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Sample records for aerosol chemical characterization

  1. Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol constituents from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere and is predominantly derived from terrestrial vegetation. Prior studies have focused largely on the hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and have demonstrated that highly oxidized compounds, such as isoprene-derived epoxides, enhance the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through heterogeneous (multiphase) reactions on acidified sulfate aerosol. However, studies on the impact of acidified sulfate aerosol on SOA formation from isoprene ozonolysis are lacking and the current work systematically examines this reaction. SOA was generated in an indoor smog chamber from isoprene ozonolysis under dark conditions in the presence of non-acidified or acidified sulfate seed aerosol. The effect of OH radicals on SOA chemical composition was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Aerosols were collected and chemically characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). Analysis revealed the formation of highly oxidized compounds, including organosulfates (OSs) and 2-methylterols, which were significantly enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol. OSs identified in the chamber experiments were also observed and quantified in summertime fine aerosol collected from two rural locations in the southeastern United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  2. Optical and Chemical Characterization of Aerosols Produced from Cooked Meats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Foreman, E.; Blanc, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    Cooking processes can release a variety compounds into the air immediately above a cooking surface. The distribution of compounds will largely depend on the type of food that is being processed and the temperatures at which the food is prepared. High temperatures release compounds from foods like meats and carry them away from the preparation surface into cooler regions where condensation into particles can occur. Aerosols formed in this manner can impact air quality, particularly in urban areas where the amount of food preparation is high. Reported here are the results of laboratory experiments designed to optically and chemically characterize aerosols derived from cooking several types of meats including ground beef, salmon, chicken, and pork both in an inert atmosphere and in synthetic air. The laboratory-generated aerosols are studied using a laminar flow cell that is configured to accommodate simultaneous optical characterization in the mid-infrared and collection of particles for subsequent chemical analysis by gas chromatography. Preliminary optical results in the visible and ultra-violet will also be presented.

  3. Chemical characterization of aerosol particles by laser Raman spectroscopy. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, K.H.

    1999-12-01

    The importance of aerosol particles in many branches of science, such as atmospheric chemistry, combustion, interfacial science, and material processing, has been steadily growing during the past decades. One of the unique properties of these particles is the very high surface-to-volume ratios, thus making them readily serve as centers for gas-phase condensation and heterogeneous reactions. These particles must be characterized by size, shape, physical state, and chemical composition. Traditionally, optical elastic scattering has been applied to obtain the physical properties of these particle (e.g., particle size, size distribution, and particle density). These physical properties are particularly important in atmospheric science as they govern the distribution and transport of atmospheric aerosols.

  4. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Carbonaceous Aerosols in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choung, S.; Jin, J. S.; Hwang, G. S.; Jang, K. S.; Han, W. S.; OH, J.; Kwon, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have been recently paid attention more in environmental research due to their negative effects on air quality, public health, and climate change. The aerosols contain approximately >20-50% carbonaceous components such as organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) (or elemental carbon [EC]) derived from organic compounds, biomass burning, and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. The physical, chemical, and biological properties of atmospheric aerosols are strongly dependent on the carbonaceous components. In particular, the BC could significantly affect the regional air quality in the northeastern Asia, because China is one of the foremost BC emission country in the world. Previous studies have mainly focused on the quantification and source identification for carbonaceous aerosols. However, understanding of physical and chemical properties for the carbonaceous aerosols related to environmental contamination and toxicity was still incomplete due to analytical difficulties. This study is addressed to evaluate the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to air pollution through the surface, mass spectroscopic, and electron microscopic analyses, and determination of chemical composition and structure using the air particulate matter (PM2.5 and >PM2.5) samples.

  5. Chemical characterizations of soluble aerosols in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dui; Tie, Xuexi; Deng, Xuejiao

    2006-07-01

    Soluble aerosols are measured at Guangdong and Hainan Provinces of southern China. The measured chemical composition of aerosols includes F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO4=, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+. The locations of measurements include a mega city (Guangzhou), a medium city along the coastline (Haiko), a small city along the coastline (Shanya), and a remote island site in the South China Sea (Yongxing island). The results reveal that aerosols in this region are complex and heterogeneous. Sulfate aerosol (SO4=) has the highest concentrations in Guangzhou (approximately 41% of total soluble aerosol mass), suggesting that anthropogenic activities (e.g., coal burning) play important roles in controlling aerosol concentrations in Guangzhou. By contrast, the concentrations of chlorine (Cl-) and sodium (Na+) are higher in Yongxing than in Guangzhou, indicating that the sea salt is the dominant aerosol in this marine environment site. In the medium (Haiko) and small (Shanya) city sites, the effects of anthropogenic and marine activities on aerosols fall in between the values in the mega city and the remote island site. The measured ratio of Cl-/Na+ shows that the ratio is less than 1.16 in all observation sites. The ratio in the Guangzhou city, the Haiko city, the Shanya city, and the Yongxing island is 0.52, 0.91, 0.24, and 0.53, respectively, indicating that significantly heterogeneous chemical reactions occur on sea salt particles. Unlike those in Europe and North America, there are high concentrations of calcium (Ca+) in all observation sites. The percentage of calcium mass to the measured total soluble aerosols mass is 21, 32, 34, and 30 at Guangzhou, Haiko, Sanya, and Yongxing, respectively. The calculations show that calcium plays an important role in neutralizing aerosols. The calculated "cation/anion" (summation operator[ion+]/summation operator[ion-]) ratio is 2.5, 2.5, 3.2, and 2.1, at Guangzhou, Haiko, Shanya, and Yongxing, respectively. The high "cation/anion" ratios

  6. Multi- year Arctic and Antarctic aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Caiazzo, Laura; Calzolai, Giulia; Cappelletti, David; Giardi, Fabio; Grotti, Marco; Malandrino, Mery; Nava, Silvia; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Long term measurements of aerosol chemical composition in polar region are particularly relevant to investigate potential climatic effects of atmospheric components arising from both natural and anthropogenic emissions. In order to improve our knowledge on the atmospheric load and chemical composition of polar aerosol, several measurements and sampling campaigns were carried out both in Antarctica and in the Arctic since 2005.The main results are here reported. As regard as Antarctica, a continuous all-year-round sampling of size-segregated aerosol was carried from 2005 to 2013 at Dome C (East Antarctica; 75° 60' S, 123° 200' E, 3220 m a.s.l. and 1100 km away from the nearest coast). Aerosol was collected by PM10 and PM2.5 samplers and by multi-stage impactors (Dekati 4-stage impactor). Chemical analysis was carried out by Ion Chromatography (ions composition) and ICP-MS (trace metals). Sea spray showed a sharp seasonal pattern, with winter (Apr-Nov) concentrations about ten times larger than summer (Dec-Mar). Besides, in winter, sea spray particles are mainly sub micrometric, while the summer size-mode is around 1-2 um. Meteorological analysis and air mass back trajectory reconstructions allowed the identification of two major air mass pathways: micrometric fractions for transport from the closer Indian-Pacific sector, and sub-micrometric particles for longer trajectories over the Antarctic Plateau. The markers of oceanic biogenic emission (methanesulfonic acid - MSA, and non-sea-salt sulphate) exhibit a seasonal cycle with summer maxima (Nov-Mar). Their size distributions show two modes (0.4- 0.7 um and 1.1-2.1 um) in early summer and just one sub-micrometric mode in full summer. The two modes are related to different transport pathways. In early summer, air masses came primarily from the Indian Ocean and spent a long time over the continent. The transport of sulphur compounds is related to sea spray aerosols and the resulting condensation of H2SO4 and MSA over

  7. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Decesari, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Angelini, F.; Canagaratna, M.; Ng, N. L.; Trimborn, A.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Hillamo, R.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-09-01

    The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using a Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF). Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m-3) followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average), in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m-3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA) at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA) and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c). Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively) followed by OOA-b (13%), BBOA (8%) and N-OA (7%). As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM : OC) ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not change during the break-up suggesting their

  8. Chemical characterization of springtime submicrometer aerosol in Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Decesari, S.; Giulianelli, L.; Angelini, F.; Teinilä, K.; Canagaratna, M.; Ng, N. L.; Trimborn, A.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Hillamo, R.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-03-01

    The chemistry of submicron particles was investigated at San Pietro Capofiume (SPC) measurement station in the Po Valley, Italy, in spring 2008. The measurements were performed by using both off-line and on-line instruments. Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon, organic acids and biomass burning tracers were measured off-line by using a 24-h PM1 filter sampling. More detailed particle chemistry was achieved by using an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and analyzing the data by positive matrix factorization (PMF). Oxalic acid had the highest concentrations of organic acids (campaign-average 97.4 ng m-3) followed by methane sulfonic, formic, malonic, and malic acids. Samples were also analyzed for glyoxylic, succinic, azelaic and maleic acids. In total, the nine acids composed 1.9 and 3.8% of OC and water-soluble OC, respectively (average), in terms of carbon atoms. Levoglucosan concentration varied from 17.7 to 495 ng m-3 with the concentration decreasing in the course of the campaign most likely due to the reduced use of domestic heating with wood. Six factors were found for organic aerosol (OA) at SPC by PMF: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), nitrogen-containing OA (N-OA) and three different oxygenated OAs (OOA-a, OOA-b and OOA-c). Most of the OA mass was composed of OOA-a, HOA and OOA-c (26, 24 and 22%, respectively) followed by OOA-b (13%), BBOA (8%) and N-OA (7%). As expected, OOAs were the most oxygenated factors with organic matter:organic carbon (OM:OC) ratios ranging from 1.9 to 2.2. The diurnal variability of the aerosol chemical composition was greatly affected by the boundary layer meteorology. Specifically, the effect of the nocturnal layer break-up in morning hours was most evident for nitrate and N-OA indicating that these compounds originated mainly from the local sources in the Po Valley. For sulfate and OOA-a the concentration did not change during the break-up suggesting their

  9. High-Resolution Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Chemical Characterization of Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Roach, Patrick J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Bones, David L.; Nguyen, Lucas

    2010-03-01

    Characterization of the chemical composition and chemical transformations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is both a major challenge and the area of greatest uncertainty in current aerosol research. This study presents the first application of desorption electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for detailed chemical characterization and studies of chemical aging of OA collected on Teflon substrates. DESI-MS offers unique advantages both for detailed characterization of chemically labile components in OA that cannot be detected using more traditional electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and for studying chemical aging of OA. DESI-MS enables rapid characterization of OA samples collected on substrates by eliminating the sample preparation stage. In addition, it enables detection and structural characterization of chemically labile molecules in OA samples by minimizing the residence time of analyte in the solvent. SOA produced by the ozonolysis of limonene (LSOA) was allowed to react with gaseous ammonia. Chemical aging resulted in measurable changes in the optical properties of LSOA observed using UV- visible spectroscopy. DESI-MS combined with tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS/MS) enabled identification of species in aged LSOA responsible for absorption of the visible light. Detailed analysis of the experimental data allowed us to identify chemical changes induced by reactions of LSOA constituents with ammonia and distinguish between different mechanisms of chemical aging.

  10. Aerosol Chemical and Physical Characterization in Central Amazonia during the 2013 Dry Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Stern, R.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the dry season, the central Amazon forest is highly influenced by forest fires transported through large distances, changing drastically the atmospheric composition even in remote places. This work focuses on a physical-chemical characterization of the aerosol population over a pristine site in Central Amazonia during the dry season. The submicrometer organic aerosols were measured with the Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor, Aerodyne Inc). Optical properties, size distribution and other micro-physical characteristics were also analyzed. Other instruments were simultaneously used. The measurements were taken during the dry season of 2013 in the Cuieiras ecological reserve (ZF2), northwest of Manaus. The statistical analysis of the data was done with the PMF (Positive Matrix Factorization) technique, in which the organic aerosol was separated into different factors, and then its sources and forming processes were attributed. Results show that the mean aerosol loading was 5,91 μg m-3, from which 78% are of organic composition, 8.5% are sulfate, 6.5% are equivalent black carbon, 4% are ammonium and 3% are nitrate. The mass spectra variability can be explained by 3 factors only, determined with the PMF technique. They were identified as BBOA (Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol), representing 12% of the total organic mass, OOA (Oxygenated Organic Aerosol), representing 66% of the total organic mass and IEPOX-SOA (Isoprene derived Epoxydiol-Secondary Organic Aerosol), representing 21% of the total organic mass. Even in remote and pristine regions, Central Amazonia is highly impacted by biomass burning. Biogenic secondary organic aerosols are also present during the dry season, and the suppression of its wet deposition processes increases their concentration. The oxidation level and other physical-chemical characteristics indicate that the long range transport is responsible for the regional range of this impact.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol from Oxidation of Isoprene Hydroxyhydroperoxides.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri H; Chen, Yuzhi; Zhang, Zhenfa; D'Ambro, Emma L; Zhang, Xuan; Gold, Avram; Turpin, Barbara J; Thornton, Joel A; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Surratt, Jason D

    2016-09-20

    Atmospheric oxidation of isoprene under low-NOx conditions leads to the formation of isoprene hydroxyhydroperoxides (ISOPOOH). Subsequent oxidation of ISOPOOH largely produces isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are known secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors. Although SOA from IEPOX has been previously examined, systematic studies of SOA characterization through a non-IEPOX route from 1,2-ISOPOOH oxidation are lacking. In the present work, SOA formation from the oxidation of authentic 1,2-ISOPOOH under low-NOx conditions was systematically examined with varying aerosol compositions and relative humidity. High yields of highly oxidized compounds, including multifunctional organosulfates (OSs) and hydroperoxides, were chemically characterized in both laboratory-generated SOA and fine aerosol samples collected from the southeastern U.S. IEPOX-derived SOA constituents were observed in all experiments, but their concentrations were only enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate aerosol, consistent with prior work. High-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-AMS) reveals that 1,2-ISOPOOH-derived SOA formed through non-IEPOX routes exhibits a notable mass spectrum with a characteristic fragment ion at m/z 91. This laboratory-generated mass spectrum is strongly correlated with a factor recently resolved by positive matrix factorization (PMF) of aerosol mass spectrometer data collected in areas dominated by isoprene emissions, suggesting that the non-IEPOX pathway could contribute to ambient SOA measured in the Southeastern United States. PMID:27466979

  12. Chemical Characterization of the Aerosol During the CLAMS Experiment Using Aircraft and Ground Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Remer, L.; Yamasoe, M.; Fattori, A.

    2002-05-01

    During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment Nuclepore filters were collected in two ground stations and aboard the University of Wasghington's Convair 580 Reserarch Aircraft. The two ground stations were chosen in strategic positions to characterize the chemical composition, the mass concentration, black carbon (BC) content, and the absorption properties of the aerosol particles at the surface level. One of the stations was located at the Cheasapeake lighthouse (25 km from the coast) and the other one was located at the Wallops Island. Aerosol particles where collected in two stages, fine (d<2.5um) and coarse mode (2.5characterize the elemental composition, mass concentration, BC content, and absorption properties of the aerosol in the atmospheric column in the CLAMS Experiment area. Some of the filters were also submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis. The particulate matter mass for all the samples were obtained gravimetrically. The concentration of black carbon in the fine filters was optically determined by a broadband reflectance technique. The spectral (from UV to near IR) reflectance in the fine and coarse mode filter were also obtained with a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer. Aerosol elemental characterization (Na through Pb) was obtained by the PIXE (Particle induced X ray emission) analyses of the nuclepore filters. The sources of the aerosol measured at the ground stations were estimated by principal component analyses mainly in the Wallops Island, where a longer time series was collected. One of the main urban components identified in the aerosol during the experiment was sulfate. Black carbon

  13. Physical and chemical characterization of marine atmospheric aerosols over the North and South Pacific Oceans using single particle mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, H.; Jung, J.; Miura, K.; Uematsu, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and chemical properties of marine atmospheric aerosols were characterized and compared over the North and South Pacific Ocean during two trans-Pacific cruises (from Japan to Chile and Australia to Japan) during the period of January-June 2009, which cover broad region of Pacific Ocean from 40°N to 55°S and 140°E to 70°W. The measured parameters of aerosol properties were single particle size-resolved chemical composition (D = 100 ~ 1500 nm), cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations, size distribution from 10 nm to 5 μm, total aerosol nitrate and sulfate concentrations, and filter-based chemical composition. Trace gas concentrations of O3 and CO were also measured to aid air parcel categorization during the cruises. Reflecting larger anthropogenic emission in the Northern Hemisphere, pronounced concentration gradient between the North and South Pacific Ocean was observed for aerosol nitrate, CO, and O3. Aerosol sulfate also showed a similar concentration drop in the equatorial region, relatively higher sulfate concentration was observed in 30°S-40°S and 55°S regions, which was associated with increased aerosol methanesulfonic acid (MSA) concentration but little increase in local marine chlorophyll concentration, suggesting contribution of long-range transported marine biogenic sulfur from the high primary production area over the South Pacific high latitude region. Aerosol chemical classification by single particle chemical analysis revealed that certain aerosol types, such as biomass burning, elemental carbon, and elemental/organic carbon mixed type, were mainly observed in the North Pacific region, while several specific organic aerosol types with abundant aged organic and disulfur composition were identified in the South Pacific region. Further comparison of aerosol properties, aerosol sources, and atmospheric aerosol processing in the North and South Pacific Oceans will be discussed.

  14. Long-term Chemical Characterization of Submicron Aerosol Particles in the Amazon Forest - ATTO Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Holanda, B. A.; Cirino, G. G.; Saturno, J.; Krüger, M. L.; Pöhlker, C.; Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2015-12-01

    The study of the chemical composition of aerosol particles in the Amazon forest represents a step forward to understand the strong coupling between the atmosphere and the forest. For this reason submicron aerosol particles were investigated in the Amazon forest, where biogenic and anthropogenic aerosol particles coexist at the different seasons (wet/dry). The measurements were performed at the ATTO station, which is located about 150 km northeast of Manaus. At ATTO station the Aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM, Aerodyne) and the Multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP, Thermo 5012) have been operated continuously from March 2014 to July 2015. In this study, long-term measurements (near-real-time, ~30 minutes) of PM1 chemical composition were investigated for the first time in this environment.The wet season presented lower concentrations than the dry season (~5 times). In terms of chemical composition, both seasons were dominated by organics (75 and 63%) followed by sulfate (11 and 13%). Nitrate presented different ratio values between the mass-to-charges 30 to 46 (main nitrate fragments) suggesting the presence of nitrate as inorganic and organic nitrate during both seasons. The results indicated that about 75% of the nitrate signal was from organic nitrate during the dry season. In addition, several episodes with elevated amount of chloride, likely in the form of sea-salt from the Atlantic Ocean, were observed during the wet season. During those episodes, chloride comprised up to 7% of the PM1. During the dry season, chloride was also observed; however, with different volatility, which suggested that Chloride was present in different form and source. Moreover, the constant presence of sulfate and BC during the wet season might be related to biomass burning emissions from Africa. BC concentration was 2.5 times higher during the dry season. Further characterization of the organic fraction was accomplished with the positive matrix factorization (PMF), which

  15. Halogen-induced organic aerosol (XOA): a study on ultra-fine particle formation and time-resolved chemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A; Held, Andreas; Lendl, Bernhard; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    The concurrent presence of high values of organic SOA precursors and reactive halogen species (RHS) at very low ozone concentrations allows the formation of halogen-induced organic aerosol, so-called XOA, in maritime areas where high concentrations of RHS are present, especially at sunrise. The present study combines aerosol smog-chamber and aerosol flow-reactor experiments for the characterization of XOA. XOA formation yields from alpha-pinene at low and high concentrations of chlorine as reactive halogen species (RHS) were determined using a 700 L aerosol smog-chamber with a solar simulator. The chemical transformation of the organic precursor during the aerosol formation process and chemical aging was studied using an aerosol flow-reactor coupled to an FTIR spectrometer. The FTIR dataset was analysed using 2D correlation spectroscopy. Chlorine induced homogeneous XOA formation takes place at even 2.5 ppb of molecular chlorine, which was photolysed by the solar simulator. The chemical pathway of XOA formation is characterized by the addition of chlorine and abstraction of hydrogen atoms, causing simultaneous carbon-chlorine bond formation. During further steps of the formation process, carboxylic acids are formed, which cause a SOA-like appearance of XOA. During the ozone-free formation of secondary organic aerosol with RHS a special kind of particulate matter (XOA) is formed, which is afterwards transformed to SOA by atmospheric aging or degradation pathways.

  16. Chemical Characterization of Submicron Aerosol Particles in São Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira De Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Godoy, J.; Godoy, M. L.; de Assunção, J. V.; Alves, N. D.; Artaxo, P.

    2013-12-01

    Megacities, large urban conglomerates with a population of 10 million or more inhabitants, are increasingly receiving attention as strong pollution hotspots with significant global impact. The emissions from such large centers in both the developed and developing parts of the world are strongly impacted by the transportation sector. The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), located in the Southeast of Brazil, is a megacity with a population of 18 million people and 7 million vehicles, many of which fuelled by a considerably amount of anhydrous ethanol. Such fleet is considered a unique case of large scale biofuel usage worldwide. Despite the large impact on human health and atmospheric chemistry/dynamics, many uncertainties are found in terms of gas and particulate matter emissions from vehicles and their atmospheric reactivity, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. In order to better understand aerosol life cycle on such environment, a suite of instruments for gas and particulate matter characterization has been deployed in two sampling sites within the SPMA, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The instrumentation was deployed at the rooftop of a 45m high building in the University of São Paulo during winter/spring 2012. The site is located roughly 6km downwind of the city center with little influence from local sources. The second site is located in a downtown area, sampling at the top floor of the Public Health Faculty, approximately 10m above ground. The instrumentation was deployed at the Downtown site during summer/fall 2013. The average non-refractory submicron aerosol concentration at the University site was 6.7 μg m-3, being organics the most abundant specie (70%), followed by NO3 (12%), NH4 (8%), SO4 (8%) and Chl (2%). At the Downtown site, average aerosol concentration was 15.1 μg m-3, with Organics composing 65% of the mass, followed by NH4 (12%), NO3 (11%), SO4 (11%) and Chl (1%). The analysis of specific fragmentation

  17. Secondary organic aerosol (trans)formation through aqueous phase guaiacol photonitration: chemical characterization of the products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran; Kroflič, Ana; Čusak, Alen

    2014-05-01

    One of the largest primary sources of organic aerosol in the atmosphere is biomass burning (BB) (Laskin et al. 2009); in Europe its contribution to annual mean of PM10 is between 3 and 14 % (Maenhaut et al. 2012). During the process of wood burning many different products are formed via thermal degradation of wood lignin. Hardwood burning produces mainly syringol (2,6-dimetoxyphenol) derivatives, while softwood burning exclusively guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives. Taking into account physical properties of methoxyphenols only, their concentrations in atmospheric waters might be underestimated. So, their aqueous phase reactions can be an additional source of SOA, especially in regions under significant influence of wood combustion. An important class of compounds formed during physical and chemical aging of the primary BBA in the atmosphere is nitrocatechols, known as strong absorbers of UV and Vis light (Claeys et al. 2012). Very recently, methyl-nitrocatechols were proposed as suitable markers for highly oxidized secondary BBA (Iinuma et al. 2010, Kitanovski et al. 2012). In the present work, the formation of SOA through aqueous phase photooxidation and nitration of guaiacol was examined. The key objective was to chemically characterize the main low-volatility products and further to check their possible presence in the urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous phase reactions were performed in a thermostated reactor under simulated sunlight in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. Guaiacol reaction products were first concentrated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then subjected to semi-preparative liquid chromatography.The main product compounds were fractionated and isolated as pure solids and their structure was further elucidated by using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H, 13C and 2D NMR) and direct infusion negative ion electro-spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (( )ESI-MS/MS). The main photonitration products of guaiacol (4

  18. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  19. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles Basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-02-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55% of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively), and that the overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation mode aerosol, while afternoon SOA production coincides with the appearance of a distinct fine mode

  20. Chemical characterization of organosulfates in secondary organic aerosol derived from the photooxidation of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Da Silva Barbosa, Thais; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-09-01

    We report the formation of aliphatic organosulfates (OSs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of C10-C12 alkanes. The results complement those from our laboratories reporting the formation of OSs and sulfonates from gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Both studies strongly support the formation of OSs from the gas-phase oxidation of anthropogenic precursors, as hypothesized on the basis of recent field studies in which aromatic and aliphatic OSs were detected in fine aerosol collected from several major urban locations. In this study, dodecane, cyclodecane and decalin, considered to be important SOA precursors in urban areas, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber in the presence of either non-acidified or acidified ammonium sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Aerosols collected from all experiments were characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Most of the OSs identified could be explained by formation of gaseous epoxide precursors with subsequent acid-catalyzed reactive uptake onto sulfate aerosol and/or heterogeneous reactions of hydroperoxides. The OSs identified here were also observed and quantified in fine urban aerosol samples collected in Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, CA, USA. Several OSs identified from the photooxidation of decalin and cyclodecane are isobars of known monoterpene organosulfates, and thus care must be taken in the analysis of alkane-derived organosulfates in urban aerosol.

  1. Aerosol chemical characterization and role of carbonaceous aerosol on radiative effect over Varanasi in central Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S.; Dumka, U. C.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Ram, Kirpa; Panicker, A. S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Tiwari, Shani; Attri, S. D.; Soni, V. K.; Pandey, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the chemical composition of PM10 aerosols at Varanasi, in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during April to July 2011, with emphasis on examining the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) to the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE). PM10 samples are analysed for carbonaceous aerosols (Organic Carbon, OC and EC) and water-soluble ionic species (WSIS: Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, PO42- NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) and several diagnostic ratios (OC/EC, K+/EC, etc) have been also used for studying the aerosol sources at Varanasi. PM10 mass concentration varies between 53 and 310 μg m-3 (mean of 168 ± 73 μg m-3), which is much higher than the National and International air quality standards. The OC mass concentration varies from 6 μg m-3 to 24 μg m-3 (mean of 12 ± 5 μg m-3; 7% of PM10 mass), whereas EC ranges between 1.0 and 14.3 μg m-3 (4.4 ± 3.9 μg m-3; ˜3% of PM10 mass). The relative low OC/EC of 3.9 ± 2.0 and strong correlation (R2 = 0.82) between them suggest the dominance of primary carbonaceous aerosols. The contribution of WSIS to PM10 is found to be ˜12%, out of which ˜57% and 43% are anions and cations, respectively. The composite DARE estimates via SBDART model reveal significant radiative effect and atmospheric heating rates (0.9-2.3 K day-1). Although the EC contributes only ˜3% to the PM10 mass, its contribution to the surface and atmospheric forcing is significantly high (37-63% and 54-77%, respectively), thus playing a major role in climate implications over Varanasi.

  2. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles <100 nm generated by means of jets

  3. The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO): chemical and physical analysis of the Western Los Angeles basin aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Schilling, K. A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Sorooshian, A.; Chan, M. N.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2011-08-01

    The Pasadena Aerosol Characterization Observatory (PACO) represents the first major aerosol characterization experiment centered in the Western/Central Los Angeles Basin. The sampling site, located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, was positioned to sample a continuous afternoon influx of transported urban aerosol with a photochemical age of 1-2 h and generally free from major local contributions. Sampling spanned 5 months during the summer of 2009, which were broken into 3 regimes on the basis of distinct meteorological conditions. Regime I was characterized by a series of low pressure systems, resulting in high humidity and rainy periods with clean conditions. Regime II typified early summer meteorology, with significant morning marine layers and warm, sunny afternoons. Regime III was characterized by hot, dry conditions with little marine layer influence. Regardless of regime, organic aerosol (OA) is the most significant constituent of nonrefractory submicron Los Angeles aerosol (42, 43, and 55 % of total submicron mass in regimes I, II, and III, respectively). The overall oxidation state remains relatively constant on timescales of days to weeks (O:C = 0.44 ± 0.08, 0.55 ± 0.05, and 0.48 ± 0.08 during regimes I, II, and III, respectively), with no difference in O:C between morning and afternoon periods. Periods characterized by significant morning marine layer influence followed by photochemically favorable afternoons displayed significantly higher aerosol mass and O:C ratio, suggesting that aqueous processes may be important in the generation of secondary aerosol and oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) in Los Angeles. Online analysis of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) indicates that water soluble organic mass (WSOM) reaches maxima near 14:00-15:00 local time (LT), but the percentage of AMS organic mass contributed by WSOM remains relatively constant throughout the day. Sulfate and nitrate reside predominantly in accumulation

  4. The ambient organic aerosol soluble in water: Measurements, chemical characterization, and an investigation of sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Amy P.

    This thesis characterizes the ambient fine organic carbon (OC) aerosol and investigates its sources through the development and deployment of new analytical measurement techniques. Recognizing that OC is highly chemically complex, the approach was to develop methods capable of quantitatively measuring a large chemical fraction of the aerosol instead of specific chemical speciation. The focus is on organic compounds that are soluble in water (WSOC) since little is known about its chemical nature. The results from this thesis show that WSOC has mainly two sources: biomass burning and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In urban areas, WSOC increases with plume age, and tracks other photochemically produced compounds. Chemical analysis of WSOC suggests that in urban Atlanta, the SOA is mainly small-chain aliphatic compounds indirectly linked to vehicle emissions. A method was first developed for quantitative on-line measurements of WSOC by extending the application of the Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) from inorganic to organic aerosol measurements. In this approach a PILS captures ambient particles into a flow of purified water, which is then forced through a liquid filter and the carbonaceous content quantified on-line by a Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzer. An instrument was first developed for ground-based measurements and then modified for airborne deployment. Ground-based measurements at the St. Louis - Midwest Supersite during the summer of 2003 showed that the fraction of OC that is water-soluble can have a highly diurnal pattern with WSOC to OC ratios reaching 0.80 during the day and lows of 0.40 during the night. During extended periods under stagnation pollution events, this pattern was well correlated with ozone concentrations. The results are consistent with formation of SOA. Airborne PILS-TOC measurements from the NOAA WP-3D during the New England Air Quality Study/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS/ITCT) 2004 program

  5. Organic aerosol characterization by complementary measurements of chemical bonds and molecular fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Bahadur, Ranjit; Hawkins, Lelia N.; Allan, James; Baumgardner, Darrel; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2009-12-01

    Organic aerosol chemical markers from normalized concentrations of independent measurements of mass fragments (using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, AMS) are compared to bond-based functional groups (from Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, FTIR) during eight field projects in the western hemisphere. Several field projects show weak correlations between alcohol group fractions and m/ z 60 fractions, consistent with the organic hydroxyl groups and the fragmentation of saccharides, but the weakness of the correlations indicate chemical differences among the relationships for ambient aerosols in different regions. Carboxylic acid group fractions and m/ z 44 fractions are correlated weakly for three projects, with correlations expected for aerosols dominated by di-acid compounds since their fragmentation is typically dominated by m/ z 44. Despite differences for three projects with ratios of m/ z 44 to m/ z 57 fragments less than 10, five projects showed a linear trend between the project-average m/ z 44 to m/ z 57 ratio and the ratio of acid and alkane functional groups. While this correlation explains only a fraction of the fragment and bond variability measured, the consistency of this relationship at multiple sites indicates a general agreement with the interpretation of the relative amount of m/ z 44 as a carboxylic acid group marker and m/ z 57 as an alkane group marker.

  6. Urban aerosol in Oporto, Portugal: Chemical characterization of PM10 and PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Danilo; Ferreira, Catarina; Alves, Célia; Duarte, Mácio; Nunes, Teresa; Cerqueira, Mário; Pio, Casimiro; Frosini, Daniele; Colombi, Cristina; Gianelle, Vorne; Karanasiou, Angeliki; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Several urban and industrial areas in Southern Europe are not capable of meeting the implemented EU standards for particulate matter. Efficient air quality management is required in order to ensure that the legal limits are not exceeded and that the consequences of poor air quality are controlled and minimized. Many aspects of the direct and indirect effects of suspended particulate matter on climate and public health are not well understood. The temporal variation of the chemical composition is still demanded, since it enables to adopt off-set strategies and to better estimate the magnitude of anthropogenic forcing on climate. This study aims to provide detailed information on concentrations and chemical composition of aerosol from Oporto city, an urban center in Southern Europe. This city is located near the coast line in the North of Portugal, being the country's second largest urban area. Moreover, Oporto city economic prospects depend heavily on a diversified industrial park, which contribute to air quality degradation. Another strong source of air pollution is traffic. The main objectives of this study are: 1) to characterize the chemical composition of PM10 and PM2.5 by setting up an orchestra of aerosol sampling devices in a strategic place in Oporto; 2) to identify the sources of particles exploring parameters such as organic and inorganic markers (e.g. sugars as tracers for biomass burning; metals and elemental carbon for industrial and vehicular emissions); 3) to evaluate long range transport of pollutants using back trajectory analysis. Here we present data obtained between January 2013 and January 2014 in a heavy traffic roadside sampling site located in the city center. Different PM10 and PM2.5 samplers were operated simultaneously in order to collect enough mass on different filter matrixes and to fulfill the requirements of analytical methodologies. More than 100 aerosol samples were collected and then analysed for their mass concentration and

  7. Characterization of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol particles in New Hampshire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, John Frederick

    Tropospheric aerosol particles directly affect the radiative budget of the Earth, and degrade visibility, by scattering and absorbing short-wavelength solar radiation. However, the radiative effect of aerosols is highly uncertain due to the non-uniform spatial distribution of the particles over Earth, their heterogeneous chemical composition, and their variable size. This dissertation quantifies some of the physical, chemical, and optical (radiative) properties of aerosols at different locations within New Hampshire (NH) from spring 2000 to fall 2001. During spring 2000, a 1-month study conducted at a mountaintop location adjacent to the White Mountain National Forest in northern NH showed that synoptic-scale air mass transport heavily influenced aerosol properties, and hence regional visibility. During W/SW flow, aerosol parameters and haziness were generally twice as high as times of N/NE flow. Similar transport dependent results were observed in October 2000 during a regional pollution event. Pollutants built-up in concentration during 22--28 October, culminated on 28 October, and then dropped 10-fold to background levels within a 6-hour period. Synoptic weather conditions during the transition from high to low pollutant levels indicated that an intense frontal boundary traversed the region, serving as a divide between a warm, humid, and polluted air mass from the W/SW, and a cold, dry, and clean air mass advancing out of Canada. Further work connecting air mass transport and aerosol variability in southern NH revealed that maximum aerosol optical depth (AOD) occurred in summer and was primarily associated with W/SW flow. Minimum AOD occurred in winter and was generally associated with N/NE flow. Mass scattering and absorption efficiencies of PM2.5 did not vary significantly between times of transport from different source regions and were very close to theoretical values. Maximum positive values of aerosol direct radiative forcing occurred in winter and maximum

  8. Microstructural, chemical and textural characterization of ZnO nanorods synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sáenz-Trevizo, A.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Fuentes-Cobas, L.; Pizá-Ruiz, P.; Antúnez-Flores, W.; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Pérez-García, S.A.; Miki-Yoshida, M.

    2014-12-15

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition onto TiO{sub 2} covered borosilicate glass substrates. Deposition parameters were optimized and kept constant. Solely the effect of different nozzle velocities on the growth of ZnO nanorods was evaluated in order to develop a dense and uniform structure. The crystalline structure was characterized by conventional X-ray diffraction in grazing incidence and Bragg–Brentano configurations. In addition, two-dimensional grazing incidence synchrotron radiation diffraction was employed to determine the preferred growth direction of the nanorods. Morphology and growth characteristics analyzed by electron microscopy were correlated with diffraction outcomes. Chemical composition was established by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction results and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of wurtzite ZnO and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases. Morphological changes noticed when the deposition velocity was lowered to the minimum, indicated the formation of relatively vertically oriented nanorods evenly distributed onto the TiO{sub 2} buffer film. By coupling two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and computational modeling with ANAELU it was proved that a successful texture determination was achieved and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Texture analysis led to the conclusion of a preferred growth direction in [001] having a distribution width Ω = 20° ± 2°. - Highlights: • Uniform and pure single-crystal ZnO nanorods were obtained by AACVD technique. • Longitudinal and transversal axis parallel to the [001] and [110] directions, respectively. • Texture was determined by 2D synchrotron diffraction and electron microscopy analysis. • Nanorods have its [001] direction distributed close to the normal of the substrate. • Angular spread about the preferred orientation is 20° ± 2°.

  9. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  10. Chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol for source apportionment at Monterrey, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla, Y.; Mendoza, A.; Fraser, M. P.; Herckes, P.

    2015-07-01

    , source attribution results obtained using the CMB model indicate that emissions from motor vehicle exhausts are the most important, accounting for the 64 % of the PM2.5. The vegetative detritus and biomass burning had the smallest contribution (2.2 % of the PM2.5). To our knowledge, this is the second study to explore the broad chemical characterization of fine organic aerosol in Mexico and the first for the MMA.

  11. Chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosol in urban areas with different anthropic impact.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattori, I.; Bellandi, S.; Innocenti, M.; Largiuni, O.; Lucarelli, F.; Mannini, A.; Udisti, R.

    2003-04-01

    direction and intensity and rainfall frequency on ionic load and chemical composition of the aerosol was evaluated. Trends in seasonal and annual variability for some aerosol source markers were evaluated. Preliminary measurements on size and morphology of the particulate matter collected on coarse and fine filters by surface spectroscopy techniques (SEM and Atomic Force Microscopy) revealed a scarce efficiency of the dimensional selection on the coarse filter, where also several particles with size lower than nominal filter porosity were deposited. Due to the higher mass contribution of coarse particles, however, the chemical composition of this fraction does not seem to be significantly affected.

  12. Chemical characterization of aerosols in the equatorial atmosphere over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Karthikeyan, Sathrugnan; Potter, John; Wurl, Oliver; Durville, Caroline

    2013-10-01

    The region of the Indian Ocean and adjacent countries has received increased attention in recent years in the context of particulate air pollution. Aerosol samples were collected over the equatorial Indian Ocean during a one-year-long sailing cruise that covered the northeast and southwest monsoons, and an inter-monsoon period. The concentrations of airborne particulate matter (PM), selected metals and water-soluble ions were measured. In general, the PM concentrations were influenced by the proximity of sampling locations to land and air mass origins. The enrichment of metals in PM relative to those in the crustal material was very high (up to 40,000). The metal concentrations were significantly higher in PM samples which were influenced by volcanic emissions from the land masses of Indonesia. Volcanic plumes were traced using backward air mass trajectory and chemical tracers, and identified as a major particulate pollution source to the otherwise pristine air of the southern hemisphere of the Indian Ocean. NO3-, NH4+ and SO42- were low in aerosols collected over the open ocean, but a linear relationship between NH4+ and SO42- indicates their importance in the formation of cloud condensation nuclei.

  13. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia,and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Baumann, Karsten; Edgerton, Eric S.; Bairai, Solomon T.; Mueller, Stephen; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Knipping, Eladio M.; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    A year-long near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia, in 2012) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee, in 2013) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (up to 76 %) and sulfate (up to 31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the 1 year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiols (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA) and 91Fac (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed up to 66 % of total OA mass. HOA was observed during the entire year only at the urban site (on average 21 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly ( ˜ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is well correlated with the m/z 82 ion associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of IEPOX-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The

  14. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  15. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cm-3. The photolysis rate of NO2 is adjustable between 0 and 0.49 min-1. At 298 K under dry conditions, the average wall loss rates of NO, NO2 and O3 were measured to be 1.41 × 10-4 min-1, 1.39 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.31 × 10-4 min-1, respectively, and the particle number wall loss rate was measured to be 0.17 h-1. Auxiliary mechanisms of this chamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high-quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy Sciences (GIG-CAS), smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase chemistry and secondary aerosol formation.

  16. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  17. Seasonal characterization of submicron aerosol chemical composition and organic aerosol sources in the southeastern United States: Atlanta, Georgia and Look Rock, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Bairai, S. T.; Mueller, S.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A yearlong near-real-time characterization of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was conducted at an urban (Atlanta, Georgia) and rural (Look Rock, Tennessee) site in the southeastern US using the Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) collocated with established air-monitoring network measurements. Seasonal variations in organic aerosol (OA) and inorganic aerosol species are attributed to meteorological conditions as well as anthropogenic and biogenic emissions in this region. The highest concentrations of NR-PM1 were observed during winter and fall seasons at the urban site and during spring and summer at the rural site. Across all seasons and at both sites, NR-PM1 was composed largely of OA (50-76 %) and inorganic sulfate (12-31 %). Six distinct OA sources were resolved by positive matrix factorization applied to the ACSM organic mass spectral data collected from the two sites over the one year of near-continuous measurements at each site: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), biomass burning OA (BBOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), low-volatility oxygenated OA (OOA), isoprene-derived epoxydiol (IEPOX) OA (IEPOX-OA), and 91Fac OA (a factor dominated by a distinct ion at m/z 91 fragment ion previously observed in biogenic influenced areas). LV-OOA was observed throughout the year at both sites and contributed 30-66 % of total OA mass. HOA was also observed during the entire year only at the urban site (15-24 % of OA mass). BBOA (15-33 % of OA mass) was observed during winter and fall, likely dominated by local residential wood burning emission. Although SV-OOA contributes quite significantly (∼ 27 %), it was observed only at the urban site during colder seasons. IEPOX-OA was a major component (27-41 %) of OA at both sites, particularly in spring and summer. An ion fragment at m/z 75 is proposed as an additional marker for IEPOX-OA, as it is shown to correlate well with the m/z 82 ion shown to be associated with the aerosol mass spectrum of

  18. Special issue: Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol - Dedication to Professor Magda Claeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surratt, Jason D.; Szmigielski, Rafal; Faye McNeill, V.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are suspensions of liquid and solid particles that have diameters ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers (μm). Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM2.5, aerosols with aerodynamic diameters of 2.5 μm or less) are especially important since they can adversely affect air quality and human health as well as play a critical role in Earth's climate system. In terms of aerosol climate effects, PM2.5 can directly affect climate by scattering or absorbing incoming solar radiation or indirectly by acting as nuclei on which cloud droplets and ice particles form. As a result, a better understanding of processes that determine the formation and sinks of PM2.5 is needed for developing effective policies that improve air quality and public health as well as to accurately predict the response of the climate system due to changes in anthropogenic emissions.

  19. Characterization of Organic Nitrate Formation in Limonene Secondary Organic Aerosol using High-Resolution Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faxon, Cameron; Hammes, Julia; Peng, Jianfei; Hallquist, Mattias; Pathak, Ravi

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that organic nitrates (RONO2) are prevalent in the boundary layer, and can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Monoterpenes, including limonene, have been shown to be precursors for the formation of these organic nitrates. Limonene has two double bonds, either of which may be oxidized by NO3 or O3. This leads to the generation of products that can subsequently condense or partition into the particle phase, producing secondary organic aerosol. In order to further elucidate the particle and gas phase product distribution of organic nitrates forming from the reactions of limonene and the nitrate radical (NO3), a series of experiments were performed in the Gothenburg Flow Reactor for Oxidation Studies at Low Temperatures (G-FROST), described by previous work. N2O5 was used as the source for NO3 and NO2, and a characterized diffusion source was used to introduce limonene into the flow reactor. All experiments were conducted in the absence of light, and the concentration of limonene was increased step-wise throughout each experiment to modify the ratio of N2O5to limonene. The experiments were conducted such that both limonene- and N2O5-limited regimes were present. Gas and particle phase products were measured using an iodide High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) coupled to a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO, and particle size and SOA mass concentrations were derived using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). CIMS measurement techniques have previously been employed for the measurement of organic nitrate products of such compounds using multiple reagent ions. The use of this instrumentation allowed for the identification of chemical formulas for gas and particle phase species. The findings from the experiments will be presented in terms of the relative gas-particle partitioning of major products and the effects of N2O5/limonene ratios on product distributions. Additionally, a

  20. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor suspended in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with two banks of black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 °C to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with NMHCs < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cmChemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed SOA yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our GIG-CAS smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase mechanisms and aerosol chemistry.

  1. Aerosol characterization with lidar methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Matsui, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol component analysis methods for characterizing aerosols were developed for various types of lidars including polarization-sensitive Mie scattering lidars, multi-wavelength Raman scattering lidars, and multi-wavelength highspectral- resolution lidars. From the multi-parameter lidar data, the extinction coefficients for four aerosol components can be derived. The microphysical parameters such as single scattering albedo and effective radius can be also estimated from the derived aerosol component distributions.

  2. Characterizing the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) Using Satellite Observations, Balloon Measurements and a Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Liu, H.; Deshler, T.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Gadhavi, H.; Ratnam, M. V.; Jayaraman, A.; Pandit, A.; Raj, A.; Kumar, H.; Kumar, S.; Singh, A.; Stenchikov, G.; Wienhold, F.; Bian, J.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) provide a conduit for gas-phase pollutants in south Asia to reach the lower stratosphere. Now, observations from the CALIPSO satellite have revealed the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL), a summertime accumulation of aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), associated with the ASM anticyclone. The ATAL has potential implications for regional cloud properties, climate, and chemical processes in the UTLS. Here, we show in situ measurements from balloon-borne instruments, aircraft, and satellite observations, together with trajectory and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to explore the origin, composition, physical, and optical properties of aerosols in the ATAL. In particular, we show balloon-data from our BATAL-2015 field campaign to India and Saudi Arabia in summer 2015, which includes in situ backscatter measurements from COBALD instruments, and the first observations of size and volatility of aerosols in the ATAL layer using optical particle counters (OPCs). Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations point to deep convection over North India as a principal source of ATAL aerosols. Available aircraft observations suggest significant sulfur and carbonaceous components to the ATAL, which is supported by simulations using the GEOS-Chem CTM. Source elimination studies conducted with the GEOS-Chem indicate that ATAL aerosols originate primary from south Asian sources, in contrast with some earlier studies.

  3. Characterization of Cooking-Related Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedziela, R. F.; Blanc, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    The temperatures at which food is cooked are usually high enough to drive oils and other organic compounds out of materials which are being prepared for consumption. As these compounds move away from the hot cooking surface and into the atmosphere, they can participate in chemical reactions or condense to form particles. Given the high concentration of cooking in urban areas, cooking-related aerosols likely contribute to the overall amount of particulate matter on a local scale. Reported here are results for the mid-infrared optical characterization of aerosols formed during the cooking of several meat and vegetable samples in an inert atmosphere. The samples were heated in a novel aerosol generator that is designed to collect particles formed immediately above the cooking surface and inject them into a laminar aerosol flow cell. Preliminary results for the chemical processing of cooking-related aerosols in synthetic air will also be presented.

  4. Physico-chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from catechol and guaiacol as a model substance for atmospheric humic-like substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Krüger, H.-U.; Grothe, H.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Whitmore, K.; Zetzsch, C.

    2010-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol was produced from the aromatic precursors catechol and guaiacol by reaction with ozone in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight and humidity and investigated for its properties as a proxy for humic-like substances (HULIS). Beside a small particle size, a relatively low molecular weight and typical optical features in the UV/VIS spectral range, HULIS contain a typical aromatic and/or olefinic chemical structure and highly oxidized functional groups within a high chemical diversity. Various methods were used to characterize the secondary organic aerosols obtained: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the formation of different carbonyl containing functional groups as well as structural and functional differences between aerosols formed at different environmental conditions. UV/VIS spectroscopy of filter samples showed that the particulate matter absorbs far into the visible range up to more than 500 nm. Ultrahigh resolved mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS) determined O/C-ratios between 0.3 and 1 and main molecular weights between 200 and 500 Da. Temperature-programmed-pyrolysis mass spectroscopy identified carboxylic acids and lactones as major functional groups. Particle sizing using CNC-DMPS demonstrated the formation of small particles during a secondary organic aerosol formation process. Particle imaging using field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showed spherical particles, forming clusters and chains. Hence, secondary organic aerosols from catechol and guaiacol are appropriate model substances for studies of the processing of aromatic secondary organic aerosols and atmospheric HULIS on the laboratory scale.

  5. Chemical characterization of polar organic markers in aerosols in a local area around Bologna, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Bacco, Dimitri; Rossi, Mauro

    2013-08-01

    The composition and seasonal variations of water-soluble organic compounds, including 18 dicarboxylic acids and 7 sugars, were determined in the atmospheric aerosol in the surroundings of Bologna, Northern Italy, during intensive summer and winter campaigns. In both seasons the most abundant compound is levoglucosan, as the major by-product from biomass burning. The abundances of dicarboxylic acids exhibit a seasonal pattern with higher winter concentrations (mean total concentrations are 60 ng m-3 and 23 ng m-3, in winter and summer, respectively). The distribution profiles and the diagnostic ratios of these markers allowed to estimate the contribution of primary emission sources (power plants, vehicular circulation, biomass burning) associated with secondary constituents from both biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. The distinct seasonal pattern of abundances suggests, overall, the dominant role of secondary formation of particulate organics in summer, and the highest strength of primary emissions in winter.

  6. Chemical and isotopic characterization of fatty acids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aerosols - implications for biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Ballentine, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Emissions of organic materials during biomass burning have been suggested to influence the biogeochemical distribution of nutrients in a range of ecosystems. Additionally, some organic components survive pyrolytic processes and are of regional and global biogeochemical significance because they may serve as tracers for transport of biomass burning products. Two classes of compounds that are of interest in determining the transport of these products are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and fatty acids. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are stable to biodegradation and are typically produced during natural and anthropogenic combustion processes. Fatty acids are also stable to atmospheric degradation and have been implicated as useful biomarkers for atmospheric transport. In this study, PAH and fatty acids emitted during controlled low and high temperature burns of sugar cane have been chemically and isotopically characterized using GC/MS and GC/IRMS, respectively. In order to determine if these species are suitable biomarkers for the transport of biomass burning materials, aerosols collected during sugar cane burning in South Africa have been similarly analyzed.

  7. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol and particle growth events at a national background site (3295 m a.s.l.) on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, W.; Sun, Y. L.; Xu, Y. S.; Jiang, Q.; Wang, Q. Q.; Yang, W.; Wang, F.; Bai, Z. P.; Zhao, X. D.; Yang, Y. C.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exert highly uncertain impacts on radiative forcing and also have detrimental effects on human health. While aerosol particles are widely characterized in megacities in China, aerosol composition, sources and particle growth in rural areas in the Tibetan Plateau remain less understood. Here we present the results from an autumn study that was conducted from 5 September to 15 October 2013 at a national background monitoring station (3295 m a.s.l.) in the Tibetan Plateau. The submicron aerosol composition and particle number size distributions were measured in situ with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The average mass concentration of submicron aerosol (PM1) is 11.4 μg m-3 (range: 1.0-78.4 μg m-3) for the entire study, which is much lower than observed at urban and rural sites in eastern China. Organics dominated PM1, accounting for 43 % on average, followed by sulfate (28 %) and ammonium (11 %). Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of ACSM organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra identified an oxygenated OA (OOA) and a biomass burning OA (BBOA). The OOA dominated OA composition, accounting for 85 % on average, 17 % of which was inferred from aged BBOA. The BBOA contributed a considerable fraction of OA (15 %) due to the burning of cow dung and straw in September. New particle formation and growth events were frequently observed (80 % of time) throughout the study. The average particle growth rate is 2.0 nm h-1 (range: 0.8-3.2 nm h-1). By linking the evolution of particle number size distribution to aerosol composition, we found an elevated contribution of organics during particle growth periods and also a positive relationship between the growth rate and the fraction of OOA in OA, which potentially indicates an important role of organics in particle growth in the Tibetan Plateau.

  8. Chemical Properties of Combustion Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of pyrogenic and anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. ...

  9. Detection of chemical agent aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Jay A.; Ahl, Jeffrey L.; D'Amico, Francis M.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Moon, Raphael; Swim, Cynthia R.

    1999-05-01

    One of the major threats presented by a chemical agent attack is that of a munition exploding overhead and 'raining' aerosols which can contaminate surfaces when they impact. Since contact with these surfaces can be fatal, it is imperative to know when such an attack has taken place and the likely threat density and location. We present the results of an experiment designed to show the utility of a CO2 lidar in detecting such an attack. Testing occurred at Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah and involved the simulation of an explosive airburst chemical attack. Explosions occurred at a height of 30 m and liquid droplets from two chemicals, PEG-200 (polyethylene glycol 200) and TEP (triethylphosphate), were expelled and fell to the ground. The munition was the U.S. Army M9 Simulator, Projectile, Airburst, Liquid (SPAL) system that is designed for chemical warfare training exercises. The instrument that was used to detect the presence of the aerosols was the Laser Standoff Chemical Detector (LSCD) which is a light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system that utilizes a rapidly tunable, pulsed CO2 laser. The LIDAR scanned a horizontal path approximately 5 - 8 m above the ground in order to measure the concentration of liquid deposition. The LIDAR data were later correlated with card data to determine how well the system could predict the location and quantity of liquid deposition on the ground.

  10. Optical and chemical characterization of aerosols emitted from coal, heavy and light fuel oil, and small-scale wood combustion.

