

  2. CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A NEW THERMODYNAMIC AEROSOL MODULE FOR URBAN AND REGIONAL AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R824793)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient and rigorous thermodynamic model (ISORROPIA) that predicts the physical state and composition of inorganic atmospheric aerosol is presented. The advantages of this particular model render it suitable for incorporation into urban and regional air qualit...

  3. Direct-field acoustic testing of a flight system : logistics, challenges, and results.

    SciTech Connect

    Stasiunas, Eric Carl; Gurule, David Joseph; Babuska, Vit; Skousen, Troy J.

    2010-10-01

    Before a spacecraft can be considered for launch, it must first survive environmental testing that simulates the launch environment. Typically, these simulations include vibration testing performed using an electro-dynamic shaker. For some spacecraft however, acoustic excitation may provide a more severe loading environment than base shaker excitation. Because this was the case for a Sandia Flight System, it was necessary to perform an acoustic test prior to launch in order to verify survival due to an acoustic environment. Typically, acoustic tests are performed in acoustic chambers, but because of scheduling, transportation, and cleanliness concerns, this was not possible. Instead, the test was performed as a direct field acoustic test (DFAT). This type of test consists of surrounding a test article with a wall of speakers and controlling the acoustic input using control microphones placed around the test item, with a closed-loop control system. Obtaining the desired acoustic input environment - proto-flight random noise input with an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 146.7 dB-with this technique presented a challenge due to several factors. An acoustic profile with this high OASPL had not knowingly been obtained using the DFAT technique prior to this test. In addition, the test was performed in a high-bay, where floor space and existing equipment constrained the speaker circle diameter. And finally, the Flight System had to be tested without contamination of the unit, which required a contamination bag enclosure of the test unit. This paper describes in detail the logistics, challenges, and results encountered while performing a high-OASPL, direct-field acoustic test on a contamination-sensitive Flight System in a high-bay environment.

  4. [Application of model 4650 type I compressor atomizer in bronchial challenge test].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, Y; Zeng, J; He, T

    2000-06-01

    This study was directed to the feasibility of applying a simple atomizer-model 4650 type I (abbrev. M)-to bronchial challenge test. 92 cases of asthma were divided into 3 groups randomly. All of them were subjected to the bronchial challenge test by M atomizer, and by standard Dosimeter atomizer (abbrev. D) as a comparison. In the test by M atomizer, the times for inspiring challenging medicine were 1, 1.5 and 2 minutes for the 3 groups respectively, while the time for D atomizer was 1 minute for all. The results showed no significant differences (P > 0.2-0.5) between the two atomizers in the 3 groups, their values were linear correlated. When the inspiring time was 1 minute for both M and D, the test needed a higher concentration of challenging medicine for M than for D, their coefficient of correlation (r = 0.285) was relatively low. When inspiring time postponed to 1.5 minute for M, the difference in medicine concentration between M and D was smallest (-0.075 g/L), r = 0.665. However, a further postponed inspiring time to 2 minute for M reversely broadened their difference. These results indicated that the efficiency of M atomizer was a little lower than that of D, postponing the inspiring time for M could make up this weakness. A 1.5 minute inspiring time for M atomizer was the suggestion. Some modifications on M atomizer were done by us for a better efficiency, and the cheap and popular M atomizer could be a good replacement in bronchial challenge test.

  5. Testing for Accountability: A Balancing Act That Challenges Current Testing Practices and Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Koretz, in his article published in this issue, provides compelling arguments that the high stakes currently associated with accountability testing lead to behavioral changes in students, teachers, and other stakeholders that often have negative consequences, such as inflated scores. Koretz goes on to argue that these negative consequences require…

  6. Challenges of Cold Conditioning and Static Testing the Second Ares Demonstration Motor (DM-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Shyla; Davis, Larry C.

    2011-01-01

    On August 31, 2010, a five-segment demonstration motor (DM) for the Ares program was successfully tested. A series of demonstration motors (DMs) will be tested in different conditioned environments to confirm they meet their design specifications. The second demonstration motor (DM-2) was the first cold motor. The motor needed to be subjected to sub-freezing temperatures for two months so that its internal propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was approximately 40 F. Several challenges had to be overcome to make this a successful test. One challenge was to condition four field joints to get the O-rings approximately 32 F. This would be done by applying conditioning shrouds to externally cool each field joint after the test bay was pulled off. The purpose of this conditioning was to validate the new O-ring design and allow joint heaters to be eliminated. Another challenge was maintaining temperature requirements for components in the nozzle vectoring system. A separate heating system was used to warm these components during cold conditioning. There were 53 test objectives that required 764 channels of data to be recorded; 460 were specific to DM-2. This instrumentation had to be installed prior to conditioning, which meant the baseline process and timeline had to be modified to meet this time critical schedule.

  7. Challenges in molecular testing in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with advanced disease.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Crispin T; Le Quesne, John; Santis, George; Sharpe, Rowena; de Castro, David Gonzalez; Middleton, Gary; Swanton, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer diagnostics have progressed greatly in the previous decade. Development of molecular testing to identify an increasing number of potentially clinically actionable genetic variants, using smaller samples obtained via minimally invasive techniques, is a huge challenge. Tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution in response to therapy means that repeat biopsies or circulating biomarkers are likely to be increasingly useful to adapt treatment as resistance develops. We highlight some of the current challenges faced in clinical practice for molecular testing of EGFR, ALK, and new biomarkers such as PDL1. Implementation of next generation sequencing platforms for molecular diagnostics in non-small-cell lung cancer is increasingly common, allowing testing of multiple genetic variants from a single sample. The use of next generation sequencing to recruit for molecularly stratified clinical trials is discussed in the context of the UK Stratified Medicine Programme and The UK National Lung Matrix Trial. PMID:27598680

  8. Modeling and design of challenge tests: Inflammatory and metabolic biomarker study examples.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Hjorth, Stephan; Vogg, Barbara; Harlfinger, Stephanie; Gutierrez, Pablo Morentin; Peletier, Lambertus; Pehrson, Rikard; Davidsson, Pia

    2015-01-25

    Given the complexity of pharmacological challenge experiments, it is perhaps not surprising that design and analysis, and in turn interpretation and communication of results from a quantitative point of view, is often suboptimal. Here we report an inventory of common designs sampled from anti-inflammatory, respiratory and metabolic disease drug discovery studies, all of which are based on animal models of disease involving pharmacological and/or patho/physiological interaction challenges. The corresponding data are modeled and analyzed quantitatively, the merits of the respective approach discussed and inferences made with respect to future design improvements. Although our analysis is limited to these disease model examples, the challenge approach is generally applicable to the vast majority of pharmacological intervention studies. In the present five Case Studies results from pharmacodynamic effect models from different therapeutic areas were explored and analyzed according to five typical designs. Plasma exposures of test compounds were assayed by either liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or ligand binding assays. To describe how drug intervention can regulate diverse processes, turnover models of test compound-challenger interaction, transduction processes, and biophase time courses were applied for biomarker response in eosinophil count, IL6 response, paw-swelling, TNFα response and glucose turnover in vivo. Case Study 1 shows results from intratracheal administration of Sephadex, which is a glucocorticoid-sensitive model of airway inflammation in rats. Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar fluid were obtained at different time points via destructive sampling and then regressed by the mixed-effects modeling. A biophase function of the Sephadex time course was inferred from the modeled eosinophil time courses. In Case Study 2, a mouse model showed that the time course of cytokine-induced IL1β challenge was altered with or without drug intervention. Anakinra

  9. Modeling and design of challenge tests: Inflammatory and metabolic biomarker study examples.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Hjorth, Stephan; Vogg, Barbara; Harlfinger, Stephanie; Gutierrez, Pablo Morentin; Peletier, Lambertus; Pehrson, Rikard; Davidsson, Pia

    2015-01-25

    Given the complexity of pharmacological challenge experiments, it is perhaps not surprising that design and analysis, and in turn interpretation and communication of results from a quantitative point of view, is often suboptimal. Here we report an inventory of common designs sampled from anti-inflammatory, respiratory and metabolic disease drug discovery studies, all of which are based on animal models of disease involving pharmacological and/or patho/physiological interaction challenges. The corresponding data are modeled and analyzed quantitatively, the merits of the respective approach discussed and inferences made with respect to future design improvements. Although our analysis is limited to these disease model examples, the challenge approach is generally applicable to the vast majority of pharmacological intervention studies. In the present five Case Studies results from pharmacodynamic effect models from different therapeutic areas were explored and analyzed according to five typical designs. Plasma exposures of test compounds were assayed by either liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or ligand binding assays. To describe how drug intervention can regulate diverse processes, turnover models of test compound-challenger interaction, transduction processes, and biophase time courses were applied for biomarker response in eosinophil count, IL6 response, paw-swelling, TNFα response and glucose turnover in vivo. Case Study 1 shows results from intratracheal administration of Sephadex, which is a glucocorticoid-sensitive model of airway inflammation in rats. Eosinophils in bronchoalveolar fluid were obtained at different time points via destructive sampling and then regressed by the mixed-effects modeling. A biophase function of the Sephadex time course was inferred from the modeled eosinophil time courses. In Case Study 2, a mouse model showed that the time course of cytokine-induced IL1β challenge was altered with or without drug intervention. Anakinra

  10. Inversion of the anomalous diffraction approximation for variable complex index of refraction near unity. [numerical tests for water-haze aerosol model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Fymat analytic inversion method for retrieving a particle-area distribution function from anomalous diffraction multispectral extinction data and total area is generalized to the case of a variable complex refractive index m(lambda) near unity depending on spectral wavelength lambda. Inversion tests are presented for a water-haze aerosol model. An upper-phase shift limit of 5 pi/2 retrieved an accurate peak area distribution profile. Analytical corrections using both the total number and area improved the inversion.

  11. Development of a national EUCAST challenge panel for antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Desmet, S; Verhaegen, J; Glupzcynski, Y; Van Eldere, J; Melin, P; Goossens, H; Piérard, D; Declercq, P; Lagrou, K; Boel, A; Cartuyvels, R; Denis, O; Vandewal, W; Saegeman, V

    2016-08-01

    A challenge panel of bacterial strains useful for clinical laboratories to validate their European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) system was established. A total of 117 strains, obtained from Belgian Reference Centres (n = 57) and from routine clinical samples (n = 60) was selected based on resistance pattern. These strains were analysed in seven different laboratories by three different automated AST systems (Vitek (n = 2), Phoenix (n = 2) and Microscan (n = 2)) and by disc diffusion from five different manufacturers (Rosco (n = 2), Becton-Dickinson (n = 2), Biomérieux (n = 1), Bio-rad (n = 1) and i2a (n = 1)). To select the challenge panel, selection criteria were set for categorical agreement between the different systems and the number of very major errors, major errors and minor errors. Very major and major errors for at least two antibiotics were observed in 43% of all strains, leading to the exclusion of these strains from the selected panel. In only 10% of all tested strains was there 100% categorical agreement for all antibiotics. Finally, 28 strains (14 Gram-positive and 14 Gram-negative) covering a wide spectrum of resistance mechanisms were selected. Pilot-testing of this challenge panel in 20 laboratories mainly confirmed the results of the validation study. Only six strains withheld for the pilot study could not be used as challenge strain due to an overall (very) major error rate of >5% for a particular antibiotic (n = 5) or for two antibiotics (n = 1). To conclude, this challenge panel should facilitate the implementation and use of EUCAST breakpoints in laboratories. PMID:27234934

  12. Nonclinical safety testing of biopharmaceuticals--Addressing current challenges of these novel and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Frank R; Baumann, Andreas; Blaich, Guenter; de Haan, Lolke; Fagg, Rajni; Kiessling, Andrea; Kronenberg, Sven; Locher, Mathias; Milton, Mark; Tibbitts, Jay; Ulrich, Peter; Weir, Lucinda

    2015-10-01

    Non-clinical safety testing of biopharmaceuticals can present significant challenges to human risk assessment with these often innovative and complex drugs. Hot Topics in this field were discussed recently at the 4th Annual European Biosafe General Membership meeting. In this feature article, the presentations and subsequent discussions from the main sessions are summarized. The topics covered include: (i) wanted versus unwanted immune activation, (ii) bi-specific protein scaffolds, (iii) use of Pharmacokinetic (PK)/Pharmacodynamic (PD) data to impact/optimize toxicology study design, (iv) cytokine release and challenges to human translation (v) safety testing of cell and gene therapies including chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells and retroviral vectors and (vi) biopharmaceutical development strategies encompassing a range of diverse topics including optimizing entry of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) into the brain, safety testing of therapeutic vaccines, non-clinical testing of biosimilars, infection in toxicology studies with immunomodulators and challenges to human risk assessment, maternal and infant anti-drug antibody (ADA) development and impact in non-human primate (NHP) developmental toxicity studies, and a summary of an NC3Rs workshop on the future vision for non-clinical safety assessment of biopharmaceuticals.

  13. Clinical challenges and the relevance of materials testing for posterior composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Sarrett, David C

    2005-01-01

    Posterior composite restorations have been in use for approximately 30 years. The early experiences with this treatment indicated there were more clinical challenges and higher failure rates than amalgam restorations. Since the early days of posterior composites, many improvements in materials, techniques, and instruments for placing these restorations have occurred. This paper reviews what is known regarding current clinical challenges with posterior composite restorations and reviews the primary method for collecting clinical performance data. This review categorizes the challenges as those related to the restorative materials, those related to the dentist, and those related to the patient. The clinical relevance of laboratory tests is discussed from the perspective of solving the remaining clinical challenges of current materials and of screening new materials. The clinical problems related to early composite materials are no longer serious clinical challenges. Clinical data indicate that secondary caries and restoration fracture are the most common clinical problems and merit further investigation. The effect of the dentist and patient on performance of posterior composite restorations is unclear and more clinical data from hypothesis-driven clinical trials are needed to understand these factors. Improvements in handling properties to ensure void-free placement and complete cure should be investigated to improve clinical outcomes. There is a general lack of data that correlates clinical performance with laboratory materials testing. A proposed list of materials tests that may predict performance in a variety of clinical factors is presented. Polymerization shrinkage and the problems that have been attributed to this property of composite are reviewed. There is a lack of evidence that indicates polymerization shrinkage is the primary cause of secondary caries. It is recommended that composite materials be developed with antibacterial properties as a way of

  14. House-dust Mite Asthma. Results of Challenge Tests on Five Criteria with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

    PubMed Central

    McAllen, Monica K.; Assem, E. S. K.; Maunsell, K.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with asthma and house-dust allergy were investigated by five different challenge tests with mite extract (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus). These tests were performed on the skin, bronchi, nasal mucosa, and leucocytes, and on normal human lung tissue passively sensitized by the patients' serum. The results were compared with each other and with the clinical state of the patients. Of 21 patients on whom all five tests were carried out, positive reactions to every test were found in 14 (67%). Asthmatic attacks were readily induced by inhalation of the mite extract and occurred in 18 (86%). Nasal reactions were provoked in 18 (86%) and were not followed by asthmatic symptoms. A leucocyte test was positive in 19 (90%) and the serum test was positive in all (100%). Delayed asthmatic responses to bronchial challenge were seen in six patients, but there was no evidence that these were mediated by precipitins. Quantitatively there was no fixed pattern between the degrees of sensitivity of the different tissues in the same patient. The amount of mite antigen capable of causing an asthmatic reaction was extremely small—less than 1 μg. of mite material in several patients. In view of the prevalence of D. pteronyssinus in this country and its high allergenic potency, it is considered that this mite is an important factor in allergic asthma. PMID:4987898

  15. Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

    1995-06-01

    From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

  16. [Utility of challenge test in immediate hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone sodium succinate].

    PubMed

    Amaya-Mejía, Adela Sisy; Galindo-Pacheco, Lucy Vania; O'Farrill-Romanillos, Patricia María; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen Alicia; Campos-Romero, Freya Helena; del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroid hypersensitivity is a complex phenomenon in which many factors interact, such as idiosyncrasy, intolerance or allergic reactions. The prevalence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids is 0.2%-0.5%. Corticosteroids have major therapeutic implications; thus, when hypersensitivity is suspected, in-vitro and/or in-vivo testing can be performed to confirm diagnosis, being the drug challenge the gold standard. After definitive diagnosis, cross-reactivity among the different corticosteroid groups should be considered, to choose wisely if corticosteroid therapy is still required. In Coopman classification, steroids belonging to groups A, B and D2 have high cross-reactivity, however, more studies are needed to determine the degree of cross-reaction among these drugs. This paper presents the case of a woman, in who hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone succinate was confirmed by drug challenge test.

  17. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  18. Having Fun and Accepting Challenges Are Natural Instincts: Jigsaw Puzzles to Challenge Students and Test Their Abilities While Having Fun!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodenbaugh, Hanna R.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Rodenbaugh, David W.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Because jigsaw puzzles are fun, and challenging, students will endure and discover that persistence and grit are rewarded. Importantly, play and fun have a biological place just like sleep and dreams. Students also feel a sense of accomplishment when they have completed a puzzle. Importantly, the reward of mastering a challenge builds confidence…

  19. The challenges of introducing routine G6PD testing into radical cure: a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Ley, Benedikt; Luter, Nick; Espino, Fe Esperanza; Devine, Angela; Kalnoky, Michael; Lubell, Yoel; Thriemer, Kamala; Baird, J Kevin; Poirot, Eugenie; Conan, Nolwenn; Kheong, Chong Chee; Dysoley, Lek; Khan, Wasif Ali; Dion-Berboso, April G; Bancone, Germana; Hwang, Jimee; Kumar, Ritu; Price, Ric N; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Domingo, Gonzalo J

    2015-09-29

    The only currently available drug that effectively removes malaria hypnozoites from the human host is primaquine. The use of 8-aminoquinolines is hampered by haemolytic side effects in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient individuals. Recently a number of qualitative and a quantitative rapid diagnostic test (RDT) format have been developed that provide an alternative to the current standard G6PD activity assays. The WHO has recently recommended routine testing of G6PD status prior to primaquine radical cure whenever possible. A workshop was held in the Philippines in early 2015 to discuss key challenges and knowledge gaps that hinder the introduction of routine G6PD testing. Two point-of-care (PoC) test formats for the measurement of G6PD activity are currently available: qualitative tests comparable to malaria RDT as well as biosensors that provide a quantitative reading. Qualitative G6PD PoC tests provide a binomial test result, are easy to use and some products are comparable in price to the widely used fluorescent spot test. Qualitative test results can accurately classify hemizygous males, heterozygous females, but may misclassify females with intermediate G6PD activity. Biosensors provide a more complex quantitative readout and are better suited to identify heterozygous females. While associated with higher costs per sample tested biosensors have the potential for broader use in other scenarios where knowledge of G6PD activity is relevant as well. The introduction of routine G6PD testing is associated with additional costs on top of routine treatment that will vary by setting and will need to be assessed prior to test introduction. Reliable G6PD PoC tests have the potential to play an essential role in future malaria elimination programmes, however require an improved understanding on how to best integrate routine G6PD testing into different health settings.

  20. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  1. Advancing Models and Evaluation of Cumulus, Climate and Aerosol Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gettelman, Andrew

    2015-10-27

    This project was successfully able to meet its’ goals, but faced some serious challenges due to personnel issues. Nonetheless, it was largely successful. The Project Objectives were as follows: 1. Develop a unified representation of stratifom and cumulus cloud microphysics for NCAR/DOE global community models. 2. Examine the effects of aerosols on clouds and their impact on precipitation in stratiform and cumulus clouds. We will also explore the effects of clouds and precipitation on aerosols. 3. Test these new formulations using advanced evaluation techniques and observations and release

  2. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  3. Ares I-X Flight Test Development Challenges and Success Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askins, Bruce; Davis, Steve; Olsen, Ronald; Taylor, James

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Constellation Program's Ares I-X rocket launched successfully on October 28, 2009 collecting valuable data and providing risk reduction for the Ares I project. The Ares I-X mission was formulated and implemented in less than four years commencing with the Exploration Systems Architecture Study in 2005. The test configuration was founded upon assets and processes from other rocket programs including Space Shuttle, Atlas, and Peacekeeper. For example, the test vehicle's propulsion element was a Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. The Ares I-X rocket comprised a motor assembly, mass and outer mold line simulators of the Ares I Upper Stage, Orion Spacecraft and Launch Abort System, a roll control system, avionics, and other miscellaneous components. The vehicle was 327 feet tall and weighed approximately 1,800,000 pounds. During flight the rocket reached a maximum speed of Mach 4.8 and an altitude of 150,000 feet. The vehicle demonstrated staging at 130,000 feet, tested parachutes for recovery of the motor, and utilized approximately 900 sensors for data collection. Developing a new launch system and preparing for a safe flight presented many challenges. Specific challenges included designing a system to withstand the environments, manufacturing large structures, and re-qualifying heritage hardware. These and other challenges, if not mitigated, may have resulted in test cancellation. Ares I-X succeeded because the mission was founded on carefully derived objectives, led by decisive and flexible management, implemented by an exceptionally talented and dedicated workforce, and supported by a thorough independent review team. Other major success factors include the use of proven heritage hardware, a robust System Integration Laboratory, multi-NASA center and contractor team, concurrent operations, efficient vehicle assembly, effective risk management, and decentralized element development with a centralized control board. Ares I-X was a technically complex test that

  4. Applications of online high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HRToF-CIMS): opportunities and challenges for aircraft measurements, atmosphere-ecosystem exchange, and organic aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, J. A.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; D'Ambro, E.; Mohr, C.; Gaston, C.; Schobesberger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past five years, field deployable high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometers (HRToF-CIMS) have been developed and deployed for a range of problems relevant to atmospheric chemistry. The inherent duty cycle, dynamic range, mass accuracy, and resolving power of these instruments provide transformative capabilities for deriving new insights into atmospheric composition. We present examples of these capabilities from the deployments of the University of Washington HRToF-CIMS aboard research aircraft, an eddy flux tower in a boreal forest, and to measure organic aerosol composition upon temperature-programmed thermal desorption in field and chamber experiments. Specific examples include measurements of reactive halogens with all relevant isotopes simultaneously resolved from potential interferences, the opportunity for discovery, after the fact, of previously unmeasured or unexpected compounds with acquisition of the full mass spectrum, and providing a broad survey of the 100s of organic compounds that desorb from complex isoprene and monoterpene derived secondary organic aerosol matrices. While there are unique opportunities, there are also significant technical challenges to realizing the full analytical potential these instruments can provide. Many of these challenges are common to any analytical technique, but perhaps seemingly more demanding for HRToF-CIMS, such as the presumed need to calibrate 100s of molecular ion signals routinely detected in each spectrum. We detail some of the more pressing challenges and our approach towards addressing them.

  5. Comparative Antimicrobial Activities of Aerosolized Sodium Hypochlorite, Chlorine Dioxide, and Electrochemically Activated Solutions Evaluated Using a Novel Standardized Assay

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, R. M. S.; Robinson, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a standardized experimental assay to enable differential antimicrobial comparisons of test biocidal aerosols. This study represents the first chlorine-matched comparative assessment of the antimicrobial activities of aerosolized sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, and electrochemically activated solution (ECAS) to determine their relative abilities to decontaminate various surface-associated health care-relevant microbial challenges. Standard microbiological challenges were developed by surface-associating typed Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis spores, or a clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain on stainless steel, polypropylene, or fabric. All test coupons were subjected to 20-min biocidal aerosols of chlorine-matched (100 ppm) sodium hypochlorite, chlorine dioxide, or ECAS within a standard aerosolization chamber using a commercial humidifier under defined conditions. Biocidal treatment type and material surface had a significant effect on the number of microorganisms recovered from various material surfaces following treatment exposure. Under the conditions of the assay, the order of antimicrobial efficacy of biocidal aerosol treatment was as follows: ECAS > chlorine dioxide > sodium hypochlorite. For all biocides, greater antimicrobial reductions were seen when treating stainless steel and fabric than when treating plastic-associated microorganisms. The experimental fogging system and assay protocol designed within this study were shown capable of differentiating the comparative efficacies of multiple chlorine-matched biocidal aerosols against a spectrum of target organisms on a range of test surface materials and would be appropriate for testing other biocidal aerosol treatments or material surfaces. PMID:23459480

  6. Outpatient penicillin use after negative skin testing and drug challenge in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Paradis, Louis; Nguyen, Mélanie; Bégin, Philippe; Paradis, Jean; Des Roches, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The practice of elective penicillin skin testing could be compromised by the fact that patients, their parents, or their physicians remain reluctant to reuse penicillin-class antibiotics (PCAs) despite a negative evaluation by an allergist. This study addresses reuse of PCAs in a pediatric population after negative penicillin skin testing and drug challenge and factors associated with its reluctance. All children evaluated for a history of penicillin allergy at the CHU Sainte-Justine Allergy Clinic between January 1998 and June 2000 with negative skin testing and drug challenge were included in the study. A telephone survey was conducted between May and October 2002 to assess the perception of the initial reaction by the parents, subsequent use of antibiotics, and antibiotic-related adverse reactions. Among the 200 children selected, parents of 170 (85%) children completed the survey. Since the allergist evaluation, 130 (76%) children had received antibiotics. PCA was used in 59 (45%) children. Parents of 24 (18%) children refused PCAs because they still feared an adverse reaction. They were more likely to have been very frightened by their child's allergic reaction than other parents whose children had used PCAs (p = 0.008). Although elective penicillin skin testing is useful and safe in the pediatric population, a significant proportion of parents still refuse PCAs even though they are needed. Identification of parents that were very frightened by their children's allergic reactions and additional reassurance could improve this situation.

  7. Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and human pulmonary deposition calculations for Nuclear Site 201, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

    1982-06-21

    This study determined the plutonium-aerosol fluxes from the soil to quantify (1) the extent of potential human exposure by deep-lung retention of alpha-emitting particles; (2) the source term should there be any significant, long-term, transport of plutonium aerosols; and (3) the resuspension factor and rate so that, for the first time at any nuclear site, one may calculate how long it will take for wind erosion to carry away a significant amount of the contaminated soil. High-volume air samplers and cascade impactors were used to characterize the plutonium aerosols. Meteorological flux-profile methods were used to calculate dust and plutonium aerosol emission rates. A floorless wind tunnel (10-m long) was used to examine resuspension under steady-state, high wind speed. The resuspension factor was two orders of magnitude lower than the other comparable sites at NTS and elsewhere, and the average resuspension rate of 5.3 x 10/sup -8//d was also very low, so that the half-time for resuspension by wind erosion was about 36,000 y.

  8. Development of a BCG challenge model for the testing of vaccine candidates against tuberculosis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Berg, Stefan; Chamberlain, Laura; McShane, Helen; Hewinson, R Glyn; Clifford, Derek; Vordermeier, Martin

    2014-09-29

    Vaccination is being considered as part of a sustainable strategy for the control of bovine tuberculosis (BTB) in the UK. The live attenuated Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been used experimentally to vaccinate cattle against BTB. However, BCG confers partial protection against BTB and therefore, there is a need to develop improved vaccines. BTB vaccine efficacy experiments require the use of biosafety level 3 facilities which are expensive to maintain, generally oversubscribed and represent a bottle neck for the testing of vaccine candidates. One indicator of the induction of protective responses would be the ability of the host's immune response to control/kill mycobacteria. In this work we have evaluated an intranodal BCG challenge for the selection of vaccine candidates at biosafety level 2 which are capable of inducing mycobactericidal responses. To our knowledge, this is the first such report. Whilst BCG only confers partial protection, it is still the standard against which other vaccines are judged. Therefore we tested the BCG intranodal challenge in BCG (Danish strain) vaccinated cattle and showed that vaccinated cattle had lower BCG cfu counts than naïve cattle at 14 and 21 days after intranodal challenge with BCG (Tokyo strain). This model could help prioritize competing TB vaccine candidates and exploration of primary and secondary immune responses to mycobacteria. PMID:25138291

  9. Use of In Situ Cloud Condensation Nuclei, Extinction, and Aerosol Size Distribution Measurements to Test a Method for Retrieving Cloud Condensation Nuclei Profiles From Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Stephen J.; Rissman, Tracey A.; Ellman, Robert; Ferrare, Richard A.; Turner, David; Flynn, Connor; Wang, Jian; Ogren, John; Hudson, James; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; VanReken, Timothy; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    If the aerosol composition and size distribution below cloud are uniform, the vertical profile of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration can be retrieved entirely from surface measurements of CCN concentration and particle humidification function and surface-based retrievals of relative humidity and aerosol extinction or backscatter. This provides the potential for long-term measurements of CCN concentrations near cloud base. We have used a combination of aircraft, surface in situ, and surface remote sensing measurements to test various aspects of the retrieval scheme. Our analysis leads us to the following conclusions. The retrieval works better for supersaturations of 0.1% than for 1% because CCN concentrations at 0.1% are controlled by the same particles that control extinction and backscatter. If in situ measurements of extinction are used, the retrieval explains a majority of the CCN variance at high supersaturation for at least two and perhaps five of the eight flights examined. The retrieval of the vertical profile of the humidification factor is not the major limitation of the CCN retrieval scheme. Vertical structure in the aerosol size distribution and composition is the dominant source of error in the CCN retrieval, but this vertical structure is difficult to measure from remote sensing at visible wavelengths.

