Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol cloud interactions

  1. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have

  2. Aerosol-cloud interaction using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. The interactions between aerosol particles and cloud drops is critical to identifying how much they reflect solar radiation. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2013). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show

  3. Studies of organic aerosol and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Hanh To

    Atmospheric aerosols can influence society and the environment in many ways including altering the planet's energy budget, the hydrologic cycle, and public health. However, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates that the anthropogenic radiative forcing associated with aerosol effects on clouds has the highest uncertainty in the future climate predictions. This thesis focuses on the nature of the organic fraction of ambient particles and how particles interact with clouds using a combination of tools including aircraft and ground measurements, models, and satellite data. Fine aerosol particles typically contain between 20 - 90% organic matter by mass and a major component of this fraction includes water soluble organic carbon (WSOC). Consequently, water-soluble organic species can strongly influence aerosol water-uptake and optical properties. However, the chemical composition of this fraction is not well-understood. PILS-TOC was used to characterize WSOC in ambient aerosol in Los Angeles, California. The spatial distribution of WSOC was found to be influenced by (i) a wide range of aerosol sources within this urban metropolitan area, (ii) transport of pollutants by the characteristic daytime sea breeze trajectory, (iii) topography, and (iv) secondary production during transport. Meteorology is linked with the strength of many of these various processes. Many methods and instruments have been used to study aerosol-cloud interactions. Each observational platform is characterized by different temporal/spatial resolutions and operational principles, and thus there are disagreements between different studies for the magnitude of mathematical constructs used to represent the strength of aerosol-cloud interactions. This work points to the sensitivity of the magnitude of aerosol-cloud interactions to cloud lifetime and spatial resolution of measurements and model simulations. Failure to account for above-cloud aerosol layers

  4. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution, a satellite-based study on aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in the South-East Atlantic with explicit consideration of meteorological conditions is presented. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions remain difficult to quantify and contribute the largest uncertainty to global radiative forcing. These uncertainties make them one of the most important factors for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Interactions are highly complex as microphysical and macrostructural cloud adjustments to aerosol perturbations do not transpire in a black box but are highly dependent on a variety of factors like cloud regime, meteorology and aerosol properties. To gain understanding of the processes that govern ACI in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. This process study uses multiple statistical approaches to untangle the various influences on ACI. Stratocumulus clouds in the South-East Atlantic are investigated over a time span of 10 years using daily Terra MODIS L3 data for aerosol and cloud parameters. Together with ERA-Interim reanalysis data of cloud-relevant meteorological parameters, statistical relationships between aerosol and cloud properties are derived for different weather types on the basis of a kmeans cluster analysis, in addition to bivariate relationships. Also, the influence of aerosol loading on aerosol-cloud relationships is investigated. Relationships between aerosol and cloud microphysical properties are established. Macrostructural cloud adjustments are more ambiguous, as the observed positive relationship between aerosol and cloud liquid water path (LWP) is inconsistent with the Albrecht hypothesis (more cloud water due to drizzle suppression). Adjustments of cloud optical thickness (COT) to aerosol perturbations are negligible as COT is highly dependent on LWP. Strong relationships between aerosol and cloud fraction are identified, but might be spurious and

  5. Aerosol-cloud interactions: effect on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takle, Jasmine; Maheskumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particle in the atmosphere with high variability in time and space, play a major role in modulating the cloud properties and thereby precipitation. To understand the aerosol induced Invigoration effect predictors like aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud top temperature, cloud effective radii, ice water path, retrieved from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 aqua satellite data were analysed for pre monsoon April-May and post monsoon October-November months over the Indian subcontinent 8 ° N to 33° N, 65 °E to 100 °E during the period 2003-2013. Apart from the above data, mesoscale dynamical parameters such as vertical wind shear of horizontal wind, relative humidity, were also considered to understand their role in invigoration. Case studies have been carried out for the regions having heavy rainfall events & minimal rainfall events during high Aerosol optical depths occasions respectively. Analysis revealed that the heavy rainfall which occurred in this region with higher optical depths might be due to invigoration effect of aerosols wherein the dynamical as well as thermodynamical parameters were also found favourable. Minimal rainfall events were also observed most probably due to the suppression of rain formation/delay in precipitation due to high amount of aerosol concentration in these regions. Prominent 36 such cases were studied all over India during Pre & Post monsoon months.

  6. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus have a powerful effect on cloud properties. Increased aerosol concentrations resulting from pollution lead to higher cloud droplet concentrations, but smaller droplet sizes. This in turn affects the physical processes inside clouds that lead to the initiation of precipitation. Depending on a number of factors, including aerosol composition, atmospheric stability, and cloud water content, increasing CCN concentrations may either decrease or increase rainfall. In convective clouds, early rain formation is suppressed, which makes more water and energy available to rise higher in the atmosphere and form ice particles. This may invigorate the dynamics of convection, encourage the formation of hail and lightning, and enhance the transport of materials to the upper troposphere. In turn, cloud processing also affects the concentrations, composition, and distribution of atmospheric aerosols. In order to understand and quantify the effects of air pollution on climate, and precipitation in particular, knowledge of natural abundance and characteristics of aerosols is as essential as the observation of perturbed conditions. I will present recent advances in the conceptual understanding of aerosol-precipitation interactions, as well as results of measurements on aerosol and cloud characteristics in pristine and polluted conditions.

  7. A Framework for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Sarna, K.

    2014-12-01

    A broad range of strategies have been used to study Aerosol-Cloud Interactions (ACI). However, the wide scope of methods and scales used makes it difficult to quantitatively compare result from different studies. In this paper, we propose a method of aerosol-cloud interaction monitoring based on widely available remote sensing instruments and easily applicable at many different observatories. This method provides a way of identifying cases where a change in the aerosol environment causes a change in the cloud. In this scheme we attempt to use (as far as possible) the observed signal from lidar and radar. For an aerosol proxy we use the attenuated backscatter (sensitive to aerosol concentration) and to obtain information about changes in the cloud we use the radar reflectivity factor (sensitive to cloud droplet size and concentration). Assuming a positive dependence between the number concentration of cloud droplets and the number concentration of aerosol we expect that an increase of the attenuated backscatter coefficient will correspond to a small increase of the radar reflectivity factor (due to the increase of cloud droplets concentration). However, the slope of this correlation will vary. A number of factors, such as meteorology or cloud drop microphysical properties, can influence changes in a cloud. For that reason we put a constraint on the liquid water content using liquid water path information from microwave radiometers. This limitation ensures that the variability in the cloud will be primarily due to changes in microphysical properties associated with the variation in aerosols. Further, we limit the cases only to non-precipitating, low-level stratiform and stratocumulus clouds without drizzle. Although this method is based on a synergy of instruments, we use widely available systems for an efficient evaluation of the aerosol influence on the cloud. The main advantages of this scheme are the use of direct observables from widely spread remote sensing

  8. Aerosols-Cloud-Microphysics Interactions in Tropical Cyclone Earl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Yaitza

    Aerosols-cloud-microphysical processes are largely unknown in their influence on tropical cyclone evolution and intensification; aerosols possess the largest uncertainty. For example: What is the link between aerosols and cloud microphysics quantities? How efficient are the aerosols (i.e. dust from the Saharan Air Layer -SAL) as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN)? Does aerosols affect the vertical velocity, precipitation rates, cloud structure and lifetime? What are the dominant factors and in which sectors of the tropical cyclone? To address some of the questions in-situ microphysics measurements from the NASA DC-8 aircraft were obtained during the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) 2010 field campaign. A total of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Mathew) were sampled. Earl presented the excellent opportunity to study aerosols-cloud-microphysics interactions because Saharan dust was present and it underwent rapid intensification. This thesis seeks to explore hurricane Earl to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the SAL aerosols and cloud microphysics evolution. To assist in the interpretation of the microphysics observations, high resolution numerical simulations of hurricane Earl were performed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model with the new Aerosol-Aware bulk microphysics scheme. This new version of Thompson scheme includes explicit activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) from a major CCN source (i.e. sulfates and sea salt) and explicit ice nucleation (IN) from mineral dust. Three simulations are performed: (1) the Control case with the old Thompson scheme and initial conditions from GFS model, (2) the Aerosol-Aware first baseline case with GOCART aerosol module as an input conditions, and (3) the Aerosol-Aware increase case in which the GOCART aerosols concentrations were increased significantly. Overall, results of model simulations along with aircraft observations

  9. Characterizing interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2016-04-01

    This contribution presents a method to characterize the nonlinearities of interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds based on global MODIS observations. Clouds play a crucial role in the climate system as their radiative properties and precipitation patterns significantly impact the Earth's energy balance. Cloud properties are determined by environmental conditions, as cloud formation requires the availability of water vapour ("precipitable water") and condensation nuclei in sufficiently saturated conditions. The ways in which aerosols as condensation nuclei in particular influence the optical, micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds are one of the largest remaining uncertainties in climate-change research. In particular, cloud droplet size is believed to be impacted, and thereby cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation susceptibility. However, the connection between aerosols and cloud droplets is nonlinear, due to various factors and processes. The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is thought to be strongest with low aerosol loadings, whereas it saturates with high aerosol loadings. To gain understanding of the processes that govern low cloud water properties in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. In this study, global Terra MODIS L3 data sets are used to characterize the nonlinearities of the interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds. MODIS observations are binned in classes of aerosol loading to identify at what loading aerosol impact on cloud droplets is the strongest and at which loading it saturates. Results are connected to ERA-Interim and MACC data sets to identify connections of detected patterns to meteorology and aerosol species.

  10. Aerosol cloud interaction: a multiplatform-scenario-based methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; Lopes, Fabío. J. S.; Guerrero-Rascado, Juan Luis; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas

    2015-10-01

    Suspended atmospheric particles i.e. aerosol particles go through many chemical and physical processes and those interactions and transformations may cause particle change in size, structure and composition regulated by mechanisms, which are also present in clouds. These interactions play a great role in the radiation transfer in the atmosphere and are not completely understood as competing effects might occur which are known as indirect aerosol effects. Performing measurements and experiments in remote sensing to improve the knowledge of these processes are also a challenge. In face of that we propose a multi-platform approach based lidar, sun photometry and satellite observations which should be characterized under a scenario perspective in which given the cloud height, geometric and optical geometries in a diurnal/nocturnal basis will make possible to apply different analytical tools in each a set of product that specify the aerosol present in the vicinity of clouds, their optical and physical properties. These scenarios are meant to aid in tagging the expected products and help in creating a robust database to systematically study the aerosol-cloud interaction.In total we will present 6 scenarios: 3 under daylight conditions, 3 under at nighttime. Each scenario and their counterpart should be able to provide the cloud base/top height, aerosol backscattering profile and cloud optical/geometric thickness. In each instance we should count on a 5 wavelength Raman lidar system measurement, a collocated sun photometer and CALIPSO/MODIS observation from AQUA/TERRA platforms. To further improve the aerosol cloud interaction the Raman lidar system should have a water vapor channel or moreover a liquid water channel. In our study we will present a two-day case study to show the methodology feasibility and its potential application.

  11. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Triggered by Strong Aerosol Emissions in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous process-oriented modeling studies have highlighted the dependence of effectiveness of cloud brightening by aerosols on cloud regimes in warm marine boundary layer. Cloud microphysical processes in clouds that contain ice, and hence the mechanisms that drive aerosol-cloud interactions, are more complicated than in warm clouds. Interactions between ice particles and liquid drops add additional levels of complexity to aerosol effects. A cloud-resolving model is used to study aerosol-cloud interactions in the Arctic triggered by strong aerosol emissions, through either geoengineering injection or concentrated sources such as shipping and fires. An updated cloud microphysical scheme with prognostic aerosol and cloud particle numbers is employed. Model simulations are performed in pure super-cooled liquid and mixed-phase clouds, separately, with or without an injection of aerosols into either a clean or a more polluted Arctic boundary layer. Vertical mixing and cloud scavenging of particles injected from the surface is still quite efficient in the less turbulent cold environment. Overall, the injection of aerosols into the Arctic boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. The pure liquid clouds are more susceptible to the increase in aerosol number concentration than the mixed-phase clouds. Rain production processes are more effectively suppressed by aerosol injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. Aerosol injection into a clean boundary layer results in a greater cloud albedo increase than injection into a polluted one, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, the impact of dynamical feedback due to precipitation changes is small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation

  12. Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghate, Virendra P.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Kollias, Pavlos; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Breed, Daniel W.

    2007-07-01

    Giant hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes was observed using an instrumented aircraft making 16 transects of the plumes. The cloud drop size distribution width increased in the plumes due to an increased number of small cloud drops (3-5 μm) on the earlier transects and a 5-fold increase in the number of large drops (20-40 μm) relative to the background cloud 30 minutes later. The cloud effective diameter increased from about 11 μm in the background to 13 μm in the plumes. Although the giant nuclei were only a small fraction of the total aerosols produced by the flares, they dominated the cloud response. The merit of the seeding approach for controlled observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus was demonstrated.

  13. Global observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Asmi, Ari; Chin, Mian; Leeuw, Gerrit; Donovan, David P.; Kahn, Ralph; Kinne, Stefan; Kivekäs, Niku; Kulmala, Markku; Lau, William; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Suni, Tanja; Wagner, Thomas; Wild, Martin; Quaas, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Cloud drop condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) particles determine to a large extent cloud microstructure and, consequently, cloud albedo and the dynamic response of clouds to aerosol-induced changes to precipitation. This can modify the reflected solar radiation and the thermal radiation emitted to space. Measurements of tropospheric CCN and IN over large areas have not been possible and can be only roughly approximated from satellite-sensor-based estimates of optical properties of aerosols. Our lack of ability to measure both CCN and cloud updrafts precludes disentangling the effects of meteorology from those of aerosols and represents the largest component in our uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing. Ways to improve the retrieval accuracy include multiangle and multipolarimetric passive measurements of the optical signal and multispectral lidar polarimetric measurements. Indirect methods include proxies of trace gases, as retrieved by hyperspectral sensors. Perhaps the most promising emerging direction is retrieving the CCN properties by simultaneously retrieving convective cloud drop number concentrations and updraft speeds, which amounts to using clouds as natural CCN chambers. These satellite observations have to be constrained by in situ observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate (ACPC) interactions, which in turn constrain a hierarchy of model simulations of ACPC. Since the essence of a general circulation model is an accurate quantification of the energy and mass fluxes in all forms between the surface, atmosphere and outer space, a route to progress is proposed here in the form of a series of box flux closure experiments in the various climate regimes. A roadmap is provided for quantifying the ACPC interactions and thereby reducing the uncertainty in anthropogenic climate forcing.

  14. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  15. Studying cloud aerosol interactions from space - advantages and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Wollner, Uri; Dagan, Guy

    2015-04-01

    As clouds form a complex dynamical system, theoretical studies may offer several attractors for the system to converge to. Such attractors can suggest trends that link changes in aerosol properties to changes in clouds' ones. The variety of possible trends can reflect the reality or can be the result of the research approach. Differences in the way by which the physics is described (say in the turbulence scheme), or in the configurations of the numerical schemes (say bin vs. bulk) may result in significant differences in the cloud (and cloud field) properties. Therefore, it is not uncommon to find reports of contradicting conclusions to this important problem. Observations, despite having numerous problems and limitations, are the only way by which one can find if there is a preferred trend. To do so one has to slice the data to narrow cloud types, environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Furthermore, there are many artifacts or alternative interpretations that one has to consider as a part of the analysis. Most importantly, one has to "ask" the data the right questions, trying to distil clear and coherent set of evidences that will allow not only to find the preferred trend, but also to offer a physical mechanism that later could be further tested with the aid of other approaches, such as numerical models or in situ measurements. Here we will describe some of the challenges of such studies and show how we link observations and numerical models to explain contradicting reports of aerosol interaction with warm convective clouds.

  16. Aerosol and cloud properties using (A)ATSR: retrieval algorithm and application for aerosol-cloud interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; De Leeuw, Gerrit; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. The interactions between aerosol particles and cloud drops are critical to identifying the earth radiation budget. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties which can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the (Advanced) Along-Track Scanning Radiometer ((A)ATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT (1997-2012). (A)ATSR measures top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) radiances at 7 wavelengths in the spectral range from the visible to the thermal infrared. It has two views, one at nadir and the other one at 55o forward view; conical scan covers a swath of 512 km. The (A)ATSR resolution is 1 km at nadir. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmonen et al. (2013). The (A)ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV ((A)ATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick clouds. In addition to cloud properties, cloud top height is estimated using information from both nadir and forward views. AacDV has been successfully

  17. Assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions during southern African biomass burning activity, employing cloud parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiston, Modise; McFiggans, Gordon; Schultz, David

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we perform a simulation of the spatial distributions of particle and gas concentrations from a significantly large source of pollution event during a dry season in southern Africa and their interactions with cloud processes. Specific focus is on the extent to which cloud-aerosol interactions are affected by various inputs (i.e. emissions) and parameterizations and feedback mechanisms in a coupled mesoscale chemistry-meteorology model -herein Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). The southern African dry season (May-Sep) is characterised by biomass burning (BB) type of pollution. During this period, BB particles are frequently observed over the subcontinent, at the same time a persistent deck of stratocumulus covers the south West African coast, favouring long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean of aerosols above clouds. While anthropogenic pollutants tend to spread more over the entire domain, biomass pollutants are concentrated around the burning areas, especially the savannah and tropical rainforest of the Congo Basin. BB is linked to agricultural practice at latitudes south of 10° N. During an intense burning event, there is a clear signal of strong interactions of aerosols and cloud microphysics. These species interfere with the radiative budget, and directly affect the amount of solar radiation reflected and scattered back to space and partly absorbed by the atmosphere. Aerosols also affect cloud microphysics by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying precipitation pattern and the cloud albedo. Key area is to understand the role of pollution on convective cloud processes and its impacts on cloud dynamics. The hypothesis is that an environment of potentially high pollution enables the probability of interactions between co-located aerosols and cloud layers. To investigate this hypothesis, we outline an approach to integrate three elements: i) focusing on regime(s) where there are strong indications of

  18. Cloud Regimes as a Tool for Systematic Study of Various Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Systematic changes of clouds and precipitation are notoriously difficult to ascribe to aerosols. This presentation will showcase yet one more attempt to at least credibly detect the signal of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. We surmise that the concept of cloud regimes (CRs) is appropriate to conduct such an investigation. Previous studies focused on what we call here dynamical CRs, and while we continue to adopt those too for our analysis, we have found that a different way of organizing cloud systems, namely via microphysical regimes is also promising. Our analysis relies on MODIS Collection 6 Level-3 data for clouds and aerosols, and TRMM-TMPA data for precipitation. The regimes are derived by applying clustering analysis on MODIS joint histograms, and once each grid cell is assigned a regime, aerosol and precipitation data can be spatiotemporally matched and composited by regime. The composites of various cloud and precipitation variables for high (upper quartile of distribution) and low (lower quartile) aerosol loadings can then be contrasted. We seek evidence of aerosol effects both in regimes with large fractions of deep ice-rich clouds, as well as regimes where low liquid phase clouds dominate. Signals can be seen, especially when the analysis is broken by land-ocean and when additional filters are applied, but there are of course caveats which will be discussed.