    PubMed

    Frey, Anna K; Saarnio, Karri; Lamberg, Heikki; Mylläri, Fanni; Karjalainen, Panu; Teinilä, Kimmo; Carbone, Samara; Tissari, Jarkko; Niemelä, Ville; Häyrinen, Anna; Rautiainen, Jani; Kytömäki, Jorma; Artaxo, Paulo; Virkkula, Aki; Pirjola, Liisa; Rönkkö, Topi; Keskinen, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hillamo, Risto

    2014-01-01

    Particle emissions affect radiative forcing in the atmosphere. Therefore, it is essential to know the physical and chemical characteristics of them. This work studied the chemical, physical, and optical characteristics of particle emissions from small-scale wood combustion, coal combustion of a heating and power plant, as well as heavy and light fuel oil combustion at a district heating station. Fine particle (PM1) emissions were the highest in wood combustion with a high fraction of absorbing material. The emissions were lowest from coal combustion mostly because of efficient cleaning techniques used at the power plant. The chemical composition of aerosols from coal and oil combustion included mostly ions and trace elements with a rather low fraction of absorbing material. The single scattering albedo and aerosol forcing efficiency showed that primary particles emitted from wood combustion and some cases of oil combustion would have a clear climate warming effect even over dark earth surfaces. Instead, coal combustion particle emissions had a cooling effect. Secondary processes in the atmosphere will further change the radiative properties of these emissions but are not considered in this study.

  11. Aerosol Characterization Data from the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Project (ACE-Asia)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiments (ACE) were designed to increase understanding of how atmospheric aerosol particles affect the Earth's climate system. These experiments integrated in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and models to reduce the uncertainty in calculations of the climate forcing due to aerosol particles and improve the ability of models to predict the influences of aerosols on the Earth's radiation balance. ACE-Asia was the fourth in a series of experiments organized by the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program (A Core Project of the International Geosphere Biosphere Program). The Intensive Field Phase for ACE-Asia took place during the spring of 2001 (mid-March through early May) off the coast of China, Japan and Korea. ACE-Asia pursued three specific objectives: 1) Determine the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of the major aerosol types in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region and investigate the relationships among these properties. 2) Quantify the physical and chemical processes controlling the evolution of the major aerosol types and in particular their physical, chemical, and radiative properties. 3) Develop procedures to extrapolate aerosol properties and processes from local to regional and global scales, and assess the regional direct and indirect radiative forcing by aerosols in the Eastern Asia and Northwest Pacific region [Edited and shortened version of summary at http://data.eol.ucar.edu/codiac/projs?ACE-ASIA]. The Ace-Asia collection contains 174 datasets.

  12. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  13. Long-term real-time chemical characterization of submicron aerosols at Montsec (Southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pey, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Day, D. A.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2014-11-01

    Real-time measurements of inorganic (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and black carbon (BC)) and organic submicron aerosols from a continental background site (Montsec, MSC, 1570 m a.s.l.) in the Western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) were conducted for 10 months (July 2011-April 2012). An Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was co-located with other on-line and off-line PM1 measurements. Analyses of the hourly, diurnal, and seasonal variations are presented here, for the first time for this region. Seasonal trends in PM1 components are attributed to variations in: evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, air mass origin, and meteorological conditions. In summer, the higher temperature and solar radiation increases convection, enhancing the growth of the PBL and the transport of anthropogenic pollutants towards high altitude sites. Furthermore, the regional recirculation of air masses over the WMB creates a continuous increase in the background concentrations of PM1 components and causes the formation of reserve strata at relatively high altitudes. Sporadically, MSC is affected by air masses from North Africa. The combination of all these atmospheric processes at local, regional and continental scales results in a high variability of PM1 components, with poorly defined daily patterns, except for the organic aerosols (OA). OA was mostly oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), with two different types: semi-volatile (SV-OOA) and low-volatile (LV-OOA), and both showed marked diurnal cycles regardless of the air mass origin, especially SV-OOA. This different diurnal variation compared to inorganic aerosols suggested that OA components at MSC are not only associated with anthropogenic and long-range-transported secondary OA (SOA), but also with recently-produced biogenic SOA. Very different conditions drive the aerosol phenomenology in winter at MSC. The thermal inversions and the lower vertical development of the PBL leave MSC in the free troposphere

  14. Synthesis and characterization of LiNbO3 nanocrystals prepared by the aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocón, J. A.; Murillo, J. G.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Cardoza, M. N.; Contreras-López, O. E.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the synthesis of LiNbO3 nanocrystals by an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition method, onto silicon (0 0 1) substrates. Some of the nanocrystals showed a hexagonal morphology and characteristic sizes ranging from a few tens to a few hundreds of nanometers. The nanocrystals with hexagonal structure were obtained at 773 K using a carrier gas flow of 6 L/min and a deposition time of 90 min. Structural, morphological, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties were studied by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, fluorospectrometry, and cathodoluminescence, respectively. An extraordinary violet luminescence at 396 nm with excitation in UV region (280 nm) was observed in one of the samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and spectroscopy studies of the nanocrystals exhibit stimulated emission of light in the near ultraviolet-violet-green spectral region. The emission peaks in CL spectra varied according to the nature of nanoparticles. A red-shift in the CL spectra with a decrease in the particle size was observed. Apparently the size of LiNbO3 typical nanocrystals investigated in this work has tuned the photoluminescence emission. This result encourages the use and integration of LiNbO3 nanocrystals into nanophotonics applications.

  15. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) inAtmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing andSecondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to...

  16. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter surveys the analytical techniques used to determine the concentrations of aerosol mass and its chemical components. The techniques surveyed include mass, major ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium), organic carbon, elemental carbon, and trace elements. As reported in...

  17. Long-term real-time chemical characterization of submicron aerosols at Montsec (southern Pyrenees, 1570 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripoll, A.; Minguillón, M. C.; Pey, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Day, D. A.; Sosedova, Y.; Canonaco, F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.

    2015-03-01

    Real-time measurements of inorganic (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride and black carbon (BC)) and organic submicron aerosols (particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 1 μm) from a continental background site (Montsec, MSC, 1570 m a.s.l.) in the western Mediterranean Basin (WMB) were conducted for 10 months (July 2011-April 2012). An aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM) was co-located with other online and offline PM1 measurements. Analyses of the hourly, diurnal, and seasonal variations are presented here, for the first time, for this region. Seasonal trends in PM1 components are attributed to variations in evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, air mass origin, and meteorological conditions. In summer, the higher temperature and solar radiation increases convection, enhancing the growth of the PBL and the transport of anthropogenic pollutants towards high altitude sites. Furthermore, the regional recirculation of air masses over the WMB creates a continuous increase in the background concentrations of PM1 components and causes the formation of reservoir layers at relatively high altitudes. The combination of all these atmospheric processes results in a high variability of PM1 components, with poorly defined daily patterns, except for the organic aerosols (OA). OA was mostly composed (up to 90%) of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), split in two types: semivolatile (SV-OOA) and low-volatility (LV-OOA), the rest being hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA). The marked diurnal cycles of OA components regardless of the air mass origin indicates that they are not only associated with anthropogenic and long-range-transported secondary OA (SOA) but also with recently produced biogenic SOA. Very different conditions drive the aerosol phenomenology in winter at MSC. The thermal inversions and the lower vertical development of the PBL leave MSC in the free troposphere most of the day, being affected by PBL air masses only after midday, when the

  18. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of PM2.5 aerosols in a megacity of Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huiming; Wang, Qin'geng; Yang, Meng; Li, Fengying; Wang, Jinhua; Sun, Yixuan; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hongfei; Qian, Xin

    2016-11-01

    PM2.5 aerosol samples were collected during a haze-fog event in winter, as well as in spring, summer, and fall in 2013 within an urban area (Xianlin) and city center area (Gulou) of Nanjing, a megacity of SE China. The PM2.5 showed typical seasonality of waxing in winter and waning in summer or fall with annual average concentrations of 145 and 139 μg/m3 in Xianlin and Gulou, respectively. Concentrations of SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, and K+, EC, OC, secondary organic carbon, and most elements were elevated in winter. The sulfur oxidation ratio and concentrations of SO42 - and Cl- were significantly higher in Xianlin than Gulou (p < 0.05), whereas the nitrogen oxidation ratio and NO3- concentrations were significantly higher in Gulou than Xianlin (p < 0.05). A chemical mass closure construction was used to apportion PM2.5 fractions. Using the positive matrix factorization model, six source factors were identified as having contributed to PM2.5. These were secondary nitrate, road dust, sea salt and ship emissions, coal combustion, secondary sulfate, and the iron and steel industry, which contributed annual averages of 17.8 ± 15.1, 10.6 ± 9.53, 4.50 ± 3.28, 12.4 ± 9.82, 46.3 ± 14.4, and 8.42 ± 5.15%, respectively, to the PM2.5 mass in Xianlin, and 34.5 ± 16.2, 7.82 ± 7.21, 7.27 ± 5.61, 10.5 ± 9.35, 33.0 ± 16.6, and 7.00 ± 6.1%, respectively, in Gulou. Distinct seasonal patterns of the source factors in the two areas associated with the main chemical components were identified, which could be explained by various sources and meteorological conditions. Fig. S2 Temporal trends of sulfur oxidation ratio (SOR) and nitrogen oxidation ratio (NOR) in all four seasons in Xianlin (a) and Gulou (b). Fig. S3 The OC/EC ratios found in four seasons in Xianlin (a) and Gulou (b). Fig. S4 The enrichment factors (EF) obtained in four seasons in Xianlin (a) and Gulou (b). Fig. S5 Estimated versus observed PM2.5 mass concentrations during sampling period in the two areas (95

  19. Measurements of aerosol chemical composition in boreal forest summer conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ńijälä, M.; Junninen, H.; Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Vogel, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Corrigan, A.; Russell, L.; Makkonen, U.; Virkkula, A.; Mäntykenttä, J.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.

    2012-04-01

    -IT-MS, [6]) was measuring gas and particle phase aerosol composition, offering additional information on molecular compositions. Overall, the availability of a variety of aerosol chemical characterization instruments provided a good opportunity for a comparison of the results obtained by these four very different measurement approaches. Overall the results were found to agree. The inorganic particulate masses measured with the AMS and Marga were found to correlate especially well for sulphates (r2=0.92) and ammonia compounds (r2=0.82). The organic mass seen by the AMS was correlated with the FTIR filter analysis (r2=0.87) and the APCI-IT-MS (r2=0.88).

  20. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation. PMID:11035775

  1. Atmospheric aerosols as prebiotic chemical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Christopher M.; Ellison, G. Barney; Tuck, Adrian F.; Vaida, Veronica

    2000-10-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have recently been found to contain a large number of chemical elements and a high content of organic material. The latter property is explicable by an inverted micelle model. The aerosol sizes with significant atmospheric lifetimes are the same as those of single-celled organisms, and they are predicted by the interplay of aerodynamic drag, surface tension, and gravity. We propose that large populations of such aerosols could have afforded an environment, by means of their ability to concentrate molecules in a wide variety of physical conditions, for key chemical transformations in the prebiotic world. We also suggest that aerosols could have been precursors to life, since it is generally agreed that the common ancestor of terrestrial life was a single-celled organism. The early steps in some of these initial transformations should be accessible to experimental investigation.

  2. Microphysical and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, S. D.; Moon, S.; Littleton, R.; Auvermann, B.

    2005-12-01

    Due to significant atmospheric loadings of agricultural dust aerosols, the aerosol's ability to contribute significantly to climate forcing on a regional to global level has been a topic of recent interest. Efforts have been made to quantify both the aerosol extinction of the total aerosol population and the hygroscopic and chemical properties of individual particles at a cattle feedyard near Canyon, Texas. Measurements of aerosol extinction are made using open-path transmissometry. Our results show that extinction varies significantly with relative humidity. To further explore the hygroscopic nature of the particles, size-resolved aerosol samples are collected using a cascade impactor system (7 stages ranging from 0.6 micron to 16 micron diameter) and hygroscopicity measurements are conducted on these using an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). Complimentary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles is performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy. Results of the optical properties, hygroscopicity and chemical composition of aerosols will be presented and atmospheric implications discussed.

  3. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds, refractory brown and black carbon, heavy metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases. Aerosol organic matter normally contains semivolatile material th...

  4. Chemical characterization of emissions from vegetable oil processing and their contribution to aerosol mass using the organic molecular markers approach.

    PubMed

    Kavouras, I G; Stratigakis, N; Stephanou, E G

    2001-04-01

    The organic fraction of aerosol emitted from a vegetable oil processing plant was studied to investigate the contribution of emissions to ambient particles in the surrounding area. Solvent-soluble particulate organic compounds emitted from the plant accounted for 10% of total suspended particles. This percentage was lower in the receptor sites (less than 6% of total aerosol mass). Nonpolar, moderate polar, polar, and acidic compounds were detected in both emitted and ambient aerosol samples. The processing and combustion of olive pits yielded a source with strong biogenic characteristics, such as the high values of the carbon preference index (CPI) for all compound classes. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) detected in emissions were associated with both olive pits and diesel combustion. The chromatographic profile of dimethylphenanthrenes (DMPs) was characteristic of olive pit combustion. Organic aerosols collected in two receptor sites provided a different pattern. The significant contribution of vehicular emissions was identified by CPI values (approximately 1) of n-alkanes and the presence of the unresolved complex mixture (UCM). In addition, PAH concentration diagnostic ratios indicated that emissions from catalyst and noncatalyst automobiles and heavy trucks were significant. The strong even-to-odd predominance of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, and their salts indicated the contribution of a source with biogenic characteristics. However, the profile of DMPs at receptor sites was similar to that observed for diesel particulates. These differences indicated that the contribution of vegetable oil processing emissions to the atmosphere was negligible.

  5. Carbonaceous aerosols over the Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX): Chemical characterization, optical properties, and probable sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Gabriel, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Novakov, T.; Ogren, J.; Sheridan, P.; Streets, D. G.

    2002-10-01

    We measured carbonaceous material and water-soluble ionic species in the fine fraction (Dp < 1.3 μm) of aerosol samples collected on NCAR's C-130 aircraft during the intensive field phase (February-March 1999) of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). Polluted layers were present over most of the study region north of the equator at altitudes up to 3.2 km. The estimated aerosol mass (sum of carbonaceous and soluble ionic aerosol components) of fine-mode particles in these layers was 15.3 ± 7.9 μg m-3. The major components were particulate organic matter (POM, 35%), SO42- (34%), black carbon (BC, 14%), and NH4+ (11%). The main difference between the composition of the marine boundary layer (MBL, 0 to ˜1.2 km), and the overlying residual continental boundary layer (1.2 to ˜3.2 km) was a higher abundance of SO42- relative to POM in the MBL, probably due to a faster conversion of SO2 into SO42- in the MBL. Our results show that carbon is a major, and sometimes dominant, contributor to the aerosol mass and that its contribution increases with altitude. Low variability was observed in the optical properties of the aerosol in the two layers. Regression analysis of the absorption coefficient at 565 nm on BC mass (BC < 4.0 μg C m-3) yielded a specific absorption cross section of 8.1 ± 0.7 m2 g-1 for the whole period. The unusually high fraction of BC and the good correlation between the absorption coefficient and BC suggest that BC was responsible for the strong light absorption observed for the polluted layers during INDOEX. High correlation between BC and total carbon (TC) (r2 = 0.86) suggest that TC is predominantly of primary origin. Good correlations were also found between the scattering coefficient at 550 nm and the estimated aerosol mass for the fine fraction. These yielded a specific scattering cross section of 4.9 ± 0.4 m2 g-1. The observed BC/TC, BC/OC, SO42-/BC, and K+/BC ratios were fairly constant throughout the period. These ratios suggest that between

  6. Remote Marine Aerosol: A Characterization of Physical, Chemical and Optical Properties and their Relation to Radiative Transfer in the Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    Our research effort is focused on improving our understanding of aerosol properties needed for optical models for remote marine regions. This includes in-situ and vertical column optical closure and involves a redundancy of approaches to measure and model optical properties that must be self consistent. The model is based upon measured in-situ aerosol properties and will be tested and constrained by the vertically measured spectral differential optical depth of the marine boundary layer, MBL. Both measured and modeled column optical properties for the boundary layer, when added to the free-troposphere and stratospheric optical depth, will be used to establish spectral optical depth over the entire atmospheric column for comparison to and validation of satellite derived radiances (AVHRR).

  7. Physical and Chemical Properties of Anthropogenic Aerosols: An overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    A wide variety of anthropogenic sources emit fine aerosols to the atmosphere. The physical and chemical properties of these aerosols are of interest due to their influence on climate, human health, and visibility. Aerosol chemical composition is complex. Combustion aerosols can c...

  8. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry model (WRF-Chem) with added capability of diagnosing the spatial and seasonal distribution of radiative forcings for individual aerosol species over California is used to characterize the radiative forcing of speciated aerosols in California. Model simulations for the year of 2005 are evaluated with various observations including meteorological data from California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), aerosol mass concentrations from US EPA Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE), and aerosol optical depth from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and satellites. The model well captures the observed seasonal meteorological conditions over California. Overall, the simulation is able to reproduce the observed spatial and seasonal distribution of mass concentration of total PM2.5 and the relative contribution from individual aerosol species, except the model significantly underestimates the surface concentrations of organic matter (OM) and elemental carbon (EC), potentially due to uncertainty in the anthropogenic emissions of OM and EC and the outdated secondary organic aerosol mechanism used in the model. A sensitivity simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled significantly reduces the model low bias of EC. The simulation reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Central Valley and the Los Angeles metropolitan regions and high natural aerosol (dust) loading over southeastern California. The seasonality of aerosol surface concentration is mainly determined by vertical turbulent mixing, ventilation, and photochemical activity, with distinct characteristics for individual aerosol species and between urban and rural areas. The simulations show that anthropogenic aerosols dominate the aerosol optical depth (AOD). The ratio of AOD to AAOD (aerosol absorption optical depth) shows distinct seasonality with a winter maximum and a summer minimum

  9. Detailed chemical characterization of unresolved complex mixtures in atmospheric organics: Insights into emission sources, atmospheric processing, and secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Arthur W. H.; Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Worton, David R.; Ruehl, Christopher R.; Nah, Theodora; Gentner, Drew R.; Dallmann, Timothy R.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Harley, Robert A.; Gilman, Jessica B.; Kuster, William C.; Gouw, Joost A.; Offenberg, John H.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Lin, Ying H.; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are important precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in urban atmospheres. However, knowledge of the chemical composition of SVOCs is limited by current analytical techniques, which are typically unable to resolve a large number of constitutional isomers. Using a combination of gas chromatography and soft photoionization mass spectrometry, we characterize the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of semivolatile aliphatic hydrocarbons observed in Pasadena, California (~16 km NE of downtown Los Angeles), and Bakersfield, California, during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change 2010. To the authors' knowledge, this work represents the most detailed characterization of the UCM in atmospheric samples to date. Knowledge of molecular structures, including carbon number, alkyl branching, and number of rings, provides important constraints on the rate of atmospheric processing, as the relative amounts of branched and linear alkanes are shown to be a function of integrated exposure to hydroxyl radicals. Emissions of semivolatile branched alkanes from fossil fuel-related sources are up to an order of magnitude higher than those of linear alkanes, and the gas-phase OH rate constants of branched alkanes are ~30% higher than their linear isomers. Based on a box model considering gas/particle partitioning, emissions, and reaction rates, semivolatile branched alkanes are expected to play a more important role than linear alkanes in the photooxidation of the UCM and subsequent transformations into SOA. Detailed speciation of semivolatile compounds therefore provides essential understanding of SOA sources and formation processes in urban areas.

  10. Chemical characterization of size-resolved aerosols in four seasons and hazy days in the megacity Beijing of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Liu, Xingang; Gu, Jianwei; Li, Yunpeng; Qu, Yu; An, Junling; Wang, Jingli; Zhang, Yuanhang; Hu, Min; Zhang, Fang

    2015-06-01

    Size-resolved aerosol samples were collected by MOUDI in four seasons in 2007 in Beijing. The PM10 and PM1.8 mass concentrations were 166.0±120.5 and 91.6±69.7 μg/m3, respectively, throughout the measurement, with seasonal variation: nearly two times higher in autumn than in summer and spring. Serious fine particle pollution occurred in winter with the PM1.8/PM10 ratio of 0.63, which was higher than other seasons. The size distribution of PM showed obvious seasonal and diurnal variation, with a smaller fine mode peak in spring and in the daytime. OM (organic matter=1.6×OC (organic carbon)) and SIA (secondary inorganic aerosol) were major components of fine particles, while OM, SIA and Ca2+ were major components in coarse particles. Moreover, secondary components, mainly SOA (secondary organic aerosol) and SIA, accounted for 46%-96% of each size bin in fine particles, which meant that secondary pollution existed all year. Sulfates and nitrates, primarily in the form of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, CaSO4, Na2SO4 and K2SO4, calculated by the model ISORROPIA II, were major components of the solid phase in fine particles. The PM concentration and size distribution were similar in the four seasons on non-haze days, while large differences occurred on haze days, which indicated seasonal variation of PM concentration and size distribution were dominated by haze days. The SIA concentrations and fractions of nearly all size bins were higher on haze days than on non-haze days, which was attributed to heterogeneous aqueous reactions on haze days in the four seasons.

  11. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  12. Development and Characterization of a Thermodenuder for Aerosol Volatility Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Timothy Onasch

    2009-09-09

    This SBIR Phase I project addressed the critical need for improved characterization of carbonaceous aerosol species in the atmosphere. The proposed work focused on the development of a thermodenuder (TD) system capable of systematically measuring volatility profiles of primary and secondary organic aerosol species and providing insight into the effects of absorbing and nonabsorbing organic coatings on particle absorption properties. This work provided the fundamental framework for the generation of essential information needed for improved predictions of ambient aerosol loadings and radiative properties by atmospheric chemistry models. As part of this work, Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) continued to develop and test, with the final objective of commercialization, an improved thermodenuder system that can be used in series with any aerosol instrument or suite of instruments (e.g., aerosol mass spectrometers-AMS, scanning mobility particle sizers-SMPS, photoacoustic absorption spectrometers-PAS, etc.) to obtain aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties as a function of particle volatility. In particular, we provided the proof of concept for the direct coupling of our improved TD design with a full microphysical model to obtain volatility profiles for different organic aerosol components and to allow for meaningful comparisons between different TD-derived aerosol measurements. In a TD, particles are passed through a heated zone and a denuding (activated charcoal) zone to remove semi-volatile material. Changes in particle size, number concentration, optical absorption, and chemical composition are subsequently detected with aerosol instrumentation. The aerosol volatility profiles provided by the TD will strengthen organic aerosol emission inventories, provide further insight into secondary aerosol formation mechanisms, and provide an important measure of particle absorption (including brown carbon contributions and identification, and absorption enhancements

  13. Aerosol characterization of nebulized intranasal glucocorticoid formulations.

    PubMed

    Berlinski, A; Waldrep, J C

    2001-01-01

    Inhaled glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay of long-term therapy for asthma. The lack of suitable preparations in the United States has induced clinicians to use intranasal (IN) GC formulations as "nebulizer suspensions" for off-label therapy. However, no data are available regarding aerosol production and characteristics. The aim of this study was to characterize drug outputs and aerodynamic profiles of four nebulized IN GC formulations with further analysis of flunisolide (Flu), and to test the influence of different delivery system/formulation combinations. The aerodynamic profiles and drug outputs were determined by impaction and chemical analysis. The solution output was determined by the gravimetric technique. Triamcinole acetonide (TAA), fluticasone propionate (Flut), beclomethasone dipropionate (Bec), and Flu (550, 500, 840, and 250 microg, respectively) diluted to 4 mL with saline solution were tested with the Sidestream (SID) and Aero-Tech II (AT2) nebulizers. Subsequently, Flu was tested with four additional nebulizers (Pari LC + [PARI] Acorn II, Hudson T Up-draft II, and Raindrop). All the aerosols were heterodisperse and had a particle size range optimal for peripheral airway deposition (1.85 to 3.67 microm). Flu had the highest drug output in the respirable range (22.8 and 20.3 microg/min with the AT and SID, respectively). Flu was 5-11 times more efficiently nebulized than the other formulations tested. No differences were detected in the solution outputs (0.25 to 0.3 mL/min). In subsequent testing of Flu, the PARI, AT, and SID showed the best performances. The LC+ achieved the highest drug and solution output (27.4 microg/min and 0.89 mL/min, respectively). In conclusion, Flu showed the best aerosol performance characteristics. These data do not endorse the off-label utilization of nebulized IN GC, but underscores the importance of in vitro testing before selecting any formulation/nebulizer combinations for clinical use.

  14. Subarctic atmospheric aerosol composition: 1. Ambient aerosol characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Herich, Hanna; Kammermann, Lukas; Gross, Deborah S.; Ameth, Almut; Holst, Thomas; Lohmann, U.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2009-07-10

    Sub-Arctic aerosol was sampled during July 2007 at the Abisko Research Station Stordalen field site operated by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Located in northern Sweden at 68º latitude and 385 meters above sea level (msl), this site is classified as a semi-continuous permafrost mire. Number density, size distribution, cloud condensation nucleus properties, and chemical composition of the ambient aerosol were determined. Backtrajectories showed that three distinct airmasses were present over Stordalen during the sampling period. Aerosol properties changed and correlated with airmass origin to the south, northeast, or west. We observe that Arctic aerosol is not compositionally unlike that found in the free troposphere at mid-latitudes. Internal mixtures of sulfates and organics, many on insoluble biomass burning and/or elemental carbon cores, dominate the number density of particles from ~200 to 2000 nm aerodynamic diameter. Mineral dust which had taken up gas phase species was observed in all airmasses. Sea salt, and the extent to which it had lost volatile components, was the aerosol type that most varied with airmass.

  15. Characterizing the long-range transport of black carbon aerosols during Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sunita; Worden, John; Payra, Swagata; Jourdain, Line; Shim, Changsub

    2009-07-01

    A major aircraft experiment Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) mission over the NW Pacific in March-April 2001 was conducted to better understand how outflow from the Asian continent affects the composition of the global atmosphere. In this paper, a global climate model, GEOS-Chem is used to investigate possible black carbon aerosol contributions from TRACE-P region. Our result depicts that absorbing black carbon ("soot") significantly outflow during lifting to the free troposphere through warm conveyor belt and convection associated with this lifting. The GEOS-Chem simulation results show significant transport of black carbon aerosols from Asian regions to the Western Pacific region during the spring season. As estimated by GEOS-Chem simulations, approximately 25% of the black carbon concentrations over the western pacific originate from SE Asia in the spring.

  16. Chemical properties and outflow patterns of anthropogenic and dust particles on Rishiri Island during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Uyama, Yukiko; Hayano, Teruaki; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Uno, Itsushi; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of chemical properties and transport mechanisms of continental aerosols are necessary for estimating their influences on global radiative budget and on the global material cycle. Intensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols and the associated species on Rishiri Island, near the northern tip of Japan, were conducted from March to May 2001, in order to understand the chemical properties, source regions, transport pathways, and transport patterns of anthropogenic and mineral aerosols over the east Asian Pacific Rim region during the spring. Mean concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-Ca2+ in aerosols were 2.48, 0.64, 0.72, and 0.17 μg m-3, respectively. Elemental carbon and organic carbon in fine particles (d < 2.5 μm) yielded mean concentrations of 0.25 and 0.80 μg m-3, respectively. The concentrations of these species frequently increased to higher values because of outbreaks of continental polluted air masses, whereas under background conditions, they decreased to lower values similar to those observed over the remote ocean. Our results demonstrate that nss-SO42- and NH4+ coexist in fine particles, that NO3- and nss-Ca2+ coexist in coarse particles, and that each set is transported in an alternate manner. Continentally derived NO3- is transported as coarse particle to the east Asian Pacific Rim region. Anthropogenic pollutants and dust particles are not necessarily transported together. It was often found that anthropogenic fine particles containing abundant nss-SO42- appeared first and were then followed by large mineral particles that had absorbed NO3-. Short-term intrusion of the air masses containing abundant particulate carbonaceous compounds, probably due to the influence of biomass burning, also often occurred during the outflow events of continental air masses. Atmospheric behaviors of sulfate, nitrate, and carbonaceous species are different from one another, although they are all derived mainly from combustion processes.

  17. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

    1984-04-11

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

  18. Characterization of biomass burning aerosols from forest fire in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Iriana, W.; Okumura, M.; Lestari, P.; Tohno, S.; Akira, M.; Okuda, T.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass burning (forest fire, wild fire) is a major source of pollutants, generating an estimate of 104 Tg per year of aerosol particles worldwide. These particles have adverse human health effects and can affect the radiation budget and climate directly and indirectly. Eighty percent of biomass burning aerosols are generated in the tropics and about thirty percent of them originate in the tropical regions of Asia (Andreae, 1991). Several recent studies have reported on the organic compositions of biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of South America and Africa, however, there is little data about forest fire aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia. It is important to characterize biomass burning aerosols in the tropical regions of Asia because the aerosol properties vary between fires depending on type and moisture of wood, combustion phase, wind conditions, and several other variables (Reid et al., 2005). We have characterized PM2.5 fractions of biomass burning aerosols emitted from forest fire in Indonesia. During the dry season in 2012, PM2.5 aerosols from several forest fires occurring in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia were collected on quartz and teflon filters with two mini-volume samplers. Background aerosols in forest were sampled during transition period of rainy season to dry season (baseline period). Samples were analyzed with several analytical instruments. The carbonaceous content (organic and elemental carbon, OC and EC) of the aerosols was analyzed by a thermal optical reflectance technique using IMPROVE protocol. The metal, inorganic ion and organic components of the aerosols were analyzed by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), ion chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. There was a great difference of chemical composition between forest fire and non-forest fire samples. Smoke aerosols for forest fires events were composed of ~ 45 % OC and ~ 2.5 % EC. On the other hand, background aerosols for baseline periods were

  19. Chemical, physical, and optical evolution of biomass burning aerosols: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, G.; Flores, J. M.; Abo Riziq, A.; Borrmann, S.; Rudich, Y.

    2011-02-01

    In-situ chemical composition measurements of ambient aerosols have been used for characterizing the evolution of submicron aerosols from a large anthropogenic biomass burning (BB) event in Israel. A high resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-RES-TOF-AMS) was used to follow the chemical evolution of BB aerosols during a night-long, extensive nationwide wood burning event and during the following day. While these types of extensive BB events are not common in this region, burning of agricultural waste is a common practice. The aging process of the BB aerosols was followed through their chemical, physical and optical properties. Mass spectrometric analysis of the aerosol organic component showed that aerosol aging is characterized by shifting from less oxidized fresh BB aerosols to more oxidized aerosols. Evidence for aerosol aging during the day following the BB event was indicated by an increase in the organic mass, its oxidation state, the total aerosol concentration, and a shift in the modal particle diameter. The effective broadband refractive index (EBRI) was derived using a white light optical particle counter (WELAS). The average EBRI for a mixed population of aerosols dominated by open fires was m = 1.53(±0.03) + 0.07i(±0.03), during the smoldering phase of the fires we found the EBRI to be m = 1.54(±0.01) + 0.04i(±0.01) compared to m = 1.49(±0.01) + 0.02i(±0.01) of the aged aerosols during the following day. This change indicates a decrease in the overall aerosol absorption and scattering. Elevated levels of particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were detected during the entire event, which suggest possible implications for human health during such extensive event.

  20. Characterization of aerosols containing microcystin.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 mum. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  1. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  2. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  3. São Paulo aerosol characterization study.

    PubMed

    Alonso, C D; Martins, M H; Romano, J; Godinho, R

    1997-12-01

    The São Paulo Metropolitan area (SPMA) is characterized as having one of the worst air pollution problems in Brazil, with frequent violations of air quality standards for particulate matter. This paper presents the results of a receptor model source apportionment study carried out to develop a quantitative database on which a control strategy could be developed. The study was conducted in four sites with distinct land uses. Fine, coarse (CP), and total suspended particles (TSP) samples were collected on Teflon and glass filters and analyzed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF), ion chromatography, and thermal evolution. The sources were characterized by similar methodology. Chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling indicated that carbonaceous material plays an important role in the aerosol composition; that the three major source categories contributing to the fine particles are vehicles, secondary carbon, and sulfates; and that the main contributors to CP and TSP are road dust and vehicles. All sampling sites presented the same general pattern in terms of source contribution, although this contribution varied from site to site.

  4. Comprehensive characterization of PM2.5 aerosols in Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Qian, W.-B.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.

    2003-08-01

    A comprehensive characterization of PM2.5 aerosols collected in Singapore from January through December 2000 is presented. The annual average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 27.2 μg/m3. The atmospheric loading of PM2.5 was elevated sporadically from March through May, mainly due to advection of biomass burning (deliberate fires to clear plantation areas) impacted air masses from Sumatra, Indonesia. Satellite images of the area, trajectory calculations, and surface wind direction data are in support of the transport of pyrogenic products from Sumatra toward Singapore. Aerosol samples collected during the dry season were analyzed for water-soluble ions, water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC), elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon, and trace elements using a number of analytical techniques. The major components were sulfate, EC, water-soluble carbonaceous materials, and water-insoluble carbonaceous materials. Aerosol WSOC were characterized based on a combination of chromatographic separations by ion exchange chromatography, functional group investigation by proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and total organic carbon determination. The comprehensive chemical characterization of PM2.5 particles revealed that both non-sea-salt sufate (nss-SO42-) and carbonaceous aerosols mainly contributed to the increase in the mass concentration of aerosols during the smoke haze period. Using a mass closure test (a mass balance), we determined whether the physical measurement of gravimetric fine PM concentration of a sample is equal to the summed concentrations of the individually identified chemical constituents (measured or inferred) in the sample. The sum of the determined groups of aerosol components and the gravimetrically determined mass agreed reasonably well. Principal component analysis was performed from the combined data set, and five factors were observed: a soil dust component, a metallurgical industry factor, a factor representing emissions from biomass burning and

  5. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of primary biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Amato, P.; Ariya, P. A.; Delort, A.-M.; Pöschl, U.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bauer, H.; Flossmann, A. I.; Morris, C. E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses the influence of primary biological aerosols (PBA) on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that PBA represent a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affect the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms, namely fungal spores and bacteria, can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of PBA in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  6. Copper oxide aerosol: generation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Peoples, S M; McCarthy, J F; Chen, L C; Eppelsheimer, D; Amdur, M O

    1988-06-01

    Effluent gases from high temperature systems such as fossil fuel combustion and pyrometallurgical processes contain inorganic material which has the potential to interact with sulfur dioxide (SO2) on the surface of particles to form an irritant aerosol. The submicron fraction of this inorganic material is especially important as the fine particles may penetrate deep into the lung and cause serious health effects. A laboratory furnace was designed to produce a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol to stimulate emissions from copper smelters and other pyrometallurgical operations. The ultimate aim of this research is to investigate the interaction of SO2 and the copper oxide aerosol at different temperatures and humidities in order to determine the reaction products and their potential health effects upon inhalation. The initial work, as presented in this paper, was to reproducibly generate a submicrometer copper oxide aerosol and to characterize it in terms of size, morphology and composition. Two experimental regimes were set up. One admitted filtered air, without water vapor, into the furnace, and the other admitted filtered air and water vapor. The size and morphology of the aerosols were determined using an electrical aerosol analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. The particles appear as chain aggregates with a count median diameter of 0.026 micron when no water vapor was added and 0.031 micron when water vapor was added into the furnace. Composition of the aerosol was determined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The aerosol, with or without water in the furnace, consists of a mixture of copper(I) oxide and copper(II) hydroxide. PMID:3400592

  7. Physico-chemical characterization of African urban aerosols (Bamako in Mali and Dakar in Senegal) and their toxic effects in human bronchial epithelial cells: description of a worrying situation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The involvement of particulate matter (PM) in cardiorespiratory diseases is now established in developed countries whereas in developing areas such as Africa with a high level of specific pollution, PM pollution and its effects are poorly studied. Our objective was to characterize the biological reactivity of urban African aerosols on human bronchial epithelial cells in relation to PM physico-chemical properties to identify toxic sources. Methods Size-speciated aerosol chemical composition was analyzed in Bamako (BK, Mali, 2 samples with one having desert dust event BK1) and Dakar (DK; Senegal) for Ultrafine UF, Fine F and Coarse C PM. PM reactivity was studied in human bronchial epithelial cells investigating six biomarkers (oxidative stress responsive genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines). Results PM mass concentrations were mainly distributed in coarse mode (60%) and were impressive in BK1 due to the desert dust event. BK2 and DK samples showed a high content of total carbon characteristic of urban areas. The DK sample had huge PAH quantities in bulk aerosol compared with BK that had more water soluble organic carbon and metals. Whatever the site, UF and F PM triggered the mRNA expression of the different biomarkers whereas coarse PM had little or no effect. The GM-CSF biomarker was the most discriminating and showed the strongest pro-inflammatory effect of BK2 PM. The analysis of gene expression signature and of their correlation with main PM compounds revealed that PM-induced responses are mainly related to organic compounds. The toxicity of African aerosols is carried by the finest PM as with Parisian aerosols, but when considering PM mass concentrations, the African population is more highly exposed to toxic particulate pollution than French population. Regarding the prevailing sources in each site, aerosol biological impacts are higher for incomplete combustion sources resulting from two-wheel vehicles and domestic fires than from diesel

  8. Chemical evolution of multicomponent aerosol particles during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zardini, Alessandro; Riipinen, Ilona; Pagels, Joakim; Eriksson, Axel; Worsnop, Douglas; Switieckli, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Bilde, Merete

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have an important but not well quantified effect on climate and human health. Despite the efforts made in the last decades, the formation and evolution of aerosol particles in the atmosphere is still not fully understood. The uncertainty is partly due to the complex chemical composition of the particles which comprise inorganic and organic compounds. Many organics (like dicarboxylic acids) can be present both in the gas and in the condensed phase due to their low vapor pressure. Clearly, an understanding of this partition is crucial to address any other issue in atmospheric physics and chemistry. Moreover, many organics are water soluble, and their influence on the properties of aqueous solution droplets is still poorly characterized. The solid and sub-cooled liquid state vapor pressures of some organic compounds have been previously determined by measuring the evaporation rate of single-compound crystals [1-3] or binary aqueous droplets [4-6]. In this work, we deploy the HTDMA technique (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) coupled with a 3.5m laminar flow-tube and an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) for determining the chemical evolution during evaporation of ternary droplets made of one dicarboxylic acid (succinic acid, commonly found in atmospheric samples) and one inorganic compound (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) in different mixing ratios, in equilibrium with water vapor at a fixed relative humidity. In addition, we investigate the evaporation of multicomponent droplets and crystals made of three organic species (dicarboxylic acids and sugars), of which one or two are semi-volatile. 1. Bilde M. and Pandis, S.N.: Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of Individual Aerosol Species Formed in the Atmospheric Oxidation of alpha- and beta-Pinene. Environmental Science and Technology, 35, 2001. 2. Bilde M., et al.: Even-Odd Alternation of Evaporation Rates and Vapor Pressures of C3-C9 Dicarboxylic Acid Aerosols

  9. Physical characterization of incense aerosols.

    PubMed

    Mannix, R C; Nguyen, K P; Tan, E W; Ho, E E; Phalen, R F

    1996-12-20

    Experiments were performed to study the physical characteristics of smoke aerosols generated by burning three types of stick incense in a 4 m3 clean room. Sidestream cigarette smoke was also examined under the same conditions to provide a comparison. Among the parameters measured were (a) masses of aerosol, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides generated by burning the incense or cigarettes, (b) rates of decay of the particles from the air, and (c) estimates of count median particle size during a 7 h period post-burning. There was variability among the types of incense studied with respect to many of the parameters. Also, as a general trend, the greater the initial particulate mass concentration, the more rapid the rate of decay of the smoke. In relation to the quantity of particulate generated, cigarette smoke was found to produce proportionally larger quantities of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides than did incense. Due to the fact that burning incense was found to generate large quantities of particulate (an average of greater than 45 mg/g burned, as opposed to about 10 mg/g burned for the cigarettes), it is likely, in cases in which incense is habitually burned in indoor settings, that such a practice would produce substantial airborne particulate concentrations.

  10. Chemical characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosol generated from plant emissions under baseline and stressed conditions: inter- and intra-species variability for six coniferous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Wen, M.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-04-01

    The largest global source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere is derived from the oxidation of biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. Alterations to the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) profile could impact the characteristics of the SOA formed from those emissions. This study investigated the impacts of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on the composition of SOA derived from real plant emissions. Herbivory was simulated via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a proxy compound. Experiments were repeated under pre- and post-treatment conditions for six different coniferous plant types. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the plants were oxidized to form SOA via dark ozone-initiated chemistry. The SOA chemical composition was measured using a Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The aerosol mass spectra of pre-treatment biogenic SOA from all plant types tended to be similar with correlations usually greater than or equal to 0.90. The presence of a stressor produced characteristic differences in the SOA mass spectra. Specifically, the following m/z were identified as a possible biogenic stress AMS marker with the corresponding HR ion(s) shown in parentheses: m/z 31 (CH3O+), m/z 58 (C2H2O2+, C3H6O+), m/z 29 (C2H5+), m/z 57 (C3H5O+), m/z 59 (C2H3O2+, C3H7O+), m/z 71 (C3H3O2+, C4H7O+), and m/z 83 (C5H7O+). The first aerosol mass spectrum of SOA generated from the oxidation of the plant stress hormone, MeJA, is also presented. Elemental analysis results demonstrated an O : C range of baseline biogenic SOA between 0.3 and 0.47. The O : C of standard MeJA SOA was 0.52. Results presented here could be used to help identify a biogenic plant stress marker in ambient data sets collected in forest environments.

  11. Chemical characterization of biogenic secondary organic aerosol generated from plant emissions under baseline and stressed conditions: inter- and intra-species variability for six coniferous species

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Wen, M.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-04-01

    The largest global source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere is derived from the oxidation of biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. Alterations to the biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) profile could impact the characteristics of the SOA formed from those emissions. This study investigated the impacts of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on the composition of SOA derived from real plant emissions. Herbivory was simulated via application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a proxy compound. Experiments were repeated under pre- andmore » post-treatment conditions for six different coniferous plant types. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from the plants were oxidized to form SOA via dark ozone-initiated chemistry. The SOA chemical composition was measured using a Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS). The aerosol mass spectra of pre-treatment biogenic SOA from all plant types tended to be similar with correlations usually greater than or equal to 0.90. The presence of a stressor produced characteristic differences in the SOA mass spectra. Specifically, the following m/z were identified as a possible biogenic stress AMS marker with the corresponding HR ion(s) shown in parentheses: m/z 31 (CH3O+), m/z 58 (C2H2O2+, C3H6O+), m/z 29 (C2H5+), m/z 57 (C3H5O+), m/z 59 (C2H3O2+, C3H7O+), m/z 71 (C3H3O2+, C4H7O+), and m/z 83 (C5H7O+). The first aerosol mass spectrum of SOA generated from the oxidation of the plant stress hormone, MeJA, is also presented. Elemental analysis results demonstrated an O : C range of baseline biogenic SOA between 0.3 and 0.47. The O : C of standard MeJA SOA was 0.52. Results presented here could be used to help identify a biogenic plant stress marker in ambient data sets collected in forest environments.« less

  12. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Herceg, Joseph E.; Klocksieben, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

  13. Cloud and Aerosol Characterization During CAEsAR 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Tesche, M.; Krejci, R.; Baumgardner, D.; Walther, A.; Rosati, B.; Widequist, U.; Tunved, P.; O'Connor, E.; Ström, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud and Aerosol Experiment at Åre (CAEsAR 2014) campaign took place from June to October 2014 at Mt. Åreskutan, Sweden, a remote mountain site in Northern Sweden. The campaign was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of clouds and aerosols under orographic forcing. A unique and comprehensive set-up allowed an in-situ characterization of both constituents at a mountain top station at 1200 m a.s.l. including instruments to measure cloud droplet size distribution, meteorological parameters, cloud residual properties (using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet), cloud water composition and various aerosol chemical and microphysical properties (e.g. size, optical and hygroscopic properties). At the same time, a remote sensing site was installed below the mountain site at 420 m a.s.l. in the immediate vicinity (< 3 km horizontally), with vertical profiling from an aerosol lidar, winds and turbulence from a scanning Doppler lidar, a Sun photometer measuring aerosol columnar optical properties, and a precipitation sampler taking rain water for chemical analysis. In addition, regular radiosoundings were performed from the valley. Here, we present the results of this intensive campaign which includes approx. 900 hours of in-cloud sampling. Various unique cloud features were frequently observed such as dynamically-driven droplet growth, bimodal droplet distributions, and the activation of particles down to approx. 20 nm in dry particle diameter. During the campaign, a forest fire smoke plume was transported over the site with measureable impacts on the cloud properties. This data will be used to constrain cloud and aerosol models, as well as to validate satellite retrievals. A first comparison to VIIRS and MODIS satellite retrievals will also be shown.

  14. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  15. Hygroscopic, Morphological, and Chemical Properties of Agricultural Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Cheek, L.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Littleton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust is a significant source of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. In the Texas Panhandle, daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots are routinely observed in conjunction with increased cattle activity in the late afternoons and early evenings. We conducted a field study to characterize size-selected agricultural aerosols with respect to hygroscopic, morphological, and chemical properties and to attempt to identify any correlations between these properties. To explore the hygroscopic nature of agricultural particles, we have collected size-resolved aerosol samples using a cascade impactor system at a cattle feedlot in the Texas Panhandle and have used the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) to determine the water uptake by individual particles in those samples as a function of relative humidity. To characterize the size distribution of agricultural aerosols as a function of time, A GRIMM aerosol spectrometer and Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer and Counter (SMPS) measurements were simultaneously performed in an overall size range of 11 nm to 20 µm diameters at a cattle feedlot. Complementary determination of the elemental composition of individual particles was performed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). In addition to the EDS analysis, an ammonia scrubber was used to collect ammonia and ammonium in the gas and particulate phases, respectively. The concentration of these species was quantified offline via UV spectrophotometry at 640 nanometers. The results of this study will provide important particulate emission data from a feedyard, needed to improve our understanding of the role of agricultural particulates in local and regional air quality.

  16. Characterization and reconstruction of historical London, England, acidic aerosol concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, K.; Thurston, G.D.

    1989-02-01

    Several past studies of the historical London air pollution record have reported an association between daily mortality and British Smoke levels. However, this pollution index does not give direct information on particulate mass or its chemical composition. A more specific particulate matter index, aerosol acidity, was measured at a site in central London, and daily data are available for the period 1963-1972. British smoke and SO/sub 2/ were also measured at the same site. Also, meteorological parameters were routinely measured at a nearby British Meteorological Office. Thus, daily fluctuation of the acidic aerosols was characterized in terms of other environmental parameters. Each of the other parameters analyzed seems necessary, but not sufficient to explain a high level of acidic aerosol. Overall, about half of the variance of log-transformed daily fluctuations of acidic aerosols can be explained by a combination of parameters including SO/sub 2/ and British smoke concentrations, temperature, ventilation by wind, and humidity. The rest of the variance cannot be explained by the parameters included in this analysis. Potential factors responsible for this unique variance would be variations in the availability of basic gases to cause neutralization and variation in the availability of catalytic metal salts. Because the acidic aerosol has a unique component of variation, it may be possible to distinguish health effects due to this specific pollutant from other available pollution indices or environmental factors.

  17. Characterization and reconstruction of historical London, England, acidic aerosol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Thurston, G D

    1989-02-01

    Several past studies of the historical London air pollution record have reported an association between daily mortality and British Smoke levels. However, this pollution index does not give direct information on particulate mass or its chemical composition. A more specific particulate matter index, aerosol acidity, was measured at a site in central London, and daily data are available for the period 1963-1972. British Smoke and SO2 were also measured at the same site. Also, meteorological parameters were routinely measured at a nearby British Meteorological Office. Thus, daily fluctuation of the acidic aerosols was characterized in terms of other environmental parameters. Each of the other parameters analyzed seems necessary, but not sufficient to explain a high level of acidic aerosol. Overall, about half of the variance of log-transformed daily fluctuations of acidic aerosols can be explained by a combination of parameters including SO2 and British Smoke concentrations, temperature, ventilation by wind, and humidity. The rest of the variance cannot be explained by the parameters included in this analysis. Potential factors responsible for this unique variance would be variations in the availability of basic gases to cause neutralization and variation in the availability of catalytic metal salts. Because the acidic aerosol has a unique component of variation, it may be possible to distinguish health effects due to this specific pollutant from other available pollution indices or environmental factors.

  18. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  19. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  20. A strategy for characterizing the mixing state of immiscible aerosol components and the formation of multiphase aerosol particles through coagulation.

    PubMed

    Mitchem, Laura; Buajarern, Jariya; Ward, Andrew D; Reid, Jonathan P

    2006-07-20

    We demonstrate that the coagulation of two aerosol droplets of different chemical composition can be studied directly through the unique combination of optical tweezers and Raman spectroscopy. Multiple optical traps can be established, allowing the manipulation of multiple aerosol droplets. Spontaneous Raman scattering allows the characterization of droplet composition and mixing state, permitting the phase segregation of immiscible components in multiphase aerosol to be investigated with spatial resolution. Stimulated Raman scattering allows the integrity of the droplet and uniformity of refractive index to be probed. The combination of these spectroscopic probes with optical tweezers is shown to yield unprecedented detail in studies of the coagulation of decane and water droplets.

  1. Improving Molecular Level Chemical Speciation of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worton, D. R.; Decker, M.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    A substantial fraction of fine mode aerosols are organic with the majority formed in the atmosphere through oxidation of gas phase compounds emitted from a variety of natural and man-made sources. As a result, organic aerosols are comprised of thousands of individual organic species whose complexity increases exponentially with carbon number and degree of atmospheric oxidation. Chemical characterization of individual compounds present in this complex mixture provides information on sources and transformation processes that are critical for apportioning organic carbon from an often convoluted mixture of sources and to constrain oxidation mechanisms needed for atmospheric models. These compounds also affect the physical and optical properties of the aerosol but the vast majority remain unidentified and missing from published mass spectral libraries because of difficulties in separating and identifying them. We have developed improved methodologies for chemical identification in order to better understand complex environmental mixtures. Our approach has been to combine two-dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-HRTOFMS) and both traditional electron ionization (EI) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization. GC×GC provides improved separation of individual compounds over traditional one dimensional GC and minimizes co-elution of peaks resulting in mass spectra that are virtually free of interferences. VUV ionization is a ';soft' ionization technique that reduces fragmentation and enhances the abundance of the parent or molecular ion, which when combined with high resolution mass spectrometry can provide molecular formulas for chromatographic peaks. We demonstrate our methodology by applying it to identify more than 500 individual compounds in aerosol filter samples collected at Blodgett Forest, a rural site in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Using the EI NIST mass spectral library and molecular formulas determined

  2. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, Kevin C.; Kodas, Toivo T.

    1994-01-01

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the field of film coating deposition techniques, and more particularly to the deposition of multicomponent metal oxide films by aerosol chemical vapor deposition. This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  3. Preparation and characterization of magnetizable aerosols.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Romy; Glöckl, Gunnar; Nagel, Stefan; Weitschies, Werner

    2012-04-11

    Magnetizable aerosols can be used for inhalative magnetic drug targeting in order to enhance the drug concentration at a certain target site within the lung. The aim of the present study was to clarify how a typical ferrofluid can be atomized in a reproducible way. The influence of the atomization principle, the concentration of magnetic nanoparticles within the carrier liquid and the addition of commonly used pharmaceutical excipients on the aerosol droplet size were investigated. Iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles were synthesized by alkaline precipitation of mixtures of iron(II)- and iron(III)-chloride and coated with citric acid. The resulting ferrofluid was characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. Two different nebulizers (Pari Boy and eFlow) with different atomization principles were used to generate ferrofluid aerosols. A range of substances that influence the surface tension, viscosity, density or vapor pressure of the ferrofluid were added to investigate their impact on the generated aerosol droplets. The particle size was determined by laser diffraction. A stable ferrofluid with a magnetic core diameter of 10.7 ± 0.45 nm and a hydrodynamic diameter of 124 nm was nebulized by Pari Boy and eFlow. The aerosol droplet size of Pari Boy was approximately 2.5 μm and remained unaffected by the addition of substances that changed the physical properties of the solvent. The droplet size of aerosols generated by eFlow was approximately 5 μm. It was significantly reduced by the addition of Cremophor RH 40, glycerol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone and ethanol. PMID:22306649

  4. Quantification of aerosol chemical composition using continuous single particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C.-H.; McGuire, M. L.; Godri, K. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-07-01

    Mass concentrations of sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) were determined from real time single particle data in the size range 0.1-3.0 μm measured by an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) at urban and rural sites in Canada. To quantify chemical species within individual particles measured by an ATOFMS, ion peak intensity of m/z -97 for sulphate, -62 for nitrate, +18 for ammonium, +43 for OC, and +36 for EC were scaled using the number and size distribution data by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). Hourly quantified chemical species from ATOFMS single-particle analysis were compared with collocated fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 μm, PM2.5) chemical composition measurements by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) at a rural site, a Gas-Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC) at an urban site, and a Sunset Lab field OCEC analyzer at both sites. The highest correlation was found for nitrate, with correlation coefficients (Pearson r) of 0.89 (ATOFMS vs. GPIC) and 0.85 (ATOFMS vs. AMS). ATOFMS mass calibration factors, determined for the urban site, were used to calculate mass concentrations of the major PM2.5 chemical components at the rural site near the US border in southern Ontario. Mass reconstruction using the ATOFMS mass calibration factors agreed very well with the PM2.5 mass concentrations measured by a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM, r = 0.86) at the urban site and a light scattering monitor (DustTrak, r = 0.87) at the rural site. In the urban area nitrate was the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass in the winter, while organics and sulphate contributed ~64 % of the summer PM2.5 in the rural area, suggesting a strong influence of regional/trans-boundary pollution. The mass concentrations of five major species in ten size-resolved particle-types and aerosol acidity of each particle-type were determined for the rural site. On a mass basis

  5. CURRENT AND EMERGING TECHNIQUES FOR CHARACTERIZING TROPOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particulate matter generally includes dust, smoke, soot, or aerosol particles. Environmental research addresses the origin, size, chemical composition, and the formation mechanics of aerosols. In the troposphere, fine aerosols (e.g. with diameters < 2.5 um) remain suspended until...