  10. Diagnostic Role of Captopril Challenge Test in Korean Subjects with High Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hee; Park, Kyeong Seon; Hong, A Ram; Shin, Chan Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of primary aldosteronism (PA) begins with aldosterone-to-renin ratio (ARR) measurement followed by confirmative tests. However, the ARR has high false positive rates which led to unnecessary confirmatory tests. Captopril challenge test (CCT) has been used as one of confirmatory tests, but the accuracy of it in the diagnosis of PA is still controversial. We aimed to examine the clinical efficacy of CCT as a post-screening test in PA. Methods In a prospective study, we enrolled subjects with suspected PA who had hypertension and ARR >20 (ng/dL)/(ng/mL/hr). Sixty-four patients who underwent both the saline infusion test and the CCT were included. Results The diagnostic performance of plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) post-CCT was greater than that of ARR post-CCT and ARR pre-CCT in PA (area under the curve=0.956, 0.797, and 0.748, respectively; P=0.001). A cut-off value of 13 ng/dL showed the highest diagnostic odds ratio considering PAC post-CCT at 60 and 90 minutes. A PAC post-CCT of 19 ng/dL had a specificity of 100%, which can be used as a cut-off value for the confirmative test. Determining the diagnostic performance of PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes was sufficient for PA diagnosis. Subjects with PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes <13 ng/dL are less likely to have PA, and those with PAC post-CCT at 90 minutes ≥13 but <19 ng/dL should undergo secondary confirmatory tests. Conclusion The CCT test may be a reliable post-screening test to avoid the hospitalization in the setting of falsely elevated ARR screening tests. PMID:27184013

  11. Adaptive identification and interpretation of pressure transient tests of horizontal wells: challenges and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. L.; Van Hoang, Dong

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with a topical issue of defining oil reservoir properties during transient tests of horizontal wells equipped with information-measuring systems and reducing well downtime. The aim is to consider challenges and perspectives of developing models and algorithms for adaptive identification and interpretation of transient tests in horizontal wells with pressure buildup curve analysis. The models and algorithms should allow analyzing flow behavior, defining oil reservoir properties and determining well test completion time, as well as reducing well downtime. The present paper is based on the previous theoretical and practical findings in the spheres of transient well testing, systems analysis, system identification, function optimization and linear algebra. Field data and results of transient well tests with pressure buildup curve analysis have also been considered. The suggested models and algorithms for adaptive interpretation of transient tests conducted in horizontal wells with resulting pressure buildup curve make it possible to analyze flow behavior, as well as define the reservoir properties and determine well test completion time. The algorithms for adaptive interpretation are based on the integrated system of radial flow PBC models with time- dependent variables, account of additional a priori information and estimates of radial flow permeability. Optimization problems are solved with the case study of PBC interpretation for five horizontal wells of the Verkhnechonsk field.

  12. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  13. Design Challenges Encountered in a Propulsion-Controlled Aircraft Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Trindel; Burken, John; Burcham, Frank; Schaefer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center conducted flight tests of a propulsion-controlled aircraft system on an F-15 airplane. This system was designed to explore the feasibility of providing safe emergency landing capability using only the engines to provide flight control in the event of a catastrophic loss of conventional flight controls. Control laws were designed to control the flightpath and bank angle using only commands to the throttles. Although the program was highly successful, this paper highlights some of the challenges associated with using engine thrust as a control effector. These challenges include slow engine response time, poorly modeled nonlinear engine dynamics, unmodeled inlet-airframe interactions, and difficulties with ground effect and gust rejection. Flight and simulation data illustrate these difficulties.

  14. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  15. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter < 200 nm and a geometric standard deviation σg < 2.5 (5). The generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M

  16. Evaluations of Thin Cirrus Contamination and Screening in Ground Aerosol Observations Using Collocated Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Berkoff, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Cirrus clouds, particularly sub visual high thin cirrus with low optical thickness, are difficult to be screened in operational aerosol retrieval algorithms. Collocated aerosol and cirrus observations from ground measurements, such as the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET), provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of operational aerosol products to thin cirrus contamination. Quality assured aerosol optical thickness (AOT) measurements were also tested against the CALIPSO vertical feature mask (VFM) and the MODIS-derived thin cirrus screening parameters for the purpose of evaluating thin cirrus contamination. Key results of this study include: (1) Quantitative evaluations of data uncertainties in AERONET AOT retrievals are conducted. Although AERONET cirrus screening schemes are successful in removing most cirrus contamination, strong residuals displaying strong spatial and seasonal variability still exist, particularly over thin cirrus prevalent regions during cirrus peak seasons, (2) Challenges in matching up different data for analysis are highlighted and corresponding solutions proposed, and (3) Estimation of the relative contributions from cirrus contamination to aerosol retrievals are discussed. The results are valuable for better understanding and further improving ground aerosol measurements that are critical for aerosol-related climate research.

  17. Ground test challenges in the development of the Space Shuttle orbiter auxiliary power unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaffee, N. H.; Lance, R. J.; Weary, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    A conventional aircraft hydraulic system design approach was selected to provide fluid power for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Developing the power unit, known as the Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), to drive the hydraulic pumps presented a major technological challenge. A small, high speed turbine drive unit powered by catalytically decomposed hydrazine and operating in the pulse mode was selected to meet the requirement. Because of limitations of vendor test facilities, significant portions of the development, flight qualification, and postflight anomaly testing of the Orbiter APU were accomplished at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) test facilities. This paper discusses the unique requirements of attitude, gravity forces, pressure profiles, and thermal environments which had to be satisfied by the APU, and presents the unique test facility and simulation techniques employed to meet the ground test requirements. In particular, the development of the zero-g lubrication system, the development of necessary APU thermal control techniques, the accomplishment of integrated systems tests, and the postflight investigation of the APU lube oil cooler behavior are discussed.

  18. [Expansion of HIV counseling and testing strategies: technical challenges and ethical-political tensions].

    PubMed

    Mora Cárdenas, Claudia Mercedes; Monteiro, Simone; Moreira, Carlos Otávio Fiúza

    2014-08-01

    Incentives to provide universal access to antiretroviral therapy in order to control the HIV/AIDS epidemic also encouraged the diversification of HIV testing strategies, as demonstrated by the simultaneous existence of Voluntary Counseling and Testing (VCT) and Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling (PITC). This paper analyzes the concepts, principles and implementation of the VCT and PITC models regarding counseling, confidentiality and informed consent in Brazil and other countries, based on a literature review of works in the Lilacs, Medline, Sociological Abstracts and Cochrane databases published between 2000 and 2013. According to the literature, PITC increases rates of testing in comparison with VCT, but reduces sexual and reproductive rights and the autonomy of users. These findings suggest technical challenges and ethical tensions between the paradigm of exceptionalism and the normalization of HIV testing. The necessity to reconcile increased access to HIV tests with the local capacity to offer comprehensive care for people living with HIV/AIDS is highlighted. It is recommended that interdisciplinary studies about the social effects of VCT and PITC be amplified.

  19. [Trends and Challenges of the Statutory Regulation of Molecular Genetic Tests].

    PubMed

    Nobori, Tsutomu

    2015-07-01

    Advances in basic science have made it possible to characterize tumors at molecular levels and exploit the differences in the genetic makeup of tumors for personalized cancer treatment. Biomarker tests are essential to stratify patients with the same tumor histology for appropriate treatment. Such tests are developed together with drugs, involving mainly molecular genetic tests at present, and are called companion diagnostics (CDx). Under the universal health care system in Japan, molecular genetic tests are permitted in clinics, and the fees are reimbursed only when approved diagnostic reagents or kits are used. However, new tests are developed so fast that the regulation cannot keep up with the pace. To fill this gap, the framework of advanced medical technologies was introduced in 1984. In 2012, this framework was amended to classify medical technology using unapproved diagnostics or home-brew assays as advanced medical technologies A. In my talk at this symposium, trends and challenges of the statutory regulation of molecular genetic tests in Japan were discussed, followed by personal proposals to advance the clinical application of novel medical technologies in the field of personalized cancer treatment.

  20. Halogen bonded supramolecular capsules: a challenging test case for quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Recently, Diederich et al. synthesized the first supramolecular capsule with a well-defined four-point halogen bonding interaction [Angew. Chem., Int. Ed., 2015, 54, 12339]. This interesting system comprising about 400 atoms represents a challenging test case for accurate quantum chemical methods. We investigate it with our new density functional based composite method for structures and noncovalent interactions (PBEh-3c) as well as our standard protocol for supramolecular thermochemistry and give predictions for chemical modifications to improve the binding strength. PMID:27416814

  1. Behaviour of Listeria Monocytogenes in Artisanal Raw Milk Pecorino Umbro Cheese: A Microbiological Challenge Test

    PubMed Central

    Ortenzi, Roberta; Branciari, Raffaella; Primavilla, Sara; Valiani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a microbiological challenge test in artificially contaminated raw milk Pecorino Umbro cheese during cheese-making was carried out. Raw ewe milk was contaminated by a suspension of particular Listeria monocytogenes strains. The number of L. monocytogenes and L. monocytogenes dynamic growth were evaluated during cheese-making and storage. A significant decrease of the viable count of L. monocytogenes was observed during ripening and L. monocytogenes viable count was below the limit of quantification during storage. The results show that the product is unable to support the growth of the pathogen. PMID:27800412

  2. International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop on Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  3. Feasibility of HIV point-of-care tests for resource-limited settings: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Wendy; Gous, Natasha; Ford, Nathan; Scott, Lesley E

    2014-01-01

    Improved access to anti-retroviral therapy increases the need for affordable monitoring using assays such as CD4 and/or viral load in resource-limited settings. Barriers to accessing treatment, high rates of loss to initiation and poor retention in care are prompting the need to find alternatives to conventional centralized laboratory testing in certain countries. Strong advocacy has led to a rapidly expanding repertoire of point-of-care tests for HIV. point-of-care testing is not without its challenges: poor regulatory control, lack of guidelines, absence of quality monitoring and lack of industry standards for connectivity, to name a few. The management of HIV increasingly requires a multidisciplinary testing approach involving hematology, chemistry, and tests associated with the management of non-communicable diseases, thus added expertise is needed. This is further complicated by additional human resource requirements and the need for continuous training, a sustainable supply chain, and reimbursement strategies. It is clear that to ensure appropriate national implementation either in a tiered laboratory model or a total decentralized model, clear country-specific assessments need to be conducted. PMID:25197773

  4. Cell culture adapted sheeppox virus as a challenge virus for potency testing of sheeppox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, M; Bhanuprakash, V; Kallesh, D J; Balamurugan, V; Pande, A; Singh, R K

    2008-10-01

    Sheeppox virus from an outbreak of sheeppox that occurred in Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir, India) in 2000 was isolated by inoculation of susceptible sheep and further re-isolated in cell culture. The field virus, adapted to grow in lamb testes culture, was evaluated for its potential use as challenge virus in potency testing of sheeppox vaccine currently in use. The virus (passage 6) produced severe disease in susceptible sheep when inoculated subcutaneously with a dose of 106.2 TCID50. The virus identity was confirmed by PCR, sequencing of P32 gene and species-specific signature residues identified in deduced aa sequence of the gene. The virus was successfully evaluated for its virulence using two batches of sheep pox vaccines. Use of this field virus enables consistent potency experiments of sheeppox vaccines avoiding use of animals for its propagation and titration.

  5. A comparison of fasting plasma glucose and glucose challenge test for screening of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Poomalar, G K; Rangaswamy, V

    2013-07-01

    Glucose challenge test (GCT) has been used as an effective screening test for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), though it has its own limitations. Hence, we assessed the effectiveness of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) as a simpler alternative procedure. A prospective study was done in 500 pregnant women with gestational age between 22 and 37 weeks. FPG, GCT and GTT were performed in all patients using the glucose oxidase/peroxidase method. The overall sensitivity and specificity of GCT were 75.0% and 92.0%, respectively and the corresponding values for FPG were 88.8% and 95.2%. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 42.2% and 97.9% for GCT and 59.2% and 99.1% for FPG, respectively. We conclude that FPG can be used as an effective screening tool for gestational diabetes mellitus.

  6. 46 CFR Appendix E to Subpart C to... - Respirator Fit Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... completely. Then, the bulb must be released and allowed to expand fully. (vii) The bulb must be squeezed... test agent is a gas or vapor. (2) Challenge agent means the aerosol, gas, or vapor introduced into...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix E to Subpart C of... - Respirator Fit Tests

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... completely. Then, the bulb must be released and allowed to expand fully. (vii) The bulb must be squeezed... test agent is a gas or vapor. (2) Challenge agent means the aerosol, gas, or vapor introduced into...

  8. In Vitro Evaluation of a Device for Intra-Pulmonary Aerosol Generation and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Naqwi, Amir A.; Dolovich, Myrna; Somani, Arif

    2015-01-01

    For infants born with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), liquid bolus delivery of surfactant administered through an endotracheal tube is common practice. While this method is generally effective, complications such as transient hypoxia, hypercapnia, and altered cerebral blood flow may occur. Aerosolized surfactant therapy has been explored as an alternative. Unfortunately, past efforts have led to disappointing results as aerosols were generated outside the lungs with significant pharyngeal deposition and minimal intrapulmonary instillation. A novel aerosol generator (Microjet™) is evaluated herein for intrapulmonary aerosol generation within an endotracheal tube and tested with Curosurf and Infasurf surfactants. Compared with other aerosol delivery devices, this process utilizes low air flow (range 0.01-0.2 L/min) that is ideal for limiting potential barotrauma to the premature newborn lung. The mass mean diameter (MMD) of the particles for both tested surfactants was less than 4 μm, which is ideal for both uniform and distal lung delivery. As an indicator of phospholipid function, surfactant surface tension was measured before and after aerosol formation; with no significant difference. Moreover, this device has an outside diameter of <1mm, which permits insertion into an endotracheal tube (of even 2.0 mm). In the premature infant where intravenous access is either technically challenging or difficult, aerosol drug delivery may provide an alternative route in patient resuscitation, stabilization and care. Other potential applications of this type of device include the delivery of nutrients, antibiotics, and analgesics via the pulmonary route. PMID:26884641

  9. Mars Science Laboratory Sample Acquisition, Sample Processing and Handling: Subsystem Design and Test Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jandura, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling subsystem for the Mars Science Laboratory is a highly-mechanized, Rover-based sampling system that acquires powdered rock and regolith samples from the Martian surface, sorts the samples into fine particles through sieving, and delivers small portions of the powder into two science instruments inside the Rover. SA/SPaH utilizes 17 actuated degrees-of-freedom to perform the functions needed to produce 5 sample pathways in support of the scientific investigation on Mars. Both hardware redundancy and functional redundancy are employed in configuring this sampling system so some functionality is retained even with the loss of a degree-of-freedom. Intentional dynamic environments are created to move sample while vibration isolators attenuate this environment at the sensitive instruments located near the dynamic sources. In addition to the typical flight hardware qualification test program, two additional types of testing are essential for this kind of sampling system: characterization of the intentionally-created dynamic environment and testing of the sample acquisition and processing hardware functions using Mars analog materials in a low pressure environment. The overall subsystem design and configuration are discussed along with some of the challenges, tradeoffs, and lessons learned in the areas of fault tolerance, intentional dynamic environments, and special testing

  10. Non-invasive prenatal testing: a review of international implementation and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Allyse, Megan; Minear, Mollie A; Berson, Elisa; Sridhar, Shilpa; Rote, Margaret; Hung, Anthony; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal genetic testing (NIPT) is an advance in the detection of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies that analyzes cell-free fetal DNA in the blood of a pregnant woman. Since its introduction to clinical practice in Hong Kong in 2011, NIPT has quickly spread across the globe. While many professional societies currently recommend that NIPT be used as a screening method, not a diagnostic test, its high sensitivity (true positive rate) and specificity (true negative rate) make it an attractive alternative to the serum screens and invasive tests currently in use. Professional societies also recommend that NIPT be accompanied by genetic counseling so that families can make informed reproductive choices. If NIPT becomes more widely adopted, States will have to implement regulation and oversight to ensure it fits into existing legal frameworks, with particular attention to returning fetal sex information in areas where sex-based abortions are prevalent. Although there are additional challenges for NIPT uptake in the developing world, including the lack of health care professionals and infrastructure, the use of NIPT in low-resource settings could potentially reduce the need for skilled clinicians who perform invasive testing. Future advances in NIPT technology promise to expand the range of conditions that can be detected, including single gene disorders. With these advances come questions of how to handle incidental findings and variants of unknown significance. Moving forward, it is essential that all stakeholders have a voice in crafting policies to ensure the ethical and equitable use of NIPT across the world. PMID:25653560

  11. Developing a Test for Exploring Student Performance in a Complex Domain: Challenges Faced, Decisions Made, and Implications Drawn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalambous, Charalambos Y.; Kyriakides, Leonidas; Philippou, George N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the application of existing guidelines to develop a test grounded in theoretical perspectives and empirical findings in the area of problem solving. By documenting this process, the paper outlines the challenges test developers face when seeking to construct a theory/research-driven test, discusses the decisions made at…

  12. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Benjamin J.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients’ health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  13. The Current Landscape of Genetic Testing in Cardiovascular Malformations: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Landis, Benjamin J; Ware, Stephanie M

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiovascular malformations (CVMs) frequently have a genetic contribution. Through the application of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, DNA sequence variants associated with CVMs are being identified at a rapid pace. While clinicians are now able to offer testing with NGS gene panels or whole exome sequencing to any patient with a CVM, the interpretation of genetic variation remains problematic. Variable phenotypic expression, reduced penetrance, inconsistent phenotyping methods, and the lack of high-throughput functional testing of variants contribute to these challenges. This article elaborates critical issues that impact the decision to broadly implement clinical molecular genetic testing in CVMs. Major benefits of testing include establishing a genetic diagnosis, facilitating cost-effective screening of family members who may have subclinical disease, predicting recurrence risk in offsprings, enabling early diagnosis and anticipatory management of CV and non-CV disease phenotypes, predicting long-term outcomes, and facilitating the development of novel therapies aimed at disease improvement or prevention. Limitations include financial cost, psychosocial cost, and ambiguity of interpretation of results. Multiplex families and patients with syndromic features are two groups where disease causation could potentially be firmly established. However, these account for the minority of the overall CVM population, and there is increasing recognition that genotypes previously associated with syndromes also exist in patients who lack non-CV findings. In all circumstances, ongoing dialog between cardiologists and clinical geneticists will be needed to accurately interpret genetic testing and improve these patients' health. This may be most effectively implemented by the creation and support of CV genetics services at centers committed to pursuing testing for patients. PMID:27504451

  14. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  15. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    PubMed

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint.

  16. Addressing Challenges to the Design & Test of Operational Lighting Environments for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Toni A.

    2014-01-01

    In our day to day lives, the availability of light, with which to see our environment, is often taken for granted. The designers of land based lighting systems use sunlight and artificial light as their toolset. The availability of power, quantity of light sources, and variety of design options are often unlimited. The accessibility of most land based lighting systems makes it easy for the architect and engineer to verify and validate their design ideas. Failures with an implementation, while sometimes costly, can easily be addressed by renovation. Consider now, an architectural facility orbiting in space, 260 miles above the surface of the earth. This human rated architectural facility, the International Space Station (ISS) must maintain operations every day, including life support and appropriate human comforts without fail. The facility must also handle logistics of regular shipments of cargo, including new passengers. The ISS requires accommodations necessary for human control of machine systems. Additionally, the ISS is a research facility and supports investigations performed inside and outside its livable volume. Finally, the facility must support remote operations and observations by ground controllers. All of these architectural needs require a functional, safe, and even an aesthetic lighting environment. At Johnson Space Center, our Habitability and Human Factors team assists our diverse customers with their lighting environment challenges, via physical test and computer based analysis. Because of the complexity of ISS operational environment, our team has learned and developed processes that help ISS operate safely. Because of the dynamic exterior lighting environment, uses computational modeling to predict the lighting environment. The ISS' orbit exposes it to a sunrise every 90 minutes, causing work surfaces to quickly change from direct sunlight to earthshine to total darkness. Proper planning of vehicle approaches, robotics operations, and crewed

  17. AGONIST-MEDIATED AIRWAY CHALLENGE: CARDIOPULMONARY INTERACTIONS MODULATE GAS EXCHANGE AND RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    To better understand the early phase response (0-60 minutes) to airway challenge, we examined cardiopulmonary reactions during ovalbumin (OVA), histamine, and methacholine aerosol challenge tests in guinea pigs. Propranolol and 100% O2 were used to modify the reacti...

  18. Physical competition increases testosterone among Amazonian forager-horticulturalists: a test of the 'challenge hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Benjamin C; Cummings, Daniel; von Rueden, Christopher; O'Connor, Kathleen A; Smith, Eric A; Gurven, Michael; Kaplan, Hillard

    2012-07-22

    The challenge hypothesis posits that acute increases in testosterone (T) during male-male competition enhance performance and survivability while limiting the physiological costs of consistently high T. Human challenge hypothesis research focuses on young men in industrial populations, who have higher baseline T levels than men in subsistence populations. We tested whether the Tsimane, pathogenically stressed forager-horticulturalists of the Bolivian Amazon, would express acute T increases in response to physical competition. Saliva was collected from 88 Tsimane men (aged 16-59 years) before and after a competitive soccer match. Tsimane men had significantly lower baseline levels of T (β = -0.41, p < 0.001) when compared with age-matched United States (US) males. Linear mixed-effects models were used to establish that T increased significantly immediately following competition (β = 0.23, p < 0.001), remaining high 1 h later (β = 0.09, p = 0.007); equivalent to 30.1 and 15.5 per cent increases in T, respectively. We did not find larger increases in T among winners (p = 0.412), although T increases were positively associated with self-rated performance (β = 9.07, p = 0.004). These results suggest that despite lower levels of T than US males, Tsimane males exhibit acute increases in T at the same relative magnitude reported by studies in industrialized settings, with larger increases in T for those who report better individual performance.

  19. Bacterial challenge of NISSHO ultrafilter ETF 609: results of in vitro testing.

    PubMed

    Krautzig, S; Lonnemann, G; Shaldon, S; Koch, K M

    1996-07-01

    In hemodialysis, a certain degree of bacterial contamination on the dialysate side is a regular finding. Concern has been growing that this contamination may lead to a chronic inflammatory response in the patient. Ultrafiltration of dialysate can be used to reduce bacterial content and levels of cytokine-inducing substances upstream of the patient's dialyzer. The aim of this study was to test in vitro the rejection capacity of a polysulfone hollow-fiber ultrafilter (ETF 609, NISSHO Co., Osaka, Japan) challenged with bacterial filtrates derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA103. Results showed a reduction of interleukin-1 beta-inducing activity (measured on peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from 5,035 +/- 394 pg/ml prefilter to nondetectable levels postfilter and endotoxin levels (limulus amebocyte lysate assay) of 4,167 +/- 1,079 versus 12 +/- 2 pg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, ultrafiltration of dialysate with the polysulfone ultrafilter ETF 609 leads to a potent reduction of cytokine-inducing activity.

  20. Multiple roles of Myd88 in the immune response to the plague F1-V vaccine and in protection against an aerosol challenge of Yersinia pestis CO92 in mice.

    PubMed

    Dankmeyer, Jennifer L; Fast, Randy L; Cote, Christopher K; Worsham, Patricia L; Fritz, David; Fisher, Diana; Kern, Steven J; Merkel, Tod; Kirschning, Carsten J; Amemiya, Kei

    2014-01-01

    The current candidate vaccine against Yersinia pestis infection consists of two subunit proteins: the capsule protein or F1 protein and the low calcium response V protein or V-antigen. Little is known of the recognition of the vaccine by the host's innate immune system and how it affects the acquired immune response to the vaccine. Thus, we vaccinated Toll-like receptor (Tlr) 2, 4, and 2/4-double deficient, as well as signal adaptor protein Myd88-deficient mice. We found that Tlr4 and Myd88 appeared to be required for an optimal immune response to the F1-V vaccine but not Tlr2 when compared to wild-type mice. However, there was a difference between the requirement for Tlr4 and MyD88 in vaccinated animals. When F1-V vaccinated Tlr4 mutant (lipopolysaccharide tolerant) and Myd88-deficient mice were challenged by aerosol with Y. pestis CO92, all but one Tlr4 mutant mice survived the challenge, but no vaccinated Myd88-deficient mice survived the challenge. Spleens from these latter nonsurviving mice showed that Y. pestis was not cleared from the infected mice. Our results suggest that MyD88 appears to be important for both an optimal immune response to F1-V and in protection against a lethal challenge of Y. pestis CO92 in F1-V vaccinated mice.

  1. A Climatology of Global Aerosol Mixtures to Support Sentinel-5P and Earthcare Mission Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Amaridis, V.; Kahn, R. A.

    2015-06-01

    Since constraining aerosol type with satellite remote sensing continues to be a challenge, we present a newly derived global climatology of aerosol mixtures to support atmospheric composition studies that are planned for Sentinel-5P and EarthCARE. The global climatology is obtained via application of iterative cluster analysis to gridded global decadal and seasonal mean values of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of sulfate, biomass burning, mineral dust and marine aerosol as a proportion of the total AOD at 500nm output from the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART). For both the decadal and seasonal means, the number of aerosol mixtures (clusters) identified is ≈10. Analysis of the percentage contribution of the component aerosol types to each mixture allowed development of a straightforward naming convention and taxonomy, and assignment of primary colours for the generation of true colour-mixing and easy-to-interpret maps of the spatial distribution of clusters across the global grid. To further help characterize the mixtures, aerosol robotic network (AERONET) Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion products were extracted from each cluster's spatial domain and used to estimate climatological values of key optical and microphysical parameters. The aerosol type climatology represents current knowledge that would be enhanced, possibly corrected, and refined by high temporal and spectral resolution, cloud-free observations produced by Sentinel-5P and EarthCARE instruments. The global decadal mean and seasonal gridded partitions comprise a preliminary reference framework and global climatology that can help inform the choice of components and mixtures in aerosol retrieval algorithms used by instruments such as TROPOMI and ATLID, and to test retrieval results.

  2. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  3. Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Ignatov, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO) developed at NESDIS generates three products from AVHRR, operationally: clear sky radiances in all bands, and sea surface temperature (SST) derived from clear-sky brightness temperatures (BT) in Ch3B (centered at 3.7 μm), Ch4 (11 μm) and Ch5 (12 μm), and aerosol optical depths (AOD) derived from clear-sky reflectances in Ch1 (0.63), Ch2 (0.83) and Ch3A (1.61 μm). An integral part of ACSPO is the fast Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM), which calculates first-guess clear-sky BTs using global NCEP forecast atmospheric and Reynolds SST fields. Simulated BTs are employed in ACSPO for improved cloud screening, physical (RTM-based) SST inversions, and to monitor and validate satellite BTs. The model minus observation biases are monitored online in near-real time using the Monitoring IR Clear-sky radiances over Oceans for SST (MICROS; http://www.star.nesdis.noaa.gov/sod/sst/micros/). A persistent positive M-O bias is observed in MICROS, partly attributed to missing aerosol in CRTM input, causing "M" to be warmer than "O". It is thus necessary to include aerosols in CRTM and quantify their effects on AVHRR BTs and SSTs. However, sensitivity of thermal bands to aerosol is only minimal, and use of solar reflectance bands is preferable to evaluate the accuracy of CRTM modeling, with global aerosol fields as input (from e.g. Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport, GOCART, or Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System, NAAPS). Once available, the corresponding M-O biases in solar reflectance bands will be added to MICROS. Also, adding CRTM simulated reflectances in ACSPO would greatly improve cloud detection, help validate CRTM in the solar reflectance bands, and assist aerosol retrievals. Running CRTM with global aerosol as input is very challenging, computationally. While CRTM is being optimized to handle such global scattering computations, a near-real time web-based Aerosol Quality Monitor (AQUAM

  4. Challenges During Microstructural Analysis and Mechanical Testing of Small-Scale Pseudoelastic NiTi Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, S.; Wagner, M. F.-X.

    2016-06-01

    Most investigations on NiTi-based shape memory alloys involve large-scale bulk material; knowledge about the martensitic transformation in small-scale NiTi structures is still limited. In this paper, we study the microstructures of thin NiTi layers and their mechanical properties, and we discuss typical challenges that arise when experiments are performed on small samples. A physical vapor deposition (PVD) process was used to deposit thin NiTi wires with a cross section of 15 × 15 μm2 and dogbone-shaped samples 5 × 500 μm2. Microstructural properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, tensile tests were performed using optical strain measurements in order to observe martensite band formation during cyclic loading. The surfaces of the crystalline wires reflect the columnar growth of NiTi during deposition. The wires exhibit pseudoelastic material behavior during tensile testing. Fracture typically occurs along the columns because the column growth direction is perpendicular to the straining direction. Electropolishing removes these local stress raisers and hence increases fracture strains. Our results demonstrate that the pseudoelastic properties of the PVD-processed materials agree well with those of conventional NiTi, and that they provide new opportunities to study the fundamentals of martensitic transformation in small-scale model systems.

  5. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    PubMed

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population. PMID:26354339

  6. Challenges of Pre- and Post-Test Counseling for Orthodox Jewish Individuals in the Premarital Phase.

    PubMed

    Rose, E; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bajaj, K; Klugman, S; Goldwaser, T

    2016-02-01

    The Jewish community has traditionally taken ownership of its health, and has taken great strides to raise awareness about genetic issues that affect the community, such as Tay-Sachs disease and Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer syndrome. Thanks in part to these heightened awareness efforts, many Orthodox Jewish individuals are now using genetics services as they begin to plan their families. Due to unique cultural and religious beliefs and perceptions, the Orthodox Jewish patients who seek genetic counseling face many barriers to a successful counseling session, and often seek the guidance of programs such as the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH). In this article, we present clinical vignettes from the PJGH's clinical affiliate, the Reproductive Genetics practice at the Montefiore Medical Center. These cases highlight unique features of contemporary premarital counseling and screening within the Orthodox Jewish Community, including concerns surrounding stigma, disclosure, "marriageability," the use of reproductive technologies, and the desire to include a third party in decision making. Our vignettes demonstrate the importance of culturally-sensitive counseling. We provide strategies and points to consider when addressing the challenges of pre- and post-test counseling as it relates to genetic testing in this population.