  19. Arctic Aerosol-­Cloud Interactions during ASCOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R.; Hill, A. A.; Shipway, B. J.; Field, P.; Carslaw, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    A decrease in Arctic sea ice extent and thickness has been observed within recent decades. Further decreases are expected to increase the fluxes aerosol and precursor gases from the open ocean surface within the Arctic. The resulting increase in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations would be expected to result in increased cloud albedo (Struthers et al, 2011), leading to potentially large changes in radiative forcings.However, Browse et al. (2014) have shown that these increases in condensable material could also result in the growth of existing particles to sizes where they are more efficiently removed by wet deposition in drizzling stratocumulus clouds, ultimately decreasing CCN concentrations in the high Arctic. The study of Browse et al (2014) was limited in that it did not simulate alterations of dynamics or cloud properties due to either changes in heat and moisture fluxes following sea­-ice loss or changing aerosol concentrations.Taken together, the results of Struthers et al (2011) and Browse et al (2014) show that significant uncertainties remain in trying to quantify aerosol­-cloud processes in the poorly understood Arctic system. It is likely that the CCN response to sea-­ice loss is controlled by many interrelated processes and unlikely that the current representation of these processes in global climate models include is sufficient to realistically simulate long­-term changes.Using the Met Office Unified Model (UM) including Cloud AeroSol Interactions Microphysics (CASIM), we perform a case study of summertime high Arctic (>80N) clouds in order to better understand the processes currently governing Arctic clouds, and how they may change in the future. We compare our results with observations obtained during the 2008 ASCOS campaign. We then perform sensitivity studies to assess the changes in cloud properties to reductions in sea­-ice, through either changes in fluxes of surface heat and moisture or changes in fluxes of aerosol and

  20. Quantification of Feedbacks in Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, F.; Herger, N.; Ramelli, F.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    The notion of clouds as buffered or resilient systems implies that generalized feedback processes unaccounted for in climate simulations may lead to an overestimation of the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions, i.e. cloud lifetime effects. In this contribution, we study the importance of microphysical feedback processes in response to anthropogenic aerosols in orographic mixed-phase clouds. Our methods can be extended to other cloud regimes as well as dynamical and thermodynamical feedbacks. For our simulations, we use the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART-M7 in a 2D setup with an idealized mountain. To capture major processes from aerosol emission to precipitation, the model is coupled to a modal aerosol scheme and includes aerosol activation and heterogeneous freezing as well as two-moment cold and warm cloud microphysics. We perform simulations with aerosol conditions that vary in amount and chemical composition and thus perturb the warm- and ice-phase pathways of precipitation formation and their mixed-phase interactions. Our analysis is based on quantifying the interaction strength between aerosol, cloud and precipitation variables by susceptibilities, i.e. relative sensitivities d ln(Y) / d ln(X), where the change in variable Y is a response to a perturbation in variable X. We describe how to decompose susceptibilities into a direct response expected from the parameterization and a contribution from feedbacks. Resilience features similar magnitudes but opposite signs for those contributions, resulting in an overall small susceptibility. We find considerable contributions from feedbacks, which appear more important for warm-phase than for cold-phase processes. We do not observe, however, a trend for resilience in mixed-phase cloud microphysics. Moreover, feedback contributions seem of secondary importance when compared to the strong dependence of susceptibilities on the microphysical state of the cloud.

  1. Role of Clouds, Aerosols, and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction in 20th Century Simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Rind, David; Bauer, Susanne; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We use the new version of NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model, modelE2 with 2º by 2.5º horizontal resolution and 40 vertical layers, with the model top at 0.1 hPa [Schmidt et al., 2014]. We use two different treatments of the atmospheric composition and aerosol indirect effect: (1) TCAD(I) version has fully interactive Tracers of Aerosols and Chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. This model predicts total aerosol number and mass concentrations [Shindell et al., 2013]; (2) TCAM is the aerosol microphysics and chemistry model based on the quadrature methods of moments [Bauer et al., 2008]. Both TCADI and TCAM models include the first indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [Menon et al., 2010]; the TCAD model includes only the direct aerosol effect. We consider the results of the TCAD, TCADI and TCAM models coupled to "Russell ocean model" [Russell et al., 1995], E2-R. We examine the climate response for the "historical period" that include the natural and anthropogenic forcings for 1850 to 2012. The effect of clouds, their feedbacks, as well as the aerosol-cloud interactions are assessed for the transient climate change.

  2. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  3. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  4. Cloud and Aerosol Interaction Observed in SKYNET Hefei Site in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingjian; Sun, Lu; Liu, Dong; Wang, Zhien; Wang, Zhenzhu; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-06-01

    The interaction relationship between cloud and aerosol is studied via their optical depth and cloud effective radius based on ground-based remote sensors. By attenuated backscatter obtained by lidar the optical depth of cloud and aerosol is retrieved. Combing with liquid water path observed by microwave radiometer, the cloud number concentration and cloud effective radius is also retrieved based on the adiabatic hypothesis Cases studies shows that during the stable stratocumulus with interval precipitation period and aerosol with vertical motion, the cloud effective radius shows both negative and positive relationship with aerosol optical depth. It may be due to the difference of liquid water path of the cloud properties and shows complex interaction with aerosol.

  5. Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in the trade wind boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil

    This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX, March-April 2010) and a discussion of their interactions. The principal observing platform for the experiment was the Cooperative Institute for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft that was equipped with aerosol, cloud, and precipitation probes, standard meteorological instruments, and a up-looking cloud radar. The temporal variations and vertical distributions of aerosols observed on the 15 flights show a wide range of aerosol conditions that include the most intense African dust event observed at the Barbados surface site during all of 2010. An average CCN varied from 50 cm-3 to 800 cm -3 at super-saturation of 0.6 %, for example. The 10-day backward trajectories show that three distinctive air masses (originality of air mass as well as the vertical structure) dominate over the Eastern Caribbean (e.g., typical maritime air mass, Saharan Air Layer (SAL), Middle latitude dry air) with characteristic aerosol vertical structures. Many clouds in various phases of growth during BACEX are sampled. The maximum cloud depth observed is about less than 3 km and in most of the clouds is less than 1 km. Two types of precipitation features were observed for the shallow marine cumulus clouds with different impacts on boundary layer. In one, precipitation shafts are observed to emanate from the cloud base with evaporation in the sub-cloud layer (stabilize the sub-cloud layer). In the other, precipitation shafts emanate mainly near the cloud top on the downshear side of the cloud and evaporate in the cloud layer, leading to destabilizing the cloud layer and providing moisture to the layer. Only 42-44 % of clouds sampled were purely non-precipitating throughout the clouds; the remainder of the clouds showed precipitation somewhere in the cloud

  6. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ɛ, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ɛ increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitional regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ɛ further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.

  7. Simultaneous observations of aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions with three stacked unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Ramana, M V; Corrigan, C; Kim, D; Ramanathan, V

    2008-05-27

    Aerosol impacts on climate change are still poorly understood, in part, because the few observations and methods for detecting their effects are not well established. For the first time, the enhancement in cloud albedo is directly measured on a cloud-by-cloud basis and linked to increasing aerosol concentrations by using multiple autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles to simultaneously observe the cloud microphysics, vertical aerosol distribution, and associated solar radiative fluxes. In the presence of long-range transport of dust and anthropogenic pollution, the trade cumuli have higher droplet concentrations and are on average brighter. Our observations suggest a higher sensitivity of radiative forcing by trade cumuli to increases in cloud droplet concentrations than previously reported owing to a constrained droplet radius such that increases in droplet concentrations also increase cloud liquid water content. This aerosol-cloud forcing efficiency is as much as -60 W m(-2) per 100% percent cloud fraction for a doubling of droplet concentrations and associated increase of liquid water content. Finally, we develop a strategy for detecting aerosol-cloud interactions based on a nondimensional scaling analysis that relates the contribution of single clouds to albedo measurements and illustrates the significance of characterizing cloud morphology in resolving radiometric measurements. This study demonstrates that aerosol-cloud-albedo interactions can be directly observed by simultaneous observations below, in, and above the clouds. PMID:18499803

  8. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  9. Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Under Varying Meteorological Conditions: Southern Great Plains Vs. Pt. Reyes

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, M.; Schwartz, S.; Kim, B.-G.; Miller, M.; Liu, Y.; Min, Q.

    2008-03-10

    Several studies have demonstrated that cloud dynamical processes such as entrainment mixing may be the primary modulator of cloud optical properties in certain situations. For example, entrainment of dry air alters the cloud drop size distribution by enhancing drop evaporation. However, the effect of entrainment mixing and other forms or turbulence is still quite uncertain. Although these factors and aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered together when evaluating the efficacy of aerosol indirect effects, the underlying mechanisms appear to be dependent upon each other. In addition, accounting for them is impossible with the current understanding of aerosol indirect effect. Therefore, careful objective screening and analysis of observations are needed to determine the extent to which mixing related properties affect cloud optical properties, apart from the aerosol first indirect effect. This study addresses the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the context of varying meteorological conditions based on ARM data obtained at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma and at Pt. Reyes, California. Previous analyses of the continental stratiform clouds at the SGP site have shown that the thicker clouds of high liquid water path (LWP) tend to contain sub adiabatic LWPs. These sub adiabatic LWPs, which result from active mixing processes, correspond to a lower susceptibility of the clouds to aerosol-cloud interactions, and, hence, to reduced aerosol indirect effects. In contrast, the consistently steady and thin maritime stratus clouds observed at Pt. Reyes are much closer to adiabatic. These clouds provide an excellent benchmark for the study of the aerosol influence on modified marine clouds relative to continental clouds, since they form in a much more homogeneous meteorological environment than those at the continental site.

  10. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, K. .; Holben, B. N.; Hsu, N. C.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    About 60% of world population reside in Asia, in term of which sheer population density presents a major environmental stress. Economic expansion in this region is, in fact, accompanied by increases in bio-fuel burning, industrial pollution, and land cover and land use changes. With a growth rate of approx. 8%/yr for Indian economy, more than 600 million people from Lahore, Pakistan to Calcutta, India over the Indo-Gangetic Basin have particularly witnessed increased frequencies of floods and droughts as well as a dramatic increase in atmospheric loading of aerosols (i.e., anthropogenic and natural aerosol) in recent decades. This regional change (e.g., aerosol, cloud, precipitation, etc.) will constitute a vital part of the global change in the 21st century. Better understanding of the impacts of aerosols in affecting monsoon climate and water cycles is crucial in providing the physical basis to improve monsoon climate prediction and for disaster mitigation. Based on climate model simulations, absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) play a critical role in affecting interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Indian monsoon. An initiative on the integrated (aerosols, clouds, and precipitation) measurements approach over the Indo-Gangetic Basin will be discussed. An array of ground-based (e.g., AERONET, MPLNET, SMART-COMMIT, etc.) and satellite (e.g., Terra, A-Train, etc.) sensors will be utilized to acquire aerosol characteristics, sources/sinks, and transport processes during the pre-monsoon (April-May, aerosol forcing) season, and to obtain cloud and precipitation properties during the monsoon (May-June, water cycle response) season. Close collaboration with other international programs, such as ABC, CLIVAR, GEWEX, and CEOP in the region is anticipated.

  11. A State-of-the-Art Experimental Laboratory for Cloud and Cloud-Aerosol Interaction Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, Charles M.; Bushnell, Dennis M.

    2011-01-01

    The state of the art for predicting climate changes due to increasing greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere with high accuracy is problematic. Confidence intervals on current long-term predictions (on the order of 100 years) are so large that the ability to make informed decisions with regard to optimum strategies for mitigating both the causes of climate change and its effects is in doubt. There is ample evidence in the literature that large sources of uncertainty in current climate models are various aerosol effects. One approach to furthering discovery as well as modeling, and verification and validation (V&V) for cloud-aerosol interactions is use of a large "cloud chamber" in a complimentary role to in-situ and remote sensing measurement approaches. Reproducing all of the complex interactions is not feasible, but it is suggested that the physics of certain key processes can be established in a laboratory setting so that relevant fluid-dynamic and cloud-aerosol phenomena can be experimentally simulated and studied in a controlled environment. This report presents a high-level argument for significantly improved laboratory capability, and is meant to serve as a starting point for stimulating discussion within the climate science and other interested communities.

  12. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions during VOCALS-REx (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, G.; Wang, H.; Kazil, J.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite imagery of marine stratocumulus regions often reveals the existence of cellular structures that appear to be manifestations of self-organizing properties of the cloud field. These striking features present themselves in visible satellite imagery as either bright cloudy cells ringed by darker edges (closed cells) or dark cellular regions ringed by bright cloudy edges (open cells). The starkly different reflectance patterns associated with these cellular structures are of great interest from the perspective of planetary albedo. Observations have implicated precipitation as one of the controls on the preferred state of stratocumulus: Non-precipitating clouds that typically exist in regions of higher background aerosol and/or thinner cloud prefer the closed cell state, while cleaner and/or thicker precipitating clouds favor the open cell structure. Precipitation appears to be prevalent in open cells, but is not a sufficient condition for open cell formation. We will present large eddy simulations over large domains (order 100 km) that explore the processes associated with the formation and growth of open cells observed during the VOCALS-REx field experiment off the coast of Chile (October-November 2008). The simulations will include treatment of the lifecycle of aerosol. We will examine the boundary region between clean and polluted regions and show how aerosol gradients can generate mesoscale circulations that play a major role in determining cloud microphysics and morphology. Finally, we will use these results to test conceptual models of the structure of open- and closed- cell boundary layers.

  13. Ground-based Network and Supersite Measurements for Studying Aerosol Properties and Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Holben, Brent N.

    2008-01-01

    From radiometric principles, it is expected that the retrieved properties of extensive aerosols and clouds from reflected/emitted measurements by satellite (and/or aircraft) should be consistent with those retrieved from transmitted/emitted radiance observed at the surface. Although space-borne remote sensing observations contain large spatial domain, they are often plagued by contamination of surface signatures. Thus, ground-based in-situ and remote-sensing measurements, where signals come directly from atmospheric constituents, the sun, and the Earth-atmosphere interactions, provide additional information content for comparisons that confirm quantitatively the usefulness of the integrated surface, aircraft, and satellite datasets. The development and deployment of AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sunphotometer network and SMART-COMMIT (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile supersite are aimed for the optimal utilization of collocated ground-based observations as constraints to yield higher fidelity satellite retrievals and to determine any sampling bias due to target conditions. To characterize the regional natural and anthropogenic aerosols, AERONET is an internationally federated network of unique sunphotometry that contains more than 250 permanent sites worldwide. Since 1993, there are more than 480 million aerosol optical depth observations and about 15 sites have continuous records longer than 10 years for annual/seasonal trend analyses. To quantify the energetics of the surface-atmosphere system and the atmospheric processes, SMART-COMMIT instrument into three categories: flux radiometer, radiance sensor and in-situ probe. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over eight years, SMART-COMMIT have gradually refine( and been proven vital for field deployment. In this paper, we will demonstrate the

  14. Understanding the Processes Controlling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the Arctic Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pringle, K.; Mann, G.; Reddington, C.; Brooks, I. M.; Mulcahy, J.; Young, G.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.; Trembath, J.; Dean, A.; Yoshioka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use multiple configurations of the UKCA chemistry and aerosol scheme in a global climate model, capable of simulating cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplet number, to understand the processes controlling aerosol-cloud interactions in the marine Arctic boundary layer. Evaluation against an unprecedented number of aerosol and cloud observations made available through the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP), International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) and the 2013 ACCACIA campaign, suggest that Arctic summertime CCN is well represented in the model. Sensitivity studies indicate that DMS derived nucleation events are the primary source of Arctic summertime aerosol increasing mean (median) surface CCN concentrations north of 70N from 21(14) cm-3 to 46(33) cm-3. However, evaluation against observed aerosol size distributions suggests that UKCA overestimates nucleation mode (~10nm) particle concentrations either due to overestimation of boundary layer nucleation rates or underestimation of the Arctic marine boundary layer condensation sink.