  6. Parameterization of Aerosol Sinks in Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The modelers point of view is that the aerosol problem is one of sources, evolution, and sinks. Relative to evolution and sink processes, enormous attention is given to the problem of aerosols sources, whether inventory based (e.g., fossil fuel emissions) or dynamic (e.g., dust, sea salt, biomass burning). On the other hand, aerosol losses in models are a major factor in controlling the aerosol distribution and lifetime. Here we shine some light on how aerosol sinks are treated in modern chemical transport models. We discuss the mechanisms of dry and wet loss processes and the parameterizations for those processes in a single model (GEOS-5). We survey the literature of other modeling studies. We additionally compare the budgets of aerosol losses in several of the ICAP models.

  7. The chemical evolution & physical properties of organic aerosol: A molecular structure based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiyi; Cao, Tingting; Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate, atmospheric chemistry, and air quality are affected by tropospheric particulate matter. Recent measurements suggest organic compounds present in this haze comprise roughly half of total aerosol fine mass concentration globally. Unlike the well-constrained processes which result in formation of nitrate or sulfate aerosol, the oxidation of volatile organics in the atmosphere can lead to thousands of stable compounds in the aerosol phase. Development of a tractable framework to consider the chemical and physical evolution of the organic aerosol is crucial for modeling its effect on global climate. Here we show coupling a 3-dimensional coordinate system defined by the molecular descriptors of molecular weight, heteroatom mass, and double bond equivalents (D.B.E.) with high-resolution molecular mass spectrometry is a powerful approach for describing key properties of the organic aerosol. The scheme is conceptually simple, yet maintains sufficient complexity to be compatible with quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPRs) used to predict chemical and physical properties that govern aerosol behavior. From available data, both ambient organic aerosol and laboratory generated organic aerosol frequently occupy the region characterized by <10 D.B.E. <600 M.W. and <200 heteroatom mass. A QSPR analysis conducted illustrates spatial trends within the 3D space for volatility and Henry's law constants for 31,000 organic compounds considered.

  8. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: chemical interactions of Primary Biological Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguillaume, L.; Leriche, M.; Amato, P.; Ariya, P. A.; Delort, A.-M.; Pöschl, U.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bauer, H.; Flossmann, A. I.; Morris, C. E.

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the influence of bioaerosols on atmospheric chemistry and vice versa through microbiological and chemical properties and processes. Several studies have shown that biological matter represents a significant fraction of air particulate matter and hence affects the microstructure and water uptake of aerosol particles. Moreover, airborne micro-organisms can transform chemical constituents of the atmosphere by metabolic activity. Recent studies have emphasized the viability of bacteria and metabolic degradation of organic substances in cloud water. On the other hand, the viability and metabolic activity of airborne micro-organisms depend strongly on physical and chemical atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure, radiation, pH value and nutrient concentrations. In spite of recent advances, however, our knowledge of the microbiological and chemical interactions of primary biological particles in the atmosphere is rather limited. Further targeted investigations combining laboratory experiments, field measurements, and modelling studies will be required to characterize the chemical feedbacks, microbiological activities at the air/snow/water interface supplied to the atmosphere.

  9. Characterization of aerosol composition and sources in the greater Atlanta area by aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, N. L.; Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Weber, R. J. J.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    An important and uncertain aspect of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is that it is often associated with anthropogenic pollution tracers. Prior studies in Atlanta suggested that 70-80% of the carbon in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) is modern, yet it is well-correlated with the anthropogenic CO. In this study, we deployed a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at multiple sites in different seasons (May 2012-February 2013) to characterize the sources and chemical composition of aerosols in the greater Atlanta area. This area in the SE US is ideal to investigate anthropogenic-biogenic interactions due to high natural and anthropogenic emissions. These extensive field studies are part of the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE). The HR-ToF-AMS is deployed at four sites (~ 3 weeks each) in rotation: Jefferson Street (urban), Yorkville (rural), roadside site (near Highway 75/85), and Georgia Tech site (campus), with the urban and rural sites being part of the SEARCH network. We obtained seven HR-ToF-AMS datasets in total. During the entire measurement period, the ACSM is stationary at the GIT site and samples continuously. We perform positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis on the HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data to deconvolve the OA into different components. While the diurnal cycle of the total OA is flat as what have been previously observed, the OA factors resolved by PMF analysis show distinctively different diurnal trends. We find that the "more-oxidized oxygenated OA" (MO-OOA) constitutes a major fraction of OA at all sites. In summer, OA is dominated by SOA, e.g., isoprene-OA and OOA with different degrees of oxidation. In contrary, biomass burning OA is more prominent in winter data. By comparing HR-ToF-AMS and ACSM data during the same sampling periods, we find that the aerosol time series are highly correlated, indicating the

  10. Chemical characterization of water-soluble organic carbon aerosols at a rural site in the Pearl River Delta, China, in the summer of 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Shiraiwa, M.; Takegawa, N.; Miyakawa, T.; Han, S.; Kita, K.; Hu, M.; Deng, Z. Q.; Zhao, Y.; Sugimoto, N.; Blake, D. R.; Weber, R. J.

    2009-07-01

    Online measurements of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) aerosols were made using a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) combined with a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer at a rural site in the Pearl River Delta region, China, in July 2006. A macroporous nonionic (DAX-8) resin was used to quantify hydrophilic and hydrophobic WSOC, which are defined as the fractions of WSOC that penetrated through and retained on the DAX-8 column, respectively. Laboratory calibrations showed that hydrophilic WSOC (WSOCHPI) included low-molecular aliphatic dicarboxylic acids and carbonyls, saccharides, and amines, while hydrophobic WSOC (WSOCHPO) included longer-chain aliphatic dicarboxylic acids and carbonyls, aromatic acids, phenols, organic nitrates, cyclic acids, and fulvic acids. On average, total WSOC (TWSOC) accounted for 60% of OC, and WSOCHPO accounted for 60% of TWSOC. Both WSOCHPI and WSOCHPO increased with photochemical aging determined from the NOx/NOy ratio. In particular, the average WSOCHPO mass was found to increase by a factor of five within a timescale of ˜10 hours, which was substantially larger than that of WSOCHPI (by a factor of 2-3). The total increase in OC mass with photochemical aging was associated with the large increase in WSOCHPO mass. These results, combined with the laboratory calibrations, suggest that significant amounts of hydrophobic organic compounds (likely containing large carbon numbers) were produced by photochemical processing. By contrast, water-insoluble OC (WIOC) mass did not exhibit significant changes with photochemical aging, suggesting that chemical transformation of WIOC to WSOC was not a dominant process for the production of WSOC during the study period.

  11. OMPS LP Characterization of Stratospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Xu, P.; Loughman, R. P.; Jaross, G. R.; DeLand, M. T.; Colarco, P. R.; Aquila, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Suomi NPP OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) collects limb scattered radiance data over a wide spectral range (290-1000 nm) and altitude range (0-80 km). Retrieval of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles from these measurements is complicated by the need to specify particle size distribution and composition, which may vary along a single orbit, as well as on time scales ranging from hours to months. We have developed a radiance-based product, called the Aerosol Scattering Index (ASI), that allows us to characterize many aspects of stratospheric aerosol behavior directly from LP measurements. ASI data clearly demonstrate seasonal changes in the Junge layer that vary with both altitude and latitude. The ASI data can identify volcanic plumes shortly after an eruption, and track the evolution of these plumes over weeks and months. The LP ASI product shows that polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), although located at 80-85 km during summer months, can affect LP observations and ozone retrievals down to much lower altitudes. Short-lived phenomena such as bolide plumes and rocket exhaust trails are also captured by this product, providing unique information about perturbations in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  12. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

  13. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 μg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. PMID:19879288

  14. A simple QuEChERS-like extraction approach for molecular chemical characterization of organic aerosols: application to nitrated and oxygenated PAH derivatives (NPAH and OPAH) quantified by GC-NICIMS.

    PubMed

    Albinet, A; Nalin, F; Tomaz, S; Beaumont, J; Lestremau, F

    2014-05-01

    An extraction procedure based on the Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) approach has been developed and used for analysis of particle-bound nitrated and oxygenated PAH derivatives (NPAH and OPAH, respectively). Several analytical conditions, for example GC injection temperature and MS detection settings, were optimized. This analytical procedure enabled simultaneous GC-NICIMS quantification of 32 NPAH and 32 OPAH (or other oxygenated compounds), including typical components of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by photooxidation of PAH (e.g. 2-formyl-trans-cinnamaldehyde and 6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one). The QuEChERS-like approach was optimized, including the nature of the extraction solvent, the sorbent used for clean-up, and extraction time. The final extraction procedure was based on brief mechanical agitation (vortex mixing for 1.5 min), with 7 mL acetonitrile as solvent. Because dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) did not provide satisfactory results, SPE using SiO2 was selected for sample purification. Identical results were obtained when the QuEChERS-like and traditional pressurised solvent extraction (PLE) procedures were compared for analysis of fortified ambient air particle samples. The procedure was validated by analysis of two aerosol standard reference materials (NIST SRM 1649b (urban dust) and SRM 2787 (fine particulate matter, <10 μm)). For numerous NPAH and OPAH, this is the first report of their quantification in both SRMs. Compared with other extraction methods, including PLE, the QuEChERS-like procedure resulted in increased productivity and reduced extraction cost. This paper shows that QuEChERS-like extraction procedures can be suitably adapted for molecular chemical characterization of aerosol samples and could be extended to other categories of compound. PMID:24705956

  15. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  16. Chemical distribution in high-solids paint overspray aerosols.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, J B; Chan, T L

    1990-03-01

    The chemical composition of high-solids basecoat paint overspray aerosols was determined as a function of particle size. Detailed information on the chemical composition of the overspray aerosols is important in health hazard evaluation since the composition and distribution within the airborne particles may differ significantly from the bulk paint material. This study was conducted in a typical down-draft paint booth equipped with air-atomized spray painting equipment. A fixed paint target was used to simulate typical overspray generation conditions and the aerosols were collected isokinetically with a seven-stage cascade impactor for size-fractionated analysis. The overspray aerosol from six paints consisted of organic paint binders with varying amounts of inorganic species as pigments or luster enhancers. These overspray aerosols had mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) ranging from 2.9 to 9.7 microns. The size-fractionated paint samples collected on the impaction stages were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry on a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXRS) to identify the metallic elements. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine the mass distribution of aluminum and iron as indicators of nonuniform distribution. Three of the aerosols containing aluminum were found to have bimodal distributions with most aluminum distributions having cumulative MMADs larger than the total aerosol. Iron in the aerosols was bimodal for three of the paints with all samples having an overall iron MMAD less than or equal to the overspray aerosol MMAD. Analysis using ultraviolet spectrometry revealed that the organic compounds present in the size-fractionated particulate samples consisted of a single, polydispersed mode with an MMAD similar to that of the total overspray aerosol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2327324

  17. Chemical distribution in high-solids paint overspray aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arcy, J.B.; Chan, T.L. )

    1990-03-01

    The chemical composition of high-solids basecoat paint overspray aerosols was determined as a function of particle size. Detailed information on the chemical composition of the overspray aerosols is important in health hazard evaluation since the composition and distribution within the airborne particles may differ significantly from the bulk paint material. This study was conducted in a typical down-draft paint booth equipped with air-atomized spray painting equipment. A fixed paint target was used to simulate typical overspray generation conditions and the aerosols were collected isokinetically with a seven-stage cascade impactor for size-fractionated analysis. The overspray aerosol from six paints consisted of organic paint binders with varying amounts of inorganic species as pigments or luster enhancers. These overspray aerosols had mass median aerodynamic diameters (MMAD) ranging from 2.9 to 9.7 microns. The size-fractionated paint samples collected on the impaction stages were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry on a scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDXRS) to identify the metallic elements. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine the mass distribution of aluminum and iron as indicators of nonuniform distribution. Three of the aerosols containing aluminum were found to have bimodal distributions with most aluminum distributions having cumulative MMADs larger than the total aerosol. Iron in the aerosols was bimodal for three of the paints with all samples having an overall iron MMAD less than or equal to the overspray aerosol MMAD. Analysis using ultraviolet spectrometry revealed that the organic compounds present in the size-fractionated particulate samples consisted of a single, polydispersed mode with an MMAD similar to that of the total overspray aerosol.

  18. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  19. Atmospheric aerosols: A literature summary of their physical characteristics and chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, F. S., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains a summary of 199 recent references on the characterization of atmospheric aerosols with respect to their composition, sources, size distribution, and time changes, and with particular reference to the chemical elements measured by modern techniques, especially activation analysis.

  20. Analysis of the chemical and physical properties of combustion aerosols: Properties overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol chemical composition is remarkably complex. Combustion aerosols can comprise tens of thousands of organic compounds and fragments, refractory carbon, metals, cations, anions, salts, and other inorganic phases and substituents [Hays et al., 2004]. Aerosol organic matter no...

  1. Chemical characterization of particle emissions from controlled burns of biomass fuels using a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Hosseini, S.; Jung, H.; Yokelson, B.; Weise, D.; Cocker, D., III; Huang, Y.

    2012-03-01

    A total of forty-nine burns were conducted at the Missoula Fire Sciences Lab consisting of nine fuel types; i.e., chamise scrub oak, ceanothus, maritime chaparral, coastal sage scrub, California sage brush, Manzanita, oak savanna, oak woodland and masticated mesquite. This paper focuses on the chemical characterization of fine particle emissions collected for flaming, mixed and smoldering phases using a HR ToF-AMS. The evolution of OM/OC, H/C, O/C and N/C from fire ignition to extinction was measured to capture the transient and integrated chemical composition of the non-refractory portion of bulk particles. Real time elemental ratios and empirical formulas derived with respect to modified combustion efficiency (MCE) are reported. For each fuel, the hydrogen fragment ions dominate the unit mass resolution (UMR) mass spectra with no specific fragment ions attributable to an individual ecological combination. An interference ion in the UMR m/z 73, a fragment normally attributed to levoglucosan, is noted. Therefore, the results imply that C2H4O2+ (m/z 60.021) plus C3H5O2+ (m/z 73.029) are more sufficient to estimate the contribution of levoglucosan. The results did not show significant variations of levoglucosan content in the organic particle with the overall average contribution fraction ranging from 0.74% for coastal sage to 1.93% for chamise.

  2. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-07-01

    Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. Intercomparison of two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21) indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the filter-adjusted continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Correlations of the ACSM NR-PM1 (non-refractory particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 1 μm) plus elemental carbon (EC) with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) PM2.5 and Federal Reference Method (FRM) PM1 mass are strong with r2 > 0.7 and r2 > 0.8, respectively. Discrepancies might be attributed to evaporative losses of semi-volatile species from the filter measurements used to adjust the collocated continuous measurements. This suggests that adjusting the ambient aerosol continuous measurements with results from filter analysis introduced additional bias to the measurements. We also recommend to calibrate the ambient aerosol monitoring instruments using aerosol standards rather than gas-phase standards. The fitting approach for ACSM relative ionization for sulfate was shown to improve the comparisons between ACSM and collocated measurements in the absence of calibrated values, suggesting the importance of adding sulfate calibration into the ACSM calibration routine.

  3. Diurnal Chemical Characterization of Aerosols at Downtown Mexico City During the Cold Dry Seasons of 2003 and 2005. Part II. Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, E.; Moya, M.; Grutter, M.

    2006-12-01

    The SCAPE2 aerosol equilibrium model was applied to measured concentrations of aerosols and precursor gases taken during the dry seasons of 2003 and 2005 in downtown Mexico City (Part I of this work). PM2.5 was collected in diurnal 4-h sampling periods (06:00 hrs-18:00 hrs). Two different methods, FTIR and denuder difference method (DDM), were used to measure gas-phase HNO3. Besides, FTIR recorded concentrations of other inorganic gas-phase species (NH3, HCl). Particulate nitrate and ammonium was overpredicted over all sampling periods. Using denuded-HNO3 measurements in simulations, PM2.5 nitrate and ammonium was predicted within 50-70% during the morning sampling periods. For afternoon sampling periods mean normalized errors slightly increased. By using FTIR HNO3 measurements model performance significantly decreases due to large uncertainties associated with interferences in the HNO3 atmospheric determination (Moya et al., 2003).

  4. Physico-chemical properties of aerosols in Sao Paulo, Brazil and mechanisms of secondary organic aerosol formation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Varanda Rizzo, Luciana; Luiza Godoy, Maria; Godoy, Jose Marcus

    2013-04-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an increasingly important role. Sao Paulo is a megacity with a population of about 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in Sao Paulo is bellow WMO standards for aerosol particles and ozone. Many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission characteristics, we are running a source apportionment study in Sao Paulo focused on the mechanisms of organic aerosol formation. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles). This study comprises four sampling sites with continuous measurements for one year, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, O3, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to measure in real time VOCs and aerosol composition, respectively. Trace elements were measured using XRF and OC/EC analysis was determined with a Sunset OC/EC instrument. A TSI Nephelometer with 3 wavelengths measure light scattering and a MAAP measure black carbon. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10,000 and 35,000 cm-3, mostly concentrated in the nucleation and Aitken modes, with a peak in size at 80

  5. A thermoluminescent method for aerosol characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A thermoluminescent method has been used to study the interactions of aerosols with ozone. The preliminary results show that ozone reacts with many compounds found in aerosols, and that the thermoluminescence curves obtained from ozonated aerosols are characteristic of the aerosol. The results suggest several important applications of the thermoluminescent method: development of a detector for identification of effluent sources; a sensitive experimental tool for study of heterogeneous chemistry; evaluation of importance of aerosols in atmospheric chemistry; and study of formation of toxic, electronically excited species in airborne particles.

  6. Characterization and quantification of aerosol chemical species present below and within cloud over an eastern Himalayan high altitude hill station in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arindam; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji

    2016-07-01

    There are two main processes through which aerosols and gases get scavenged by rain called below-cloud scavenging or "washout" and in-cloud scavenging or "rainout". The first process refers to the washout of the aerosols and gases present below the cloud during precipitation events by raindrops along their fall. The second process corresponds to the condensation of water vapor on aerosol particles during the formation of cloud droplets and incorporation of gases surrounding the droplets by aqueous-phase reactions. However, the most efficient pathway to remove the atmospheric pollutants is below cloud scavenging which is a major pointer of ecosystem, biogeochemical cycle as well as the climate change. A study has been conducted in 2014 and 2015 monsoon (June-September) in Darjeeling (27.01 ° N, 88.15 ° E), a high altitude (2200 m asl) hill station over eastern Himalaya in India. The study was focused on the below-cloud and in-cloud scavenging of various aerosol ionic species. Attempt was also made to estimate the contribution of in-cloud scavenging and below-cloud scavenging by collecting rain samples sequentially for different rain events. Sea-salt (Na+, sea-Mg2+, Cl- and sea-SO4 2-) and soil dust (non-sea Ca2+, non-sea-Mg2+) species show sharp decrease in concentration for each of the rain sample. This indicates that these species were mostly accumulated below the cloud and washed out during rain. Their concentrations were thus decreased sharply as rains progressed. On the other hand, non-SO4-2 and NH4+ showed different behavior. Their concentrations decreased sharply at the initial stage of the rain and then remained almost constant with rainfall. This explains wash out of these two species at the initial stage of the rain and their contribution from "within the cloud". NH4 + and non-sea-SO4 2- could thus act as cloud condensation nuclei over this part of Himalaya. A strong correlation between these two species indicates their association as (NH4)2SO4. Acidity

  7. Influence of aqueous chemistry on the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol in Fresno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwajin; Ge, Xinlei; Collier, Sonya; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Yele; Wang, Youliang; Herckes, Pierre; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    A measurement study was conducted in the Central Valley (Fresno) of California in January 2010, during which radiation fog events were frequently observed. Fog plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry by scavenging aerosol particles and trace gases and serving as a medium for various aqueous-phase reactions. Understanding the effects of fog on the microphysical and chemical processing of aerosol particles requires detailed information on their chemical composition. In this study, we characterized the chemical composition of fog water and interstitial aerosol particles to study the effects of fog processing on aerosol properties. Fog water samples were collected during the 2010 Fresno campaigns with a Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC) while interstitial submicron aerosols were characterized in real time with an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The fog water samples were later analyzed using the HR-ToF-AMS, ion chromatography, and a total carbon analyzer. The chemical composition and characteristics of interstitial particles during the fog events were compared to those of dissolved inorganic and organic matter in fog waters. Compared to interstitial aerosols, fog water is composed of a higher fraction of ammonium nitrate and oxygenated organics, due to aqueous formation of secondary aerosol species as well as enhanced gas-to-particle partitioning of water soluble species under water rich conditions. Sulfate is formed most efficiently in fog water although its contribution to total dissolved mass is relatively low. The HR-ToF-AMS mass spectra of organic matter in fog water (FOM) are very similar to that of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) derived from positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the HR-ToF-AMS spectra of ambient aerosol (r2 = 0.96), but FOM appears to contain a large fraction of acidic functional groups than OOA. FOM is also enriched of

  8. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM), especially fine particles (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 1 m, PM1), has been found to play an important role in global climate change, air quality, and human health. The continuous study of aerosol parameters is therefore imperative for better understanding the environmental effects of the atmospheric particles, as well as their sources, formation and transformation processes. The particle size distribution is particularly important, since this physical parameter determines the mass and number density, lifetime and atmospheric transport, or optical scattering behavior of the particles in the atmosphere (Jaenicke, 1998). Over the years several efforts have been made to improve the knowledge about the chemical composition of atmospheric particles as a function of size (Samara and Voutsa, 2005) and to characterize the relative contribution of different components to the fine particulate matter. It is well established that organic materials constitute a highly variable fraction of the atmospheric aerosol. This fraction is predominantly found in the fine size mode in concentrations ranging from 10 to 70% of the total dry fine particle mass (Middlebrook et al., 1998). Although organic compounds are major components of the fine particles, the composition, formation mechanism of organic aerosols are not well understood. This is because particulate organic matter is part of a complex atmospheric system with hundreds of different compounds, both natural and anthropogenic, covering a wide range of chemical properties. The aim of this study was to characterize the forest PM1, and investigate effects of air mass transport on the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition, estimate and provide insights into the sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols through analysis ^13C/12C isotopic ratio as a function of the aerosol particles size. The measurements were performed at the Rugšteliškis integrated

  9. Lake Spray Aerosol: A Chemical Signature from Individual Ambient Particles.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; May, Nathaniel W; Colón-Bernal, Isabel D; Pratt, Kerri A; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-09-20

    Aerosol production from wave breaking on freshwater lakes, including the Laurentian Great Lakes, is poorly understood in comparison to sea spray aerosol (SSA). Aerosols from freshwater have the potential to impact regional climate and public health. Herein, lake spray aerosol (LSA) is defined as aerosol generated from freshwater through bubble bursting, analogous to SSA from seawater. A chemical signature for LSA was determined from measurements of ambient particles collected on the southeastern shore of Lake Michigan during an event (July 6-8, 2015) with wave heights up to 3.1 m. For comparison, surface freshwater was collected, and LSA were generated in the laboratory. Single particle microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis of field and laboratory-generated samples show that LSA particles are primarily calcium (carbonate) with lower concentrations of other inorganic ions and organic material. Laboratory number size distributions show ultrafine and accumulation modes at 53 (±1) and 276 (±8) nm, respectively. This study provides the first chemical signature for LSA. LSA composition is shown to be coupled to Great Lakes water chemistry (Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+)) and distinct from SSA. Understanding LSA physicochemical properties will improve assessment of LSA impacts on regional air quality, climate, and health. PMID:27548099

  10. Lake Spray Aerosol: A Chemical Signature from Individual Ambient Particles.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; May, Nathaniel W; Colón-Bernal, Isabel D; Pratt, Kerri A; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-09-20

    Aerosol production from wave breaking on freshwater lakes, including the Laurentian Great Lakes, is poorly understood in comparison to sea spray aerosol (SSA). Aerosols from freshwater have the potential to impact regional climate and public health. Herein, lake spray aerosol (LSA) is defined as aerosol generated from freshwater through bubble bursting, analogous to SSA from seawater. A chemical signature for LSA was determined from measurements of ambient particles collected on the southeastern shore of Lake Michigan during an event (July 6-8, 2015) with wave heights up to 3.1 m. For comparison, surface freshwater was collected, and LSA were generated in the laboratory. Single particle microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis of field and laboratory-generated samples show that LSA particles are primarily calcium (carbonate) with lower concentrations of other inorganic ions and organic material. Laboratory number size distributions show ultrafine and accumulation modes at 53 (±1) and 276 (±8) nm, respectively. This study provides the first chemical signature for LSA. LSA composition is shown to be coupled to Great Lakes water chemistry (Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+)) and distinct from SSA. Understanding LSA physicochemical properties will improve assessment of LSA impacts on regional air quality, climate, and health.

  11. Detailed Aerosol Characterization using Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, Otto; di Noia, Antonio; Stap, Arjen; Rietjens, Jeroen; Smit, Martijn; van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are believed to cause the second most important anthropogenic forcing of climate change after greenhouse gases. In contrast to the climate effect of greenhouse gases, which is understood relatively well, the negative forcing (cooling effect) caused by aerosols represents the largest reported uncertainty in the most recent assessment of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. There is growing consensus in the aerosol remote sensing community that multi-angle measurements of intensity and polarization are essential to unambiguously determine all relevant aerosol properties. This presentations adresses the different aspects of polarimetric remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, including retrieval algorithm development, validation, and data needs for climate and air quality applications. During past years, at SRON-Netherlands Instite for Space Research retrieval algorithms have been developed that make full use of the capabilities of polarimetric measurements. We will show results of detailed aerosol properties from ground-based- (groundSPEX), airborne- (NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter), and satellite (POLDER) measurements. Also we will discuss observational needs for future instrumentation in order to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in climate change and air quality.

  12. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.; Turner, R.S.

    1994-07-01

    In many surgeries, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools may produce aerosolized blood and other biological material from bone and soft tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols when tissues are vaporized and condensed. Studies have been reported in the literature concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of these aerosols may contain infectious material. Garden et al. (1988) reported the presence of papilloma virus DNA in the fumes produced from laser surgery, but the infectivity of the aerosol was not assessed. Moon and Nininger (1989) measured the size distribution and production rate of emissions from laser surgery and found that particles were generally less than 0.5 {mu}m diameter. More recently there has been concern expressed over the production of aerosolized blood during surgical procedures that require power tools. In an in vitro study, the production of an aerosol containing the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was reported when power tools were used to cut tissues with blood infected with HIV. Another study measured the size distribution of blood aerosols produced by surgical power tools and found blood-containing particles in a number of size ranges. Health care workers are anxious and concerned about whether surgically produced aerosols are inspirable and can contain viable pathogens such as HIV. Other pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) are also of concern. The Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at the National Institute for Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures. This document reports details of the experimental and sampling approach, methods, analyses, and results on potential production of blood-associated aerosols from surgical procedures in the laboratory and in the hospital surgical suite.

  13. Effects of Chemical Aging on the Heterogeneous Freezing of Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, K.; Brooks, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosols are emitted into the atmosphere from a variety of sources and display a wide range of effectiveness in promoting the nucleation of ice in clouds. Soot and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) arise from incomplete combustion and other pollutant sources. Hydrocarbon compounds in diesel motor oil and other fuel blends include compounds such as octacosane (a straight saturated alkane), squalane (a branched saturated alkane) and squalene (an unsaturated branched alkene). At temperatures above -36°C, the formation of ice crystals in the atmosphere is facilitated by heterogeneous freezing processes in which atmospheric aerosols act as ice nuclei (IN). The variability in ability of organic particles to facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation causes major uncertainties in predictions of aerosol effects on climate. Further, atmospheric aerosol composition and ice nucleation ability can be altered via chemical aging and reactions with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone. In this study, we take a closer look at the role of chemical oxidation on the efficiency of specific IN during contact freezing laboratory experiments. The freezing temperatures of droplets in contact with representative organic aerosols are determined through the use of an optical microscope apparatus equipped with a cooling stage and a digital camera. Chemical changes at the surface of aerosols due to ozone exposure are characterized using Raman Microspectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy with Horizontal Attenuated Total Reflectance. Our results indicate that oxidation of certain atmospheric organics (soot and PAHS) enhances their ice nucleation ability. In this presentation, results of heterogeneous nucleation on various types of organic aerosols will be presented, and the role of structure in promoting freezing will be discussed.

  14. Aerosol chemical composition in cloud events by high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Liqing; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kortelainen, Aki; Jaatinen, Antti; Portin, Harri; Miettinen, Pasi; Komppula, Mika; Leskinen, Ari; Virtanen, Annele; Smith, James N; Sueper, Donna; Worsnop, Douglas R; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari

    2013-03-19

    This study presents results of direct observations of aerosol chemical composition in clouds. A high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was used to make measurements of cloud interstitial particles (INT) and mixed cloud interstitial and droplet residual particles (TOT). The differences between these two are the cloud droplet residuals (RES). Positive matrix factorization analysis of high-resolution mass spectral data sets and theoretical calculations were performed to yield distributions of chemical composition of the INT and RES particles. We observed that less oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA) were mainly distributed into the INT particles, whereas more oxidized low-volatile oxygenated OA (LVOOA) mainly in the RES particles. Nitrates existed as organic nitrate and in chemical form of NH(4)NO(3). Organic nitrates accounted for 45% of total nitrates in the INT particles, in clear contrast to 26% in the RES particles. Meanwhile, sulfates coexist in forms of acidic NH(4)HSO(4) and neutralized (NH(4))(2)SO(4). Acidic sulfate made up 64.8% of total sulfates in the INT particles, much higher than 10.7% in the RES particles. The results indicate a possible joint effect of activation ability of aerosol particles, cloud processing, and particle size effects on cloud formation.

  15. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. 1992 Annual summary

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1993-01-30

    This study is aimed at characterizing the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions. Changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol are measured with aerosols having different surface properties due to the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. The kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modeling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol is using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during, the course of the reaction. This dynamics information can be used to generate kinetic data for systems which are similar in nature to those studied, but are not amenable to laboratory investigation. We show here that increased MDSRS sensitivity is achieved by using an excitation laser source that has a narrow linewidth and we have been able to detect sulfate anion concentrations much lower than previously reported. We have shown that the linewidth of the MDSRS mode excited in a droplet is limited by the laser linewidth. This is a positive result for it eases our ability to quantify the MDSRS gain equation. This result also suggests that MDSRS signal size should be independent of droplet size, and preliminary experiments confirm this hypothesis.

  16. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1993-01-30

    This study is aimed at characterizing the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions. Changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol are measured with aerosols having different surface properties due to the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. The kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modeling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol is using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during, the course of the reaction. This dynamics information can be used to generate kinetic data for systems which are similar in nature to those studied, but are not amenable to laboratory investigation. We show here that increased MDSRS sensitivity is achieved by using an excitation laser source that has a narrow linewidth and we have been able to detect sulfate anion concentrations much lower than previously reported. We have shown that the linewidth of the MDSRS mode excited in a droplet is limited by the laser linewidth. This is a positive result for it eases our ability to quantify the MDSRS gain equation. This result also suggests that MDSRS signal size should be independent of droplet size, and preliminary experiments confirm this hypothesis.

  17. Sarychev Volcanic Aerosol and Chemical measurements over Eureka, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perro, C. W.; Duck, T. J.; Bitar, L.; Nott, G. J.; Lesins, G. B.; O'Neill, N. T.; Eloranta, E.; Strong, K.; Carn, S. A.; Lindenmaier, R.; Batchelor, R.; Saha, A.; Pike-Thackray, C.; Drummond, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    On July 01, 2009, lidar measurements from Eureka, Canada (80°N, 85°W) detected unusually high amounts of aerosol in the lower stratosphere which are believed to have originated from the Sarychev Eruption on the Kuril Islands in Russia (48°N,153°E). The suite of instruments that are part of the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC) have been used to measure the optical and chemical properties of the volcanic plume over Eureka. Lidar measurements show significant structure in the stratospheric aerosol that reaches altitudes of approximately 17 km. Initially there were several layers of aerosol in the lower stratosphere, which began to mix vertically so that by the end of August the aerosol was mixed into one homogeneous layer in the lower stratosphere. Lidar and sun photometer measurements are used to track the change in the integrated volume backscatter cross section from July 2009, with an initial peak value of 0.007 sr-1 until March 2010 when values have returned to background levels. Lidar measurements also show the plume descending over time. Satellite data from OMI and CALIPSO are used to track the SO2 and aerosols in the plume as it travels from the Kuril Islands to Eureka. Ground based measurements from a UV-VIS Spectrophotometer detected SO2 that correlated with OMI measurements over Eureka on July 01. A fourier transform spectrometer was used to monitor a number of chemical species in the UTLS region with HCL for example spiking during the same period. Effects of the stratospheric aerosols on the incoming short wave radiation during the summer months are also examined.

  18. Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water: 1. Isolation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions with a XAD-8 resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Amy P.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2006-03-01

    Group separation of the aqueous extract of fine particles bearing water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) provides unique insights into the sources of organic carbon (OC). XAD-8 resin coupled with a Total Organic Carbon analyzer allows for direct quantification. We term the fraction of WSOC not retained by a XAD-8 resin column at pH 2 as hydrophilic WSOC (WSOCxp); this includes saccharides, amines, and carbonyls and aliphatic monocarboxylic/dicarboxylic/oxocarboxylic acids with less than 4 or 5 carbons. The fraction of WSOC retained by XAD-8, termed the hydrophobic fraction (WSOCxr), include aromatic acids, phenols, organic nitrates, cyclic acids, and carbonyls and monocarboxylic/dicarboxylic acids with greater than 3 or 4 carbons. However, only aromatic compounds (or aromatic-like compounds with similar properties) can subsequently be extracted from XAD-8 with high efficiency. By coupling a Particle-into-Liquid Sampler with this technique, online measurements of WSOC, WSOCxp, and WSOCxr are possible. Urban measurements from St. Louis and Atlanta, on a carbon mass basis, show an increase in the mean WSOC fraction from winter (51%) to summer (61%), due to increases in the WSOCxp/OC from 0.25 to 0.35. During a summer Atlanta PM event, WSOC to OC was 0.75, driven largely by increases in the WSOCxp. The results are consistent with the view that in the summer, there are increased amounts of oxygenated polar compounds, possibly from secondary organic aerosol production, and that these compounds account for an even larger fraction of OC during stagnation events. A companion paper describes a method to further group speciate these XAD-8 isolated fractions.

  19. Real-Time Characterization of Aerosol Particle Composition above the Urban Canopy in Beijing: Insights into the Interactions between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Aerosol Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhenyi; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Gao, Zhiqiu; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-10-01

    Despite extensive efforts into the characterization of air pollution during the past decade, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition above the urban canopy in the megacity Beijing has never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous real-time measurements of aerosol composition at two different heights at the same location in urban Beijing from December 19, 2013 to January 2, 2014. The nonrefractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer at near-ground level and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor at 260 m on a 325 m meteorological tower in Beijing. Secondary aerosol showed similar temporal variations between ground level and 260 m, whereas much weaker correlations were found for the primary aerosol. The diurnal evolution of the ratios and correlations of aerosol species between 260 m and the ground level further illustrated a complex interaction between vertical mixing processes and local source emissions on aerosol chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer. As a result, the aerosol compositions at the two heights were substantially different. Organic aerosol (OA), mainly composed of primary OA (62%), at the ground level showed a higher contribution to NR-PM1 (65%) than at 260 m (54%), whereas a higher concentration and contribution (15%) of nitrate was observed at 260 m, probably due to the favorable gas-particle partitioning under lower temperature conditions. In addition, two different boundary layer structures were observed, each interacting differently with the evolution processes of aerosol chemistry.

  20. Real-Time Characterization of Aerosol Particle Composition above the Urban Canopy in Beijing: Insights into the Interactions between the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Aerosol Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yele; Du, Wei; Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Chen; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhenyi; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa; Gao, Zhiqiu; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-10-01

    Despite extensive efforts into the characterization of air pollution during the past decade, real-time characterization of aerosol particle composition above the urban canopy in the megacity Beijing has never been performed to date. Here we conducted the first simultaneous real-time measurements of aerosol composition at two different heights at the same location in urban Beijing from December 19, 2013 to January 2, 2014. The nonrefractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ by a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer at near-ground level and an aerosol chemical speciation monitor at 260 m on a 325 m meteorological tower in Beijing. Secondary aerosol showed similar temporal variations between ground level and 260 m, whereas much weaker correlations were found for the primary aerosol. The diurnal evolution of the ratios and correlations of aerosol species between 260 m and the ground level further illustrated a complex interaction between vertical mixing processes and local source emissions on aerosol chemistry in the atmospheric boundary layer. As a result, the aerosol compositions at the two heights were substantially different. Organic aerosol (OA), mainly composed of primary OA (62%), at the ground level showed a higher contribution to NR-PM1 (65%) than at 260 m (54%), whereas a higher concentration and contribution (15%) of nitrate was observed at 260 m, probably due to the favorable gas-particle partitioning under lower temperature conditions. In addition, two different boundary layer structures were observed, each interacting differently with the evolution processes of aerosol chemistry. PMID:26348650

  1. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  2. Molecular Characterization of Secondary Aerosol from Oxidation of Cyclic Methylsiloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Johnston, Murray V.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) have been identified as important gas-phase atmospheric contaminants, but knowledge of the molecular composition of secondary aerosol derived from cVMS oxidation is incomplete. Here, the chemical composition of secondary aerosol produced from the OH-initiated oxidation of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5, C10H30O5Si5) is characterized by high performance mass spectrometry. ESI-MS reveals a large number of monomeric (300 < m/z < 470) and dimeric (700 < m/z < 870) oxidation products. With the aid of high resolution and MS/MS, it is shown that oxidation leads mainly to the substitution of a CH3 group by OH or CH2OH, and that a single molecule can undergo many CH3 group substitutions. Dimers also exhibit OH and CH2OH substitutions and can be linked by O, CH2, and CH2CH2 groups. GC-MS confirms the ESI-MS results. Oxidation of D4 (C8H24O4Si4) exhibits similar substitutions and oligomerizations to D5, though the degree of oxidation is greater under the same conditions and there is direct evidence for the formation of peroxy groups (CH2OOH) in addition to OH and CH2OH.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Secondary Aerosol from Oxidation of Cyclic Methylsiloxanes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Johnston, Murray V

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) have been identified as important gas-phase atmospheric contaminants, but knowledge of the molecular composition of secondary aerosol derived from cVMS oxidation is incomplete. Here, the chemical composition of secondary aerosol produced from the OH-initiated oxidation of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5, C10H30O5Si5) is characterized by high performance mass spectrometry. ESI-MS reveals a large number of monomeric (300 < m/z < 470) and dimeric (700 < m/z < 870) oxidation products. With the aid of high resolution and MS/MS, it is shown that oxidation leads mainly to the substitution of a CH3 group by OH or CH2OH, and that a single molecule can undergo many CH3 group substitutions. Dimers also exhibit OH and CH2OH substitutions and can be linked by O, CH2, and CH2CH2 groups. GC-MS confirms the ESI-MS results. Oxidation of D4 (C8H24O4Si4) exhibits similar substitutions and oligomerizations to D5, though the degree of oxidation is greater under the same conditions and there is direct evidence for the formation of peroxy groups (CH2OOH) in addition to OH and CH2OH. PMID:26729452

  4. Assessment of microphysical and chemical factors of aerosols over seas of the Russian Artic Eastern Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, Liudmila; Polkin, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The newly observed kickoff of the Northern Route development drew serious attention to state of the Arctic Resource environment. Occurring climatic and environmental changes are more sensitively seen in polar areas in particular. Air environment control allows for making prognostic assessments which are required for planning hazardous environmental impacts preventive actions. In August - September 2013, RV «Professor Khlustin» Northern Sea Route expeditionary voyage took place. En-route aerosol sampling was done over the surface of the Beringov, Chukotka and Eastern-Siberia seas (till the town of Pevek). The purpose of sampling was to assess spatio-temporal variability of optic, microphysical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles of the surface layer within different areas adjacent to the Northern Sea Route. Aerosol test made use of automated mobile unit consisting of photoelectric particles counter AZ-10, aetalometr MDA-02, aspirator on NBM-1.2 pump chassis, and the impactor. This set of equipment allows for doing measurements of number concentration, dispersed composition of aerosols within sizes d=0.3-10 mkm, mass concentration of submicron sized aerosol, and filter-conveyed aerosols sampling. Filter-conveyed aerosols sampling was done using method accepted by EMEP and EANET monitoring networks. The impactor channel was upgraded to separate particles bigger than 1 mkm in size, and the fine grain fraction settled down on it. Reverse 5-day and 10-day trajectories of air mass transfer executed at heights of 10, 1500 and 3500 m were analyzed. The heights were selected by considerations that 3000 m is the height which characterizes air mass trend in the lower troposphere. 1500 m is the upper border of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the sampling was done in the Earth's surface layer at less than 10 m. Minimum values of the bespoken microphysical characteristics are better characteristic of higher latitudes where there are no man induced sources of

  5. Chemical and Aerosol Signatures of Biomass Burning via Long Range Transport observed at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; Obrist, D.; McCubbin, I. B.; Fain, X.; Rahn, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the Steamboat Springs Ski Resort in Colorado at an elevation 3.2 km. During the spring of 2008, two field projects were conducted at SPL; Storm Peak Cloud and Aerosol Characterization (SPACC) and a State of Colorado Mercury Monitoring project. Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), along with CO, ozone and aerosol concentrations and aerosol size distributions will be presented from April 28 to July 1st 2008. This work focuses on specific case studies pertaining to long range transport events. Specifically, high levels of GEM and CO will be presented from May 15, 2008. This data will be coupled with HYSPLIT backtrajectories, chemical modeling via MOZART, and satellite imagery (MODIS) to present evidence that Siberian wildfires impacted the air quality at Storm Peak Laboratory.

  6. A new method for assessing the aerosol to rain chemical composition relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourcier, L.; Masson, O.; Laj, P.; Chausse, P.; Pichon, J. M.; Paulat, P.; Bertrand, G.; Sellegri, K.

    2012-11-01

    Measurements were conducted at three sampling sites located at different altitudes in the centre of France during two years, both in the rain and aerosol phases. The rain was sampled at a boundary layer site while the aerosol particles were collected at two different altitudes, which allow a better characterization of the vertical atmospheric column being washed out. Various chemical analyses were performed to characterize reactive (NO3-, SO42-, NH4+ and K+) and inert (7Be, 210Pb and 137Cs) species transfer from the aerosol to the rain phase. This set-up was ideal to calculate the washout ratio (WR) using different concentrations of the aerosol phase. Using the classical WR calculated with the aerosol concentration sampled at the same altitude than the rain collectors, we observed a seasonality of WR, with higher value in winter and lower value in summer for radionuclides. At the higher altitude site, local contaminations do not influence the aerosol concentration, which then should be representative of the whole atmospheric column. The annual variability is high at this site maybe because aerosol concentrations can be less concentrated than the whole atmospheric column when this later one is not well mixed. In order to increase the reliability of the WR, we propose a new method for calculating washout ratio from measurements at the rain collector level. This new calculation takes into account the height of the boundary layer, we observed that it decreased the variability of the washout ratio (for 7Be, 210Pb and NO3-), with less dependence to the season.

  7. Intercomparison and closure calculations using measurements of aerosol species and optical properties during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.; Carrico, Christian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Carrillo, Jacqueline; Schichtel, Bret

    2005-07-01

    Physical and optical properties of inorganic aerosols have been extensively studied, but less is known about carbonaceous aerosols, especially as they relate to the non-urban settings such as our nation's national parks and wilderness areas. Therefore an aerosol characterization study was conceived and implemented at one national park that is highly impacted by carbonaceous aerosols, Yosemite. The primary objective of the study was to characterize the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a carbon-dominated aerosol, including the ratio of total organic matter weight to organic carbon, organic mass scattering efficiencies, and the hygroscopic characteristics of a carbon-laden ambient aerosol, while a secondary objective was to evaluate a variety of semi-continuous monitoring systems. Inorganic ions were characterized using 24-hour samples that were collected using the URG and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) monitoring systems, the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) cascade impactor, as well as the semi-continuous particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) technology. Likewise, carbonaceous material was collected over 24-hour periods using IMPROVE technology along with the thermal optical reflectance (TOR) analysis, while semi-continuous total carbon concentrations were measured using the Rupprecht and Patashnick (R&P) instrument. Dry aerosol number size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and optical particle counter, scattering coefficients at near-ambient conditions were measured with nephelometers fitted with PM10 and PM2.5 inlets, and "dry" PM2.5 scattering was measured after passing ambient air through Perma Pure Nafion® dryers. In general, the 24-hour "bulk" measurements of various aerosol species compared more favorably with each other than with the semi-continuous data. Semi-continuous sulfate measurements correlated well with the 24-hour measurements, but were biased low by

  8. Aerosol-halogen interaction: Change of physico-chemical properties of SOA by naturally released halogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Balzer, N.; Buxmann, J.; Grothe, H.; Krüger, H.; Platt, U.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or salt pans and salt lakes. These heterogeneous release mechanisms have been overlooked so far, although their potential of interaction with organic aerosols like Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA), Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) or Atmospheric Humic LIke Substances (HULIS) is completely unknown. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organo-halogen compounds or halogenated organic particles in the atmospheric boundary layer. To study the interaction of organic aerosols with reactive halogen species (RHS), SOA was produced from α-pinene, catechol and guaiacol using an aerosol smog-chamber. The model SOAs were characterized in detail using a variety of physico-chemical methods (Ofner et al., 2011). Those aerosols were exposed to molecular halogens in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to halogens, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans, in order to study the complex aerosol-halogen interaction. The heterogeneous reaction of RHS with those model aerosols leads to different gaseous species like CO2, CO and small reactive/toxic molecules like phosgene (COCl2). Hydrogen containing groups on the aerosol particles are destroyed to form HCl or HBr, and a significant formation of C-Br bonds could be verified in the particle phase. Carbonyl containing functional groups of the aerosol are strongly affected by the halogenation process. While changes of functional groups and gaseous species were visible using FTIR spectroscopy, optical properties were studied using Diffuse Reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. Overall, the optical properties of the processed organic aerosols are significantly changed. While chlorine causes a "bleaching" of the aerosol particles, bromine shifts the maximum of UV/VIS absorption to the red end of the UV/VIS spectrum. Further physico-chemical changes were recognized according to the aerosol size-distributions or the

  9. Quantification of aerosol chemical composition using continuous single particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, C.-H.; McGuire, M. L.; Godri, K. J.; Slowik, J. G.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mass concentrations of particulate matter (PM) chemical components were determined from data for 0.3 to 3.0 μm particles measured by an Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) data at an urban and rural site. Hourly-averaged concentrations of nitrate, sulphate, ammonium, organic carbon, and elemental carbon, estimated based on scaled ATOFMS peak intensities of corresponding ion marker species, were compared with collocated chemical composition measurements by an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), a Gas-Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC), and a Sunset Lab field OCEC analyzer. The highest correlation was found for nitrate, with correlation coefficients (Pearson r) of 0.89 and 0.85 at the urban and rural sites, respectively. ATOFMS mass calibration factors, determined for the urban site, were used to calculate mass concentrations of the major PM chemical components at the rural site. Mass reconstruction using this ATOFMS based composition data agreed very well with the total PM mass measured at the rural site. Size distributions of the ten main types of particles were resolved for the rural site and the mass composition of each particle type was determined in terms of sulphate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon and elemental carbon. This is the first study to estimate hourly mass concentrations of individual aerosol components and the mass composition of individual particle-types based on ATOFMS single particle measurements.

  10. Chemical and physicochemial properties of submicron aerosol agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.; Ehrman, S.; Friedlander, S.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The formation of nanometer-sized aerosol particles in a premixed methane flame from both solid-phase aerosol precursors and gas-phase precursors was investigated. Techniques were developed to determine the distribution of the individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size by using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). To determine the distribution of chemical species both from particle to particle and within the particles on a nanometer scale, we used the analytical electron microscopy techniques of energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS) coupled with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The observed distribution of individual chemical species as a function of agglomerate size was linked to the material properties of the solid-phase precursors. For aerosol formed from gas-phase precursors by gas-to-particle conversion, the distribution of species on a manometer scale was found to correspond to the equilibrium phase distribution expected from equilibrium for the system at the flame temperatures.

  11. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  12. Apparatus and method for the characterization of respirable aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Douglas K.; Hodges, Bradley W.; Bush, Jesse D.; Mishima, Jofu

    2016-05-31

    An apparatus for the characterization of respirable aerosols, including: a burn chamber configured to selectively contain a sample that is selectively heated to generate an aerosol; a heating assembly disposed within the burn chamber adjacent to the sample; and a sampling segment coupled to the burn chamber and configured to collect the aerosol such that it may be analyzed. The apparatus also includes an optional sight window disposed in a wall of the burn chamber such that the sample may be viewed during heating. Optionally, the sample includes one of a Lanthanide, an Actinide, and a Transition metal.

  13. Characterization of aerosols above the Northern Adriatic Sea: Case studies of offshore and onshore wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazzola, J.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Canepa, E.; Tedeschi, G.; Prati, P.; Zarmpas, P.; Bastianini, M.; Missamou, T.; Cavaleri, L.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol particles in coastal areas result from a complex mixing between sea spray aerosols locally generated at the sea surface by the wind-waves interaction processes and a continental component resulting from natural and/or anthropogenic sources. This paper presents a physical and chemical analysis of the aerosol data acquired from May to September 2014 in the Adriatic Sea. Aerosol distributions were measured on the Acqua Alta platform located 15 km off the coast of Venice using two Particle Measuring System probes and a chemical characterization was made using an Ion Chromatography analysis (IC). Our aim is to study both the sea-spray contribution and the anthropogenic influence in the coastal aerosol of this Mediterranean region. To this end, we focus on a comparison between the present data and the aerosol size distributions measured south of the French Mediterranean coast. For air masses of marine origin transported by southern winds on the French coast and by the Sirocco in the Adriatic, we note a good agreement between the concentrations of super-micrometer aerosols measured in the two locations. This indicates a similar sea surface production of sea-spray aerosols formed by bubble bursting processes in the two locations. In contrast, the results show larger concentrations of submicron particles in the North-Western Mediterranean compared to the Adriatic, which result probably from a larger anthropogenic background for marine conditions. In contrast, for a coastal influence, the chemical analysis presented in the present paper seems to indicate a larger importance of the anthropogenic impact in the Northern Adriatic compared to the North-Western Mediterranean.

  14. Ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometric characterization of organic aerosol from European and Chinese cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Huang, Ru-Jin; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol constitutes a substantial fraction (20-90%) of submicrometer aerosol mass, playing an important role in air quality and human health. Over the past few years, ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (UHRMS) has been applied to elucidate the chemical composition of ambient aerosols. However, most of the UHRMS studies used direct infusion without prior separation by liquid chromatography, which may cause the loss of individual compound information and interference problems. In the present study, urban ambient aerosol with particle diameter < 2.5 μm was collected in Mainz, Germany and Beijing, China, respectively. Two pretreatment procedures were applied to extract the organic compounds from the filter samples: One method uses a mixture of acetonitrile and water, the other uses pure water and prepared for the extraction of humic-like substances. The extracts were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with an Orbitrap mass spectrometer in both negative and the positive modes. The effects of pretreatment procedures on the characterization of organic aerosol and the city-wise difference in chemical composition of organic aerosol will be discussed in detail.