  7. High-Stakes Testing in the Warm Heart of Africa: The Challenges and Successes of the Malawi National Examinations Board

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakwera, Elias; Khembo, Dafter; Sireci, Stephen G.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, tests are held to high standards of quality. In developing countries such as Malawi, psychometricians must deal with these same high standards as well as several additional pressures such as widespread cheating, test administration difficulties due to challenging landscapes and poor resources, difficulties in reliably scoring…

  8. An objective approach for Burkholderia pseudomallei strain selection as challenge material for medical countermeasures efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Van Zandt, Kristopher E; Tuanyok, Apichai; Keim, Paul S; Warren, Richard L; Gelhaus, H Carl

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis, a rare disease of biodefense concern with high mortality and extreme difficulty in treatment. No human vaccines are available that protect against B. pseudomallei infection, and with the current limitations of antibiotic treatment, the development of new preventative and therapeutic interventions is crucial. Although clinical trials could be used to test the efficacy of new medical countermeasures (MCMs), the high mortality rates associated with melioidosis raises significant ethical issues concerning treating individuals with new compounds with unknown efficacies. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has formulated a set of guidelines for the licensure of new MCMs to treat diseases in which it would be unethical to test the efficacy of these drugs in humans. The FDA "Animal Rule" 21 CFR 314 calls for consistent, well-characterized B. pseudomallei strains to be used as challenge material in animal models. In order to facilitate the efficacy testing of new MCMs for melioidosis using animal models, we intend to develop a well-characterized panel of strains for use. This panel will comprise of strains that were isolated from human cases, have a low passage history, are virulent in animal models, and are well-characterized phenotypically and genotypically. We have reviewed published and unpublished data on various B. pseudomallei strains to establish an objective method for selecting the strains to be included in the panel of B. pseudomallei strains with attention to five categories: animal infection models, genetic characterization, clinical and passage history, and availability of the strain to the research community. We identified 109 strains with data in at least one of the five categories, scored each strain based on the gathered data and identified six strains as candidate for a B. pseudomallei strain panel. PMID:23057010

  9. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  10. Design challenges encountered in the F-15 PCA flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Trindel A.; Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Schaefer, Peter; Burken, John

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center conducted flight tests of a propulsion-controlled aircraft system on an F-15 airplane. This system was designed to explore the feasibility of providing safe emergency landing capability using only the engines to provide flight control in the event of a catastrophic loss of conventional flight controls. Control laws were designed to control the flight path and bank angle using only commands to the throttles. While the program was highly successful, this paper concentrates on the challenges encountered using engine thrust as the only control effector. Compared to conventional flight control surfaces, the engines are slow, nonlinear, and have limited control effectiveness. This increases the vulnerability of the system to outside disturbances and changes in aerodynamic conditions. As a result, the PCA system had problems with gust rejection. Cross coupling of the longitudinal and lateral axis also occured, primarily as a result of control saturation. The normally negligible effects of inlet airframe interactions became significant with the engines as the control effector. Flight and simulation data are used to illustrate these difficulties.

  11. Oxygen challenge test in septic shock patients: prognostic value and influence of respiratory status.

    PubMed

    Mari, Arnaud; Vallée, Fabrice; Bedel, Jérome; Riu, Béatrice; Ruiz, Jean; Sanchez-Verlaan, Pascale; Geeraerts, Thomas; Génestal, Michèle; Silva, Stein; Fourcade, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Transcutaneous oxygen pressure (PtcO2) value in response to an increase of FiO2 or oxygen challenge test (OCT) in ventilated patients has been reported to be related to peripheral perfusion and outcome during septic shock. However, patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome could demonstrate compromised arterial oxygenation with OCT impairment decoupled to circulatory failure. The aims of this study were to confirm the prognostic value of OCT and to explore the influence of respiratory status on OCT results. This was a prospective study set in an intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital. Fifty-six mechanically ventilated patients with septic shock criteria were studied. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure was measured at baseline and after OCT, at intensive care unit admittance (T0), and 24 h later (T24). Survival at day 28 and hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed and compared according to outcome and respiratory status. Central hemodynamic parameters or static transcutaneous data did not differ between survivors and nonsurvivors at enrollment. The OCT was statistically different at T24 according to outcome (P < 0.001), but sensitivity was low (53%). Moreover, patients with low OCT results at T24 exhibited more severe respiratory failure (P < 0.01). The OCT at T24 is related to outcome but is influenced by the severity of respiratory failure. Our results suggest considering with caution hemodynamic management based on OCT in septic shock patients with altered pulmonary function.

  12. Manufacturing and test of 2G-HTS coils for rotating machines: Challenges, conductor requirements, realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oomen, Marijn; Herkert, Werner; Bayer, Dietmar; Kummeth, Peter; Nick, Wolfgang; Arndt, Tabea

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the use of 2nd-generation High-Temperature Superconductors (2G-HTSs) in the rotors of electrical motors and generators. For these devices the conductor must be wound into robust impregnated coils, which are operated in vacuum at temperatures around 30 K, in strong magnetic fields of about 2T. Differences in thermal contraction between the coil former, conductor constituents, impregnation resin, bandage and heat-sink materials (assembled at room temperature) cause mechanical stresses at operating temperature. Rotating-machine operation adds Lorentz forces and challenging centripetal accelerations up to thousands of g. Second generation-HTS conductors withstand large tensile stresses in axial direction and compression in normal direction. However, shear stresses, axial compression, and tension normal to the conductor can cause degradation in superconducting properties. Such stresses can be mitigated by correct choice of materials, coil lay-out and manufacturing process. A certain stress level will remain, which the conductor must withstand. We have manufactured many impregnated round and race-track coils, using different 2G-HTS conductors, and tested them at temperatures from 25 K to 77 K. Degradation of the superconductor in early coils was traced to the mentioned differences in thermal contraction, and was completely avoided in coils produced later. We will discuss appropriate coil-winding techniques to assure robust and reliable superconductor performance.

  13. [Aerosol therapy].

    PubMed

    Wildhaber, J H

    1998-08-15

    Aerosol therapy plays a major role in the diagnosis and treatment of various lung diseases. The aim of inhalation therapy is to deposit a reproducible and adequate dose of a specific drug to the airways, in order to achieve a high, local, clinical effect while avoiding serious systemic side effects. To achieve this goal, it is therefore important to have an efficient inhalation device to deliver different medications. However, the currently available therapeutic inhalation devices (nebuliser, pressurised metered-dose inhaler and dry powder inhaler) are not very efficient in aerosol delivery and have several disadvantages. Inhalation devices can be assessed by in vitro studies, filter studies and radiolabelled deposition studies. Several radiolabelled deposition studies have shown that nebulisers and pressurised metered-dose inhalers are not very efficient in aerosol delivery. In children, before 1997, only 0.5% to 15% of the total nebulised or actuated dose from a nebuliser or pressurised metered-dose inhaler actually reached the lungs. These numbers were somewhat improved in adults, 30% of the total nebulised or actuated dose reaching the airways. Aerosol therapy with dry powder inhalers was the most efficient before 1997, 30% of the total dose being deposited in the lungs of adults and children. In 1997, new developments in pressurised metered-dose inhalers much improved their efficiency in aerosol delivery. Lung deposition can be increased by up to 60% with use of a non-electrostatic holding chamber and/or a pressurised metered-dose inhaler with a hydrofluoroalkane propellant possessing superior aerosol characteristics. Several studies comparing the clinical efficiency of different inhalation devices have shown that the choice of an optimal inhalation device is crucial. In addition to the aerosol characteristics, ventilation parameters and airway morphology have an important bearing on deposition patterns. These parameters may be greatly influenced by the

  14. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy.

  15. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy. PMID:27424134

  16. Up to the Challenge: SLA Commits to New Tools and Techniques to Ace Old Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstein, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    According to conference co-chair Ty Webb, this year's Special Libraries Association (SLA) conference theme, "Climb to New Heights," challenges the info pro to "accept challenges by creating innovative solutions." To meet that need, conference programming, which runs June 3-6 in Denver, includes SYNERGY sessions, which are based on the…

  17. Detecting Lung Diseases from Exhaled Aerosols: Non-Invasive Lung Diagnosis Using Fractal Analysis and SVM Classification

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Zhao, Weizhong; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Background Each lung structure exhales a unique pattern of aerosols, which can be used to detect and monitor lung diseases non-invasively. The challenges are accurately interpreting the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and quantitatively correlating them to the lung diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, we presented a paradigm of an exhaled aerosol test that addresses the above two challenges and is promising to detect the site and severity of lung diseases. This paradigm consists of two steps: image feature extraction using sub-regional fractal analysis and data classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the breath test in four asthmatic lung models. A high-fidelity image-CFD approach was employed to compute the exhaled aerosol patterns under different disease conditions. Findings By employing the 10-fold cross-validation method, we achieved 100% classification accuracy among four asthmatic models using an ideal 108-sample dataset and 99.1% accuracy using a more realistic 324-sample dataset. The fractal-SVM classifier has been shown to be robust, highly sensitive to structural variations, and inherently suitable for investigating aerosol-disease correlations. Conclusion For the first time, this study quantitatively linked the exhaled aerosol patterns with their underlying diseases and set the stage for the development of a computer-aided diagnostic system for non-invasive detection of obstructive respiratory diseases. PMID:26422016

  18. Aerosol effects on deep convection in a multi-scale aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Morrison, H.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have been demonstrated to affect convective clouds and precipitation in observations, process models, and regional climate models. However, examining aerosol effects on convective clouds and precipitation in global climate models has been extremely challenging, as until recently the treatments in the few global climate models that include aerosol effects on convective clouds have used conventional cumulus parameterizations and hence have been quite crude. We have recently built a multi-scale aerosol-climate model, PNNL-MMF, which is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) model. The extended model explicitly treats aerosol effects on deep convection using a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme in the cloud-resolving model component of the MMF. In this presentation, we examine aerosol effects on convective clouds at the global scale using the PNNL-MMF model. Our results show that the frequency of precipitation occurrence at a given liquid water path increases with increasing aerosol loading for deep clouds with surface precipitation rate larger than 10 mm/day. This relationship is particularly evident during the summer time, when convection activity is strong, and may indicate invigoration of deep convection by aerosols. The modeled relationship of aerosols, clouds and precipitation is further compared with observations from the ARM long-term sites (e.g., SGP). The causes of the modeled relationship of aerosols, clouds and precipitations are examined by using a pair of 5-year MMF simulations with and without anthropogenic aerosols.

  19. Emerging Resistance, New Antimicrobial Agents  …  but No Tests! The Challenge of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing in the Current US Regulatory Landscape.

    PubMed

    Humphries, R M; Hindler, J A

    2016-07-01

    Accurate and timely performance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) by the clinical laboratory is paramount to combating antimicrobial resistance. The ability of laboratories in the United States to effectively perform ASTs is challenged by several factors. Some, such as new resistance mechanisms and the associated evolution of testing recommendations and breakpoints, are inevitable. Others are entirely man-made. These include unnecessarily strict US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) limitations on how commercial AST systems can be used for diagnostic testing, the absence of up-to-date performance data on these systems, and the lack of commercially available FDA-cleared tests for newer antimicrobial agents or for older agents with updated breakpoints. This viewpoint will highlight contemporary AST challenges faced by the clinical laboratory, and propose some solutions. PMID:27025822

  20. Five myofibrillar lesion types in eccentrically challenged, unloaded rat adductor longus muscle--a test model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Balog, E. M.; Fitts, R. H.; Riley, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Sarcomere disruptions are observed in the adductor longus (AL) muscles following voluntary reloading of spaceflown and hindlimb suspension unloaded (HSU) rat, which resemble lesions in eccentrically challenged muscle. We devised and tested an eccentric contraction (ECCON) test system for the 14-day HSU rat AL. Six to 7 hours following ECCON, ALs were fixed to allow immunostaining and electron microscopy (EM). Toluidine blue-stained histology semithin sections were screened for lesion density (#/mm2). Serial semithin sections from the ECCON group were characterized for myosin immunointensity of lesions. Five myofibrillar lesion types were identified in histological semithin sections: focal contractions; wide A-bands; opaque areas; missing A-bands; and hyperstretched sarcomeres. Lesion density by type was greater for ECCON than NonECCON ALs (P< or =0.05; focal contractions and opaque regions). Lesion density (#-of-all-five-types/mm2) was significantly different (ECCON: 23.91+/-10.58 vs. NonECCON: 5.48+/-1.28, P< or =0.05; ECCON vs. SHAM: 0.00+/-0.00; P< or = 0.025). PostECCON optimal tension decreased (Poi-drop, 17.84+/-4.22%) and was correlated to lesion density (R2=0.596), but prestretch tension demonstrated the highest correlation with lesion density (R2=0.994). In lesions, the darkly staining A-band lost the normally organized thick filament alignment to differing degrees across the different lesion types. Ranking the five lesion types by a measure of lesion length deformation (hypercontracted to hyperstretched) at the light microscopy level, related to the severity of thick filament registry loss across the lesion types at the electron microscopic level. This ranking suggested that the five lesion types seen in semithin sections at the light level represented a lesion progression sequence and paralleled myosin immunostaining loss as the distorted A-band filaments spread across the hyperlengthening lesion types. Lesion ultrastructure indicated damage involved

  1. Summary report on 49 L ferrocyanide aerosol tests TO208-1 and TO209-1

    SciTech Connect

    Fauske, H.K.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results of the first test conducted in a series of tests directed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). For the record, Ref.[l] is included as Appendix A. The test discussed in this document, designated as T0127-1, is a ferrocyanide reaction propagation rate determination test conducted under an inert argon atmosphere of 10 atm. abs. (130 psig). The test was conducted in a new 49 L containment volume described in Section 2.0. The test sample was dry In-Farm 1 bottom flow sheet material. The test protocol was similar to that described in Refs.[2 and 3]. However, as requested in Ref.[l] supplemental gas sample taking procedures were prepared and followed as described in Section 4.0 and Appendix B. Test results shoved an inverse reaction propagation velocity of {approx}4 sec/cm. This is about 50% faster than a prior similar test conducted under 1 atm. abs. pressure. For further comparison, this burn velocity of the ferrocyanide test is also about an order-of-magnitude slower than a slow burn gun powder at 1 atm. Pre- and post-test gas samples were taken and have been forwarded to WHC for further analyses. Details of these results are presented in Section 5.0 and comparisons with other similar reaction propagation rate tests are discussed in Section 6.0.

  2. Clomiphene citrate challenge test in the assessment of ovarian reserve before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, S; Vicdan, K; Işik, A Z; Ozgün, O D; Alaybeyoğlu, L; Polat, G; Biberoğlu, K

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the performance of clomiphene citrate (CC) challenge test to predict diminished ovarian reserve before controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The 198 women who underwent the CC challenge test fulfilled the following criteria; over 35 years of age, removal of one ovary or previous ovarian surgery, the presence of ovarian endometrioma or previous poor response to ovarian hyperstimulation. Of the patients tested, 141 were found to have a normal CC challenge test while 57 had an abnormal result. The cancellation rate of the cycle with a poor response was significantly higher in women with an abnormal test (36.8%) than in those with a normal test (19.8%) (P < 0.05). The sensitivity of CC test for cycle cancellation was found to be 43% with a specificity of 76%, positive and negative predictive values of 37 and 80%, respectively. The estradiol values on hCG day, the number of retrieved oocytes and metaphase II oocytes and the rate of transfer cycles were significantly lower in females with an abnormal test. Women with normal test results had higher pregnancy rates per embryo transfer than those with abnormal test results (21.5 vs. 13.3%) and the predictive value of an abnormal test for failing to conceive was 93% (53/57) with a sensitivity of 31%, specificity of 84% and negative predictive value of 15.6%. Of 57 women with an abnormal test result, 25 (43.8%) were abnormal due only to an elevated day 10 or 11 value of FSH, which could not be detected using only basal FSH screening. In this group, the cancellation rate (48 vs. 19.8%, P < 0.01), the rate of transfer cycles (48 vs. 72.3%, P < 0.05) and the mean number of retrieved oocytes (4.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 6.4 +/- 3.1, P < 0.01) were all significantly different from normal test group. Although the rate of pregnancies per started cycle (8 vs. 15.6%) did not show a statistically significant difference, this is most probably due to the low number

  3. Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) Method for Airborne Aerosol Light Extinction Measurement: Instrument Validation and First Results from Field Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, A.; Perim de Faria, J.; Berg, M.; Bundke, U.; Freedman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate requires the continuous measurement of aerosol optical parameters like the aerosol extinction coefficient on a regular basis. Remote sensing and ground-based networks are well in place (e.g., AERONET, ACTRIS), whereas the regular in situ measurement of vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol optical properties remains still an important challenge in quantifying climate change. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. Recently, a compact and robust family of optical instruments based on the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique has become available for measuring aerosol light extinction. While this technique was successfully deployed for ground-based atmospheric measurements under various conditions, its suitability for operation aboard aircraft in the free and upper free troposphere still has to be demonstrated. In this work, the modifications of a CAPS PMex instrument for measuring aerosol light extinction on aircraft, the results from subsequent laboratory tests for evaluating the modified instrument prototype, and first results from a field deployment aboard a research aircraft will be covered. In laboratory studies, the instrument showed excellent agreement (deviation < 5%) with theoretical values calculated from Rayleigh scattering cross-sections, when operated on pressurized air and CO2 at ambient and low pressure (~200 hPa). For monodisperse and polydisperse aerosols, reference aerosol extinction coefficients were calculated from measured size distributions and agreed with the CAPS PMex instrument

  4. A satellite view of the direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Matsoukas, Christos; Fotiadi, Aggeliki; Benas, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for better understanding and predicting current and future climate change. They are determining, apart from clouds, patterns of solar radiation through scattering and absorption processes. Especially, under cloud-free skies, aerosols are the major modulator of the solar radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. Although significant improvement has been made as to better understanding the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, there is still a need for further improvement in our knowledge of the DRE spatial and temporal patterns, in particular with respect to extended spatial and temporal coverage of relevant information. In an ongoing rapidly evolving era of great satellite-based achievements, concerning the knowledge of solar radiation budget and its modulators, and with the great progress in obtaining significant information on key aerosol optical properties needed for modeling DRE, it is a great challenge to use all this new aerosol information and to see what is the new acquired scientific knowledge. The objective of this study is to obtain an improved view of global aerosol DRE effects using contemporary accurate data for the important atmospheric and surface parameters determining the solar radiation budget, with emphasis to state of the art aerosol data. Thus, a synergy is made of different datasets providing the necessary input data and of a detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute spectral globally distributed aerosol DREs. Emphasis is given on using highly accurate and well-tested aerosol optical properties. Spectral information on aerosol optical depth (AOD) is taken from retrieved products of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, while similar information is taken from MODIS for the aerosol asymmetry parameter (AP) over ocean. Information from MODIS is also taken for the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA). All this information comes from the latest Collection

  5. Surface tension depression by low-solubility organic material in aqueous aerosol mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwier, Allison; Mitroo, Dhruv; McNeill, V. Faye

    2012-07-01

    Surface-active material, including long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs), comprises a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass. Surface-active species are thought to form a film at the gas-aerosol interface, with implications for aerosol heterogeneous chemistry and cloud formation. However, LCFA phase behavior and surface-bulk partitioning has not been characterized under most conditions typical of tropospheric aerosol water (i.e. acidic, high ionic content), making it challenging to predict surface film formation in aerosols. In this study, we present measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions containing the slightly soluble LCFAs oleic and stearic acid. The effect of varying pH, organic concentration, and inorganic salt content was tested for each system. We observe surface tension depression compared to water of up to ˜30 and 45% for aqueous solutions containing stearic or oleic acid at pH 0-8 and high inorganic salt concentrations (NaCl and (NH4)2SO4). This suggests that surface film formation is favorable for these species in atmospheric aerosols.

  6. The Challenge of Validation: Assessing the Performance of a Test of Productive Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Tess; Clenton, Jon

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the performance of a vocabulary test designed to measure second language productive vocabulary knowledge.The test, Lex30, uses a word association task to elicit vocabulary, and uses word frequency data to measure the vocabulary produced. Here we report firstly on the reliability of the test as measured by a test-retest study, a…

  7. Developments and Challenges in the Use of Computer-Based Testing for Assessing Second Language Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockey, Gary J.

    2009-01-01

    Computer-based testing (CBT) to assess second language ability has undergone remarkable development since Garret (1991) described its purpose as "the computerized administration of conventional tests" in "The Modern Language Journal." For instance, CBT has made possible the delivery of more authentic tests than traditional paper-and-pencil tests.…

  8. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  9. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  10. Early Morning Challenge: The Potential Effects of Chronobiology on Taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Roger John

    1995-01-01

    Cites research to support the notion that the time of day in which the SAT is administered has a significant adverse impact on many students taking the test. Suggests that changes in testing procedures (making tests available via computer at any time of the day or year) will serve students. (RS)

  11. [Non-invasive Genetic Prenatal Testing - A Serious Challenge for Society as a Whole].

    PubMed

    Zerres, K

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive genetic prenatal tests nowadays allow a highly reliable identification of pregnancies with foetal aneuploidies. Due to the general availability of these tests for all pregnant women, non-invasive genetic prenatal testing raises many ethical questions whieh can only be answered by a debate focused on society as a whole.

  12. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site.

  13. Type of Aerosols Determination Over Malaysia by AERONET Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Tan, F.; Abdullah, K.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are one of the most interesting studies by the researchers due to the complicated of their characteristic and are not yet well quantified. Besides that there still have huge uncertainties associated with changes in Earth's radiation budget. The previous study by other researchers shown a lot of difficulties and challenges in quantifying aerosol influences arise. As well as the heterogeneity from the aerosol loading and properties: spatial, temporal, size, and composition. In this study, we were investigated the aerosol characteristics over two regions with different environmental conditions and aerosol sources contributed. The study sites are Penang and Kuching, Malaysia where ground-based AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun-photometer was deployed. The types of the aerosols for both study sites were identified by analyzing aerosol optical depth, angstrom parameter and spectral de-convolution algorithm product from sun-photometer. The analysis was carried out associated with the in-situ meteorological data of relative humidity, visibility and air pollution index. The major aerosol type over Penang found in this study was hydrophobic aerosols. Whereas the hydrophilic type of the aerosols was highly distributed in Kuching. The major aerosol size distributions for both regions were identified in this study. The result also shows that the aerosol optical properties were affected by the types and characteristic of aerosols. Therefore, in this study we generated an algorithm to determine the aerosols in Malaysia by considered the environmental factors. From this study we found that the source of aerosols should always being consider in to retrieve the accurate information of aerosol for air quality study.

  14. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A

    2014-02-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples-which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR.

  15. Cross-Institute Evaluations of Inhibitor-Resistant PCR Reagents for Direct Testing of Aerosol and Blood Samples Containing Biological Warfare Agent DNA

    PubMed Central

    Minogue, Timothy D.; Rachwal, Phillip A.; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid pathogen detection is crucial for the timely introduction of therapeutics. Two groups (one in the United Kingdom and one in the United States) independently evaluated inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for the direct testing of substrates. In the United Kingdom, a multiplexed Bacillus anthracis (target) and Bacillus subtilis (internal-control) PCR was used to evaluate 4 reagents against 5 PCR inhibitors and down-selected the TaqMan Fast Virus 1-Step master mix (Life Technologies Inc.). In the United States, four real-time PCR assays (targeting B. anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEEV], and Orthopoxvirus spp.) were used to evaluate 5 reagents (plus the Fast Virus master mix) against buffer, blood, and soil samples and down-selected the KAPA Blood Direct master mix (KAPA Biosystems Inc.) with added Platinum Taq (Life Technologies). The down-selected reagents underwent further testing. In the United Kingdom experiments, both reagents were tested against seven contrived aerosol collector samples containing B. anthracis Ames DNA and B. subtilis spores from a commercial formulation (BioBall). In PCR assays with reaction mixtures containing 40% crude sample, an airfield-collected sample induced inhibition of the B. subtilis PCR with the KAPA reagent and complete failure of both PCRs with the Fast Virus reagent. However, both reagents allowed successful PCR for all other samples—which inhibited PCRs with a non-inhibitor-resistant reagent. In the United States, a cross-assay limit-of-detection (LoD) study in blood was conducted. The KAPA Blood Direct reagent allowed the detection of agent DNA (by four PCRs) at higher concentrations of blood in the reaction mixture (2.5%) than the Fast Virus reagent (0.5%), although LoDs differed between assays and reagent combinations. Across both groups, the KAPA Blood Direct reagent was determined to be the optimal reagent for inhibition relief in PCR. PMID:24334660

  16. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  17. Assaying embryotoxicity in the test tube: current limitations of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) challenging its applicability domain.

    PubMed

    Riebeling, Christian; Hayess, Katrin; Peters, Annelieke K; Steemans, Margino; Spielmann, Horst; Luch, Andreas; Seiler, Andrea E M

    2012-05-01

    Testing for embryotoxicity in vitro is an attractive alternative to animal experimentation. The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is such a method, and it has been formally validated by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. A number of recent studies have underscored the potential of this method. However, the EST performed well below the 78% accuracy expected from the validation study using a new set of chemicals and pharmaceutical compounds, and also of toxicity criteria, tested to enlarge the database of the validated EST as part of the Work Package III of the ReProTect Project funded within the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union. To assess the performance and applicability domain of the EST we present a detailed review of the substances and their effects in the EST being nitrofen, ochratoxin A, D-penicillamine, methylazoxymethanol, lovastatin, papaverine, warfarin, β-aminopropionitrile, dinoseb, furosemide, doxylamine, pravastatin, and metoclopramide. By delineation of the molecular mechanisms of the substances we identify six categories of reasons for misclassifications. Some of these limitations might also affect other in vitro methods assessing embryotoxicity. Substances that fall into these categories need to be included in future validation sets and in validation guidelines for embryotoxicity testing. Most importantly, we suggest conceivable improvements and additions to the EST which will resolve most of the limitations.

  18. Assessment of different formulations of oral Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in rodent models for immunogenicity and protection against aerosol challenge with M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Smith, Alan; Court, Pinar; Vipond, Julia; Nadian, Allan; Hewinson, R Glyn; Batchelor, Hannah K; Perrie, Yvonne; Williams, Ann; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-10-29

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is causing considerable economic loss to farmers and Government in the United Kingdom as its incidence is increasing. Efforts to control bTB in the UK are hampered by the infection in Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) that represent a wildlife reservoir and source of recurrent M. bovis exposure to cattle. Vaccination of badgers with the human TB vaccine, M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), in oral bait represents a possible disease control tool and holds the best prospect for reaching badger populations over a wide geographical area. Using mouse and guinea pig models, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy, respectively, of candidate badger oral vaccines based on formulation of BCG in lipid matrix, alginate beads, or a novel microcapsular hybrid of both lipid and alginate. Two different oral doses of BCG were evaluated in each formulation for their protective efficacy in guinea pigs, while a single dose was evaluated in mice. In mice, significant immune responses (based on lymphocyte proliferation and expression of IFN-gamma) were only seen with the lipid matrix and the lipid in alginate microcapsular formulation, corresponding to the isolation of viable BCG from alimentary tract lymph nodes. In guinea pigs, only BCG formulated in lipid matrix conferred protection to the spleen and lungs following aerosol route challenge with M. bovis. Protection was seen with delivery doses in the range 10(6)-10(7) CFU, although this was more consistent in the spleen at the higher dose. No protection in terms of organ CFU was seen with BCG administered in alginate beads or in lipid in alginate microcapsules, although 10(7) in the latter formulation conferred protection in terms of increasing body weight after challenge and a smaller lung to body weight ratio at necropsy. These results highlight the potential for lipid, rather than alginate, -based vaccine formulations as suitable delivery

  19. A new test for evaluating Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injections.

    PubMed

    2007-03-01

    An explosion of Eighth Amendment challenges to lethal injection protocols has struck the federal courts. The Supreme Court's recent decision in Hill v. McDonough,1 which empowered prisoners to bring challenges to lethal injection procedures under 42 U.S.C. para. 1983, has facilitated a flood of new lethal injection cases. In response, several courts have ordered states to alter their protocols, spurring other capital inmates to litigate such challenges. Distressingly, the courts evaluating these claims have almost no law to guide them. The last Supreme Court decision applying the Eighth Amendment to a method of execution was written in 1947; that case, Louisiana ex rel. Francis v. Resweber,2 occurred before the Eighth Amendment was applied to the states and resulted in a 4-1-4 split. Although lower courts have heard numerous challenges to execution methods, few have analyzed the constitutional validity of a method of execution in detail. Making matters worse, courts that find Eighth Amendment violations must craft equitable remedies that often amount to entirely new execution protocols. No clear precedent exists to guide courts in formulating such remedies. This Note proposes a legal standard for the administration of Eighth Amendment method-of-execution claims, focusing on lethal injection cases. Part I describes lethal injection procedures and summarizes recent litigation. Part II discusses the difficulty of evaluating lethal injection claims, analyzing both general difficulties in interpreting the Eighth Amendment and specific difficulties associated with lethal injection cases. Part III proposes a standard for addressing method-of-execution claims that attempts to balance a prisoner's interest in a painless execution with a state's interest in conducting executions efficiently. Part IV discusses remedies for unconstitutional procedures. Part V concludes.