  15. Cloud-Aerosol Interaction and Its Impact on the Onset of the East Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, William K.-M.; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    Effect of aerosols from biomass burning on the early development of East Asian monsoon is investigated using various satellites and in situ observations including TOMS Aerosol Index (AI). GPCP precipitation, ISCCP cloud cover, and GISS surface air temperature. Based on TRMM fire produce and mean winds fields at 85Omb. we identified the source and interaction regions of aerosols and investigated aerosol-cloud-precipitation characteristics in those regions. During March-April, northern Thailand, Myanmar. and Laos are major source of smoke from the combustion of agricultural waste. Excessive smoke. represented by high AI, is observed especially during dry and cloud-free year. On the other hand. there is no ground source of smoke in the interaction region. The most of aerosols in this area are believed to be transported from the source region. AI is appeared to be correlated with more clouds and less precipitation in interaction region. It suggests that the aerosol-cloud interaction can alter the distribution of cloud and the characteristics of regional hydrology. Aerosol-induced changes in atmospheric stability and associated circulation turns out to be very important to pre-monsoon rainfall pattern in southern China. Prolonged biomass burning is especially effective in changing rainfall pattern during April and May. Results suggest that excessive aerosol transported from source region may intensify pre-monsoon rain band over central China in May and lead to early monsoon onset.

  16. Aerosol and Cloud Interaction Observed From High Spectral Resolution Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Wenying; Schuster, Gregory L.; Loeb, Norman G.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies utilizing satellite retrievals have shown a strong correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud cover. However, these retrievals from passive sensors are subject to many limitations, including cloud adjacency (or 3D) effects, possible cloud contamination, uncertainty in the AOD retrieval. Some of these limitations do not exist in High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) observations; for instance, HSRL observations are not a ected by cloud adjacency effects, are less prone to cloud contamination, and offer accurate aerosol property measurements (backscatter coefficient, extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, backscatter Angstrom exponent,and aerosol optical depth) at a neospatial resolution (less than 100 m) in the vicinity of clouds. Hence, the HSRL provides an important dataset for studying aerosol and cloud interaction. In this study, we statistically analyze aircraft-based HSRL profiles according to their distance from the nearest cloud, assuring that all profile comparisons are subject to the same large-scale meteorological conditions. Our results indicate that AODs from HSRL are about 17% higher in the proximity of clouds (approximately 100 m) than far away from clouds (4.5 km), which is much smaller than the reported cloud 3D effect on AOD retrievals. The backscatter and extinction coefficients also systematically increase in the vicinity of clouds, which can be explained by aerosol swelling in the high relative humidity (RH) environment and/or aerosol growth through in cloud processing (albeit not conclusively). On the other hand, we do not observe a systematic trend in lidar ratio; we hypothesize that this is caused by the opposite effects of aerosol swelling and aerosol in-cloud processing on the lidar ratio. Finally, the observed backscatter Angstrom exponent (BAE) does not show a consistent trend because of the complicated relationship between BAE and RH. We demonstrate that BAE should not be used as a surrogate for Angstrom

  17. Importance of Raman Lidar Aerosol Extinction Measurements for Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonghua; Moshary, Fred; Gross, Barry; Gilerson, Alex

    2016-06-01

    Using a UV Raman Lidar for aerosol extinction, and combining Microwave Radiometer derived Liquid Water Path (LWP) with Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer derived Cloud Optical depth, to get cloud effective radius (Reff), we observe under certain specialized conditions, clear signatures of the Twomey Aerosol Indirect effect on cloud droplet properties which are consistent with the theoretical bounds. We also show that the measurement is very sensitive to how far the aerosol layer is from the cloud base and demonstrate that surface PM25 is far less useful. Measurements from both the DOE ARM site and new results at CCNY are presented.

  18. Impacts of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions on Climate Change in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S.; Jung, Y.; Baek, H.; Cho, C.

    2013-12-01

    Climate impact by anthropogenic drivers gives high concerns in climate change simulation. IPCC AR4 emphasized the role of aerosol on climate besides the GHGs due to its negative significant radiative forcing. We find that climate feedback of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia through direct and indirect (aerosol-cloud interaction) radiative process using HadGEM2-AO developed by the UK Met office. Due to the industrial revolution and population growth, total anthropogenic aerosol emissions have grown dramatically over East Asia; sulfate aerosol is the dominant component accounting for about 50% of total aerosol optical depth at 550nm (Figure 1). An increased amount of aerosols might increase the CCN number concentration and lead to more, but smaller, cloud droplets for fixed liquid water content. This increases the albedo of the cloud, resulting in enhance reflection and a cooling effect. And smaller drops require longer growth times to reach size at which they easily fall as precipitation. This effect called the cloud lifetime effect may enhance the cloud cover (Figure 2), with a persistent positive correlation between cloud cover and aerosol optical depth. Particularly, aerosols have an influence on the amount of cloud cover (SC, ST, and NS) through the interaction with precipitation efficiency of low level clouds. As a result of perturbations of East Asia aerosols from preindustrial to present day, a net radiative flux at the top of atmosphere is estimated to be -4 W/m2, with a regional mean surface cooling of 1.2 K. More detailed analysis will be shown at the conference. Fig. 1. (a) Total AOD distributions (b) Changes in decadal mean AOD over East Asia. Fig 2. Cloud cover distributions classified by ISCCP cloud types.

  19. 3D Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Interaction Observed in Collocated MODIS and ASTER Images of Cumulus Cloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.

    2007-01-01

    3D aerosol-cloud interaction is examined by analyzing two images containing cumulus clouds in biomass burning regions in Brazil. The research consists of two parts. The first part focuses on identifying 3D clo ud impacts on the reflectance of pixel selected for the MODIS aerosol retrieval based purely on observations. The second part of the resea rch combines the observations with radiative transfer computations to identify key parameters in 3D aerosol-cloud interaction. We found that 3D cloud-induced enhancement depends on optical properties of nearb y clouds as well as wavelength. The enhancement is too large to be ig nored. Associated biased error in 1D aerosol optical thickness retrie val ranges from 50% to 140% depending on wavelength and optical prope rties of nearby clouds as well as aerosol optical thickness. We caution the community to be prudent when applying 1D approximations in comp uting solar radiation in dear regions adjacent to clouds or when usin g traditional retrieved aerosol optical thickness in aerosol indirect effect research.

  20. The VOCALS Regional Experiment: Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R.

    2012-12-01

    Robert Wood, C.S. Bretherton, C. R. Mechoso, R. A. Weller, B. J. Huebert, H. Coe, B. A. Albrecht, P. H. Daum, D. Leon, A. Clarke, P. Zuidema, C. W. Fairall, G. Allen, S. deSzoeke, G. Feingold, J. Kazil, S. Yuter, R. George, A. Berner, C. Terai, G. Painter, H. Wang, M. Wyant, D. Mechem The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) is an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific (SEP), a region dominated by strong coastal upwelling, extensive cold SSTs, and home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northen Chile. A central theme of VOCALS-REx is the improved understanding of links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties. In this presentation, we will present a synthesis of results from VOCALS-REx focusing on the following questions: (a) how are aerosols, clouds and precipitation inter-related in the SEP region? (b) what microphysical-macrophysical interactions are necessary for the formation and maintenance of open cells? (c) how do cloud and MBL properties change across the strong microphysical gradients from the South American coast to the remote ocean?

  1. Atmospheric electricity and aerosol-cloud interactions in earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Tammet, Hannes; Mäkelä, Antti; Haapalainen, Jussi; Mirme, Sander; Nieminen, Tuomo; Franchin, Alessandro; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2013-05-01

    Firstly, atmospheric ions play an important role in the fair weather electricity in Earth's atmosphere. Small ions, or charged molecular clusters, carry electric currents in the atmosphere. These small ions are continuously present, and their lifetime in lower atmosphere is about one minute. It's essential to find out a connection between the production rate of cluster ions, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment, and their ambient concentrations, in order to understand electrical properties of air. Secondly, atmospheric ions are important for Earth's climate, due to their potential role in secondary aerosol formation, which can lead to increased number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which in turn can change the cloud properties. Our aim is to quantify the connections between these two important roles of air ions based on field observations.

  2. Use of active and passive ground based remote sensors to explore cloud droplet modifications in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw Thet

    We explore the potential aerosol impact on cloud optical properties which is a strong modifier of climate forcing. Previous studies have shown that increased aerosol loading can affect the cloud optical properties such as cloud optical depth and cloud droplet effective radius in rural areas, particularly at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Southern Great Plain site. In this study, we attempt to observe and quantify aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City, using a combination of passive and active radiometric sensors. In particular, we look for signatures of the Twomey indirect effect which states that the droplet size of water phase clouds will decrease with increasing aerosols. We find that under certain conditions, a strong signature is found between the cloud drop effective radius and extinction and this effect is in part due to vertical wind uptake. In demonstrating the Aerosol Cloud Interaction, we use multiple approaches. For example, we derive the integrated liquid water path using both a multiband neural network and dual channel approach and show general agreement between two methods while the DC approach seems more robust. We also find that these measurements are difficult and sensitive to the position of the aerosols relative to the cloud base. As a corollary, we explore whether near surface aerosol loading can effecting the cloud by using particulate matter (PM2.5) and find that the effects are too variable to be given any statistical weight. Finally, we explore the potential of modifying our approach to remove the noisy and difficult measurement of Raman LIDAR derived extinction with calibrated LIDAR backscatter. The results seem to show a general improvement in correlation and offer the possibility of increasing the number of cases observed.

  3. Strong aerosol-cloud interaction in altocumulus during updraft periods: lidar observations over central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J.; Ansmann, A.; Bühl, J.; Wandinger, U.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time, a liquid-water cloud study of the aerosol-cloud-dynamics relationship, solely based on lidar, was conducted. Twenty-nine cases of pure liquid-water altocumulus layers were observed with a novel dual-field-of-view Raman lidar over the polluted central European site of Leipzig, Germany, between September 2010 and September 2012. By means of the novel Raman lidar technique, cloud properties such as the droplet effective radius and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) in the lower part of altocumulus layers are obtained. The conventional aerosol Raman lidar technique provides the aerosol extinction coefficient (used as aerosol proxy) below cloud base. A collocated Doppler lidar measures the vertical velocity at cloud base and thus updraft and downdraft occurrence. Here, we present the key results of our statistical analysis of the 2010-2012 observations. Besides a clear aerosol effect on cloud droplet number concentration in the lower part of the altocumulus layers during updraft periods, turbulent mixing and entrainment of dry air is assumed to be the main reason for the found weak correlation between aerosol proxy and CDNC higher up in the cloud. The corresponding aerosol-cloud interaction parameter based on changes in cloud droplet number concentration with aerosol loading was found to be close to 0.8 at 30-70 m above cloud base during updraft periods and below 0.4 when ignoring vertical-wind information in the analysis. Our findings are extensively compared with literature values and agree well with airborne observations.

  4. Aerosol-cloud interaction determined by satellite data over the Baltic Sea countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponaro, Giulia; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigates the use of long-term satellite data to assess the influence of aerosols upon cloud parameters over the Baltic Sea region. This particular area offers the contrast of a very clean environment (Fennoscandia) against a more polluted one (Germany, Poland). The datasets consists of Collection 6 Level 3 daily observations from 2002 to 2014 collected by the NASA's Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on-board the Aqua platform. The MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) product is used as a proxy for the number concentration of aerosol particles while the cloud effective radius (CER) and cloud optical thickness (COT) describe cloud microphysical and optical properties respectively. Satellite data have certain limitations, such as the restriction to summer season due to solar zenith angle restrictions and the known problem of the ambiguity of the aerosol-cloud interface, for instance. Through the analysis of a 12-years dataset, distribution maps provide information on a regional scale about the first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) by determining the aerosol-cloud interaction (ACI). The ACI is defined as the change in cloud optical depth or effective radius as a function of aerosol load for a fixed liquid water path (LWP). The focusing point of the current study is the evaluation of regional trends of ACI over the observed area of the Baltic Sea.

  5. Combined observational and modeling efforts of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions over Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, Adrian; Tsay, Si-Chee; Nguyen, Xuan Anh

    2016-04-01

    Low-level stratocumulus (Sc) clouds cover more of the Earth's surface than any other cloud type rendering them critical for Earth's energy balance, primarily via reflection of solar radiation, as well as their role in the global hydrological cycle. Stratocumuli are particularly sensitive to changes in aerosol loading on both microphysical and macrophysical scales, yet the complex feedbacks involved in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions remain poorly understood. Moreover, research on these clouds has largely been confined to marine environments, with far fewer studies over land where major sources of anthropogenic aerosols exist. The aerosol burden over Southeast Asia (SEA) in boreal spring, attributed to biomass burning (BB), exhibits highly consistent spatiotemporal distribution patterns, with major variability due to changes in aerosol loading mediated by processes ranging from large-scale climate factors to diurnal meteorological events. Downwind from source regions, the transported BB aerosols often overlap with low-level Sc cloud decks associated with the development of the region's pre-monsoon system, providing a unique, natural laboratory for further exploring their complex micro- and macro-scale relationships. Compared to other locations worldwide, studies of springtime biomass-burning aerosols and the predominately Sc cloud systems over SEA and their ensuing interactions are underrepresented in scientific literature. Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties, whether ground-based or from satellites, generally lack information on microphysical processes; thus cloud-resolving models are often employed to simulate the underlying physical processes in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud model has recently been enhanced with a triple-moment (3M) bulk microphysics scheme as well as the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6 aerosol module. Because the aerosol burden not only affects cloud

  6. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24% to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6-h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3°C.

  7. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  8. SeReNA Project: studying aerosol interactions with cloud microphysics in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, A. L.; Catandi, P. B.; Frigeri, F. F.; Ferreira, W. C.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-12-01

    Cloud microphysics and its interaction with aerosols is a key atmospheric process for weather and climate. Interactions between clouds and aerosols can impact Earth's radiative balance, its hydrological and energetic cycles, and are responsible for a large fraction of the uncertainty in climatic models. On a planetary scale, the Amazon Basin is one of the most significant land sources of moisture and latent heat energy. Moreover, every year this region undergoes mearked seasonal shifts in its atmospheric state, transitioning from clean to heavily polluted conditions due to the occurrence of seasonal biomass burning fires, that emit large amounts of smoke to the atmosphere. These conditions make the Amazon Basin a special place to study aerosol-cloud interactions. The SeReNA Project ("Remote sensing of clouds and their interaction with aerosols", from the acronym in Portuguese, @SerenaProject on Twitter) is an ongoing effort to experimentally investigate the impact of aerosols upon cloud microphysics in Amazonia. Vertical profiles of droplet effective radius of water and ice particles, in single convective clouds, can be derived from measurements of the emerging radiation on cloud sides. Aerosol optical depth, cloud top properties, and meteorological parameters retrieved from satellites will be correlated with microphysical properties derived for single clouds. Maps of cloud brightness temperature will allow building temperature vs. effective radius profiles for hydrometeors in single clouds. Figure 1 shows an example extracted from Martins et al. (2011), illustrating a proof-of-concept for the kind of result expected within the framework for the SeReNA Project. The results to be obtained will help foster the quantitative knowledge about interactions between aerosols and clouds in a microphysical level. These interactions are a fundamental process in the context of global climatic changes, they are key to understanding basic processes within clouds and how aerosols

  9. Improving our fundamental understanding of the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the climate system.

    PubMed

    Seinfeld, John H; Bretherton, Christopher; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Coe, Hugh; DeMott, Paul J; Dunlea, Edward J; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Guenther, Alex B; Kahn, Ralph; Kraucunas, Ian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Molina, Mario J; Nenes, Athanasios; Penner, Joyce E; Prather, Kimberly A; Ramanathan, V; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam; Rasch, Philip J; Ravishankara, A R; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Stephens, Graeme; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-24

    The effect of an increase in atmospheric aerosol concentrations on the distribution and radiative properties of Earth's clouds is the most uncertain component of the overall global radiative forcing from preindustrial time. General circulation models (GCMs) are the tool for predicting future climate, but the treatment of aerosols, clouds, and aerosol-cloud radiative effects carries large uncertainties that directly affect GCM predictions, such as climate sensitivity. Predictions are hampered by the large range of scales of interaction between various components that need to be captured. Observation systems (remote sensing, in situ) are increasingly being used to constrain predictions, but significant challenges exist, to some extent because of the large range of scales and the fact that the various measuring systems tend to address different scales. Fine-scale models represent clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interactions with high fidelity but do not include interactions with the larger scale and are therefore limited from a climatic point of view. We suggest strategies for improving estimates of aerosol-cloud relationships in climate models, for new remote sensing and in situ measurements, and for quantifying and reducing model uncertainty. PMID:27222566

  10. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, JD; Berg, LK

    2015-12-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in boundary layer and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign is designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. HI-SCALE consists of 2, 4-week intensive observational periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer, to take advantage of different stages and distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as well as aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. Most of the proposed instrumentation will be deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream 1 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface will be supplemented with aerosol microphysical properties measurements. The G-1 aircraft will complete transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds.

  11. Applying super-droplets as a compact representation of warm-rain microphysics for aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds may influence aerosol characteristics of their environment. The relevant processes include wet deposition (rainout or washout) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) recycling through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle drops. Recycled CCN physicochemical properties may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions (e.g. SO2 oxidation). The key challenge of representing these processes in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track properties of activated CCN throughout the cloud lifecycle. Lack of such "memory" characterises the so-called bulk, multi-moment as well as bin representations of cloud microphysics. In this study we apply the particle-based scheme of Shima et al. 2009. Each modelled particle (aka super-droplet) is a numerical proxy for a multiplicity of real-world CCN, cloud, drizzle or rain particles of the same size, nucleus type,and position. Tracking cloud nucleus properties is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. The super-droplet scheme is furthermore characterized by linear scalability in the number of computational particles, and no numerical diffusion in the condensational and in the Monte-Carlo type collisional growth schemes. The presentation will focus on processing of aerosol by a drizzling stratocumulus deck. The simulations are carried out using a 2D kinematic framework and a VOCALS experiment inspired set-up (see http://www.rap.ucar.edu/~gthompsn/workshop2012/case1/).