  15. Characterization of Organic Nitrogen in the Atmosphere Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts on characterizing organic nitrogen (ON) compounds in atmospheric aerosols and aqueous droplets, knowledge of ON chemistry is still limited, mainly due to its chemical complexity and lack of highly time-resolved measurements. This work is aimed at optimizing the method of using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) to characterize ON compounds in atmospheric aerosols. Seventy-five pure nitrogen-containing organic compounds covering a variety of functional groups were analyzed with the HR-AMS. Our results show that ON compounds commonly produce NHx+, NOx+, which are usually attributed to inorganic N species such as ammonium and nitrate, and CH2N+ at m/z = 28, which is rarely quantified in ambient aerosol due to large interference from N2+ in the air signal. As a result, using the nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) calibration factor proposed by Aiken et al. (2008) on average leads to ~ 20% underestimation of N/C in ambient organic aerosol. A new calibration factor of 0.79 is proposed for determining the average N/C in organics. The relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) of different ON species, on average, are found to be consistent with the default RIE value (1.4) for the total organics. The AMS mass spectral features of various types of ON species (amines, amides, amino acids, etc.) are examined and used for characterizing ON composition in ambient aerosols. Our results indicate that submicron organic aerosol measured during wintertime in Fresno, CA contains significant amounts of amino-compounds whereas more diversified ON species, including N-containing aromatic heterocycle (e.g., imidazoles), are observed in fog waters collected simultaneously. Our findings have important implications for understanding atmospheric ON behaviors via the widespread HR-AMS measurements of ambient aerosols and droplets.

  16. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilde, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-04-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterized by a less dense urbanization. We present here the results obtained in San Pietro Capofiume, which is located in a sparsely inhabited sector of the Po Valley, Italy. The experiment was carried out in summer 2009 in the framework of the EUCAARI project ("European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud Climate Aerosol Interaction"). For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art techniques were used in parallel: (1) on-line TSI aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), (2) on-line Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS), (3) soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), (4) on-line high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer-thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (HR-ToFMS-TAG), (5) off-line twelve-hour resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy, and (6) chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) for the analysis of gas-phase precursors of secondary aerosol. Data from each aerosol spectroscopic method were analysed individually following ad-hoc tools (i.e. PMF for AMS, Art-2a for ATOFMS). The results obtained from each techniques are herein presented and compared. This allows us to clearly link the modifications in aerosol chemical composition to transitions in air mass origin and meteorological regimes. Under stagnant conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC

  17. Uncertainties of simulated aerosol optical properties induced by assumptions on aerosol physical and chemical properties: an AQMEII-2 perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The calculation of aerosol optical properties from aerosol mass is a process subject to uncertainty related to necessary assumptions on the treatment of the chemical species mixing state, density, refractive index, and hygroscopic growth. In the framework of the AQMEII-2 model in...

  18. Complete chemical analysis of aerosol particles in real-time

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Mo; Reilly, P.T.A.; Gieray, R.A.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Real-time mass spectrometry of individual aerosol particles using an ion trap mass spectrometer is described. The microparticles are sampled directly from the air by a particle inlet system into the vacuum chamber. An incoming particle is detected as it passes through two CW laser beams and a pulsed laser is triggered to intercept the particle for laser ablation ionization at the center of the ion trap. The produced ions are analyzed by the ion trap mass spectrometer. Ions of interest are selected and dissociated through collision with buffer gas atoms for further fragmentation analysis. Real-time chemical analyses of inorganic, organic, and bacterial aerosol articles have been demonstrated. It has been confirmed that the velocity and the size of the incoming particles highly correlate to each other. The performance of the inlet system, particle detection, and preliminary results are discussed.

  19. Characterization of aerosols produced by surgical procedures: A summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Muggenburg, B.A.; Lundgren, D.L.; Turner, R.S.; Guilmette, R.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Jones, R.K.

    1994-11-01

    In many types of surgery, especially orthopedic procedures, power tools such as saws and drills are used. These tools can impart considerable energy in disrupting tissue and may produce aerosolized blood and material from bone and other tissues. Surgical lasers and electrocautery tools can also produce aerosols due to vaporization of blood and tissues. A number of studies have been reported concerning production of aerosols during surgery, and some of the aerosols produced may contain infectious materials. Health care workers have expressed concern and questions pertaining to the occupational transmission of blood-borne pathogens including the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) via blood aerosols during surgery. Little or no data existed characterizing the aerosols produced performing surgical procedures. Because of this lack of data, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health funded a project at ITRI to assess the extent of aerosolization of blood and other tissues during surgical procedures in the laboratory and in a hospital surgical suite.

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Measurements of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in Smog Chamber Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, P. L.; Hunter, J. F.; Daumit, K. E.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Cross, E. S.; Canagaratna, M.; Jayne, J.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal vaporization-electron impact ionization (TV-EI) mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for understanding the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and atmospheric aging. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and recently developed Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are two instruments that utilize the same TV-EI technique. The ACSM trades the particle sizing capability, sensitivity, speed, and resolution of the AMS for simplicity, affordability, and ease of operation - enabling stand-alone continuous sampling for extended periods of time. Here we present results of an intercomparison between a high-resolution AMS and an ACSM. Three well-studied SOA formation chamber experiments were conducted: isoprene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, m-xylene photooxidation under high NOx conditions, and α-pinene ozonolysis under low NOx conditions. Comparisons between time-series and mass spectra from these experiments, along with positive matrix factorization analysis results demonstrate that the ACSM, while it does not provide the same level of detail as an AMS, is a suitable tool for exploring the chemistry of SOA formation in chamber studies.

  1. Characterizing the formation of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa; Black, Douglas; Brown, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    Organic aerosol is an important fraction of the fine particulate matter present in the atmosphere. This organic aerosol comes from a variety of sources; primary organic aerosol emitted directly from combustion process, and secondary aerosol formed in the atmosphere from condensable vapors. This secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can result from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In rural areas of the United States, organic aerosols can be a significant part of the aerosol load in the atmosphere. However, the extent to which gas-phase biogenic emissions contribute to this organic load is poorly understood. Such an understanding is crucial to properly apportion the effect of anthropogenic emissions in these rural areas that are sometimes dominated by biogenic sources. To help gain insight on the effect of biogenic emissions on particle concentrations in rural areas, we have been conducting a field measurement program at the University of California Blodgett Forest Research Facility. The field location includes has been used to acquire an extensive suite of measurements resulting in a rich data set, containing a combination of aerosol, organic, and nitrogenous species concentration and meteorological data with a long time record. The field location was established in 1997 by Allen Goldstein, a professor in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at the University of California at Berkeley to study interactions between the biosphere and the atmosphere. The Goldstein group focuses on measurements of concentrations and whole ecosystem biosphere-atmosphere fluxes for volatile organic compounds (VOC's), oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOC's), ozone, carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy. Another important collaborator at the Blodgett field location is Ronald Cohen, a professor in the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley. At the Blodgett field location, his group his group performs measurements of the

  2. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure.

    PubMed

    Lioy, P J; Waldman, J M

    1989-02-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidic aerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO4(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m3/hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m3/hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H2SO4 and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes.

  3. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, P J; Waldman, J M

    1989-01-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidic aerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO4(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m3/hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m3 (as H2SO4) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m3/hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H2SO4 and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. PMID:2651103

  4. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  5. Characterizing Aerosolized Particulate As Part Of A Nanoprocess Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jankovic, John Timothy; Ogle, Burton R; Zontek, Tracy L; Hollenbeck, Scott M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this effort was to propose important aerosol characterization parameters that should be gathered as part of a nanomaterial hazard assessment and to offer a methodology for applying that data to daily operations. This study documents different ways of characterizing nanoscale materials using an aerosol from a process simulation consisting of a vacuum cleaner motor operating inside an enclosure. The aerosol is composed of insoluble carbon particles plus environmental background constituents. The average air concentration is 2.76E+5 p/cm3. Size measurements of the aerosol indicate > 70% of the particulate is blade-like in shape, 50% of which have a height dimension 100 nm. In terms of an equivalent spherical diameter 0.8% of the particulate is 100 nm in size. The carbon blades are characterized as having a root-mean-square roughness of 75 nm, and average fractal dimension of 2.25. These measures: aerosol chemistry, solubility, shape and size, surface area, number concentration and size distribution are important parameters to collect for current exposure assessment and toxicology and epidemiology studies.

  6. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  7. Modeling regional secondary organic aerosol using the Master Chemical Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyi; Cleveland, Meredith; Ziemba, Luke D.; Griffin, Robert J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Pankow, James F.; Ying, Qi

    2015-02-01

    A modified near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.2) with 5727 species and 16,930 reactions and an equilibrium partitioning module was incorporated into the Community Air Quality Model (CMAQ) to predict the regional concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the eastern United States (US). In addition to the semi-volatile SOA from equilibrium partitioning, reactive surface uptake processes were used to simulate SOA formation due to isoprene epoxydiol, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. The CMAQ-MCM-SOA model was applied to simulate SOA formation during a two-week episode from August 28 to September 7, 2006. The southeastern US has the highest SOA, with a maximum episode-averaged concentration of ∼12 μg m-3. Primary organic aerosol (POA) and SOA concentrations predicted by CMAQ-MCM-SOA agree well with AMS-derived hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) urban concentrations at the Moody Tower at the University of Houston. Predicted molecular properties of SOA (O/C, H/C, N/C and OM/OC ratios) at the site are similar to those reported in other urban areas, and O/C values agree with measured O/C at the same site. Isoprene epoxydiol is predicted to be the largest contributor to total SOA concentration in the southeast US, followed by methylglyoxal and glyoxal. The semi-volatile SOA components are dominated by products from β-caryophyllene oxidation, but the major species and their concentrations are sensitive to errors in saturation vapor pressure estimation. A uniform decrease of saturation vapor pressure by a factor of 100 for all condensable compounds can lead to a 150% increase in total SOA. A sensitivity simulation with UNIFAC-calculated activity coefficients (ignoring phase separation and water molecule partitioning into the organic phase) led to a 10% change in the predicted semi-volatile SOA concentrations.

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties and Chemical Composition Measured on the Ronald H. Brown During ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Miller, T. L.; Coffman, D.

    2001-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties were made onboard the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown during the ACE-Asia Intensive Field Program to characterize Asian aerosol as it was transported across the Pacific Ocean. The ship traveled across the Pacific from Hawaii to Japan and into the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan. Trajectories indicate that remote marine air masses were sampled on the transit to Japan. In the ACE-Asia study region air masses from Japan, China, Mongolia, and the Korea Peninsula were sampled. A variety of aerosol types were encountered including those of marine, volcanic, crustal, and industrial origin. Presented here, for the different air masses encountered, are aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom Exponent, and aerosol optical depth) and chemical composition (major ions, total organic and black carbon, and trace elements). Scattering by submicron aerosol (55 % RH and 550 nm) was less than 20 1/Mm during the transit from Hawaii to Japan. In continental air masses, values ranged from 60 to 320 1/Mm with the highest submicron scattering coefficients occurring during prefrontal conditions with a low marine boundary layer height and trajectories from Japan. For the continental air masses, the ratio of scattering by submicron to sub-10 micron aerosol during polluted conditions averaged 0.8 and during a dust event 0.41. Aerosol optical depth (500 nm) ranged from 0.08 during the Pacific transit to 1.3 in the prefrontal conditions described above. Optical depths during dust events ranged from 0.2 to 0.6. Submicron non-sea salt (nss) sulfate concentrations ranged from 0.5 ug/m-3 during the Pacific transit to near 30 ug/m-3 during the prefrontal conditions described above. Black carbon to total carbon mass ratios in air masses from Asia averaged 0.18 with highest values (0.32) corresponding to trajectories crossing the Yangtze River valley.

  9. Characterization of selenium in ambient aerosols and primary emission sources.

    PubMed

    De Santiago, Arlette; Longo, Amelia F; Ingall, Ellery D; Diaz, Julia M; King, Laura E; Lai, Barry; Weber, Rodney J; Russell, Armistead G; Oakes, Michelle

    2014-08-19

    Atmospheric selenium (Se) in aerosols was investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy. These techniques were used to determine the oxidation state and elemental associations of Se in common primary emission sources and ambient aerosols collected from the greater Atlanta area. In the majority of ambient aerosol and primary emission source samples, the spectroscopic patterns as well as the absence of elemental correlations suggest Se is in an elemental, organic, or oxide form. XRF microscopy revealed numerous Se-rich particles, or hotspots, accounting on average for ∼16% of the total Se in ambient aerosols. Hotspots contained primarily Se(0)/Se(-II). However, larger, bulk spectroscopic characterizations revealed Se(IV) as the dominant oxidation state in ambient aerosol, followed by Se(0)/Se(-II) and Se(VI). Se(IV) was the only observed oxidation state in gasoline, diesel, and coal fly ash, while biomass burning contained a combination of Se(0)/Se(-II) and Se(IV). Although the majority of Se in aerosols was in the most toxic form, the Se concentration is well below the California Environmental Protection Agency chronic exposure limit (∼20000 ng/m(3)). PMID:25075640

  10. Generation and Characterization of Indoor Fungal Aerosols for Inhalation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Søren T.; Koponen, Ismo K.; Kling, Kirsten I.; Barooni, Afnan; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Tendal, Kira; Wolkoff, Peder

    2016-01-01

    In the indoor environment, people are exposed to several fungal species. Evident dampness is associated with increased respiratory symptoms. To examine the immune responses associated with fungal exposure, mice are often exposed to a single species grown on an agar medium. The aim of this study was to develop an inhalation exposure system to be able to examine responses in mice exposed to mixed fungal species aerosolized from fungus-infested building materials. Indoor airborne fungi were sampled and cultivated on gypsum boards. Aerosols were characterized and compared with aerosols in homes. Aerosols containing 107 CFU of fungi/m3 air were generated repeatedly from fungus-infested gypsum boards in a mouse exposure chamber. Aerosols contained Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus ustus, Aspergillus versicolor, Chaetomium globosum, Cladosporium herbarum, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium camemberti, Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium commune, Penicillium glabrum, Penicillium olsonii, Penicillium rugulosum, Stachybotrys chartarum, and Wallemia sebi. They were all among the most abundant airborne species identified in 28 homes. Nine species from gypsum boards and 11 species in the homes are associated with water damage. Most fungi were present as single spores, but chains and clusters of different species and fragments were also present. The variation in exposure level during the 60 min of aerosol generation was similar to the variation measured in homes. Through aerosolization of fungi from the indoor environment, cultured on gypsum boards, it was possible to generate realistic aerosols in terms of species composition, concentration, and particle sizes. The inhalation-exposure system can be used to study responses to indoor fungi associated with water damage and the importance of fungal species composition. PMID:26921421

  11. The Hohenpeissenberg aerosol characterization experiment (HAZE2002): Aerosol composition derived from mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Berresheim, H.; Borrmann, S.; Poeschl, U.; Roempp, A.; Schneider, J.

    2003-04-01

    The HAZE Experiment was conducted between 17.05.2002 and 31.05.2002, at the meteorological observatory of the Deutsche Wetterdienst (DWD) at Hohenpeissenberg (47^o48'N,11^o02'E, 985m). The objective was to make essential progress in understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the atmospheric aerosol, in particular relating to the Gas-To-Particle-Conversion and the interaction with meteorological processes. The measurements included online mass spectrometric analysis using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), filter samples with GC analyses of organic compounds, particle size distribution (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), SMPS, OPC), as well as the total particle concentration (CPC). Additionally, several gas-phase substances were measured (e.g. Benzene, Acetone). The measurements obtained with the AMS show a strong variability of the aerosol composition. The non-refractory aerosol composition was dominated by nitrate, sulphate, and organics, whereas ammonium was surprisingly low. High number concentration of up to 14000 particles/cm^3 were observed. These particles mostly had diameters between 200 nm and 400 nm and were mainly composed of ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate. Various meteorological conditions allowed to study their influence on the aerosol. For example, on rainy days the concentrations of ammonium sulphate particles decreased, whereas the concentrations of ammonium nitrate particles increased.

  12. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    PubMed

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides.

  13. Chemical characterization of element 112.

    PubMed

    Eichler, R; Aksenov, N V; Belozerov, A V; Bozhikov, G A; Chepigin, V I; Dmitriev, S N; Dressler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Gorshkov, V A; Haenssler, F; Itkis, M G; Laube, A; Lebedev, V Ya; Malyshev, O N; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Petrushkin, O V; Piguet, D; Rasmussen, P; Shishkin, S V; Shutov, A V; Svirikhin, A I; Tereshatov, E E; Vostokin, G K; Wegrzecki, M; Yeremin, A V

    2007-05-01

    The heaviest elements to have been chemically characterized are seaborgium (element 106), bohrium (element 107) and hassium (element 108). All three behave according to their respective positions in groups 6, 7 and 8 of the periodic table, which arranges elements according to their outermost electrons and hence their chemical properties. However, the chemical characterization results are not trivial: relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the heaviest elements can strongly influence chemical properties. The next heavy element targeted for chemical characterization is element 112; its closed-shell electronic structure with a filled outer s orbital suggests that it may be particularly susceptible to strong deviations from the chemical property trends expected within group 12. Indeed, first experiments concluded that element 112 does not behave like its lighter homologue mercury. However, the production and identification methods used cast doubt on the validity of this result. Here we report a more reliable chemical characterization of element 112, involving the production of two atoms of (283)112 through the alpha decay of the short-lived (287)114 (which itself forms in the nuclear fusion reaction of 48Ca with 242Pu) and the adsorption of the two atoms on a gold surface. By directly comparing the adsorption characteristics of (283)112 to that of mercury and the noble gas radon, we find that element 112 is very volatile and, unlike radon, reveals a metallic interaction with the gold surface. These adsorption characteristics establish element 112 as a typical element of group 12, and its successful production unambiguously establishes the approach to the island of stability of superheavy elements through 48Ca-induced nuclear fusion reactions with actinides. PMID:17476264

  14. Growth of ultra long multiwall carbon nanotube arrays by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Heejun; Kim, Sang Yong; Koh, Ken Ha; Lee, Soonil

    2010-09-01

    Using a home-made aerosol nebulizer, we developed a new aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process that made it possible to synthesize vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays with heights over a few millimeters routinely. An essential part of this technique was in-situ formation of metal catalyst nanoparticles via pyrolysis of ferrocene-ethanol aerosol right before CNT synthesis. Through the optimization of aerosol supply and CVD process parameters, we were able to synthesize clean VACNT arrays as long as 4.38 mm with very low metal contents in 20 min. Furthermore, it is worthy noting that such an outstanding height is achieved very quickly without supporting materials and water-assistance. By taking advantage of almost complete inhibition of CNT growth on low melting-temperature metals, we were able to fabricate patterned VACNT arrays by combining AACVD process with a conventional photolithograpic patterning of gold lines. Characterizations of as-grown nanotubes such as morphology, purity, and metal contents are presented. PMID:21133158

  15. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate.

  16. Characterization of aerosol transport in a recoil transfer chamber for heavy element chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Morales, Gabriel; Tereshatov, Evgeny; Folden, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Heavy elements (HE) are elements with Z >103 that can be synthesized via target material bombardment by accelerated charged particles. Production and investigation of properties of new elements result in understanding of upper limit of Periodic Table of Elements. Study of chemical behavior of HE is usually based on comparison with their light homologue properties. Such experiments require transportation of elements of interest from a target chamber to a radiochemical laboratory within several seconds. Aerosol transport is a widely known way to transfer non-volatile elements in on-line experiments. This particular project is devoted to design, characterization and optimization of aerosol transport for implementation in future experiments at Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. Different types of aerosol generators and particle parameters such as: size distribution, concentration and charge have been considered. Results showing procedure development will be presented. *Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  17. Biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon during SAMBBA: impact of chemical composition on radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, William; Allan, James; Flynn, Michael; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Hodgson, Amy; Liu, Dantong; O'shea, Sebastian; Bauguitte, Stephane; Szpek, Kate; Langridge, Justin; Johnson, Ben; Haywood, Jim; Longo, Karla; Artaxo, Paulo; Coe, Hugh

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. Globally, biomass burning aerosols are thought to exert a small warming effect but with the uncertainty being 4 times greater than the central estimate. On regional scales, the impact is substantially greater, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, both in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated

  18. Acidic sulfate aerosols: characterization and exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Waldman, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    Exposures to acidic aerosol in the atmosphere are calculated from data reported in the scientific literature. The majority of date was not derived from studies necessarily designed to examine human exposures. Most of the studies were designed to investigate the characteristics of the atmosphere. However, the measurements were useful in defining two potential exposure situations: regional stagnation and transport conditions and local plume impacts. Levels of acidicaerosol in excess of 20 to 40 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) have been observed for time durations ranging from 1 to 12 hr. These were associated with high, but not necessarily the highest, atmospheric SO/sub 4/(2)- levels. Exposures of 100 to 900 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were calculated for the acid events that were monitored. In contrast, earlier London studies indicated that apparent acidity in excess of 100 micrograms/m/sup 3/ (as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) was present in the atmosphere, and exposures less than 2000 micrograms/m/sup 3//hr were possible. Our present knowledge about the frequency, magnitude, and duration of acidic sulfate aerosol events and episodes is insufficient. Efforts must be made to gather more data, but these should be done in such a way that evaluation of human exposure is the focus of the research. In addition, further data are required on the mechanisms of formation of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and on what factors can be used to predict acidic sulfate episodes. 96 references.

  19. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g. HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. Particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with high traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations indicating minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA accounting for a major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ∼120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  20. Characterization of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan, R.L.; Woods, D.C.; McCormick, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens as well as morphological and elemental analyses were obtained between 7 April and 7 August 1980. In situ measurements were made in early phreatic and later, minor phreatomagmatic eruption clouds near the vent of the volcano and in plumes injected into the stratosphere from the major eruptions of 18 and 25 May. The phreatic aerosol was characterized by an essentially monomodal size distribution dominated by silicate particles larger than 10 micrometers in diameter. The phreatomagmatic eruption cloud was multimodal; the large size mode consisted of silicate particles and the small size modes were made up of mixtures of sulfuric acid and silicate particles. The stratospheric aerosol from the main eruption exhibited a characteristic narrow single mode with particles less than 1 micrometer in diameter and nearly all of the mass made up of sulfuric acid droplets.

  1. Characterization of aerosols from eruptions of mount st. Helens.

    PubMed

    Chuan, R L; Woods, D C; McCormick, M P

    1981-02-20

    Measurements of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens as well as morphological and elemental analyses were obtained between 7 April and 7 August 1980. In situ measurements were made in early phreatic and later, minor phreatomagmatic eruption clouds near the vent of the volcano and in plumes injected into the stratosphere from the major eruptions of 18 and 25 May. The phreatic aerosol was characterized by an essentially monomodal size distribution dominated by silicate particles larger than 10 micrometers in diameter. The phreatomagmatic eruption cloud was multimodal; the large size mode consisted of silicate particles and the small size modes were made up of mixtures of sulfuric acid and silicate particles. The stratospheric aerosol from the main eruption exhibited a characteristic narrow single mode with particles less than 1 micrometer in diameter and nearly all of the mass made up of sulfuric acid droplets.

  2. Simulation of aerosol chemical compositions in the Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrit, Mounir; Kata Sartelet, Karine; Sciare, Jean; Marchand, Nicolas; Pey, Jorge; Sellegri, Karine

    2016-04-01

    This work aims at evaluating the chemical transport model (CTM) Polair3d of the air-quality modelling platform Polyphemus during the ChArMex summer campaigns of 2013, using ground-based measurements performed at ERSA (Cape Corsica, France), and at determining the processes controlling organic aerosol concentrations at ERSA. Simulations are compared to measurements for concentrations of both organic and inorganic species, as well as the ratio of biogenic versus anthropogenic particles, and organic aerosol properties (oxidation state). For inorganics, the concentrations of sulphate, sodium, chloride, ammonium and nitrate are compared to measurements. Non-sea-salt sulphate and ammonium concentrations are well reproduced by the model. However, because of the geographic location of the measurement station at Cape Corsica which undergoes strong wind velocities and sea effects, sea-salt sulphate, sodium, chloride and nitrate concentrations are strongly influenced by the parameterizations used for sea-salt emissions. Different parameterizations are compared and a parameterization is chosen after comparison to sodium measurements. For organics, the concentrations are well modelled when compared to experimental values. Anthropogenic particles are influenced by emission of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC). Measurements allow us to refine the estimation of those emissions, which are currently missing in emission inventories. Although concentrations of biogenic particles are well simulated, the organic chemical compounds are not enough oxidised in the model. The observed oxidation state of organics shows that the oligomerisation of pinonaldehyde was over-estimated in Polyphemus. To improve the oxidation property of organics, the formation of extremely low volatile organic compounds from autoxidation of monoterpenes is added to Polyphemus, using recently published data from chamber experiments. These chemical compounds are highly oxygenated and are formed rapidly, as first

  3. Intercomparison of an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) with ambient fine aerosol measurements in Downtown Atlanta, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Croteau, P. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E. S.; Kollman, M. S.; Ng, N. L.; Verma, V.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.; Weber, R. J.; Surratt, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was recently developed to provide long-term real-time continuous measurements of ambient non-refractory (i.e., organic, sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, and chloride) submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1). Currently, there are a limited number of field studies that evaluate the long-term performance of the ACSM against established monitoring networks. In this study, we present seasonal intercomparisons of the ACSM with collocated fine aerosol (PM2.5) measurements at the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) Jefferson Street (JST) site near downtown Atlanta, GA, during 2011-2012. The collocated measurements included a second ACSM, continuous and integrated sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium measurements, as well as a semi-continuous Sunset organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC/EC) analyzer, continuous tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM), 24 h integrated Federal Reference Method (FRM) filters, and continuous scanning electrical mobility system-mixing condensation particle counter (SEMS-MCPC). Intercomparison of the two collocated ACSMs resulted in strong correlations (r2 > 0.8) for all chemical species, except chloride (r2 = 0.21); mass concentration for all chemical species agreed within ±27%, indicating that ACSM instruments are capable of stable and reproducible operation. Chemical constituents measured by the ACSM are also compared with those obtained from the continuous measurements from JST. Since the continuous measurement concentrations are adjusted to match the integrated filter measurements, these comparisons reflect the combined uncertainties of the ACSM, continuous, and filter measurements. In general, speciated ACSM mass concentrations correlate well (r2 > 0.7) with the continuous measurements from JST, although the correlation for nitrate is weaker (r2 = 0.55) in summer. Differences between ACSM mass concentrations and the filter-adjusted JST continuous data are 5-27%, 4

  4. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. The online measurement data and techniques included: size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS); total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm (CPC, SMPS, OPC); monoterpenes determined by gas chromatography- ion trap mass spectrometry; OH and H2SO4 determined by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: 11% ammonium, 19% nitrate, 20% sulfate, and 50% organics (OM1). In spite of strongly changing meteorological conditions and absolute concentration levels of particulate matter (3-13 μg m-3 PM1), OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. In contrast, the ratio of nitrate to sulfate was highly dependent on temperature (14-32°C) and relative humidity (20-100%), which could be explained by thermodynamic model calculations of NH3/HNO3/NH4NO3 gas-particle partitioning. From the combination of optical and other sizing techniques (OPC, AMS, SMPS), an average refractive index of 1.40-1.45 was inferred for the measured rural aerosol

  5. Long-term measurement of aerosol chemical composition in Athens, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskevopoulou, Despina; Liakakou, Eleni; Theodosi, Christina; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The collection of our samples was conducted for a period of five years (2008 - 2013) in Athens, Greece. The site is situated at the premises of the National Observatory of Athens on Penteli Hill, northeast Athens suburbs, and is considered an urban background station. The aim of our study was a first long-term estimation of the chemical mass closure of aerosol. For the purposes of the study, we applied three filter samplers during the sampling period: two Partisol FRM Model 2000 air samplers (one of them collecting PM10 and the other PM2.5 fractions of aerosol) and one Dichotomous Partisol auto-sampler (with PM2.5 and PM2.5-10 inlet). Aerosols were collected on Whatman QM-A quartz fiber filters and the mass of the collected samples was estimated by weighing the pre-combusted filters before and after sampling, under controlled conditions, using a microbalance. All quartz filters were analysed for organic (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) by a thermal - optical transmission technique. The concentration of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was defined for each filter using a total organic carbon analyzer, while the content in main water soluble ions (Cl-, Br-, NO-3, SO4-2, PO4-3, C2O4-2, NH4+, K+, Na+, Mg+2, Ca+2) was determined by ion chromatography. Additionally the filters were analyzed for trace metals by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Aerosol chemical mass closure calculations were conducted for the PM2.5 fraction. The area of Athens is characterized by aged aerosol that can originate from the marine boundary layer, the European mainland and occasionally from North African desert areas. The contribution of dust and particulate organic matter on PM levels was estimated taking into consideration the location of the sampling site, while identification and evaluation of sources was performed. Additionally, non-sea salt concentrations of the main ions were estimated to complete the chemical closure in the extended area. According to

  6. Aerosol characterization at the Saharan AERONET site Tamanrasset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, C.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Bustos, J. J.; Basart, S.; Romero, P. M.; Camino, C.; Mimouni, M.; Zeudmi, L.; Goloub, P.; Baldasano, J. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-06-01

    More than two years of columnar atmospheric aerosol measurements (2006-2009) at Tamanrasset site, in the heart of the Sahara desert, are analysed. AERONET level 2.0 data were used. The KCICLO method was applied to a part of level 1.5 data series to improve the quality of the results. The annual variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE) has been found to be strongly linked to the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) thermodynamic features. The dry-cool season (autumn and winter time) is characterized by a shallow CBL and very low mean turbidity (AOD ~ 0.09 at 440 nm, AE ~ 0.62). The wet-hot season (spring and summer time) is dominated by high turbidity of coarse dust particles (AE ~ 0.28, AOD ~ 0.39 at 440 nm) and a deep CBL. The aerosol-type characterization shows desert mineral dust as prevailing aerosol. Both pure Saharan dust and very clear sky conditions are observed depending on the season. However, several case studies indicate an anthropogenic fine mode contribution from Libya and Algeria's industrial areas. The Concentration Weighted Trajectory (CWT) source apportionment method was used to identify potential sources of air masses arriving at Tamanrasset at several heights for each season. Microphysical and optical properties and precipitable water vapour were also investigated.

  7. Characterization of Electronic Cigarette Aerosol and Its Induction of Oxidative Stress Response in Oral Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tongke; Shu, Shi; Chang, Chong Hyun; Messadi, Diana; Xia, Tian; Zhu, Yifang; Hu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have generated and characterized Electronic Cigarette (EC) aerosols using a combination of advanced technologies. In the gas phase, the particle number concentration (PNC) of EC aerosols was found to be positively correlated with puff duration whereas the PNC and size distribution may vary with different flavors and nicotine strength. In the liquid phase (water or cell culture media), the size of EC nanoparticles appeared to be significantly larger than those in the gas phase, which might be due to aggregation of nanoparticles in the liquid phase. By using in vitro high-throughput cytotoxicity assays, we have demonstrated that EC aerosols significantly decrease intracellular levels of glutathione in NHOKs in a dose-dependent fashion resulting in cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that EC aerosols cause cytotoxicity to oral epithelial cells in vitro, and the underlying molecular mechanisms may be or at least partially due to oxidative stress induced by toxic substances (e.g., nanoparticles and chemicals) present in EC aerosols. PMID:27223106

  8. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R. W.; Klemm, K.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G. L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July - August 1990 joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with 'background' air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forest region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region.

  9. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R. W.; Klemm, K.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G. L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July-August 1990 joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) SB/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with"background"air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forested region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region.

  10. Aerosol chemical vapor deposition of metal oxide films

    DOEpatents

    Ott, K.C.; Kodas, T.T.

    1994-01-11

    A process of preparing a film of a multicomponent metal oxide including: forming an aerosol from a solution comprised of a suitable solvent and at least two precursor compounds capable of volatilizing at temperatures lower than the decomposition temperature of said precursor compounds; passing said aerosol in combination with a suitable oxygen-containing carrier gas into a heated zone, said heated zone having a temperature sufficient to evaporate the solvent and volatilize said precursor compounds; and passing said volatilized precursor compounds against the surface of a substrate, said substrate having a sufficient temperature to decompose said volatilized precursor compounds whereby metal atoms contained within said volatilized precursor compounds are deposited as a metal oxide film upon the substrate is disclosed. In addition, a coated article comprising a multicomponent metal oxide film conforming to the surface of a substrate selected from the group consisting of silicon, magnesium oxide, yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide, sapphire, or lanthanum gallate, said multicomponent metal oxide film characterized as having a substantially uniform thickness upon said substrate.

  11. Characterization of sources for southern African aerosols through fatty acid and trajectory analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billmark, Kaycie A.; Swap, Robert J.; Macko, Stephen A.

    2003-07-01

    Biogeochemical cycles in southern Africa are affected by emissions from extensive biomass burning. Emitted trace gases and aerosols frequently accumulate and recirculate in the well-defined synoptic pattern that persists for long time periods over southern Africa. The role of organic aerosols during atmospheric transport and the influence of neighboring air masses on biogeochemical dynamics in this nutrient-limited region are insufficiently studied. The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) was conducted in part to investigate the impacts of this large-scale transport and deposition of increasingly anthropogenic emissions on southern African biogeochemical cycling. This study explores the understanding of regional atmospheric transport through the identification of chemical biomarkers to describe aerosols collected during the SAFARI 2000 dry season research campaign. Total suspended particulate aerosol samples were collected diurnally for a period of two weeks in Mongu, Zambia. Mongu is bordered by the Zambezi River on the west and the Miombo woodland savanna in all other directions. It also lies on the northern extent of the Kalahari Desert. This region is characterized by high biomass burning emissions of river floodplain grasses and woodland savanna during the dry season. Fatty acids were extracted from the collected aerosols and analyzed using gas chromatography. The resultant fatty acid compositions were examined for temporal patterns and trends. Furthermore, these results were compared to both synoptic meteorological patterns over the region, as well as to modeled air parcel trajectories, to gain insight into changes in aerosol composition resulting from changes in atmospheric transports from regions of different vegetation. The results of these analyses confirm that abundances of fatty acids are dependent on local and synoptic meteorology and can thus be used as an additional geochemical tracer to better describe aerosol sources and

  12. Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols in a Costa Rican Premontane Cloud Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, A. R.; Guffin, E. C.; Brooks, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    The composition and size of atmospheric aerosols are key to understanding both the direct effects of aerosols on climate and their role as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In this study, aerosols in a Costa Rican tropical premontane cloud forest were collected and analyzed by size, chemical composition, and source to determine their role in specific weather events and cloud formation. Particle concentration and size distributions were measured using a TSI AeroTrak spectrometer. A PIXE Cascade Impactor with two sampling stages was used to collect particles in the submicron and supermicron size ranges. To survey the biogenic component of aerosols, pollen particles were collected with a Rotorod Model 20. Aerosol and pollen samples were analyzed on "typical" and "event" days. Collected aerosol samples were analyzed for molecular functional groups present via Raman Microspectroscopy. AeroTrak collection showed particles in all size bins, with the majority of particles in the 0.3 μm bin. Typical days were consistently dominated by submicron particles. Event days were marked by strong and/or unusual wind speeds and directions, or heavy precipitation events. Concentrations of coarse particles were significantly increased during events. Raman analysis showed peaks at 2900, 1550, 1350, 1068, 450, and 141 wavenumbers, which indicate a mixture of organics, humic-like substances, nitrates, sulfates, and inorganic salts. Light microscopy analysis of pollen samples showed a large variability in daily pollen count with the greatest pollen count occurring on wind event days. Prevalent taxa of pollen identified were genus Pourouma in the Moraceae family, and Asteraceae family. Detailed characterization of the biogenic aerosol population present in the remote cloud forest will be presented and atmospheric implications discussed.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

    2009-02-13

    Chemical characterizations of atmospheric aerosols is a serious analytical challenge because of the complexity of particulate matter analyte composed of a large number of compounds with a wide range of molecular structures, physico-chemical properties, and reactivity. In this study chemical composition of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) samples is characterized by high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurement combined with Kendrick analysis allowed us to assign elemental composition for hundreds of compounds in the range of m/z values of 50-1000. ESI/MS spectra of different BBOA samples contain a variety of distinct, sample specific, characteristic peaks that can be used as unique markers for different types of biofuels. Our results indicate that a significant number of high-MW organic compounds in BBOA samples are highly oxidized polar species that can be efficiently detected using ESI/MS but are difficult to observe using the conventional GCMS analysis of aerosol samples. The average O:C ratios obtained for each of the BBOA samples studied in this work are in a strikingly good agreement with the previously reported values obtained using STXM/NEXAFS. The degree of unsaturation of detected organic compounds shows a clear decrease with increase in the molecular weight of the anyalyte molecules. The decrease is particularly pronounced for the samples containing a large number of CH2-based homologous series.

  14. AEROSOL CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTION ON BOARD THE DOE G1 AIRCRAFT USING A PARTICLE INTO LIQUID SAMPLER DURING THE TEXAQS 2000 EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    LEE,Y.N.; SONG,Z.; LIU,Y.; DAUM,P.; WEBER,R.; ORSINI,D.; LAULAINEN,N.; HUBBE,J.; MORRIS,V.

    2001-01-13

    Knowledge of aerosol chemical composition is key to understanding a number of properties of ambient aerosol particles including sources, size/number distribution, chemical evolution, optical properties and human health effects. Although filter based techniques have been widely used to determine aerosol chemical constituents, they generally cannot provide sufficiently fast time resolution needed to investigate sources and chemical evolution that effect aerosol chemical, size and number changes. In order to gain an ability to describe and predict the life cycles of ambient aerosols as a basis for ambient air quality control, fast and sensitive determination of the aerosol chemical composition must be made available. To help to achieve this goal, we deployed a newly developed technique, referred to as PILS (particle-into-liquid-sampler), on the DOE G1 aircraft during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) to characterize the major ionic species of aerosol particles with aerodynamic size smaller than 2.5 {micro}m (PM 2.5). The results obtained are examined in the context of other simultaneously collected data for insights into the measurement capability of the PILS system.

  15. Characterization of submicron aerosols at a suburban site in central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Zhao, Jian; Du, Wei; Ana, Godson; Wang, Zhenzhu; Sun, Lu; Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing; Ye, Xingnan; Sun, Yele

    2016-04-01

    We have characterized the chemical composition and sources of submicron aerosol (PM1) at a suburban site in Xinzhou in central China using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor from July 17 to September 5, 2014. The average (±1σ) PM1 concentration was 35.4 (±20.8) μg/m3 for the entire study period, indicating that Xinzhou was less polluted compared to the megacities in the North China Plain (NCP). The PM1 was mainly composed of organic aerosol and sulfate, on average accounting for 33.1% and 32.4%, respectively, followed by nitrate (14.4%) and ammonium (11.8%). Higher sulfate and lower nitrate contributions than those in megacities in the NCP elucidated an important emission source of coal combustion in central China. Three organic aerosol (OA) factors, i.e., hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and low-volatility OOA (LV-OOA), were identified using positive matrix factorization. Secondary OA (=SV-OOA + LV-OOA) dominated OA, on average accounting for 82%, indicating that OA at the Xinzhou site was overall oxidized. We also observed relatively similar aerosol bulk composition and OA composition at low and high mass loading periods, and also from the different source areas, indicating that aerosol species were homogeneously distributed over a regional scale near the site for most of the time during this study. Slightly higher mass concentrations and sulfate contributions from the southern air masses were likely due to the transport from the polluted cities, such as Taiyuan to the south. In addition, the daily variation of PM1 in Xinzhou resembled that observed in Beijing, indicating that the wide-scale regional haze pollution often influences both the NCP and the central China.

  16. Characterization of aerosol composition, concentrations, and sources at Baengnyeong Island, Korea using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyoung; Choi, Jinsoo; Lee, Gangwoong; Ahn, Junyoung; Park, Jin Soo; Atwood, Samuel A.; Schurman, Misha; Choi, Yongjoo; Chung, Yoomi; Collett, Jeffrey L.

    2015-11-01

    To improve understanding of the sources and chemical properties of particulate pollutants on the western side of the Korean Peninsula, an Aerodyne High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measured non-refractory fine (PM1) particles from May to November, 2011 at Baengnyeong Island, South Korea. Organic matter and sulfate were generally the most abundant species and exhibited maximum concentrations of 36 μg/m3 and 39 μg/m3, respectively. Nitrate concentrations peaked at 32 μg/m3 but were typically much lower than sulfate and organic matter concentrations. May, September, October, and November featured the highest monthly average concentrations, with lower concentrations typically observed from June through August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis and individual case studies revealed that transport from eastern China, an area with high SO2 emissions, was associated with high particulate sulfate concentrations at the measurement site. Observed sulfate aerosol sometimes was fully neutralized by ammonium but often was acidic; the average ammonium to sulfate molar ratio was 1.49. Measured species size distributions revealed a range of sulfate particle size distributions with modes between 100 and 600 nm. Organic aerosol source regions were widespread, including contributions from eastern China and South Korea. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis indicated three "factors," or types of organic aerosol, comprising one primary, hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) and two oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) components, including a more oxidized (MO-OOA) and a less oxidized (LO-OOA) oxidized organic aerosol. On average, HOA and OOA contributed 21% and 79% of the organic mass (OM), respectively, with the MO-OOA fraction nearly three times as abundant as the LO-OOA fraction. Biomass burning contributions to observed OM were low during the late spring/early summer agricultural burning season in eastern China, since

  17. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2008-02-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. Online measurements included: Size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles; total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm; gas-phase concentration of monoterpenes, CO, O3, OH, and H2SO4. Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: Fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: (23±39)% ammonium nitrate, (27±23)% ammonium sulfate, and (50±40)% organics (OM1). OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. The average ratio of OM1 to OC2.5 was 2.1±1.4, indicating a high proportion of heteroelements in the organic fraction of the sampled rural aerosol. This is consistent with the high ratio of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) over hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inferred from the AMS results (4:1), and also with the high abundance of proteins (~3%) indicating a high proportion of primary biological material (~30%) in PM2.5. This finding was confirmed by low abundance of PAHs (<1 ng m-3) and EC (<1 μg m-3) in PM2.5 and detection of several secondary organic aerosol compounds (dicarboxylic acids) and their precursors (monoterpenes). New particle formation was observed almost

  18. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: sampling criteria and aerosol characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Jared L.; Friend, Sherri; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to develop protocols for sampling and characterizing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerosols in workplaces or during inhalation studies. Manufactured dry powder containing MWCNT’s, combined with soot and metal catalysts, form complex morphologies and diverse shapes. The aerosols, examined in this study, were produced using an acoustical generator. Representative samples were collected from an exposure chamber using filters and a cascade impactor for microscopic and gravimetric analyses. Results from filters showed that a density of 0.008–0.10 particles per µm2 filter surface provided adequate samples for particle counting and sizing. Microscopic counting indicated that MWCNT’s, resuspended at a concentration of 10 mg/m3, contained 2.7 × 104 particles/cm3. Each particle structure contained an average of 18 nanotubes, resulting in a total of 4.9 × 105 nanotubes/cm3. In addition, fibrous particles within the aerosol had a count median length of 3.04 µm and a width of 100.3 nm, while the isometric particles had a count median diameter of 0.90 µm. A combination of impactor and microscopic measurements established that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the mixture was 1.5 µm. It was also determined that the mean effective density of well-defined isometric particles was between 0.71 and 0.88 g/cm3, and the mean shape factor of individual nanotubes was between 1.94 and 2.71. The information obtained from this study can be used for designing animal inhalation exposure studies and adopted as guidance for sampling and characterizing MWCNT aerosols in workplaces. The measurement scheme should be relevant for any carbon nanotube aerosol. PMID:23033994

  19. Aerosol characterization at the Saharan AERONET site Tamanrasset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guirado, C.; Cuevas, E.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.; Alonso-Pérez, S.; Bustos, J. J.; Basart, S.; Romero, P. M.; Camino, C.; Mimouni, M.; Zeudmi, L.; Goloub, P.; Baldasano, J. M.; de Frutos, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    More than 2 years of columnar atmospheric aerosol measurements (2006-2009) at the Tamanrasset site (22.79° N, 5.53° E, 1377 m a.s.l.), in the heart of the Sahara, are analysed. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) level 2.0 data were used. The KCICLO (K is the name of a constant and ciclo means cycle in Spanish) method was applied to a part of the level 1.5 data series to improve the quality of the results. The annual variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) has been found to be strongly linked to the convective boundary layer (CBL) thermodynamic features. The dry-cool season (autumn and winter) is characterized by a shallow CBL and very low mean turbidity (AOD ~ 0.09 at 440 nm, AE ~ 0.62). The wet-hot season (spring and summer) is dominated by high turbidity of coarse dust particles (AE ~ 0.28, AOD ~ 0.39 at 440 nm) and a deep CBL. The aerosol-type characterization shows desert mineral dust as the prevailing aerosol. Both pure Saharan dust and very clear sky conditions are observed depending on the season. However, several case studies indicate an anthropogenic fine mode contribution from the industrial areas in Libya and Algeria. The concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) source apportionment method was used to identify potential sources of air masses arriving at Tamanrasset at several heights for each season. Microphysical and optical properties and precipitable water vapour were also investigated.

  20. Satellite perspective of aerosol intercontinental transport: From qualitative tracking to quantitative characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2013-04-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers the opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. We review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  1. Satellite Perspective of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport: From Qualitative Tracking to Quantitative Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chin, Mian; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of aerosol intercontinental transport (ICT) is both widespread and compelling. Model simulations suggest that ICT could significantly affect regional air quality and climate, but the broad inter-model spread of results underscores a need of constraining model simulations with measurements. Satellites have inherent advantages over in situ measurements to characterize aerosol ICT, because of their spatial and temporal coverage. Significant progress in satellite remote sensing of aerosol properties during the Earth Observing System (EOS) era offers opportunity to increase quantitative characterization and estimates of aerosol ICT, beyond the capability of pre-EOS era satellites that could only qualitatively track aerosol plumes. EOS satellites also observe emission strengths and injection heights of some aerosols, aerosol precursors, and aerosol-related gases, which can help characterize aerosol ICT. After an overview of these advances, we review how the current generation of satellite measurements have been used to (1) characterize the evolution of aerosol plumes (e.g., both horizontal and vertical transport, and properties) on an episodic basis, (2) understand the seasonal and inter-annual variations of aerosol ICT and their control factors, (3) estimate the export and import fluxes of aerosols, and (4) evaluate and constrain model simulations. Substantial effort is needed to further explore an integrated approach using measurements from on-orbit satellites (e.g., A-Train synergy) for observational characterization and model constraint of aerosol intercontinental transport and to develop advanced sensors for future missions.

  2. Aerosol characterization over the southeastern United States using high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: spatial and seasonal variation of aerosol composition, sources, and organic nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Suresh, S.; Guo, H.; Weber, R. J.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    We deployed a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) to characterize the chemical composition of submicron non-refractory particles (NR-PM1) in the southeastern US. Measurements were performed in both rural and urban sites in the greater Atlanta area, GA and Centreville, AL for approximately one year, as part of Southeastern Center of Air Pollution and Epidemiology study (SCAPE) and Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Organic aerosol (OA) accounts for more than half of NR1 mass concentration regardless of sampling sites and seasons. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of HR-ToF-AMS measurements identified various OA sources, depending on location and season. Hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and cooking OA (COA) have important but not dominant contributions to total OA in urban sites. Biomass burning OA (BBOA) concentration shows a distinct seasonal variation with a larger enhancement in winter than summer. We find a good correlation between BBOA and brown carbon, indicating biomass burning is an important source for brown carbon, although an additional, unidentified brown carbon source is likely present at the rural Yorkville site. Isoprene-derived OA (Isoprene-OA) is only deconvolved in warmer months and contributes 18-36% of total OA. The presence of Isoprene-OA factor in urban sites is more likely from local production in the presence of NOx than transport from rural sites. More-oxidized and less-oxidized oxygenated organic aerosol (MO-OOA and LO-OOA, respectively) are dominant fractions (47-79%) of OA in all sites. MO-OOA correlates well with ozone in summer, but not in winter, indicating MO-OOA sources may vary with seasons. LO-OOA, which reaches a daily maximum at night, correlates better with estimated nitrate functionality from organic nitrates than total nitrates. Based on the HR-ToF-AMS measurements, we estimate that the nitrate functionality from organic nitrates

  3. Characterization of an aerosol chamber for human exposures to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L; Reist, P C; Boehlecke, B A; Jacobs, R R

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize an exposure chamber in which human subjects could be exposed to low dust concentrations carrying an endotoxin coating. An exposure chamber, dust dispersion method, and endotoxin characterization technique were developed for inhalation exposures. A 6.27 m3 exposure chamber was designed and constructed from cinder block, glass windows, and Plexiglas. Using an acetone adhesion process, Enterobacter agglomerans were adsorbed onto respirable cellulose particles to create the endotoxin aerosol. The size distribution of the endotoxin-treated particles was verified using light microscopy and cascade impactors. A dry powder dust generator was refined to consistently disperse small quantities of the aerosol into the chamber to maintain dust concentrations at approximately 250 micrograms/m3. Dust levels during the chamber exposures were monitored using a portable continuous aerosol monitor (PCAM). During initial exposure runs, PCAM monitoring stations were positioned at different locations within a 0.5-meter matrix to document mixing patterns. Total dust and cascade impactor samples were collected throughout each exposure period to characterize the chamber operating system and insure the mean airborne dust concentration fulfilled target levels. A one-factor analysis of variance at the 95 percent confidence interval illustrated that there was not a statistically significant difference in the mean dust concentration throughout the exposure runs compared to the individual runs. Together the consistency of the total dust filters, endotoxin concentrations, and aerosol-monitoring instrument were adequate to allow use of the chamber for experimental studies involving human volunteers.

  4. Biokinetics and dosimetry of inhaled Cm aerosols in beagles: effect of aerosol chemical form.

    PubMed

    Guilmette, R A; Kanapilly, G M

    1988-12-01

    This study was designed to provide tissue distribution data of 244Cm that was inhaled by beagle dogs. Two chemical forms that were presumed to bracket the solubility of pure Cm compounds in vivo were used: 244Cm2O3 (oxide) and 244Cm(NO3)3 (nitrate). Adult dogs of both sexes received a single brief pernasal exposure to either a monodisperse aerosol of 244Cm2O3 (1.4 micron activity median aerodynamic diameter, AMAD, and 1.16 geometric standard deviation, sigma g) or a polydisperse aerosol of 244Cm(NO3)3 (1.1 micron AMAD, 1.74 sigma g). The resulting initial pulmonary burdens (IPB) were 1.5 and 1.7 kBq kg-1 body mass for the oxide and nitrate groups, respectively. The tissue distribution data obtained from the dogs that were serially sacrificed from 4 h to 2 y after exposure showed that both chemical forms were very soluble in vivo. For the oxide group, 78% IPB was cleared from the lung with a T 1/2 of 7.6 d, whereas for the nitrate group, 42% IPB cleared with a T 1/2 of 0.6 d. The lung retention for each group was described by three-component exponential functions. Most of the Cm that cleared the lung was redeposited in the liver (37% IPB) and skeleton (27% IPB), with lesser amounts in the muscle, fat and connective tissue (3.5% IPB) and kidney (approximately 2% IPB). The only significant difference noted in the biokinetics of Cm for the two exposure groups was a more rapid translocation of Cm from the lung to liver and bone during the first 10-20 d after exposure to the nitrate compared to the oxide chemical form. Extrapolation of these data to obtain estimates of committed dose equivalents for man indicate substantial agreement with the limits for occupational exposure specified by ICRP 30 (1979). PMID:3198400

  5. Chemical, Physical and Optical Properties of Saharan Dust Aerosols at a Marine Site in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz Montalvo, D. L.; Mayol Bracero, O. L.; Morales, F.; Sheridan, P.; Ogren, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric dust particles blown from the Sahara across the Atlantic into the Caribbean have an impact on its climate and public health. These particles may play a significant role in radiative forcing, affecting the extinction of solar radiation and thus having an influence on climate. About half of the dust that travels from Africa contains particles that are small enough to inhale. Human breathe them into the respiratory system and they settle in the lungs causing respiratory problems. To have a better understanding of these effects, information is needed on the properties of these aerosols. As part of this study, chemical, physical and optical characterization is being performed on aerosol samples collected at a marine site on the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico (Cabezas de San Juan, Fajardo), during periods with and without Saharan incursions. Stacked-filter units (SFU) are used to collect particles with diameters smaller than 1.7 μm, using Nuclepore, quartz and Teflon filters. These filter samples are analyzed to obtain the chemical composition of the particles. Initially we are focusing on the carbonaceous fraction (elemental and organic carbon, EC, and OC) of the aerosol using thermal/optical analysis. Online measurements of total particle number concentrations and aerosol light scattering coefficients are performed using a condensation particle counter and an integrating nephelometer, respectively. In addition, a sunphotometer, part of AERONET (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/), is used to obtain the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Preliminary results include only samples collected from air masses under the influence of Saharan dust, as signified by AOT satellite images from MODIS and the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. In terms of the chemical composition, EC concentrations were at low-to-undetectable levels, indicating that OC concentrations

  6. Molecular corridors and parameterizations of volatility in the chemical evolution of organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-03-01

    The formation and aging of organic aerosols (OA) proceed through multiple steps of chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases, which is challenging for the interpretation of field measurements and laboratory experiments as well as accurate representation of OA evolution in atmospheric aerosol models. Based on data from over 30 000 compounds, we show that organic compounds with a wide variety of functional groups fall into molecular corridors, characterized by a tight inverse correlation between molar mass and volatility. We developed parameterizations to predict the saturation mass concentration of organic compounds containing oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur from the elemental composition that can be measured by soft-ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Field measurement data from new particle formation events, biomass burning, cloud/fog processing, and indoor environments were mapped into molecular corridors to characterize the chemical nature of the observed OA components. We found that less-oxidized indoor OA are constrained to a corridor of low molar mass and high volatility, whereas highly oxygenated compounds in atmospheric water extend to high molar mass and low volatility. Among the nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds identified in atmospheric aerosols, amines tend to exhibit low molar mass and high volatility, whereas organonitrates and organosulfates follow high O : C corridors extending to high molar mass and low volatility. We suggest that the consideration of molar mass and molecular corridors can help to constrain volatility and particle-phase state in the modeling of OA particularly for nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compounds.