  20. Overcoming Challenges in Conducting Clinical Trials in Minority Populations: Identifying and Testing What Works

    PubMed Central

    Azuine, Romuladus E.; Ekejiuba, Sussan E.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in clinical trials is one of the greatest gifts that humanity can give to the fields of medicine and public health. Clinical trials are central in public health’s mission to advance drug discovery. The enrollment and retention of participants, especially minority populations, is one of the most practical challenges of successfully implementing a clinical trial. In spite of these challenges, there are many reasons why a broader public participation in clinical trials is critical. The ability to generalize the scientific findings and the principles of equity, justice, and beneficence require an equitable distribution of the risks, benefits, and burdens of research for all classes and groups of people. A new methodology article published in this journal presents a promising framework for addressing minority recruitment and retention using what is known and using it innovatively to address a difficult problem facing clinical trials and public health. The innovative application of what is known in addressing a challenging problem, as this article presents, is worth the reading of all those interested in scientifically rigorous and ethically sound clinical trials that substantially comprise of diverse populations.

  1. Overcoming Challenges in Conducting Clinical Trials in Minority Populations: Identifying and Testing What Works

    PubMed Central

    Azuine, Romuladus E.; Ekejiuba, Sussan E.

    2015-01-01

    Participation in clinical trials is one of the greatest gifts that humanity can give to the fields of medicine and public health. Clinical trials are central in public health’s mission to advance drug discovery. The enrollment and retention of participants, especially minority populations, is one of the most practical challenges of successfully implementing a clinical trial. In spite of these challenges, there are many reasons why a broader public participation in clinical trials is critical. The ability to generalize the scientific findings and the principles of equity, justice, and beneficence require an equitable distribution of the risks, benefits, and burdens of research for all classes and groups of people. A new methodology article published in this journal presents a promising framework for addressing minority recruitment and retention using what is known and using it innovatively to address a difficult problem facing clinical trials and public health. The innovative application of what is known in addressing a challenging problem, as this article presents, is worth the reading of all those interested in scientifically rigorous and ethically sound clinical trials that substantially comprise of diverse populations. PMID:27621989

  2. Public Health Genomics and Genetic Test Evaluation: The Challenge of Conducting Behavioural Research on the Utility of Lifestyle-Genetic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Saskia C.; Wardle, Jane; Humphries, Steve E.

    2008-01-01

    Human genetics research is increasingly concerned with multifactorial conditions such as diabetes and heart disease, which are influenced not only by genetic but also lifestyle factors such as diet and smoking. Although the results of ‘lifestyle-genetic’ tests using this information could conceivably motivate lifestyle changes in the future, companies are already selling such tests and related lifestyle advice commercially. Some academics and lobby groups have condemned the companies for selling these tests in advance of scientific support. Others are concerned that the tests may not motivate lifestyle improvements, instead causing distress in people receiving adverse test results and complacency in those receiving reassuring results. There is currently no regulatory oversight of genetic test utility, despite consensus in the Public Health Genomics community that clinical utility (including psychological and behavioural impact) of all emerging genetic tests should be evaluated before being introduced for individual use. Clearly, empirical data in this area is much needed, to inform understanding of the potential utility of these tests, and of whether stricter regulation of commercial exploitation is needed. In this article, we review the current situation regarding lifestyle-genetic tests, and discuss the challenges inherent in conducting this kind of behavioural research in the genomics era. PMID:19776630

  3. Biological aerosol trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSha, Michael S.

    1999-01-01

    In recent history, manmade and natural events have shown us the every-present need for systems to monitor the troposphere for contaminates. These contaminants may take either a chemical or biological form, which determines the methods we use to monitor them. Monitoring the troposphere for biological contaminants is of particular interest to my organization. Whether manmade or natural, contaminants of a biological origin share similar constituents; typically the aromatic amino acids tryptophan, phenylalanine, and tyrosine. All of these proteinaceous compounds autofluorescence when exposed to UV radiation and this established the basis of the laser-induced fluorescence technique we use to detect biological contaminants. This technique can be employed in either point or remote detection schemes and is a valuable tool for discriminating proteinaceous form non-proteinaceous aerosols. For this particular presentation I am going to describe a breadboard point sensor we designed and fabricated to detect proteinaceous aerosols. Previous point sensor designs relied on convoluted flow paths to concentrate the aerosols into a solution. Other systems required precise beam alignment to evenly distribute the energy irradiating the detector elements. Our objective was to build a simple system where beam alignment is not critical, and the flow is straight and laminar. The breadboard system was developed over a nine- month period and its performance assessed at a recent test at Dugway Proving Grounds in Utah. In addition, we have performed chamber experiments in an attempt to establish a baseline for the systems. The results of these efforts are presented here.

  4. Who Pays? Coverage Challenges for Cardiovascular Genetic Testing in U.S. Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spoonamore, Katherine G.; Johnson, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiovascular (CV) conditions are common, and comprehensive care of affected families often involves genetic testing. When the clinical presentations of these conditions overlap, genetic testing may clarify diagnoses, etiologies, and treatments in symptomatic individuals and facilitate the identification of asymptomatic, at-risk relatives, allowing for often life-saving preventative care. Although some professional society guidelines on inherited cardiac conditions include genetic testing recommendations, they quickly become outdated owing to the rapid expansion and use of such testing. Currently, these guidelines primarily discuss the benefits of targeted genetic testing for identifying at-risk relatives. Although most insurance policies acknowledge the benefit and the necessity of this testing, many exclude coverage for testing altogether or are vague about coverage for testing in probands, which is imperative if clinicians are to have the best chance of accurately identifying pathogenic variant(s) in a family. In response to uncertainties about coverage, many commercial CV genetic testing laboratories have shouldered the burden of working directly with commercial payers and protecting patients/institutions from out-of-pocket costs. As a result, many clinicians are unaware that payer coverage policies may not match professional recommendations for CV genetic testing. This conundrum has left patients, clinicians, payers, and laboratories at an impasse when determining the best path forward for meaningful and sustainable testing. Herein, we discuss the need for all involved parties to recognize their common goals in this process, which should motivate collaboration in changing existing frameworks and creating more sustainable access to genetic information for families with inherited CV conditions. PMID:27303673

  5. Effect of bronchoconstrictive aerosols on pulmonary gas trapping in the A/J mouse.

    PubMed

    Yiamouyiannis, C A; Stengel, P W; Cockerham, S L; Silbaugh, S A

    1995-10-01

    We exposed A/J mice to several challenge aerosols and measured gas trapped within excised lungs by quantitating their buoyancy in saline (Archimedes' principle). The temporal stability of the excised lung gas volume (ELGV) measurement was also examined. ELGV increased in a dose proportional manner with increasing concentrations of methacholine and reached a maximum of 338 +/- 33% above vehicle-exposed controls. The A/J mice were 100 times more responsive to aerosol methacholine compared to hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ mice. Aerosol challenges of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 mimetic, and serotonin resulted in a 40% and 135% increase in ELGV's versus their controls, respectively. ELGV's were not increased after aerosols of leukotriene C4, histamine, substance P, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyl-alanine and platelet activating factor. Both normal (filtered air-exposed) and hyperinflated (methacholine-exposed) excised lungs lost about 10% of their initial volume by 30 min and 40-65% of initial volume by 4 h. Occlusion of the trachea in either group did not affect the total gas lost, suggesting that majority of the gas loss was via transpleural diffusion. We conclude that determination of ELGV in mice, when performed soon after challenge testing, is a simple, rapid and reliable estimate of airway obstruction. PMID:8610213

  6. "It Is Not Easy": Challenges for Provider-Initiated HIV Testing and Counseling in Flanders, Belgium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manirankunda, Lazare; Loos, Jasna; Debackaere, Pieterjan; Nostlinger, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    This study identified physicians' HIV testing practices and their barriers toward implementing provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) for Sub-Saharan African migrants (SAM) in Flanders, Belgium. In-depth interviews were conducted on a purposive sample of 20 physicians (ten GPs and ten internists). GPs performed mainly…

  7. Challenges in Obtaining HIV Testing in an Acute Involuntary Inpatient Psychiatric Setting.

    PubMed

    Weller, Jennifer; Levitt, Gwen; Myers, Robert; Riley, Aaron; Gesmundo, Celsius-Kit

    2016-01-01

    Even in health care professions, a stigma remains for patients with co-occurring HIV and serious mental illness. Researchers at a large, urban medical center encountered this stigma when they attempted to initiate a study of cognition in psychiatric inpatients with and without HIV who were seen as vulnerable in the context of research. Education efforts and advocacy on the part of the research team was instrumental and resulted in system-wide changes in the hospital, including the addition of HIV testing to the psychiatric admission laboratory panel. Within the first year that routine laboratory orders included an HIV test, the rate of testing ordered by inpatient-attending psychiatrists reached 60% of admissions. As of 2014, 13 HIV tests were found to be HIV seropositive in inpatients, with four of those cases classified as new-onset, as opposed to two positive tests in the year prior to our study. PMID:27426407

  8. A normal and biotransforming model of the human bronchial epithelium for the toxicity testing of aerosols and solubilised substances.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Zoë C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of the experimental workflow by the Lung and Particle Research Group at Cardiff University, that led to the development of the two in vitro lung models - the normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) model and the lung-liver model, Metabo-Lung™. This work was jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. The NHBE model is a three-dimensional, in vitro, human tissue-based model of the normal human bronchial epithelium, and Metabo-Lung involves the co-culture of the NHBE model with primary human hepatocytes, thus permitting the biotransformation of inhaled toxicants in an in vivo-like manner. Both models can be used as alternative test systems that could replace the use of animals in research and development for safety and toxicity testing in a variety of industries (e.g. the pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetics, and food industries). Metabo-Lung itself is a unique tool for the in vitro detection of toxins produced by reactive metabolites. This 21st century animal replacement model could yield representative in vitro predictions for in vivo toxicity. This advancement in in vitro toxicology relies on filter-well technology that will enable a wide-spectrum of researchers to create viable and economic alternatives for respiratory safety assessment and disease-focused research. PMID:25635646

  9. A normal and biotransforming model of the human bronchial epithelium for the toxicity testing of aerosols and solubilised substances.

    PubMed

    Prytherch, Zoë C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of the experimental workflow by the Lung and Particle Research Group at Cardiff University, that led to the development of the two in vitro lung models - the normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) model and the lung-liver model, Metabo-Lung™. This work was jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. The NHBE model is a three-dimensional, in vitro, human tissue-based model of the normal human bronchial epithelium, and Metabo-Lung involves the co-culture of the NHBE model with primary human hepatocytes, thus permitting the biotransformation of inhaled toxicants in an in vivo-like manner. Both models can be used as alternative test systems that could replace the use of animals in research and development for safety and toxicity testing in a variety of industries (e.g. the pharmaceutical, environmental, cosmetics, and food industries). Metabo-Lung itself is a unique tool for the in vitro detection of toxins produced by reactive metabolites. This 21st century animal replacement model could yield representative in vitro predictions for in vivo toxicity. This advancement in in vitro toxicology relies on filter-well technology that will enable a wide-spectrum of researchers to create viable and economic alternatives for respiratory safety assessment and disease-focused research.

  10. Oxygen restriction as challenge test reveals early high-fat-diet-induced changes in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Duivenvoorde, Loes P M; van Schothorst, Evert M; Derous, Davina; van der Stelt, Inge; Masania, Jinit; Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J; Keijer, Jaap

    2015-06-01

    Challenge tests stress homeostasis and may reveal deviations in health that remain masked under unchallenged conditions. Ideally, challenge tests are non-invasive and applicable in an early phase of an animal experiment. Oxygen restriction (OxR; based on ambient, mild normobaric hypoxia) is a non-invasive challenge test that measures the flexibility to adapt metabolism. Metabolic inflexibility is one of the hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome. To test whether OxR can be used to reveal early diet-induced health effects, we exposed mice to a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet for only 5 days. The response to OxR was assessed by calorimetric measurements, followed by analysis of gene expression in liver and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) and serum markers for e.g. protein glycation and oxidation. Although HF feeding increased body weight, HF and LF mice did not differ in indirect calorimetric values under normoxic conditions and in a fasting state. Exposure to OxR; however, increased oxygen consumption and lipid oxidation in HF mice versus LF mice. Furthermore, OxR induced gluconeogenesis and an antioxidant response in the liver of HF mice, whereas it induced de novo lipogenesis and an antioxidant response in eWAT of LF mice, indicating that HF and LF mice differed in their adaptation to OxR. OxR also increased serum markers of protein glycation and oxidation in HF mice, whereas these changes were absent in LF mice. Cumulatively, OxR is a promising new method to test food products on potential beneficial effects for human health. PMID:24974902

  11. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  12. A System to Create Stable Nanoparticle Aerosols from Nanopowders.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yaobo; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle aerosols released from nanopowders in workplaces are associated with human exposure and health risks. We developed a novel system, requiring minimal amounts of test materials (min. 200 mg), for studying powder aerosolization behavior and aerosol properties. The aerosolization procedure follows the concept of the fluidized-bed process, but occurs in the modified volume of a V-shaped aerosol generator. The airborne particle number concentration is adjustable by controlling the air flow rate. The system supplied stable aerosol generation rates and particle size distributions over long periods (0.5-2 hr and possibly longer), which are important, for example, to study aerosol behavior, but also for toxicological studies. Strict adherence to the operating procedures during the aerosolization experiments ensures the generation of reproducible test results. The critical steps in the standard protocol are the preparation of the material and setup, and the aerosolization operations themselves. The system can be used for experiments requiring stable aerosol concentrations and may also be an alternative method for testing dustiness. The controlled aerosolization made possible with this setup occurs using energy inputs (may be characterized by aerosolization air velocity) that are within the ranges commonly found in occupational environments where nanomaterial powders are handled. This setup and its operating protocol are thus helpful for human exposure and risk assessment. PMID:27501179

  13. Challenges in the development and testing of a reference terminology model for nursing interventions.

    PubMed

    Button, P S; Androwich, I; Mead, C N; Zingo, C; Konicek, D; Campbell, K E

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the work of the Interventions Group of the first Nursing Terminology Summit (1999) and to describe the challenges and insights of this group as they have evolved a reference terminology model for nursing interventions. When the group began its work as part of the first meeting of the Nursing Terminology Summit, it had the overall objective of proposing the intervention component of a reference terminology model for nursing. Although there is not a definitive proposal for this to date, the group's exploration and analysis has clarified and explicated both the types of models of clinical information and the current " state of the art" of formal representations of nursing interventions as well as the relationship of nursing languages to these formal representations. In addition, it is our perspective that the work of this group is representative of the process and challenges facing many similar groups currently engaged in modeling efforts. Consequently, critical success factors of such efforts are identified and discussed. This paper reports both the specific outputs of the group related to progress in defining a terminology model of nursing interventions and observations and lessons learned regarding consensus modeling work.

  14. A Novel Hypoxia Challenge Test Demonstrates Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Susceptibility to Acrolein Gas in Hypertensive Rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    High levels of air pollution increase the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations including those with hypertension. Stress tests are useful for manifesting latent effects of exposure, particularly at low concentrations, often when no...

  15. Recombinant Mal d 1 facilitates sublingual challenge tests of birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy.

    PubMed

    Kinaciyan, T; Nagl, B; Faustmann, S; Kopp, S; Wolkersdorfer, M; Bohle, B

    2016-02-01

    It is still unclear whether allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen improves birch pollen-related food allergy. One reason for this may be the lack of standardized tests to assess clinical reactions to birch pollen-related foods, for example apple. We tested the applicability of recombinant (r) Mal d 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in apple, for oral challenge tests. Increasing concentrations of rMal d 1 in 0.9% NaCl were sublingually administered to 72 birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy. The dose of 1.6 μg induced oral allergy syndromes in 26.4%, 3.2 μg in 15.3%, 6.3 μg in 27.8%, 12.5 μg in 8.3%, 25 μg in 11.1%, and 50 μg in 4.2% of the patients. No severe reactions occurred. None of the patients reacted to 0.9% NaCl alone. Sublingual administration of 50 μg of rMal d 1 induced no reactions in three nonallergic individuals. Our approach allows straight forward, dose-defined sublingual challenge tests in a high number of birch pollen-allergic patients that inter alia can be applied to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of birch pollen AIT on birch pollen-related food allergy.

  16. The challenges of testing metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in algal bioassays: titanium dioxide and gold nanoparticles as case studies.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Nanna B; Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Baun, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Aquatic toxicology of engineered nanoparticles is challenged by methodological difficulties stemming partly from highly dynamic and poorly understood behavior of nanoparticles in biological test systems. In this paper scientific and technical challenges of testing not readily soluble nanoparticles in standardised algal growth inhibition tests are highlighted with specific focus on biomass quantification methods. This is illustrated through tests with TiO2 and Au nanoparticles, for which cell-nanoparticle interactions and behavior was studied during incubation. Au NP coating layers changed over time and TiO2 nanoparticle aggregation/agglomeration increased as a function of concentration. Three biomass surrogate measuring techniques were evaluated (coulter counting, cell counting in haemocytometer, and fluorescence of pigment extracts) and out of these the fluorometric methods was found to be most suitable. Background correction was identified as a key issue for biomass quantification, complicated by algae-particle interactions and nanoparticle transformation. Optimisation of the method is needed to reduce further particle interference on measurements.

  17. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  18. Challenges and opportunities for the implementation of virological testing in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Teri; Bygrave, Helen; Fajardo, Emmanuel; Ford, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Though the advantages of routine virological monitoring for patients on anti-retroviral therapy have been established, cost and complexity limit its full implementation. Monitoring is important for diagnosing virological failure early on, before the development of drug resistance mutations, and to trigger early adherence interventions. Simple and cost-effective viral load tests that facilitate simplification and decentralization of testing and strategies, such as the use of dried blood spots and pooled sample testing, which further aid simplification, are becoming available. In addition, replacing immunological monitoring with virological monitoring in non-viremic patients in a phased manner will reduce the costs associated with dual immuno-virological monitoring. Going forward, the simplification of testing paired with price reducing strategies that will allow for healthy competition between multiple manufacturers will enable the implementation of viral load testing in resource-poor settings. It is important that future HIV and AIDS treatment guidelines provide clear recommendations for routine virological monitoring and that governments and donors fund the implementation of accurate and operationally proven testing platforms in a comprehensive manner. PMID:23078767

  19. Using Brittle Fragmentation Theory to represent Aerosol Mineral Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Improved estimates of dust aerosol effects upon climate require the characterization of dust mineral and chemical composition. Regional variations in soil mineral composition lead to variations in dust aerosol composition. Yet, deriving aerosol mineral content also requires knowledge of the parent soil size distribution along with the fragmentation of soil particles and aggregates during the emission process. These processes modify the size distribution and mineral abundance of the emitted aerosols compared to the parent soil. An additional challenge for modeling is that global atlases of soil texture and composition are based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates, particularly phyllosilicates, that are encountered in natural soils, drastically altering the original size distribution of the soil that is subject to wind erosion. We propose both a semi-empirical and theoretical method to constrain the size-resolved mineral composition of emitted dust aerosols based on global atlases of soil texture and composition. Our semi-empirical method re-aggregates clay phyllosilicate minerals into larger soil particle sizes and constrains the size distribution of each emitted mineral based on observed mineral distributions at the source. Our theoretical method extends Kok's brittle fragmentation theory to individual minerals. To this end we reconstruct the undisturbed size distribution for each mineral as a function of soil texture and soil type and calculate the emitted size distribution applying brittle fragmentation and assuming homogeneous fragmentation properties among the mineral aggregates. These approaches were tested within the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE. We discuss the improvements achieved and suggest future developments.

  20. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small Satellite Missions: Experiences from the Space Technology 5 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5(ST5) payload was successfully carried into orbit on an OSC Pegasus XL launch vehicle, which was carried aloft and dropped from the OSC Lockheed L-1011 from Vandenberg Air Force Base March 22,2006, at 9:03 am Eastern time, 6:03 am Pacific time. In order to reach the completion of the development and successful launch of ST 5, the systems integration and test(I&T) team determined that a different approach was required to meet the project requirements rather than the standard I&T approach used for single, room-sized satellites. The ST5 payload, part of NASA's New Millennium Program headquartered at JPL, consisted of three micro satellites (approximately 30 kg each) and the Pegasus Support Structure (PSS), the system that connected the spacecrafts to the launch vehicle and deployed the spacecrafts into orbit from the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. ST5 was a technology demonstration payload, intended to test six (6) new technologies for potential use for future space flights along with demonstrating the ability of small satellites to perform quality science. The main technology was a science grade magnetometer designed to take measurements of the earth's magnetic field. The three spacecraft were designed, integrated, and tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center with integration and environmental testing occurring in the Bldg. 7-1 0-15-29. The three spacecraft were integrated and tested by the same I&T team. The I&T Manager determined that there was insufficient time in the schedule to perform the three I&T spacecraft activities in series used standard approaches. The solution was for spacecraft #1 to undergo integration and test first, followed by spacecraft #2 and #3 simultaneously. This simultaneous integration was successful for several reasons. Each spacecraft had a Lead Test Conductor who planned and coordinated their spacecraft through its integration and test activities. One team of engineers and technicians executed the integration of all

  1. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  2. Particle-size dependence of immersion freezing: Investigation of INUIT test aerosol particles with freely suspended water drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Karoline; Debertshäuser, Michael; Eppers, Oliver; Jantsch, Evelyn; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    One goal of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT) is to investigate the efficiencies of several test ice nuclei under comparable conditions but with different experimental techniques. In the present studies, two methods are used: the Mainz vertical wind tunnel and an acoustic levitator placed inside a cold chamber. In both cases drops are freely levitated, either at their terminal velocity in the wind tunnel updraft or around the nodes of a standing ultrasonic wave in the acoustic levitator. Thus, heat transfer conditions are well approximated, and wall contact effects on freezing as well as electrical charges of the drops are avoided. Drop radii are 370 μm and 1 mm, respectively. In the wind tunnel, drops are investigated at constant temperatures within a certain time period and the onset of freezing is observed directly. In the acoustic levitator, the drop temperature decreases during the experiments and is measured by an in-situ calibrated Infrared thermometer. The onset of freezing is indicated by a rapid rise of the drop surface temperature because of the release of latent heat. Investigated test ice nuclei are Snomax® as a proxy of biological particles and illite NX as well as K-feldspar as represents of mineral dust. The particle concentrations are 1 × 10-12 to 3 × 10-6 g Snomax® per drop and 5 × 10-9 to 5 × 10-5 g mineral dust per drop. Freezing temperatures are between -2 and -18° C in case of Snomax® and between -14 and -26° C in case of mineral dust. The lower the particle masses per drop the lower are the freezing temperatures. For similar particle concentrations in the drops, the median freezing temperatures determined by the two techniques agree well within the measurement errors. With the knowledge of the specific particle surface area of the mineral dusts, the results are interpreted also in terms of particle surface area per drop. Results from the wind tunnel experiments which are performed at constant temperatures indicate

  3. Clinical uncertainties, health service challenges, and ethical complexities of HIV "test-and-treat": a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sonali P; Shah, Kavita R; Sarma, Karthik V; Mahajan, Anish P

    2013-06-01

    Despite the HIV "test-and-treat" strategy's promise, questions about its clinical rationale, operational feasibility, and ethical appropriateness have led to vigorous debate in the global HIV community. We performed a systematic review of the literature published between January 2009 and May 2012 using PubMed, SCOPUS, Global Health, Web of Science, BIOSIS, Cochrane CENTRAL, EBSCO Africa-Wide Information, and EBSCO CINAHL Plus databases to summarize clinical uncertainties, health service challenges, and ethical complexities that may affect the test-and-treat strategy's success. A thoughtful approach to research and implementation to address clinical and health service questions and meaningful community engagement regarding ethical complexities may bring us closer to safe, feasible, and effective test-and-treat implementation.

  4. Penetration of Combustion Aerosol Particles Through Filters of NIOSH-Certified Filtering Facepiece Respirators (FFRs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Kim, Jinyong; Yermakov, Michael; Elmashae, Yousef; He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are commonly worn by first responders, first receivers, and other exposed groups to protect against exposure to airborne particles, including those originated by combustion. Most of these FFRs are NIOSH-certified (e.g., N95-type) based on the performance testing of their filters against charge-equilibrated aerosol challenges, e.g., NaCl. However, it has not been examined if the filtration data obtained with the NaCl-challenged FFR filters adequately represent the protection against real aerosol hazards such as combustion particles. A filter sample of N95 FFR mounted on a specially designed holder was challenged with NaCl particles and three combustion aerosols generated in a test chamber by burning wood, paper, and plastic. The concentrations upstream (Cup) and downstream (Cdown) of the filter were measured with a TSI P-Trak condensation particle counter and a Grimm Nanocheck particle spectrometer. Penetration was determined as (Cdown/Cup) ×100%. Four test conditions were chosen to represent inhalation flows of 15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min. Results showed that the penetration values of combustion particles were significantly higher than those of the "model" NaCl particles (p < 0.05), raising a concern about applicability of the N95 filters performance obtained with the NaCl aerosol challenge to protection against combustion particles. Aerosol type, inhalation flow rate and particle size were significant (p < 0.05) factors affecting the performance of the N95 FFR filter. In contrast to N95 filters, the penetration of combustion particles through R95 and P95 FFR filters (were tested in addition to N95) were not significantly higher than that obtained with NaCl particles. The findings were attributed to several effects, including the degradation of an N95 filter due to hydrophobic organic components generated into the air by combustion. Their interaction with fibers is anticipated to be similar to those involving "oily" particles

  5. Penetration of Combustion Aerosol Particles Through Filters of NIOSH-Certified Filtering Facepiece Respirators (FFRs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuang; Kim, Jinyong; Yermakov, Michael; Elmashae, Yousef; He, Xinjian; Reponen, Tiina; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2015-01-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) are commonly worn by first responders, first receivers, and other exposed groups to protect against exposure to airborne particles, including those originated by combustion. Most of these FFRs are NIOSH-certified (e.g., N95-type) based on the performance testing of their filters against charge-equilibrated aerosol challenges, e.g., NaCl. However, it has not been examined if the filtration data obtained with the NaCl-challenged FFR filters adequately represent the protection against real aerosol hazards such as combustion particles. A filter sample of N95 FFR mounted on a specially designed holder was challenged with NaCl particles and three combustion aerosols generated in a test chamber by burning wood, paper, and plastic. The concentrations upstream (Cup) and downstream (Cdown) of the filter were measured with a TSI P-Trak condensation particle counter and a Grimm Nanocheck particle spectrometer. Penetration was determined as (Cdown/Cup) ×100%. Four test conditions were chosen to represent inhalation flows of 15, 30, 55, and 85 L/min. Results showed that the penetration values of combustion particles were significantly higher than those of the "model" NaCl particles (p < 0.05), raising a concern about applicability of the N95 filters performance obtained with the NaCl aerosol challenge to protection against combustion particles. Aerosol type, inhalation flow rate and particle size were significant (p < 0.05) factors affecting the performance of the N95 FFR filter. In contrast to N95 filters, the penetration of combustion particles through R95 and P95 FFR filters (were tested in addition to N95) were not significantly higher than that obtained with NaCl particles. The findings were attributed to several effects, including the degradation of an N95 filter due to hydrophobic organic components generated into the air by combustion. Their interaction with fibers is anticipated to be similar to those involving "oily" particles

  6. Modern Advances in Genetic Testing: Ethical Challenges and Training Implications for Current and Future Psychologists

    PubMed Central

    Richmond-Rakerd, Leah S.

    2014-01-01

    The ethical implications for psychological practice of genetic testing are largely unexplored. Predictive testing can have a significant impact on health and well-being, and increasing numbers of individuals with knowledge of their risk for various disorders are likely to present for psychotherapy. In addition, more people will struggle with the decision of whether to obtain information regarding their genetic material. Psychologists will need to have the appropriate knowledge and clinical skills to effectively counsel this population. This article highlights the relevant ethical issues surrounding psychological treatment of individuals pursuing or considering undergoing genetic testing. These issues are extended to psychologists working in research, education, and policy domains. Recommendations for graduate training programs to facilitate current and future practitioner competence are also discussed. PMID:24707160

  7. IN SEARCH OF A FATHER: LEGAL CHALLENGES SURROUNDING POSTHUMOUS PATERNITY TESTING.

    PubMed

    Stirton, Ruth H; Wilkinson, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    This article interrogates the workings of the Human Tissue Act 2004, as it applies to paternity testing by DNA analysis after the death of the putative father. We use a case series methodology more usually seen in medical research, through which we present three real case studies involving posthumous paternity testing of retained tissue. We argue that the criminal offence in section 45 of the Human Tissue Act 2004, which is being used to regulate this activity, is inappropriate and inadequate to do so. The threat of the shadow of the criminal law is too blunt an instrument to address the subtleties of the issues that arise in the context of posthumous paternity testing. We call for reform of the Human Tissue Act 2004 and the creation of a specific exception to properly deal with requests of this nature.