  12. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarna, Karolina; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.

    2016-03-01

    A new method for continuous observation of aerosol-cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of the change of the cloud droplet size due to the change in the aerosol concentration. We use high-resolution measurements from a lidar, a radar and a radiometer, which allow us to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example case studies were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program deployment on Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, in 2009 to present the method. We use the cloud droplet effective radius (re) to represent cloud microphysical properties and an integrated value of the attenuated backscatter coefficient (ATB) below the cloud to represent the aerosol concentration. All data from each case study are divided into bins of the liquid water path (LWP), each 10 g m-2 wide. For every LWP bin we present the correlation coefficient between ln re and ln ATB, as well as ACIr (defined as ACIr = -d ln re/d ln ATB, change in cloud droplet effective radius with aerosol concentration). Obtained values of ACIr are in the range 0.01-0.1. We show that ground-based remote sensing instruments used in synergy can efficiently and continuously monitor aerosol-cloud interactions.

  13. EDITORIAL: Aerosol cloud interactions—a challenge for measurements and modeling at the cutting edge of cloud climate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2008-04-01

    Research in aerosol properties and cloud characteristics have historically been considered two separate disciplines within the field of atmospheric science. As such, it has been uncommon for a single researcher, or even research group, to have considerable expertise in both subject areas. The recent attention paid to global climate change has shown that clouds can have a considerable effect on the Earth's climate and that one of the most uncertain aspects in their formation, persistence, and ultimate dissipation is the role played by aerosols. This highlights the need for researchers in both disciplines to interact more closely than they have in the past. This is the vision behind this focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Certain interactions between aerosols and clouds are relatively well studied and understood. For example, it is known that an increase in the aerosol concentration will increase the number of droplets in warm clouds, decrease their average size, reduce the rate of precipitation, and extend the lifetime. Other effects are not as well known. For example, persistent ice super-saturated conditions are observed in the upper troposphere that appear to exceed our understanding of the conditions required for cirrus cloud formation. Further, the interplay of dynamics versus effects purely attributed to aerosols remains highly uncertain. The purpose of this focus issue is to consider the current state of knowledge of aerosol/cloud interactions, to define the contemporary uncertainties, and to outline research foci as we strive to better understand the Earth's climate system. This focus issue brings together laboratory experiments, field data, and model studies. The authors address issues associated with warm liquid water, cold ice, and intermediate temperature mixed-phase clouds. The topics include the uncertainty associated with the effect of black carbon and organics, aerosol types of anthropogenic interest, on droplet and ice formation. Phases

  14. Satellite observation of aerosol - cloud interactions over semi-arid and arid land regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klüser, L.; Holzer-Popp, T.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite observations from three different sources are used to study the interactions between aerosol and ice clouds in five semi-arid and arid land regions over Africa and Asia, reaching from the South-African Kalahari to the Taklimakan and Gobi in Mongolia. (1) Six years of Aqua MODIS cloud and aerosol observations (including "Deep Blue" retrievals) which contain a qualitative separation into coarse and fine mode aerosol are analysed. (2) Five years of APOLLO cloud observations and SYNAER aerosol retrievals which allow discriminating between mineral dust and soot dominated cases from AATSR and SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT are exploited. (3) Moreover IASI provides one year of ice cloud and mineral dust observations over land retrieved with a newly developed method based on singular vector decomposition. Cloud top temperature observations are used to asses the state of convection and to statistically re-project observation distributions of cloud properties to background conditions. Then the difference between observation density distributions of background and re-projected aerosol-contaminated samples can be evaluated. By such way of analysis the influence of different cloud development stages, which also manifest in seasonal cycles of cloud properties, can be minimised. The analysis of the various observation density distributions shows that liquid water and ice effective radius is mainly decreased for increased total aerosol content for both aerosol types, biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust, separately. Two different modes of aerosol impacts on cloud optical depth can be shown. Optical depth is mainly increased, directly following the theory of the so-called "Twomey effect". In the West African Sahel a decrease of cloud water path (for both liquid water and ice) under the influence of absorbing aerosols results also in decreased optical depth. As at the same time the cloud fraction does not decrease under aerosol influence, the statistical decrease of mean

  15. CloudAerosol interaction during lightning activity over land and ocean: Precipitation pattern assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Jayanti; Chaudhuri, Sutapa; Chowdhury, Arumita Roy; Bandyopadhyay, Tanuka

    2016-06-01

    The present study attempts to identify the land - ocean contrast in cloud - aerosol relation during lightning and non-lightning days and its effect on subsequent precipitation pattern. The thermal hypothesis in view of Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) behind the land - ocean contrast is observed to be insignificant in the present study region. The result shows that the lightning activities are significantly and positively correlated with aerosols over both land and ocean in case of low aerosol loading whereas for high aerosol loading the correlation is significant but, only over land. The study attempts to comprehend the mechanism through which the aerosol and lightning interact using the concept of aerosol indirect effect that includes the study of cloud effective radius, cloud fraction and precipitation rate. The result shows that the increase in lightning activity over ocean might have been caused due to the first aerosol indirect effect, while over land the aerosol indirect effect might have been suppressed due to lightning. Thus, depending on the region and relation between cloud parameters it is observed that the precipitation rate decreases (increases) over ocean during lightning (non-lightning) days. On the other hand during non-lightning days, the precipitation rate decreases over land.

  16. LES simulation of cloud-aerosols-chemistry interactions in Western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, M.; Brosse, F.; Mari, C. H.; Couvreux, F.

    2014-12-01

    Low clouds have a major impact on the radiative balance of the earth, in particular in tropical areas. The Southern West Africa (SWA) area encounters during boreal summer frequent formations of stratus and/or cumulus clouds over a large extent. These cloud bands, still badly represented in climatic models, can lead to large errors in the estimation of the cloud radiative forcing. Moreover, these cloud bands can evolve or not in cumulus congestus clouds leading to precipitations. The SWA area is characterized by a large diversity of natural and anthropic emissions of gaseous chemical species and aerosol particles. These emissions have a potential large impact on the number concentration and chemical composition of aerosol particles over the SWA zone. This impact is direct through emissions of primary particles, and indirect through the formation of secondary particles from gaseous precursors. A part of these particles will act as cloud condensation nuclei, thus, influencing the cloud microphysics characteristics. In order to improve our understanding of these complex processes, an airborne campaign is planed in summer 2015 over SWA zone in the framework of the European project DACCIWA (Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa). To prepare the campaign and begin to investigate the cloud-chemistry-aerosols interactions, a LES simulation on a case study designed from an AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) case has been performed with the 3D online-chemistry Meso-NH model. The LES simulation captures the chemical segregation due to thermals in the rising convective boundary layer. Comparing simulation with or without cloud chemistry highlights the effect of aqueous phase chemistry on gaseous precursors of aerosol particles.

  17. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-28

    In this study, aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ε, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ε increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitionalmore » regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ε further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.« less

  18. Sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions to autoconversion parameterization in WRF model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoning; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-04-01

    parameterization schemes. Hence, our results suggest that accurate parameterization of cloud microphysical processes, especially the autoconversion process is very important to improve the understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. References Kessler, E. (1969). On the distribution and continuity of water substance in atmospheric circulation, Meteorol. Monogr., 10, 84 pp. Khairoutdinov, M., and Kogan, Y. (2000). A new cloud physics parameterization in a large-eddy simulation model of marine stratocumulus, Mon.Wea. Rev., 128, 229-243. Liu, Y., Daum, P. H., and McGraw R. (2005). Size truncation effect, threshold behavior, and a new type of autoconversion parameterization, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L11811, doi:10.1029/2005GL022636.

  19. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in

  20. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  1. Aerosol cloud interactions in southeast Pacific stratocumulus: satellite observations, in situ data and regional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Rhea

    The influence of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud radiative properties in the persistent southeast Pacific stratocumulus deck is investigated using MODIS satellite observations, in situ data from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), and WRF-Chem, a regional model with interactive chemistry and aerosols. An albedo proxy is derived based on the fractional coverage of low cloud (a macrophysical field) and the cloud albedo, with the latter broken down into contributions from microphysics (cloud droplet concentration, Nd and macrophysics (liquid water path). Albedo variability is dominated by low cloud fraction variability, except within 10-15° of the South American coast, where cloud albedo variability contributes significantly. Covariance between cloud fraction and cloud albedo also contributes significantly to the variance in albedo, which highlights how complex and inseparable the factors controlling albedo are. N d variability contributes only weakly, which emphasizes that attributing albedo variability to the indirect effects of aerosols against the backdrop of natural meteorological variability is extremely challenging. Specific cases of aerosol changes can have strong impacts on albedo. We identify a pathway for periodic anthropogenic aerosol transport to the unpolluted marine stratocumulus >1000 km offshore, which strongly enhances Nd and albedo in zonally-elongated 'hook'-shaped arc. Hook development occurs with Nd increasing to polluted levels over the remote ocean primarily due to entrainment of a large number of small aerosols from the free troposphere that contribute a relatively small amount of aerosol mass to the marine boundary layer. Strong, deep offshore flow needed to transport continental aerosols to the remote ocean is favored by a trough approaching the South American coast and a southeastward shift of the climatological subtropical high pressure system. DMS significantly influences the aerosol number and

  2. Evaluation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in GISS ModelE Using ASR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Menon, S.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Bennartz, R.; Cribb, M.

    2011-12-01

    The impacts of aerosol particles on clouds continue to rank among the largest uncertainties in global climate simulation. In this work we assess the capability of the NASA GISS ModelE, coupled to MATRIX aerosol microphysics, in correctly representing warm-phase aerosol-cloud interactions. This evaluation is completed through the analysis of a nudged, multi-year global simulation using measurements from various US Department of Energy sponsored measurement campaigns and satellite-based observations. Campaign observations include the Aerosol Intensive Operations Period (Aerosol IOP) and Routine ARM Arial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) at the Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma, the Marine Stratus Radiation, Aerosol, and Drizzle (MASRAD) campaign at Pt. Reyes, California, and the ARM mobile facility's 2008 deployment to China. This combination of datasets provides a variety of aerosol and atmospheric conditions under which to test ModelE parameterizations. In addition to these localized comparisons, we provide the results of global evaluations completed using measurements derived from satellite remote sensors. We will provide a basic overview of simulation performance, as well as a detailed analysis of parameterizations relevant to aerosol indirect effects.

  3. Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Retrieving Aerosol Ångström Exponents from Calipso Measurements of Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark; Liu, Zhaoyan; Hu, Yong-Xiang; Powell, Kathleen; Omar, Ali; Rodier, Sharon; Hunt, William; Kar, Jayanta; Tackett, Jason; Getzewich, Brian; Lee, Kam-Pui

    2016-06-01

    Backscatter and extinction from water clouds are well-understood, both theoretically and experimentally, and thus changes to the expected measurement of layer-integrated attenuated backscatter can be used to infer the optical properties of overlying layers. In this paper we offer a first look at a new retrieval technique that uses CALIPSO measurements of opaque water clouds to derive optical depths and Ångström exponents for overlying aerosol layers.

  4. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under a China Meteorological Administration (CMA) chemical weather modeling system, GRAPES/CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System, CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment). Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are interactively fed online into a two-moment cloud scheme (WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme - WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred.

    The results show that aerosols that interact with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content, and cloud droplet number concentrations, while decreasing the mean diameters of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive microphysical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48 % enhancements of threat score for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The aerosols that interact with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  5. Evaluation of Aerosol-cloud Interaction in the GISS Model E Using ARM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBoer, G.; Bauer, S. E.; Toto, T.; Menon, Surabi; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Observations from the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are used to evaluate the ability of the NASA GISS ModelE global climate model in reproducing observed interactions between aerosols and clouds. Included in the evaluation are comparisons of basic meteorology and aerosol properties, droplet activation, effective radius parameterizations, and surface-based evaluations of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). Differences between the simulated and observed ACI are generally large, but these differences may result partially from vertical distribution of aerosol in the model, rather than the representation of physical processes governing the interactions between aerosols and clouds. Compared to the current observations, the ModelE often features elevated droplet concentrations for a given aerosol concentration, indicating that the activation parameterizations used may be too aggressive. Additionally, parameterizations for effective radius commonly used in models were tested using ARM observations, and there was no clear superior parameterization for the cases reviewed here. This lack of consensus is demonstrated to result in potentially large, statistically significant differences to surface radiative budgets, should one parameterization be chosen over another.

  6. Quantifying components of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelinka, Mark D.; Andrews, Timothy; Forster, Piers M.; Taylor, Karl E.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of anthropogenic aerosols with radiation and clouds is the largest source of uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the climate during the industrial period. Here we apply novel techniques to diagnose the contributors to the shortwave (SW) effective radiative forcing (ERF) from aerosol-radiation-interaction (ERFari) and from aerosol cloud interaction (ERFaci) in experiments performed in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. We find that the ensemble mean SW ERFari+aci of -1.40±0.56 W m-2 comes roughly 25% from ERFari (-0.35±0.20 W m-2) and 75% from ERFaci (-1.04±0.67 W m-2). ERFari is made up of -0.62±0.30 W m-2 due to aerosol scattering opposed by +0.26 ± 0.12 W m-2 due to aerosol absorption and is largest near emission sources. The ERFari from nonsulfate aerosols is +0.13 ± 0.09 W m-2, consisting of -0.15±0.11 W m-2 of scattering and +0.29 ± 0.15 W m-2 of absorption. The change in clear-sky flux is a negatively biased measure of ERFari, as the presence of clouds reduces the magnitude and intermodel spread of ERFari by 40-50%. ERFaci, which is large both near and downwind of emission sources, is composed of -0.99±0.54 W m-2 from enhanced cloud scattering, with much smaller contributions from increased cloud amount and absorption. In models that allow aerosols to affect ice clouds, large increases in the optical depth of high clouds cause substantial longwave and shortwave radiative anomalies. Intermodel spread in ERFaci is dominated by differences in how aerosols increase cloud scattering, but even if all models agreed on this effect, over a fifth of the spread in ERFaci would remain due solely to differences in total cloud amount.

  7. Interactions between biomass-burning aerosols and clouds over Southeast Asia: current status, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Loftus, Adrian M; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Hsu, N Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chantara, Somporn

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between aerosols, clouds, and precipitation remain among the largest sources of uncertainty in the Earth's energy budget. Biomass-burning aerosols are a key feature of the global aerosol system, with significant annually-repeating fires in several parts of the world, including Southeast Asia (SEA). SEA in particular provides a "natural laboratory" for these studies, as smoke travels from source regions downwind in which it is coupled to persistent stratocumulus decks. However, SEA has been under-exploited for these studies. This review summarizes previous related field campaigns in SEA, with a focus on the ongoing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) and results from the most recent BASELInE deployment. Progress from remote sensing and modeling studies, along with the challenges faced for these studies, are also discussed. We suggest that improvements to our knowledge of these aerosol/cloud effects require the synergistic use of field measurements with remote sensing and modeling tools. PMID:25085565

  8. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Evaluated with Aircraft Measurements during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE)"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, W. C.; Arnott, P.; Bucholtz, A.; Buzorius, G.; Chuang, P. Y.; Jonsson, H. H.; Murphy, S. M.; Rissman, T. A.; Small, J. D.; Sorooshian, A.; Varutbangkul, V.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    In this presentation we explore how aerosols influence the microphysical, dynamical, and radiative properties of marine stratocumulus clouds. We address these aerosol-cloud interactions using data collected by the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft during the MASE (Marine Stratus Experiment) campaign, which was conducted off the coast of northern California in July of this year. The otter was instrumented to measure aerosol number concentration, size distribution from 15 nm - 2500 nm, composition (TOF-AMS; PILS), and light absorption. Furthermore, an array of optical probes on the aircraft provided detailed information on the cloud microphysics, including droplet concentration, size distribution, liquid water content and precipitation size distribution. Pyranometers measuring upwelling and downwelling solar irradiance (0.3 μm - 3.5 μm) mounted on a stabilized radiometer platform were used to obtain cloud albedo immediately above the region that was being profiled. Localized (2-20 km wide) regions of high aerosol concentration in the marine boundary layer (MBL) were found and identified as "ship tracks", although no coincident features were immediately apparent in the visible satellite images. Vertical profiles were conducted by the Twin Otter within and on both sides of each ship track to obtain the contrast in aerosol and cloud properties. The ship emissions enhanced aerosol number concentration by factors ranging from 2 to more than 10. They contribute almost entirely to sulfate aerosol -- there was virtually no change in organic aerosol concentration measured by the Aerodyne TOF-AMS or light absorption measured by a photoacoustic instrument within the tracks. The ship emissions are found to have a significant impact on the cloud microphysics, including nearly a doubling of droplet concentration and a reduction in effective radius. The change in droplet dispersion is found to be important in understanding the indirect effect. Cloud albedo tended to be slightly enhanced

  9. Analyzing signatures of aerosol-cloud interactions from satelliteretrievals and the GISS GCM to constrain the aerosol indirecteffect

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, S.; Del Genio, A.D.; Kaufman, Y.; Bennartz, R.; Koch, D.; Loeb, N.; Orlikowski, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evidence of aerosol-cloud interactions are evaluated using satellite data from MODIS, CERES, AMSR-E, reanalysis data from NCEP and data from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model. We evaluate a series of model simulations: (1) Exp N- aerosol direct radiative effects; (2) Exp C- Like Exp N but with aerosol effects on liquid-phase cumulus and stratus clouds; (3) Exp CN- Like Exp C but with model wind fields nudged to reanalysis data. Comparison between satellite-retrieved data and model simulations for June to August 2002, over the Atlantic Ocean indicate the following: a negative correlation between aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and cloud droplet effective radius (R{sub eff}) for all cases and satellite data, except for Exp N; a weak but negative correlation between liquid water path (LWP) and AOT for MODIS and CERES; and a robust increase in cloud cover with AOT for both MODIS and CERES. In all simulations, there is a positive correlation between AOT and both cloud cover and LWP (except in the case of LWP-AOT for Exp CN). The largest slopes are obtained for Exp N, implying that meteorological variability may be an important factor. The main fields associated with AOT variability in NCEP/MODIS data are warmer temperatures and increased subsidence for less clean cases, not well captured by the model. Simulated cloud fields compared with an enhanced data product from MODIS and AMSR-E indicate that model cloud thickness is over-predicted and cloud droplet number is within retrieval uncertainties. Since LWP fields are comparable this implies an under-prediction of R{sub eff} and thus an over-prediction of the indirect effect.