  7. Chemical composition of emissions from urban sources of fine organic aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Hildemann, L.M.; Markowski, G.R.; Cass, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    A dilution source sampling system was used to collect primary fine aerosol emissions from important sources of urban organic aerosol, including a boiler burning No. 2 fuel oil, a home fireplace, a fleet of catalyst-equipped and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternative dilution sampling techniques were used to collect emissions from cigarette smoking and a roofing tar pot, and grab sample techniques were employed to characterize paved road dust, brake lining wear, and vegetative detritus. Organic aerosol constituted the majority of the fine aerosol mass emitted from many of the sources tested. Fine primary organic aerosol emissions within the heavily urbanized western portion of the Los Angeles Basin were determined to total 29.8 metric ton/day. Over 40% of these organic aerosol emissions are from anthropogenic pollution sources that are expected to emit contemporary (nonfossil) aerosol carbon, in good agreement with the available ambient monitoring data.

  8. Characterization of aerosols and fibers emitted from composite materials combustion.

    PubMed

    Chivas-Joly, C; Gaie-Levrel, F; Motzkus, C; Ducourtieux, S; Delvallée, A; De Lagos, F; Nevé, S Le; Gutierrez, J; Lopez-Cuesta, J-M

    2016-01-15

    This work investigates the aerosols emitted during combustion of aircraft and naval structural composite materials (epoxy resin/carbon fibers and vinyl ester/glass fibers and carbon nanotubes). Combustion tests were performed at lab-scale using a modified cone calorimeter. The aerosols emitted have been characterized using various metrological devices devoted to the analysis of aerosols. The influence of the nature of polymer matrices, the incorporation of fibers and carbon nanotubes as well as glass reinforcements on the number concentration and the size distribution of airborne particles produced, was studied in the 5 nm-10 μm range. Incorporation of carbon fibers into epoxy resin significantly reduced the total particle number concentration. In addition, the interlaced orientation of carbon fibers limited the particles production compared to the composites with unidirectional one. The carbon nanotubes loading in vinyl ester resin composites influenced the total particles production during the flaming combustion with changes during kinetics emission. Predominant populations of airborne particles generated during combustion of all tested composites were characterized by a PN50 following by PN(100-500). PMID:26348148

  9. Characterization of aerosol emitted by the combustion of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motzkus, C.; Chivas-Joly, C.; Guillaume, E.; Ducourtieux, S.; Saragoza, L.; Lesenechal, D.; Macé, T.

    2011-07-01

    Day after day, new applications using nanoparticles appear in industry, increasing the probability to find these particles in the workplace as well as in ambient air. As epidemiological studies have shown an association between increased particulate air pollution and adverse health effects in susceptible members of the population, it is particularly important to characterize aerosols emitted by different sources of emission, during the combustion of composites charged with nanoparticles for example. The present study is led in the framework of the NANOFEU project, supported by the French Research Agency (ANR), in order to characterize the fire behaviour of polymers charged with suitable nanoparticles and make an alternative to retardant systems usually employed. To determine the impact of these composites on the emission of airborne particles produced during their combustions, an experimental setup has been developed to measure the mass distribution in the range of 30 nm - 10 μm and the number concentration of submicrometric particles of the produced aerosol. A comparison is performed on the aerosol emitted during the combustion of several polymers alone (PMMA, PA-6), polymers containing nanofillers (silica, alumina, and carbon nanotubes) and polymers containing both nanofillers and a conventional flame retardant system (ammonium polyphosphate). The results on the morphology of particles were also investigated using AFM.

  10. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  11. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosols Using Nanospray Desorption/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Patrick J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (Nano-DESI) combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR/MS) is a promising approach for detailed chemical characterization of atmospheric organic aerosol (OA) collected in laboratory and field experiments. In Nano-DESI analyte is desorbed into a solvent bridge formed between two capillaries and the analysis surface, which enables fast and efficient characterization of OA collected on substrates without special sample preparation. Stable signals achieved using Nano-DESI make it possible to obtain high-quality HR/MS data using only a small amount of material (<10 ng). Furthermore, Nano-DESI enables efficient detection of chemically labile compounds in OA, which is important for understanding chemical aging phenomena.

  13. All-year-round aerosol chemical composition at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, Roberto; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Galli, Gaia; Ghedini, Costanza; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita

    2010-05-01

    induced) controlling the MSA-H2SO4 ratio from DMS. Since, in summer, DMS in route toward central Antarctica is subjected to larger atmospheric concentrations of OH (and/or BrO) radical, lower temperatures and lower humidity, all conditions promoting the preferential H2SO4 formation, non-sea-salt sulphate is assumed to be the most reliable biogenic marker at Dome C. A further insight from ice-core stratigraphies is concerning the sea salt sodium (ssNa) content in snow precipitation as a reliable marker of sea-ice extent, via frost-flower formation at the pack-ice seasonal growth. This interpretation faces with the classical view that consider higher sea-spray production as caused by an increase in zonal wind intensity. Sea spray originated from frost flowers can be distinguished from sea spray coming from bulk sea-water by the lower sulphate/sodium ratio (caused by mirabilite - Na2SO4 10H20 - precipitation occurring when sea-ice temperature falls below -8°C). High resolution aerosol measurement can allow to identify different sea-spray sources and quantify frost flowers contribution to the annual ssNa budget. Finally, dust recorded in ice cores can be used as a valuable proxy for changes in hydrological cycles in the dust source areas and transport processes (pathways and scavenging). The geochemical characterization of dust in the present-day aerosol, compared with chemical composition of soils collected in South America and Australia, allows identifying the major dust source area (South America) and reconstructing pathways of atmospheric circulation. South America role in feeding dust aerosol at Dome C was supported also by comparing aerosol composition with satellite observations (dust plumes on the source sites) and back-trajectory analysis (air masses reaching Antarctica) during massive dust-storm events.

  14. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols between Moscow and Vladivostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuokka, S.; Teinilä, K.; Saarnio, K.; Aurela, M.; Sillanpää, M.; Hillamo, R.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Skorokhod, A. I.; Elansky, N. F.; Belikov, I. B.

    2007-05-01

    The TROICA-9 expedition (Trans-Siberian Observations Into the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) was carried out at the Trans-Siberian railway between Moscow and Vladivostok in October 2005. Measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were made from an observatory carriage connected to a passenger train. Black carbon (BC) concentrations in fine particles (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm) were measured with an aethalometer using a five-minute time resolution. Concentrations of inorganic ions and some organic compounds (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, oxalate and methane sulphonate) were measured continuously by using an on-line system with a 15-min time resolution. In addition, particle volume size distributions were determined for particles in the diameter range 3-850 nm using a 10-min. time resolution. The continuous measurements were completed with 24-h. PM2.5 filter samples which were stored in a refrigerator and later analyzed in chemical laboratory. The analyses included mass concentrations of PM2.5, ions, monosaccharide anhydrides (levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan) and trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, V and Zn). The mass concentrations of PM2.5 varied in the range of 4.3-34.8 μg m-3 with an average of 21.6 μg m-3. Fine particle mass consisted mainly of BC (average 27.6%), SO42- (13.0%), NH4+ (4.1%), and NO3- (1.4%). One of the major constituents was obviously also organic carbon which was not determined. The contribution of BC was high compared with other studies made in Europe and Asia. High concentrations of ions, BC and particle volume were observed between Moscow and roughly 4000 km east of it, as well as close to Vladivostok, primarily due to local anthropogenic sources. In the natural background area between 4000 and 7200 km distance from Moscow, observed concentrations were low, even though there were local particle sources, such as forest fires, that increased occasionally concentrations. The

  15. Aerosol characterization over Sundarban mangrove forest at the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Das, Sanat Kumar; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Singh, Soumendra; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted on chemical characterization of size segregated and cumulative aerosols during winter, 2015 and summer 2016 over a remote mangrove forest at Sundarban at the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal. Aerosols originated from the surf zone at the land-ocean boundary of Sundarban mangrove forest and aerosols advected from Kolkata and other metropolitan and urban cities at Indo-Gangetic Plain were characterized in terms of major water soluble inorganic species. Attempt was made to investigate the combined effect of locally generated sea-salt and advected anthropogenic aerosols could change the pristine marine character at this region during the above mentioned periods. Significant chloride depletion from sea-salt aerosols was observed in coarse and ultrafine mode compared to fine mode in winter whereas reverse trend was observed during summer. On an average the chloride to sodium ratio in PM10 aerosol was found to be around 0.6 which was much lower than that in sea-water. It was observed that non-sea-sulphate and nitrate aerosols were the major species depleting chloride from sea-salt aerosols. This supported the interaction between fresh marine and polluted anthropogenic aerosols. The average concentration of PM10 aerosols was 64 μg m-3 in winter and 89 μg m-3 in summer. Major water soluble ionic species were used for the source apportionment of aerosol during the two seasons. On an average it was observed that 60-70 % of total PM10 aerosols were constituted by the major water soluble ionic species. Emission flux and deposition flux of aerosols were also studied over this remote forest region. It was also observed that anthropogenic ionic species were mostly accumulated in the ultrafine and fine mode region both during winter and summer. On the other hand sea-salt species were mostly accumulated in the coarse mode region. Sulphate aerosol showed bimodal distribution with prominent peaks both at ultrafine/fine and coarse mode region

  16. Validation of the assimilation of satellite-based aerosol measurements into a chemical transport model using aerosol component information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, Dmytro; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion

    Aerosol monitoring is of growing interest due to the impact of aerosol particle concentration on human health and the global climate. The key question of this paper is to understand how the assimilation of satellite atmospheric aerosol observations with enhanced observation and background covariance matrices improves the capability of a chemical transport model in reproducing the distribution of tropospheric particles. The task of this study is a validation of assimilation results by using ground-based AERONET measurements for 2006-2008 at stations from Europe and Africa regions. The study is carried out using the Model for Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH operated at DLR). As measurement input vector for as-similation satellite data from SCIAMACHY and AATSR instruments onboard ENVISAT was used. Synergetic Aerosol Retrieval (SYNAER) observational and model data have been cou-pled by means of data the two-dimensional variational assimilation. SYNAER measurements are able to distinguish between different aerosol components such as water-soluble, soot, sea salt and long-range transported mineral aerosols. The final analysis is highly dependent on the specification of the error covariance matrices. Since observation and background error covari-ance matrices are not perfectly known, a large potential for improvements of the analyses is offered by methods allowing their constructing and tuning. In this study, a method proposed by Desroziers and Ivanov (2001) is used to tune background and observational error statistics of the 2D-Var assimilation procedure by using information content analysis of the retrieval algorithm.

  17. Identification and quantification of individual chemical compounds in biogenic secondary organic aerosols using GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, M.; Worton, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A. W.; Ruehl, C.; Zhao, Y.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have adverse effects on human health and air quality and affect radiative forcing and thus climate. While the organic fraction of aerosols is substantial, the sources and chemistry leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosols are very poorly understood. Characterizing individual compounds present in organic aerosol provides insights into the sources, formation mechanisms and oxidative transformations that have taken place. Fifteen aerosol samples collected over a 5 day period at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, part of the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in July 2009, were analyzed using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). Approximately 600 compounds were observed in each sample as significant peaks in the chromatogram. Of these, around a third were identified by matching the unique electron ionization (EI) mass spectrum of each compound to the NIST library of characteristic fragmentation patterns. One filter sample was also analyzed using vacuum ultraviolet ionization (VUV) instead of EI. This 'soft' ionization technique results in much less fragmentation yielding the molecular ion of each compound, from which the exact mass was determined. If the formula of the EI library matched compound equaled the high mass resolution VUV molecular weight within a certain tolerance (< 30 ppm), then the library match was considered confirmed; 226 compounds were identified in this way. Using the VUV technique 234 additional compounds that were not in the EI mass spectral database were assigned chemical formulas based on the observed molecular weights. The chemical formulas in conjunction with the location of the compound in the GCxGC chromatogram were used to provide further classification of these compounds based on their likely functionalization. The broad array of observed oxygenated

  18. Characterization and Cytotoxic Assessment of Ballistic Aerosol Particulates for Tungsten Alloy Penetrators into Steel Target Plates

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Brenda I.; Murr, Lawrence E.; Suro, Raquel M.; Gaytan, Sara M.; Ramirez, Diana A.; Garza, Kristine M.; Schuster, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    The nature and constituents of ballistic aerosol created by kinetic energy penetrator rods of tungsten heavy alloys (W-Fe-Ni and W-Fe-Co) perforating steel target plates was characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These aerosol regimes, which can occur in closed, armored military vehicle penetration, are of concern for potential health effects, especially as a consequence of being inhaled. In a controlled volume containing 10 equispaced steel target plates, particulates were systematically collected onto special filters. Filter collections were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) which included energy-dispersive (X-ray) spectrometry (EDS). Dark-field TEM identified a significant nanoparticle concentration while EDS in the SEM identified the propensity of mass fraction particulates to consist of Fe and FeO, representing target erosion and formation of an accumulating debris field. Direct exposure of human epithelial cells (A549), a model for lung tissue, to particulates (especially nanoparticulates) collected on individual filters demonstrated induction of rapid and global cell death to the extent that production of inflammatory cytokines was entirely inhibited. These observations along with comparisons of a wide range of other nanoparticulate species exhibiting cell death in A549 culture may suggest severe human toxicity potential for inhaled ballistic aerosol, but the complexity of the aerosol (particulate) mix has not yet allowed any particular chemical composition to be identified. PMID:20948926

  19. Source term experiments project (STEP): aerosol characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of four experiments is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's TREAT Reactor. They have been designed to provide some of the necessary data regarding magnitude and release rates of fission products from degraded fuel pins, physical and chemical characteristics of released fission products, and aerosol formation and transport phenomena. These are in-pile experiments, whereby the test fuel is heated by neutron induced fission and subsequent clad oxidation in steam environments that simulate as closely as practical predicted reactor accident conditions. The test sequences cover a range of pressure and fuel heatup rate, and include the effect of Ag/In/Cd control rod material.

  20. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  1. Evolution of biomass burning aerosol over the Amazon: airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition, microphysical properties, mixing state and optical properties during SAMBBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W.; Allan, J. D.; Flynn, M.; Darbyshire, E.; Hodgson, A.; Liu, D.; O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Szpek, K.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Artaxo, P.; Coe, H.

    2013-12-01

    Biomass burning represents one of the largest sources of particulate matter to the atmosphere, resulting in a significant perturbation to the Earth's radiative balance coupled with serious impacts on public health. On regional scales, the impacts are substantial, particularly in areas such as the Amazon Basin where large, intense and frequent burning occurs on an annual basis for several months. Absorption by atmospheric aerosols is underestimated by models over South America, which points to significant uncertainties relating to Black Carbon (BC) aerosol properties. Initial results from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which took place during September and October 2012 over Brazil on-board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft, are presented here. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a DMT Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The physical, chemical and optical properties of the aerosols across the region will be characterized in order to establish the impact of biomass burning on regional air quality, weather and climate. The aircraft sampled a range of conditions including sampling of pristine Rainforest, fresh biomass burning plumes, regional haze and elevated biomass burning layers within the free troposphere. The aircraft sampled biomass burning aerosol across the southern Amazon in the states of Rondonia and Mato Grosso, as well as in a Cerrado (Savannah-like) region in Tocantins state. This presented a range of fire conditions, in terms of their number, intensity, vegetation-type and their combustion efficiencies. Near-source sampling of fires in Rainforest environments suggested that smouldering combustion dominated, while flaming combustion dominated in the Cerrado. This led to significant differences in aerosol chemical composition, particularly in terms of the BC content, with BC being enhanced in the Cerrado

  2. Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-05-13

    Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

  3. Methodology for the passive detection and discrimination of chemical and biological aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, William J.; Shokhirev, Kirill N.; Konno, Daisei; Rossi, David C.; Richardson, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The standoff detection and discrimination of aerosolized biological and chemical agents has traditionally been addressed through LIDAR approaches, but sensor systems using these methods have yet to be deployed. We discuss the development and testing of an approach to detect these aerosols using the deployed base of passive infrared hyperspectral sensors used for chemical vapor detection. The detection of aerosols requires the inclusion of down welling sky and up welling ground radiation in the description of the radiative transfer process. The wavelength and size dependent ratio of absorption to scattering provides much of the discrimination capability. The approach to the detection of aerosols utilizes much of the same phenomenology employed in vapor detection; however, the sensor system must acquire information on non-line-of-sight sources of radiation contributing to the scattering process. We describe the general methodology developed to detect chemical or biological aerosols, including justifications for the simplifying assumptions that enable the development of a real-time sensor system. Mie scattering calculations, aerosol size distribution dependence, and the angular dependence of the scattering on the aerosol signature will be discussed. This methodology will then be applied to two test cases: the ground level release of a biological aerosol (BG) and a nonbiological confuser (kaolin clay) as well as the debris field resulting from the intercept of a cruise missile carrying a thickened VX warhead. A field measurement, conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range will be used to illustrate the issues associated with the use of the method.

  4. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous

  5. Chemical and size effects of hygroscopic aerosols on light scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ignatius N.

    1996-08-01

    The extensive thermodynamic and optical properties recently reported [Tang and Munkelwitz, 1994a] for sulfate and nitrate solution droplets are incorporated into a visibility model for computing light scattering by hygroscopic aerosols. The following aerosol systems are considered: NH4HSO4, (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)3H(SO4), NaHSO4, Na2SO4, NH4NO3, and NaNO3. In addition, H2SO4 and NaCl are included to represent freshly formed sulfate and background sea-salt aerosols, respectively. Scattering coefficients, based on 1 μg dry salt per cubic meter of air, are calculated as a function of relative humidity for aerosols of various chemical compositions and lognormal size distributions. For a given size distribution the light scattered by aerosol particles per unit dry-salt mass concentration is only weakly dependent on chemical constituents of the hygroscopic sulfate and nitrate aerosols. Sulfuric acid and sodium chloride aerosols, however, are exceptions and scatter light more efficiently than all other inorganic salt aerosols considered in this study. Both internal and external mixtures exhibit similar light-scattering properties. Thus for common sulfate and nitrate aerosols, since the chemical effect is outweighed by the size effect, it follows that observed light scattering by the ambient aerosol can be approximated, within practical measurement uncertainties, by assuming the aerosol being an external mixture. This has a definite advantage for either visibility degradation or climatic impact modeling calculations, because relevant data are now available for external mixtures but only very scarce for internal mixtures.

  6. Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe L.; Arnott, W. P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-08-09

    A comparison between observed aerosol optical properties from the MILAGRO field campaign, which took place in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during March 2006, and values simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) model, reveals large differences. To help identify the source of the discrepancies, data from the MILAGRO campaign are used to evaluate the "aerosol chemical to aerosol optical properties" module implemented in the full chemistry version of the WRF-Chem model. The evaluation uses measurements of aerosol size distributions and chemical properties obtained at the MILAGRO T1 site. These observations are fed to the module, which makes predictions of various aerosol optical properties, including the scattering coefficient, Bscat; the absorption coefficient, Babs; and the single-scattering albedo, v0; all as a function of time. This simulation is compared with independent measurements obtained from a photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) at a wavelength of 870 nm. Because of line losses and other factors, only "fine mode" aerosols with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 mm are considered here. Over a 10-day period, the simulations of hour-by-hour variations of Bscat are not satisfactory, but simulations of Babs and v0 are considerably better. When averaged over the 10-day period, the computed and observed optical properties agree within the uncertainty limits of the measurements and simulations. Specifically, the observed and calculated values are, respectively: (1) Bscat, 34.1 ± 5.1 Mm-1 versus 30.4 ± 4.3 Mm-1; (2) Babs, 9.7 ± 1.0 Mm-1 versus 11.7 ± 1.5 Mm-1; and (3) v0, 0.78 ± 0.04 and 0.74 ± 0.03. The discrepancies in values of v0 simulated by the full WRF-Chem model thus cannot be attributed to the "aerosol chemistry to optics" module. The discrepancy is more likely due, in part, to poor characterization of emissions near the T1 site, particularly black carbon emissions.

  7. [Chemical Composition of the Single Particle Aerosol in Winter in Nanning Using SPAMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-lin; Song, Hong-jun; Chen, Zhi-ming; Huang, Jiong-li; Yang, Jun-chao; Mao, Jing-ying; Li, Hong; Liang, Gui-yun; Mo, Zhao-yu

    2016-02-15

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was performed to characterize the PM2.5 in Nanning from 15 to 24 February 2015. The correlation (R2) between the PM2.5 number concentration and the mass concentration of PM2.5 obtained using SPAMS was 0.76. The particle number concentration could reflect the atmospheric pollution situation to some degree. The Art-2a classification method was used to classify the chemical composition of PM2.5. The results showed that the principal chemical constituents were elemental carbon, organic elements carbon hybrid particles, organic carbon, rich potassium particles, mineral substance, rich sodium particles, second inorganic particles, levoglucosan and other heavy metals. Among them, the composition of elemental carbon was the highest, followed by organic carbon and rich potassium particles. The particle size of 80% of PM2.5 was mainly concentrated in the range of 0.2 microm to 1.0 microm with a peak value occurring at 0. 62 microm. The particle size distribution characteristics of different chemical components were similar. The number concentration of the chemical components in PM2.5 had the same variation tread with the mass concentration of PM2.5 over time. To a certain extent, the change in chemical composition could reflect the instantaneous pollution source.

  8. [Chemical Composition of the Single Particle Aerosol in Winter in Nanning Using SPAMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-lin; Song, Hong-jun; Chen, Zhi-ming; Huang, Jiong-li; Yang, Jun-chao; Mao, Jing-ying; Li, Hong; Liang, Gui-yun; Mo, Zhao-yu

    2016-02-15

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was performed to characterize the PM2.5 in Nanning from 15 to 24 February 2015. The correlation (R2) between the PM2.5 number concentration and the mass concentration of PM2.5 obtained using SPAMS was 0.76. The particle number concentration could reflect the atmospheric pollution situation to some degree. The Art-2a classification method was used to classify the chemical composition of PM2.5. The results showed that the principal chemical constituents were elemental carbon, organic elements carbon hybrid particles, organic carbon, rich potassium particles, mineral substance, rich sodium particles, second inorganic particles, levoglucosan and other heavy metals. Among them, the composition of elemental carbon was the highest, followed by organic carbon and rich potassium particles. The particle size of 80% of PM2.5 was mainly concentrated in the range of 0.2 microm to 1.0 microm with a peak value occurring at 0. 62 microm. The particle size distribution characteristics of different chemical components were similar. The number concentration of the chemical components in PM2.5 had the same variation tread with the mass concentration of PM2.5 over time. To a certain extent, the change in chemical composition could reflect the instantaneous pollution source. PMID:27363128

  9. Measurements of the chemical, physical, and optical properties of single aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, Ryan Christopher

    Knowledge of aerosol physical, chemical, optical properties is essential for judging the effect that particulates have on human health, climate and visibility. The aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) is capable of measuring, in real-time, the size and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols. This was exemplified by the recent deployments of the ATOFMS to Mexico City and Riverside. The ATOFMS provided rapid information about the major particle types present in the atmosphere. Industrial sources of particles, such as fine mode particles containing lead, zinc and chloride were detected in Mexico City. The rapid time response of the ATOFMS was also exploited to characterize a coarse particle concentrator used in human health effects studies. The ATOFMS showed the ability to detect changes in particle composition with a time resolution of 15 min during short 2 hour human exposure studies. As a major component of this work, an optical measurement has been added to the ATOFMS. The scattered light intensity was acquired for each sized and chemically analyzed particle. This scattering information together with the particle aerodynamic diameter, enabled the refractive index and density of the aerosol to be retrieved. This method was validated in the laboratory using different test particles such as oils, aqueous salt solutions and black carbon particles. It was found that the nozzle-type inlet does not evaporate aqueous salt particles as has been observed for aerodynamic lens inlets. These new optical and microphysical measurements were integrated into the ATOFMS for field deployment in Riverside and Mexico City. For both cities, the different mixing states were found to have unique refractive indexes and densities. A fraction of the strongly absorbing elemental carbon particles were observed to have a spherical morphology due to heavy mixing with secondary species. In addition to the quantitative refractive index and effective density measurements

  10. Chemical properties and morphology of Marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean atmosphere: a mesocosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, Barbara; Sellegri, Karine; Charrière, Bruno; Sempéré, Richard; Mas, Sébastien; Marchand, Nicolas; George, Christian; Même, Aurèlie; R'mili, Badr; Delmont, Anne; Schwier, Allison; Rose, Clémence; Colomb, Aurèlie; Pey, Jorge; Langley Dewitt, Helen

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary Sea Salt Aerosol formed at the sea surface from background level of the aerosol. An alternative tool to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment is provided by the mesocosms, which represent an important link between field studies and laboratory experiments. The sea-air transfer of particles and gases was investigated in relation to water chemical composition and biological activity during a mesocosm experiment within the SAM project (Sources of marine Aerosol in the Mediterranean) at the Oceanographic and Marine Station STARESO in Western Corsica (May 2013). Three 2 m mesocosms were filled with screened (<1000 µm) 2260 L of subsurface (1 m) seawater and covered with a transparent Teflon film dome to minimize atmospheric contamination. The mesocosms were equipped with a pack of optical and physicochemical sensors and received different treatments: one was left unchanged as control and two were enriched by addition of nitrates and phosphates respecting Redfield ratio (N:P = 16). The evolution of the three systems was followed for 20 days. The set of sensors in each mesocosm was allowed to monitor, at high frequency (every 10 min), the water temperature, conductivity, pH, incident light, fluorescence of chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen concentration. The mesocosm seawaters were daily sampled for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses. Both dissolved and gaseous VOCs were also analyzed. In addition, few liters of seawater from each mesocosm were daily and immediately collected and transferred to a bubble-bursting apparatus to simulate nascent sea spray aerosol. On

  11. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  12. Method for characterization of low molecular weight organic acids in atmospheric aerosols using ion chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brent, Lacey C; Reiner, Jessica L; Dickerson, Russell R; Sander, Lane C

    2014-08-01

    The structural composition of PM2.5 monitored in the atmosphere is usually divided by the analysis of organic carbon, black (also called elemental) carbon, and inorganic salts. The characterization of the chemical composition of aerosols represents a significant challenge to analysts, and studies are frequently limited to determination of aerosol bulk properties. To better understand the potential health effects and combined interactions of components in aerosols, a variety of measurement techniques for individual analytes in PM2.5 need to be implemented. The method developed here for the measurement of organic acids achieves class separation of aliphatic monoacids, aliphatic diacids, aromatic acids, and polyacids. The selective ion monitoring capability of a triple quadropole mass analyzer was frequently capable of overcoming instances of incomplete separations. Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1649b Urban Dust was characterized; 34 organic acids were qualitatively identified, and 6 organic acids were quantified.

  13. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a nonhuman-primate, head-only aerosol chamber

    PubMed Central

    Bohannon, J. Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B.; Johnson, Reed F.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05–500 μm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modelled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to nonhuman primates within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of nonhuman primate infectious disease models. Here we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements. PMID:25970823

  14. Generation and characterization of large-particle aerosols using a center flow tangential aerosol generator with a non-human-primate, head-only aerosol chamber.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, J Kyle; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Kuhn, Jens H; Wada, Jiro; Bollinger, Laura; Jahrling, Peter B; Johnson, Reed F

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol droplets or particles produced from infected respiratory secretions have the potential to infect another host through inhalation. These respiratory particles can be polydisperse and range from 0.05 to 500 µm in diameter. Animal models of infection are generally established to facilitate the potential licensure of candidate prophylactics and/or therapeutics. Consequently, aerosol-based animal infection models are needed to properly study and counter airborne infections. Ideally, experimental aerosol exposure should reliably result in animal disease that faithfully reproduces the modeled human disease. Few studies have been performed to explore the relationship between exposure particle size and induced disease course for infectious aerosol particles. The center flow tangential aerosol generator (CenTAG™) produces large-particle aerosols capable of safely delivering a variety of infectious aerosols to non-human primates (NHPs) within a Class III Biological Safety Cabinet (BSC) for establishment or refinement of NHP infectious disease models. Here, we report the adaptation of this technology to the Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) environment for the future study of high-consequence viral pathogens and the characterization of CenTAG™-created sham (no animal, no virus) aerosols using a variety of viral growth media and media supplements. PMID:25970823

  15. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.; MCGRAW, R.; BENKOVITZ, C.M.; WRIGHT, D.L.

    2001-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  16. Chemical composition of aerosol particles and light extinction apportionment before and during the heating season in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingqing; Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Du, Wei; Sun, Chengzhu; Fu, Pingqing; Wang, Zifa

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts into characterization of the sources and formation mechanisms of severe haze pollution in the megacity of Beijing, the response of aerosol composition and optical properties to coal combustion emissions in the heating season remain poorly understood. Here we conducted a 3 month real-time measurement of submicron aerosol (PM1) composition by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor and particle light extinction by a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift extinction monitor in Beijing, China, from 1 October to 31 December 2012. The average (±σ) PM1 concentration was 82.4 (±73.1) µg/m3 during the heating period (HP, 15 November to 31 December), which was nearly 50% higher than that before HP (1 October to 14 November). While nitrate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) showed relatively small changes, organics, sulfate, and chloride were observed to have significant increases during HP, indicating the dominant impacts of coal combustion sources on these three species. The relative humidity-dependent composition further illustrated an important role of aqueous-phase processing for the sulfate enhancement during HP. We also observed great increases of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and coal combustion OA (CCOA) during HP, which was attributed to higher emissions at lower temperatures and coal combustion emissions, respectively. The relationship between light extinction and chemical composition was investigated using a multiple linear regression model. Our results showed that the largest contributors to particle extinction were ammonium nitrate (32%) and ammonium sulfate (28%) before and during HP, respectively. In addition, the contributions of SOA and primary OA to particle light extinction were quantified. The results showed that the OA extinction was mainly caused by SOA before HP and by SOA and CCOA during HP, yet with small contributions from HOA and cooking aerosol for the entire study period. Our results elucidate substantial changes of aerosol

  17. Synergic use of TOMS and AERONET observations for characterization of aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Sinyuk, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.

    2003-04-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  18. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  19. Chemical Characterization of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-07-01

    Exoplanetary discoveries in the past two decades have unveiled an astonishing diversity in the physical characteristics of exoplanetary systems, including their orbital properties, masses, radii, equilibrium temperatures, and stellar hosts. Exoplanets known today range from gas-giants to nearly Earth-size planets, and some even in the habitable zones of their host stars. Recent advances in exoplanet observations and theoretical methods are now leading to unprecedented constraints on the physicochemical properties of exoplanetary atmospheres, interiors, and their formation conditions. I will discuss the latest developments and future prospects of this new era of exoplanetary characterization. In particular, I will present some of the latest constraints on atmospheric chemical compositions of exoplanets, made possible by state-of-the-art high-precision observations from space and ground, and their implications for atmospheric processes and formation conditions of exoplanets. The emerging framework for using atmospheric elemental abundance ratios for constraining the origins and migration pathways of giant exoplanets, e.g. hot Jupiters, will also be discussed. A survey of theoretical and observational directions in the field will be presented along with several open questions on the horizon.

  20. Importance of Physico-Chemical Properties of Aerosols in the Formation of Arctic Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, S. A.; Girard, E.

    2014-12-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in the Arctic weather and climate system but interactions between aerosols, clouds and radiation are poorly understood. Consequently, it is essential to fully understand their properties and especially their formation process. Extensive measurements from ground-based sites and satellite remote sensing reveal the existence of two Types of Ice Clouds (TICs) in the Arctic during the polar night and early spring. TIC-1 are composed by non-precipitating very small (radar-unseen) ice crystals whereas TIC-2 are detected by both sensors and are characterized by a low concentration of large precipitating ice crystals. It is hypothesized that TIC-2 formation is linked to the acidification of aerosols, which inhibit the ice nucleating properties of ice nuclei (IN). As a result, the IN concentration is reduced in these regions, resulting to a smaller concentration of larger ice crystals. Over the past 10 years, several parameterizations of homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation have been developed to reflect the various physical and chemical properties of aerosols. These parameterizations are derived from laboratory studies on aerosols of different chemical compositions. The parameterizations are also developed according to two main approaches: stochastic (that nucleation is a probabilistic process, which is time dependent) and singular (that nucleation occurs at fixed conditions of temperature and humidity and time-independent). This research aims to better understand the formation process of TICs using a newly-developed ice nucleation parameterizations. For this purpose, we implement some parameterizations (2 approaches) into the Limited Area version of the Global Multiscale Environmental Model (GEM-LAM) and use them to simulate ice clouds observed during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Arctic Cloud (ISDAC) in Alaska. We use both approaches but special attention is focused on the new parameterizations of the singular approach. Simulation

  1. Analysis of the Effects of Chemical Composition and Humidity on Visibility using Highly Time Resolved Aerosol Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunden, M. M.; Brown, N. J.; Liu, D.; Tonse, S.

    2005-12-01

    relationships among extinction, aerosol loading and type, and relative humidity. References 1. Lunden, M.M., T.L. Thatcher, S.V. Hering, and N.J. Brown (2003). The Use of Time- and Chemically-Resolved Particulate Data to Characterize the Infiltration of Outdoor PM-2.5 into a Residence in the San Joaquin Valley. Environmental Science and Technology 37, pp 4724-4732. 2. Malm, W.C., 'IMPROVE, Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments,' ISSN: 0737-5352-47, Colorado State University, May 2000.

  2. Characterization of a Photoacoustic Aerosol Absorption Spectrometer for Aircraft-based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, B. J.; Wagner, N. L.; Richardson, M.; Brock, C. A.; Murphy, D. M.; Adler, G.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol directly impacts the Earth's climate through extinction of incoming and outgoing radiation. The optical extinction is due to both scattering and absorption. In situ measurements of aerosol extinction and scattering are well established and have uncertainties less than 5%. However measurements of aerosol absorption typically have uncertainties of 20-30%. Development and characterization of more accurate and precise instrumentation for measurement of aerosol absorption will enable a deeper understand of significance and spatial distribution of black and brown carbon aerosol, the effect of atmospheric processes on aerosol optical properties, and influence of aerosol optical properties on direct radiative forcing. Here, we present a detailed characterization of a photoacoustic aerosol absorption spectrometer designed for deployment aboard research aircraft. The spectrometer operates at three colors across the visible spectrum and is calibrated in the field using ozone. The field calibration is validated in the laboratory using synthetic aerosol and simultaneous measurements of extinction and scattering. In addition, the sensitivity of the instrument is characterized under conditions typically encountered during aircraft sampling e.g. as a function of changing pressure. We will apply this instrument characterization to ambient aerosol absorption data collected during the SENEX and SEAC4RS aircraft based field campaigns.

  3. Chemically-Resolved Volatility Measurements of Organic Aerosol from Different Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Docherty, K. S.; Mohr, C.; Ulbrich, I. M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    A newly modified fast temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) was coupled to a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) for rapid quantification of chemically-resolved volatility of organic aerosols (OA) emitted from individual sources. The TD-AMS system was used to characterize primary OA (POA) from biomass burning, trash burning surrogates (paper and plastic), and meat cooking as well as chamber-generated secondary OA (SOA) from a-pinene and gasoline vapor. Almost all atmospheric models represent POA as non-volatile, with no allowance for evaporation upon heating or dilution, or condensation upon cooling. Our results indicate that all OAs observed show semi-volatile behavior and that most POAs are at least as volatile as SOA measured in urban environments. Biomass-burning OA (BBOA) exhibited a wide range of volatilities, but more often showed volatility similar to urban OA. Paper-burning resembles BBOA because of its high volatility and intermediate atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratio, while meat-cooking OAs (MCOA) have consistently lower volatility than ambient OA. Chamber-generated SOA was significantly more volatile than urban SOA, challenging extrapolation of traditional laboratory volatility measurements to the atmosphere. Most OAs sampled show increasing O/C ratio and decreasing H/C (hydrogen-to-carbon) ratio with temperature, further indicating that more oxygenated OA components are less volatile.

  4. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  5. Enabling the identification, quantification, and characterization of organics in complex mixtures to understand atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, Gabriel Avram

    Particles in the atmosphere are known to have negative health effects and important but highly uncertain impacts on global and regional climate. A majority of this particulate matter is formed through atmospheric oxidation of naturally and anthropogenically emitted gases to yield highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA), an amalgamation of thousands of individual chemical compounds. However, comprehensive analysis of SOA composition has been stymied by its complexity and lack of available measurement techniques. In this work, novel instrumentation, analysis methods, and conceptual frameworks are introduced for chemically characterizing atmospherically relevant mixtures and ambient aerosols, providing a fundamentally new level of detailed knowledge on their structures, chemical properties, and identification of their components. This chemical information is used to gain insights into the formation, transformation and oxidation of organic aerosols. Biogenic and anthropogenic mixtures are observed in this work to yield incredible complexity upon oxidation, producing over 100 separable compounds from a single precursor. As a first step toward unraveling this complexity, a method was developed for measuring the polarity and volatility of individual compounds in a complex mixture using two-dimensional gas chromatography, which is demonstrated in Chapter 2 for describing the oxidation of SOA formed from a biogenic compound (longifolene: C15H24). Several major products and tens of substantial minor products were produced, but none could be identified by traditional methods or have ever been isolated and studied in the laboratory. A major realization of this work was that soft ionization mass spectrometry could be used to identify the molecular mass and formula of these unidentified compounds, a major step toward a comprehensive description of complex mixtures. This was achieved by coupling gas chromatography to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with

  6. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care.

  7. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care. PMID:27136117

  8. Advanced spray-dried design, physicochemical characterization, and aerosol dispersion performance of vancomycin and clarithromycin multifunctional controlled release particles for targeted respiratory delivery as dry powder inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Woong; Li, Xiaojian; Vogt, Frederick G; Hayes, Don; Zwischenberger, Joseph B; Park, Eun-Seok; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-10-15

    Respirable microparticles/nanoparticles of the antibiotics vancomycin (VCM) and clarithromycin (CLM) were successfully designed and developed by novel organic solution advanced spray drying from methanol solution. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of pump feeding rates of 25% (Low P), 50% (Medium P) and 75% (High P). Systematic and comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Karl Fischer titration (KFT), laser size diffraction (LSD), gravimetric vapor sorption (GVS), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and spectroscopy for chemical imaging mapping. These novel spray-dried (SD) microparticulate/nanoparticulate dry powders displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) with high values in emitted dose (ED), respirable fraction (RF), and fine particle fraction (FPF). VCM DPIs displayed better aerosol dispersion performance compared to CLM DPIs which was related to differences in the physicochemical and particle properties of VCM and CLM. In addition, organic solution advanced co-spray drying particle engineering design was employed to successfully produce co-spray-dried (co-SD) multifunctional microparticulate/nanoparticulate aerosol powder formulations of VCM and CLM with the essential lung surfactant phospholipid, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), for controlled release pulmonary nanomedicine delivery as inhalable dry powder aerosols. Formulation optimization was achieved through statistical experimental design of molar ratios of co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC. XRPD and DSC confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid-state was preserved following spray drying. Co-SD VCM:DPPC and co-SD CLM:DPPC dry powder aerosols demonstrated controlled release of antibiotic drug that was fitted to various

  9. CCN frequency distributions and aerosol chemical composition from long-term observations at European ACTRIS supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, Stefano; Rinaldi, Matteo; Schmale, Julia Yvonne; Gysel, Martin; Fröhlich, Roman; Poulain, Laurent; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Cloud droplet number concentration is regulated by the availability of aerosol acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Predicting the air concentrations of CCN involves knowledge of all physical and chemical processes that contribute to shape the particle size distribution and determine aerosol hygroscopicity. The relevance of specific atmospheric processes (e.g., nucleation, coagulation, condensation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol, etc.) is time- and site-dependent, therefore the availability of long-term, time-resolved aerosol observations at locations representative of diverse environments is strategic for the validation of state-of-the-art chemical transport models suited to predict CCN concentrations. We focused on long-term (year-long) datasets of CCN and of aerosol composition data including black carbon, and inorganic as well as organic compounds from the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at selected ACTRIS supersites (http://www.actris.eu/). We discuss here the joint frequency distribution of CCN levels and of aerosol chemical components concentrations for two stations: an alpine site (Jungfraujoch, CH) and a central European rural site (Melpitz, DE). The CCN frequency distributions at Jungfraujoch are broad and generally correlated with the distributions of the concentrations of aerosol chemical components (e.g., high CCN concentrations are most frequently found for high organic matter or black carbon concentrations, and vice versa), which can be explained as an effect of the strong seasonality in the aerosol characteristics at the mountain site. The CCN frequency distributions in Melpitz show a much weaker overlap with the distributions of BC concentrations or other chemical compounds. However, especially at high CCN concentration levels, a statistical correlation with organic matter (OM) concentration can be observed. For instance, the number of CCN (with particle diameter between 20 and 250 nm) at a supersaturation of 0.7% is

  10. Physical and chemical characterization of bioaerosols - Implications for nucleation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariya, P. A.; Sun, J.; Eltouny, N. A.; Hudson, E. D.; Hayes, C. T.; Kos, G.

    The importance of organic compounds in the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and as cloud condensation and ice-forming nuclei, has been recognized for several decades. Organic compounds comprise a significant fraction of the suspended matter mass, leading to local (e.g. toxicity, health hazards) and global (e.g. climate change) impacts. The state of knowledge of the physical chemistry of organic aerosols has increased during the last few decades. However, due to their complex chemistry and the multifaceted processes in which they are involved, the importance of organic aerosols, particularly bioaerosols, in driving physical and chemical atmospheric processes is still very uncertain and poorly understood. Factors such as solubility, surface tension, chemical impurities, volatility, morphology, contact angle, deliquescence, wettability, and the oxidation process are pivotal in the understanding of the activation processes of cloud droplets, and their chemical structures, solubilities and even the molecular configuration of the microbial outer membrane, all impact ice and cloud nucleation processes in the atmosphere. The aim of this review paper is to assess the current state of knowledge regarding chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols with a focus on those properties important in nucleation processes. We herein discuss the potential importance (or lack thereof) of physical and chemical properties of bioaerosols and illustrate how the knowledge of these properties can be employed to study nucleation processes using a modeling exercise. We also outline a list of major uncertainties due to a lack of understanding of the processes involved or lack of available data. We will also discuss key issues of atmospheric significance deserving future physical chemistry research in the fields of bioaerosol characterization and microphysics, as well as bioaerosol modeling. These fundamental questions are to be addressed prior to any definite conclusions on the

  11. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P.

    2014-04-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging, and by changing in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) is compared with MOCAGE simulations and showed that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the bias (from 0.032 to 0.002) and a better correlation (from 0.062 to 0.322) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive bias in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.153 to 0.026), and a negative bias in the desert dust representation in the African dust outflow region (from -0.179 to -0.051). The updates in sedimentation produced a modest difference; the bias with MODIS data from 0.002 in the updated configuration went to

  12. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM): particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Lee, B. P.; Huang, D.; Jie Li, Y.; Schurman, M. I.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Chan, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 on the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA), characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), and sulfate are found to be dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear mealtime concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during mealtimes, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and the influence of continental air masses.

  13. Continuous measurements at the urban roadside in an Asian Megacity by Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM): particulate matter characteristics during fall and winter seasons in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Lee, B. P.; Huang, D.; Li, Y. J.; Schurman, M. I.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Chan, C. K.

    2015-07-01

    Non-refractory submicron aerosol is characterized using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) in the fall and winter seasons of 2013 at the roadside in an Asian megacity environment in Hong Kong. Organic aerosol (OA), characterized by application of Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF), and sulfate are found dominant. Traffic-related organic aerosol shows good correlation with other vehicle-related species, and cooking aerosol displays clear meal-time concentration maxima and association with surface winds from restaurant areas. Contributions of individual species and OA factors to high NR-PM1 are analyzed for hourly data and daily data; while cooking emissions in OA contribute to high hourly concentrations, particularly during meal times, secondary organic aerosol components are responsible for episodic events and high day-to-day PM concentrations. Clean periods are either associated with precipitation, which reduces secondary OA with a~lesser impact on primary organics, or clean oceanic air masses with reduced long-range transport and better dilution of local pollution. Haze events are connected with increases in contribution of secondary organic aerosol, from 30 to 50 % among total non-refractory organics, and influence of continental air masses.

  14. Isolation of an unknown compound, from both blood of Bhopal aerosol disaster victims and residue of tank E-610 of Union Carbide India Limited--chemical characterization of the structure.

    PubMed

    Chandra, H; Saraf, A K; Jadhav, R K; Rao, G J; Sharma, V K; Sriramachari, S; Vairamani, M

    1994-04-01

    A total of more than 28 chemical entities/reaction products in the form of gases, vapour and particulate matter were reported from the tank E-610 of methyl isocyanate (MIC) storage tank of Union Carbide India Limited on the night of 2/3 December 1984 in Bhopal. In earlier studies, methyl isocyanate and its trimer, with a few other compounds, were reported in the human victims preserved in deep freeze. Randomly selected samples were analysed by gas chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer (ITD-800, Finnigan MAT, UK). Four of the cases showed the peaks and fragmentation pattern identified with one of the unidentified compound of molecular weight 269 amu in the Tank Residue, which constituted about 0.2 area per cent on GC-ITD. After isolation by column chromatography and being exposed to characterization, it was identified as a Spiro compound. It was possibly formed by the polymerization of five molecules of methyl isocyanate.

  15. Chemical composition of the atmospheric aerosol in the troposphere over the Hudson Bay lowlands and Quebec-Labrador regions of Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Gorzelska, K.; Talbot, R.W.; Lefer, B.; Klemm, K.; Klemm, O.; Gregory, G.L.; Anderson, B.; Barrie, L.A.

    1994-01-20

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected in the boundary layer and free troposphere over continental and coastal subarctic regions of Canada during the July-August 1990 joint US-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B/Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES). The samples were analyzed for the following water soluble species: sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, potassium, sodium, chloride, oxalate, methylsulfonate, and total amine nitrogen. Ammonium and sulfate were the major water soluble components of these aerosols. The nearly neutral (overall) chemical composition of summertime aerosol particles contrasts their strongly acidic wintertime composition. Aerosol samples were separated into several air mass categories and characterized in terms of chemical composition, associated mixing ratios of gaseous compounds, and meteorological parameters. The fundamental category represented particles associated with {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} air masses. The summertime atmospheric aerosols in background air over the North American subarctic and Arctic regions were characterized by relatively small and spatially uniform mixing ratios of the measured species. These aerosol particles were aged to the extent that they had lost their primary source signature. The chemical profile of the background air aerosols was frequently modified by additions from biomass fire plumes, aged tropical marine air, and intrusions of upper troposphere/lower stratospheric air. Aerosols in boundary layer background air over the boreal forested region of Quebec-Labrador had significantly larger mixing ratios of ammonium and sulfate relative to the Hudson Bay region. This may reflect infiltration of anthropogenic pollution or be due to natural emissions from this region. 71 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Temporal variability in Chemical and Stable isotopic characteristics of ambient bulk aerosols over a coastal environment of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, R.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Sarma, V. V.; Praveen, P.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols are known to influence regional biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in addition to regional radiation budgets. Owing to multiplicity of primary sources of natural and anthropogenic origin, their detailed chemical and isotopic characterization can greatly help in source apportionment and identifying secondary processes. From the roof of NIO-Goa (India) [15.46οN, 73.8oE; at ~55.8 MASL], atmospheric bulk aerosols (n=22) were collected on Quartz filters, from 2009 December to January 2011 covering entire 2010 (except monsoon period) to investigate temporal variability in their chemical and isotopic characteristics of the carbonaceous fraction i.e. TC, TOC and TN mass concentrations and their stable isotopic ratios (δ13CTC, δ13CTOC and δ15NTN). Both δ13CTC and δ13CTOC varied in narrow ranges (-24.9±1.1‰, -25.7±0.9‰ respectively), but significant differences were observed between the two during pre-monsoon months (as high as 2.3‰), possibly due to mixing of inorganic mineral dust. δ15NTN values showed a wide range of variability (average = 13.6±7.2‰), with significantly lower values (~2-5‰; as reported earlier by Agnihotri et al. 2011) during pre-monsoon period compared to those during winter (as high as ~26‰). Using δ13CTC values and two end-member mixing model (assuming δ13C of marine and continental carbon as -21 and -27‰ respectively), the average marine carbon fraction for Goa aerosols was estimated as 36±18.5%, significantly higher than reported for Chennai aerosols (~19%) (Pavuluri et al., 2011), but close to the reported average for marine aerosols at Bermuda (38%) (Turekian et al., 2003). Chemical and isotopic characteristics of ambient aerosols over Goa along with contemporaneous meteorological data indicate that winter aerosols contain significant proportion of carbonaceous fraction originated from biomass burning and other anthropogenic activities carried out in northern parts of

  17. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  18. Aerosol Characterization and New Instrumentation for Better Understanding Snow Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beres, N. D.

    2015-12-01

    Snow albedo is determined by snowpack thickness and grain size, but also affected by contamination with light-absorbing, microscopic (e.g., mineral dust, combustion aerosols, bio-aerosols) and macroscopic (e.g., microalgae, plant debris, sand, organisms) compounds. Most currently available instruments for measuring snow albedo utilize the natural, downward flux of solar radiation and the reflected upward flux. This reliance on solar radiation (and, thus, large zenith angles and clear-sky conditions) leads to severe constraints, preventing characterization of detailed diurnal snow albedo cycles. Here, we describe instrumentation and methodologies to address these limitations with the development and deployment of new snow radiation sensors for measuring surface spectral and in-snow radiative properties. This novel instrumentation will be tested at the CRREL/UCSB Eastern Sierra (CUES) Snow Study Site at Mammoth Mountain, which is extensively instrumented for characterizing snow properties including snow albedo and surface morphology. However, it has been lacking instrumentation for the characterization of aerosols that can be deposited on the snow surface through dry and wet deposition. Currently, we are installing aerosol instrumentation at the CUES site, which are also described. This includes instruments for the multi-wavelength measurement of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients and for the characterization of aerosol size distribution. Knowledge of aerosol concentration and physical and optical properties will allow for the study of aerosol deposition and modification of snow albedo and for establishing an aerosol climatology for the CUES site.

  19. Aerosol Size and Chemical Composition in the Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R. Y. W.; Hayes, P. L.; Leaitch, W. R.; Croft, B.; O'Neill, N. T.; Fogal, P.; Drummond, J. R.; Sloan, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic aerosol have a strong annual cycle, with winter months dominated by long range transport from lower latitudes resulting in high mass loadings. Conversely, local emissions are more prominent in the summer months because of the decreased influence of transported aerosol, allowing us to regularly observe both transported and local aerosol. This study will present observations of aerosol chemical composition and particle number size distribution collected at the Polar Environment Artic Research Laboratory and the Alert Global Atmospheric Watch Observatory at Eureka (80N, 86W) and Alert (82N, 62W), Nunavut, respectively. Summer time observations of the number size distribution reveal a persistent mode of particles centered between 30-50 nm, with occasional bursts of smaller particles. The non-refractory aerosol chemical composition, measured by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer, is primarily organic, with contributions from both aged and fresher organic aerosol. Factor analysis will be conducted to better understand these sources. The site at Eureka is more susceptible to long range transport since it is at the top of a mountain ridge (610 m above sea level) and will be compared to the site at Alert on an elevated plain (200 m above sea level). This will allow us to determine the relative contributions from processes and sources at the sites at different elevations. Comparisons with aerosol optical depth and GEOS-Chem model output will also be presented to put these surface measurements into context with the overlying and regional atmosphere. Results from this study contribute to our knowledge of aerosol in the high Arctic.