  8. Challenges in the development of an immunochromatographic interferon-gamma test for diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Kalantri, Yatiraj; Schumacher, Samuel G; Michael, Joy S; Shankar, Deepa; Saxena, Arvind; Sriram, Natarajan; Balamugesh, Thangakunam; Luo, Robert; Pollock, Nira R; Pai, Madhukar; Christopher, Devasahayam J

    2013-01-01

    Existing diagnostic tests for pleural tuberculosis (TB) have inadequate accuracy and/or turnaround time. Interferon-gamma (IFNg) has been identified in many studies as a biomarker for pleural TB. Our objective was to develop a lateral flow, immunochromatographic test (ICT) based on this biomarker and to evaluate the test in a clinical cohort. Because IFNg is commonly present in non-TB pleural effusions in low amounts, a diagnostic IFNg-threshold was first defined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IFNg in samples from 38 patients with a confirmed clinical diagnosis (cut-off of 300 pg/ml; 94% sensitivity and 93% specificity). The ICT was then designed; however, its achievable limit of detection (5000 pg/ml) was over 10-fold higher than that of the ELISA. After several iterations in development, the prototype ICT assay for IFNg had a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval (CI): 50-83) and a specificity of 94% (95% CI: 81-99%) compared to ELISA on frozen samples. Evaluation of the prototype in a prospective clinical cohort (72 patients) on fresh pleural fluid samples, in comparison to a composite reference standard (including histopathological and microbiologic test results), showed that the prototype had 65% sensitivity (95% CI: 44-83) and 89% specificity (95% CI: 74-97). Discordant results were observed in 15% of samples if testing was repeated after one freezing and thawing step. Inter-rater variability was limited (3%; 1 out of 32). In conclusion, despite an iterative development and optimization process, the performance of the IFNg ICT remained lower than what could be expected from the published literature on IFNg as a biomarker in pleural fluid. Further improvements in the limit of detection of an ICT for IFNg, and possibly combination of IFNg with other biomarkers such as adenosine deaminase, are necessary for such a test to be of value in the evaluation of pleural tuberculosis. PMID:24376880

  9. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small, Multiple Satellite Missions: Experiences from the Space Technology 5 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The ST5 technology demonstration mission led by GSFC of NASA's New Millennium Program managed by JPL consisted of three micro satellites (approximately 30 kg each) deployed into orbit from the Pegasus XL launch vehicle. In order to meet the launch date schedule of ST5, a different approach was required rather than the standard I&T approach used for single, room-sized satellites. The three spacecraft were designed, integrated, and tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. It was determined that there was insufficient time in the schedule to perform three spacecraft I&T activities in series using standard approaches. The solution was for spacecraft #1 to undergo integration and test first, followed by spacecraft #2 and #3 simultaneously. This simultaneous integration was successful for several reasons. Each spacecraft had a Lead Test Conductor who planned and coordinated their spacecraft through its integration and test activities. One team of engineers and technicians executed the integration of all three spacecraft, learning and gaining knowledge and efficiency as spacecraft #1 integration and testing progressed. They became acutely familiar with the hardware, operation and processes for I&T, thus had the experience and knowledge to safely execute I&T for spacecraft #2 and #3. The integration team was extremely versatile; each member could perform many different activities or work any spacecraft, when needed. ST5 was successfully integrated, tested and shipped to the launch site per the I&T schedule that was planned three years previously. The I&T campaign was completed with ST5's successful launch on March 22, 2006.

  10. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  11. The Introduction of Standardized External Testing in Ukraine: Challenges and Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalchuk, Serhiy; Koroliuk, Svitlana

    2012-01-01

    Standardized external testing (SET) began to be implemented in Ukraine in 2008 as an instrument for combating corruption in higher education and ensuring fair university admission. This article examines the conditions and processes that led to the introduction of SET, overviews its implementation over three years (2008-10), analyzes SET and…

  12. The AmpliChip CYP450 test: principles, challenges, and future clinical utility in digestive disease.

    PubMed

    Juran, Brian D; Egan, Laurence J; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2006-07-01

    Understanding genetically encoded inherited differences in drug metabolism and targets (ie, receptors, transporters) offers the promise of minimizing adverse drug reactions and improving therapies. Among the enzymes involved in drug metabolism, the cytochromes P450 (CYP450) hold a central position. In fact, CYP450 are involved in the biotransformation of most drugs used in clinical practice. Recent advances in the development of DNA-based diagnostics, coupled with a better understanding of genetic polymorphisms in influencing pharmacologic responses, have provided the foundation for novel in vitro tests that may predict side effects and/or therapeutic responses. The AmpliChip CYP450 test was developed as a clinical test to evaluate an individual's metabolic capacity for certain drugs by identifying polymorphisms of 2 CYP450 enzymes (ie, CYP2D6 and CYP2D19). Even though the AmpliChip CYP450 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, its practical clinical utility has not yet been determined, and there is a paucity of data related to gastrointestinal and liver diseases. An understanding of the principles and opportunities provided by this new category of diagnostic test is key before planning the necessary studies to evaluate the usefulness of AmpliChip CYP450 in gastroenterologic clinical practice.

  13. Recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) for direct food contact applications: challenge test of an inline recycling process.

    PubMed

    Franz, R; Welle, F

    2002-05-01

    Of all the plastics used for packaging, due to its low diffusivity and chemical inertness, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is one of the favoured candidate plastics for closed-loop recycling for new packaging applications. In the work reported here, a PET-recycling process was investigated with respect to its cleaning efficiency and compliance of the PET recyclate with food law. The key technology of the investigated PET-recycling process to remove contaminants consists of a predecontamination-extruder combination. At the end of the recycling process, there is either a pelletizing system or downstream equipment to produce preforms or flat sheets. Therefore, the process has two process options, an inline production of PET preforms and a batch option producing PET pellets. In the case of possible misuse of PET bottles by the consumer, the inline process produces higher concentrations in the bottle wall of the recyclate containing preforms. Owing to the dilution of the PET output material by large amounts of uncontaminated PET, the batch option is the less critical process in terms of consumer protection. Regarding an appropriate testing procedure for the evaluation of a bottle-to-bottle recycling process, both process options have their own specific requirements with respect to the design of a challenge test. A novel challenge test approach to the inline mode of a recycling process is presented here.

  14. Recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate) for direct food contact applications: challenge test of an inline recycling process.

    PubMed

    Franz, R; Welle, F

    2002-05-01

    Of all the plastics used for packaging, due to its low diffusivity and chemical inertness, poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is one of the favoured candidate plastics for closed-loop recycling for new packaging applications. In the work reported here, a PET-recycling process was investigated with respect to its cleaning efficiency and compliance of the PET recyclate with food law. The key technology of the investigated PET-recycling process to remove contaminants consists of a predecontamination-extruder combination. At the end of the recycling process, there is either a pelletizing system or downstream equipment to produce preforms or flat sheets. Therefore, the process has two process options, an inline production of PET preforms and a batch option producing PET pellets. In the case of possible misuse of PET bottles by the consumer, the inline process produces higher concentrations in the bottle wall of the recyclate containing preforms. Owing to the dilution of the PET output material by large amounts of uncontaminated PET, the batch option is the less critical process in terms of consumer protection. Regarding an appropriate testing procedure for the evaluation of a bottle-to-bottle recycling process, both process options have their own specific requirements with respect to the design of a challenge test. A novel challenge test approach to the inline mode of a recycling process is presented here. PMID:12028650

  15. Standards for Radiation Effects Testing: Ensuring Scientific Rigor in the Face of Budget Realities and Modern Device Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, J M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is presented of the space radiation environment and its effects on electrical, electronic, and electromechanical parts. Relevant test standards and guidelines are listed. Test standards and guidelines are necessary to ensure best practices, minimize and bound systematic and random errors, and to ensure comparable results from different testers and vendors. Test standards are by their nature static but exist in a dynamic environment of advancing technology and radiation effects research. New technologies, failure mechanisms, and advancement in our understanding of known failure mechanisms drive the revision or development of test standards. Changes to standards must be weighed against their impact on cost and existing part qualifications. There must be consensus on new best practices. The complexity of some new technologies exceeds the scope of existing test standards and may require development of a guideline specific to the technology. Examples are given to illuminate the value and limitations of key radiation test standards as well as the challenges in keeping these standards up to date.

  16. Antiphospholipid antibody testing for the antiphospholipid syndrome: a comprehensive practical review including a synopsis of challenges and recent guidelines.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Wong, Richard C W

    2014-10-01

    The antiphospholipid (antibody) syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune condition characterised by a wide range of clinical features, but primarily identified as thrombotic and/or obstetric related adverse events. APS is associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), including the so-called lupus anticoagulant (LA). These aPL are heterogeneous in nature, detected with varying sensitivity and specificity by a diverse range of laboratory tests. All these tests are unfortunately imperfect, suffer from poor assay reproducibility (inter-method and inter-laboratory) and a lack of standardisation and harmonisation. Clinicians and laboratory personnel may struggle to keep abreast of these factors, as well as the expanding range of available aPL tests, and consequent result interpretation. Therefore, APS remains a significant diagnostic challenge for many clinicians across a wide range of clinical specialities, due to these issues related to laboratory testing as well as the ever-expanding range of reported clinical manifestations. This review is primarily focussed on issues related to laboratory testing for APS in regards to the currently available assays, and summarises recent international consensus guidelines for aPL testing, both for the liquid phase functional LA assays and the solid phase assays (anticardiolipin and anti-beta-2-Glycoprotein-I).

  17. Generation of a monodispersed aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, H.; Mikasa, M.; Devicariis, R.

    1974-01-01

    The identity and laboratory test methods for the generation of a monodispersed aerosol are reported on, and are subjected to the following constraints and parameters; (1) size distribution; (2) specific gravity; (3) scattering properties; (4) costs; (5) production. The procedure called for the collection of information from the literature, commercial available products, and experts working in the field. The following topics were investigated: (1) aerosols; (2) air pollution -- analysis; (3) atomizers; (4) dispersion; (5) particles -- optics, size analysis; (6) smoke -- generators, density measurements; (7) sprays; (8) wind tunnels -- visualization.

  18. Testing Together Challenges the Relationship’: Consequences of HIV Testing as a Couple in a High HIV Prevalence Setting in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tabana, Hanani; Doherty, Tanya; Rubenson, Birgitta; Jackson, Debra; Ekström, Anna Mia; Thorson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Objective We conducted qualitative individual and combined interviews with couples to explore their experiences since the time of taking an HIV test and receiving the test result together, as part of a home-based HIV counselling and testing intervention. Methods This study was conducted in October 2011 in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, about 2 years after couples tested and received results together. Fourteen couples were purposively sampled: discordant, concordant negative and concordant positive couples. Findings Learning about each other’s status together challenged relationships of the couples in different ways depending on HIV status and gender. The mutual information confirmed suspected infidelity that had not been discussed before. Negative women in discordant partnerships remained with their positive partner due to social pressure and struggled to maintain their HIV negative status. Most of the couple relationships were characterized by silence and mistrust. Knowledge of sero-status also led to loss of sexual intimacy in some couples especially the discordant. For most men in concordant negative couples, knowledge of status was an awakening of the importance of fidelity and an opportunity for behaviour change, while for concordant positive and discordant couples, it was seen as proof of infidelity. Although positive HIV status was perceived as confirmation of infidelity, couples continued their relationship and offered some support for each other, living and managing life together. Sexual life in these couples was characterized by conflict and sometimes violence. In the concordant negative couples, trust was enhanced and behaviour change was promised. Conclusions Findings suggest that testing together as couples challenged relationships in both negative and positive ways. Further, knowledge of HIV status indicated potential to influence behaviour change especially among concordant negatives. In the discordant and concordant positive couples

  19. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    SciTech Connect

    Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. ); Zammit, M.G. ); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. ); Bruetsch, R.I. )

    1992-01-01

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  20. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    SciTech Connect

    Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P.; Zammit, M.G.; Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S.; Bruetsch, R.I.

    1992-11-01

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge `92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  1. Concordance between physiological arousal and subjective distress among Vietnam combat veterans undergoing challenge testing for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Marx, Brian P; Bovin, Michelle J; Suvak, Michael K; Monson, Candice M; Sloan, Denise M; Fredman, Steffany J; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Kaloupek, Danny G; Keane, Terence M

    2012-08-01

    This study examined concordance between physiological arousal and subjective distress during a laboratory challenge task. Data were collected during the multisite VA Cooperative Study 334 in the early 1990s examining psychophysiological arousal among combat-exposed Vietnam veterans with (n = 775) and without (n = 369) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Study participants were presented with 6 standardized neutral scenes and 6 standardized combat scenes. Participants provided a subjective rating of distress after each slide. During the presentation, levels of heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) were recorded. Using linear mixed effects modeling, both HR level and SC level exhibited significant positive associations with subjective distress ratings (pr = .33, p < .001 and pr = .19, p < .001, respectively). Individuals with PTSD demonstrated greater concordance between their distress ratings and SC level during exposure to combat slides than participants without PTSD (pr = .28, p < .001 vs. pr = .18, p < .001). Although a significant association was found between subjective distress and HR reactivity and SC reactivity, these findings were not moderated by PTSD status. The results of these analyses suggest that patients' reports of distress during exposure-based treatments might serve as approximate measures of actual physiological arousal. PMID:22848013

  2. Chloe's Law: A Powerful Legislative Movement Challenging a Core Ethical Norm of Genetic Testing.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur L

    2015-08-01

    Since the early 1970s, the ethical norm governing counselors involved in testing and screening for genetic conditions related to reproduction has been strict neutrality. Counseling about reproductive genetics was to be patient centered but nondirective. Many advocates for people with Down syndrome believe that high abortion rates following a diagnosis of this condition show an unfounded bias against those with Down syndrome. These advocates have succeeded in enacting federal and state legislation that requires women who receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome to receive positive information about the condition, thereby ending the nominal goal of value-neutral counseling and setting the stage for further normative shifts in clinical reproductive genetics as counseling expands because of cell-free testing.

  3. Chloe’s Law: A Powerful Legislative Movement Challenging a Core Ethical Norm of Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the ethical norm governing counselors involved in testing and screening for genetic conditions related to reproduction has been strict neutrality. Counseling about reproductive genetics was to be patient centered but nondirective. Many advocates for people with Down syndrome believe that high abortion rates following a diagnosis of this condition show an unfounded bias against those with Down syndrome. These advocates have succeeded in enacting federal and state legislation that requires women who receive a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome to receive positive information about the condition, thereby ending the nominal goal of value-neutral counseling and setting the stage for further normative shifts in clinical reproductive genetics as counseling expands because of cell-free testing. PMID:26247743

  4. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  5. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop.

  6. Integration and Testing Challenges of Small, Multiple Satellite Missions: Experiences from the Space Technology 5 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauerwein, Timothy A.; Gostomski, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The ST5 payload, part of NASA s New Millennium Program headquartered at JPL, consisted of three micro satellites (approx. 30 kg each) deployed into orbit from the Pegasus XL launch. ST5 was a technology demonstration mission, intended to test new technologies for potential use for future missions. In order to meet the launch date schedule of ST 5, a different approach was required rather than the standard I&T approach used for single, room-sized satellites. The I&T phase was planned for spacecraft #1 to undergo integration and test first, followed by spacecraft #2 and #3 in tandem. A team of engineers and technicians planned and executed the integration of all three spacecraft emphasizing versatility and commonality. They increased their knowledge and efficiency through spacecraft #1 integration and testing and utilized their experience and knowledge to safely execute I&T for spacecraft #2 and #3. Each integration team member could perform many different roles and functions and thus better support activities on any of the three spacecraft. The I&T campaign was completed with STS s successful launch on March 22,2006

  7. MDIs: physics of aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Clark, A R

    1996-03-01

    The aerosol clouds produced by metered dose inhalers are very dynamic and dramatic changes in both droplet size and velocity take place within the first few centimeters of the spray plume. It is the interaction of this dynamic cloud with the geometry of the mouth and oropharynx that controls the extent of oral deposition and hence the ability of the MDI to deliver a respiratory therapeutic to the lung. Oral deposition is controlled by inertial mechanisms and in order to develop meaningful in-vitro test methods consideration must be given to both the velocity and droplet size distribution of the cloud. The correct design of the inlet ports used to convey MDI clouds in aerosol sizing instruments is therefore crucial to the development of successful in-vitro methodologies. The use of large sampling chambers or the characterization of residual aerosol droplets is unlikely to produce meaning product comparisons or satisfactory product control data.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol--Observations, Processes, and Impact on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kresmer, Stefanie; Thomason, Larry W.; von Hobe, Marc; Hermann, Markus; Deshler, Terry; Timmreck, Claudia; Toohey, Matthew; Stenke, Andrea; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Weigel, Ralf; Fueglistaler, Stephan; Prata, Fred J.; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Schlager, Hans; Barnes, John E.; Antuna-Marrero, Juan-Carlos; Fairlie, Duncan; Palm, Mathias; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Notholt, Justus; Rex, Markus; Bingen, Christine; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bourassa, Adam; Plane, John M. C.; Klocke, Daniel; Carn, Simon A.; Clarisse, Lieven; Trickl, Thomas; Neeley, Ryan; James, Alexander D.; Rieger, Landon; Wilson, James C.; Meland, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Interest in stratospheric aerosol and its role in climate have increased over the last decade due to the observed increase in stratospheric aerosol since 2000 and the potential for changes in the sulfur cycle induced by climate change. This review provides an overview about the advances in stratospheric aerosol research since the last comprehensive assessment of stratospheric aerosol was published in 2006. A crucial development since 2006 is the substantial improvement in the agreement between in situ and space-based inferences of stratospheric aerosol properties during volcanically quiescent periods. Furthermore, new measurement systems and techniques, both in situ and space based, have been developed for measuring physical aerosol properties with greater accuracy and for characterizing aerosol composition. However, these changes induce challenges to constructing a long-term stratospheric aerosol climatology. Currently, changes in stratospheric aerosol levels less than 20% cannot be confidently quantified. The volcanic signals tend to mask any nonvolcanically driven change, making them difficult to understand. While the role of carbonyl sulfide as a substantial and relatively constant source of stratospheric sulfur has been confirmed by new observations and model simulations, large uncertainties remain with respect to the contribution from anthropogenic sulfur dioxide emissions. New evidence has been provided that stratospheric aerosol can also contain small amounts of nonsulfatematter such as black carbon and organics. Chemistry-climate models have substantially increased in quantity and sophistication. In many models the implementation of stratospheric aerosol processes is coupled to radiation and/or stratospheric chemistry modules to account for relevant feedback processes.

  9. Retrieving Aerosol in a Cloudy Environment: Aerosol Availability as a Function of Spatial and Temporal Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.; Heidinger, Andrew; Pierce, R. Bradley; Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of using satellite observations to retrieve aerosol properties in a cloudy environment is to prevent contamination of the aerosol signal from clouds, while maintaining sufficient aerosol product yield to satisfy specific applications. We investigate aerosol retrieval availability at different instrument pixel resolutions, using the standard MODIS aerosol cloud mask applied to MODIS data and a new GOES-R cloud mask applied to GOES data for a domain covering North America and surrounding oceans. Aerosol availability is not the same as the cloud free fraction and takes into account the technqiues used in the MODIS algorithm to avoid clouds, reduce noise and maintain sufficient numbers of aerosol retrievals. The inherent spatial resolution of each instrument, 0.5x0.5 km for MODIS and 1x1 km for GOES, is systematically degraded to 1x1 km, 2x2 km, 4x4 km and 8x8 km resolutions and then analyzed as to how that degradation would affect the availability of an aerosol retrieval, assuming an aerosol product resolution at 8x8 km. The results show that as pixel size increases, availability decreases until at 8x8 km 70% to 85% of the retrievals available at 0.5 km have been lost. The diurnal pattern of aerosol retrieval availability examined for one day in the summer suggests that coarse resolution sensors (i.e., 4x4 km or 8x8 km) may be able to retrieve aerosol early in the morning that would otherwise be missed at the time of current polar orbiting satellites, but not the diurnal aerosol properties due to cloud cover developed during the day. In contrast finer resolution sensors (i.e., 1x1 km or 2x2 km) have much better opportunity to retrieve aerosols in the partly cloudy scenes and better chance of returning the diurnal aerosol properties. Large differences in the results of the two cloud masks designed for MODIS aerosol and GOES cloud products strongly reinforce that cloud masks must be developed with specific purposes in mind and that a generic cloud mask

  10. Immunization by a bacterial aerosol.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Wong, Yun-Ling; Muttil, Pavan; Padilla, Danielle; Sadoff, Jerry; Derousse, Jessica; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Elbert, Katharina; Bloom, Barry R; Miller, Rich; Fourie, P Bernard; Hickey, Anthony; Edwards, David

    2008-03-25

    By manufacturing a single-particle system in two particulate forms (i.e., micrometer size and nanometer size), we have designed a bacterial vaccine form that exhibits improved efficacy of immunization. Microstructural properties are adapted to alter dispersive and aerosol properties independently. Dried "nanomicroparticle" vaccines possess two axes of nanoscale dimensions and a third axis of micrometer dimension; the last one permits effective micrometer-like physical dispersion, and the former provides alignment of the principal nanodimension particle axes with the direction of airflow. Particles formed with this combination of nano- and micrometer-scale dimensions possess a greater ability to aerosolize than particles of standard spherical isotropic shape and of similar geometric diameter. Here, we demonstrate effective application of this biomaterial by using the live attenuated tuberculosis vaccine bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Prepared as a spray-dried nanomicroparticle aerosol, BCG vaccine exhibited high-efficiency delivery and peripheral lung targeting capacity from a low-cost and technically simple delivery system. Aerosol delivery of the BCG nanomicroparticle to normal guinea pigs subsequently challenged with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis significantly reduced bacterial burden and lung pathology both relative to untreated animals and to control animals immunized with the standard parenteral BCG.

  11. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-09-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  12. Challenges of Cold Conditioning and Static Testing the Ares Demonstration Motor (DM-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Shyla; Davis, Larry C.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares first stage rocket is a "human-rated" motor capable of producing and sustaining 3.5 million pounds of thrust throughout it s two-minute burn period. A series of demonstration motors (DM) will be tested in different conditioned environments to confirm they meet all design specifications. The second demonstration motor (DM-2) was designated to be a "cold motor", this means the internal propellant mean bulk temperature (PMBT) was 40 +5\\-3 F. The motor was subjected to subfreezing temperatures for two months.

  13. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  14. HDR opportunities and challenges beyond the long-term flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, D.V.

    1992-01-01

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the world's largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  15. Evaluation of the filtration performance of NIOSH-approved N95 filtering facepiece respirators by photometric and number-based test methods.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Samy; Miller, Adam; Eimer, Benjamin C

    2011-01-01

    N95 particulate filtering facepiece respirators are certified by measuring penetration levels photometrically with a presumed severe case test method using charge neutralized NaCl aerosols at 85 L/min. However, penetration values obtained by photometric methods have not been compared with count-based methods using contemporary respirators composed of electrostatic filter media and challenged with both generated and ambient aerosols. To better understand the effects of key test parameters (e.g., particle charge, detection method), initial penetration levels for five N95 model filtering facepiece respirators were measured using NaCl aerosols with the aerosol challenge and test equipment employed in the NIOSH respirator certification method (photometric) and compared with an ultrafine condensation particle counter method (count based) for the same NaCl aerosols as well as for ambient room air particles. Penetrations using the NIOSH test method were several-fold less than the penetrations obtained by the ultrafine condensation particle counter for NaCl aerosols as well as for room particles indicating that penetration measurement based on particle counting offers a more difficult challenge than the photometric method, which lacks sensitivity for particles < 100 nm. All five N95 models showed the most penetrating particle size around 50 nm for room air particles with or without charge neutralization, and at 200 nm for singly charged NaCl monodisperse particles. Room air with fewer charged particles and an overwhelming number of neutral particles contributed to the most penetrating particle size in the 50 nm range, indicating that the charge state for the majority of test particles determines the MPPS. Data suggest that the NIOSH respirator certification protocol employing the photometric method may not be a more challenging aerosol test method. Filter penetrations can vary among workplaces with different particle size distributions, which suggests the need for the

  16. Small-scale Rainfall Challenges Tested with Semi-distributed and Distributed Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiba, Abdellah; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Gires, Auguste; Schertzer, Daniel; Bompard, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there is a growing interest on small-scale rainfall information, provided by weather radars, to be used in urban water management and decision-making. Indeed, it helps to better understand the essential interactions between natural and man-made urban environments, both being complex systems. However the integration of this information in hydrological models remains a big challenge. In fact, urban water managers often rely on lumped or semi-distributed models with much coarser data resolution. The scope of this work is to investigate the sensitivity of two hydrological models to small-scale rainfall, and their potential improvements to integrate wholly the small-scale information. The case study selected to perform this study is a small urban catchment (245 ha), located at Val-de-Marne county (southeast of Paris, France). Investigations were conducted using either CANOE model, a semi-distributed conceptual model that is widely used in France for urban modeling, or a fully distributed and physically based model, Multi-Hydro, developed at Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (www hmco-dev.enpc.fr/Tools-Training/Tools/Multi-Hydro.php). Initially, in CANOE model the catchment was divided into 9 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha to 76ha. A refinement process was conduced in the framework of this investigation in order to improve the model resolution by considering higher number of smaller sub-catchments. The new configuration consists of 44 sub-catchments with size ranging from 1ha-14ha. The Multi-Hydro modeling approach consists on rasterizing the catchment information to a regular spatial grid of a resolution chosen by the user. Each pixel is then affected by specific information, e.g., a unique land type per pixel, for which hydrological and physical properties are set. First of all, both models were validated with respect to real flow measurements using three types of rainfall data: (1) point measurement data coming form the Sucy-en-Brie rain gauge; (2) Meteo

  17. Balloon profiles of stratospheric NO2 and HNO3 for testing the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 on sulfate aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, C. R.; May, R. D.; Allen, M.; Jaegle, L.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of stratospheric NO2, HNO3, HCl, and CH4 from 34 to 24 km were made in August 1992 from Palestine, Texas, using the Balloon-borne Laser In-Situ Sensor (BLISS) tunable diode laser spectrometer. Although the measurements of NO2, HNO3, and NO2/HNO3 agree well with gas-phase model calculations near 34 km where Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) 2 data show little sulfate aerosol, this is not true at the lower altitudes where SAGE 2 shows high aerosol loadings. At 24 km the BLISS NO2 and HNO3 measurements are 70% lower and 50% higher, respectively, than the gas phase model predictions, with a measured NO2/HNO3 ratio 5 times smaller. When the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 and ClONO2 on sulfate aerosol of surface area densities matching the SAGE 2 measurements is added to the model, good agreement with the BLISS measurements is found over the whole altitude range.

  18. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOSIN AIR, CARPETING, AND DUST AND ITS REEMISSION FROM CARPETING FOLLOWING THE USE OF TOTAL RELEASE AEROSOLS IN AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of experiments to explore the relationships between the insecticide chlorpyrifos and its distribution into carpet., carpet dust, and reemission into air. Two total release aerosols containing 0.5% chlorpyrifos were applied in the living room and den of EP...

  19. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  20. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  1. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  2. Hospital washbasin water: risk of Legionella-contaminated aerosol inhalation.

    PubMed

    Cassier, P; Landelle, C; Reyrolle, M; Nicolle, M C; Slimani, S; Etienne, J; Vanhems, P; Jarraud, S

    2013-12-01

    The contamination of aerosols by washbasin water colonized by Legionella in a hospital was evaluated. Aerosol samples were collected by two impingement technologies. Legionella was never detected by culture in all the (aerosol) samples. However, 45% (18/40) of aerosol samples were positive for Legionella spp. by polymerase chain reaction, with measurable concentrations in 10% of samples (4/40). Moreover, immunoassay detected Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and L. anisa, and potentially viable bacteria were seen on viability testing. These data suggest that colonized hospital washbasins could represent risks of exposure to Legionella aerosol inhalation, especially by immunocompromised patients.

  3. Challenges in the Hydrocode Modelling of Hopkinson Bar Tests on Polymeric specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Rory; Church, Phil; Gould, Peter; Camrbidge University Shock Physics Team; QinetiQ Hopkinson bar Team; QinetiQ WES Team

    2011-06-01

    QinetiQ has developed physically based material models that can predict the mechanical and failure response of polymer composites, at high and low levels of stress and strain rate. Previous experience of using the Hopkinson bar to validate such models has suggested that direct comparison with the measured wave output is preferable due to the lack of equilibrium during the test. The presence of large oscillations in the predicted stress strain results are explained in terms of Poisson's ratio. A Bancroft dispersion analysis demonstrates that the source of these oscillations is Pochhammer-Chree waves generated in the Hopkinson bars. The intermittent and rare nature of similar oscillations observed experimentally is suggested to be due to the precise conditions of impact and shape of the striker and incident bars. It is shown that by accounting for these effects and by refining the validation process, excellent levels of agreement between prediction and experiment are obtained.

  4. HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long-Term Flow Test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchane, David

    1992-03-24

    The long term flow test (LTFT) of the worlds largest, deepest, and hottest hot dry rock (HDR) reservoir currently underway at Fenton Hill, NM, is expected to demonstrate that thermal energy can be mined from hot rock within the earth on a sustainable basis with minimal water consumption. This test will simulate the operations of a commercial facility in some ways, but it will not show that energy from HDR can be produced at a variety of locations with different geological settings. Since the Fenton Hill system was designed as a research facility rather than strictly for production purposes, it will also not demonstrate economic viability, although it may well give indications of system modifications needed for economic HDR operations. A second production site must be constructed, ideally under the direction of the private geothermal community, to begin the process of proving that the vast HDR resources can be accessed on a worldwide scale. This facility should be designed and engineered to produce and market energy at competitive prices. At the same time, a wide variety of techniques to advance the state-of-the-art of HDR technology must be pursued to develop this infant technology rapidly to its maximum potential. A number of design and operational techniques have been conceived which may lead to improved economics in HDR systems. After careful technical and economic scrutiny, those showing merit should be vigorously pursued. Finally, research and development work in areas such as reservoir interrogation, and system modeling must be accelerated to increase the competitiveness and geographical applications of HDR and the geothermal industry in general. This paper addresses the above issues in detail and outlines possible paths to future prosperity for the commercial geothermal industry.