  10. Aerosol patterns and aerosol-cloud-interactions off the West African Coast based on the A-train formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Bendix, Jörg; Cermak, Jan

    2013-04-01

    In this study, spatial and temporal aerosol patterns off the Western African coast are characterized and related to cloud properties, based on satellite data Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in atmospheric processes and influence our environmental system in a complex way. Their identification, characterization, transport patterns as well as their interactions with clouds pose major challenges. Especially the last aspect reveals major uncertainties in terms of the Earth's radiation budget as reported in the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC, 2007). Western and Southern Africa are dominated by two well-known source types of atmospheric aerosols. First, the Saharan Desert is the world's largest aeolian dust emitting source region. Second, biomass burning aerosol is commonly transported off-shore further south (Kaufman et al., 2005). Both aerosol types influence Earth's climate in different manners and can be detected by the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor onboard the EOS platforms as they propagate to the Central and Southern Atlantic. The motivation of this study was to reveal the seasonal pattern of the Saharan dust transport based on an observation period of 11 years and trying to explain the meteorological mechanisms. North African dust plumes are transported along a latitude of 19°N in July and 6°N in January. The seasonally fluctuating intensities adapt to the annual cycle of wind and precipitation regimes. A strong relationship is found between the spatial shift of the Azores High and the Saharan dust load over the middle Atlantic Ocean. Monthly Aerosol Optical Thickness products of Terra MODIS and NCEP-DOE (National Centers for Environmental Predictions) Reanalysis II data are used for this purpose. The relationship between aerosol and cloud droplet parameters is blurred by high sensitivities to aerosol size and composition (Feingold, 2003; McFiggans et al., 2006) as well as meteorological context (Ackerman et al., 2004

  11. Ground-based remote sensing scheme for monitoring aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarna, K.; Russchenberg, H. W. J.

    2015-11-01

    A method for continuous observation of aerosol-cloud interactions with ground-based remote sensing instruments is presented. The main goal of this method is to enable the monitoring of cloud microphysical changes due to the changing aerosol concentration. We use high resolution measurements from lidar, radar and radiometer which allow to collect and compare data continuously. This method is based on a standardised data format from Cloudnet and can be implemented at any observatory where the Cloudnet data set is available. Two example study cases were chosen from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program deployment at Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal in 2009 to present the method. We show the Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficient, r, and the Coefficient of Determination, r2 for data divided into bins of LWP, each of 10 g m-2. We explain why the commonly used way of quantity aerosol cloud interactions by use of an ACI index (ACIr,τ = dln re,τ/dlnα) is not the best way of quantifying aerosol-cloud interactions.

  12. Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why Has It Been Do Difficult to Quantify Aerosol-Cloud Interactions for Climate Assessment, and How Can We Make Progress?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    The organizers of the National Academy of Sciences Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia Series on Improving Our Fundamental Understanding of the Role of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the Climate System would like to post Ralph Kahn's presentation entitled Remote Sensing of Aerosols from Satellites: Why has it been so difficult to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions for climate assessment, and how can we make progress? to their public website.

  13. Introducing Subgrid-scale convective cloud and aerosol interactions to the WRF-CMAQ integrated modeling system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many regional and global climate models include aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on grid-scale/resolved clouds. However, the interaction between aerosols and convective clouds remains highly uncertain, as noted in the IPCC AR4 report. The objective of this work is to help fill in ...

  14. A New WRF-Chem Treatment for Studying Regional Scale Impacts of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in Parameterized Cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A new treatment of cloud-aerosol interactions within parameterized shallow and deep convection has been implemented in WRF-Chem that can be used to better understand the aerosol lifecycle over regional to synoptic scales. The modifications to the model to represent cloud-aerosol interactions include treatment of the cloud dropletnumber mixing ratio; key cloud microphysical and macrophysical parameters (including the updraft fractional area, updraft and downdraft mass fluxes, and entrainment) averaged over the population of shallow clouds, or a single deep convective cloud; and vertical transport, activation/resuspension, aqueous chemistry, and wet removal of aerosol and trace gases in warm clouds. Thesechanges have been implemented in both the WRF-Chem chemistry packages as well as the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization that has been modified to better represent shallow convective clouds. Preliminary testing of the modified WRF-Chem has been completed using observations from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) as well as a high-resolution simulation that does not include parameterized convection. The simulation results are used to investigate the impact of cloud-aerosol interactions on the regional scale transport of black carbon (BC), organic aerosol (OA), and sulfate aerosol. Based on the simulations presented here, changes in the column integrated BC can be as large as -50% when cloud-aerosol interactions are considered (due largely to wet removal), or as large as +35% for sulfate in non-precipitating conditions due to the sulfate production in the parameterized clouds. The modifications to WRF-Chem version 3.2.1 are found to account for changes in the cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) and changes in the chemical composition of cloud-drop residuals in a way that is consistent with observations collected during CHAPS. Efforts are currently underway to port the changes described here to WRF-Chem version 3.5, and it is anticipated that they

  15. Interactions of Water with Mineral Dust Aerosol: Water Adsorption, Hygroscopicity, Cloud Condensation, and Ice Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Cziczo, Daniel J; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-04-13

    Mineral dust aerosol is one of the major types of aerosol present in the troposphere. The molecular level interactions of water vapor with mineral dust are of global significance. Hygroscopicity, light scattering and absorption, heterogneous reactivity and the ability to form clouds are all related to water-dust interactions. In this review article, experimental techniques to probe water interactions with dust and theoretical frameworks to understand these interactions are discussed. A comprehensive overview of laboratory studies of water adsorption, hygroscopicity, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation of fresh and atmspherically aged mineral dust particles is provided. Finally, we relate laboratory studies and theoretical simulations that provide fundemental insights into these processes on the molecular level with field measurements that illustrate the atmospheric significance of these processes. Overall, the details of water interactions with mineral dust are covered from multiple perspectives in this review article. PMID:27015126

  16. Aerosol-cloud-land surface interactions within tropical sea breeze convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the influence of aerosols, surface roughness length, soil moisture, and synergistic interactions among these factors on tropical convective rainfall focused along a sea breeze front are explored within idealized cloud-resolving modeling simulations using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The idealized RAMS domain setup is representative of the coastal Cameroon rainforest in equatorial Africa. In order to assess the potential sensitivity of sea breeze convection to increasing anthropogenic activity and deforestation occurring in such regions, 27 total simulations are performed in which combinations of enhanced aerosol concentrations, reduced surface roughness length, and reduced soil moisture are included. Both enhanced aerosols and reduced soil moisture are found to individually reduce the precipitation due to reductions in downwelling shortwave radiation and surface latent heat fluxes, respectively, while perturbations to the roughness length do not have a large impact on the precipitation. The largest soil moisture perturbations dominate the precipitation changes due to reduced low-level moisture available to the convection, but if the soil moisture perturbation is more moderate, synergistic interactions between soil moisture and aerosols enhance the sea breeze precipitation. This is found to result from evening convection that forms ahead of the sea breeze only when both effects are present. Interactions between the resulting gust fronts and the sea breeze front locally enhance convergence and therefore the rainfall. The results of this study underscore the importance of considering the aerosol-cloud-land surface system responses to perturbations in aerosol loading and land surface characteristics.

  17. Aerosol, cloud and biosphere interactions (Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hang

    2013-04-01

    The response of cloud characteristics and precipitation processes to increasing anthropogenic aerosol concentrations is one of the largest uncertainties in the current understanding of climate change. We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets using models with detailed spectral microphysics. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration, we found distinctly regimes of CCN activation, cloud, rain and snow formation, which implies strongly dynamic dependence for the aerosol impact. In a further study, we also found that the cloud droplet formation is more sensitive to the aerosol number concentration and its size than to its chemical composition. Nitrous acid (HONO), as an important precursor of OH radical, is a key species in atmospheric photochemistry. Field observations suggest a large missing source of HONO. We show that biogenic nitrite in soil can release HONO and explain the reported strength and diurnal variation of the missing source. On the other hand, HONO emission provides another pathway for the emission of reactive nitrogen from soil, which is currently missing in the nitrogen cycle. Fertilized soils appear to be particularly strong sources of HONO and OH. Thus, agricultural activities and land-use changes may strongly influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence of nitrite-producing microbes, the release of HONO from soil may also be important in natural environments, including forests, boreal and polar regions. The above stories summarize most of my previous studies, but are a snapshot of Aerosol, cloud and biosphere interactions.

  18. The Explicit-Cloud Parameterized-Pollutant Hybrid Approach for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Multiscale Modelling Framework Models: Tracer Transport Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-05-30

    All estimates of aerosol indirect effects on the global energy balance have either completely neglected the influence of aerosol on convective clouds or treated the influence in a highly parameterized manner. Embedding cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within each grid cell of a global model provides a multiscale modelling framework for treating both the influence of aerosols on convective as well as stratiform clouds and the influence of all clouds on the aerosol, but treating the interactions explicitly by simulating all aerosol processes in the CRM would be computationally prohibitive. An alternate approach is to use horizontal statistics (e.g., cloud mass flux, cloud fraction, and precipitation) from the CRM simulation to drive a single-column parameterization of cloud effects on the aerosol and then use the aerosol profile to simulate aerosol effects on clouds within the CRM. Here we test this concept for vertical transport by clouds, using a CRM with tracer transport simulated explicitly to serve as a benchmark. We show that this parameterization, driven by the CRM’s cloud mass fluxes, reproduces the tracer transport by the CRM significantly better than a single column model that uses a conventional convective cloud parameterization.

  19. Response Timescales and Multiple Equilibria in Boundary-Layer Cloud-Aerosol Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretherton, C. S.; Berner, A.; Wood, R.

    2012-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of subtropical stratocumulus-topped boundary layers coupled to an interactive aerosol model are run for multiday periods to examine their coupled equilibria and adjustment timescales. The LES includes two-moment Morrison microphysics, interactive radiation, and Razzak-Ghan cloud droplet activation from a single log-normal size distribution of hygroscopic aerosol with prognosed total aerosol mass and number. The aerosol evolves due to surface and entrainment sources, dry coalescence, precipitation sinks coupled to the Morrison microphysics due to autoconversion and accretion of cloud droplets (and a source due to raindrop evaporation), and cloud and rain scavenging of interstitial aerosol. Simulations are initialized with an idealized southeast Pacific stratocumulus sounding based on observations during VOCALS REx and forced with specified SST, mean subsidence, geostrophic wind, and free-tropospheric aerosol concentration. The surface aerosol source is based on the Clarke parameterization for the dependence of sea-salt number concentration on wind speed. Both surface and free-tropospheric aerosol are assumed to quickly grow to a specified size due to a surface DMS source. The goal is to explore the adjustment timescales and long-term equilibria produced by this model, to compare with studies such as Wood et al. (2012) that postulate that remote marine boundary layer aerosol concentrations are controlled as much by the precipitation sink as the surface and entrainment sources. We show that the coupled cloud-aerosol model supports rapid transitions from a solid, high aerosol, stratocumulus-capped state to a cumulus-like state reminisniscent of pockets of open cells as the liquid water path rises above a threshold supporting sufficient precipitation. The system can support multiple long-term equilibria for the same boundary forcing, or slow oscillations between a collapsed POC-like state and a deepening, thickening stratocumulus

  20. Modeling aerosol-cloud interactions with a self-consistent cloud scheme in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ming, Y; Ramaswamy, V; Donner, L J; Phillips, V T; Klein, S A; Ginoux, P A; Horowitz, L H

    2005-05-02

    This paper describes a self-consistent prognostic cloud scheme that is able to predict cloud liquid water, amount and droplet number (N{sub d}) from the same updraft velocity field, and is suitable for modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In the scheme, the evolution of droplets fully interacts with the model meteorology. An explicit treatment of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation allows the scheme to take into account the contributions to N{sub d} of multiple types of aerosol (i.e., sulfate, organic and sea-salt aerosols) and kinetic limitations of the activation process. An implementation of the prognostic scheme in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) AM2 GCM yields a vertical distribution of N{sub d} characteristic of maxima in the lower troposphere differing from that obtained through diagnosing N{sub d} empirically from sulfate mass concentrations. As a result, the agreement of model-predicted present-day cloud parameters with satellite measurements is improved compared to using diagnosed N{sub d}. The simulations with pre-industrial and present-day aerosols show that the combined first and second indirect effects of anthropogenic sulfate and organic aerosols give rise to a global annual mean flux change of -1.8 W m{sup -2} consisting of -2.0 W m{sup -2} in shortwave and 0.2 W m{sup -2} in longwave, as model response alters cloud field, and subsequently longwave radiation. Liquid water path (LWP) and total cloud amount increase by 19% and 0.6%, respectively. Largely owing to high sulfate concentrations from fossil fuel burning, the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude land and oceans experience strong cooling. So does the tropical land which is dominated by biomass burning organic aerosol. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere and land/ocean ratios are 3.1 and 1.4, respectively. The calculated annual zonal mean flux changes are determined to be statistically significant, exceeding the model's natural variations

  1. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction at the Land Site of VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, Javier; Shaw, Glenn; Krejci, Radovan; Chand, Duli; Gallarado, Laura; Cordova, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol-Cloud-Ocean interactions in the South-East Pacific represent one of the best natural laboratories to study aerosol-cloud-climate processes thanks to stable large scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and large anthropogenic sources associated mainly with copper industry. This article discuss the microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and the free troposphere(FT) related to the coastal MBL dynamics, stratocumulus cloud formation and dissipation in an environment influenced by air pollution sources in the FT and MBL. The analysis is based on observations from the Land Sites of VOCALS-REx at Paposo (25 S, 70 W, 700 masl) on the Pacific ocean coast, about 150 km south of Antofagasta in Chile and from free tropospheric site at ESO Paranal Observatory located inland at 2435 masl some 40 km NE from Paposo site. Combination of the in situ measurements from both, free troposphere and MBL together with lidar observations provides comprehensive insight into MBL-free troposphere interactions. The aerosol properties in FT are to a large degree controlled by sulfate-dominated aerosol from copper industry in northern Chile. The free tropospheric aerosol close to the coast has very stable accumulation mode dominated size distribution with mode diameter ~0.1 µm, but the aerosol number density for particles > 0.01 µm as well as for particles > 0.26 µm show large variability between 300 and 1600 cm-3 and 5 and 50 cm-3, respectively. The large variability can be attributed to changing influence from individual emission sources due to changing intensity of the coastal jet flow and diurnal ventilation of the shallow boundary layer in hilly region of the Atacama Desert mountain plateau. Polluted aerosols from FT are transported to the MBL along the Andes western slope through katabatic flows and downward mixed into the MBL most intensively in a narrow band along the coast.

  2. Ceilometer for aerosol profiling: comparison with the multiwavelength in the frame of INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonna, Fabio; Vande Hey, Joshua; Rosoldi, Marco; Amato, Francesco; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Observations of cloud base height are important for meteorology, observations of aerosols are important for air quality applications, observations of cloud cover and aerosols address key uncertainties in climate study. To improve parameterization and uncertainties of numerical models, observations provided by high resolution networks of ground-based instruments are needed. In order to achieve broad, high resolution coverage, low-cost instruments are preferable, though it is essential that the sensitivity, stability, biases and uncertainties of these instruments are well-understood. Despite of their differences from more advanced and more powerful lidars, low construction and operation cost of ceilometer, originally designed for cloud base height monitoring, has fostered their use for the quantitative study of aerosol properties. The large number of ceilometers available worldwide represent a strong motivation to investigate to which extent they can be used to fill the geographical gaps between advanced lidar stations and how their continuous data flow can be linked to existing networks of the advanced lidars, like EARLINET (European Aerosol research LIdar NETwork). In order to make the best use of existing and future ceilometer deployments, ceilometer must be better characterized. This is the purpose of the INTERACT campaign carried out in the frame of ACTRIS Transnational Access activities at CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (CIAO - 760 m a.s.l., 40.60 N, 15.72 E). In this paper, an overview of the results achieved during the campaign is provided. In particular multi-wavelength Raman lidar measurements are used to investigate the capability of ceilometers to provide reliable information about atmospheric aerosol content through the INTERACT (INTERcomparison of Aerosol and Cloud Tracking) campaign carried out at the CNR-IMAA Atmospheric Observatory (760 m a.s.l., 40.60N, 15.72E), in the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosol Clouds Trace gases Research InfraStructure) FP7

  3. Modelling Volcanic Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Warm Cumulus Cloud Using the High Resolution Nested Suite of the UK Met Office Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A. K.; Field, P.; Carslaw, K. S.; Hill, A. A.; Shipway, B. J.; Grosvenor, D. P.; Marsham, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The impacts that aerosols have on clouds and clouds have on aerosols remain the largest uncertainty in terms of the effect on radiative forcing. Regional and global models are unable to resolve these small scale interactions, while high resolution eddy-resolving models are unable to capture the larger scale dynamics of the atmosphere and can only be run over a limited size domain for a limited time. Here we present results using the high resolution (1km, 0.3km) nested version of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) which bridges the scale gap between models. A new microphysics scheme, Cloud and AeroSol Interactive Microphysics (CASIM) is coupled to a chemistry and aerosol scheme (GLOMAP-mode) which allows for fully interactive aerosol and cloud microphysics.Results showing the effect of volcanic aerosol from the slowly degassing Kilauea volcano, Hawaii on trade wind cumuli will be presented. The presence of a subtropical high pressure in the summer allows the study of aerosol-cloud interactions in a uniform unpolluted marine background environment without the complications of anthropogenic pollution. Satellite data has shown that cumulus clouds affected by the volcanic plume had smaller cloud droplets, reduced precipitation efficiency, increased cloud amount and higher cloud tops. Other researchers have hypothesised that that the observed changes in cloud properties cannot be explained by the orographic effect of the island or the sea surface temperature anomaly. We present results using CASIM in the UM at high resolution to systematically compare the relative effects of dynamical and aerosol-cloud interactions. Initial results show that the orography of the island does not have a significant impact on the cumulus cloud further downwind from the island but there is an effect in the immediate vicinity of the island. Initial results also indicate that 1km resolution is not high enough to resolve small cumulus cloud.