  20. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2015-08-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 μm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical processing as rBC in the atmosphere

  1. Design and application of a new modular adapter for laser diffraction characterization of inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Schaller, M; Witt, W; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    An inhaler adapter has been designed for the characterization of the aerosol clouds from medical aerosol generators such as nebulizers, dry powder inhalers (dpis) and metered dose inhalers (mdis) with laser diffraction technology. The adapter has a pre-separator, for separation of large particles (i.e. carrier crystals) from the aerosol cloud before it is exposed to the laser beam. It also has a fine particle collector for measuring the emitted mass fraction of fines by chemical detection methods after laser diffraction sizing. The closed system enables flow control through the aerosol generators and all test conditions, including ambient temperature and relative humidity, are automatically recorded. Counter flows minimize particle deposition onto the two windows for the laser beam, which make successive measurements without cleaning of these windows possible. The adapter has successfully been tested for nebulizers, mdis and dpis. In a comparative study with ten nebulizers it was found that these devices differ considerably in droplet size (distribution) of the aerosol cloud for the same 10% aqueous tobramycin solution (volume median diameters ranging from 1.25 to 3.25 microm) when they are used under the conditions recommended by the manufacturers. The droplet size distribution generated by the Sidestream (with PortaNeb compressor) is very constant during nebulization until dry running of the device. Comparative testing of dpis containing spherical pellet type of formulations for the drug (e.g. the AstraZeneca Turbuhaler) with the adapter is fast and simple. But also formulations containing larger carrier material could successfully be measured. Disintegration efficiency of a test inhaler with carrier retainment (acting as a pre-separator) could be measured quite accurately both for a colistin sulfate formulation with 16.7% of a lactose fraction 106-150 microm and for a budesonide formulation with a carrier mixture of Pharmatose 325 and 150 M. Therefore, it is

  2. Molecular Characterization of Marine Organic Aerosols Collected during a Round-the-World Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P.; Kawamura, K.; Miura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected on board the R/V Hakuho Maru during a round-the-world cruise (KH89-2) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. More than 140 organic species were detected in the marine aerosols and were grouped into 11 organic compound classes, including aliphatic lipids, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols, lignin/resin acids, sterols, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydroxy-/polyacids, aromatic acids, as well as secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers from the photooxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 0.94 to 98 ng m-3 (average 31 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in coastal regions (California Coast, South China Sea, and Western North Pacific) than in open marine areas (North Pacific and North Atlantic), suggesting that long-range atmospheric transport from the continents is the main source of marine organic aerosols. Isoprene SOA tracers, i.e., 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols, were detected in all the samples (0.11-22 ng m-3, average 3.6 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in the tropical regions. They accounted for 0.48-29% of the total identified organics. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, secondary oxidation products (30-31%), fossil fuel combustion products (27-28%), as well as marine natural emissions (22-34%) were found as major contributors to the marine aerosols. In California Coast, North Indian Ocean and South China Sea, secondary oxidation products can contribute 44-55% of the total identified organics, followed by terrestrial natural emissions (12-27%), while biomass burning emissions were found to contribute only 1-2%. However, in the western North Pacific near the Asian continent, fossil fuel combustion (27%) and

  3. Characterization of polar organic compounds and source analysis of fine organic aerosols in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunchun

    Organic aerosols, as an important fraction of airborne particulate mass, significantly affect the environment, climate, and human health. Compared with inorganic species, characterization of individual organic compounds is much less complete and comprehensive because they number in thousands or more and are diverse in chemical structures. The source contributions of organic aerosols are far from being well understood because they can be emitted from a variety of sources as well as formed from photochemical reactions of numerous precursors. This thesis work aims to improve the characterization of polar organic compounds and source apportionment analysis of fine organic carbon (OC) in Hong Kong, which consists of two parts: (1) An improved analytical method to determine monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls collected on filter substrates has been established. These oxygenated compounds were determined as their butyl ester or butyl acetal derivatives using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The new method made improvements over the original Kawamura method by eliminating the water extraction and evaporation steps. Aerosol materials were directly mixed with the BF 3/BuOH derivatization agent and the extracting solvent hexane. This modification improves recoveries for both the more volatile and the less water-soluble compounds. This improved method was applied to study the abundances and sources of these oxygenated compounds in PM2.5 aerosol samples collected in Hong Kong under different synoptic conditions during 2003-2005. These compounds account for on average 5.2% of OC (range: 1.4%-13.6%) on a carbon basis. Oxalic acid was the most abundant species. Six C2 and C3 oxygenated compounds, namely oxalic, malonic, glyoxylic, pyruvic acids, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal, dominated this suite of oxygenated compounds. More efforts are therefore suggested to focus on these small compounds in understanding the role of oxygenated

  4. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical, Microphysical, and Chemical Measurements between LAX and Long Beach Harbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornhill, K. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Chen, G.; Winstead, E.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Diskin, G. S.; Nenes, A.; Lathem, T. L.; Arctas Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In the summer of 2008, measurements of aerosols were made on-board the NASA DC-8 over the state of California, as part of the second phase of the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) on behalf of the California Air resources Board (CARB). The DC-8 made four flights, between 18 June and 26 June, totaling 33 hours, to examine California’s atmosphere to better understand the chemical dynamics of smog and greenhouse gases over the state. The NASA DC-8 had a suite of aerosol instruments, capable of measuring the number concentrations, optical properties, and size distributions of aerosols between 0.003 and 1500 um. In this presentation, we will compare aerosol observations made at two areas within the Los Angeles Basin, Los Angeles International airport (LAX) and Long Beach Harbor. LAX is in the middle of the second most populated metropolitan area in the United States and is the fifth busiest airport in the world, while Long Beach Harbor (20 miles south of LAX) is the world’s 2nd busiest container port. Initial results suggest a greater aerosol loading and additional presence of ultrafine aerosols during the week due to vehicular emissions. We will also present analysis of aerosol observations as a function of time of day from the four missed approaches at LAX and four over flights of Long Beach Harbor.

  5. The chemical composition of fine ambient aerosol particles in the Beijing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekat, Bettina; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Gnauk, Thomas; Müller, Konrad; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2010-05-01

    The strong economical growth in China during the last few decades led to heavy air pollution caused by significantly increased particle emissions. The aerosol particles affect not only the regional air quality and visibility, but can also influence cloud formation processes and the radiative balance of the atmosphere by their optical and microphysical properties. The ability to act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) is related to microphysical properties like the hygroscopic growth or the cloud droplet activation. The chemical composition of CCN plays an important role on these properties and varies strongly with the particle size and the time of day. Hygroscopic or surface active substances can increase the hygroscopicity and lower the surface tension of the particle liquid phase, respectively. The presence of such compounds may result in faster cloud droplet activation by faster water uptake. The DFG project HaChi (Haze in China) aimed at studying physical and chemical parameters of urban aerosol particles in the Beijing area in order to associate the chemical composition of aerosol particles with their ability to act as CCN. To this end, two measurement campaigns were performed at the Wuqing National Ordinary Meteorological Observing Station, which is a background site near Beijing. The winter campaign was realized in March 2009 and the summer campaign took place from mid July 2009 to mid August 2009. Fine particles with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than or equal 1 μm were continuously sampled for 24h over the two campaigns using a DIGITEL high volume sampler (DHA-80). The present contribution presents and discusses the results of the chemical characterization of the DIGITEL filters samples. The filters were analyzed for the mass concentration, inorganic ions and carbon sum parameters like elemental (EC), organic (OC) and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). The WSOC fraction was further characterized for hygroscopic substances like low molecular

  6. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  7. Characterization of Microphysical Properties of Saharan Dust Aerosols During Trans-Atlantic Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, L.; Morris, V. R.

    2005-12-01

    The NOAA Center in Atmospheric Sciences (NCAS) Trans-Atlantic Saharan Dust AERosol and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) 2004 was a 27 day mission aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown (RHB). The AEROSE mission took place during February 29th thru March 26th, departing from Barbados to the Canary Islands and ending in Puerto Rico. The cruise tracks for AEROSE 2004 coincided with one of the biggest dust storms to date for this season. One of the goals of the mission was to provide a set of critical measurements to characterize the impacts and microphysical evolution of Saharan dust aerosol during Trans-Atlantic transport. A Laser Particle Counter (LPC) was used to retrieve in-situ number density distribution. A Quartz Crystal Microbalance Cascade Impactor (QCM) was used to retrieve in-situ mass density distributions. The QCM also provides a sampling platform for post analysis to determine morphological properties and elemental chemical composition. The morphological properties were determined with the use of a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The combination of the SEM with an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis system provides the elemental composition details. I will present the evolution of the chemical elements as a function of size as they are transported. The elemental analysis has identified elements such as Fe, Al, Si, Zn, Ti, Co, S, and C all which are characteristics of Saharan dust origin.

  8. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be underpinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Since bubble bursting is sensitive to the physicochemical properties of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into SSA composition. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an inter-comparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm size range. These particles, when dried, had more spherical morphologies compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles, which can be attributed to the presence of additional organic carbon. In addition to an inter-comparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method utilized in this study on SSA composition was undertaken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous operation of the plunging waterfall mechanism resulted in the accumulation of surface foam and an over-expression of organic matter in SSA particles compared to pulsed plunging waterfall. Throughout this set of experiments, comparative differences in the SSA number size distribution were coincident with differences in aerosol composition, indicating that the production mechanism of SSA exerts

  9. Activation of "synthetic ambient" aerosols - Relation to chemical composition of particles <100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, J.; Hitzenberger, R.; Reischl, G.; Bauer, H.; Leder, K.; Puxbaum, H.

    2012-07-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are an important fraction of atmospheric aerosols because of their role in cloud formation. Experimental studies focus either on direct field measurements of complex ambient aerosols or laboratory investigations on well defined aerosols produced from single substances or substance mixtures. In this study, we focussed on the ultrafine aerosol because in terms of number concentration, the majority of the CCN are expected to have sizes in this range. A field study was performed from July 2007 to October 2008 to investigate the activation behaviour of the atmospheric aerosol in Vienna (Burkart et al., 2011). Filter samples of the aerosol <0.1 μm aerodynamic equivalent diameter were collected, elutriated and used to generate "synthetic ambient" aerosol in a nebulizer. Chemical analyses of the ultrafine water soluble material were also performed. The CCN properties of the "synthetic ambient" aerosol were obtained using the University of Vienna CCN counter (Giebl et al., 2002; Dusek et al., 2006b) at a nominal supersaturation (SS) of 0.5%. Activation diameters dact ranged from 54.5 nm to 66 nm, were larger than dact of typical single inorganic salts and showed no seasonal pattern in contrast to the fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC), which ranged from 44% in spring to 15% in winter. The average hygroscopicity parameter κ (Petters and Kreidenweis, 2007) obtained from the activation curves ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 (average 0.24), which was significantly lower than κchem calculated from the chemical composition (0.43 ± 0.07).

  10. Quantitative ED-EPMA of Individual Particles and its Application for Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, C.

    2008-12-01

    An electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) technique using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultra-thin window, named low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements such as C, N, and O, as well as higher-Z elements that can be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive EPMA (ED-EPMA). The quantitative determination of low-Z elements (using full Monte Carlo simulations, from the electron impact to the X-ray detection) in individual environmental particles has improved the applicability of single-particle analysis, especially in atmospheric environmental aerosol research; many environmentally important atmospheric particles, e.g. sulfates, nitrates, ammonium, and carbonaceous particles, contain low-Z elements. In addition, an expert system that can perform chemical speciation from the elemental composition data obtained by the low-Z particle EPMA has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA was applied to characterize K-feldspar particle samples of which the chemical compositions are well defined by the use of various bulk analytical methods. Chemical compositions of the K-feldspar samples obtained from the low-Z particle EPMA turn out to be very close to those from bulk analyses. The low-Z particle EPMA technique has been applied for the characterization of atmospheric aerosol particle samples, including Asian dust, urban, and indoor particulate samples: (1) The extent of chemical modification of Asian dust particles sampled in Chuncheon and Incheon, Korea, during several Asian dust storm events occurred in 2002-2006 was investigated. Mixing of Asian dust with air pollutants and sea-salts strongly depends on the characteristics of Asian dust storm events such as air-mass backward trajectories. For instance, no significant chemical modification of mineral dust corresponded to fast moving air-masses at high altitudes. Inversely, extensive chemical modification was

  11. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  12. Physicochemical Characterization of Coarse Lake Spray Aerosol Particle from Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.; Colon-Bernal, I. D.

    2015-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases coarse particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Freshwater lakes, such as the Great Lakes, can generate lake spray aerosols (LSA), similarly to how sea spray is generated, during periods of high winds and wave action. This LSA has the potential to impact climate through direct and indirect effects (ie. scattering/absorption and cloud nucleation) and are suggested to impact human health via inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Very few studies have been conducted to assess the physicochemical properties of freshwater LSA. Prior work in our lab included the construction and characterization of a laboratory based LSA generator. In this work, we examine laboratory generated aerosol particles from laboratory based freshwater standards, freshwater samples collected from Lake Michigan, and ambient particles collected during a wave event on the shores of Lake Michigan in the summer of 2015. Particle size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition are presented and discussed as a function of laboratory generated and ambient collected LSA. Results indicate that there are characteristic particles that represent LSA. This study represents the next step towards evaluating and understanding the potential for coarse LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  13. Feasibility of polarized all-sky imaging for aerosol characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, A.; Blumthaler, M.

    2012-12-01

    Polarized all-sky distribution measurements contain radiative information about aerosol properties. We investigate the method of all-sky imaging for aerosol property retrieval and propose a technical frame work for image processing and analysis. Using Zernike polynomials, we decompose the relative Stokes parameter distributions, which efficiently captures the information content. The resulting feature vector is well suited for all-sky imaging, independent of calibration and robust against noise. It can be directly used in existing algorithms or alternative types of retrieval methods of aerosol optical properties in the future. By modeling possible aerosol scenarios we investigate the influence of different aerosol types in terms of the first two principal components describing the maximal variances. In this representation we show that the feature vector from a polarized all-sky imager is suitable for aerosol classification with respect to size and single scatter albedo.

  14. Analysis of Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohno, S.; Hoeller, R.; Ito, K.; Onishi, Y.; Ma, C. J.; Kasahara, M.; Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S.

    2001-12-01

    During springtime the Japanese archipelago is periodically influenced by haze events originating from the Asian continent. The sources of these materials include both anthropogenic and natural aerosol, including the well-known yellow sand (Kosa) events, which can be recognized at places as far as Hawaii and the west coast of the United States. But there is also strong evidenced, which we want to support in this study, that these Kosa events are accompanied by strongly absorbing material as well as sulfates and organics. The springtime of 2001 was characterized by several strong dust events, which happened to be during the international ACE-Asia campaign. We participated in the ACE observation network by setting up a monitoring station during the period March 19 to April 6, 2001 for the measurement of aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties as well as observations of sky radiation. The measurement site is located on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture). Tango was chosen as an observation site, since it is relatively unpolluted and can therefore serve as a background site for studies of the direct impact of the mainland Asian outflow on the western Pacific area. The purpose of this work is to perform local and column closure experiments on aerosol properties, and to distinguish the anthropogenic part of the aerosol from the natural one. For this purpose, backward air-mass trajectories are calculated to identify potential sources of the observed aerosol. For measurements of aerosol mass-size distributions we used 12-stage low-pressure impactors, which were subsequently analyzed for elemental and ionic concentrations by PIXE, and Ion-chromatography, respectively. In addition, to get both the necessary time- and size-resolution, a DRUM sampler was operated with continuous collection and analysis for mass and optical transmission from 320 nm to 850 nm. Analysis is scheduled by synchrotron-XRF to < 0.1 ng/m3 for trace elemental

  15. Evidence for ships emissions in the Central Mediterranean Sea from aerosol chemical analyses at the island of Lampedusa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, S.; Sferlazzo, D. M.; Pace, G.; di Sarra, A.; Bommarito, C.; Calzolai, G.; Ghedini, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Meloni, D.; Monteleone, F.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of aerosol chemical composition made on the island of Lampedusa, south of the Sicily channel, during years 2004-2008, are used to identify the influence of ship emissions on aerosol particles in the Central Mediterranean. Evidence of ship emissions influence is found in 17% of the daily samples. Aerosol samples influenced by ships are characterized by elevated Ni and V soluble fraction (about 80% for aerosol from ships, versus about 40 % for crustal particles), high V and Ni to Si ratios, and values of Vsol>6 ng m-3. Back trajectories analysis on the selected events show that air masses prevalently come from the Sicily channel, where an intense ship traffic occurs. Vsol, Nisol, and non-sea salt SO42- (nssSO42-) show a marked seasonal behaviour, with an evident summer maximum. Such a pattern can be explained by several processes: (i) increased photochemical activity in summer, leading to a faster production of secondary aerosols, mainly nssSO42-, from the oxidation of SO2 in the ship plume; (ii) stronger marine boundary layer (MBL) stability in summer, leading to higher concentration of emitted compounds in the lowest atmospheric layers; (iii) more frequent meteorological conditions leading to consecutive days with trajectories from the Sicily channel in summer. A very intense event in spring 2008 was studied in detail, also using size segregated chemical measurements. These data show that elements arising from heavy oil combustion (V, Ni, Al, Fe) are distributed in the sub-micrometric fraction of the aerosol, and the metals are present as free metals, carbonates, oxides hydrates or labile complex with organic ligands, so that they are dissolved in mild condition (HNO3, pH1.5). Data suggest a characteristic nssSO42-/V ratio in the range 200-400 for ship emission aerosols in summer at Lampedusa. By using the value of 200 a lower limit for the ship contribution to total sulphates is estimated. Ship emissions account, as a summer average, at least for 1

  16. Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties ofBiomass Burn Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Lewis, K.; Desyaterik, Yury; Wang, Z.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Arnott, W.P.; Laskin, Alexander; Gilles, M.K.

    2008-01-29

    Aerosols generated from burning different plant fuels were characterized to determine relationships between chemical, optical and physical properties. Single scattering albedo ({omega}) and Angstrom absorption coefficients ({alpha}{sub ap}) were measured using a photoacoustic technique combined with a reciprocal nephelometer. Carbon-to-oxygen atomic ratios, sp{sup 2} hybridization, elemental composition and morphology of individual particles were measured using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion of X-rays (SEM/EDX). Particles were grouped into three categories based on sp2 hybridization and chemical composition. Measured {omega} (0.4-1.0 at 405 nm) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0-3.5) values displayed a fuel dependence. The category with sp{sup 2} hybridization >80% had values of {omega} (<0.5) and {alpha}{sub ap} ({approx}1.25) characteristic of light absorbing soot. Other categories with lower sp2 hybridization (20 to 60%) exhibited higher {omega} (>0.8) and {alpha}{sub ap} (1.0 to 3.5) values, indicating increased absorption spectral selectivity.

  17. Tying Biological Activity to Changes in Sea Spray Aerosol Chemical Composition via Single Particle Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Collins, D. B.; Axson, J. L.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Grassian, V. H.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    In remote marine environments, sea spray aerosols (SSA) often represent the greatest aerosol burden, thus having significant impacts on direct radiative interactions and cloud processes. Previous studies have shown that SSA is a complex mixture of inorganic salts and an array of dissolved and particulate organic components. Enrichment of SSA organic content is often correlated to seawater chlorophyll concentrations, a measure of oceanic biological activity. As the physical and chemical properties of aerosols control their radiative effects, recent studies conducted by the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment have endeavored to further elucidate the ties between marine biological activity and primary SSA chemical composition using highly time resolved single particle analyses. A series of experiments performed in the recently developed Marine Aerosol Reference Tank evaluated the effect of changing marine microbial populations on SSA chemical composition, which was monitored via an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a variety of offline spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Each experiment was initiated using unfiltered and untreated seawater, thus maintaining a high level of biogeochemical complexity. This study is the first of its kind to capture daily changes in the primary SSA mixing state over the growth and death of a natural phytoplankton bloom. Increases in organic aerosol types (0.4-3 μm), internally and externally mixed with sea salt, could not be correlated to chlorophyll concentrations. Maximum production of these populations occurred two to four days after the in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence peaked in intensity. This work is in contrast to the current paradigm of correlating SSA organic content to seawater chlorophyll concentration.

  18. Characterizing Uncertainty in Global Aerosol Retrievals from Multiple Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, M.; Smirnov, A.; Ichoku, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Complementary global aerosol products have been routinely available from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, SeaWiFS, and VIIRS. However, a variety of studies suggest that individual aerosol products have significant differences in the geographic distribution of their retrieval uncertainties. Nonetheless, it can be difficult or impractical to track down relevant product validation studies and invest time in mastering the proprietary file formats of these aerosol products. As a result, many studies are performed using data from one or two most familiar products that, oftentimes, may not be optimal for a given region of interest. In this presentation, we will use Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) data within the framework of the Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) to catalog the accuracy of aerosol retrievals from the spaceborne sensors listed above. We will report our findings in analyzing the spatial and temporal distributions of the uncertainties in the global over-land and maritime retrievals of aerosols based on inter-comparing spaceborne data with coincident ground-based measurements from both AERONET and MAN. We will also explain our vision of how this analysis can be used as a base for a multi-sensor aerosol product package that would help end users to make a more informed choice when selecting data for their regions of interest.

  19. Characterization of particleboard aerosol - size distribution and formaldehyde content

    SciTech Connect

    Stumpf, J.M.; Blehm, K.D.; Buchan, R.M.; Gunter, B.J.

    1986-12-01

    Health hazards unique to particleboard include the generation of urea-formaldehyde resin bound in wood aerosol and release of formaldehyde gas that can be inhaled by the worker. A particleboard aerosol was generated by a sanding process and collected under laboratory conditions that determined the particle size distribution and formaldehyde content. Three side-by-side Marple 296 personal cascade impactors with midget impingers attached downstream collected particleboard aerosol and gaseous formaldehyde for ten sample runs. Gravimetric analysis quantified the collected aerosol mass, and chromotropic acid/spectrophotometric analytical methods were employed for formaldehyde content in particleboard aerosol and gaseous formaldehyde liberated from sanded particleboard. Significant variations (p<.005) were observed for the particleboard mass and gaseous formaldehyde collected between sample runs. No significant differences (..cap alpha.. = .05) were observed for the aerosol size distribution determined and formaldehyde content in particle board aerosol per unit mass for sampling trials. The overall MMAD of particleboard aerosol was 8.26 ..mu..mAED with a sigmag of 2.01. A predictive model was derived for determining the expected formaldehyde content (..mu..g) by particleboard aerosol mass (mg) collected and particulate size (..mu..mAED).

  20. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of Cu-ZnO composite from single source precursors.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Mazhar, Muhammad; Hamid, Mazhar; O'Brien, Paul; Malik, Mohammad A; Helliwell, Madeleine; Raftery, James

    2009-07-28

    Two heterobimetallic precursors [Zn(TFA)3(micro-OH)Cu3(dmae)3Cl].THF (1) and [Zn(TFA)4Cu3(dmae)4] (2) [dmae=N,N-dimethylaminoethanolate and TFA=trifluoroacetate], have been synthesized and characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, TGA and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Both complexes were used to deposit thin films of Cu-ZnO composite on glass substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method. The films were characterized by "scotch tape" test for adhesion, thickness measurement as a function of temperature, EDX for composition, SEM for surface morphology and XRD for crystalline phases. Thin film deposition studies at 250, 325, 400, 475 degrees C indicated the increase in thickness with temperature reaching a maximum at 400 degrees C and then decreasing. EDX and PXRD results showed the uniform distribution of cubic metallic copper and hexagonal zinc oxide phases which make them useful for nanocatalysis on structured surfaces. PMID:19587992

  1. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of binary alloy films: Studies of film composition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Kodas, T.T.

    1995-08-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Cu-Ag and Cu-Pd alloys using aerosol precursor delivery over a range of preheating temperatures, 70 {approximately} 80 C and substrate temperatures, 250 {approximately} 300 C is described. The precursors used include Cu(hfac){sub 2}, (hfac)Ag(SEt{sub 2}) and Pd(hfac){sub 2} dissolved in toluene and 10% H{sub 2} in Ar as carrier gas. The films were characterized by SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The X-ray diffraction results showed the Cu/Ag films were composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases of Cu-Ag alloys, the Cu/Pd films were Cu-Pd and Pd-Ag alloy, solid solutions, under these conditions. Compositional variation studies in Cu-Pd and Pd-Ag alloy systems were also conducted by mixing Cu(hfac){sub 2}/Pd(hfac){sub 2} and (hfac) Ag(SEt{sub 2})/Pd(hfac){sub 2} in toluene solution in different ratios. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and the results showed the composition of films was affected by the solution stoichiometry.

  2. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  3. Seasonal variations in the physico-chemical characteristics of aerosols in North Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Charles

    2014-05-01

    From 2007 to 2012, this study investigated the mass concentration and chemical composition of ambient aerosols (i.e. PM10, PM2.5, and PMc = PM10-PM2.5) at Cape Fuguei, Yangminshan, and NTU (National Taiwan University) stations in northern Taiwan. It was found that the concentration and composition of aerosols exhibited significant seasonal variations but without an inter-annual trend during the study period. Moderate correlations (R2 = 0.4-0.6) were observed among the aerosol concentrations at the respective stations, indicating that the aerosol concentrations were dominated by factors on regional scales. During the seasons of northeasterly winter monsoons, long range transport of dust and particulate air pollutants from the Asia Continent had negatively impacted the atmospheric environment in this area. On the other hand, as a highly developed urban area, Taipei has substantial local emissions of air pollutants that should have transported to the surrounding areas of Taipei basin and caused deterioration of air quality and visibility in Cape Fuguei and Yangminshan. The results indicated that the major components of aerosols in Taipei include sulfate, sea salts, dust, and organic matters. In addition, contributions from nitrate, ammonium, and elemental carbon were also significant. In terms of mass concentration, most of the sea salts and dust particles existed in the coarse mode of aerosols, whereas sulfate and EC were confined within PM2.5. This suggests that the dust and sea salts particles were externally mixed with EC and sulfate in the aerosols over Taipei area. Further, it was found that nitrate were closely associated with sea salts in aerosols, suggesting the reaction between nitric acid and sea salt particles. Different seasonality was observed for sea salt and dust: sea salts peaked in fall and dust reached the maximal level in springtime, implying their sources were regulated by independent seasonal factors. Particulate pollutants (i.e. sulfate, nitrate

  4. Production Mechanism, Number Concentration, Size Distribution, Chemical Composition, and Optical Properties of Sea Spray Aerosols Workshop, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2013-10-21

    The objective of this workshop was to address the most urgent open science questions for improved quantification of sea spray aerosol-radiation-climate interactions. Sea spray emission and its influence on global climate remains one of the most uncertain components of the aerosol-radiation-climate problem, but has received less attention than other aerosol processes (e.g. production of terrestrial secondary organic aerosols). Thus, the special emphasis was placed on the production flux of sea spray aerosol particles, their number concentration and chemical composition and properties.

  5. Enabling the identification, quantification, and characterization of organics in complex mixtures to understand atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, Gabriel Avram

    Particles in the atmosphere are known to have negative health effects and important but highly uncertain impacts on global and regional climate. A majority of this particulate matter is formed through atmospheric oxidation of naturally and anthropogenically emitted gases to yield highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA), an amalgamation of thousands of individual chemical compounds. However, comprehensive analysis of SOA composition has been stymied by its complexity and lack of available measurement techniques. In this work, novel instrumentation, analysis methods, and conceptual frameworks are introduced for chemically characterizing atmospherically relevant mixtures and ambient aerosols, providing a fundamentally new level of detailed knowledge on their structures, chemical properties, and identification of their components. This chemical information is used to gain insights into the formation, transformation and oxidation of organic aerosols. Biogenic and anthropogenic mixtures are observed in this work to yield incredible complexity upon oxidation, producing over 100 separable compounds from a single precursor. As a first step toward unraveling this complexity, a method was developed for measuring the polarity and volatility of individual compounds in a complex mixture using two-dimensional gas chromatography, which is demonstrated in Chapter 2 for describing the oxidation of SOA formed from a biogenic compound (longifolene: C15H24). Several major products and tens of substantial minor products were produced, but none could be identified by traditional methods or have ever been isolated and studied in the laboratory. A major realization of this work was that soft ionization mass spectrometry could be used to identify the molecular mass and formula of these unidentified compounds, a major step toward a comprehensive description of complex mixtures. This was achieved by coupling gas chromatography to high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry with

  6. Chemical characterization of asturian cider.

    PubMed

    Picinelli, A; Suárez, B; Moreno, J; Rodríguez, R; Caso-García, L M; Mangas, J J

    2000-09-01

    Ninety-four samples of Asturian natural cider were analyzed for titratable and volatile acidities, pH, alcoholic, total polyphenol, and acidic polysaccharide contents, nonvolatile acids, polyalcohols, residual sugars, and major volatile compounds. A partial least-squares regression analysis (PLR-1) was performed to correlate the chemical composition and the origin of the raw material, the cider samples being grouped into two categories: an "odd" class, cider made from foreign apples (1995 and 1997), and an "even" class, ciders made from Asturian apples (1996 and 1998). The mathematical model has a multiple linear correlation coefficient of 80%. PMID:10995303

  7. Chemical composition of Eastern Black Sea aerosol--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Balcılar, Ilker; Zararsız, Abdullah; Kalaycı, Yakup; Doğan, Güray; Tuncel, Gürdal

    2014-08-01

    Trace element composition of atmospheric particles collected at a high altitude site on the Eastern Black Sea coast of Turkey was investigated to understand atmospheric transport of pollutants to this semi-closed basin. Aerosol samples were collected at a timber-storage area, which is operated by the General Directorate of Forestry. The site is situated at a rural area and is approximately 50 km to the Black Sea coast and 200 km to the Georgia border of Turkey. Coarse (PM2.5-10) and fine (PM2.5) aerosol samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 using a "stacked filter unit". Collected samples were shipped to the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, where Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Ba, Pb were measured by Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF). Comparison of measured concentrations of elements with corresponding data generated at other parts of Turkey demonstrated that concentrations of pollution derived elements are higher at Eastern Black Sea than their corresponding concentrations measured at other parts of Turkey, which is attributed to frequent transport of pollutants from north wind sector. Positive matric factorization revealed four factors including three anthropogenic and a crustal factor. Southeastern parts of Turkey, Georgia and Black Sea coast of Ukraine were identified as source regions affecting composition of particles at our site, using trajectory statistics, namely "potential source contribution function" (PSCF). PMID:24373640

  8. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  9. Application of Aerosol Assimilation System of MODIS Radiances to Regional Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Allura, A.; Charmichael, G. R.; Tang, Y.; Chai, T.; Chung, C. E.; Anderson, T. L.

    2006-12-01

    We present results from an assimilation system of radiances from the MODIS channels that sense atmospheric aerosols over land and ocean on the chemical transport model STEM. A test case is designed to simulate transport of aerosols tracers over the area of interest which includes India, east and south Asia at 50km horizontal resolution. A detailed treatment of the source, transport and deposition of the aerosol species are included. The model simulates five aerosol components: sulfate, organic carbon, black carbon, dust and sea salt. Total AODs at 550nm wavelength over land and ocean and fine mode AODs at 550nm wavelength over ocean are the level 2 aerosol products from Terra MODIS channel four used in this application. The intent of the study is to verify the improvement in the model performances while the initial conditions are corrected using an Optimum Interpolation technique to assimilate the MODIS data. The model results are compared with ground-based measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the AERONET network. Sensitivity analyses are provided in order to describe the effect of changing in assimilation technique's free parameters. The method is designed to optimize the use of the information provided by fine mode AODs, which are available over ocean, coupled with the total AODs available also over land. Improvements on the model results using this approach are highlighted during specific event where the model has experienced low agreement with observed data. Results are also compared to other assimilations methods.

  10. A model for studying the composition and chemical effects of stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Turco, Richard P.; Jacobson, Mark Z.

    1994-01-01

    We developed polynomial expressions for the temperature dependence of the mean binary and water activity coefficients for H2SO4 and HNO3 solutions. These activities were used in an equilibrium model to predict the composition of stratospheric aerosols under a wide range of environmental conditions. For typical concentrations of H2O, H2SO4, HNO3, HCl, HBr, HF, and HOCl in the lower stratosphere, the aerosol composition is estimated as a function of the local temperature and the ambient relative humidity. For temperatures below 200 K, our results indicate that (1) HNO3 contributes a significant mass fraction to stratospheric aerosols, and (2) HCl solubility is considerably affected by HNO3 dissolution into sulfate aerosols. We also show that, in volcanically disturbed periods, changes in stratospheric aerosol composition can significantly alter the microphysics that leads to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The effects caused by HNO3 dissolution on the physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols are discussed.

  11. Physical and Chemical Properties of Aerosols at the Tropical Coastal Site, Trivandrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Susan K.; Nair, Prabha R.; Parameswaran, Krishnaswamy; Jacob, Salu; Abraham, Annamma; Abhilash, K. S.

    The influence of tropospheric aerosols on the regional climate is fairly well accepted though there exists large uncertainties in assessing its exact magnitude. This is mainly due to the fact that the aerosol properties are highly variable at short spatial and temporal extents and the information available is rather limited. To overcome these deficiency it is highly essential to gather and analyse long term data covering different seasons over varying climatic regimes. Trivandrum (8.55o N, 77o E), a tropical coastal site situated near the southern tip of Indian Peninsula, is a location where systematic monitoring of different aerosol parameters are being carried out since last two decades. With progressing time new techniques and instruments are also being incorporated. This paper presents the results from the observations on aerosols carried out during the period 2003 to 2005 at this location. Different aerosol properties such as total mass concentration, number density, size distribution, optical depth, chemical composition, etc. are studied systematically during this period. A High Volume Sampler (for measuring total mass loading), Aerosol Spectrometer (for measuring size segregated number density from which size distribution can be derived), and Microtops Sunphotometer (which measures optical depth at 1020 nm) are used to study the physical/optical properties of aerosols. The chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols is examined employing Ion Chromatography, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Inductively Couple Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy. The mean mass concentration of aerosols observed at this site is 54 µg m-3 , which varies by ±19 µg m-3 depending on season and prevailing meteorology. The aerosol number density is 108 particles/m3 . The mass loading at this location is significantly low compared to the northern parts of India as well as the national ambient air quality standards indicating that the environment is relatively less polluted as

  12. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  13. Winter time chemical characteristics of aerosols over the Bay of Bengal: continental influence.

    PubMed

    Aryasree, S; Nair, Prabha R; Girach, I A; Jacob, Salu

    2015-10-01

    As part of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) conducted under the Geosphere Biosphere Programme of Indian Space Research Organisation, ship-based aerosol sampling was carried out over the marine environment of Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the northern winter months of December 2008 to January 2009. About 101 aerosol samples were collected, covering the region from 3.4° to 21° N latitude and 76° to 98° E longitude-the largest area covered-including the south east (SE) BoB for the first time. These samples were subjected to gravimetric and chemical analysis and the total aerosol loading as well the mass concentration of the ionic species namely F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), NO2 (-), NO3 (-), PO4 (2-), SO4 (2-), NH4 (+), etc. and the metallic species, Na, Mg, Ca, K, Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Pb were estimated for each sample. Based on the spatial distribution of individual chemical species, the air flow pattern, and airmass back trajectory analysis, the source characteristics of aerosols for different regions of BoB were identified. Significant level of continental pollution was noticed over BoB during winter. While transport of pollution from Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) contributed to aerosols over north BoB, those over SE BoB were influenced by SE Asia. A quantitative study on the wind-induced production of sea salt aerosols and a case study on the species dependent effect of rainfall are also presented in this paper. PMID:25994269

  14. Modelling of primary aerosols in the chemical transport model MOCAGE: development and evaluation of aerosol physical parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sič, B.; El Amraoui, L.; Marécal, V.; Josse, B.; Arteta, J.; Guth, J.; Joly, M.; Hamer, P. D.

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with recent improvements to the global chemical transport model of Météo-France MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) that consists of updates to different aerosol parameterizations. MOCAGE only contains primary aerosol species: desert dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and also volcanic ash in the case of large volcanic eruptions. We introduced important changes to the aerosol parameterization concerning emissions, wet deposition and sedimentation. For the emissions, size distribution and wind calculations are modified for desert dust aerosols, and a surface sea temperature dependant source function is introduced for sea salt aerosols. Wet deposition is modified toward a more physically realistic representation by introducing re-evaporation of falling rain and snowfall scavenging and by changing the in-cloud scavenging scheme along with calculations of precipitation cloud cover and rain properties. The sedimentation scheme update includes changes regarding the stability and viscosity calculations. Independent data from satellites (MODIS, SEVIRI), the ground (AERONET, EMEP), and a model inter-comparison project (AeroCom) are compared with MOCAGE simulations and show that the introduced changes brought a significant improvement on aerosol representation, properties and global distribution. Emitted quantities of desert dust and sea salt, as well their lifetimes, moved closer towards values of AeroCom estimates and the multi-model average. When comparing the model simulations with MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) observations over the oceans, the updated model configuration shows a decrease in the modified normalized mean bias (MNMB; from 0.42 to 0.10) and a better correlation (from 0.06 to 0.32) in terms of the geographical distribution and the temporal variability. The updates corrected a strong positive MNMB in the sea salt representation at high latitudes (from 0.65 to 0.16), and a negative MNMB in the desert

  15. Combined X-Ray and Raman Spectroscopic Techniques for the Characterization of Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, J. Y.; Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Gilles, M. K.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R.; Radway, J.

    2014-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol along with mineral dust dominates the global mass flux of particles to the atmosphere. Marine aerosol particles are of particular interest because of their continual impact on cloud formation, precipitation, atmospheric chemical processes, and thus global climate. Here we report on the physical/chemical characteristics of sub-surface waters, aerosolized sea spray particles, and particles/organic species present in surface microlayer (SML) samples collected during oceanic field campaigns and generated during laboratory experiments, revealing a biogenic primary source of the organic fraction of airborne particles. We also report on ice nucleation experiments with aerosolized particles collected during the May 2014 WACS II North Atlantic cruise and with laboratory generated exudate material from diatom cultures with the potential to impact cirrus and mixed phase clouds. Physicochemical analyses using a multi-modal approach which includes Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near-Edge Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) and Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence and chemical similarity of polysaccharide-rich transparent exopolymer (TEP) material and proteins in both SML sea spray aerosol and ice forming aerosol particles, regardless of the extent of biological activity in surface waters. Our results demonstrate a direct relationship between the marine environment and composition of marine aerosol through primary particle emission.

  16. Recent Improvements to CALIOP Level 3 Aerosol Profile Product for Global 3-D Aerosol Extinction Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackett, J. L.; Getzewich, B. J.; Winker, D. M.; Vaughan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    With nine years of retrievals, the CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product provides an unprecedented synopsis of aerosol extinction in three dimensions and the potential to quantify changes in aerosol distributions over time. The CALIOP level 3 aerosol profile product, initially released as a beta product in 2011, reports monthly averages of quality-screened aerosol extinction profiles on a uniform latitude/longitude grid for different cloud-cover scenarios, called "sky conditions". This presentation demonstrates improvements to the second version of the product which will be released in September 2015. The largest improvements are the new sky condition definitions which parse the atmosphere into "cloud-free" views accessible to passive remote sensors, "all-sky" views accessible to active remote sensors and "cloudy-sky" views for opaque and transparent clouds which were previously inaccessible to passive remote sensors. Taken together, the new sky conditions comprehensively summarize CALIOP aerosol extinction profiles for a broad range of scientific queries. In addition to dust-only extinction profiles, the new version will include polluted-dust and smoke-only extinction averages. A new method is adopted for averaging dust-only extinction profiles to reduce high biases which exist in the beta version of the level 3 aerosol profile product. This presentation justifies the new averaging methodology and demonstrates vertical profiles of dust and smoke extinction over Africa during the biomass burning season. Another crucial advancement demonstrated in this presentation is a new approach for computing monthly mean aerosol optical depth which removes low biases reported in the beta version - a scenario unique to lidar datasets.

  17. Characterization of the Sunset Semi-Continuous Carbon Aerosol Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Jace J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cary, R.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2009-07-01

    Accurate quantification of carbonaceous aerosols is essential for reducing uncertainty in climate change models and is important for long-term air quality monitoring by government agencies. The field-deployable Sunset Semi-Continuous Organic Carbon/Elemental Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (Sunset OCEC) utilizes a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health thermal-optical method to determine total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC) at near real-time; however, its performance is not yet fully characterized. Two collocated Sunset OCEC Analyzers, Unit A and Unit B, were used to determine the relative standard deviation (RSD) and limit of detection (LOD) between June 23 and July 9, 2007, in Richland, Washington, USA. A high-efficiency particulate air filter was utilized to determine the LODs of both instruments. The RSDs between the two Sunset OCECs were 9.12% for TC, 13.0% for Optical OC, and 8.97% for Thermal OC, indicating good precision between the instruments, although the RSDs for Thermal and Optical EC were higher, 29.0% and 48.3%, respectively. The LOD of Unit A was approximately 0.21 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, and ~0.004 µgC/m3 for Optical and Thermal EC. Similarly, Unit B had an LOD of ~0.29 µgC/m3 for TC, Optical OC, and Thermal OC, 0.018 µgC/m3 for Optical EC, and 0.004 µgC/m3 for Thermal EC. Factors that may have contributed to the poor RSDs of Thermal and Optical EC include the low EC mass loading in Richland, minor leakage in the oxygen valve of Unit B, and excessive noise from the non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) laser in Unit B, resulting in scattered Optical EC measurements. Improved RSDs of all OC and EC parameters are expected after the Unit B NDIR is tuned up. Future work should reevaluate the precision of the Sunset OCECs and investigate the differences in various thermal-optical protocols on OCEC quantification.

  18. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was dominated by organics that appeared to be internally mixed with nitrate or sulfate. The sulfate was most likely formed via heterogeneous reactions, because the SOR was constant under dry conditions (RH < 50%) and began to increase when RH > 50%, suggesting an important contribution from heterogeneous reactions with abundant aerosol water under wet conditions. Finally, the correlations between [NO3-]/[SO42 -] and [NH4+]/[SO42 -] suggest that the homogenous reaction between HNO3 and NH3 dominated the formation of nitrate under conditions of

  19. The chemical composition of organic nitrogen in marine rainwater and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, K. E.; Hastings, M. G.; Peters, A.; Sigman, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    The current state of knowledge on organic nitrogen in the atmosphere is very limited. Atmospheric water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is a subset of the complex water soluble organic matter measured in atmospheric aerosols and rainwater; as such, it impacts cloud condensation processes and aerosol chemical and optical properties. In marine and continental atmospheric deposition, the organic N fraction can be 20-80% of total N potentially influencing receiving ecosystems. Therefore, atmospheric WSON plays an important role in both atmospheric chemistry and the global biogeochemical N cycle. However, the sources (i.e., anthropogenic vs. terrestrial vs. marine), composition (e.g., reduced or oxidized N), potential connections to inorganic N (NO3- and NH4+), and spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric WSON are largely unknown. Samples were collected on or near the island of Bermuda (32.27°N, 64.87°W), which is located in the western North Atlantic and experiences seasonal changes in transport that allow for study of both anthropogenically and primarily marine influenced air masses. Rainwater samples (n=7) and aqueous extracted aerosol samples (n=4) were analyzed by positive ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to characterize the chemical composition of the water soluble organic N on a per compound level. We found ~ 800 N containing compounds in 8 compound classes. The CHON+ compound class contained the largest number of N compounds (~ 460). Compared to continental rainwater [Altieri et al., ES&T, 2009], the CHON+ compounds in the marine samples are as dominant in number, yet have less regular patterns and lower O:C ratios for comparable N:C ratios. In fact, average O:C ratios of all N containing compound classes were lower in the marine samples than in continental rainwater samples. No organosulfates or nitrooxy-organosulfates were detected in the marine samples, both of

  20. All year round chemical composition of aerosol reaching the inner Antarctic Plateau (Dome C - East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udisti, R.; Becagli, S.; Castellano, E.; Cerri, O.; Marino, F.; Morganti, A.; Nava, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Traversi, R.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2005, continuous, all-year-round aerosol sampling was carried out at Dome C (Central East Antarctica, 3233 m a.s.l., about 1100 km far from the coast-line), in the framework of Station Concordia project. Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in summer and winter period by using different low- and medium-volume systems, including pre-selected cut-off samplers (with PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 heads) and multi-stage (Andersen 8-stage and Dekati 4-stage) impactors. Sampling resolution and volume range from 1 day to 1 month and from 2.3 to 12 m3/h respectively. Aerosol study at Dome C aims to improve our knowledge on present day source intensity, transport efficiency and pathways (including stratosphere-to-troposphere interchanges) of particles reaching internal sites of Antarctica and to understand size- and chemical-fractionation effects occurring during the transport (by comparison with coastal aerosol composition). Besides, more information on atmosphere-snow interaction, including depositional and post depositional processes, as well as the effect of sublimation/condensation processes on snow surface, improves the reconstruction of past atmosphere composition from EPICA-DC deep ice core, drilled in the same site. Here we report some results of the chemical composition of the Antarctic background aerosol reaching Dome C, pointing out the seasonal pattern and the temporal trend of some ionic components used as tracers of sea spray, marine biogenic and crustal emissions. The atmospheric load in the summer is more than one order of magnitude lower than that measured in coastal sites and chemical composition is dominated by secondary aerosol, mainly originated by biological marine activity (S-cycle), and distributed in the finest aerosol fractions. H2SO4 from oxidation of biogenic DMS is the main component, while the contribution of HNO3 to the ionic budget is difficult to evaluate because of the re-emission into the atmosphere from the filter surface (acidic

  1. Characterization of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsula from multi-platform satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M. J.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Lee, J.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.; Huang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-faceted near-simultaneous observations from the sensors aboard multiple satellite platforms, so called the A-Train, are utilized to characterize the spatial distributions and the optical properties of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsula. Observations from the A-Train sensors, especially, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), are synthesized to retrieve single-scattering albedo (SSA) and effective aerosol layer height (ALH) of BBS aerosols in the region. The retrieval algorithm extracts the absorption and height information about smoke aerosols, which is lumped into ultraviolet spectra at the top of the atmosphere, by taking the most reliable information contents that each satellite measurement can deliver. The results of retrieved SSA and ALH showed reasonable agreements with in-situ measurements, AEROsol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) data, and lidar-based observations. The uncertainty and sensitivity of the retrieval algorithm are also presented. The retrieved quantities are then used together with other satellite datasets to characterize the three-dimensional distributions of smoke aerosols over the Indochina Peninsular during the boreal spring time. Given the frequent horizontal collocations of smoke and clouds in the region, implication of smoke vertical distributions for long-range transports is also discussed. The results of this study are anticipated to advance our understanding on the climatic impacts of the smoke aerosols in the region.

  2. MODIS and AERONET characterization of the global aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.

    2002-05-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere. To use the MODIS data for global assessment of aerosol forcing AERONET data are used to answer some key critical questions: - Are MODIS data collected at 10:30 am representative of the daily forcing? - What is the concentration and properties of background aerosol and that of anthropogenic aerosol These questions and more will be answered in the talk

  3. a Study on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Stratospheric Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    The physical and chemical properties of stratospheric aerosols under background and perturbed conditions are discussed. First, a multi-component aerosol physical chemistry model was developed to study the composition and reactivity of stratospheric aerosols. The compositions are predicted from an equilibrium assumption between the condensed-and gas-phases, and they are calculated as a function of ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the total mass of nitric acid and sulfuric acid present per unit volume of air. The water and solute activity parameters in the aerosol model are derived from various laboratory sources, and the set of equilibrium equations are solved using a unique numerical scheme. The aerosol model is applied to study the formation of nitric acid-containing aerosols in the stratosphere. Also, the equilibrium compositions are used to estimate the extent of aqueous phase processing of chlorine species in the aerosol solutions. This processing can contribute to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, especially after major volcanic eruptions where sulfate aerosols are more abundant. Second, a surface chemistry model was constructed that includes Langmuir trace-gas adsorption and desorption, Brunauer, Emmett and Teller adsorption of water vapor, surface poisoning, solvation and diffusion of molecules on the surface, chemical activation and reaction of adsorbates, and product desorption or reaction. This model is used to study the effects of relative humidity and other physical parameters on the efficiency of heterogeneous chemical processes which occur on the surfaces of solid polar stratospheric clouds. These heterogeneous chemical processes are responsible for the formation of the "ozone hole", can contribute to global ozone depletion, and may have tropospheric significance. Finally, a fluid dynamics and thermodynamics model of volcanic eruption columns was used to develop a scheme for predicting the extent of HCl removal from volcanic

  4. Characterization of particulate products for aging of ethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosol.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingqiang; Zhang, Jiahui; Cai, Shunyou; Liao, Yingmin; Zhao, Weixiong; Hu, Changjin; Gu, Xuejun; Fang, Li; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-09-01

    Aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles formed from OH- initiated oxidation of ethylbenzene in the presence of high mass (100-300μg/m(3)) concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol was investigated in a home-made smog chamber in this study. The chemical composition of aged ethylbenzene SOA particles was measured using an aerosol laser time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ALTOFMS) coupled with a Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithm. Experimental results showed that nitrophenol, ethyl-nitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, methyl glyoxylic acid, 5-ethyl-6-oxo-2,4-hexadienoic acid, 2-ethyl-2,4-hexadiendioic acid, 2,3-dihydroxy-5-ethyl-6-oxo-4-hexenoic acid, 1H-imidazole, hydrated N-glyoxal substituted 1H-imidazole, hydrated glyoxal dimer substituted imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde, N-glyoxal substituted hydrated 1H-imidazole-2-carbaldehyde and high-molecular-weight (HMW) components were the predominant products in the aged particles. Compared to the previous aromatic SOA aging studies, imidazole compounds, which can absorb solar radiation effectively, were newly detected in aged ethylbenzene SOA in the presence of high concentrations of (NH4)2SO4 seed aerosol. These findings provide new information for discussing aromatic SOA aging mechanisms. PMID:27593289

  5. Two chemically distinct light-absorbing pools of urban organic aerosols: A comprehensive multidimensional analysis of trends.

    PubMed

    Paula, Andreia S; Matos, João T V; Duarte, Regina M B O; Duarte, Armando C

    2016-02-01

    The chemical and light-absorption dynamics of organic aerosols (OAs), a master variable in the atmosphere, have yet to be resolved. This study uses a comprehensive multidimensional analysis approach for exploiting simultaneously the compositional changes over a molecular size continuum and associated light-absorption (ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence) properties of two chemically distinct pools of urban OAs chromophores. Up to 45% of aerosol organic carbon (OC) is soluble in water and consists of a complex mixture of fluorescent and UV-absorbing constituents, with diverse relative abundances, hydrophobic, and molecular weight (Mw) characteristics between warm and cold periods. In contrast, the refractory alkaline-soluble OC pool (up to 18%) is represented along a similar Mw and light-absorption continuum throughout the different seasons. Results suggest that these alkaline-soluble chromophores may actually originate from primary OAs sources in the urban site. This work shows that the comprehensive multidimensional analysis method is a powerful and complementary tool for the characterization of OAs fractions. The great diversity in the chemical composition and optical properties of OAs chromophores, including both water-soluble and alkaline-soluble OC, may be an important contribution to explain the contrasting photo-reactivity and atmospheric behavior of OAs.

  6. Coupling aerosol optics to the MATCH (v5.5.0) chemical transport model and the SALSA (v1) aerosol microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Emma; Kahnert, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A new aerosol-optics model is implemented in which realistic morphologies and mixing states are assumed, especially for black carbon particles. The model includes both external and internal mixing of all chemical species, it treats externally mixed black carbon as fractal aggregates, and it accounts for inhomogeneous internal mixing of black carbon by use of a novel "core-grey-shell" model. Simulated results of aerosol optical properties, such as aerosol optical depth, backscattering coefficients and the Ångström exponent, as well as radiative fluxes are computed with the new optics model and compared with results from an older optics-model version that treats all particles as externally mixed homogeneous spheres. The results show that using a more detailed description of particle morphology and mixing state impacts the aerosol optical properties to a degree of the same order of magnitude as the effects of aerosol-microphysical processes. For instance, the aerosol optical depth computed for two cases in 2007 shows a relative difference between the two optics models that varies over the European region between -28 and 18 %, while the differences caused by the inclusion or omission of the aerosol-microphysical processes range from -50 to 37 %. This is an important finding, suggesting that a simple optics model coupled to a chemical transport model can introduce considerable errors affecting radiative fluxes in chemistry-climate models, compromising comparisons of model results with remote sensing observations of aerosols, and impeding the assimilation of satellite products for aerosols into chemical-transport models.

  7. Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Kimberly A.; Bertram, Timothy H.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Deane, Grant B.; Stokes, M. Dale; DeMott, Paul J.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Palenik, Brian P.; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Molina, Mario J.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Geiger, Franz M.; Roberts, Gregory C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Ault, Andrew P.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.; Ebben, Carlena J.; Forestieri, Sara D.; Guasco, Timothy L.; Hersey, Scott P.; Kim, Michelle J.; Lambert, William F.; Modini, Robin L.; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E.; Ruppel, Matthew J.; Ryder, Olivia S.; Schoepp, Nathan G.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Zhao, Defeng

    2013-01-01

    The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60–180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

  8. Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol.