  5. False-positive diatom test: a real challenge? A post-mortem study using standardized protocols.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Philippe; Miettinen, Arto; Spilling, Kristian; Sajantila, Antti

    2013-09-01

    The main criticism of the validity of the diatom test for the diagnosis of drowning is based on the potential ante- and post-mortem penetration of diatoms and the finding of diatoms in bodies of non-drowned human beings. However, qualitative and quantitative studies on diatoms in organs of the non-drowned have yielded both conflicting and contradictory results. In the present study, we have analysed under standardised methods the diatom content in several organs of 14 non-drowned human bodies. Overall, only 9 diatoms (6 entire, 3 fragmented) were disclosed in 6 of the 14 non-drowned bodies. Each of these 6 cadavers had only a single "positive" organ. Six diatoms were found in the bone marrow, 2 in the lung, and one in the pleural liquid. No diatoms were recovered from the brain, liver, kidney, or blood samples of any of these 14 bodies. Moreover, in five additional cadavers, whose lungs were injected, prior autopsy, with a 3.5L solution containing a bi-cellulate diatom culture (Thalassiosira baltica, Thalassiosira levanderi) via tracheostomy, a few diatoms appeared in the pleural cavity and in the blood from the left heart chamber, but none in any other internal organs investigated. The results of the presented study demonstrate that the issue of the false-positive diatom test should not be a logical impediment to the performance of the diatom method. However, strict and standardized protocols aimed at avoiding contamination during sample preparation must be used, appropriate separation values set and taxonomic analysis of all diatoms performed. PMID:23701706

  6. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  7. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  8. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  9. Workshop Summary: International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Workshop On Aerosol Forecast Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to reinforce the working partnership between centers who are actively involved in global aerosol forecasting, and to discuss issues related to forecast verification. Participants included representatives from operational centers with global aerosol forecasting requirements, a panel of experts on Numerical Weather Prediction and Air Quality forecast verification, data providers, and several observers from the research community. The presentations centered on a review of current NWP and AQ practices with subsequent discussion focused on the challenges in defining appropriate verification measures for the next generation of aerosol forecast systems.

  10. Implementation challenges for designing integrated in vitro testing strategies (ITS) aiming at reducing and replacing animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    De Wever, Bart; Fuchs, Horst W; Gaca, Marianna; Krul, Cyrille; Mikulowski, Stan; Poth, Albrecht; Roggen, Erwin L; Vilà, Maya R

    2012-04-01

    At the IVTIP (in vitro testing industrial platform) meeting of November 26th 2009 entitled 'Toxicology in the 21st century ('21C')--working our way towards a visionary reality' all delegates endorsed the emerging concept of the '21C' vision as the way forward to enable a thorough, reliable and systematic approach to future toxicity testing without the use of animals. One of the emerging concepts focused on integrating a defined number of tests modelling in vivo-relevant and well-characterised toxicity pathways representing mechanistic endpoints. At this meeting the importance of Integrated Testing Strategies (ITS) as tools towards reduction and eventually replacement of the animals currently used for hazard identification and risk assessment was recognised. A follow-up IVTIP Spring 2010 meeting entitled 'Integrated In Vitro Testing Strategies (ITS)--Implementation Challenges' was organised to address pending questions about ITS. This report is not a review of the ITS literature, but a summary of the discussions triggered by presented examples on how to develop and implement ITS. Contrasts between pharmaceutical and chemical industry, as well as a list of general but practical aspects to be considered while developing an ITS emerged from the discussions. In addition, current recommendations on the validation of ITS were discussed. In conclusion, the outcome of this workshop improved the understanding of the participants of some important factors that may impact the design of an ITS in function of its purpose (e.g., screening, or early decision making versus regulatory), the context in which they need to be applied (e.g., ICH guidelines, REACH) and the status and quality of the available tools. A set of recommendations of best practices was established and the importance of the applicability of the individual tests as well as the testing strategy itself was highlighted.

  11. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  12. Assessment of the Interactions Among Tropospheric Aerosol Loading, Radiative Balance and Clouds Through Examination of Their Multi-decadal Trends

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. Anthropogenic emissions of prima...

  13. Experimental aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Twenhafel, N A; Shaia, C I; Bunton, T E; Shamblin, J D; Wollen, S E; Pitt, L M; Sizemore, D R; Ogg, M M; Johnston, S C

    2015-01-01

    Eight guinea pigs were aerosolized with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) and developed lethal interstitial pneumonia that was distinct from lesions described in guinea pigs challenged subcutaneously, nonhuman primates challenged by the aerosol route, and natural infection in humans. Guinea pigs succumbed with significant pathologic changes primarily restricted to the lungs. Intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were observed in many alveolar macrophages. Perivasculitis was noted within the lungs. These changes are unlike those of documented subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs and aerosolized filoviral infections in nonhuman primates and human cases. Similar to findings in subcutaneously challenged guinea pigs, there were only mild lesions in the liver and spleen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aerosol challenge of guinea pigs with guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga). Before choosing this model for use in aerosolized ebolavirus studies, scientists and pathologists should be aware that aerosolized guinea pig-adapted Zaire ebolavirus (variant: Mayinga) causes lethal pneumonia in guinea pigs.

  14. Transition from Nondestructive Testing (NDT) to Structural Health Monitoring (SHM): potential and challenges (presentation video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, Peter

    2014-03-01

    There is a gradual shift in emphasis from periodic inspection with detachable transducers (NDT) to permanently installed monitoring systems giving information about the structural integrity at pre-programmed intervals or on demand (SHM). The drivers of this change are discussed, together with the requirements of successful SHM systems. Particular issues are that NDT often involves scanning and this is not possible with typical SHM configurations; it therefore becomes important to cover a significant area of structure from each transducer position. Guided waves provide a possible solution to this problem and permanently installed guided wave pipe inspection systems are now available. The sensitivity obtained with a permanently installed system is significantly better than that in a one-off test as baseline subtraction can be employed. However, this is far from trivial as it is necessary to compensate for benign changes such as temperature. The guided wave technique does not provide accurate remaining thickness information and is best complemented by point measurements at selected locations. Another issue is that the SHM transducers must survive in operational conditions, which is particularly difficult at high temperatures. Recent work at Imperial College and associated spin-out companies on solutions to these problems is discussed.

  15. Flight Test Evaluation of Synthetic Vision Concepts at a Terrain Challenged Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Prince, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randell E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Parrish, Russell V.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is striving to eliminate poor visibility as a causal factor in aircraft accidents as well as enhance operational capabilities of all aircraft through the display of computer generated imagery derived from an onboard database of terrain, obstacle, and airport information. To achieve these objectives, NASA 757 flight test research was conducted at the Eagle-Vail, Colorado airport to evaluate three SVS display types (Head-up Display, Head-Down Size A, Head-Down Size X) and two terrain texture methods (photo-realistic, generic) in comparison to the simulated Baseline Boeing-757 Electronic Attitude Direction Indicator and Navigation/Terrain Awareness and Warning System displays. The results of the experiment showed significantly improved situation awareness, performance, and workload for SVS concepts compared to the Baseline displays and confirmed the retrofit capability of the Head-Up Display and Size A SVS concepts. The research also demonstrated that the tunnel guidance display concept used within the SVS concepts achieved required navigation performance (RNP) criteria.

  16. Evaluating Structural Equation Models for Categorical Outcomes: A New Test Statistic and a Practical Challenge of Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Scott; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    This research is concerned with two topics in assessing model fit for categorical data analysis. The first topic involves the application of a limited-information overall test, introduced in the item response theory literature, to structural equation modeling (SEM) of categorical outcome variables. Most popular SEM test statistics assess how well the model reproduces estimated polychoric correlations. In contrast, limited-information test statistics assess how well the underlying categorical data are reproduced. Here, the recently introduced C2 statistic of Cai and Monroe (2014) is applied. The second topic concerns how the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) fit index can be affected by the number of categories in the outcome variable. This relationship creates challenges for interpreting RMSEA. While the two topics initially appear unrelated, they may conveniently be studied in tandem since RMSEA is based on an overall test statistic, such as C2. The results are illustrated with an empirical application to data from a large-scale educational survey.

  17. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  18. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  19. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  20. Emission factors of fine particles, carbonaceous aerosols and traces gases from road vehicles: Recent tests in an urban tunnel in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Li, Guanghui; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Zhonghui; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Xinyu; Deng, Wei; Liu, Tengyu; Huang, Zuzhao; Zhang, Zhanyi

    2015-12-01

    Motor vehicles contribute primarily and secondarily to air quality problems due to fine particle (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) pollution in China's megacities. Characterizing vehicle emission with the rapid change of vehicle numbers and fleet compositions is vital for both bottom-up emission survey and top-down source apportioning. To obtain emission factors (EFs) of PM2.5, carbonaceous aerosols and trace gases for road vehicles, in urban Guangzhou we conducted a field campaign in 2014 in the Zhujiang Tunnel, a heavily burdened tunnel with about 40,000 motor vehicles passing through each of its two separated bores per day. PM2.5 and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were sampled for offline analysis while trace gases including SO2, NOx and CO were measured online and in situ. An eddy covariance system with an integrated 3-D sonic anemometer was also adopted to measure CO2 and winds inside the tunnel. We recorded an average fleet composition of 61% light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDVs) + 12% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDVs) + 27% liquefied petroleum gas vehicles (LPGVs), and EFs of 82.7 ± 28.3, 19.3 ± 4.7 and 13.3 ± 3.3 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively, for PM2.5, organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC). These EFs were respectively 23.4%, 18.3% and 72.3% lower when compared to that measured in the same tunnel in 2004. EFs of PM2.5, OC and EC were higher at night time (148 ± 126, 29 ± 24 and 21 ± 18 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively) due to significantly elevated fractions of HDVs in the traffic fleets. An average ratio of OC to EC 1.45 from this tunnel study was much higher than that of ∼0.5 in previous tunnel studies. The EFs of SO2, NOx, CO, CO2 and NMHCs for road traffic were also obtained from our tunnel tests, and they were 20.7 ± 2.9, (1.29 ± 0.2)E+03, (3.10 ± 0.68)E+03, (3.90 ± 0.49)E+05, and 448 ± 39 mg veh-1 km-1, respectively.

  1. Technological advances in diagnostic testing for von Willebrand disease: new approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; Graf, L

    2014-06-01

    Diagnostic tests for von Willebrand disease (VWD) are important for the assessment of VWD, which is a commonly encountered bleeding disorder worldwide. Technical innovations have been applied to improve the precision and lower limit of detection of von Willebrand factor (VWF) assays, including the ristocetin cofactor activity assay (VWF:RCo) that uses the antibiotic ristocetin to induce plasma VWF binding to glycoprotein (GP) IbIXV on target platelets. VWF-collagen-binding assays, depending on the type of collagen used, can improve the detection of forms of VWD with high molecular weight VWF multimer loss, although the best method is debatable. A number of innovations have been applied to VWF:RCo (which is commonly performed on an aggregometer), including replacing the target platelets with immobilized GPIbα, and quantification by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoturbidimetric, or chemiluminescent end-point. Some common polymorphisms in the VWF gene that do not cause bleeding are associated with falsely low VWF activity by ristocetin-dependent methods. To overcome the need for ristocetin, some new VWF activity assays use gain-of-function GPIbα mutants that bind VWF without the need for ristocetin, with an improved precision and lower limit of detection than measuring VWF:RCo by aggregometry. ELISA of VWF binding to mutated GPIbα shows promise as a method to identify gain-of-function defects from type 2B VWD. The performance characteristics of many new VWF activity assays suggest that the detection of VWD, and monitoring of VWD therapy, by clinical laboratories could be improved through adopting newer generation VWF assays.

  2. A method for sampling microbial aerosols using high altitude balloons.

    PubMed

    Bryan, N C; Stewart, M; Granger, D; Guzik, T G; Christner, B C

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the challenges posed to microbial aerosol sampling at high altitudes, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and extent of microbial taxa in the Earth-atmosphere system. To directly address this knowledge gap, we designed, constructed, and tested a system that passively samples aerosols during ascent through the atmosphere while tethered to a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. The sampling payload is ~ 2.7 kg and comprised of an electronics box and three sampling chambers (one serving as a procedural control). Each chamber is sealed with retractable doors that can be commanded to open and close at designated altitudes. The payload is deployed together with radio beacons that transmit GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude and altitude) in real time for tracking and recovery. A cut mechanism separates the payload string from the balloon at any desired altitude, returning all equipment safely to the ground on a parachute. When the chambers are opened, aerosol sampling is performed using the Rotorod® collection method (40 rods per chamber), with each rod passing through 0.035 m3 per km of altitude sampled. Based on quality control measurements, the collection of ~ 100 cells rod(-1) provided a 3-sigma confidence level of detection. The payload system described can be mated with any type of balloon platform and provides a tool for characterizing the vertical distribution of microorganisms in the troposphere and stratosphere. PMID:25455021

  3. The detailed aerosol properties derived using GRASP Algorithm from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Fuertes, David; Huang, Xin; Derimian, Yevgeny; Ovigneur, Bertrand; Descloitres, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    The presentation introduces a new aerosol product derived from multi-angular polarimetric POLDER/PARASOL observations using recently developed GRASP algorithm The GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) algorithm described by Dubovik et al. (2011, 2014) derives an extended set of aerosol parameters including detailed particle size distribution, spectral refractive index, single scattering albedo and the fraction of non-spherical particles. Over land GRASP simultaneously retrieves properties of both aerosol and underlying surface. The robust performance of algorithm was illustrated in a series of numerical tests and real data case studies. However, the algorithm is significantly slower than conventional look-up-table retrievals because it performs all radiative transfer calculations on-line. This is why the application of the algorithm for processing large volumes of satellite data was considered as unacceptably challenging task. During two last years GRASP algorithm and its operational retrieval environment has been significantly optimized, improved and adapted for processing extended set of observational data. Hence, here we demonstrate the first results of GRASP aerosol products obtained from large data sets of PARASOL/POLDER observations. It should be noted that in addition the core retrieved aerosol and surface parameters GRASP output may include a variety of user-oriented products including values of daily fluxes and aerosol radiative forcing. 1. Dubovik, O., M. Herman, A. Holdak, T. Lapyonok, D. Tanré, J. L. Deuzé, F. Ducos, A. Sinyuk, and A. Lopatin, "Statistically optimized inversion algorithm for enhanced retrieval of aerosol properties from spectral multi-angle polarimetric satellite observations", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 4, 975-1018, 2011. 2. Dubovik, O., T. Lapyonok, P. Litvinov, M. Herman, D. Fuertes, F. Ducos, A. Lopatin, A. Chaikovsky, B. Torres, Y. Derimian, X. Huang, M. Aspetsberger, and C. Federspiel "GRASP: a versatile

  4. Challenge testing the lactoperoxidase system against a range of bacteria using different activation agents.

    PubMed

    Fweja, L W T; Lewis, M J; Grandison, A S

    2008-07-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LP) exerts antimicrobial effects in combination with H(2)O(2) and either thiocyanate (SCN(-)) or a halide (e.g., I(-)). Garlic extract in the presence of ethanol has also been used to activate the LP system. This study aimed to determine the effects of 3 LP activation systems (LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2); LP+I(-)+H(2)O(2); LP + garlic extract + ethanol) on the growth and activity of 3 test organisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus). Sterilized milk was used as the reaction medium, and the growth pattern of the organisms and a range of keeping quality (KQ) indicators (pH, titratable acidity, ethanol stability, clot on boiling) were monitored during storage at the respective optimum growth temperature for each organism. The LP+I(-)+ H(2)O(2) system reduced bacterial counts below the detection limit shortly after treatment for all 3 organisms, and no bacteria could be detected for the duration of the experiment (35 to 55 h). The KQ data confirmed that the milk remained unspoiled at the end of the experiments. The LP + garlic extract + ethanol system, on the other hand, had no effect on the growth or KQ with P. aeruginosa, but showed a small retardation of growth of the other 2 organisms, accompanied by small increases (5 to 10 h) in KQ. The effects of the LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2) system were intermediate between those of the other 2 systems and differed between organisms. With P. aeruginosa, the system exerted total inhibition within 10 h of incubation, but the bacteria regained viability after a further 5 h, following a logarithmic growth curve. This was reflected in the KQ indicators, which implied an extension of 15 h. With the other 2 bacterial species, LP+SCN(-)+H(2)O(2) exerted an obvious inhibitory effect, giving a lag phase in the growth curve of 5 to 10 h and KQ extension of 10 to 15 h. When used in combination, I(-) and SCN(-) displayed negative synergy.

  5. iPads at Field Camp: A First Test of the Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, S. D.; Stewart, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    traditional tools. We are addressing some aspects of software limitations and future technology improvements by the industry will naturally reduce other limitations. We will continue testing iPads during field trips and courses for the foreseeable future. As we begin to deal with these limitations and students become more accustomed to their use in the field, we expect our students to more fully embrace iPads as a convenient field and mapping tool.

  6. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-03-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013) algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components and their mixing ratios. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data qualitatively by visible analysis of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing global daily gridded satellite data against daily

  7. Aerosol Climate Time Series in ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Pinnock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. Meanwhile, full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer, but also from ATSR instruments and the POLDER sensor), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which were also validated and improved in the reprocessing. For the three ATSR algorithms the use of an ensemble method was tested. The paper will summarize and discuss the status of dataset reprocessing and validation. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension

  8. Prediction of anaphylaxis during peanut food challenge: usefulness of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level.

    PubMed

    Wainstein, Brynn Kevin; Studdert, Jennie; Ziegler, Mary; Ziegler, John B

    2010-06-01

    Cutoffs (decision points) of the peanut skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE level for predicting peanut allergy have been proposed. It is not known whether decision points indicating a significant risk of severe reactions on challenge differ from those indicating probable allergy. We aimed at determining the usefulness of allergy tests for predicting the risk of anaphylaxis on challenge following the ingestion of up to 12 g of peanut in peanut-sensitized children. Children attending the Allergy Clinic who had a positive peanut SPT and completed open-label in-hospital peanut challenges were included. The challenge protocol provided for challenges to be continued beyond initial mild reactions. Eighty-nine in-hospital peanut challenges were performed. Thirty-four were excluded as the challenge was not completed, leaving 55 for analysis. Children who completed the challenge and did not react (n = 28) or reacted without anaphylaxis (n = 6) represented the comparison group (n = 34). The study group comprised 21 children whose challenge resulted in anaphylaxis. The mean peanut SPT wheal size and specific IgE level were associated with the severity of reactions on challenge. Among the 21 children, who developed anaphylaxis, in only 3 cases was anaphylaxis the initial reaction. Unexpectedly, a history of anaphylaxis was not predictive of anaphylaxis on challenge. Anaphylaxis developed at cumulative doses of peanut ranging from 0.02 to 11.7 g. Provided that a fixed amount of peanut is ingested, available tests for peanut allergy may assist in predicting the risk of anaphylaxis during challenge in peanut-sensitized children.

  9. Spectra Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Laboratory and Urban Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.

    a shell-core model, we verified, for the first time, that AEA can be as high as 1.6 even for non-absorbing coating on BC, suggesting that the organic coating need not be intrinsically brown to observe effects commonly attributed to BrC absorption. Additionally, for laboratory generated incense burning aerosols, AEA varied as lambda -4.5for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1047 nm. In contrast, the wood smoke aerosols during winter had a much weaker wavelength dependence (lambda-1.1), comparable to that of traffic emission aerosols. During these observations, the multispectral SSA decreased with the wavelength for traffic-related emissions, yet it increased for biomass and incense burning aerosol. The strong spectral dependence was due to the enhanced light absorption by BrC at UV and blue wavelengths. In all cases, results of this analysis suggested that inefficient smoldering combustion processes can emit predominantly BrC, in comparison to high-temperature and flaming burning processes. During the CARES field campaign, aerosols were dominated by biogenic emissions. Aerosol light absorption was modestly enhanced (lambda -1.6) at shorter wavelengths (355, 375, 405, and 532 nm) compared to 870 and 1047 nm, likely due to the spectral dependence of coating on BC. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentration steadily increased in the latter half of the campaign, with strong 355 nm aerosol light scattering. Overall, results of this field campaign showed that the biogenic SOA was not BrC, i.e. it didn't have intrinsic characteristics near UV absorption. These results should be further tested and analyzed to assess the full implications of BrC aerosol light absorption.

  10. Scale-up of Routine Viral Load Testing in Resource-Poor Settings: Current and Future Implementation Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Teri; Cohn, Jennifer; Bonner, Kimberly; Hargreaves, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Despite immense progress in antiretroviral therapy (ART) scale-up, many people still lack access to basic standards of care, with our ability to meet the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS 90-90-90 treatment targets for HIV/AIDS dependent on dramatic improvements in diagnostics. The World Health Organization recommends routine monitoring of ART effectiveness using viral load (VL) testing at 6 months and every 12 months, to monitor treatment adherence and minimize failure, and will publish its VL toolkit later this year. However, the cost and complexity of VL is preventing scale-up beyond developed countries and there is a lack of awareness among clinicians as to the long-term patient benefits and its role in prolonging the longevity of treatment programs. With developments in this diagnostic field rapidly evolving—including the recent improvements for accurately using dried blood spots and the imminent appearance to the market of point-of-care technologies offering decentralized diagnosis—we describe current barriers to VL testing in resource-limited settings. Effective scale-up can be achieved through health system and laboratory system strengthening and test price reductions, as well as tackling multiple programmatic and funding challenges. PMID:26743094

  11. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    PubMed

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units.

  12. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    characteristics and composition of aerosols. These processes, together with other physical properties (i.e., size, density, and refractive index), determine the atmospheric lifetime of aerosols and their radiative forcing. To better represent physical properties of aerosols, we adapted an aerosol microphysics model that simulates aerosol size distribution. Work toward this goal was done in collaboration with Professor Anthony Wexler of University of California at Davis. Professor Wexler's group has developed sectional models of atmospheric aerosol dynamics that include an arbitrary number of size sections and chemical compounds or compound classes. The model, AIM (Aerosol Inorganic Model), is designed to predict the mass distribution and composition of urban and regional particulate matter (''Sun and Wexler'', 1998a, b). This model is currently incorporated into EPA's Models-3 air quality modeling platform/CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) to test its performance with previous simulations of CMAQ over the continental US.

  13. Characteristics of Chinese aerosols determined by individual-particle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Anderson, James R.

    2001-08-01

    Tropospheric aerosols that originate in China and are transported over the North Pacific Ocean have potentially significant impacts on regional and global climate. These aerosols are complex mixtures of soil dust and anthropogenic particles from a variety of sources, including fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, mining, smelting, and other industrial processes, plus reaction products of heterogeneous processes that affect these particles during transport. In the coastal marine atmosphere, these particles could be further mixed with marine aerosols. To provide examples of the diversity of chemical and physical properties of east Asian aerosols in the spring, individual aerosol particle samples were collected in April and May 1999 in three different environments in China: Qingdao on the coast of the East China Sea, Beijing in the northeast interior, and Mount Waliguan in remote northwestern China. Results reveal that aerosols in this region are complex and heterogeneous. In addition to significant differences in aerosol composition and size distributions among the samples, each sample contains a large number of polyphase aggregates. Many of the particles also have irregular shapes; for a number of the particle types, the irregular shapes should persist even at high ambient RH. Because composition, degree and nature of polyphase aggregation, and shape all effect aerosol radiative properties, the complex state of east Asian aerosols presents a challenge for the modeling of aerosol radiative forcing in the region.

  14. Challenging Pneumatic Requirements for Acoustic Testing of the Cryogenic Second Stage for the New Delta 3 Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Andrew T.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes the unique pneumatic test requirements for the acoustic and shock separation testing of the Second Stage for the new Delta III Rocket at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The testing was conducted in the 45,000 cu ft (25-feet wide by 30-feet deep by 50-foot high) Acoustic Facility. The acoustic testing required that the liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) tanks be filled with enough liquid nitrogen (LN2) to simulate launch fuel masses during testing. The challenge for this test dealt with designing, procuring, and fabricating the pneumatic supply systems for quick assembly while maintaining the purity requirements and minimizing costs. The pneumatic systems were designed to fill and drain the both LOX and LH2 tanks as well as to operate the fill/drain and vent valves for each of the tanks. The test criteria for the pneumatic sub-systems consisted of function, cleanliness, availability, and cost. The first criteria, function, required the tanks to be filled and drained in an efficient manner while preventing them from seeing pressures greater than 9 psig which would add a pressure cycle to the tank. An LN2 tanker, borrowed from another NASA facility, served as the pre-cool and drain tanker. Pre-cooling the tanks allowed for more efficient and cost effective transfer from the LN2 delivery tankers. Helium gas, supplied from a high purity tube trailer, was used to pressurize the vapor space above the LN2 pushing it into the drain tanker. The tube trailer also supplied high pressure helium to the vehicle for valve control and component purges. Cleanliness was maintained by proper component selection, end-use particle filtration, and any on-site cleaning determined necessary by testing. In order to meet the availability/cost juggling act, products designed for LOX delivery systems were procured to ensure system compatibility while off the shelf valves and tubing designed for the semiconductor industry were procured for

  15. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  16. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013), algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun photometer

  17. The challenge of producing skin test antigens with minimal resources suitable for human application against a neglected tropical disease; leprosy.

    PubMed

    Rivoire, Becky L; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A; Brennan, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3-10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  18. Rewards and challenges of providing HIV testing and counselling services: health worker perspectives from Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bott, Sarah; Neuman, Melissa; Helleringer, Stephane; Desclaux, Alice; Asmar, Khalil El; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2015-10-01

    The rapid scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, counselling and treatment throughout sub-Saharan Africa has raised questions about how to protect patients' rights to consent, confidentiality, counselling and care in resource-constrained settings. The Multi-country African Testing and Counselling for HIV (MATCH) study investigated client and provider experiences with different modes of testing in sub-Saharan Africa. One component of that study was a survey of 275 HIV service providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda that gathered quantifiable indicators and qualitative descriptions using a standardized instrument. This article presents provider perspectives on the challenges of obtaining consent, protecting confidentiality, providing counselling and helping clients manage disclosure. It also explores health workers' fear of infection within the workplace and their reports on discrimination against HIV clients within health facilities. HIV care providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda experienced substantial rewards from their work, including satisfaction from saving lives and gaining professional skills. They also faced serious resource constraints, including staff shortages, high workloads, lack of supplies and inadequate infrastructure, and they expressed concerns about accidental exposure. Health workers described heavy emotional demands from observing clients suffer emotional, social and health consequences of being diagnosed with HIV, and also from difficult ethical dilemmas related to clients who do not disclose their HIV status to those around them, including partners. These findings suggest that providers of HIV testing and counselling need more resources and support, including better protections against HIV exposure in the workplace. The findings also suggest that health facilities could improve care by increasing attention to consent, privacy and confidentiality and that health policy makers and ethicists need to address some

  19. The Challenge of Producing Skin Test Antigens with Minimal Resources Suitable for Human Application against a Neglected Tropical Disease; Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rivoire, Becky L.; TerLouw, Stephen; Groathouse, Nathan A.; Brennan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    True incidence of leprosy and its impact on transmission will not be understood until a tool is available to measure pre-symptomatic infection. Diagnosis of leprosy disease is currently based on clinical symptoms, which on average take 3–10 years to manifest. The fact that incidence, as defined by new case detection, equates with prevalence, i.e., registered cases, suggests that the cycle of transmission has not been fully intercepted by implementation of multiple drug therapy. This is supported by a high incidence of childhood leprosy. Epidemiological screening for pre-symptomatic leprosy in large endemic populations is required to facilitate targeted chemoprophylactic interventions. Such a test must be sensitive, specific, simple to administer, cost-effective, and easy to interpret. The intradermal skin test method that measures cell-mediated immunity was explored as the best option. Prior knowledge on skin testing of healthy subjects and leprosy patients with whole or partially fractionated Mycobacterium leprae bacilli, such as Lepromin or the Rees' or Convit' antigens, has established an acceptable safety and potency profile of these antigens. These data, along with immunoreactivity data, laid the foundation for two new leprosy skin test antigens, MLSA-LAM (M. leprae soluble antigen devoid of mycobacterial lipoglycans, primarily lipoarabinomannan) and MLCwA (M. leprae cell wall antigens). In the absence of commercial interest, the challenge was to develop these antigens under current good manufacturing practices in an acceptable local pilot facility and submit an Investigational New Drug to the Food and Drug Administration to allow a first-in-human phase I clinical trial. PMID:24874086

  20. Rewards and challenges of providing HIV testing and counselling services: health worker perspectives from Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda.