  4. Aerosol-cloud interactions in ship tracks using Terra MODIS/MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Christensen, Matthew W.; Diner, David J.; Garay, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    Simultaneous ship track observations from Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) have been compiled to investigate how ship-injected aerosols affect marine warm boundary layer clouds for different cloud types and environmental conditions. By taking advantage of the high spatial resolution multiangle observations available from MISR, we utilized the retrieved cloud albedo, cloud top height, and cloud motion vectors to examine cloud property responses in ship-polluted and nearby unpolluted clouds. The strength of the cloud albedo response to increased aerosol level is primarily dependent on cloud cell structure, dryness of the free troposphere, and boundary layer depth, corroborating a previous study by Chen et al. (2012) where A-Train satellite data were utilized. Under open cell cloud structure the cloud properties are more susceptible to aerosol perturbations as compared to closed cells. Aerosol plumes caused an increase in liquid water amount (+38%), cloud top height (+13%), and cloud albedo (+49%) for open cell clouds, whereas for closed cell clouds, little change in cloud properties was observed. Further capitalizing on MISR's unique capabilities, the MISR cross-track cloud speed was used to derive cloud top divergence. Statistically averaging the results from the identified plume segments to reduce random noise, we found evidence of cloud top divergence in the ship-polluted clouds, whereas the nearby unpolluted clouds showed cloud top convergence, providing observational evidence of a change in local mesoscale circulation associated with enhanced aerosols. Furthermore, open cell polluted clouds revealed stronger cloud top divergence as compared to closed cell clouds, consistent with different dynamical mechanisms driving their responses. These results suggest that detailed cloud responses, classified by cloud type and environmental conditions, must be accounted for in global climate modeling

  5. Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, N.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D. M.

    2009-02-02

    The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI) to present day (PD) and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario) that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential ACI. The aerosol indirect effect (AIE) is estimated to be -2.0 Wm{sup -2} for PD-PI and -0.6 Wm{sup -2} for 2050-PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of ACI substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of ACI leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and {approx}10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions ({approx}10-30%). Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15-20% across the industrialized regions due to ACI allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1-2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that ACI must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  6. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  7. A Novel Tool for Simulating Aerosol-cloud Interactions with a Sectional Model Implemented to a Large-Eddy Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kokkola, H.; Maalick, Z.; Korhonen, H.; Liqing, H.

    2015-12-01

    A new cloud-resolving model setup for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, with a special emphasis on partitioning and wet deposition of semi-volatile aerosol species, is presented. The model is based on modified versions of two well-established model components: the Large-Eddy Simulator (LES) UCLALES, and the sectional aerosol model SALSA, previously employed in the ECHAM climate model family. Implementation of the UCLALES-SALSA is described in detail. As the basis for this work, SALSA has been extended to include a sectional representation of the size distributions of cloud droplets and precipitation. Microphysical processes operating on clouds and precipitation have also been added. Given our main motivation, the cloud droplet size bins are defined according to the dry particle diameter. The droplet wet diameter is solved dynamically through condensation equations, but represents an average droplet diameter inside each size bin. This approach allows for accurate tracking of the aerosol properties inside clouds, but minimizes the computational cost. Since the actual cloud droplet diameter is not fully resolved inside the size bins, processes such as precipitation formation rely on parameterizations. For realistic growth of drizzle drops to rain, which is critical for the aerosol wet deposition, the precipitation size bins are defined according to the actual drop size. With these additions, the implementation of the SALSA model replaces most of the microphysical and thermodynamical components within the LES. The cloud properties and aerosol-cloud interactions simulated by the model are analysed and evaluated against detailed cloud microphysical boxmodel results and in-situ aerosol-cloud interaction observations from the Puijo measurement station in Kuopio, Finland. The ability of the model to reproduce the impacts of wet deposition on the aerosol population is demonstrated.

  8. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Ship Tracks Using Terra MODIS/MISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Christensen, M.; Diner, D. J.; Garay, M. J.; Nelson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous ship track observations from Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) have been compiled to investigate how ship-injected aerosols affect marine warm boundary layer clouds under different cloud types and environmental conditions. Taking advantage of the high spatial resolution multiangle observations uniquely available from MISR, we utilized the retrieved cloud albedo, cloud top height, and cloud motion vectors to examine the cloud property responses in ship-polluted and nearby unpolluted clouds. The strength of cloud albedo response to increased aerosol level is primarily dependent on cloud cell structure, dryness of the free troposphere, and boundary layer depth, corroborating a previous study by Chen et al. (2012) where A-Train satellite data were applied. Under open cell cloud structure, the cloud properties are more susceptible to aerosol perturbations as compared to closed cells. Aerosol plumes caused an increase in liquid water amount (+27%), cloud top height (+11%), and cloud albedo (+40%) for open cell clouds, whereas under closed cell clouds, little changes in cloud properties were observed. Further capitalizing on MISR's unique capabilities, the MISR cross-track cloud speed has been used to derive cloud top divergence. Statistically averaging the results from many plume segments to reduce random noise, we have found that in ship-polluted clouds there is stronger cloud top divergence, and in nearby unpolluted clouds, convergence occurs and leads to downdrafts, providing observational evidence for cloud top entrainment feedback. These results suggest that detailed cloud responses, classified by cloud type and environmental conditions, must be accounted for in global climate modeling studies to reduce uncertainties of aerosol indirect forcing. Reference: Chen, Y.-C. et al. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 8223-8235, doi:10.5194/acp-12

  9. The resolution dependence of cloud effects and ship-induced aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possner, A.; Zubler, E.; Lohmann, U.; Schär, C.

    2016-05-01

    Measures of aerosol-cloud interactions in stratocumulus have been shown to depend on the resolution of the applied data set. In order to contrast resolution with emission dilution effects in models, a regional numerical weather prediction model is used to simulate ship tracks at a range of spatiotemporal resolutions ranging from the global climate modeling scale (Δx = 50 km, Δt = 180 s) to the convection-resolving scale (Δx = 1 km, Δt = 20 s). The background simulations without ship emissions display a high degree of similarity in the planetary boundary layer and cloud properties at all spatiotemporal resolutions. Simulations assessing the impact of emission dilution show an increasing overestimation of the shortwave (SW) cloud radiative effect (CRE) with degenerating emission resolution. Although mean perturbations in the activation-sized aerosol number concentration (Nact) are similar for all dilution experiments, the variability in Nact is increasingly lost with stronger emission dilution. The enhanced Nact homogeneity in turn leads to an overestimated SW CRE. We show that emission dilution alone accounts for 47% of the overestimated SW CRE simulated at low resolutions. The remainder of the differences is attributed to a combination of locally enhanced aerosol concentrations due to weaker vertical mixing simulated at coarse resolutions, in combination with a faster conversion rate of Aitken to accumulation mode particles by redistribution in these regions.

  10. A New Approach to Using a Cloud-resolving Model to Study the Interactions Between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  11. A New Approach to using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    , a new approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  12. A New Approach to using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    this talk. In particular, a new approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  13. Impact of transpacific aerosol on air quality over the United States: A perspective from aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhining; Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Observations have well established that aerosols from various sources in Asia, Europe, and Africa can travel across the Pacific and reach the contiguous United States (U.S.) at least on episodic bases throughout a year, with a maximum import in spring. The imported aerosol not only can serve as an additional source to regional air pollution (e.g., direct input), but also can influence regional air quality through the aerosol-cloud-radiation (ACR) interactions that change local and regional meteorology. This study assessed impacts of the transpacific aerosol on air quality, focusing on surface ozone and PM2.5, over the U.S. using the NASA Unified Weather Research Forecast model. Based on the results of 3-month (April to June of 2010) simulations, the impact of direct input (as an additional source) of transpacific aerosol caused an increase of surface PM2.5 concentration by approximately 1.5 μg m-3 over the west coast and about 0.5 μg m-3 over the east coast of the U.S. By influencing key meteorological processes through the ACR interactions, the transpacific aerosol exerted a significant effect on both surface PM2.5 (±6 μg m-3) and ozone (±12 ppbv) over the central and eastern U.S. This suggests that the transpacific transport of aerosol could either improve or deteriorate local air quality and complicate local effort toward the compliance with the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards.

  14. Aerosols, Clouds, and Precipitation as Scale Interactions in the Climate System and Controls on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Leo

    Clouds are major regulators of atmospheric energy flows. Their character depends on atmospheric composition, dynamics, and thermodynamic state. Clouds can assume organized structures whose scales are planetary, while processes important for determining basic properties occur on the scale of microns. The range of processes, scales, and interactions among them has precluded the development of concise theories for the role of clouds in climate, and limitations in modeling clouds in complex climate models remain among the key uncertainties in understanding and projecting climate change. The distribution function of vertical velocities (updraft speeds) in clouds is an important control on climate forcing by clouds and possibly a strong correlate with climate sensitivity. (Climate forcing refers to the change in Earth's energy balance as atmospheric composition changes, in particular, due to human activity. Climate sensitivity is defined here as the equilibrium change in globally averaged annual surface temperature as a result of doubled carbon dioxide.) Vertical velocities are central because they determine the thermodynamic environment governing phase changes of water, with both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena important. The spatial and temporal spectra of relevant vertical velocities includes scales both numerically resolved by climate models and below their resolution limit. The latter implies a requirement to parameterize these smaller scale motions in models. The scale dependence of vertical velocities and emerging observational constraints on their distribution provide new opportunities for representing aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in climate models. Success in doing so could provide important breakthroughs in understanding both climate forcing and sensitivity.

  15. Cloud Dynamical Controls on Climate Forcing by Aerosol-Cloud Interactions: New Insights from Observations, High-Resolution Models, and Parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Leo

    2016-04-01

    At frequently observed, low updraft speeds, cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations are controlled mostly by cloud-scale vertical velocities and not aerosol number concentrations. Reducing uncertainty in estimates of climate forcing by aerosol-cloud interactions will require taking account of these thermodynamically limited cloud regimes in global climate models. The scales of the relevant cloud dynamics are often well-below resolved scales in climate and numerical weather prediction models, ranging to tens of meters at large-eddy scale for stratocumulus clouds. Observations of vertical velocities from cloud radars in field programs and at fixed observational sites are providing a basis for evaluating new classes of parameterizations for convective and non-convective clouds that include probability distribution functions (PDFs) for vertical velocity, which can be used to drive physically based representations of droplet and crystal activation. High-resolution cloud models with detailed treatments of aerosol and microphysical processes can also be evaluated using these observations. Vertical velocities in both high-resolution models and parameterizations currently show discrepancies from observations while capturing qualitative features. Improved treatments of microphysical and turbulence processes in high-resolution cloud models hold promise for improving agreement with observations, while a wide range of advances in parameterization are possible paths to improvement for simulating sub-grid vertical velocities and aerosol-cloud interactions.

  16. Using the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) to investigate aerosol-convection interactions in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Wagner, Till

    2014-05-01

    Convection plays an important role in the climate system through its effects on radiation, precipitation, large-scale dynamics and vertical transport of aerosols and trace gases. The effects of aerosols on the development of convective cloud and precipitation are a source of considerable uncertainty in current climate modelling. Most current global climate models use 'mass-flux' convection schemes, which represent the ensemble of convective clouds in a GCM column by a single 'mean' updraught. In addition to over-simplifying the representation of such clouds, this presents particular problems in the context of aerosol-convection interactions: firstly because the relationship between aerosol and the droplet size distribution depends on the vertical velocity distribution, about which little or no information is available, and secondly because the effects of convective transport and scavenging may vary nonlinearly over the ensemble (e.g. between precipitating and non-precipitating clouds and due to different loadings). The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) addresses these limitations by simulating a spectrum of updraughts with different cross-sectional areas within each GCM column, based on the quasi-equilibrium approach of Arakawa and Schubert. For each cloud type, an entraining Lagrangian parcel model is initiated by perturbations at the surface, allowing a realistic vertical velocity to develop by cloud base so that detailed size-resolved microphysics can be represented within the cloud above. These different cloud types interact via competition for resolved-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE). Transport of water, aerosol and other tracers is calculated separately for each cloud type, allowing for different entrainment and scavenging behaviours. By using CCFM embedded within the ECHAM6-HAM aerosol-climate model, we show how this approach can both improve the distribution of convective precipitation events compared to a typical mass-flux scheme, and

  17. Interesting Scientific Questions Regarding Interactions in the Gas-aerosol-cloud System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    2002-01-01

    The growth of human population and their use of land, food and energy resources affect the Earth's atmosphere, biosphere and oceans in a complex manner. Many important questions in earth sciences today deal with issues regarding the impact of human activities on our immediate and future environment, ranging in scope from local (i.e. air pollution) to global (i.e. global warming) scale problems. Because the mass of the Earth's atmosphere is negligible compare to that found in the oceans and the biosphere, the atmosphere can respond quickly to natural and/or manmade perturbations. For example, seasonal 'ozone hole' formation in the Antarctic is a result of manmade CFC emissions in just the last 40 years. Also, the observed rise in global temperatures (known as global warming) is linked to a rapid increase in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas concentrations (emitted primarily by combustion processes) over the last century. The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a mixture of gases, aerosol and cloud particles. Natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols affect the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Changes in the chemical and physical makeup of the atmosphere can influence how the Earth will interact with the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing infrared radiation and vise versa. While, some perturbations are short-lived, others are long-lived and can affect the Earth's global climate and chemistry in many decades to come, In order to be able to separate the natural effects from anthropogenic ones, it is essential that we understand the basic physics and chemistry of interactions in the gas-aerosol-cloud system in the Earth's atmosphere. The important physics and chemistry that takes place in the coupled gas-aerosol-cloud system as it relates to aircraft observations are discussed.

  18. Aerosol-cloud interactions studied with the chemistry-climate model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Tost, H.; Steil, B.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-08-01

    This study uses the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model to simulate cloud properties and estimate cloud radiative effects induced by aerosols. We have tested two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation parameterizations, i.e., the standard STN (osmotic coefficient model) and hybrid (HYB, replacing the osmotic coefficient by the κ hygroscopicity parameter) schemes to calculate aerosol hygroscopicity and critical supersaturation, and consider aerosol-cloud feedbacks with a focus on warm clouds. Both prognostic schemes (STN and HYB) account for aerosol number, size and composition effects on droplet nucleation, and are tested in combination with two different cloud cover parameterizations, i.e., a relative humidity threshold and a statistical cloud cover scheme (RH-CLC and ST-CLC). The use of either STN and HYB leads to very different cloud radiative effects, particularly over the continents. The STN scheme predicts highly effective CCN activation in warm clouds and hazes/fogs near the surface. The enhanced CCN activity increases the cloud albedo effect of aerosols and cools the Earth's surface. The cooler surface enhances the hydrostatic stability of the lower continental troposphere and thereby reduces convection and convective precipitation. In contrast, the HYB simulations calculate lower, more realistic CCN activation and consequent cloud albedo effect, leading to relatively stronger convection and high cloud formation. The enhanced high clouds increase greenhouse warming and moderate the cooling effect of the low clouds. With respect to the cloud radiative effects, the statistical ST-CLC scheme shows much higher sensitivity to aerosol-cloud coupling for all continental regions than the RH-CLC threshold scheme, most pronounced for low clouds but also for high clouds. Simulations of the short wave cloud radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere in ST-CLC are a factor of 2-8 more sensitive to aerosol coupling than the RH-CLC configurations. The long wave

  19. A DNS study of aerosol and small-scale cloud turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkovskaia, Natalia; Rannik, Ullar; Phillips, Vaughan; Siebert, Holger; Wehner, Birgit; Boy, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interaction between small-scale turbulence and aerosol and cloud microphysical properties using direct numerical simulations (DNS). We consider the domain located at the height of about 2000 m from the sea level, experiencing transient high supersaturation due to atmospheric fluctuations of temperature and humidity. To study the effect of total number of particles (Ntot) on air temperature, activation and supersaturation, we vary Ntot. To investigate the effect of aerosol dynamics on small-scale turbulence and vertical air motion, we vary the intensity of turbulent fluctuations and the buoyant force. We find that even a small number of aerosol particles (55.5 cm-3), and therefore a small droplet number concentration, strongly affects the air temperature due to release of latent heat. The system comes to an equilibrium faster and the relative number of activated particles appears to be smaller for larger Ntot. We conclude that aerosol particles strongly affect the air motion. In a case of updraught coursed by buoyant force, the presence of aerosol particles results in acceleration of air motion in vertical direction and increase of turbulent fluctuations.

  20. Use of Lidar Derived Optical Extinction and Backscattering Coefficients Near Cloud Base to Explore Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonhgua; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Combination of microwave radiometer (MWR) and mutlifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurement data together with SBDART radiative transfer model to compute cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud droplet effective radius (Reff). Quantify the first aerosol indirect effect using calculated Reff and aerosol extinction from Raman lidar measurement in urban coastal region. Illustrate comparison between ground-based and satellite retrievals. Demonstrate relationship between surface aerosol (PM2.5) loading and Reff. We also explain the sensitivity of aerosol-cloud-index (ACI) depend on the aerosol layer from cloud base height. Potential used of less noisy elastic backscattering to calculate the ACI instead of using Raman extinction. We also present comparison of elastic backscattering and Raman extinction correlation to Reff.