    PubMed

    Prather, Kimberly A; Bertram, Timothy H; Grassian, Vicki H; Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Demott, Paul J; Aluwihare, Lihini I; Palenik, Brian P; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H; Moffet, Ryan C; Molina, Mario J; Cappa, Christopher D; Geiger, Franz M; Roberts, Gregory C; Russell, Lynn M; Ault, Andrew P; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B; Corrigan, Craig E; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Ebben, Carlena J; Forestieri, Sara D; Guasco, Timothy L; Hersey, Scott P; Kim, Michelle J; Lambert, William F; Modini, Robin L; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E; Ruppel, Matthew J; Ryder, Olivia S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Sullivan, Ryan C; Zhao, Defeng

    2013-05-01

    The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60-180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties.

  9. Bringing the ocean into the laboratory to probe the chemical complexity of sea spray aerosol.

    PubMed

    Prather, Kimberly A; Bertram, Timothy H; Grassian, Vicki H; Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Demott, Paul J; Aluwihare, Lihini I; Palenik, Brian P; Azam, Farooq; Seinfeld, John H; Moffet, Ryan C; Molina, Mario J; Cappa, Christopher D; Geiger, Franz M; Roberts, Gregory C; Russell, Lynn M; Ault, Andrew P; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Collins, Douglas B; Corrigan, Craig E; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A; Ebben, Carlena J; Forestieri, Sara D; Guasco, Timothy L; Hersey, Scott P; Kim, Michelle J; Lambert, William F; Modini, Robin L; Mui, Wilton; Pedler, Byron E; Ruppel, Matthew J; Ryder, Olivia S; Schoepp, Nathan G; Sullivan, Ryan C; Zhao, Defeng

    2013-05-01

    The production, size, and chemical composition of sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles strongly depend on seawater chemistry, which is controlled by physical, chemical, and biological processes. Despite decades of studies in marine environments, a direct relationship has yet to be established between ocean biology and the physicochemical properties of SSA. The ability to establish such relationships is hindered by the fact that SSA measurements are typically dominated by overwhelming background aerosol concentrations even in remote marine environments. Herein, we describe a newly developed approach for reproducing the chemical complexity of SSA in a laboratory setting, comprising a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves. A mesocosm experiment was performed in natural seawater, using controlled phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria concentrations, which showed SSA size and chemical mixing state are acutely sensitive to the aerosol production mechanism, as well as to the type of biological species present. The largest reduction in the hygroscopicity of SSA occurred as heterotrophic bacteria concentrations increased, whereas phytoplankton and chlorophyll-a concentrations decreased, directly corresponding to a change in mixing state in the smallest (60-180 nm) size range. Using this newly developed approach to generate realistic SSA, systematic studies can now be performed to advance our fundamental understanding of the impact of ocean biology on SSA chemical mixing state, heterogeneous reactivity, and the resulting climate-relevant properties. PMID:23620519

  10. Probabilistic Exposure Analysis for Chemical Risk Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Kenneth T.; Cullen, Alison C.; Frey, H. Christopher; Price, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the science of probabilistic exposure assessment (PEA) as applied to chemical risk characterization. Current probabilistic risk analysis methods applied to PEA are reviewed. PEA within the context of risk-based decision making is discussed, including probabilistic treatment of related uncertainty, interindividual heterogeneity, and other sources of variability. Key examples of recent experience gained in assessing human exposures to chemicals in the environment, and other applications to chemical risk characterization and assessment, are presented. It is concluded that, although improvements continue to be made, existing methods suffice for effective application of PEA to support quantitative analyses of the risk of chemically induced toxicity that play an increasing role in key decision-making objectives involving health protection, triage, civil justice, and criminal justice. Different types of information required to apply PEA to these different decision contexts are identified, and specific PEA methods are highlighted that are best suited to exposure assessment in these separate contexts. PMID:19223660

  11. Thermodynamic Characterization of Mexico City Aerosol during MILAGRO 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Sullivan, A.; Weber, R.; VanReken, T.; Fischer, M.; Matias, E.; Moya, M.; Farmer, D.; Cohen, R.C.

    2008-12-05

    Fast measurements of aerosol and gas-phase constituents coupled with the ISORROPIA-II thermodynamic equilibrium model are used to study the partitioning of semivolatile inorganic species and phase state of Mexico City aerosol sampled at the T1 site during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. Overall, predicted semivolatile partitioning agrees well with measurements. PM{sub 2.5} is insensitive to changes in ammonia but is to acidic semivolatile species. For particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m diameter, semi-volatile partitioning requires 30-60 min to equilibrate; longer time is typically required during the night and early morning hours. When the aerosol sulfate-to-nitrate molar ratio is less than unity, predictions improve substantially if the aerosol is assumed to follow the deliquescent phase diagram. Treating crustal species as 'equivalent sodium' (rather than explicitly) in the thermodynamic equilibrium calculations introduces important biases in predicted aerosol water uptake, nitrate and ammonium; neglecting crustals further increases errors dramatically. This suggests that explicitly considering crustals in the thermodynamic calculations is required to accurately predict the partitioning and phase state of aerosols.

  12. MODIS and AERONET Characterization of the Global Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Reme, Lorraine; Tanre, Didier; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently produced daily MODIS aerosol data for the whole year of 2001 are used to show the concentration and dynamics of aerosol over ocean and large parts of the continents. The data were validated against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements over land and ocean. Monthly averages and a movie based on the daily data are produced and used to demonstrate the spatial and temporal evolution of aerosol. The MODIS wide spectral range is used to distinguish fine smoke and pollution aerosol from coarse dust and salt. The movie produced from the MODIS data provides a new dimension to aerosol observations by showing the dynamics of the system. For example in February smoke and dust emitted from the Sahel and West Africa is shown to travel to the North-East Atlantic. In April heavy dust and pollution from East Asia is shown to travel to North America. In May-June pollution and dust play a dynamical dance in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. In Aug-September smoke from South Africa and South America is shown to pulsate in tandem and to periodically to be transported to the otherwise pristine Southern part of the Southern Hemisphere.

  13. High resolution simulations of aerosol microphysics in a global and regionally nested chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, P. J.; Marks, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol indirect effect is the largest source of forcing uncertainty in current climate models. This effect arises from the influence of aerosols on the reflective properties and lifetimes of clouds, and its magnitude depends on how many particles can serve as cloud droplet formation sites. Assessing levels of this subset of particles (cloud condensation nuclei, or CCN) requires knowledge of aerosol levels and their global distribution, size distributions, and composition. A key tool necessary to advance our understanding of CCN is the use of global aerosol microphysical models, which simulate the processes that control aerosol size distributions: nucleation, condensation/evaporation, and coagulation. Previous studies have found important differences in CO (Chen, D. et al., 2009) and ozone (Jang, J., 1995) modeled at different spatial resolutions, and it is reasonable to believe that short-lived, spatially-variable aerosol species will be similarly - or more - susceptible to model resolution effects. The goal of this study is to determine how CCN levels and spatial distributions change as simulations are run at higher spatial resolution - specifically, to evaluate how sensitive the model is to grid size, and how this affects comparisons against observations. Higher resolution simulations are necessary supports for model/measurement synergy. Simulations were performed using the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem (v9-02). The years 2008 and 2009 were simulated at 4ox5o and 2ox2.5o globally and at 0.5ox0.667o over Europe and North America. Results were evaluated against surface-based particle size distribution measurements from the European Supersites for Atmospheric Aerosol Research project. The fine-resolution model simulates more spatial and temporal variability in ultrafine levels, and better resolves topography. Results suggest that the coarse model predicts systematically lower ultrafine levels than does the fine-resolution model. Significant

  14. Predicting the Mineral and Chemical Composition of Dust Aerosols: Evaluation and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Soil dust aerosols in Earth system models are typically assumed to have globally uniform properties. However, important climate processes related to dust depend on the aerosol mineral and chemical composition, which varies regionally. Such processes include aerosol radiative forcing, transport of bioavailable iron that catalyzes marine photosynthesis, heterogeneous chemistry, ice nucleation, and cloud condensation.We have implemented a new version of the soil dust aerosol scheme in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE that takes into account the mineral composition of the dust particles. Dust aerosols are represented as an external mixture of minerals such as illite, kaolinite, smectite, carbonates, quartz, feldspar and gypsum, as well as iron oxides and accretions of iron oxides with each of the these minerals.We present a new publically available compilation of measurements of mineral fractions derived from ca. 50 references from the literature. This compilation is used to evaluate our new model of mineral and elemental composition within ModelE. We discuss the challenges of comparing simulated mineral fractions to measurements, which often come from field campaigns and ship cruises of limited duration. Despite uncertainties of the measurements, we show the importance of estimating the undisturbed size distribution of the parent soil prior to wet sieving, along with the modification of this size distribution during emission. In particular, our new model reproduces measurements showing greater amount of aerosols at silt sizes (whose diameters exceed 2 μm) including significant amounts of clay mineral aerosols (like illite) at silt sizes. Our model also reduces the systematic overestimation of quartz, while allowing iron to be transported farther from its source as impurities than in its pure, crystalline form.

  15. Characterizing the Hygroscopicity of Nascent Sea Spray Aerosol from Synthetic Blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Sultana, C. M.; Lee, C.; Wang, X.; Helgestad, T.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Cornwell, G.; Novak, G.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles make up a significant portion of natural aerosols and are therefore important in establishing the baseline for anthropogenic aerosol climate impacts. Scattering of solar radiation by aerosols affects Earth's radiative budget and the degree of scattering is size-dependent. Thus, aerosols scatter more light at elevated relative humidities when they grow larger via water uptake. This growth depends critically on chemical composition. SSA can become enriched in organics during phytoplankton blooms, becoming less salty and therefore less hygroscopic. Subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85% relative humidity (GF(85%)) of SSA particles were quantified during two mesocosm experiments in enclosed marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). The two experiments were conducted with filtered seawater collected at separate times from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA. Phytoplankton blooms in each tank were induced via the addition of nutrients and photosynthetically active radiation. The "indoor" MART was illuminated with fluorescent light and the other "outdoor" MART was illuminated with sunlight. The peak chlorophyll-a concentrations were 59 micrograms/L and 341 micrograms /L for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. GF(85%) values for SSA particles were quantified using a humidified cavity ringdown spectrometer and particle size distributions. Particle composition was monitored with a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Relationships between the observed particle GFs and the particle composition markers will be discussed.

  16. Characterization of the seasonal cycle of south Asian aerosols: A Regional-Scale Modeling Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikary, Bhupesh; Carmichael, Gregory; Tang, Youhua; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Schauer, James J.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Ramana, Muvva V.

    2007-11-07

    The STEM chemical transport model is used to study the aerosol distribution, composition and seasonality over South Asia from September 2004 to August 2005. Model predictions of sulfate, black carbon, primary organic carbon, other anthropogenic particulate matter, wind blown mineral dusts and sea salt are compared at two sites in South Asia where year long experimental observations are available from the Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) Project. The model predictions are able to capture both the magnitude and seasonality of aerosols over Hanimaadhoo Observatory, Maldives. However, the model is not able to explain the seasonality at the Kathmandu Observatory; but the model does capture Kathmandu’s observed annual mean concentration. The absence of seasonal brick kiln emissions within Kathmandu valley in the current inventory is a probable reason for this problem. This model study reveals high anthropogenic aerosol loading over the Ganges valley even in the monsoonal months, which needs to be corroborated by experimental observations. Modeling results also show a high dust loading over South Asia with a distinct seasonality. Model results of aerosol monthly composition are also presented at 5 cities in South Asia. Total and fine mode aerosol optical depth along with contribution from each aerosol species is presented; the results show that the anthropogenic fraction dominates in the dry season with major contributions from sulfate and absorbing aerosols. Finally comparison with observations show that model improvements are needed in the treatment of aerosol dry and wet removal processes and increase in sulfate production via heterogeneous pathways.

  17. Characterization of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, Antonis; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The properties and distribution of aerosols over the broader Mediterranean region are complex since particles of different nature are either produced within its boundaries or transported from other regions. Thus, coarse dust aerosols are transported primarily from Sahara and secondarily from Middle East, while fine polluted aerosols are either produced locally from anthropogenic activities or they are transported from neighbouring or remote European areas. Also during summer biomass aerosols are transported towards the Mediterranean, originating from massive and extended fires occurring in northern Balkans and Eastern Europe and favoured by the prevailing synoptic conditions. In addition, sea-salt aerosols originate from the Mediterranean Sea or the Atlantic Ocean. Occasionally, aerosols are encountered at very high concentrations (aerosol episodes or events) significantly affecting atmospheric dynamics and climate as well as human health. Given the coexistence of different aerosols as internal and external mixtures characterizing and discriminating between the different types of aerosol episodes is a big challenge. A characterization and classification of intense aerosol episodes in the Mediterranean basin (March 2000 - February 2007) is attempted in the present study. This is achieved by implementing an objective and dynamic algorithm which uses daily aerosol optical properties derived from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. The aerosol episodes are first classified into strong and extreme ones, according to their intensity, by means of aerosol optical depth at 550nm (AOD550nm). Subsequently, they are discriminated into the following aerosol types: (i) biomass/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) sea-salt like (SS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The classification is based on aerosol optical properties accounting for the particles' size (Ångström exponent, Effective radius), the

  18. Experimental Determination of Chemical Diffusion within Secondary Organic Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, Evan H.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2013-02-28

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Recent experimental evidence from a number of groups indicates that SOA is in a semi-solid phase, the viscosity of which remained unknown. We find that when SOA is made in the presence of vapors of volatile hydrophobic molecules the SOA particles absorb and trap them. Here, we illustrate that it is possible to measure the evaporation rate of these molecules that is determined by their diffusion in SOA, which is then used to calculate a reasonably accurate value for the SOA viscosity. We use pyrene as a tracer molecule and a-pinene SOA as an illustrative case. It takes ~24 hours for half the pyrene to evaporate to yield a viscosity of 10^8 Pa s for a-pinene. This viscosity is consistent with measurements of particle bounce and evaporation rates. We show that viscosity of 10^8 Pa s implies coalescence times of minutes, consistent with the findings that SOA particles are spherical. Similar measurements on aged SOA particles doped with pyrene yield a viscosity of 10^9 Pa s, indicating that hardening occurs with time, which is consistent with observed decrease in water uptake and evaporation rate with aging.

  19. Characterization of ambient aerosols at the San Francisco International Airport using BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T; McJimpsey, E L; Coffee, K R; Fergenson, D P; Riot, V J; Tobias, H J; Woods, B W; Gard, E E; Frank, M

    2006-03-16

    The BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system is a rapidly fieldable, fully autonomous instrument that can perform correlated measurements of multiple orthogonal properties of individual aerosol particles. The BAMS front end uses optical techniques to nondestructively measure a particle's aerodynamic diameter and fluorescence properties. Fluorescence can be excited at 266nm or 355nm and is detected in two broad wavelength bands. Individual particles with appropriate size and fluorescence properties can then be analyzed more thoroughly in a dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Over the course of two deployments to the San Francisco International Airport, more than 6.5 million individual aerosol particles were fully analyzed by the system. Analysis of the resulting data has provided a number of important insights relevant to rapid bioaerosol detection, which are described here.

  20. Characterizing interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2016-04-01

    This contribution presents a method to characterize the nonlinearities of interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds based on global MODIS observations. Clouds play a crucial role in the climate system as their radiative properties and precipitation patterns significantly impact the Earth's energy balance. Cloud properties are determined by environmental conditions, as cloud formation requires the availability of water vapour ("precipitable water") and condensation nuclei in sufficiently saturated conditions. The ways in which aerosols as condensation nuclei in particular influence the optical, micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds are one of the largest remaining uncertainties in climate-change research. In particular, cloud droplet size is believed to be impacted, and thereby cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation susceptibility. However, the connection between aerosols and cloud droplets is nonlinear, due to various factors and processes. The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is thought to be strongest with low aerosol loadings, whereas it saturates with high aerosol loadings. To gain understanding of the processes that govern low cloud water properties in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. In this study, global Terra MODIS L3 data sets are used to characterize the nonlinearities of the interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds. MODIS observations are binned in classes of aerosol loading to identify at what loading aerosol impact on cloud droplets is the strongest and at which loading it saturates. Results are connected to ERA-Interim and MACC data sets to identify connections of detected patterns to meteorology and aerosol species.

  1. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  2. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically-resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocity for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon was 2.05 ± 0.04 mm/s. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm/s and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  3. Eddy covariance measurements with high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry: a new approach to chemically resolved aerosol fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D. K.; Kimmel, J. R.; Phillips, G.; Docherty, K. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Sueper, D.; Nemitz, E.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Although laboratory studies show that biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) yield substantial secondary organic aerosol (SOA), production of biogenic SOA as indicated by upward fluxes has not been conclusively observed over forests. Further, while aerosols are known to deposit to surfaces, few techniques exist to provide chemically-resolved particle deposition fluxes. To better constrain aerosol sources and sinks, we have developed a new technique to directly measure fluxes of chemically-resolved submicron aerosols using the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in a new, fast eddy covariance mode. This approach takes advantage of the instrument's ability to quantitatively identify both organic and inorganic components, including ammonium, sulphate and nitrate, at a temporal resolution of several Hz. The new approach has been successfully deployed over a temperate ponderosa pine plantation in California during the BEARPEX-2007 campaign, providing both total and chemically resolved non-refractory (NR) PM1 fluxes. Average deposition velocities for total NR-PM1 aerosol at noon were 2.05 ± 0.04 mm s-1. Using a high resolution measurement of the NH2+ and NH3+ fragments, we demonstrate the first eddy covariance flux measurements of particulate ammonium, which show a noon-time deposition velocity of 1.9 ± 0.7 mm s-1 and are dominated by deposition of ammonium sulphate.

  4. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    PubMed

    Eichler; Bruchle; Dressler; Dullmann; Eichler; Gaggeler; Gregorich; Hoffman; Hubener; Jost; Kirbach; Laue; Lavanchy; Nitsche; Patin; Piguet; Schadel; Shaughnessy; Strellis; Taut; Tobler; Tsyganov; Turler; Vahle; Wilk; Yakushev

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table.

  5. Chemical characterization of bohrium (element 107)

    PubMed

    Eichler; Bruchle; Dressler; Dullmann; Eichler; Gaggeler; Gregorich; Hoffman; Hubener; Jost; Kirbach; Laue; Lavanchy; Nitsche; Patin; Piguet; Schadel; Shaughnessy; Strellis; Taut; Tobler; Tsyganov; Turler; Vahle; Wilk; Yakushev

    2000-09-01

    The arrangement of the chemical elements in the periodic table highlights resemblances in chemical properties, which reflect the elements' electronic structure. For the heaviest elements, however, deviations in the periodicity of chemical properties are expected: electrons in orbitals with a high probability density near the nucleus are accelerated by the large nuclear charges to relativistic velocities, which increase their binding energies and cause orbital contraction. This leads to more efficient screening of the nuclear charge and corresponding destabilization of the outer d and f orbitals: it is these changes that can give rise to unexpected chemical properties. The synthesis of increasingly heavy elements, now including that of elements 114, 116 and 118, allows the investigation of this effect, provided sufficiently long-lived isotopes for chemical characterization are available. In the case of elements 104 and 105, for example, relativistic effects interrupt characteristic trends in the chemical properties of the elements constituting the corresponding columns of the periodic table, whereas element 106 behaves in accordance with the expected periodicity. Here we report the chemical separation and characterization of six atoms of element 107 (bohrium, Bh), in the form of its oxychloride. We find that this compound is less volatile than the oxychlorides of the lighter elements of group VII, thus confirming relativistic calculations that predict the behaviour of bohrium, like that of element 106, to coincide with that expected on the basis of its position in the periodic table. PMID:10993071

  6. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2016-02-02

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites.more » The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have

  7. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Gorkowski, K.; Dubey, M. K.; Fleming, Z. L.; Visser, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Ng, N. L.

    2016-02-01

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 µm) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the contribution from different sources is distinctly different between the two sites. The concentration of solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC; measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for < 10 % of the total OA (measured by a HR-ToF-AMS) at 250 °C, the two measurements are well-correlated, suggesting that the non-volatile organics have similar sources or have undergone similar chemical

  8. Chemical composition, sources, and processes of urban aerosols during summertime in Northwest China: insights from High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Zhang, Q.; Chen, M.; Ge, X.; Ren, J.; Qin, D.

    2014-06-01

    An aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed along with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) to measure the temporal variations of the mass loading, chemical composition, and size distribution of sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) in Lanzhou, northwest China, during 12 July-7 August 2012. The average PM1 mass concentration including non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) measured by HR-ToF-AMS and black carbon (BC) measured by MAAP during this study was 24.5 μg m-3 (ranging from 0.86 to 105μg m-3), with a mean composition consisting of 47% organics, 16% sulfate, 12% BC, 11% ammonium, 10% nitrate, and 4% chloride. The organics was consisted of 70% carbon, 21% oxygen, 8% hydrogen, and 1% nitrogen, with the average oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.33 and organic mass-to-carbon ratio (OM / OC) of 1.58. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high-resolution mass spectra of organic aerosols (OA) identified four distinct factors which represent, respectively, two primary OA (POA) emission sources (traffic and food cooking) and two secondary OA (SOA) types - a fresher, semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA) and a more aged, low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA). Traffic-related hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and BC displayed distinct diurnal patterns both with peak at ~07:00-11:00 (BJT: UTC +8) corresponding to the morning rush hours, while cooking OA (COA) peaked during three meal periods. The diurnal profiles of sulfate and LV-OOA displayed a broad peak between ∼07:00-15:00, while those of nitrate, ammonium, and SV-OOA showed a narrower peak at ~08:00-13:00. The later morning and early afternoon peak in the diurnal profiles of secondary aerosol species was likely caused by mixing down of pollutants aloft, which were likely produced in the residual layer decoupled from the boundary layer during night time. The mass spectrum of SV-OOA also showed similarity with that of

  9. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site Laboratoire d'Hygiène de la Ville de Paris (LHVP) in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m-3, e.g., during winter.

  10. Hygroscopic properties of the Paris urban aerosol in relation to its chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamilli, K. A.; Poulain, L.; Held, A.; Nowak, A.; Birmili, W.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol hygroscopic growth factors and chemical properties were measured as part of the MEGAPOLI "Megacities Plume Case Study" at the urban site LHVP in the city center of Paris from June to August 2009, and from January to February 2010. Descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DGF) were derived in the diameter range from 25 to 350 nm at relative humidities of 30, 55, 75, and 90% by applying the summation method on humidified and dry aerosol size distributions measured simultaneously with a humidified differential mobility particle sizer (HDMPS) and a twin differential mobility particle sizer (TDMPS). For 90% relative humidity, the DGF varied from 1.06 to 1.46 in summer, and from 1.06 to 1.66 in winter. Temporal variations in the observed mean DGF could be well explained with a simple growth model based on the aerosol chemical composition measured by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and black carbon photometry (MAAP). In particular, good agreement was observed when sulfate was the predominant inorganic factor. A clear overestimation of the predicted growth factor was found when the nitrate mass concentration exceeded values of 10 μg m3, e.g. during winter.

  11. Atmospheric aerosol characterization combining multi-wavelength Raman lidar and MAX-DOAS measurements in Gwanjgu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jihyo; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Kwang Chul; Lee, Kwon-Ho; Shin, Sungkyun; Noh, Young M.; Müller, Detlef; Kim, Young J.

    2011-11-01

    Integrated approach has been adopted at the ADvanced Environmental Research Center (ADEMRC), Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Korea for effective monitoring of atmospheric aerosol. Various active and passive optical remote sensing techniques such as multi-wavelength (3β+2α+1δ) Raman LIDAR, sun-photometry, MAX-DOAS, and satellite retrieval have been utilized. This integrated monitoring system approach combined with in-situ surface measurement is to allow better characterization of physical and optical properties of atmospheric aerosol. Information on the vertical distribution and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol is important for understanding its transport characteristics as well as radiative effect. The GIST multi-wavelength (3β + 2α+1δ) Raman lidar system can measure vertical profiles of optical properties of atmospheric aerosols such as extinction coefficients at 355 and 532nm, particle backscatter coefficients at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, and depolarization ratio at 532nm. The incomplete overlap between the telescope field-of-view and beam divergence of the transmitting laser significantly affects lidar measurement, resulting in higher uncertainty near the surface where atmospheric aerosols of interest are concentrated. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique is applied as a complementary tool for the detection of atmospheric aerosols near the surface. The passive Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) technique uses scattered sunlight as a light source from several viewing directions. Recently developed aerosol retrieval algorithm based on O4 slant column densities (SCDs) measured at UV and visible wavelengths has been utilized to derive aerosol information (e.g., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol extinction coefficients (AECs)) in the lower troposphere. The aerosol extinction coefficient at 356 nm was retrieved for the 0-1 and 1-2 km layers based on the MAX-DOAS measurements using the retrieval algorithm

  12. Characterization of aerosols containing Legionella generated upon nebulization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra, Séverine; Leclerc, Lara; Massard, Pierre André; Girardot, Françoise; Riffard, Serge; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-09-01

    Legionella pneumophila is, by far, the species most frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Human infection occurs almost exclusively by aerosol inhalation which places the bacteria in juxtaposition with alveolar macrophages. LD risk management is based on controlling water quality by applying standardized procedures. However, to gain a better understanding of the real risk of exposure, there is a need (i) to investigate under which conditions Legionella may be aerosolized and (ii) to quantify bacterial deposition into the respiratory tract upon nebulization. In this study, we used an original experimental set-up that enables the generation of aerosol particles containing L. pneumophila under various conditions. Using flow cytometry in combination with qPCR and culture, we determined (i) the size of the aerosols and (ii) the concentration of viable Legionella forms that may reach the thoracic region. We determined that the 0.26–2.5 μm aerosol size range represents 7% of initial bacterial suspension. Among the viable forms, 0.7% of initial viable bacterial suspension may reach the pulmonary alveoli. In conclusion, these deposition profiles can be used to standardize the size of inoculum injected in any type of respiratory tract model to obtain new insights into the dose response for LD.

  13. Characterization of aerosols containing Legionella generated upon nebulization

    PubMed Central

    Allegra, Séverine; Leclerc, Lara; Massard, Pierre André; Girardot, Françoise; Riffard, Serge; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is, by far, the species most frequently associated with Legionnaires’ disease (LD). Human infection occurs almost exclusively by aerosol inhalation which places the bacteria in juxtaposition with alveolar macrophages. LD risk management is based on controlling water quality by applying standardized procedures. However, to gain a better understanding of the real risk of exposure, there is a need (i) to investigate under which conditions Legionella may be aerosolized and (ii) to quantify bacterial deposition into the respiratory tract upon nebulization. In this study, we used an original experimental set-up that enables the generation of aerosol particles containing L. pneumophila under various conditions. Using flow cytometry in combination with qPCR and culture, we determined (i) the size of the aerosols and (ii) the concentration of viable Legionella forms that may reach the thoracic region. We determined that the 0.26–2.5 μm aerosol size range represents 7% of initial bacterial suspension. Among the viable forms, 0.7% of initial viable bacterial suspension may reach the pulmonary alveoli. In conclusion, these deposition profiles can be used to standardize the size of inoculum injected in any type of respiratory tract model to obtain new insights into the dose response for LD. PMID:27671446

  14. Chemical Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols Above a Pristine South East Asian Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, N. H.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.; Hamilton, J.; Chen, Q.; Martin, S.; Trembath, J.

    2009-04-01

    conjunction with a constant pressure inlet. The aerosols' chemical origins have been further investigated by comparing these spectra to chamber experiments, mass spectral libraries and data from comparable experiments in other locations. These data are also being analysed in conjunction with offline techniques applied to samples collected using filters and a Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS). Methods used include liquid chromatography and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry. These techniques provide a more detailed chemical characterisation of the SOA and water soluble organic carbon, allowing direct links back to gas phase precursors. In conjunction with the field measurements, a programme of chamber experiments is being carried out at Manchester as part of the ACES project. This will generate comparable SOA under controlled conditions and subjecting them to similar analysis.

  15. Seasonal contrast in aerosol abundance over northern south Asia using a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, C.; Sadavarte, P.; Madhavan, B. L.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.; Adhikary, B.; D'Allura, A.; Cherian, R.; Das, S.; Gupta, T.; Streets, D. G.; Wei, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Northern South-Asia, home to about half a billion people, experiences large aerosol abundances almost all year around. There are gaps in our understanding of seasonal variations in regional aerosol emissions, abundance and radiative effects. The present study uses chemical transport model simulations (at ~ 60km resolution), with regionally estimated emissions, to investigate the contrast in aerosol surface and columnar abundance during pre-monsoon transition, monsoon and inter-monsoon transition periods over than Gangetic plain (GP) and Tibetan plateau. The interplay between aerosol emissions and atmospheric transport is examined to explain the variability. Model predictions were evaluated with available in-situ measurements and AOD from AERONET and MODIS level-2 retrievals (at 10 km resolution) processed with quality weighting to the model resolution. During April, AOD was dominated by dust at most sites across the GP and Tibet. However, AOD from organic carbon (emitted from agricultural residue burning) is also significant at several sites (Pantnagar, Godavari, Kolkata, Dhaka, and at high altitude Pyramid and Lhasa sites), consistent with recently reported MISR climatology in this region. In contrast, during July and September, AOD was dominated by sulfate at all sites. In April, aerosols over the GP could be attributed to emissions from large industrial sources (thermal power plant, cement industries, iron & steel and other industries) and agricultural residue burning transported from the northwest, along with forest burning emissions transported from the east. Large fluxes of open burning emissions in the east GP, along with prevailing easterly wind flow into the GP led to an east-west gradient in anthropogenic aerosols. During July, there was little open burning, so aerosol concentrations were largely from industrial emissions transported out through the north. In the Tibet region, dust was predominant during both April and July. During September

  16. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I

  17. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, T.; Kojima, T.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; de la Rosa, J.; Calzolai, G.; Nava, S.; Chiari, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2013-02-01

    The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples with Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), and hourly Streaker with Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) samples collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa") and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5-10), As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1-2.5), metalliferous sodic particulate matter (PM) interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  18. Optical, physical, and chemical properties of springtime aerosol over Barrow Alaska in 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Shantz, Nicole C.; Gultepe, Ismail; Andrews, Elisabeth; Earle, Michael; MacDonald, A. M.; Liu, Peter S.K.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2014-03-06

    Airborne observations from four flights during the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) are used to examine some cloud-free optical, physical, and chemical properties of aerosol particles in the springtime Arctic troposphere. The number concentrations of particles larger than 0.12 μm (Na>120), important for light extinction and cloud droplet formation, ranged from 15 to 2260 cm-3, with the higher Na>120 cases dominated by measurements from two flights of long-range transported biomass burning (BB) aerosols. The two other flights examined here document a relatively clean aerosol and an Arctic Haze aerosol impacted by larger particles largely composed of dust. For observations from the cleaner case and the BB cases, the particle light scattering coefficients at low relative humidity (RH<20%) increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120, driven mostly by an increase in mean sizes of particles with increasing Na>120 (BB cases). For those three cases, particle light absorption coefficients also increased nonlinearly with increasing Na>120 and linearly with increasing submicron particle volume concentration. In addition to black carbon, brown carbon was estimated to have increased light absorption coefficients by 27% (450 nm wavelength) and 14% (550 nm) in the BB cases. For the case with strong dust influence, the absorption relative to submicron particle volume was small compared with the other cases. There was a slight gradient of Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) mean volume diameter (MVD) towards smaller sizes with increasing height, which suggests more scavenging of the more elevated particles, consistent with a typically longer lifetime of particles higher in the atmosphere. However, in approximately 10% of the cases, the MVD increased (>0.4 μm) with increasing altitude, suggesting transport of larger fine particle mass (possibly coarse particle mass) at high levels over the Arctic. This may be because of transport of

  19. Daily and hourly chemical impact of springtime transboundary aerosols on Japanese air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, T.; Kojima, T.; Amato, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; de la Rosa, J.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Alastuey, A.; Querol, X.; Gibbons, W.

    2012-09-01

    The regular eastward drift of transboundary aerosol intrusions from the Asian mainland into the NW Pacific region has a~pervasive impact on air quality in Japan, especially during springtime. Analysis of 24-h filter samples (ICP-AES and ICP-MS) and hourly Streaker (PIXE) samples of particulate matter collected continuously for six weeks reveal the chemistry of successive waves of natural mineral desert dust ("Kosa") and metalliferous sulphatic pollutants arriving in Western Japan during spring 2011. The main aerosol sources recognised by PMF analysis of Streaker data are mineral dust and fresh sea salt (both mostly in the coarser fraction PM2.5-10), As-bearing sulphatic aerosol (PM0.1-2.5), metalliferous sodic PM interpreted as aged, industrially contaminated marine aerosol, and ZnCu-bearing aerosols. Whereas mineral dust arrivals are typically highly transient, peaking over a few hours, sulphatic intrusions build up and decline more slowly, and are accompanied by notable rises in ambient concentrations of metallic trace elements such as Pb, As, Zn, Sn and Cd. The magnitude of the loss in regional air quality due to the spread and persistence of pollution from mainland Asia is especially clear when cleansing oceanic air advects westward across Japan, removing the continental influence and reducing concentrations of the more undesirable metalliferous pollutants by over 90%. Our new chemical database, especially the Streaker data, demonstrates the rapidly changing complexity of ambient air inhaled during these transboundary events, and implicates Chinese coal combustion as the main source of the anthropogenic aerosol component.

  20. Characterization of the Aerosol Instrument Package for the In-service Aircraft Global Observing System IAGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, Ulrich; Berg, Marcel; Tettig, Frank; Franke, Harald; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric aerosol influences the climate twofold via the direct interaction with solar radiation and indirectly effecting microphysical properties of clouds. The latter has the largest uncertainty according to the last IPPC Report. A measured in situ climatology of the aerosol microphysical properties is needed to reduce the reported uncertainty of the aerosol climate impact. The European Research Infrastructure IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System; www.iagos.org) responds to the increasing requests for long-term, routine in situ observational data by using commercial passenger aircraft as measurement platform. However, scientific instrumentation for the measurement of atmospheric constituents requires major modifications before being deployable aboard in-service passenger aircraft. The IAGOS Aerosol Package (IAGOS-P2C) consists of two modified Butanol based CPCs (Model Grimm 5.410) and one optical particle counter (Model Grimm Sky OPC 1.129). A thermodenuder at 250°C is placed upstream the second CPC, thus the number concentrations of the total aerosol and the non-volatile aerosol fraction is measured. The Sky OPC measures the size distribution in the rage theoretically up to 32 μ m. Because of the inlet cut off diameter of D50=3 μ m we are using the 16 channel mode in the range of 250 nm - 2.5 μ m at 1 Hz resolution. In this presentation the IAGOS Aerosol package is characterized for pressure levels relevant for the planned application, down to cruising level of 150 hPa including the inlet system. In our aerosol lab we have tested the system against standard instrumentation with different aerosol test substances in a long duration test. Particle losses are characterized for the inlet system. In addition first results for airborne measurements are shown from a first field campaign.

  1. Profile and Morphology of Fungal Aerosols Characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM)

    PubMed Central

    Afanou, Komlavi Anani; Straumfors, Anne; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Skaar, Ida; Hjeljord, Linda; Skare, Øivind; Green, Brett James; Tronsmo, Arne; Eduard, Wijnand

    2016-01-01

    Fungal aerosols consist of spores and fragments with diverse array of morphologies; however, the size, shape, and origin of the constituents require further characterization. In this study, we characterize the profile of aerosols generated from Aspergillus fumigatus, A. versicolor, and Penicillium chrysogenum grown for 8 weeks on gypsum boards. Fungal particles were aerosolized at 12 and 20 L min−1 using the Fungal Spore Source Strength Tester (FSSST) and the Stami particle generator (SPG). Collected particles were analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). We observed spore particle fraction consisting of single spores and spore aggregates in four size categories, and a fragment fraction that contained submicronic fragments and three size categories of larger fragments. Single spores dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while the submicronic fragment fraction was the highest in the aerosols collected from A. versicolor (median: 34%) and P. chrysogenum (median: 31%). Morphological characteristics showed near spherical particles that were only single spores, oblong particles that comprise some spore aggregates and fragments (<3.5 μm), and fiber-like particles that regroup chained spore aggregates and fragments (>3.5 μm). Further, the near spherical particles dominated the aerosols from A. fumigatus (median: 53%), while oblong particles were dominant in the aerosols from A. versicolor (68%) and P. chrysogenum (55%). Fiber-like particles represented 21% and 24% of the aerosols from A. versicolor and P. chrysogenum, respectively. This study shows that fungal particles of various size, shape, and origin are aerosolized, and supports the need to include a broader range of particle types in fungal exposure assessment. PMID:26855468

  2. Development and characterization of a resistance spot welding aerosol generator and inhalation exposure system.

    PubMed

    Afshari, Aliakbar; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T; Jackson, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Friend, Sherri; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Leonard, H Donny; Meighan, Terence G; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2014-10-01

    Limited information exists regarding the health risks associated with inhaling aerosols that are generated during resistance spot welding of metals treated with adhesives. Toxicology studies evaluating spot welding aerosols are non-existent. A resistance spot welding aerosol generator and inhalation exposure system was developed. The system was designed by directing strips of sheet metal that were treated with an adhesive to two electrodes of a spot welder. Spot welds were made at a specified distance from each other by a computer-controlled welding gun in a fume collection chamber. Different target aerosol concentrations were maintained within the exposure chamber during a 4-h exposure period. In addition, the exposure system was run in two modes, spark and no spark, which resulted in different chemical profiles and particle size distributions. Complex aerosols were produced that contained both metal particulates and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Size distribution of the particles was multi-modal. The majority of particles were chain-like agglomerates of ultrafine primary particles. The submicron mode of agglomerated particles accounted for the largest portion of particles in terms of particle number. Metal expulsion during spot welding caused the formation of larger, more spherical particles (spatter). These spatter particles appeared in the micron size mode and accounted for the greatest amount of particles in terms of mass. With this system, it is possible to examine potential mechanisms by which spot welding aerosols can affect health, as well as assess which component of the aerosol may be responsible for adverse health outcomes.

  3. Development of aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition for thin film fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Marthatika, Dian; Panatarani, Camellia; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is widely used to grow a thin film applied in many industrial applications. This paper report the development of an aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) which is one of the CVD methods. Newly developed AACVD system consists of a chamber of pyrex glass, two wire-heating elements placed to cover pyrex glass, a substrate holder, and an aerosol generator using an air brush sprayer. The temperature control system was developed to prevent condensation on the chamber walls. The control performances such as the overshoot and settling time were obtained from of the developed temperature controller. Wire-heating elements were controlled at certain setting value to heat the injected aerosol to form a thin film in the substrate. The performance of as-developed AACVD system tested to form a thin film where aerosol was sprayed into the chamber with a flow rate of 7 liters/minutes, and vary in temperatures and concentrations of precursor. The temperature control system have an overshoot around 25 °C from the desired set point temperature, very small temperature ripple 2 °C and a settling time of 20 minutes. As-developed AACVD successfully fabricated a ZnO thin film with thickness of below 1 µm. The performances of system on formation of thin films influenced by the generally controlled process such as values of setting temperature and concentration where the aerosol flow rate was fixed. Higher temperature was applied, the more uniform ZnO thin films were produced. In addition, temperature of the substrate also affected on surface roughness of the obtained films, while concentration of ZnO precursor determined the thickness of produce films. It is concluded that newly simple AACVD can be applied to produce a thin film.

  4. Online hygroscopicity and chemical measurement of urban aerosol in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinning; Ye, Xingnan; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jianmin; Yang, Xin; Gross, Deborah S.

    2014-10-01

    Submicron aerosol hygroscopicity and composition were simultaneously measured with a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) in-line with an Aerosol Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) in wintertime of 2009 in Shanghai. 250 nm dry diameter aerosol particles were humidified (85% RH) and selected based on their hygroscopicity. Two Growth Factor (GF) modes were observed persistently: a weak nearly-hydrophobic (NH) mode with GF at around 1.05 and a strong hydrophilic mode with GF around 1.46. Aerosol particles at different GFs were chemically analyzed by ATOFMS to link the aerosol hygroscopicity and chemistry. Particles were grouped into five major classes: inorganic dust/ash, biomass burning particles (BB), elemental carbon and organic carbon mixed particles (ECOC), Amine rich organic carbon particles (OC-Amine), and high mass organic carbon particles (HMOC). Different particle types were found enriched in the two GF modes. ECOC and OC-Amine particles internally mixed with secondary inorganic species were found mostly in the hydrophilic mode. Pure EC particles and a small group of clay particles among the dust/ash type with strong signals of aluminum and silicon oxides appeared in the NH mode. HMOC particles were exclusively found in the NH mode. Chemical signature intensities were analyzed to examine the particle mixing states and their impact on the diversity of hygroscopicity for each particle type. BB particles in the NH mode had stronger organic carbon signals, while those in hydrophilic mode had stronger potassium salt signals. In general, an elevated OC mass fraction increased particle's hydrophobicity. Amine and secondary inorganic species such as nitrate strongly increased particle's hygroscopicity.

  5. Molecular corridors represent the multiphase chemical evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Berkemeier, T.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K. A.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Pöschl, U.

    2014-03-01

    The dominant component of atmospheric organic aerosol is that derived from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA consists of a multitude of organic compounds, only a small fraction of which has historically been identified. Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases. Current SOA models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation. The recent advent of soft ionization mass spectrometry methods now facilitates a more complete molecular identification of SOA than heretofore possible. Based on such novel measurements, we show here that the chemical evolution of SOA from a variety of VOC precursors adheres to characteristic "molecular corridors" with a tight inverse correlation between volatility and molar mass. Sequential and parallel reaction oxidation and dimerization pathways progress along these corridors through characteristic regimes of reaction-, diffusion-, or accommodation-limited multiphase chemical kinetics that can be classified according to reaction location, degree of saturation, and extent of heterogeneity of gas and particle phases. These molecular corridors constrain the properties of unidentified products and reaction pathways and rates of SOA evolution, thereby facilitating the further development of aerosol models for air quality and climate.

  6. Effects of Chemical Aging on Global Secondary Organic Aerosol using the Volatility Basis Set Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, R.; Jo, D.; Kim, M.; Spracklen, D. V.; Hodzic, A.

    2014-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) constitutes significant mass fractions (20-90%) of total dry fine aerosols in the atmosphere. However, global models of OA have shown large discrepancies when compared to the observations because of the limited capability to simulate secondary OA (SOA). For reducing the discrepancies between observations and models, recent studies have shown that chemical aging reactions in the atmosphere are important because they can lead to decreases in organic volatility, resulting in increase of SOA mass yields. To efficiently simulate chemical aging of SOA in the atmosphere, we implemented the volatility basis set approach in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). We present full-year simulations and their comparisons with multiple observations - global aerosol mass spectrometer dataset, the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments from the United States, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme dataset and water-soluble organic carbon observation data collected over East Asia. Using different input parameters in the model, we also explore the uncertainty of the SOA simulation for which we use an observational constraint to find the optimized values with which the model reduces the discrepancy from the observations. Finally, we estimate the effect of OA on climate using our best simulation results.

  7. Aerosol Chemical and Physical Properties Observed over Puerto Rico in the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusino-Atresino, R.; Xia, L.; Song, F.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols that originate in Africa and are transported over the Atlantic Ocean have potential impacts over the Caribbean region. To investigate aerosol properties over this region, air sampling was conducted at San Juan Cape (18.46°N, 66.12°W), Puerto Rico during the summer months in 2006. Aerosol samples were collected by both commercial PM2.5 sampler and in-house fabricated TSP sampler. Analyses of aerosols were made through the use of the following instrumental methods: (1)Ion Chromatography for the determinations of water-soluble cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, methanesulfonate, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate); (2)Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for the concentrations of selected trace elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V); (3)Scanning Electron Microscopy for individual aerosol particle characterization. Crustal enrichment factors were calculated to determine the strength of crustal source. Preliminary results indicate that sodium (22 - 99 μg m- 3) and ammonium (1.1 - 50 μg m-3) were the major cations and chloride (1.5 - 99 μg m-3) and sulfate (35 μg m-3) were the dominant anions. Malonate (3.8 - 6.9 μg m- 3) was the most abundant organic anion. Atmospheric concentrations of iron ranged 0.30 - 3.3 ng m- 3. The elements, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V, were enriched by factors of 600 to 40,000 relative to their natural abundance in crustal soil. Principal components analysis indicates six assemblages of fifteen types of aerosol particles, dominated by Si - rich particles.

  8. Star Photometry for the Characterization of Columnar Aerosol Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Ramirez, D.; Lyamani, H.; Olmo Reyes, F. J.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Whiteman, D. N.; Aceituno, J.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of columnar aerosol particles at nighttime is essential to completely understand aerosol dynamics and so will largely improve aerosol models. However, the current knowledge columnar nighttime aerosol is poor due to the lack of continuous measurements partly associated with previous technological limitations. Here we present the development, set up, calibration and data quality algorithms for the star photometer at the station of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 m a.s.l.) in Spain. The main advantage of this instrument is that make uses of a CCD camera as detector allowing direct star flux measurements. Filters center at 380, 440, 500, 670, 880 and 1020 nm allows spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Among all the stars, only those that are isolated and possess constant extratarrestial flux are considered. Two methods for the calibration of the system at high mountain places are presented. The first one consists of doing a Langley calibration of a selected star together with measurements of other stars. From the Langley calibration, we transferred AOD and get the calibration constants for other stars. The second method is the Astronomical Langley Method that consists of dividing the measurements by the optical air mass and so more stable calibration constant are obtained. On the other hand, the atmospheric turbulence is important for very short exposure times (< 1 s) and so uncertainties in AOD are of ±0.02 for λ < 800nm and ±0.01 for λ > 800nm. The instrument operated continuously for more than four consecutive years and so a large database was created. Cloud screening and data quality algorithms following AERONET inheritance were developed. Basically, moving averages are applied with different temporal-windows combined with a procedure to detect outliers. On the other hand, with quality data guaranteed the analysis of day-to-night columnar aerosol properties is presented. Mean AOD(440 nm) (0.18 ± 0.10 and 0.19 ± 0.11 for daytime and

  9. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24% to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6-h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3°C.

  10. Investigating the Chemical Pathways to PAH- and PANH-Based Aerosols in Titan's Atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella Marion; Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, Claire Louise; Salama, Farid

    2011-01-01

    A complex organic chemistry between Titan's two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. These aerosols are at the origin of the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. In situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini have revealed the presence of large amounts of neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan. In particular, benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3), which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, have been detected, suggesting that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan s aerosols. Moreover, results from numerical models as well as laboratory simulations of Titan s atmospheric chemistry are also suggesting chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN ...) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols.

  11. Real-Time Chemical Analysis of E-Cigarette Aerosols By Means Of Secondary Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Diego; Gaisl, Thomas; Barrios-Collado, César; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Kohler, Malcolm; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-02-12

    Chemical analysis of aerosols collected from electronic cigarettes (ECs) has shown that these devices produce vapors that contain harmful and potentially harmful compounds. Conventional analytical methods used for the analysis of electronic cigarettes do not reflect the actual composition of the aerosols generated because they usually neglect the changes in the chemical composition that occur during the aerosol generation process and after collection. The aim of this work was to develop and apply a method for the real-time analysis of electronic cigarette aerosols, based on the secondary electrospray ionization technique coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry, by mimicking the "vaping" process. Electronic cigarette aerosols were successfully analyzed and quantitative differences were found between the liquids and aerosols. Thanks to the high sensitivity shown by this method, more than 250 chemical substances were detected in the aerosols, some of them showing a high correlation with the operating power of the electronic cigarettes. The method also allows proper quantification of several chemical components such as alkaloids and flavor compounds.

  12. Aerosol Layering Characterization Near the Gobi Desert by a Double Polarization Lidar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Boselli, A.; Sannino, A.; Song, C.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2016-06-01

    In order to carry out 4-D (space and time) analysis of the atmospheric aerosol distribution and to make a characterization of their properties and time evolution, a transportable multi-wavelength, Elastic/Raman scanning lidar system with angular scanning capability has been realized. The system uses a diode pumped Nd:YAG laser source, specifically designed for this device, and a receiving systems able to detect elastic signals at 355, 532 and 1064 nm and Raman signals at 386, 407 and 607 nm. It also allows to perform aerosol depolarization measurements at both 355nm and 532nm. A first measurement campaign has been carried out in Dunhuang, North-West of China, in the region of the Gobi desert with the aims to study and characterize desert dust at source. Optical properties of aerosol layers developing in the atmosphere have been analyzed and lidar data are discussed in terms of profiles of aerosol backscatter coefficient at 355nm, 532nm, aerosol extinction coefficient at 355nm, aerosol depolarization ratio at 355nm and 532nm and water vapor mixing ratio. Depolarization ratio measured simultaneously at two wavelengths allowed also to study its dependence on the wavelength.

  13. Estimation of aerosol type from airborne hyperspectral data: a new technique designed for industrial plume characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Marion, R.; Foucher, P.-Y.; Briottet, X.

    2012-11-01

    The determination of the aerosol type in a plume from remotely sensed data without any a priori knowledge is a challenging task. If several methods have already been developed to characterize the aerosols from multi or hyperspectral data, they are not suited for industrial particles, which have specific physical and optical properties, changing quickly and in a complex way with the distance from the source emission. From radiative transfer equations, we have developed an algorithm, based on a Look-Up Table approach, enabling the determination of the type of this kind of particles from hyperspectral data. It consists in the selection of pixels pairs, located at the transitions between two kinds of grounds (or between an illuminated and a shadow area), then in the comparison between normalized estimated Aerosol Optical Thicknesses (AOTs) and pre-calculated AOTs. The application of this algorithm to simulated data leads to encouraging results: the selection of only six pixels pairs allows the algorithm to differentiate aerosols emitted by a metallurgical plant from biomass burning particles, urban aerosols and particles from an oil depot explosion, regardless the size and the aerosol concentration. The algorithm performances are better for a relatively high AOT but the single scattering approximation does not enable the characterization of thick plumes (AOT above 2.0). However, the choice of transitions (type of grounds) does not seem to significantly affect the results.

  14. Multisensor analyzer detector (MSAD) for low cost chemical and aerosol detection and pattern fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, David C.; Merdes, Daniel W.; Lysak, Daniel B., Jr.; Curtis, Richard C.; Lang, Derek C.; Mazzara, Andrew F.; Nicholas, Nicholas C.

    2002-08-01

    MSAD is being developed as a low-cost point detection chemical and biological sensor system designed around an information fusion inference engine that also allows additional sensors to be included in the detection process. The MSAD concept is based on probable cause detection of hazardous chemical vapors and aerosols of either chemical or biological composition using a small portable unit containing an embedded computer system and several integrated sensors with complementary capabilities. The configuration currently envisioned includes a Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) sensor of chemical vapors and a detector of respirable aerosols based on Fraunhofer diffraction. Additional sensors employing Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS), Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) detection, Flame Photometric Detection (FPD), and other principles are candidates for integration into the device; also, available commercial detectors implementing IMS, SAW, and FPD will be made accessible to the unit through RS232 ports. Both feature and decision level information fusion is supported using a Continuous Inference Network (CINET) of fuzzy logic. Each class of agents has a unique CINET with information inputs from a number of available sensors. Missing or low confidence sensor information is gracefully blended out of the output confidence for the particular agent. This approach constitutes a plug and play arrangement between the sensors and the information pattern recognition algorithms. We are currently doing simulant testing and developing out CINETs for actual agent testing at Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC) later this year.

  15. Characterization of aerosol properties from polarimetric satellite observations using GRASP algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, Oleg; Litvinov, Pavel; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Ducos, Fabrice; Huang, Xin; Lopatin, Anton; Fuertes, David; Derimian, Yevgeny

    2016-04-01

    GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) is recently developed (Dubovik et al. 2011, 2014) sophisticated algorithm of new generation. The algorithm retrieves aerosol and surface properties simultaneously. It realizes statistically optimized fitting using multi-pixel concept when the retrieval is implemented simultaneously for a large group of satellite pixels. This allows for using additional a priori information about limited variability of aerosol of surface properties in time and/or space. GPASP searches in continuous space of solutions and doesn't utilize look-up-tables. GRASP doesn't use any location specific information about aerosol or surface type in the each observed pixel, and the results are essentially driven by observations. However GRASP retrieval takes longer computational time compare to most conventional algorithms. This main practical challenge of employing GRASP has been addressed during last two years and GRASP algorithm has been significantly optimized and adapted to operational needs. As a result of this optimization and GRASP has been accelerated to the level acceptable for processing large volumes of satellite observations. Recently GRASP has been applied to multi-years archives of PARASO/POLDER. The analysis of the results shows that GRASP retrievals provide rather robust and comprehensive aerosol characterization including such properties as absorption and aerosol type even for observations over bright surfaces and for monitoring very high aerosol loading events (with AOD up to 3 or 4). In addition, the attempts to estimate such aerosol characteristics as aerosol height, air quality, radiative forcing, etc. have been made. The results and illustrations will be presented.