    PubMed

    Bott, Sarah; Neuman, Melissa; Helleringer, Stephane; Desclaux, Alice; Asmar, Khalil El; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2015-10-01

    The rapid scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, counselling and treatment throughout sub-Saharan Africa has raised questions about how to protect patients' rights to consent, confidentiality, counselling and care in resource-constrained settings. The Multi-country African Testing and Counselling for HIV (MATCH) study investigated client and provider experiences with different modes of testing in sub-Saharan Africa. One component of that study was a survey of 275 HIV service providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda that gathered quantifiable indicators and qualitative descriptions using a standardized instrument. This article presents provider perspectives on the challenges of obtaining consent, protecting confidentiality, providing counselling and helping clients manage disclosure. It also explores health workers' fear of infection within the workplace and their reports on discrimination against HIV clients within health facilities. HIV care providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda experienced substantial rewards from their work, including satisfaction from saving lives and gaining professional skills. They also faced serious resource constraints, including staff shortages, high workloads, lack of supplies and inadequate infrastructure, and they expressed concerns about accidental exposure. Health workers described heavy emotional demands from observing clients suffer emotional, social and health consequences of being diagnosed with HIV, and also from difficult ethical dilemmas related to clients who do not disclose their HIV status to those around them, including partners. These findings suggest that providers of HIV testing and counselling need more resources and support, including better protections against HIV exposure in the workplace. The findings also suggest that health facilities could improve care by increasing attention to consent, privacy and confidentiality and that health policy makers and ethicists need to address some

  1. Rewards and challenges of providing HIV testing and counselling services: health worker perspectives from Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Sarah; Neuman, Melissa; Helleringer, Stephane; Desclaux, Alice; Asmar, Khalil El; Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf

    2015-01-01

    The rapid scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, counselling and treatment throughout sub-Saharan Africa has raised questions about how to protect patients’ rights to consent, confidentiality, counselling and care in resource-constrained settings. The Multi-country African Testing and Counselling for HIV (MATCH) study investigated client and provider experiences with different modes of testing in sub-Saharan Africa. One component of that study was a survey of 275 HIV service providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda that gathered quantifiable indicators and qualitative descriptions using a standardized instrument. This article presents provider perspectives on the challenges of obtaining consent, protecting confidentiality, providing counselling and helping clients manage disclosure. It also explores health workers’ fear of infection within the workplace and their reports on discrimination against HIV clients within health facilities. HIV care providers in Burkina Faso, Kenya and Uganda experienced substantial rewards from their work, including satisfaction from saving lives and gaining professional skills. They also faced serious resource constraints, including staff shortages, high workloads, lack of supplies and inadequate infrastructure, and they expressed concerns about accidental exposure. Health workers described heavy emotional demands from observing clients suffer emotional, social and health consequences of being diagnosed with HIV, and also from difficult ethical dilemmas related to clients who do not disclose their HIV status to those around them, including partners. These findings suggest that providers of HIV testing and counselling need more resources and support, including better protections against HIV exposure in the workplace. The findings also suggest that health facilities could improve care by increasing attention to consent, privacy and confidentiality and that health policy makers and ethicists need to address some

  2. Condensing Organic Aerosols in a Microphysical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  3. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  4. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  5. Evaluating Aerosol Process Modules within the Framework of the Aerosol Modeling Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Velu, V.; Gustafson, W. I.; Chapman, E.; Easter, R. C.; Shrivastava, M.; Singh, B.

    2012-12-01

    Factors that influence predictions of aerosol direct and indirect forcing, such as aerosol mass, composition, size distribution, hygroscopicity, and optical properties, still contain large uncertainties in both regional and global models. New aerosol treatments are usually implemented into a 3-D atmospheric model and evaluated using a limited number of measurements from a specific case study. Under this modeling paradigm, the performance and computational efficiency of several treatments for a specific aerosol process cannot be adequately quantified because many other processes among various modeling studies (e.g. grid configuration, meteorology, emission rates) are different as well. The scientific community needs to know the advantages and disadvantages of specific aerosol treatments when the meteorology, chemistry, and other aerosol processes are identical in order to reduce the uncertainties associated with aerosols predictions. To address these issues, an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) has been developed that systematically and objectively evaluates new aerosol treatments for use in regional and global models. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) have also been ported to WRF so that they can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. Data from several campaigns, including the 2006

  6. Aerosol MTF revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeika, Norman S.; Zilberman, Arkadi; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak

    2014-05-01

    Different views of the significance of aerosol MTF have been reported. For example, one recent paper [OE, 52(4)/2013, pp. 046201] claims that the aerosol MTF "contrast reduction is approximately independent of spatial frequency, and image blur is practically negligible". On the other hand, another recent paper [JOSA A, 11/2013, pp. 2244-2252] claims that aerosols "can have a non-negligible effect on the atmospheric point spread function". We present clear experimental evidence of common significant aerosol blur and evidence that aerosol contrast reduction can be extremely significant. In the IR, it is more appropriate to refer to such phenomena as aerosol-absorption MTF. The role of imaging system instrumentation on such MTF is addressed too.

  7. DMPS (DIMAVAL) as a challenge test to assess the mercury and arsenic body/kidney load in humans and as a treatment of mercury toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aposhian, H.V.; Maiorino, R.M.; Aposhian, M.M.; Hurlbut, K.M.

    1996-12-31

    Mercury is an element which, with its compounds, is hazardous and is found in hazardous wastes. In Order to develop suitable diagnostic and therapeutic agents for mercury exposure, we have sought alternative test systems. We have used the chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS, DIMAVAL{reg_sign}) for estimating the body burden of mercury in normal humans and in dental personnel in a developing country, and for detoxifying humans with mercurous chloride exposure. Use of the DMPS-mercury challenge test has shown that two-thirds of the mercury excreted in the urine of volunteers with dental amalgams appears to be derived from the mercury vapor released from their amalgams. The DMPS challenge test (300 mg, by mouth, after an 11 hr fast) was useful for monitoring dental personnel for mercury vapor exposure. The DMPS challenge test was given to 11 factory workers who make a skin lotion that contains mercurous chloride, 8 users of the skin lotion, and 9 controls. The increases in urinary Hg resulting from the DMPS challenge were 45, 87, and 38-fold, respectively. The results demonstrate that in humans exposed to mercurous chloride, the DMPS-mercury challenge test is of value for a more realistic estimation of mobilizable Hg. DMPS should be considered for use to determine mercury body burdens and to treat humans exposed to mercury and its compounds via exposure to hazardous wastes. 42 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Aerosol Inoculator for Exposure of Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gerone, Peter J.; Couch, Robert B.; Knight, Vernon

    1971-01-01

    The performance of an aerosol inoculator for human volunteers is described in tests that used the PR8 strain of type A influenza virus and sodium fluorescein as a physical tracer. Virus recovery from the aerosols was approximately 1% and was unaffected by such variables as prolonged aerosolization, total airflow, relative humidity, or method of sampling. The recovery of sodium fluorescein from the aerosol was approximately 12% and was influenced by total airflow rates and relative humidity. With this apparatus, it should be possible to deliver reasonably predictable and measurable doses of respiratory viruses to human subjects. The design makes it possible to dismantle the inoculator into its component parts to facilitate portability. Images PMID:5132095

  9. Methacholine bronchial challenge using a dosimeter with controlled tidal breathing.

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, M M; Lahdensuo, A; Kellomaeki, L; Karvonen, J; Muittari, A

    1988-01-01

    A new inhalation synchronised dosimeter triggered by low inspiratory flow rates has been assessed. The methacholine challenge test using dosimeter nebulisation with controlled tidal breathing was compared with continuous nebulisation using De Vilbiss No 40 nebulisers with deep inhalations in 11 asthmatic subjects. Within subject PD20 FEV1 values were lower with the dosimeter method than with the continuous nebulisation method (geometric means 158 and 588 micrograms). The repeatability of the dosimeter method with controlled tidal breathing was studied in 11 asthmatic subjects, and the 95% range for a single measurement was +/- 0.72 doubling doses of methacholine. The dosimeter method has greater efficacy because aerosol is delivered during the first part of an inhalation, minimising loss of aerosol outside the respiratory tract. The dosimeter technique combined with controlled tidal breathing appears to be a useful method for carrying out standardised non-specific bronchoprovocation tests. Images PMID:3065974

  10. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in their characterization and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) will be used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  11. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Using Satellite and Surface Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patadia, F.; Christopher, S. A.

    2008-05-01

    Over the industrial period, aerosols have increased due to human activities and their effects on climate are the largest source of uncertainty in the current IPCC estimates of global climate forcing due to human activities. Inhomogeneous distribution of aerosols in space and time poses a challenge in characterizing their properties and requires global measurements to assess their effects and reduce the associated uncertainties. In this paper we use global measurements from both satellite and ground based observations for one year time period to estimate the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and discuss the associated uncertainties. For this, aerosol properties (optical depth) derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), a federation of ground-based remote sensing instruments, are used in this paper in conjunction with measurements of the TOA shortwave flux from CERES instrument (onboard Terra satellite). High spectral and spatial resolution observations from Imager (MODIS) is used to identify clear sky conditions within CERES foot print and GOCART results will also be used for separating aerosol types. Global aerosol forcing and corresponding radiative forcing efficiencies will be presented as a function of major aerosol types [including anthropogenic (sulfate, soot, black carbon) and natural (dust) aerosols], region and season. This study should serve as a useful constraint for both numerical modeling simulations and satellite based estimates of SWARF.

  12. Influence of Aerosols on Monsoon Circulation and Hydroclimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global water cycles and climate change. In the Asian monsoon regions, the response of the regional water cycle and climate to aerosol forcing is very complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. Up to now, besides the general notion that aerosols may significantly impact monsoon through altering large scale radiative heating gradients, there has been very little information regarding the specific signatures, and mechanisms of aerosol-monsoon water cycle interaction. In this talk, based on preliminary results from observations and climate model experiments, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon water cycle, in particular the effects of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), and the role of the Tibetan Plateau. The influence of aerosol forcing relative to those due to sea surface temperature and land surface processes, and impact on potential predictability of the monsoon climate system will also be discussed.

  13. Influence of Aerosols on Monsoon Circulation and Hydroclimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.

    2006-01-01

    Long recognized as a major environmental hazard, aerosol is now known to have strong impacts on both regional and global water cycles and climate change. In the Asian monsoon regions, the response of the regional water cycle and climate to aerosol forcing is very complex, not only because of presence of diverse mix of aerosol species with vastly different radiative properties, but also because the monsoon is strongly influenced by ocean and land surface processes, land use, land change, as well as regional and global greenhouse warming effects. Thus, sorting out the impacts of aerosol forcing, and interaction with the monsoon water cycle is a very challenging problem. Up to now, besides the general notion that aerosols may significantly impact monsoon through altering large scale radiative heating gradients, there has been very little information regarding the specific signatures, and mechanisms of aerosol-monsoon water cycle interaction. In this talk, based on preliminary results from observations and climate model experiments, I will offer some insights into how aerosols may impact the Asian monsoon water cycle, in particular the effects of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), and the role of the Tibetan Plateau. The influence of aerosol forcing relative to those due to sea surface temperature and land surface processes, and impact on potential predictability of the monsoon climate system will also be discussed.

  14. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  15. Development and testing of an aerosol/stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes. Final technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Kreidenweis, S.M.; Cotton, W.R.

    1999-05-20

    At the present time, general circulation models (GCMs) poorly represent clouds, to the extent that they cannot be relied upon to simulate the climatic effects of increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases, or of anthropogenic perturbations to concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN). The long-term objective of this research was the development of an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary-layer clouds which responds to variations in CCN and IN. The work plan was to perform simulations of these cloud systems to gain understanding of their dynamics and microphysics, especially how aerosols affect cloud development and properties, that cold then be used to guide parameterizations. Several versions of the CSU RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System), modified to treat Arctic clouds, have been used during the course of this work. The authors also developed a new modeling system, the Trajectory Ensemble Model, to perform detailed chemical and microphysical simulations off-line from the host LES model. The increased understanding of the cloud systems investigated in this research can be applied to a single-column cloud model, designed as an adaptive grid model which can interface into a GCM vertical grid through distinct layers of the troposphere where the presence of layer clouds is expected.

  16. Total serum IgE level influences oral food challenge tests for IgE-mediated food allergies.

    PubMed

    Horimukai, K; Hayashi, K; Tsumura, Y; Nomura, I; Narita, M; Ohya, Y; Saito, H; Matsumoto, K

    2015-03-01

    Probability curves predicting oral food challenge test (OFC) results based on specific IgE levels are widely used to prevent serious allergic reactions. Although several confounding factors are known to affect probability curves, the main factors that affect OFC outcomes are currently unclear. We hypothesized that an increased total IgE level would reduce allergic reactivity. Medical records of 337 and 266 patients who underwent OFCs for 3.5 g boiled hen's egg white and 3.1 ml raw cow's milk, respectively, were examined retrospectively. We subdivided the patients into three groups based on total IgE levels and age by percentile (<25th, 25-75th, and >75th percentiles), and logistic regression analyses were performed on each group. Patients with higher total IgE levels were significantly less responsive. In addition, age did not significantly affect the OFC results. Therefore, total IgE levels should be taken into account when predicting OFC results based on food-specific IgE levels.

  17. Optical closure study on light-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, Andreas; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Andrews, Elizabeth; Hallar, Anna G.

    2014-05-01

    The in situ measurement of atmospheric aerosol optical properties is an important component of quantifying climate change. In particular, the in-situ measurement of the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of aerosol scattering to aerosol extinction, is identified as a key challenge in atmospheric sciences and climate change research. Ideally, the complete set of aerosol optical properties is measured through optical closure studies which simultaneous measure aerosol extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients. The recent development of new optical instruments have made real-time in situ optical closure studies attainable, however, many of these instruments are state-of-the-art but not practical for routine monitoring. In our studies we deployed a suit of well-established and recently developed instruments including the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) method for aerosol light extinction, multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for aerosol light absorption, and an integrating nephelometer (NEPH) for aerosol light scattering measurements. From these directly measured optical properties we calculated light absorption from extinction minus scattering (difference method), light extinction from scattering plus absorption, and aerosol single-scattering albedo from combinations CAPS + MAAP, NEPH + PSAP, NEPH + MAAP, CAPS + NEPH. Closure studies were conducted for laboratory-generated aerosols composed of various mixtures of black carbon (Regal 400R pigment black, Cabot Corp.) and ammonium sulphate, urban aerosol (Billerica, MA), and background aerosol (Storm Peak Lab.). Key questions addressed in our closure studies are: (1) how well can we measure aerosol light absorption by various methods, and (2) how well can we measure the aerosol single-scattering albedo by various instrument combinations? In particular we investigated (3) whether the combination of a CAPS and NEPH provides a reasonable

  18. Skin prick testing predicts peanut challenge outcome in previously allergic or sensitized children with low serum peanut-specific IgE antibody concentration.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Richard C; Richmond, Peter; Prescott, Susan L; Mallon, Dominic F; Gong, Grace; Franzmann, Annkathrin M; Naidoo, Rama; Loh, Richard K S

    2007-05-01

    Peanut allergy is transient in some children but it is not clear whether quantitating peanut-specific IgE by Skin Prick Test (SPT) adds additional information to fluorescent-enzyme immunoassay (FEIA) in discriminating between allergic and tolerant children. To investigate whether SPT with a commercial extract or fresh foods adds additional predictive information for peanut challenge in children with a low FEIA (<10 k UA/L) who were previously sensitized, or allergic to peanuts. Children from a hospital-based allergy service who were previously sensitized or allergic to peanuts were invited to undergo a peanut challenge unless they had a serum peanut-specific IgE>10 k UA/L, a previous severe reaction, or a recent reaction to peanuts (within two years). SPT with a commercial extract, raw and roasted saline soaked peanuts was performed immediately prior to open challenge in hospital with increasing quantity of peanuts until total of 26.7 g of peanut was consumed. A positive challenge consisted of an objective IgE mediated reaction occurring during the observation period. 54 children (median age of 6.3 years) were admitted for a challenge. Nineteen challenges were positive, 27 negative, five were indeterminate and three did not proceed after SPT. Commercial and fresh food extracts provided similar diagnostic information. A wheal diameter of >or=7 mm of the commercial extract predicted an allergic outcome with specificity 97%, positive predictive value 93% and sensitivity 83%. There was a tendency for an increase in SPT wheal since initial diagnosis in children who remained allergic to peanuts while it decreased in those with a negative challenge. The outcome of a peanut challenge in peanut sensitized or previously allergic children with a low FEIA can be predicted by SPT. In this cohort, not challenging children with a SPT wheal of >or=7 mm would have avoided 15 of 18 positive challenges and denied a challenge to one out of 27 tolerant children.

  19. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  20. A novel challenge test incorporating irradiation (60Co) of compost sub-samples to validate thermal lethality towards pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Watabe, Miyuki; Stewart, Andrew; Cherie Millar, B; Rao, Juluri R

    2009-01-01

    Maturing compost heaps normally attaining temperatures ranging from 55 to 65 degrees C is generally regarded to conform to recommended biological risks and sanitation standards for composts stipulated by either EU or US-EPA. Composted products derived from animal sources are further required by EU biohazard safety regulatory legislation that such composts either attain 70 degrees C for over 3h during maturation or via treatment at 70 degrees C for 1h before being considered for dispensation on land. The setting of the upper limit of thermal lethality at 70 degrees C/1h for achieving biosecurity of the animal waste composted products (e.g. pelleted fertilizer formulations) is not properly substantiated by specific validation tests, comprising a 'wipe-out' step (usually via autoclaving) followed by inoculation of a prescribed bacterium, exposure to 70 degrees C/1h and the lethality determined. Pelleted formulations of composts are not amenable for wet methods (autoclaving) for wipe-out sterilization step as this is detrimental to the pellet and compromises sample integrity. This study describes a laboratory method involving the employment of ((60)Co) irradiation 'wipe-out' step to: (a) compost sub-samples drawn from compost formulation heaps and (b) pelleted products derived from composted animal products while determining the thermal lethality of a given time/temperature (70 degrees C/1h) treatment process and by challenging the irradiated sample (not just with one bacterium but), out with 10 potential food-poisoning organisms from the bacterial genera (Campylobacter, Escherichia, Listeria, Salmonella, Yersinia) frequently detected in pig and poultry farm wastes. This challenge test on compost sub-samples can be a useful intervention ploy for 'inspection and validation' technique for composters during the compost maturity process, whose attainment of temperatures of 55-65 degrees C is presumed sufficient for attainment of sanitation. Stringent measures are further

  1. Pulmonary aerosol actions of LY188695 (KB2413), a new potent H1-receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Silbaugh, S A; Stengel, P W; Rinkema, L E

    1987-06-01

    The new potent H1 receptor antagonist, LY188695 (KB2413), was delivered to guinea pigs as a pulmonary aerosol and its ability to inhibit histamine-induced airway obstruction examined. Aerosol LY188695 was more effective than inhaled chlorpheniramine or clemastine in reducing the pulmonary gas trapping produced by histamine challenge. Lung antihistamine effects occurred within minutes of a brief, low concentration aerosol exposure and persisted for at least 1 hour. LY188695 aerosol treatment did not produce significant inhibition of methacholine-induced gas trapping. Although systemic antihistamine effects occurred 50 minutes after LY188695 inhalation, aerosol administration produced an enhanced local (i.e., lung) action compared to intravenous delivery.

  2. Satellite stratospheric aerosol measurement validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The validity of the stratospheric aerosol measurements made by the satellite sensors SAM II and SAGE was tested by comparing their results with each other and with results obtained by other techniques (lider, dustsonde, filter, and impactor). The latter type of comparison required the development of special techniques that convert the quantity measured by the correlative sensor (e.g., particle backscatter, number, or mass) to that measured by the satellite sensor (extinction) and quantitatively estimate the uncertainty in the conversion process. The results of both types of comparisons show agreement within the measurement and conversion uncertainties. Moreover, the satellite uncertainty is small compared to aerosol natural variability (caused by seasonal changes, volcanoes, sudden warmings, and vortex structure). It was concluded that the satellite measurements are valid.

  3. Satellite stratospheric aerosol measurement validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The validity of the stratospheric aerosol measurements made by the satellite sensors SAM II and SAGE was tested by comparing their results with each other and with results obtained by other techniques (lider, dustsonde, filter, and impactor). The latter type of comparison required the development of special techniques that convert the quantity measured by the correlative sensor (e.g. particle backscatter, number, or mass) to that measured by the satellite sensor (extinction) and quantitatively estimate the uncertainty in the conversion process. The results of both types of comparisons show agreement within the measurement and conversion uncertainties. Moreover, the satellite uncertainty is small compared to aerosol natural variability (caused by seasonal changes, volcanoes, sudden warmings, and vortex structure). It was concluded that the satellite measurements are valid.

  4. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Determination of aerosol size distributions from spectral attenuation measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassl, H

    1971-11-01

    An iteration method for the determination of size distributions of aerosols from spectral attenuation data, similar to the one previously published for clouds, is presented. The basis for this iteration is to consider the extinction efficiency factor of particles as a set of weighting functions covering the entire radius region of a distribution. The weighting functions were calculated exactly from the Mie theory. Aerosol distributions are shown derived from tests with analytical size distributions and also generated from measured aerosol extinction data in seven spectral channels from 0.4-microto 10-micro wavelength in continental aerosols. The influence of relative humidity on the complex index of refraction is also discussed.

  6. Modified cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) method for airborne aerosol light extinction measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim de Faria, Julia; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate requires the consideration of at least two major factors: the aerosol single-scattering albedo, defined as the relation between the amount of energy scattered and extinguished by an ensemble of aerosol particles; and the aerosol optical depth, calculated from the integral of the particle extinction coefficient over the thickness of the measured aerosol layer. Remote sensing networks for measuring these aerosol parameters on a regular basis are well in place (e.g., AERONET, ACTRIS), whereas the regular in situ measurement of vertical profiles of atmospheric aerosol optical properties remains still an important challenge in quantifying climate change. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. Recently, a compact and robust family of optical instruments based on the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) technique has become available for measuring aerosol light extinction. In particular, the CAPS PMex particle optical extinction monitor has demonstrated sensitivity of less than 2 Mm-1 in 1 second sampling period; with a 60 s averaging time, a detection limit of less than 0.3 Mm-1 can be achieved. While this technique was successfully deployed for ground-based atmospheric measurements under various conditions, its suitability for operation aboard aircraft in the free and upper free troposphere still has to be demonstrated. Here, we report on the modifications of a CAPS PMex instrument for measuring aerosol light extinction on aircraft, and subsequent laboratory tests for evaluating the modified instrument prototype: (1) In a

  7. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  8. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  9. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  10. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  11. Temporal evolution of aerosol derived from N2-Raman lidar at a Mediterranean coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaoxia; Chazette, Patrick; Totems, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Following the temporal variability of the aerosols in the atmospheric column on coastal areas is challenging. In situ ground-based or integrated column properties are not enough to understand the sea-continent exchange processes and identify the sources of particles. Now classical approach using the synergy between passive (e.g. sunphotometer) and active (e.g. backscatter lidar) instruments gives only a partial view of the aerosol properties, because they could be highly heterogeneous in the lower and middle troposphere. On June-July 2014, an automatic N2-Raman lidar (355 nm) was installed at a coastal site close to Toulon in the South of France. Using the coupling between cross-polarized elastic and N2-Raman channels, various aerosol natures are identified all along the time and against the altitude. Specific regularization algorithms have been tested to improve the aerosol classification. The results of these tests will be presented in terms of sensitivity studies based on the Monte Carlo approach. Selecting the most appropriate inversion method of the lidar profiles, the aerosol types encountered during the field campaign will be presented. We will also discuss their origin and the sea-continent exchanges including the sea breeze effect. We will see that a proper identification of particles passes through analyses coupling satellite observations and air mass trajectory studies. Acknowledgments: The experiments have been funded by the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), and the Centre national de la recherchescientifique (CNRS). We thank Université de Toulon (SeaTech Engineering School) for their hosts. The Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Labex IPSL, is also acknowledged for its support in the data simulations and analyses.

  12. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children

    SciTech Connect

    Raizenne, M.E.; Burnett, R.T.; Stern, B.; Franklin, C.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O/sub 3/ at 143 ppb; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 47.7 micrograms/m/sup 3/; and (H+) at 550 nmole/m/sup 3/. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  13. Acute lung function responses to ambient acid aerosol exposures in children.

    PubMed

    Raizenne, M E; Burnett, R T; Stern, B; Franklin, C A; Spengler, J D

    1989-02-01

    We examined the relationship between lung function changes and ambient acid aerosol episodes in children attending a residential summer camp. Young females (112) performed daily spirometry, and 96 were assessed on one occasion for airway hyperresponsiveness using a methacholine bronchoprovocation test. Air quality measurements were performed on site and four distinct acid aerosol episodes were observed during the 41-day study. The maximum values observed during the 41-day study were: O3 at 143 ppb; H2SO4 at 47.7 micrograms/m3; and [H+] at 550 nmole/m3. Maximum decrements of 3.5 and 7% for FEV1 and PEF, respectively, were observed to be associated with the air pollution episodes. There was some evidence of a differential lung function response to the episodes where children with a positive response to a methacholine challenge had larger decrements compared to their nonresponsive counterparts.

  14. Analytical techniques for ambient sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Kumar, R.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    Work done to further develop the infrared spectroscopic analytical method for the analysis of atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as some exploratory work on a new procedure for determining proton acidity in aerosol samples is described. Earlier work had led to the successful use of infrared (ir) spectrophotometry for the analysis of nitrate, ammonium, and neutral and acidic sulfates in aerosol samples collected by an impactor on a Mylar-film substrate. In this work, a filter-extraction method was developed to prepare filter-collected aerosol samples for ir analysis. A study was made comparing the ir analytical results on filter-collected samples with impactor-collected samples. Also, the infrared analytical technique was compared in field studies with light-scattering techniques for aerosol analysis. A highly sensitive instrument for aerosol analysis using attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy was designed, built, and tested. This instrument provides a measurement sensitivity much greater (by a factor of 6 for SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) than that obtainable using the KBr-pellet method. This instrument collect size- and time-resolved samples and is potentially capable of providing automated, near real-time aerosol analysis. Exploratory work on a novel approach to the determination of proton acidity in filter- or impactor-collected aerosol samples is also described. In this technique, the acidic sample is reacted with an access of a tagged, vapor-phase base. The unreacted base is flushed off and the amount of the tag retained by the sample is a direct measure of the proton acidity of the sample. The base was tagged with Ge, which can be conveniently determined by the x-ray fluorescence technique.

  15. Determining the effects and challenges of incorporating genetic testing into primary care management of hypertensive patients with African ancestry.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C R; Abul-Husn, N S; Ellis, S; Ramos, M A; Negron, R; Suprun, M; Zinberg, R E; Sabin, T; Hauser, D; Calman, N; Bagiella, E; Bottinger, E P

    2016-03-01

    People of African ancestry (Blacks) have increased risk of kidney failure due to numerous socioeconomic, environmental, and clinical factors. Two variants in the APOL1 gene are now thought to account for much of the racial disparity associated with hypertensive kidney failure in Blacks. However, this knowledge has not been translated into clinical care to help improve patient outcomes and address disparities. GUARDD is a randomized trial to evaluate the effects and challenges of incorporating genetic risk information into primary care. Hypertensive, non-diabetic, adults with self-reported African ancestry, without kidney dysfunction, are recruited from diverse clinical settings and randomized to undergo APOL1 genetic testing at baseline (intervention) or at one year (waitlist control). Providers are educated about genomics and APOL1. Guided by a genetic counselor, trained staff return APOL1 results to patients and provide low-literacy educational materials. Real-time clinical decision support tools alert clinicians of their patients' APOL1 results and associated risk status at the point of care. Our academic-community-clinical partnership designed a study to generate information about the impact of genetic risk information on patient care (blood pressure and renal surveillance) and on patient and provider knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. GUARDD will help establish the effective implementation of APOL1 risk-informed management of hypertensive patients at high risk of CKD, and will provide a robust framework for future endeavors to implement genomic medicine in diverse clinical practices. It will also add to the important dialog about factors that contribute to and may help eliminate racial disparities in kidney disease. PMID:26747051

  16. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  17. Testing the discrimination and detection limits of WorldView-2 imagery on a challenging invasive plant target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, T. P.; Wardell-Johnson, G. W.; Pracilio, G.; Brown, C.; Corner, R.; van Klinken, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    Invasive plants pose significant threats to biodiversity and ecosystem function globally, leading to costly monitoring and management effort. While remote sensing promises cost-effective, robust and repeatable monitoring tools to support intervention, it has been largely restricted to airborne platforms that have higher spatial and spectral resolutions, but which lack the coverage and versatility of satellite-based platforms. This study tests the ability of the WorldView-2 (WV2) eight-band satellite sensor for detecting the invasive shrub mesquite (Prosopis spp.) in the north-west Pilbara region of Australia. Detectability was challenged by the target taxa being largely defoliated by a leaf-tying biological control agent (Gelechiidae: Evippe sp. #1) and the presence of other shrubs and trees. Variable importance in the projection (VIP) scores identified bands offering greatest capacity for discrimination were those covering the near-infrared, red, and red-edge wavelengths. Wavelengths between 400 nm and 630 nm (coastal blue, blue, green, yellow) were not useful for species level discrimination in this case. Classification accuracy was tested on three band sets (simulated standard multispectral, all bands, and bands with VIP scores ≥1). Overall accuracies were comparable amongst all band-sets (Kappa = 0.71-0.77). However, mesquite omission rates were unacceptably high (21.3%) when using all eight bands relative to the simulated standard multispectral band-set (9.5%) and the band-set informed by VIP scores (11.9%). An incremental cover evaluation on the latter identified most omissions to be for objects <16 m2. Mesquite omissions reduced to 2.6% and overall accuracy significantly improved (Kappa = 0.88) when these objects were left out of the confusion matrix calculations. Very high mapping accuracy of objects >16 m2 allows application for mapping mesquite shrubs and coalesced stands, the former not previously possible, even with 3 m resolution hyperspectral

  18. A wind tunnel test of newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers.

    PubMed

    Su, Wei-Chung; Tolchinsky, Alexander D; Sigaev, Vladimir I; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2012-07-01

    In this study the performance of two newly developed personal bioaerosol samplers was evaluated. The two test samplers are cyclone-based personal samplers that incorporate a recirculating liquid film. The performance evaluations focused on the physical efficiencies that a personal bioaerosol sampler could provide, including aspiration, collection, and capture efficiencies. The evaluation tests were carried out in a wind tunnel, and the test personal samplers were mounted on the chest of a full-size manikin placed in the test chamber of the wind tunnel. Monodisperse fluorescent aerosols ranging from 0.5 to 20 microm were used to challenge the samplers. Two wind speeds of 0.5 and 2.0 m/sec were employed as the test wind speeds in this study. The test results indicated that the aspiration efficiency of the two test samplers closely agreed with the ACGIH inhalable convention within the size range of the test aerosols. The aspiration efficiency was found to be independent of the sampling orientation. The collection efficiency acquired from these two samplers showed that the 50% cutoff diameters were both around 0.6 microm. However the wall loss of these two test samplers increased as the aerosol size increased, and the wall loss of PAS-4 was considerably higher than that of PAS-5, especially in the aerosol size larger than 5 microm, which resulted in PAS-4 having a relatively lower capture efficiency than PAS-5. Overall, the PAS-5 is considered a better personal bioaerosol sampler than the PAS-4.