  1. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions and the Role of Clouds in Modifying Atmospheric Composition during INTEX-NA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Chen, G.; Barrick, J. D.; Winstead, E. L.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Vay, S. A.; McNaughton, C.; Clarke, A. D.; Dibb, J. E.

    2005-12-01

    During the summer 2004 INTEX-NA mission, extensive measurements of atmospheric composition were recorded aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft as it flew sampling missions within the North American tropospheric airshed. Clouds were often encountered along the flight paths, as wet convection was quite active throughout the study area. To examine the impact of these clouds upon trace gas distributions and chemistry as well as to search for links between aerosols and cloud properties (indirect effects), particle size distribution data recorded aboard the DC-8 were used to derive a number of important cloud microphysical parameters including cloud water content, extinction, effective radius, and particle mean volume and number diameters. We have also analyzed UV-Dial aerosol profiles to calculate cirrus cloud frequency, optical depth, wavelength dependencies, and depolarization ratios. Results of the study indicate that the aircraft flew within clouds somewhere between 5 and 10% of the time at most flight levels. The largest cloud particles, highest cloud water concentrations, and greatest average extinctions were found at temperatures between -20 and 0 C. Most of the cumulus clouds sampled during the mission contained low liquid water contents (< 0.2 g/m3), had relatively small particles (< 20 um), and exhibited small values of light extinction. Many cloud penetrations occurred at the top of the planetary boundary layer, where convective overshoot had produced high levels of water vapor saturation. Assuming these clouds grew in parcels that contained roughly the same aerosol particle concentrations as the air just below cloud base, we investigated the relationship between submicron particle densities and cloud microphysical properties and found that there were significant differences in median cloud extinction, effective radius, volume mean diameter, and total particle concentrations between the "clean", low aerosol and "polluted", high aerosol cases. Thin cirrus clouds were

  2. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  3. Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Marine Open- and Closed-Cell Stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Feingold, G.

    2008-12-01

    Satellite imagery shows the recurrence of striking images of cellular structures exhibiting both closed- and open-cell patterns in marine stratocumulus fields. The open-cell region has much lower cloud albedo than closed cells. Aside from that, previous observational and modeling studies have suggested that open- and closed-cell regions are different in many other aspects, such as concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud droplet number and size, precipitation efficiency, and cloud dynamics. In this work, aerosol- cloud interactions and dynamical feedbacks are investigated within a large eddy simulation (LES) modeling framework to study the activation, cloud scavenging, mixing and transport of CCN in the open- and closed- cell boundary layer and near the open/closed-cell boundaries. The model domain size of 120 km by 60 km is large enough to represent mesoscale organizations that are associated with different cellular structures and that are promoted by CCN perturbation from ship emissions. Simulation results show that depletion of CCN by collision and coalescence in clouds is critical to the formation of precipitation and open-cell structure in a stratocumulus deck. Once the open cellular structure has formed in the clean environment, a substantial increase of CCN transported from a neighboring polluted environment or from ship emissions do not close it during the 12-hour simulation due to the lack of dynamical and moisture support in the open-cell cloud-free region. However, the contaminated open cells are not able to self-sustain as a result of shutoff of precipitation. This points to the critical role of precipitation-triggered circulations in maintaining an open-cellular structure.

  4. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  5. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  6. Studies of ice nuclei at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike

    2013-04-01

    Ice containing clouds permanently cover 40% of the earth's surface. Ice formation processes have a large impact on the formation of precipitation, cloud radiative properties, cloud electrification and hence influence both, weather and climate. Our understanding of the physical and chemical processes underlying ice formation is limited. However what we know is that the two main pathways of atmospheric ice formation are homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. The latter involves aerosol particles that act as ice nuclei inducing cloud droplet freezing at temperatures significantly above the homogeneous freezing threshold temperature. Particles acting as IN are e.g. dust particles, but also biological particles like bacteria, pollen and fungal spores. Different heterogeneous freezing mechanisms do exit, with their relative importance for atmospheric clouds still being debated. However, there are strong indications that immersion freezing is the most important mechanism when considering mixed phase clouds. What we are still lacking is a) the fundamental process understanding on how aerosol particles induce ice nucleation and b) means to quantify ice nucleation in atmospheric models. Concerning a) there most likely is not only one answer, considering the variety of IN found in the atmosphere. With respect to b) different approaches based on either the stochastic or singular hypotheses have been suggested. However it is still being debated which would be a suitable way to parameterize laboratory data for use in atmospheric modeling. In this presentation, both topics will be addressed. Using the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) (Hartmann et al., 2011), we examined different types of dust particles with and without coating, and biological particles such as bacteria and pollen, with respect to their immersion freezing behaviour. We will summarize our findings concerning the properties controlling the ice nucleation behaviour of these particles and

  7. Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan

    2010-10-19

    Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the "solar-background" mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM's zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS's 1 Hz sampling to study the "twilight zone" around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM's 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM's operational data processing.

  8. A new laboratory facility to study gas-aerosol-cloud interactions in a turbulent environment: The Π Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Bench, Jim; Shaw, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    A detailed understanding of interactions of aerosols, cloud droplets/ice crystals, and trace gases within the turbulent atmosphere is of prime importance for an accurate understanding of Earth's climate system. But despite extensive research activity during the last decades these interactions are still poorly understood and ill quantified. For example: Every cloud droplet in Earth's atmosphere (~1025) was catalyzed by a preexisting aerosol particle. While every cloud droplet began as an aerosol particle, not every aerosol particle becomes a cloud droplet. The particle to droplet transformation, known as activation, requires that the particle be exposed to some critical concentration of water vapor, which differs for different combinations of particle size and chemical composition. Similarly, the formation of ice particles in the atmosphere is often catalyzed by aerosol particles, either activated or not. Even in the simplest scenarios it is challenging to gain a full understanding of the aerosol activation and ice nucleation processes, but at least two other factors contribute greatly to the complexity observed in the atmosphere. First, aerosols and cloud particles are not static entities, but are continuously interacting with their chemical environment, and therefore changing in their properties. Second, clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, and therefore thermodynamic and compositional variables, such as water vapor or trace gas concentration, fluctuate in space and time. Indeed, the coupling between turbulence and microphysical processes is recognized as one of the major research challenges in cloud physics today. We have developed a multiphase, turbulent reaction chamber - called the Π Chamber because of the internal volume of 3.14 m3 (with cylindical wall installed) - designed to address the open issues outlined above. It is capable of pressures ranging from sea level to ~60 mbar, and can sustain temperatures of +55 to -55

  9. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

    2011-05-24

    We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: • Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. • Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. • Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

  10. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine

    2014-04-10

    This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

  11. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  12. Final Report for LDRD Project ''A New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL''

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Bergman, D J; Dignon, J E; Connell, P S

    2002-01-31

    of aerosol/cloud interactions on climate forcing [Chuang and Penner, 1995]. Our research has been recognized as one of a few studies attempting to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate in the IPCC Third Assessment Report [IPCC, 2001]. Our previous assessments of aerosol climate effects were based on a general circulation model (NCAR CCM1) fully coupled to a global tropospheric chemistry model (GRANTOUR). Both models, however, were developed more than a decade ago. The lack of advanced physics representation and techniques in our current models limits us from further exploring the interrelationship between aerosol, cloud, and climate variation. Our objective is to move to a new era of aerosol/cloud/climate modeling at LLNL by coupling the most advanced chemistry and climate models and by incorporating an aerosol microphysics module. This modeling capability will enable us to identify and analyze the responsible processes in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions and therefore, to improve the level of scientific understanding for aerosol climate effects. This state-of-the-art coupled models will also be used to address the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural emissions in the spatial pattern of aerosol climate forcing in order to assess the potential of human induced climate change.

  13. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog in East Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing: 2012 DRAGON Campaigns and Climatological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Lynch, P.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Arola, A. T.; Munchak, L. A.; O'Neill, N. T.; Lyapustin, A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Govindaraju, R.; Hyer, E. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. Major Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) field campaigns involving multiple AERONET sites in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AODf) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from Dark Target, Deep Blue and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Underestimation of fine mode AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) and by the NASA Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis For Research And Applications Aerosol Re-analysis (MERRAaero) models at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (Level 2 data). Additionally, multi-year monitoring at several AERONET sites are examined for climatological statistics of cloud screening of fine mode aerosol events. Aerosol that has been affected by clouds or the near-cloud environment may be more prevalent than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in

  14. Aerosol-Radiation-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Future Suborbital Activities to Address Knowledge Gaps in Satellite and Model Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Piketh, S.; Formenti, P.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Shinozuka, Y.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Schmidt, S.; Flynn, C.; Schmid, B.; Luna, B.; Abel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The SE Atlantic stratocumulus deck interacts with the dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and may mix into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects, and their global representation in climate models remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. Our understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions in the SE Atlantic is hindered both by the lack of knowledge on aerosol and cloud properties, as well as the lack of knowledge about detailed physical processes involved. Most notably, we are missing knowledge on the absorptive and cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, including their vertical distribution relative to clouds, on the locations and degree of aerosol mixing into clouds, on the processes that govern cloud property adjustments, and on the importance of aerosol effects on clouds relative to co-varying synoptic scale meteorology. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling. Recent efforts to make full use of A-Train aerosol sensor synergies will be highlighted. We describe planned field campaigns in the region to address the existing knowledge gaps. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the five synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing some of the key aerosol and cloud properties and a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: NASA

  15. multi-dimensional Cloud-aERosol Exploratory Study using RPAS (mCERES): Bottom-up and top-down closure of aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Greg; Calmer, Radiance; Sanchez, Kevin; Cayez, Grégoire; Nicoll, Kerianne; Hashimshoni, Eyal; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ansmann, Albert; Sciare, Jean; Ovadneite, Jurgita; Bronz, Murat; Hattenberger, Gautier; Preissler, Jana; Buehl, Johannes; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Clouds are omnipresent in earth's atmosphere and constitute an important role in regulating the radiative budget of the planet. However, the response of clouds to climate change remains uncertain, in particular, with respect to aerosol-cloud interactions and feedback mechanisms between the biosphere and atmosphere. Aerosol-cloud interactions and their feedbacks are the main themes of the European project FP7 BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic Emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic Understanding). The National Center for Meteorological Research (CNRM-GAME, Toulouse, France) conducted airborne experiments in Cyprus and Ireland in March and August 2015 respectively to link ground-based and satellite observations. Multiple RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft systems) were instrumented for a specific scientific focus to characterize the vertical distribution of aerosol, cloud microphysical properties, radiative fluxes, 3D wind vectors and meteorological state parameters. Flights below and within clouds were coordinated with satellite overpasses to perform 'top-down' closure of cloud micro-physical properties. Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei spectra at the ground-based site have been used to determine cloud microphyical properties using wind vectors and meteorological parameters measured by the RPAS at cloud base. These derived cloud properties have been validated by in-situ RPAS measurements in the cloud and compared to those derived by the Suomi-NPP satellite. In addition, RPAS profiles in Cyprus observed the layers of dust originating from the Arabian Peninsula and the Sahara Desert. These profiles generally show a well-mixed boundary layer and compare well with ground-based LIDAR observations.

  16. Role of Clouds, Aerosols, and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction in 20th Century Simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Rind, David; Bauer, Susanne; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    The key uncertainties in the climate sensitivity to the increasing greenhouse gases lie in the behavior and impact of short-lived species, such as tropospheric aerosols and ozone, and secondly, in the response and impact of the ocean circulation.

  17. Possible interaction of meteor explosion with stratospheric aerosols on cloud nucleation based on 2011 observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, M.-A.; Vaillant, M.; Benoit, R.

    2012-04-01

    stratosphere aerosols is suggested to resulting from the energy released by the meteor explosion. A direct link between the meteor explosion and the subsequent hailstones and heavy precipitation is clearly established by their similar range of composite debris. The meteor explosion is suggested to have initiated phase transformation of the stratospheric aerosols and their agglutination by complex mechanisms that remain to be further elucidated. The agglutinated particles with carbonaceous components have probably initiated condensation processes thus resulting into cloud formation. This was accomplished within a few days as shown by the time lag between the initial meteor explosion and the following precipitation events. The occurrence of the later across approximately the same region as the one of the debris pulverization from the meteor explosion suggests that the trajectory of the meteor would strongly constrain the agglutination processes. This data reveals the occurrence of solid aerosols with carbonaceous components in the stratosphere, most probably loaded by former volcanic events. In the case of serial meteor explosion the agglutination processes could significantly increase the agglutination process of stratospheric aerosols with resulting cloud formation and thus change of radiative forcing. Further research should reveal the role of meteor explosion on climate through cloud-aerosol precipitation interactions.

  18. The DACCIWA Project: Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Massive economic and population growth and urbanisation are expected to lead to a tripling of anthropogenic emissions from southern West Africa (SWA) between 2000 and 2030, the impacts of which on human health, ecosystems, food security and the regional climate are largely unknown. An assessment of these impacts is complicated by (a) a superposition with effects of global climate change, (b) the strong dependence of SWA on the sensitive West African monsoon, (c) incomplete scientific understanding of interactions between emissions, clouds, radiation, precipitation and regional circulations and (d) by a lack of observations to advance our understanding and improve predictions. The purpose of this contribution is to introduce the research consortium DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud interactions in West Africa), which comprises 16 partners in six European and West African countries. The interdisciplinary DACCIWA team will build on the scientific and logistical foundations established by the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project and collaborate closely with operational centres. DACCIWA will receive funding of about M8.75€ from the European Commission as part of Framework Programme 7 from 2015 until 2018. The DACCIWA project will conduct extensive fieldwork in SWA to collect high-quality observations, spanning the entire process chain from surface-based natural and anthropogenic emissions to impacts on health, ecosystems and climate. This will include a major field campaign in summer 2015 with three research aircrafts and two ground-based supersites. Combining the resulting benchmark dataset with a wide range of modelling activities will allow us: (a) to assess all relevant physical and chemical processes, (b) to improve the monitoring of climate and compositional parameters from space, (c) to determine health impacts from air pollution, and (d) to develop the next generation of weather and climate models capable of representing coupled

  19. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Determined by Both in Situ and Satellite Data Over a Northern High-Latitude Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Remer, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    The first aerosol indirect effect over a clean, northern high-latitude site was investigated by determining the aerosol cloud interaction (ACI) using three different approaches; ground-based in situ measurements, combined ground-based in situ measurements 5 and satellite retrievals and using only satellite retrievals. The obtained values of ACI were highest for in situ ground-based data, clearly lower for combined ground-based and satellite data, and lowest for data relying solely on satellite retrievals. One of the key findings of this study was the high sensitivity of ACI to the definition of the aerosol burden. We showed that at least a part of the variability in ACI can be explained by 10 how different investigators have related dierent cloud properties to "aerosol burden".

  20. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns in Asia from AERONET and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Reid, Jeffrey; Lynch, Peng; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, George; Lyapustin, Alexei; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Siniuk, Alexander; Smirnov, Alexander; Wang, Pucai; Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea during Spring of 2012 have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) signal from AERONET data for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors (from both dark target and MAIAC algorithms) were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. Cloud properties retrieved from MODIS are also investigated in relation to the AERONET and satellite measurements of AOD. Underestimation of AOD by the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) model at very high AOD at sites in China and Korea was observed, especially for observations that are cloud screened by AERONET (L2 data). Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in Korea resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud

  1. Analysis of the Interaction and Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during Dragon Campaigns from Aeronet and Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Schafer, J.; Giles, D. M.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sano, I.; Lynch, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Crawford, J. H.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Trevino, N.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Satellite retrievals of AOD from MODIS sensors were also investigated to assess the issue of detectability of high AOD events associated with high cloud fraction. AERONET is updating the cloud-screening algorithm applied to AOD data in the upcoming Version 3 database. Comparisons of cloud screening from Versions 2 and 3 of cases with high AOD associated with clouds will be studied. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET

  2. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  3. Interactions of mineral dust with pollution and clouds: An individual-particle TEM study of atmospheric aerosol from Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Axisa, Duncan; Tompa, Éva; Freney, Evelyn; Bruintjes, Roelof; Buseck, Peter R.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosol particles from desert dust interact with clouds and influence climate on regional and global scales. The Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) aerosol campaign was initiated to study the effects of dust particles on cloud droplet nucleation and cloud properties. Here we report the results of individual-particle studies of samples that were collected from an aircraft in April 2007. We used analytical transmission electron microscopy, including energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, electron diffraction, and imaging techniques for the morphological, chemical, and structural characterization of the particles. Dust storms and regional background conditions were encountered during four days of sampling. Under dusty conditions, the coarse (supermicrometer) fraction resembles freshly crushed rock. The particles are almost exclusively mineral dust grains and include common rock-forming minerals, among which clay minerals, particularly smectites, are most abundant. Unaltered calcite grains also occur, indicating no significant atmospheric processing. The particles have no visible coatings but some contain traces of sulfur. The fine (submicrometer) fraction is dominated by particles of anthropogenic origin, primarily ammonium sulfate (with variable organic coating and some with soot inclusions) and combustion-derived particles (mostly soot). In addition, submicrometer, iron-bearing clay particles also occur, many of which are internally mixed with ammonium sulfate, soot, or both. We studied the relationships between the properties of the aerosol and the droplet microphysics of cumulus clouds that formed above the aerosol layer. Under dusty conditions, when a large concentration of coarse-fraction mineral particles was in the aerosol, cloud drop concentrations were lower and droplet diameters larger than under regional background conditions, when the aerosol was dominated by submicrometer sulfate particles.