  16. Potential chemical evolution of aerosols on Titan's surface: some new results on Titan's tholins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, P.; Poch, O.; Ramirez, S. I.; Buch, A.; Brassé, C.; Raulin, F.

    2011-10-01

    Titan's environment hosts a complex organic chemistry that can be investigated from Earth-based laboratory experiments. One of the key astrobiological questions of Titan's environment is the fate of the organic aerosols produced in the atmosphere, after they are deposited on the surface. In the present study, we report the geological structures these aerosols may encounter in the light of the last observations of the Cassini-Huygens mission. We chose to quantify the production of some astrobiologically interesting molecules in putative ammonia-water bodies likely to be present at the surface or subsurface of Titan, as crater melt pools or cryolavas. After aerosol analogues (tholins) synthesis and surface hydrolysis simulation, some resulting products were identified and quantified. Tholins were found to be very reactive toward an oxygen source. Urea was identified as the main product of Titan's tholins hydrolysis in ammonia-water solutions, with a production yield in mass, ranging from 6 to 12% at 279 K after 10 weeks. Several amino acids - alanine, glycine and aspartic acid - and perhaps the uracil nucleobase were also produced with yields from 0.001 to 0.4%. The determination of production yields carried out by the present study is a major step into the characterization of potential aerosols evolution on Titan.

  17. Dual carbon isotope characterization of total organic carbon in wintertime carbonaceous aerosols from northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Andersson, August; Sarin, M. M.; Sheesley, R. J.; Kirillova, E.; Rengarajan, R.; Sudheer, A. K.; Ram, K.; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2016-05-01

    Large-scale emissions of carbonaceous aerosols (CA) from South Asia impact both regional climate and air quality, yet their sources are not well constrained. Here we use source-diagnostic stable and radiocarbon isotopes (δ13C and Δ14C) to characterize CA sources at a semiurban site (Hisar: 29.2°N, 75.2°E) in the NW Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) and a remote high-altitude location in the Himalayan foothills (Manora Peak: 29.4°N, 79.5°E, 1950 m above sea level) in northern India during winter. The Δ14C of total aerosol organic carbon (TOC) varied from -178‰ to -63‰ at Hisar and from -198‰ to -1‰ at Manora Peak. The absence of significant differences in the 14C-based fraction biomass of TOC between Hisar (0.81 ± 0.03) and Manora Peak (0.82 ± 0.07) reveals that biomass burning/biogenic emissions (BBEs) are the dominant sources of CA at both sites. Combining this information with δ13C, other chemical tracers (K+/OC and SO42-/EC) and air mass back trajectory analyses indicate similar source regions in the IGP (e.g., Punjab and Haryana). These results highlight that CA from BBEs in the IGP are not only confined to the atmospheric boundary layer but also extend to higher elevations of the troposphere, where the synoptic-scale circulations could substantially influence their abundances both to the Himalayas and over the downwind oceanic regions such as the Indian Ocean. Given the vast emissions of CA from postharvest crop residue combustion practices in the IGP during early Northeast Monsoon, this information is important for both improved process and model understanding of climate and health effects, as well as in guiding policy decision aiming at reducing emissions.

  18. Characterization of inhalation aerosols: a critical evaluation of cascade impactor analysis and laser diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    de Boer, A H; Gjaltema, D; Hagedoorn, P; Frijlink, H W

    2002-12-01

    Cascade impactor analysis is the standard technique for in vitro characterization of aerosol clouds generated by medical aerosol generators. One important reason for using this inertial separation principle is that drug fractions are classified into aerodynamic size ranges that are relevant to the deposition in the respiratory tract. Measurement of these fractions with chemical detection methods enables establishment of the particle size distribution of the drug in the presence of excipients. However, the technique is laborious and time consuming and most of the devices used for inhaler evaluation lack sufficient possibilities for automation. In addition to that, impactors often have to be operated under conditions for which they were not designed and calibrated. Particularly, flow rates through impactors are increased to values at which the flow through the nozzles is highly turbulent. This has an uncontrolled influence on the collection efficiencies and cut-off curves of these nozzles. Moreover, the cut-off value varies with the flow rate through an impactor nozzle. On the other hand, the high air flow resistances of most impactors are rather restricting to the attainable (fixed) inspiratory flow curves through these devices. Especially for breath actuated dry powder inhalers, higher flow rates and flow increase rates may be desirable than can be achieved in combination with a particular type of impactor. In this paper, the applicability of laser diffraction technology is evaluated as a very fast and highly reliable alternative for cascade impactor analysis. With this technique, aerodynamic diameters cannot be measured, but for comparative evaluation and development, comprising most in vitro applications, this is not necessary. Laser diffraction has excellent possibilities for automated recording of data and testing conditions, and the size classes are independent of the flow rate. Practical limitations can be overcome by using a special inhaler adapter which

  19. Chemical insights, explicit chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol from methylglyoxal and glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Y. B.; Tan, Y.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    Atmospherically abundant, volatile water soluble organic compounds formed through gas phase chemistry (e.g., glyoxal (C2), methylglyoxal (C3) and acetic acid) have great potential to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via aqueous chemistry in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols. This paper (1) provides chemical insights into aqueous-phase OH radical-initiated reactions leading to SOA formation from methylglyoxal and (2) uses this and a previously published glyoxal mechanism (Lim et al., 2010) to provide SOA yields for use in chemical transport models. Detailed reaction mechanisms including peroxy radical chemistry and a full kinetic model for aqueous photochemistry of acetic acid and methylglyoxal are developed and validated by comparing simulations with the experimental results from previous studies (Tan et al., 2010, 2012). This new methylglyoxal model is then combined with the previous glyoxal model (Lim et al., 2010), and is used to simulate the profiles of products and to estimate SOA yields. At cloud relevant concentrations (∼ 10-6-∼ 10-3 M; Munger et al., 1995) of glyoxal and methylglyoxal, the major photooxidation products are oxalic acid and pyruvic acid, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ∼ 120% for glyoxal and ∼ 80% for methylglyoxal. Oligomerization of unreacted aldehydes during droplet evaporation could enhance yields. In wet aerosols, where total dissolved organics are present at much higher concentrations (∼ 10 M), the major products are oligomers formed via organic radical-radical reactions, and simulated SOA yields (by mass) are ∼ 90% for both glyoxal and methylglyoxal.

  20. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of indoor aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Whicker, J. J.; Martin, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When a hazardous aerosol or gas is inadvertently or deliberately released in an occupied facility, the airborne material presents a hazard to people. Inadvertent accidents and exposures continue to occur in Los Alamos and other nuclear facilities despite state-of-art engineering and administrative controls, and heightened diligence. Despite the obvious need in occupational settings and for homeland defense, the body of research in hazardous aerosol dispersion and control in large, complex, ventilated enclosures is extremely limited. The science governing generation, transport, inhalation, and detection of airborne hazards is lacking and must be developed to where it can be used by engineers or safety professionals in the prediction of worker exposure, in the prevention of accidents, or in the mitigation of terrorist actions. In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX5.4, and experiments were used to assess flow field characteristics, and to investigate aerosol release and transport in a large, ventilated workroom in a facility at Savannah River Site. Steady state CFD results illustrating a complex, ventilation-induced, flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and quiet zones are presented, as are time-dependent CFD and experimental aerosol dispersion results. The comparison of response times between CFD and experimental results was favorable. It is believed that future applications of CFD and experiments can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation (HVAC) systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs. Ultimately, statistical methods will be used in conjunction with CFD calculations to determine the optimal number and location of detectors, as well as optimal egress routes in event of a release.

  1. Chemical and physical properties of bulk aerosols within four sectors observed during TRACE-P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Anderson, B. E.; Talbot, R. W.; Dibb, J. E.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Kiley, C. M.; Russo, R.; Scheuer, E.; Seid, G.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.

    2003-11-01

    Chemical and physical aerosol data collected on the DC-8 during TRACE-P were grouped into four sectors based on back trajectories. The four sectors represent long-range transport from the west (WSW), regional circulation over the western Pacific and Southeast Asia (SE Asia), polluted transport from northern Asia with substantial sea salt at low altitudes (NNW) and a substantial amount of dust (Channel). WSW has generally low mixing ratios at both middle and high altitudes, with the bulk of the aerosol mass due to non-sea-salt water-soluble inorganic species. Low altitude SE Asia also has low mean mixing ratios in general, with the majority of the aerosol mass comprised of non-sea-salts, however, soot is also relatively important in this region. NNW had the highest mean sea salt mixing ratios, with the aerosol mass at low altitudes (<2 km) evenly divided between sea salts, non-sea-salts, and dust. The highest mean mixing ratios of water-soluble ions and soot were observed at the lowest altitudes (<2 km) in the Channel sector. The bulk of the aerosol mass exported from Asia emanates from Channel at both low and midaltitudes, due to the prevalence of dust compared to other sectors. Number densities show enhanced fine particles for Channel and NNW, while their volume distributions are enhanced due to sea salt and dust. Low-altitude Channel exhibits the highest condensation nuclei (CN) number densities along with enhanced scattering coefficients, compared to the other sectors. At midaltitudes (2-7 km), low mean CN number densities coupled with a high proportion of nonvolatile particles (≥65%) observed in polluted sectors (Channel and NNW) are attributed to wet scavenging which removes hygroscopic CN particles. Low single scatter albedo in SE Asia reflects enhanced soot.

  2. Investigation of the detailed chemical composition of organic aerosol in a South East Asian Rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Jacqueline; Ward, Martyn; Rami Alfarra, M.; Lewis, Alastair; McFiggans, Gordon; Robinson, Niall

    2010-05-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in tropical regions is a key uncertainty in quantifying the effect of man made emissions on the climate. Large quantities of volatile organic compounds are emitted from natural biogenic sources in the tropics, including isoprene, monoterpenes and sequiterpenes. There are very few studies of the detailed chemical composition of organic aerosols in tropical rainforest regions, but these would provide information on the importance of primary versus secondary organic aerosols, the key VOC precursors, oxidation state and volatility. Particle samples were collected in a tropical rainforest at Danum Valley in Borneo as part of the OP3 field campaign in 2008. Twenty four hour filter samples were collected at the Global Atmospheric Watch station at a height of around 10 m and shipped back to the laboratory (below -4 °C) for offline analysis. The OA composition was studied using multiple high resolution chromatographic techniques including comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time of flight mass spectrometry (GCXGC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry (LC-MSn). The composition was directly compared to chamber generated SOA (as part of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earths System , ACES, experiment) to determine SOA tracers. A biogenic SOA tracer MS fragmentation library was constructed and a number of SOA components from limonene, linalool and -pinene were identified in the rainforest OA. Very high resolution mass spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance FTICR-MS) allowed the O:C and H:C ratios to be determined and these will be compared to those obtained by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS). In addition, the OA composition from the rainforest will be compared to other locations.

  3. Chemical characteristics of ambient aerosols contributed by cooking process at Noorpur village near New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha

    Generally, industrial and transport sectors are considered as major contributors of air pollution but recently, biomass burning is also reported as a major source of atmospheric aerosols (1, 2) especially in the developing world where solid fuels such as dung cake, wood and crop residues are used in traditional cooking which are responsible for poor air quality, respiratory problems and radiative forcing etc .In India, most of the research has been focused on emission estimates from biomass burning and cooking. No effort has been made to understand the chemistry and sources of fine aerosols in rural areas during cooking hours. This study fills this knowledge gap and strengthens our understanding about abundance of various chemical constituents of atmospheric aerosols emitted during cooking hours.Aerosol samples were collected from village called Noorpur (28.470 N, 77.030 E) which lies near Delhi city. Sampling was carried out during August 2011-May 2012 by using handy sampler (Envirotech model APM 821) installed at the terrace of a building (~6m). The aerosol samples were collected on 8 hourly basis at a flow rate of 1 LPM. Water extracts of these filters were analyzed for major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and major cations (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ Mg2+) by ion chromatography (Metrohm 883 Basic IC Plus). During cooking period, the concentration of the major ions followed the order of Ca2+> SO42-> NO3-> Cl-> K+> NH4+> Mg2+> Na2+> F-. Among anion SO42 (5 µg/m3) showed highest value and in case of cations Ca2+ (7.32µg/m3) has highest value.

  4. Relating aerosol absorption due to soot, organic carbon, and dust to emission sources determined from in-situ chemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Bahadur, R.; Suski, K. J.; Cahill, J. F.; Chand, D.; Schmid, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, K. A.

    2013-09-01

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies. Using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such estimates. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) derived from 10 operational AERONET sites in California are combined for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns in California between 2010 and 2011 are combined in order to validate the methodology used for the estimates of aerosol chemistry using spectral optical properties. Results from this study indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear, since their optical properties are similar. On the other hand, knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  5. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking. PMID:26730457

  6. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking.

  7. Characterization of a head-only aerosol exposure system for nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Dabisch, P A; Kline, J; Lewis, C; Yeager, J; Pitt, M L M

    2010-02-01

    A well-characterized exposure chamber is necessary to generate reproducible atmospheres for inhalation toxicology studies. The aim of the present study was to characterize a head-only exposure chamber for non-human primates. Aerosols containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used to characterize a 16-L dynamic airflow head-only exposure chamber. A 250-ml plastic bottle with a respirator attached located inside the chamber was used to simulate a breathing head. Chamber leak rate, mixing, and aerosol spatial distributions were quantified. The chamber concentration profile was measured at the chamber exhaust using an aerodynamic particle sizer. Aerosol spatial distribution was determined by collecting filter samples at several chamber locations. The particle size distribution was determined by collecting cascade impactor samples at several chamber locations. The estimated chamber leak rate was within standards suggested in the literature. The measured average aerosol residence time was similar to theoretical aerosol residence time, suggesting that the chamber was mixing well. Additionally, the average concentration measured at each of the sampling locations within the chamber was similar, and the within-run coefficients of variation (CV) across all sampling locations was similar to those reported in previously published studies, again suggesting that the aerosol concentration throughout the chamber was uniform. The particle size distribution was similar throughout the exposure chamber. Additionally, the BSA concentration and particle size distributions measured in the breathing zone of the simulated head were not significantly different from measurements made elsewhere in the chamber, suggesting that respiration does not affect the average aerosol concentration or particle size distribution at the mouth. PMID:20063997

  8. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    the two samples was corroborated by the changes in ozone, ethane, propane, morphology of particles, as well as by the FLEXPART retroplumes. In this presentation we will report the first detailed molecular characterization of free tropospheric aged aerosol intercepted at the Pico Mountain Observatory.

  9. Aerosol characterization over the North China Plain: Haze life cycle and biomass burning impacts in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yele; Jiang, Qi; Xu, Yisheng; Ma, Yan; Zhang, Yingjie; Liu, Xingang; Li, Weijun; Wang, Fei; Li, Jie; Wang, Pucai; Li, Zhanqing

    2016-03-01

    The North China Plain experiences frequent severe haze pollution during all seasons. Here we present the results from a summer campaign that was conducted at Xianghe, a suburban site located between the megacities of Beijing and Tianjin. Aerosol particle composition was measured in situ by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor along with a suite of collocated measurements during 1-30 June 2013. Our results showed that aerosol composition at the suburban site was overall similar to that observed in Beijing, which was mainly composed of organics (39%), nitrate (20%), and sulfate (18%). Positive matrix factorization of organic aerosol (OA) identified four OA factors with different sources and processes. While secondary organic aerosol dominated OA, on average accounting for 70%, biomass burning OA (BBOA) was also observed to have a considerable contribution (11%) for the entire study period. The contribution of BBOA was increased to 21% during the BB period in late June, indicating a large impact of agricultural burning on air pollution in summer. Biomass burning also exerted a significant impact on aerosol optical properties. It was estimated that ~60% enhancement of absorption at the ultraviolet spectral region was caused by the organic compounds from biomass burning. The formation mechanisms and sources of severe haze pollution episodes were investigated in a case study. The results highlighted two different mechanisms, i.e., regional transport and local sources, driving the haze life cycles differently in summer in the North China Plain. While secondary aerosol species dominated aerosol composition in the episode from regional transport, organics and black carbon comprised the major fraction in the locally formed haze episode.

  10. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions.

    PubMed

    Che, H C; Zhang, X Y; Wang, Y Q; Zhang, L; Shen, X J; Zhang, Y M; Ma, Q L; Sun, J Y; Zhang, Y W; Wang, T T

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate. PMID:27075947

  11. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, H. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Ma, Q. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. T.

    2016-04-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate.

  12. Characterization and parameterization of aerosol cloud condensation nuclei activation under different pollution conditions

    PubMed Central

    Che, H. C.; Zhang, X. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, L.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Ma, Q. L.; Sun, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. W.; Wang, T. T.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation capacity of aerosol particles in different pollution conditions, a long-term field experiment was carried out at a regional GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station in the Yangtze River Delta area of China. The homogeneity of aerosol particles was the highest in clean weather, with the highest active fraction of all the weather types. For pollution with the same visibility, the residual aerosol particles in higher relative humidity weather conditions were more externally mixed and heterogeneous, with a lower hygroscopic capacity. The hygroscopic capacity (κ) of organic aerosols can be classified into 0.1 and 0.2 in different weather types. The particles at ~150 nm were easily activated in haze weather conditions. For CCN predictions, the bulk chemical composition method was closer to observations at low supersaturations (≤0.1%), whereas when the supersaturation was ≥0.2%, the size-resolved chemical composition method was more accurate. As for the mixing state of the aerosol particles, in haze, heavy haze, and severe haze weather conditions CCN predictions based on the internal mixing assumption were robust, whereas for other weather conditions, predictions based on the external mixing assumption were more accurate. PMID:27075947

  13. Characterization of Halyomorpha halys (brown marmorated stink bug) biogenic volatile organic compound emissions and their role in secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Danielle; Dutcher, Dabrina; Raymond, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    The formation of aerosols is a key component in understanding cloud formation in the context of radiative forcings and global climate modeling. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are a significant source of aerosols, yet there is still much to be learned about their structures, sources, and interactions. The aims of this project were to identify the BVOCs found in the defense chemicals of the brown marmorated stink bug Halymorpha halys and quantify them using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and test whether oxidation of these compounds by ozone-promoted aerosol and cloud seed formation. The bugs were tested under two conditions: agitation by asphyxiation and direct glandular exposure. Tridecane, 2(5H)-furanone 5-ethyl, and (E)-2-decenal were identified as the three most abundant compounds. H. halys were also tested in the agitated condition in a smog chamber. It was found that in the presence of 100-180 ppm ozone, secondary aerosols do form. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC) were used to characterize the secondary aerosols that formed. This reaction resulted in 0.23 microg/ bug of particulate mass. It was also found that these secondary organic aerosol particles could act as cloud condensation nuclei. At a supersaturation of 1%, we found a kappa value of 0.09. Once regional populations of these stink bugs stablilize and the populations estimates can be made, the additional impacts of their contribution to regional air quality can be calculated.

  14. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  15. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  16. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  17. Developing a broad spectrum atmospheric aerosol characterization for remote sensing platforms over desert regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Shadrian B.; Brown, Andrea M.

    2014-05-01

    Remotely sensed imagery of targets embedded in Earth's atmosphere requires characterization of aerosols between the space-borne sensor and ground to accurately analyze observed target signatures. The impact of aerosol microphysical properties on retrieved atmospheric radiances has been shown to negatively affect the accuracy of remotely sensed data collects. Temporally and regionally specific meteorological conditions require exact site atmospheric characterization, involving extensive and timely observations. We present a novel methodology which fuses White Sands New Mexico regional aerosol micro pulse lidar (MPL) observations with sun photometer direct and diffuse products for broad-wavelength (visible - longwave infrared) input into the radiative transfer model MODTRAN5. Resulting radiances are compared with those retreived from the NASA Aqua MODIS instrument.

  18. Characterization of aerosol episodes in the greater Mediterranean Sea area from satellite observations (2000-2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Torres, O.

    2016-03-01

    An algorithm able to identify and characterize episodes of different aerosol types above sea surfaces of the greater Mediterranean basin (GMB), including the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean off the coasts of Iberia and northwest Africa, is presented in this study. Based on this algorithm, five types of intense (strong and extreme) aerosol episodes in the GMB are identified and characterized using daily aerosol optical properties from satellite measurements, namely MODIS-Terra, Earth Probe (EP)-TOMS and OMI-Aura. These aerosol episodes are: (i) biomass-burning/urban-industrial (BU), (ii) desert dust (DD), (iii) dust/sea-salt (DSS), (iv) mixed (MX) and (v) undetermined (UN). The identification and characterization is made with our algorithm using a variety of aerosol properties, namely aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent (α), fine fraction (FF), effective radius (reff) and Aerosol Index (AI). During the study period (2000-2007), the most frequent aerosol episodes are DD, observed primarily in the western and central Mediterranean Sea, and off the northern African coasts, 7 times/year for strong episodes and 4 times/year for extreme ones, on average. The DD episodes yield 40% of all types of strong aerosol episodes in the study region, while they account for 71.5% of all extreme episodes. The frequency of occurrence of strong episodes exhibits specific geographical patterns, for example the BU are mostly observed along the coasts of southern Europe and off the Atlantic coasts of Portugal, the MX episodes off the Spanish Mediterranean coast and over the Adriatic and northern Aegean Sea, while the DSS ones over the western and central Mediterranean Sea. On the other hand, the extreme episodes for all but DD aerosol display more patchy spatial patterns. The strong episodes exhibit AOD at 550 nm as high as 1.6 in the southernmost parts of central and eastern Mediterranean Sea, which rise up to 5 for the extreme, mainly DD and DSS, episodes. Although more

  19. Providing Size-Resolved Mixing State Inputs to Improve Aerosol Optics Models: Comparison of ACE-Asia Aerosol Chemical Measurements for Different Source Regions With Simultaneous Optical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Poon, G.; Guazzotti, S.; Sodeman, D.; Holecek, J.; Spencer, M.; Prather, K.

    2005-12-01

    Measurements made of the aerodynamic size and chemical composition of single aerosol particles on board the R/V Ronald H. Brown sailing between Hawaii and the Sea of Japan during ACE-Asia in 2001 revealed a complex mixture of mineral dust, organic carbon, elemental carbon, sulfates, nitrates, chloride, ammonium, and sea salt. The air mass source regions included influences from the Pacific Ocean, Miyakejima volcano, Gobi and Taklimakan Deserts, Shanghai, Japan, and Korea. The particle composition sampled from each of these regions showed unique changes in the aerosol's mixing state. This complexity presents major challenges in accurately modeling the optical properties of the Asian aerosol. The degree of closure between the measured chemical and optical properties of this aerosol and those predicted by models has been presented by Quinn et al. [JGR, 109, D19S01, doi: 10.1029/2003JD004010, 2004]. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were partly attributed to the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres for the aerosol population. Good correlations between measured and calculated aerosol mass and light scattering were found but relied on particle shapes not confirmed by measurements. To better our understanding of the relationship between aerosol chemistry and optical measurements, and provide more detailed inputs to improve the predictions of optical models, we present size-resolved single-particle mixing state results obtained by an ATOFMS for the seven air mass source regions described by Quinn et al. (2004). Our results do not support the assumption of a homogeneous internally mixed aerosol population for many of the source regions. Particular focus is given to the mixing state and chemical associations of sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, OC, EC, dust, and sea salt. We demonstrate the segregation of ammonium, sulfate, and nitrate within individual particles throughout the study and discuss the different

  20. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles; airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouch, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2013-09-01

    The MEGAPOLI experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) giving detailed information of the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of BC, measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), black carbon and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy). Plotting the equivalent ratios for the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) resolved species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in Mexico city, Mexico and in New England, USA. Using the measured VOCs species together with recent organic aerosol formation yields we predicted ~ 50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA

  1. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles: airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouche, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Bourianne, T.; Gomes, L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2014-02-01

    The MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris, using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), giving detailed information on the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of black carbon (BC), measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), BC, and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy)). Plotting the equivalent ratios of different organic aerosol species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in London, Mexico City, and in New England, USA. Using the measured SOA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) species together with organic aerosol formation

  2. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; McKinney, K.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Alexander, M. L.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3 ‰) reported in non-IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA from chamber studies indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from isoprene. We introduce a graphical diagnostic to study the presence and aging of IEPOX-SOA as a triangle plot of fCO2 vs. fC5H6O. Finally, we develop a simplified method to estimate ambient IEPOX-SOA mass concentrations, which is shown to perform well compared to the full PMF method. The uncertainty of the tracer method is up to a factor of ~ 2, if the fC5H6O of the local IEPOX-SOA is not available. When only unit mass-resolution data are available, as with the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM), all methods may perform less well because of increased interferences from other ions at m/z 82. This study clarifies the strengths and limitations of the different AMS methods for detection of IEPOX-SOA and will enable improved characterization of this OA component.

  3. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-10-23

    to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3 ‰) reported in non-IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA from chamber studies indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from isoprene. We introduce a graphical diagnostic to study the presence and aging of IEPOX-SOA as a triangle plot of fCO2 vs. fC5H6O. Finally, we develop a simplified method to estimate ambient IEPOX-SOA mass concentrations, which is shown to perform well compared to the full PMF method. The uncertainty of the tracer method is up to a factor of ~ 2, if the fC5H6O of the local IEPOX-SOA is not available. When only unit mass-resolution data are available, as with the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM), all methods may perform less well because of increased interferences from other ions at m/z 82. This study clarifies the strengths and limitations of the different AMS methods for detection of IEPOX-SOA and will enable improved characterization of this OA component.« less

  4. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm), occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO), freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm-3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm-3 (during biomass burning (BB) events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m-3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m-3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m-3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m-3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe) ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m-3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m-3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe), among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol processing (O : C &cong

  5. Size-Resolved Identification, Characterization, and Quantification of Primary Biological Organic Aerosol at a European Rural Site.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R; Hueglin, Christoph; Fermo, Paola; Sciare, Jean; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Mazar, Yinon; Abbaszade, Gülcin; El Kazzi, Mario; Gonzalez, Raquel; Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Flasch, Mira; Wolf, Robert; Křepelová, Adéla; Canonaco, Francesco; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Slowik, Jay G; Zimmermann, Ralf; Rudich, Yinon; Baltensperger, Urs; El Haddad, Imad; Prévôt, André S H

    2016-04-01

    Primary biological organic aerosols (PBOA) represent a major component of the coarse organic matter (OMCOARSE, aerodynamic diameter > 2.5 μm). Although this fraction affects human health and the climate, its quantification and chemical characterization currently remain elusive. We present the first quantification of the entire PBOACOARSE mass and its main sources by analyzing size-segregated filter samples collected during the summer and winter at the rural site of Payerne (Switzerland), representing a continental Europe background environment. The size-segregated water-soluble OM was analyzed by a newly developed offline aerosol mass spectrometric technique (AMS). Collected spectra were analyzed by three-dimensional positive matrix factorization (3D-PMF), showing that PBOA represented the main OMCOARSE source during summer and its contribution to PM10 was comparable to that of secondary organic aerosol. We found substantial cellulose contributions to OMCOARSE, which in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry molecular markers quantification, underlined the predominance of plant debris. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis instead revealed that the sum of bacterial and fungal spores mass represented only a minor OMCOARSE fraction (<0.1%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis of C and N binding energies throughout the size fractions revealed an organic N increase in the PM10 compared to PM1 consistent with AMS observations. PMID:26900965

  6. Size-Resolved Identification, Characterization, and Quantification of Primary Biological Organic Aerosol at a European Rural Site.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, Carlo; Daellenbach, Kaspar R; Hueglin, Christoph; Fermo, Paola; Sciare, Jean; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Mazar, Yinon; Abbaszade, Gülcin; El Kazzi, Mario; Gonzalez, Raquel; Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Flasch, Mira; Wolf, Robert; Křepelová, Adéla; Canonaco, Francesco; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Slowik, Jay G; Zimmermann, Ralf; Rudich, Yinon; Baltensperger, Urs; El Haddad, Imad; Prévôt, André S H

    2016-04-01

    Primary biological organic aerosols (PBOA) represent a major component of the coarse organic matter (OMCOARSE, aerodynamic diameter > 2.5 μm). Although this fraction affects human health and the climate, its quantification and chemical characterization currently remain elusive. We present the first quantification of the entire PBOACOARSE mass and its main sources by analyzing size-segregated filter samples collected during the summer and winter at the rural site of Payerne (Switzerland), representing a continental Europe background environment. The size-segregated water-soluble OM was analyzed by a newly developed offline aerosol mass spectrometric technique (AMS). Collected spectra were analyzed by three-dimensional positive matrix factorization (3D-PMF), showing that PBOA represented the main OMCOARSE source during summer and its contribution to PM10 was comparable to that of secondary organic aerosol. We found substantial cellulose contributions to OMCOARSE, which in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry molecular markers quantification, underlined the predominance of plant debris. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis instead revealed that the sum of bacterial and fungal spores mass represented only a minor OMCOARSE fraction (<0.1%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis of C and N binding energies throughout the size fractions revealed an organic N increase in the PM10 compared to PM1 consistent with AMS observations.

  7. Characterizations of atmospheric fungal aerosol in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Linlin; Engling, Guenter; He, Kebin; Du, Zhenyu

    2013-04-01

    Fungal aerosols constitute the most abundant fraction of biological aerosols in the atmosphere, influencing human health, the biosphere, atmospheric chemistry and climate. However, the total abundance of fungal spores in the atmosphere is still poorly understood and quantified. PM10 and PM2.5 samples were collected by high volume samplers simultaneously at a rural site (MY) and an urban site (THU) in Beijing, China. Various carbohydrates were quantified by high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), including the sugar alcohols mannitol and arabitol, proposed as molecular tracers for fungal aerosol. The annual average concentrations of arabitol in PM2.5 and PM10 at the THU site were 7.4±9.4 ng/m3 and 10.3±9.5 ng/m3, and the respective mannitol concentrations were 21.0±20.4 ng/m3 and 31.9±26.9 ng/m3. Compared to PM10, the monthly average concentrations of arabitol and mannitol in PM2.5 did not vary significantly and were present at nearly consistent levels in the different seasons. Moreover, during summer and autumn higher arabitol and mannitol levels than during spring and winter were observed in coarse particles, probably due to different dominant sources of fungal spores in different seasons. In the dry period (i.e., winter and spring) in Beijing, probably only the suspension from exposed surfaces, (e.g., soil resuspension, transported dust, etc.) can be regarded as the main sources for fungal aerosols. On the other hand, in summer and autumn, fungal spores in the atmosphere can be derived from more complex sources, including plants, vegetation decomposition and agricultural activity, such as ploughing; these fungal spore sources may contribute more to coarse PM. Mannitol and arabitol correlated well with each other, both in PM10 (R2 = 0.71) and PM2.5 (R2 = 0.81). Although fungal spore levels at rural sites were consistently higher than those at urban sites in other studies, the findings in our study were

  8. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prank, Marje; Sofiev, Mikhail; Tsyro, Svetlana; Hendriks, Carlijn; Semeena, Valiyaveetil; Vazhappilly Francis, Xavier; Butler, Tim; Denier van der Gon, Hugo; Friedrich, Rainer; Hendricks, Johannes; Kong, Xin; Lawrence, Mark; Righi, Mattia; Samaras, Zissis; Sausen, Robert; Kukkonen, Jaakko; Sokhi, Ranjeet

    2016-05-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution ~ 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) monitoring network. All models systematically underestimated PM10 and PM2.5 by 10-60 %, depending on the model and the season of the year, when the calculated dry PM mass was compared with the measurements. The average water content at laboratory conditions was estimated between 5 and 20 % for PM2.5 and between 10 and 25 % for PM10. For majority of the PM chemical components, the relative underestimation was smaller than it was for total PM, exceptions being the carbonaceous particles and mineral dust. Some species, such as sea salt and NO3-, were overpredicted by the models. There were notable differences between the models' predictions of the seasonal variations of PM, mainly attributable to different treatments or omission of some source categories and aerosol processes. Benzo(a)pyrene concentrations were overestimated by all the models over the whole year. The study stresses the importance of improving the models' skill in simulating mineral dust and carbonaceous compounds, necessity for high-quality emissions from wildland fires, as well as the need for an explicit consideration of aerosol water content in model-measurement comparison.

  9. GC/MS Characterization of Fatty Acids Extracted From Southern African Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, L. G.; Billmark, K. A.; Swap, R. J.; Macko, S. A.

    2001-12-01

    Fatty acids of total suspended particulate aerosol samples, collected in Mongu, Zambia during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) field campaign, were analyzed to characterize emissions from an important source of aerosols in the southern African region. The sample site was chosen specifically so as to decrease the influence of industrial emissions and to focus primarily on the emissions from biomass burning, of which fatty acids are a significant component. Previous investigations in southern Africa have identified emissions from biomass burning as a significant contributor to the haze layer prevalent across the subcontinent. In order to better understand the origins of the materials within the haze layer, characteristic compounds of different source materials were identified in the aerosols. This characterization may clarify the contributions to total aerosol loads from other sources, including marine aerosols or mineral dust. By determining the distributions and concentrations of distinct organic components, this study enables future investigations to quantify the contribution of emissions from biomass burning at specific geographic locations.

  10. The real part of the refractive indices and effective densities for chemically segregated ambient aerosols in Guangzhou by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Bi, X.; Qiu, N.; Han, B.; Lin, Q.; Peng, L.; Chen, D.; Wang, X.; Peng, P.; Sheng, G.; Zhou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols are essential to better evaluate their radiative forcing. This paper first presents an estimate of the real part of the refractive indices (n) and effective densities (ρeff) of chemically segregated atmospheric aerosols in China. Vacuum aerodynamic diameter, chemical compositions, and light scattering intensities of individual particles were simultaneously measured by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS) during fall of 2012 in Guangzhou. On the basis of Mie theory, n and ρeff were estimated for 17 particle types in four categories: organics (OC), elemental carbon (EC), internally mixed EC and OC (ECOC), and metal rich, respectively. Results indicate the presence of spherical or nearly spherical shape for majority of particle types, whose partial scattering cross section vs. sizes were well fitted to Mie theoretical modeling results. While sharing n in a narrow range (1.47-1.53), majority of particle types exhibited a wide range of ρeff (0.87-1.51 g cm-3). OC group is associated with the lowest ρeff (0.87-1.07 g cm-3), while metal rich group with the highest ones (1.29-1.51 g cm-3). It is noteworthy that a specific EC type exhibits a complex scattering curve vs. size due to the presence of both compact and irregularly shape particles. Overall, the results on detailed relationship between physical and chemical properties benefits future researches on the impact of aerosols on visibility and climate.

  11. Integrating biomass, sulphate and sea-salt aerosol responses into a microphysical chemical parcel model: implications for climate studies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Smith, M H; Rap, A

    2007-11-15

    Aerosols are known to influence significantly the radiative budget of the Earth. Although the direct effect (whereby aerosols scatter and absorb solar and thermal infrared radiation) has a large perturbing influence on the radiation budget, the indirect effect (whereby aerosols modify the microphysical and hence the radiative properties and amounts of clouds) poses a greater challenge to climate modellers. This is because aerosols undergo chemical and physical changes while in the atmosphere, notably within clouds, and are removed largely by precipitation. The way in which aerosols are processed by clouds depends on the type, abundance and the mixing state of the aerosols concerned. A parametrization with sulphate and sea-salt aerosol has been successfully integrated within the Hadley Centre general circulation model (GCM). The results of this combined parametrization indicate a significantly reduced role, compared with previous estimates, for sulphate aerosol in cloud droplet nucleation and, consequently, in indirect radiative forcing. However, in this bicomponent system, the cloud droplet number concentration, N(d) (a crucial parameter that is used in GCMs for radiative transfer calculations), is a smoothly varying function of the sulphate aerosol loading. Apart from sea-salt and sulphate aerosol particles, biomass aerosol particles are also present widely in the troposphere. We find that biomass smoke can significantly perturb the activation and growth of both sulphate and sea-salt particles. For a fixed salt loading, N(d) increases linearly with modest increases in sulphate and smoke masses, but significant nonlinearities are observed at higher non-sea-salt mass loadings. This non-intuitive N(d) variation poses a fresh challenge to climate modellers.

  12. Influences of relative humidity and particle chemical composition on aerosol scattering properties during the 2006 PRD campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingang; Cheng, Yafang; Zhang, Yuanhang; Jung, Jinsang; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Chang, Shih-Yu; Kim, Young J.; Fan, Shaojia; Zeng, Limin

    In situ measurements of the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols were carried out in Guangzhou city, China, from 1 to 31 July 2006 during the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Campaign. The light extinction coefficient of the ambient atmosphere, the aerosol scattering coefficient under dry conditions, the aerosol absorption coefficient under ambient conditions, NO 2 concentration, and relative humidity (RH) were measured by transmissionmeter, an integrating nephelometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), a NO X analyzer, and an automatic meteorological station, respectively. Meanwhile, the molecular scattering coefficient was calculated by the Rayleigh scattering function using the US Standard Atmosphere. A method to calculate the aerosol hygroscopic growth factor f(RH), defined as the ratio of the aerosol scattering coefficient under a wet condition to that under a dry condition (40% RH), is proposed based on these optical parameters. The mean and standard deviation aerosol hygroscopic growth factors at 80% RH ( f(RH)=80%) in Ganzhou were 2.04±0.28, 2.29±0.28, and 2.68±0.59 for urban aerosols, mixed aerosols, and marine aerosols, respectively, with the air mass classification being based on the air mass source region. The relationship between f(RH) and RH is fitted by empirical equations and the fitting parameters are calculated. The relationships between f(RH)=80% and total carbon mass fraction (TCF) in PM 2.5, the water-soluble mass fraction (WSF) in PM 10, and the sea-salt aerosol mass fraction (SSF) in PM 10 reveal that the hygroscopic properties of the observed aerosol have a good positive correlation with the WSF and SSF, but have a negative correlation with the TCF.

  13. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2011-11-01

    Knowledge of the variations of mass concentration, chemical composition and size distributions of submicron aerosols near roadways is of importance for reducing exposure assessment uncertainties in health effects studies. The goal of this study is to deploy and evaluate an Atmospheric Sciences Research Center-Mobile Laboratory (ASRC-ML), equipped with a suite of rapid response instruments for characterization of traffic plumes, adjacent to the Long Island Expressway (LIE) - a high-traffic highway in the New York City Metropolitan Area. In total, four measurement periods, two in the morning and two in the evening were conducted at a location approximately 30 m south of the LIE. The mass concentrations and size distributions of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species were measured in situ at a time resolution of 1 min by an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, along with rapid measurements (down to 1 Hz) of gaseous pollutants (e.g., HCHO, NO2, NO, O3, and CO2, etc.), black carbon (BC), and particle number concentrations and size distributions. The particulate organics varied dramatically during periods with highest traffic influences from the nearby roadway. The variations were mainly observed in the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), a surrogate for primary OA from vehicle emissions. The inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate) and oxygenated OA (OOA) showed much smoother variations - with minor impacts from traffic emissions. The concentration and chemical composition of NR-PM1 also varied differently on different days depending on meteorology, traffic intensity and vehicle types. Overall, organics dominated the traffic-related NR-PM1 composition (>60%) with HOA being the major fraction of OA. The traffic-influenced organics showed two distinct modes in mass-weighted size distributions, peaking at ~120 nm and 500 nm (vacuum aerodynamic diameter, Dva), respectively. OOA and inorganic species appear to be

  14. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Aerosols Collected at Mauna Loa Observatory During Asian Dust Storm Event

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a significant influence on global climate due to their ability to absorb and scatter incoming solar radiation. Size, composition, and morphology affect a particle’s radiative properties and these can be characterized by electron microscopy. Lo...

  15. Characterization of novel di- and tricarboxylic acids in fine tropical aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zdráhal, Z; Vermeylen, R; Claeys, M; Maenhaut, W; Guyon, P; Artaxo, P

    2001-04-01

    Three unknown di- and tricarboxylic acids were characterized in the fine size fraction of aerosols which were collected during the wet season in the Amazon basin (Rondonia, Brazil). For the structural characterization of the methyl esters of these unknown compounds, mass spectrometry with electron ionization (EI) and tandem mass spectral techniques combined with gas chromatographic (GC) separation were employed. Fragment and parent ion spectra were recorded during elution of the GC peaks by linked scanning of the B and E sectors in combination with high-energy collision-induced dissociation. The fragmentation patterns of significant ions in the first-order EI spectra were also obtained for nonanedioic acid, which was examined as a model compound. The compounds were tentatively identified as 4-acetyloxyheptanedioic acid and cis and trans isomers of 5-hexene-1,1,6-tricarboxylic acid. Since there were indications of biomass burning during the aerosol sampling the di- and tricarboxylic acids characterized in the present work could be markers for biomass burning. Furthermore, the characterization of di- and tricarboxylic acids in the fine size fraction of atmospheric aerosols may be important for assessing the effects of organic aerosols in cloud formation.

  16. Molecular corridors and kinetic regimes in the multiphase chemical evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Berkemeier, T.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K. A.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Pöschl, U.

    2014-08-01

    The dominant component of atmospheric, organic aerosol is that derived from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA consists of a multitude of organic compounds, only a small fraction of which has historically been identified. Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases. Current SOA models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes, nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation. Based on molecular identification of SOA oxidation products, we show here that the chemical evolution of SOA from a variety of VOC precursors adheres to characteristic "molecular corridors" with a tight inverse correlation between volatility and molar mass. The slope of these corridors corresponds to the increase in molar mass required to decrease volatility by one order of magnitude (-dM / dlogC0). It varies in the range of 10-30 g mol-1, depending on the molecular size of the SOA precursor and the O : C ratio of the reaction products. Sequential and parallel reaction pathways of oxidation and dimerization or oligomerization progressing along these corridors pass through characteristic regimes of reaction-, diffusion-, or accommodation-limited multiphase chemical kinetics that can be classified according to reaction location, degree of saturation, and extent of heterogeneity of gas and particle phases. The molecular corridors and kinetic regimes help to constrain and describe the properties of the products, pathways, and rates of SOA evolution, thereby facilitating the further development of aerosol models for air quality and climate.

  17. Molecular corridors and kinetic regimes in the multiphase chemical evolution of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Berkemeier, T.; Schilling-Fahnestock, K.; Seinfeld, J.; Poeschl, U.

    2014-12-01

    The dominant component of atmospheric organic aerosol is that derived from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), so-called secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA consists of a multitude of organic compounds, only a small fraction of which has historically been identified. Formation and evolution of SOA is a complex process involving coupled chemical reaction and mass transport in the gas and particle phases. Current SOA models do not embody the full spectrum of reaction and transport processes nor do they identify the dominant rate-limiting steps in SOA formation. Based on molecular identification of SOA oxidation products, we show here that the chemical evolution of SOA from a variety of VOC precursors adheres to characteristic "molecular corridors" with a tight inverse correlation between volatility and molar mass. The slope of these corridors corresponds to the increase in molar mass required to decrease volatility by one order of magnitude (-dM/dlogC0). It varies in the range of 10-30 g mol-1 depending on the molecular size of the SOA precursor and the O:C ratio of the reaction products. Sequential and parallel reaction pathways of oxidation and dimerization or oligomerization progressing along these corridors pass through characteristic regimes of reaction-, diffusion-, or accommodation-limited multiphase chemical kinetics that can be classified according to reaction location, degree of saturation, and extent of heterogeneity of gas and particle phases. The molecular corridors and kinetic regimes help to constrain and described the properties of the products, pathways and rates of SOA evolution, thereby facilitating the further development of aerosol models for air quality and climate.

  18. Formation and chemical aging of secondary organic aerosol during the β-caryophyllene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasoglou, A.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production during the oxidation of β-caryophyllene by ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) and the subsequent chemical aging of the products during reactions with OH were investigated. Experiments were conducted with ozone and with hydroxyl radicals at low NOx (zero added NOx) and at high NOx (hundreds of parts per billion). The SOA mass yield at 10 μg m-3 of organic aerosol was 27% for the ozonolysis, 20% for the reaction with OH at low NOx, and 38% at high NOx under dry conditions, 20 °C, and ozone excess. Parameterizations of the fresh SOA yields have been developed. The average fresh SOA atomic O : C ratio varied from 0.24 to 0.34 depending on the oxidant and the NOx level, while the H : C ratio was close to 1.5 for all systems examined. An average density of 1.06 ± 0.1 μg m-3 of the β-caryophyllene SOA was estimated. The exposure to UV light had no effect on the β-caryophyllene SOA concentration and aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The chemical aging of the β-caryophyllene SOA produced was studied by exposing the fresh SOA to high concentrations (107 molecules cm-3) of OH for several hours. These additional reactions increased the SOA concentration by 15-40% and O : C by approximately 25%. A limited number of experiments suggested that there was a significant impact of the relative humidity on the chemical aging of the SOA. The evaporation rates of β-caryophyllene SOA were quantified by using a thermodenuder allowing us to estimate the corresponding volatility distributions and effective vaporization enthalpies.

  19. SPICAV/SOIR mesospheric aerosols observations and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilquet, Valérie; Fedorova, Anna; Belyaev, Denis; Luginin, Mikhail; Drummond, Rachel; Mahieux, Arnaud; Robert, Séverine; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Montmessin, Franck; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2014-05-01

    SPICAV/SOIR on-board Venus Express is able to target the layer of aerosols above the cloud layer at the terminator in the 118-320 nm (SPICAV-UV), the 0.65-1.7 μm (SPICAV-IR) and the 2.2-4.3 μm (SOIR) spectral region. From independent retrievals for the 3 channels of the SPICAV/SOIR instrument, it has been postulated that the upper haze on Venus includes, in some instances, a bimodal population, one type of particle with a radius comprised between ~0.1 and 0.3 μm and the second type, detected in the IR, with a radius varying between ~0.4 and 1 μm [1]. In this work, the retrieval of the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was refined through a unique retrieval procedure combining the data from the 3 channels of the instrument. It is based on Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in the spectra. A dependence on altitude of the aerosol particles size distribution and of aerosol composition is also investigated. We will present the analysis of a subset of SPICAV/SOIR orbits with simultaneous solar occultation transmission spectra for the 3 channels. The optical model was built using mean radius values (r1 and r2) between 0.01 μm and 1.0 μm. For bimodal size distributions, the ratio between the number of bigger particles and the number of smaller particles can vary between 10-4 and 10-1. Values of the refractive index for H2SO4/water droplets were found in the literature for concentrations between 64% and 87% H2SO4. First results show that the H2SO4 concentration in the particles decreases with increasing altitudes and that in some instances the fit of the extinction over the whole spectral range is improved when using a bimodal size distribution. At the equator, the upper haze is found at higher altitudes than near the North Pole and the H2SO4 concentration found is lower for a given aerosol loading. Next, we plan to extend the analysis to the full data set and to build an H2SO4 concentration gradient with

  20. Aging of Secondary Organic Aerosol from β-Pinene: Changes in Chemical Composition, Density and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafzadeh, M.; Hastie, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted in large quantities into the atmosphere. These VOC, which includes β-pinene, can react to produce secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which contribute to a substantial fraction of ambient organic aerosols and are known to adversely affect visibility, climate and health. Despite this, the current knowledge regarding the SOA composition, their physical properties and the chemical aging processes they undergo in the atmosphere is limited. In this study, chemical aging of SOA generated from the photooxidation of β-pinene was investigated in the York University smog chamber. The formation and aging of both gas and particle phase products were analyzed using an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The density of secondary organic matter was also simultaneously measured over the course of the aging experiments, allowing us to improve our understanding in changes in particle composition that may occur. In addition, particle phase and shape was investigated for generated particles from β-pinene oxidation by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results of this work, including particle density and morphology will be presented as well as comparisons of gas and particle phase products time profiles during aging.

  1. Quantitative ED-EPMA combined with morphological information for the characterization of individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, SuJin; Hwang, HeeJin; Kang, Sunni; Park, YooMyung; Kim, HyeKyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    A quantitative single-particle analytical technique, called low- Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis, combined with the utilization of their morphological information on individual particles, was applied to characterize six aerosol samples collected in one Korean city, Incheon, during March 9-15, 2006. The collected supermicron aerosol particles were classified based on their chemical species and morphology on a single-particle basis. Many different particle types were identified and their emission source, transport, and reactivity in the air were elucidated. In the samples, particles in the "soil-derived particles" group were the most abundant, followed by "reacted sea-salts", "reacted CaCO 3-containing particles", "genuine sea-salts", "reacted sea-salts + others", "Fe-containing particles", "anthropogenic organics", (NH 4) 2SO 4, "K-containing particles", and "fly ash". The application of this single-particle analysis, fully utilizing their chemical compositional and morphological data of individual particles, clearly revealed the different characteristics of the six aerosol samples. For samples S3 and S5, which were sampled during two Asian dust storm events, almost all particles were of soil origin that had not experienced chemical modification and that did not entrain sea-salts during their long-range transport. For sample S1, collected at an episodic period of high PM 10 concentration and haze, anthropogenic, secondary, and soil-derived particles emitted from local sources were predominant. For samples S2, S4, and S6, which were collected on average spring days with respect to their PM 10 concentrations, marine originated particles were the most abundant. Sample S2 seems to have been strongly influenced by emissions from the Yellow Sea and Korean peninsula, sample S4 had the minimum anthropogenic influence among the four samples collected in the absence of any Asian dust storm event, and sample S6 seems to have entrained air pollutants that had been

  2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE PAGES

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore » photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  3. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased during photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.

  4. Aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition of superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-χ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, K. V.; Ott, K. C.; Dye, R. C.; Hubbard, K. M.; Peterson, E. J.; Coulter, J. Y.; Kodas, T. T.

    1992-08-01

    A hybrid process, aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposotion (AACVD), is described for reproducible preparation of superconducting thin films of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-χ. The process consists of atomizing a toluene solution of the Y, Ba, and Cu tetramethylheptanedionato complexes using an aerosol generator. The aerosol is transported into a CVD reactor where solvent and precursor evaporation and deposition occur at atmospheric pressure on heated substrates. The process provides stable evaporation rates for all three precursors, yielding constant film stoichiometry throughout the deposition period and from film to film. Superconducting films may be deposited in-situ at substrate heater temperatures above 825°C, or may be formed at lower temperatures by deposition followed by post-deposition annealing at higher temperatures. The microstructure and quality of films are highly dependent on the conditions employed in deposition and in the case of films deposited below 825°C, the post-deposition annealing conditions. Superconducting films prepared by the AACVD/post-annealing process have a metallic normal state resistivity signature with a zero resistance temperature typically above 88K, and are highly c-axis oriented. Transport critical current densities measured at 75 K on polycrystalline films prepared by the AACVD process are 220 000 A/cm 2 and 84 000 A/cm 2 at self-field and 0.1 T, respectively.

  5. Effect of phytoplankton biomass in seawater on chemical properties of sea spray aerosols.

    PubMed

    Park, Jiyeon; Kim, Dohyung; Lee, Kwangyul; Han, Seunghee; Kim, Hyunji; Williams, Leah R; Joo, Hung Soo; Park, Kihong

    2016-09-15

    This study is to investigate the effect of biological seawater properties on sea spray aerosols (SSA). Concentrations of chlorophyll-a and bacteria were measured at coastal site in Korea in fall and summer seasons. Also, aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was used to determine chemical constituents (organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and chloride) of non-refractory submicrometer aerosols sprayed from seawaters using a bubble bursting system. The average concentration of chlorophyll-a in seawater in fall was 1.75±0.78μg/l, whereas it significantly increased to 5.11±2.16μg/l in summer. It was found that the fraction of organics in the submicrometer SSA was higher in summer (68%) than fall (49%), and that the organic fraction in the SSA increased as the concentration of chlorophyll-a increased in seawater, suggesting that the high phytoplankton biomass in seawater could lead to the enhancement of organic species in the SSA.

  6. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition control parameters for selective deposition of tungsten oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, S; Umek, P; Blackman, C

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten oxide films were deposited via Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) from the single-source precursor W(OPh)6. Film morphology and optimum deposition temperatures for formation of quasi-one-dimensional structures is influenced by the solvent 'carrier' used for deposition of the films with bulk porous films and nanostructured needles, hollow tubes and fibres obtained dependent on the solvent used and the deposition temperature. This influence of solvent could be exploited for the synthesis of other nanomaterials, and so provide a new and versatile route to develop and integrate nanostructured materials for device applications. PMID:22097557

  7. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  8. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  9. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  10. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  11. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  12. 40 CFR 160.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLP standards shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine stability, solubility, octanol...

  13. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...

  14. 40 CFR 792.135 - Physical and chemical characterization studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Physical and chemical characterization... A Study § 792.135 Physical and chemical characterization studies. (a) All provisions of the GLPs shall apply to physical and chemical characterization studies designed to determine...