  19. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  20. A Cough Aerosol Simulator for the Study of Disease Transmission by Human Cough-Generated Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lindsley, William G.; Reynolds, Jeffrey S.; Szalajda, Jonathan V.; Noti, John D.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol particles expelled during human coughs are a potential pathway for infectious disease transmission. However, the importance of airborne transmission is unclear for many diseases. To better understand the role of cough aerosol particles in the spread of disease and the efficacy of different types of protective measures, we constructed a cough aerosol simulator that produces a humanlike cough in a controlled environment. The simulated cough has a 4.2 l volume and is based on coughs recorded from influenza patients. In one configuration, the simulator produces a cough aerosol containing particles from 0.1 to 100 µm in diameter with a volume median diameter (VMD) of 8.5 µm and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.9. In a second configuration, the cough aerosol has a size range of 0.1–30 µm, a VMD of 3.4 µm, and a GSD of 2.3. The total aerosol volume expelled during each cough is 68 µl. By generating a controlled and reproducible artificial cough, the simulator allows us to test different ventilation, disinfection, and personal protection scenarios. The system can be used with live pathogens, including influenza virus, which allows isolation precautions used in the healthcare field to be tested without risk of exposure for workers or patients. The information gained from tests with the simulator will help to better understand the transmission of infectious diseases, develop improved techniques for infection control, and improve safety for healthcare workers and patients. PMID:26500387

  1. Title I Testing and Assessment. Challenging Standards for Disadvantaged Children. Summary of a Workshop (Washington, DC, April 1, 1995). Board Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kober, Nancy L., Ed.; Feuer, Michael J., Ed.

    The Improving America's Schools Act of 1994 substantially revised the Title I program for disadvantaged children. Some of the most far-reaching changes relate to testing and accountability. States will now need to develop their own assessments and ensure that these assessments are aligned with challenging state standards linked to educational…

  2. The Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using the MERIS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Levy, R. C.; Lotz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Retrieval of aerosol properties for satellite instruments without shortwave-IR spectral information, multi-viewing, polarization and/or high-temporal observation ability is a challenging problem for spaceborne aerosol remote sensing. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm (XBAER: eXtensible Bremen AErosol Retrieval) is presented. XBAER utilizes the global surface spectral library database for the determination of surface properties while the MODIS collection 6 aerosol type treatment is adapted for the aerosol type selection. In order to take the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect into account for the MERIS reduce resolution (1km) retrieval, a modified Ross-Li mode is used. The AOT is determined in the algorithm using lookup tables including polarization created using Radiative Transfer Model SCIATRAN3.4, by minimizing the difference between atmospheric corrected surface reflectance with given AOT and the surface reflectance calculated from the spectral library. The global comparison with operational MODIS C6 product, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) product, Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aerosol product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results. The current XBAER algorithm is only valid for aerosol remote sensing over land and a similar method will be extended to ocean later.

  3. Radiative Impacts of Elevated Aerosol Layers from Different Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Heimerl, K.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles are omnipresent in the Earth's atmosphere and have important impacts on weather and climate by their effects on the atmospheric radiative balance. With the advent of more and more sophisticated representations of atmospheric processes in earth system models, the lack of reliable input data on aerosols leads to significant uncertainties in the prediction of future climate scenarios. In recent years large discrepancies in radiative forcing estimates from aerosol layers in modeling studies have been revealed emphasizing the need for detailed and systematic observations of aerosols. Airborne in-situ measurements represent an important pillar for validating both model results and retrievals of aerosol distributions and properties from remote sensing methods on global scales. However, detailed observations are challenging and therefore are subject to substantial uncertainties themselves. Here we use data from airborne in-situ measurements of elevated aerosol layers from various field experiments in different regions of the world. The data set includes Saharan mineral dust layers over Africa, the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean from the SALTRACE and the SAMUM campaigns as well as long-range transported biomass burning aerosol layers from wild fires in the Sahel region and North America measured over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Europe and the Arctic detected during SAMUM2, CONCERT2011, DC3 and ACCESS 2012. We aim to characterize the effects of the measured aerosol layers, in particular with respect to ageing, mixing state and vertical structure, on the overall atmospheric radiation budget as well as local heating and cooling rates. We use radiative transfer simulations of short and long-wave radiation and aerosol optical properties derived in a consistent way from the in-situ observations of microphysical properties using T-matrix calculations. The results of this characterization will help to improve the parameterization of the effects of elevated

  4. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions. PMID:24601011

  5. Steps Toward an Aerosol-Type Global Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Earth-observing satellites have produced a global record of aerosol optical depth approaching two decades in length. However a global record of aerosol properties at the level-of-detail required for constraining aerosol radiative forcing, aerosol-cloud interaction assessments, and many air quality applications is as yet lacking. Some aerosol-type information is derived from surface-based photometers, and qualitative classification is possible under favorable conditions from MISR, POLDER, and CALIPSO. More detailed particle microphysical properties are obtained from in situ measurements, but sampling is poor, and the suite of coincident measurements required for many applications is rarely acquired. Aerosol transport models can connect remote-sensing and in situ observations to specific aerosol sources, and extrapolate limited observational sampling in space and time. The biggest challenges to producing a global aerosol-type data record are filling gaps in detailed observations, maintaining global observing capabilities, and putting the pieces together. Obtaining detailed particle properties is probably the leading observational gap. One simplifying factor is that, for a given aerosol source and season, aerosol amounts can vary, but the particle properties tend to be repeatable. So an aircraft payload designed and deployed frequently enough to acquire the PDFs of the key variables could fill this gap; the SAM-CAAM (Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses) concept aims at meeting this objective. Such data would add value to the entire satellite data record, improving the aerosol property assumptions in retrievals, and providing quantitative mass extinction efficiencies to translate between remote-sensing optical constraints and the aerosol mass book-kept in climate models. This will also help putting the pieces together in other ways, by improving the connection between remote-sensing particle types and those defined in models. The

  6. Remote Sensing of Spectral Aerosol Properties: A Classroom Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2006-01-01

    Bridging the gap between current research and the classroom is a major challenge to today s instructor, especially in the sciences where progress happens quickly. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland teamed up in designing a graduate class project intended to provide a hands-on introduction to the physical basis for the retrieval of aerosol properties from state-of-the-art MODIS observations. Students learned to recognize spectral signatures of atmospheric aerosols and to perform spectral inversions. They became acquainted with the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm over oceans, and methods for its evaluation, including comparisons with groundbased AERONET sun-photometer data.

  7. Comparison of aerosol behavior during sodium fires in CSTF with the HAA-3B code. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Owen, R.K.

    1980-03-01

    Four large-scale tests using sodium fire aerosol sources have been carried out in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF). Two of the tests employed pool fires and two used spray fires as the aerosol source. Because the CSTF containment vessel is approximately half-scale (20.3 m in height) of a typical reactor building, the CSTF results have provided a large-scale proof test of the HAA-3B Code. For the two pool fire tests, the measured and predicted airborne concentrations were in good agreement when the aerosol source term was based on post-test measurements of aerosol formation, accounting for water vapor uptake.

  8. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  9. Fire aerosol experiment and comparisons with computer code predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, W. S.; Nichols, B. D.; White, B. W.; Smith, P. R.; Leslie, I. H.; Corkran, J. R.

    1988-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, in cooperation with New Mexico State University, has carried on a series of tests to provide experimental data on fire-generated aerosol transport. These data will be used to verify the aerosol transport capabilities of the FIRAC computer code. FIRAC was developed by Los Alamos for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is intended to be used by safety analysts to evaluate the effects of hypothetical fires on nuclear plants. One of the most significant aspects of this analysis deals with smoke and radioactive material movement throughout the plant. The tests have been carried out using an industrial furnace that can generate gas temperatures to 300 C. To date, we have used quartz aerosol with a median diameter of about 10 microns as the fire aerosol simulant. We also plan to use fire-generated aerosols of polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The test variables include two nominal gas flow rates (150 and 300 cu ft/min) and three nominal gas temperatures (ambient, 150 C, and 300 C). The test results are presented in the form of plots of aerosol deposition vs length of duct. In addition, the mass of aerosol caught in a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter during the tests is reported. The tests are simulated with the FIRAC code, and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  10. LOAC: A light aerosol counter/sizer for atmospheric balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Thaury, Claire; Mineau, Jean-Luc; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Berthet, Gwenael; Gaubicher, Bertrand; Coute, Benoit

    nature of the aerosols in the different size classes. The first tests already conducted with a laboratory prototype have shown that the concept works well, in particular for the identification of the aerosol natures using the 2-angles method. The first test flight of LOAC is expected to be performed at the end of 2010. LOAC is planned to be flown in future projects, in particular for the study of aerosols transport over Mediterranean Sea using low altitude drifting balloons (ChArMEx project, see presentation by Dulac et al.), and using high altitude (35-40 km) stratospheric balloons for the determination of the nature of stratospheric aerosol layer in the middle stratosphere.

  11. The economics and ethics of aerosol geoengineering strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, Marlos; Keller, Klaus; Tuana, Nancy

    2010-05-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions are changing the Earth's climate and impose substantial risks for current and future generations. What are scientifically sound, economically viable, and ethically defendable strategies to manage these climate risks? Ratified international agreements call for a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to avoid dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Recent proposals, however, call for a different approach: geoengineering climate by injecting aerosol precursors into the stratosphere. Published economic studies typically neglect the risks of aerosol geoengineering due to (i) a potential failure to sustain the aerosol forcing and (ii) due to potential negative impacts associated with aerosol forcings. Here we use a simple integrated assessment model of climate change to analyze potential economic impacts of aerosol geoengineering strategies over a wide range of uncertain parameters such as climate sensitivity, the economic damages due to climate change, and the economic damages due to aerosol geoengineering forcings. The simplicity of the model provides the advantages of parsimony and transparency, but it also imposes considerable caveats. For example, the analysis is based on a globally aggregated model and is hence silent on intragenerational distribution of costs and benefits. In addition, the analysis neglects the effects of future learning and is based on a simple representation of climate change impacts. We use this integrated assessment model to show three main points. First, substituting aerosol geoengineering for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions can fail the test of economic efficiency. One key to this finding is that a failure to sustain the aerosol forcing can lead to sizeable and abrupt climatic changes. The monetary damages due to such a discontinuous aerosol geoengineering can dominate the cost-benefit analysis because the monetary damages of climate change are expected to increase with

  12. Androgen correlates of male reproductive effort in wild male long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis): A multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Girard-Buttoz, Cédric; Heistermann, Michael; Rahmi, Erdiansyah; Agil, Muhammad; Ahmad Fauzan, Panji; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-03-15

    The challenge hypothesis (Wingfield et al., 1990) has been broadly utilised as a conceptual framework to study male androgen correlates of reproductive challenges in mammals. These studies mainly assessed male androgen responsiveness to a general degree of challenge over extended periods of time. Short term co-variation between the socio-sexual challenging context and androgen levels remains, however, largely understudied. We thus aim at providing a multi-level test of the challenge hypothesis by investigating the inter- and intra-individual variations in faecal androgen excretion associated to 1) breeding seasonality, 2) dominance rank, 3) mate-guarding activity and 4) value of the guarded female. We studied long-tailed macaques, a species in which males engage in highly challenging monopolisation of females over discreet periods of time. This particularity allows testing specifically the predicted increase from level B to level C in the challenge hypothesis. The study was carried out during two reproductive seasons on three groups of wild long-tailed macaques. We combined behavioural observations and non-invasive measurements of faecal androgen metabolite (fAM) levels. We found that, as predicted by the challenge hypothesis, male long-tailed macaques respond not only to seasonal but also to short term reproductive challenges by adapting their androgen levels. First, males exhibited a seasonal rise in fAM levels during the mating period which may be triggered by fruit availability as shown by our phenological data. Second, males had increased androgen levels when mate-guarding females and, across mate-guarding periods, males had higher fAM levels when monopolising high-ranking parous females than when monopolising low-ranking ones. Finally, high-ranking males had higher fAM levels than low-ranking males year round. Our study confirms that, in species with a high degree of female monopolisability, androgen may be an important physiological fitness enhancing tool

  13. Vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei, aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and scattering across the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J. J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Nenes, A.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Brock, C. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Lack, D.; Law, D. C.; Liao, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Richardson, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Wagner, N. L.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The evolutions of vertical distributions of aerosol chemical, microphysical, hygroscopic, and optical properties present fundamental challenges to the understanding of ground-level air quality and radiative transfer, and few datasets exist to date for evaluation of atmospheric models. Data collected from recent NASA and NOAA field campaigns in the California Central Valley (DISCOVER-AQ), southeast United States (SENEX, SEAC4RS) and Texas (DISCOVER-AQ) allow for a unique opportunity to constrain vertical profiles of climate-relevant aerosol properties. This work presents in-situ aircraft measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and derivations of aerosol hygroscopicity, water uptake, and light scattering. Aerosol hygroscopicity is derived from CCN and aerosol measurements. Inorganic water uptake is calculated from aerosol composition using ISORROPIA, a chemical thermodynamic model, while organic water uptake is calculated from organic hygroscopicity. Aerosol scattering closure is performed between scattering from water uptake calculations and in-situ scattering measurements.

  14. Assessment of climate sensitivity to the representation of aerosols in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Laura; Michou, Martine; Nabat, Pierre; Saint-Martin, David

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols can significantly affect the Earth's radiative balance due to absorption, scattering, and indirect effects upon the climate system. Although our understanding of aerosol properties has improved over recent decades, aerosol radiative forcing remains as one of the largest uncertainties when projecting future climate change. A coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model was used to perform sensitivity tests in order to investigate how the representation of aerosols within the model can affect decadal climate variability. These tests included looking at the difference between using constant emissions versus using emissions that evolve over a period of thirty years; examining the impacts of including indirect effects from sea salt and organics; altering the aerosol optical properties; and using an interactive aerosol scheme versus using 2-D climatologies. The results of these sensitivity tests show how modifying certain aspects of the aerosol scheme can significantly modify radiative flux and global surface temperature.

  15. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  16. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  17. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  18. Distribution and clearance of radioactive aerosol on the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    McLean, J A; Bacon, J R; Mathews, K P; Thrall, J H; Banas, J M; Hedden, J; Bayne, N K

    1984-03-01

    The distribution and clearance of aerosolized radioactive technetium 99m pertechnate in physiologic buffered saline was analyzed in four human adult asymptomatic volunteers following delivery into one nostril in the same manner as for nasal challenge testing (i.e., 0.1 ml via a 251 DeVilbiss atomizer powered by a compressor delivering 0.10 +/- 0.01 gm/spray). For comparison, squeeze bottles and spray bottles from commercial sources, a 114 and a 127 DeVilbiss atomizer, and a pipette were employed. Lateral imagery via minicomputer processing was used to determine both distribution and clearance of the radiotracer. The counts after 1 minute were lower following pipette delivery than with the other devices. None yielded discernable , wide-spread distribution of aerosol throughout the nasal cavity. Following delivery from the 251 atomizer, mean clearance at 17 minutes was 60.0%. Similar clearance rates were obtained with the other spraying methods except for lower values with the squeeze bottle. Analysis of six hour clearance studies by linear regression showed a relatively rapid initial phase, which is probably due largely to mucociliary clearance, and a prolonged late phase related to the very slow disappearance of residual material located far anteriorly in the nose. Achieving good initial retention and rapid clearance of material deposited anteriorly in the nose are desirable attributes of devices employed for administering materials intranasally.

  19. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  20. Emergency protection from aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.; Chester, C.V.

    1981-07-01

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  1. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  2. MISR Aerosol Typing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of global aerosol properties and aerosol impacts on climate. A central goal is to more strongly tie and constrain modeling efforts to observational data. A major element for exchanges between data and modeling groups are annual meetings. The meeting was held September 20 through October 2, 1014 and the organizers would like to post the presentations.

  3. Aerosol Deposition and Solar Panel Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Rollings, A.; Taylor, S. J.; Parks, J.; Barnard, J.; Holmes, H.

    2015-12-01

    Passive and active solar collector farms are often located in relatively dry desert regions where cloudiness impacts are minimized. These farms may be susceptible to reduced performance due to routine or episodic aerosol deposition on collector surfaces. Intense episodes of wind blown dust deposition may negatively impact farm performance, and trigger need to clean collector surfaces. Aerosol deposition rate depends on size, morphology, and local meteorological conditions. We have developed a system for solar panel performance testing under real world conditions. Two identical 0.74 square meter solar panels are deployed, with one kept clean while the other receives various doses of aerosol deposition or other treatments. A variable load is used with automation to record solar panel maximum output power every 10 minutes. A collocated sonic anemometer measures wind at 10 Hz, allowing for both steady and turbulent characterization to establish a link between wind patterns and particle distribution on the cells. Multispectral photoacoustic instruments measure aerosol light scattering and absorption. An MFRSR quantifies incoming solar radiation. Solar panel albedo is measured along with the transmission spectra of particles collected on the panel surface. Key questions are: At what concentration does aerosol deposition become a problem for solar panel performance? What are the meteorological conditions that most strongly favor aerosol deposition, and are these predictable from current models? Is it feasible to use the outflow from an unmanned aerial vehicle hovering over solar panels to adequately clean their surface? Does aerosol deposition from episodes of nearby forest fires impact performance? The outlook of this research is to build a model that describes environmental effects on solar panel performance. Measurements from summer and fall 2015 will be presented along with insights gleaned from them.

  4. Recent Rainfall and Aerosol Chemistry From Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R.; Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This project was devoted to testing the use of Be-7 as a tracer for quantifying trace element fluxes from the atmosphere to the oceans. Rainfall and aerosol samples were collected between June 15, 2011 and July 27, 2013 at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) located near the eastern end of the island of Bermuda. Collectors were situated near ground level, clear of surrounding vegetation, at a meteorological monitoring station in front of the BIOS laboratory, about 10 m above sea level. This is a Bermuda Air Quality Program site used for ambient air quality monitoring. To quantify the atmospheric deposition of Be-7, plastic buckets were deployed for collection of fallout over ~3 week periods. Wet deposition was collected for trace element analysis using a specially modified "GEOTRACES" N-CON automated wet deposition collector. Aerosol samples were collected with a Tisch TE-5170V-BL high volume aerosol sampler, modified to collect 12 replicate samples on acid-washed 47mm diameter Whatman-41 filters, using procedures identical to those used for the US GEOTRACES aerosol program (Morton et al., 2013). Aerosol and rainfall samples were analyzed for total Na, Mg, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, and U using ICPMS. Confirming earlier data from Bermuda, strong seasonality in rainfall and aerosol loading and chemistry was observed, particularly for aerosol and rainfall Fe concentrations when Saharan dust arrives in July/August with SE trajectories.

  5. Meteorological and Aerosol Sensing with small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, J.; Möhler, O.; Haunold, W.; Schrod, J.; Brooks, I.; Norris, S.; Brooks, B.; Hill, M.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) facilitate the monitoring of several meteorological and aerosol parameters with high resolution in space and time. They are small, easy to operate, cost efficient and allow for flexible application during field campaigns. We present two experimental payloads for measurement of relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distribution and the collection of aerosol samples on board the small UAS SIRIUS II. The payload modules are light weight (<1kg) and can be easily switched between two flights. All sensors can be controlled from the ground and the measured data is recorded by the autopilot together with the position data. The first module contains a sensor package for measurement of relative humidity and temperature and the Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Prope (CLASP) for acquisition of aerosol size distributions. CLASP measures aerosol particles with diameters from 0.12μm to 9.25μm in up to 32 channels at a frequency of 10 Hz. The second module also contains a humidity and temperature sensor package and the aerosol sample collection device. The aerosol sampler collects air samples at 2 l/min onto a sample holder. After the flight the ice nuclei on the sample holder are activated in the lab and counted. In August 2012 the complete setup will be used during a measurement campaign at mount "Kleiner Feldberg" close to Frankfurt. Until then we will perform test flights and additional laboratory tests.

  6. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate challenge test for mercury in humans. III. Urinary mercury after exposure to mercurous chloride.

    PubMed

    Maiorino, R M; Gonzalez-Ramirez, D; Zuniga-Charles, M; Xu, Z; Hurlbut, K M; Aposhian, M M; Dart, R C; Woods, J S; Ostrosky-Wegman, P; Gonsebatt, M E; Aposhian, H V

    1996-05-01

    The sodium salt of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonic acid (Dimaval; DMPS) challenge test has been given previously to humans exposed to elemental mercury (vapor) or mercuric salts, but not mercurous salts. The test (300 mg p.o., after an 11-hr fast) was given to 11 factory workers who make a skin lotion that contains mercurous chloride, eight users of the skin lotion and nine controls. Urines were analyzed for total mercury by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The mercury excreted for 6 hr before and 6 hr after DMPS treatment was 113 micrograms +/- 26 and 5037 micrograms +/- 682 S.E.M. for the skin lotion makers; 16.2 micrograms +/- 3.4 and 1410 micrograms +/- 346 S.E.M. for the skin lotions users; and 0.49 micrograms +/- 0.11 and 18.4 micrograms +/- 7.1 S.E.M. for the controls, respectively. The increases in urinary mercury resulting from the DMPS challenge test were 45-, 87- and 38-fold, respectively. The results demonstrate that, in humans exposed to mercurous chloride, DMPS increases the urinary excretion of mercury and that the DMPS/mercury challenge test is of value for a more realistic estimation of mobilizable mercury. An attempt to associate genotoxicity, as indicated by micronuclei content in buccal cells, with mercury exposure was inconclusive, perhaps because of the small number of subjects.

  7. Supporting Students with Challenging Behaviors: A Paraeducator Curriculum. Field Test Version 2.0. Instructor's Manual [and] Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backus, Linda; CichoskiKelly, Eileen

    These two manuals provide instructors and participants with a curriculum to train paraeducators to provide supportive services to students with challenging behaviors in inclusive classroom settings. The requires approximately 12 hours of instruction and 10 hours of practicum and can be offered in a variety of formats (intensively or over a number…

  8. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  9. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements

  10. Cell-free fetal DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy and beyond: clinical integration challenges in the US context.

    PubMed

    Allyse, Megan; Sayres, Lauren C; King, Jaime S; Norton, Mary E; Cho, Mildred K

    2012-11-01

    The recent release of new, non-invasive prenatal tests for fetal aneuploidy using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) has been hailed as a revolution in prenatal testing and has triggered significant commercial interest in the field. Ongoing research portends the arrival of a wide range of cffDNA tests. However, it is not yet clear how these tests will be integrated into well-established prenatal testing strategies in the USA, as the timing of such testing and the degree to which new non-invasive tests will supplement or replace existing screening and diagnostic tools remain uncertain. We argue that there is an urgent need for policy-makers, regulators and professional societies to provide guidance on the most efficient and ethical manner for such tests to be introduced into clinical practice in the USA.

  11. Cell-free fetal DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy and beyond: clinical integration challenges in the US context

    PubMed Central

    Allyse, Megan; Sayres, Lauren C.; King, Jaime S.; Norton, Mary E.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2012-01-01

    The recent release of new, non-invasive prenatal tests for fetal aneuploidy using cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) has been hailed as a revolution in prenatal testing and has triggered significant commercial interest in the field. Ongoing research portends the arrival of a wide range of cffDNA tests. However, it is not yet clear how these tests will be integrated into well-established prenatal testing strategies in the USA, as the timing of such testing and the degree to which new non-invasive tests will supplement or replace existing screening and diagnostic tools remain uncertain. We argue that there is an urgent need for policy-makers, regulators and professional societies to provide guidance on the most efficient and ethical manner for such tests to be introduced into clinical practice in the USA. PMID:22863603

  12. Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggiola, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using support from NASA Grant No. NAG 2-963, SRI International successfully completed the project, entitled, 'Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation.' This effort (SRI Project 7383) covered the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a real-time aerosol speciation instrument in NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the Spring 1996 SUbsonic aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission. This final technical report describes the pertinent details of the instrument design, its abilities, its deployment during SUCCESS and the data acquired from the mission, and the post-mission calibration, data reduction, and analysis.

  13. Ion-aerosol Interactions In The Troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.

    Climatic effects of atmospheric ionisation and electrification result from electrically- influenced processes with a radiative impact on atmospheric energy transfer. Two such processes are (1) production of aerosol particles from ionisation and (2) electrical en- hancement of aerosol collection by water droplets, for which mechanisms have been theoretically established. Radiative changes observed following atmospheric nuclear weapons testing support the first hypothesis, when taken together with recent obser- vations of particle formation associated with ions. A review of this work and the evi- dence for electrical effects on water droplet scavenging and contact ice nucleation will be presented.

  14. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  15. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  16. Steady generation of aerosols with an improved constant output atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dea, J. Y.; Katz, U.

    1981-01-01

    It is common practice to generate laboratory aerosols of soluble materials with pneumatic atomizers. In a typical device, a solution of the substance to be aerosolized is injected into a jet of air and the liquid is broken up into very small droplets. After forced evaporation, a dry aerosol of the solute is produced. A number of commercially available devices were tested, and despite differences in design, all the atomizers tested suffered from short- and/or long-term fluctuations of their output particle number concentrations. The mechanisms responsible for atomizer instabilities are discussed and methods for alleviating these problems are considered.

  17. Contact ice nucleation by submicron atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshler, T.

    1982-01-01

    An apparatus designed to measure the concentrations of submicron contact ice nuclei is described. Here, natural forces transfer nuclei to supercooled sample drops suspended in an aerosol stream. Experimental measurements of the scavenging rate of the sample drops for several humidities and aerosol sizes are found to be in agreement with theory to within a factor of two. This fact, together with the statistical tests showing a difference between the data and control samples, is seen as indicating that a reliable measurement of the concentrations of submicron contact ice nuclei has been effected. A figure is included showing the ice nucleus concentrations as a function of temperature and assumed aerosol radius. For a 0.01 micron radius, the average is 1/liter at -15 C and 3/liter at -18 C. It is noted that the measurements are in fair agreement with ice crystal concentrations in stable winter clouds measured over Elk Mountain, WY (Vali et al., 1982).

  18. Particle-Resolved Modeling of Aerosol Mixing State in an Evolving Ship Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, N. S.; Tian, J.; Pfaffenberger, L.; Schlager, H.; Petzold, A.

    2011-12-01

    The aerosol mixing state is important since it impacts the particles' optical and CCN properties and thereby their climate impact. It evolves continuously during the particles' residence time in the atmosphere as a result of coagulation with other particles and condensation of secondary aerosol species. This evolution is challenging to represent in traditional aerosol models since they require the representation of a multi-dimensional particle distribution. While modal or sectional aerosol representations cannot practically resolve the aerosol mixing state for more than a few species, particle-resolved models store the composition of many individual aerosol particles directly. They thus sample the high-dimensional composition state space very efficiently and so can deal with tens of species, fully resolving the mixing state. Here we use the capabilities of the particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC to simulate the evolution of particulate matter emitted from marine diesel engines and compare the results to aircraft measurements made in the English Channel in 2007 as part of the European campaign QUANTIFY. The model was initialized with values of gas concentrations and particle size distributions and compositions representing fresh ship emissions. These values were obtained from a test rig study in the European project HERCULES in 2006 using a serial four-stroke marine diesel engine operating on high-sulfur heavy fuel oil. The freshly emitted particles consisted of sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon and ash. We then tracked the particle population for several hours as it evolved undergoing coagulation, dilution with the background air, and chemical transformations in the aerosol and gas phase. This simulation was used to compute the evolution of CCN properties and optical properties of the plume on a per-particle basis. We compared our results to size-resolved data of aged ship plumes from the QUANTIFY Study in 2007 and showed that the model was able to reproduce

  19. The Aerosol Modeling Testbed: A community tool to objectively evaluate aerosol process modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Easter, Richard C.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Grell, Georg; Barth, Mary

    2011-03-02

    This study describes a new modeling paradigm that significantly advances how the third activity is conducted while also