  4. Constraining the aerosol influence on cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, E.; Quaas, J.; Bellouin, N.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have the potential to modify many different cloud properties. There is significant uncertainty in the strength of these aerosol-cloud interactions in analyses of observational data, partly due to the difficulty in separating aerosol effects on clouds from correlations generated by local meteorology. The relationship between aerosol and cloud fraction (CF) is particularly important to determine, due to the strong correlation of CF to other cloud properties and its large impact on radiation. It has also been one of the hardest to quantify from satellites due to the strong meteorological covariations involved. This work presents a new method to analyze the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and CF. By including information about the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), the impact of the meteorological covariations is significantly reduced. This method shows that much of the AOD-CF correlation is explained by relationships other than that mediated by CDNC. By accounting for these, the strength of the global mean AOD-CF relationship is reduced by around 80%. This suggests that the majority of the AOD-CF relationship is due to meteorological covariations, especially in the shallow cumulus regime. Requiring CDNC to mediate the AOD-CF relationship implies an effective anthropogenic radiative forcing from an aerosol influence on liquid CF of -0.48 W m-2 (-0.1 to -0.64 W m-2), although some uncertainty remains due to possible biases in the CDNC retrievals in broken cloud scenes.

  5. Aerosols-cloud-climate -interactions in the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). Importance of biogenic particles for cloud properties and anthropogenic indirect effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seland, Ø.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevâg, A.

    2012-04-01

    According to the 4th assessment report of IPCC, major sources of uncertainty in anthropogenic climate change projections are inaccurate model description and weak knowledge of aerosols and their interactions with radiation and clouds, as well as the cloud feedback to radiative forcing. One important aspect of the associated uncertainty is the natural atmosphere. Anthropogenic climate change is an increment caused by anthropogenic emissions relative to the properties of the climate system untouched by man. This is crucial for the direct and indirect effects of aerosols, since the amount, size and physical properties of natural background particles strongly influence the same properties of the anthropogenic aerosol components. In many climate models where CDNC is calculated explicitly, CDNC is constrained by prescribing a lower bound below which calculated values are not allowed. This is done in order to keep the aerosol in-direct effect within estimated values. The rationale for using such a lower bound is to keep the aerosol radiative forcing constrained by the forcing of green-house gases and 20th century climate.We hypothesize this lower bound can be removed or made less strict by including aerosols of biogenic origin. We will present results and sensitivity studies from simulations with the NorESM where we have added contributions from organic carbon of natural origin both from vegetation and oceanic sources. By including aerosols of biogenic origin we obtain close to the median indirect radiative forcing reported by IPCC AR4, as well as reproducing the temperature increase in the 20th century. NorESM is based on the Earth system model CCSM4.0 from NCAR, but is using CAM4-Oslo instead of CAM4 as atmosphere model and an updated version of MICOM from the Bergen Climate Model (BCM) instead of the ocean model POP2. The aerosol module includes sea-salt, dust, sulphate, black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (OM). Primary aerosol size-distributions are

  6. A Process-Modeling Study of Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in Response to Controlled Seawater Spray in Marine Boundary Layer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Rasch, P. J.; Feingold, G.

    2010-12-01

    Vast areas of the oceanic surface are covered by stratocumulus (Sc) clouds. They significantly enhance the reflection of incoming solar radiation back to space, leading to a considerable cooling of the Earth-atmosphere system. It has been argued that a 4% increase in the areal coverage or a 0.06 increase in cloud albedo of Sc clouds can offset the warming by atmospheric CO2 doubling (Randall et al. 1984; Latham et al. 2008). Acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol particles can modify cloud albedo, cloud longevity and precipitation efficiency. Recent observational and modeling studies have suggested that aerosol, through its effect on precipitation, can alter cloud cellular structures in marine Sc region, representing a powerful modification of clouds by aerosol. The possibility of mitigating global warming by spraying sea-salt particles into marine boundary layer to brighten Sc clouds was raised by Latham (1990). The idea has been evaluated by several global climate model studies but their inability to represent cloud-scale dynamics and microphysics raises questions about the validity of the results. Using a high-resolution version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we investigate the impact of seawater spray on the formation and evolution of marine Sc through aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions and dynamical feedback. We will demonstrate how injected aerosol particles are transported from the ocean surface into clouds and affect cloud microphysics and macrophysics under various meteorological conditions. We will also use simulation results to explore whether the influx of sea-salt aerosols always enhances cloud albedo and how the performance depends on the distribution of sprayers.

  7. Investigation of warm-cloud microphysics using a multi-component cloud model: Interactive effects of the aerosol spectrum. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zahn, S.G.

    1993-12-01

    Clouds, especially low, warm, boundary-layer clouds, play an important role in regulating the earth's climate due to their significant contribution to the global albedo. The radiative effects of individual clouds are controlled largely by cloud microstructure, which is itself sensitive to the concentration and spectral distribution of the atmospheric aerosol. Increases in aerosol particle concentrations from anthropogenic activity could result in increased cloud albedo and global cloudiness, increasing the amount of reflected solar radiation. However, the effects of increased aerosol particle concentrations could be offset by the presence of giant or ultragiant aerosol particles. A one-dimensional, multi-component microphysical cloud model has been used to demonstrate the effects of aerosol particle spectral variations on the microstructure of warm clouds. Simulations performed with this model demonstrate that the introduction of increased concentrations of giant aerosol particles has a destabilizing effect on the cloud microstructure. Also, it is shown that warm-cloud microphysical processes modify the aerosol particle spectrum, favoring the generation of the largest sized particles via the collision-coalescence process. These simulations provide further evidence that the effect of aerosol particles on cloud microstructure must be addressed when considering global climate forecasts.

  8. Airborne investigation of the aerosols-cloud interactions in the vicinity and within a marine stratocumulus over the North Sea during EUCAARI (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, S.; Weigel, R.; Sellegri, K.; Roberts, G.; Gomes, L.; Stohl, A.; Laj, P.; Momboisse, G.; Bourianne, T.; Puygrenier, V.; Burnet, F.; Chosson, F.; Brenguier, J. L.; Etcheberry, J. M.; Villani, P.; Pichon, J. M.; Schwarzenboeck, A.

    2013-12-01

    Within the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) project, the Meteo France research aircraft ATR-42 was operated from Rotterdam (Netherlands) airport during May 2008, to perform scientific flights dedicated to the investigation of aerosol-cloud interactions. The objective of this study is to illustrate the impact of cloud processing on the aerosol particle physical and chemical properties. The presented results are retrieved from measurements during flight operation with two consecutive flights, first from Rotterdam to Newcastle (United Kingdom) and subsequently reverse along the same waypoints back to Rotterdam using data measured with compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Cloud-related measurements during these flights were performed over the North Sea within as well as in close vicinity of a marine stratocumulus cloud layer. Particle physical and chemical properties observed in the close vicinity, below and above the stratocumulus cloud, show strong differences: (1) the averaged aerosol size distributions, observed above and below the cloud layer, are of bimodal character with pronounced minima between Aitken and accumulation mode, very likely due to cloud processing. (2) the chemical composition of aerosol particles is strongly dependent on the position relative to the cloud layer (vicinity or below/above cloud). In general, the nitrate and organic relative mass fractions decrease with decreasing distance to the cloud, in the transit from cloud-free conditions towards the cloud boundaries. This relative mass fraction decrease ranges from a factor of three to ten, thus leading to an increase of the sulfate and ammonium relative mass concentrations while approaching the cloud layer. (3), the chemical composition of cloud droplet residuals, analyzed downstream of a Counterflow virtual Impactor (CVI) inlet indicates increased fractions of mainly soluble chemical

  9. A New Approach to Modeling Aerosol Effects on East Asian Climate: Parametric Uncertainties Associated with Emissions, Cloud Microphysics and their Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Yang, Ben; Liu, Xiaohong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-16

    In this study, we adopt a parametric sensitivity analysis framework that integrates the quasi-Monte Carlo parameter sampling approach and a surrogate model to examine aerosol effects on the East Asian Monsoon climate simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). A total number of 256 CAM5 simulations are conducted to quantify the model responses to the uncertain parameters associated with cloud microphysics parameterizations and aerosol (e.g., sulfate, black carbon (BC), and dust) emission factors and their interactions. Results show that the interaction terms among parameters are important for quantifying the sensitivity of fields of interest, especially precipitation, to the parameters. The relative importance of cloud-microphysics parameters and emission factors (strength) depends on evaluation metrics or the model fields we focused on, and the presence of uncertainty in cloud microphysics imposes an additional challenge in quantifying the impact of aerosols on cloud and climate. Due to their different optical and microphysical properties and spatial distributions, sulfate, BC, and dust aerosols have very different impacts on East Asian Monsoon through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. The climatic effects of aerosol do not always have a monotonic response to the change of emission factors. The spatial patterns of both sign and magnitude of aerosol-induced changes in radiative fluxes, cloud, and precipitation could be different, depending on the aerosol types, when parameters are sampled in different ranges of values. We also identify the different cloud microphysical parameters that show the most significant impact on climatic effect induced by sulfate, BC and dust, respectively, in East Asia.

  10. How does increasing horizontal resolution in a global climate model improve the simulation of aerosol-cloud interactions?

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Po -Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Wang, Hailong; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Gustafson, Jr., William I.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yuying; Ma, Hsi -Yen

    2015-06-28

    The Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 is run at horizontal grid spacing of 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 degrees, with the meteorology nudged towards the Year Of Tropical Convection analysis, and cloud simulators and the collocated A-Train satellite observations are used to explore the resolution dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions. The higher-resolution model produces results that agree better with observations, showing an increase of susceptibility of cloud droplet size, indicating a stronger first aerosol indirect forcing (AIF), and a decrease of susceptibility of precipitation probability, suggesting a weaker second AIF. The resolution sensitivities of AIF are attributed to those of droplet nucleation and precipitation parameterizations. The annual average AIF in the northern hemisphere mid-latitudes (where most anthropogenic emissions occur) in the 0.25° model is reduced by about 1 W m⁻² (-30%) compared to the 2° model, leading to a 0.26 W m⁻² reduction (-15%) in the global annual average AIF.

  11. Ground-based observations of aerosol-cloud interactions in the North East of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Joseph, E.; Min, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Five years ground-based observations (2006 to 2010) of aerosol and cloud properties derived from passive radiometric sensors deployed at an atmospheric measurement field station in the Baltimore-Washington corridor operated by Howard University were used to examine aerosol indirect effect on cloud optical depth (COD), liquid water path (LWP), cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud droplet number concentration (Nd). A higher frequency of clouds with small Re (<7µm) was found during summer of 2006 and 2007 along with higher frequency of abundant aerosol loading (AOD>0.5). The five-year data are screened for summer boundary layer clouds only and are separated into clean and polluted cases based on aerosol particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter≤2.5µm (PM2.5) value. Evidence of aerosol indirect effect on cloud microphysics is found where for the polluted cases the mean (and median) values of Nd distributions were elevated while the mean (and median) values of Re were decreased as compared to those for the clean cases under various LWP ranges. Relatively, the aerosol indirect effects on modifying cloud microphysical properties are found more significant with large LWP than with small LWP.

  12. Dust Aerosol Impact on North Africa Climate: A GCM Investigation of Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Using A-Train Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, Jonathan; Su, Hui; Liu, Xiaohong

    2012-02-15

    The climatic effects of dust aerosols in North Africa have been investigated using the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The model includes an efficient and physically based radiation parameterization scheme developed specifically for application to clouds and aerosols. Parameterization of the effective ice particle size in association with the aerosol indirect effect based on cloud and aerosol data retrieved from A-Train satellite observations have been employed in the climate model simulations. Offline simulations reveal that the direct solar, IR, and net forcings by dust aerosols generally increase with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the dust semi-direct effect is included with the presence of ice clouds, positive IR radiative forcing is enhanced, since ice clouds trap substantial IR radiation, while the positive solar forcing with dust aerosols alone has been changed to negative values due to the strong reflection of solar radiation by clouds, indicating that cloud forcing could exceed aerosol forcing. With the aerosol indirect effect, the net cloud forcing is generally reduced for ice water path (IWP) larger than 20 g m-2. The magnitude of the reduction increases with IWP. AGCM simulations show that the reduced ice crystal mean effective size due to the aerosol first indirect effect result in less OLR and net solar flux at the top of the atmosphere over the cloudy area of the North Africa region because ice clouds with smaller size trap more IR radiation and reflect more solar radiation. The precipitation in the same area, however, increases due to the aerosol indirect effect on ice clouds, corresponding to the enhanced convection as indicated by reduced OLR. The increased precipitation seems to be associated with enhanced ice water contents in this region. The 200 mb radiative heating rate shows more cooling with the aerosol indirect effect since greater cooling is

  13. Real-case simulations of aerosol-cloud interactions in ship tracks over the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possner, A.; Zubler, E.; Lohmann, U.; Schär, C.

    2015-02-01

    Ship tracks provide an ideal test bed for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs) and for evaluating their representation in model parameterisations. Regional modelling can be of particular use for this task, as this approach provides sufficient resolution to resolve the structure of the produced track including their meteorological environment whilst relying on the same formulations of parameterisations as many general circulation models. In this work we simulate a particular case of ship tracks embedded in an optically thin stratus cloud sheet which was observed by a polar orbiting satellite at 12:00 UTC on 26 January 2003 around the Bay of Biscay. The simulations, which include moving ship emissions, show that the model is indeed able to capture the structure of the track at a horizontal grid spacing of 2 km and to qualitatively capture the observed cloud response in all simulations performed. At least a doubling of the cloud optical thickness was simulated in all simulations together with an increase in cloud droplet number concentration by about 40 cm-3 (300%) and decrease in effective radius by about 5 μm (40%). Furthermore, the ship emissions lead to an increase in liquid water path in at least 25% of the track regions. We are confident in the model's ability to capture key processes of ship track formation. However, it was found that realistic ship emissions lead to unrealistic aerosol perturbations near the source regions within the simulated tracks due to grid-scale dilution and homogeneity. Combining the regional-modelling approach with comprehensive field studies could likely improve our understanding of the sensitivities and biases in ACI parameterisations, and could therefore help to constrain global ACI estimates, which strongly rely on these parameterisations.

  14. Decadal simulation and comprehensive evaluation of CESM/CAM5.1 with advanced chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Zhang, Yang; Glotfelty, Tim; He, Ruoying; Bennartz, Ralf; Rausch, John; Sartelet, Karine

    2015-03-01

    Earth system models have been used for climate predictions in recent years due to their capabilities to include biogeochemical cycles, human impacts, as well as coupled and interactive representations of Earth system components (e.g., atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice). In this work, the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with advanced chemistry and aerosol treatments, referred to as CESM-NCSU, is applied for decadal (2001-2010) global climate predictions. A comprehensive evaluation is performed focusing on the atmospheric component—the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) by comparing simulation results with observations/reanalysis data and CESM ensemble simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The improved model can predict most meteorological and radiative variables relatively well with normalized mean biases (NMBs) of -14.1 to -9.7% and 0.7-10.8%, respectively, although temperature at 2 m (T2) is slightly underpredicted. Cloud variables such as cloud fraction (CF) and precipitating water vapor (PWV) are well predicted, with NMBs of -10.5 to 0.4%, whereas cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud optical thickness (COT) are moderately-to-largely underpredicted, with NMBs of -82.2 to -31.2%, and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is overpredictd by 26.7%. These biases indicate the limitations and uncertainties associated with cloud microphysics (e.g., resolved clouds and subgrid-scale cumulus clouds). Chemical concentrations over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (e.g., SO42-, Cl-, OC, and PM2.5) are reasonably well predicted with NMBs of -12.8 to -1.18%. Concentrations of SO2, SO42-, and PM10 are also reasonably well predicted over Europe with NMBs of -20.8 to -5.2%, so are predictions of SO2 concentrations over the East Asia with an NMB of -18.2%, and the tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) over the globe with an NMB of -3.5%. Most meteorological and radiative variables

  15. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Knowledge Gaps, Planned Observations to Address Them, and Implications for Global Climate Change Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Luna, B.; Abel, S.

    2015-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles, yet the fate of these particles and their influence on regional and global climate is poorly understood. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical Stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The stratocumulus "climate radiators" are critical to the regional and global climate system. They interact with dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and are mixed into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects. As emphasized in the latest IPCC report, the global representation of these aerosol-cloud interaction processes in climate models is one of the largest uncertainty in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling, and describe planned field campaigns in the region. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the following four synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: 1) ORACLES (Observations of Aerosols above Clouds and their interactions), a five-year investigation between 2015 and 2019 with three Intensive Observation Periods (IOP), recently funded by the NASA Earth-Venture Suborbital Program, 2) CLARIFY-2016 (Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Interactions and Forcing: Year 2016), a comprehensive observational and modeling programme funded by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and supported by the UK Met Office. 3) LASIC (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds), a funded

  16. Aerosol-cloud interactions in the South-East Atlantic: knowledge gaps, planned observations to address them, and implications for global climate change modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, Robert; Zuidema, Paquita; Haywood, James; Luna, Bernadette; Abel, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles, yet the fate of these particles and their influence on regional and global climate is poorly understood. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical Stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The stratocumulus "climate radiators" are critical to the regional and global climate system. They interact with dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and are mixed into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects. As emphasized in the latest IPCC report, the global representation of these aerosol-cloud interaction processes in climate models is one of the largest uncertainty in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling, and describe planned field campaigns in the region. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the following four synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: 1) ORACLES (ObseRvations of Aerosols above CLouds and their intEractionS), a five-year investigation between 2015 and 2019 with three Intensive Observation Periods (IOP), recently funded by the NASA Earth-Venture Suborbital Program, 2) CLARIFY-2016 (CLoud-Aerosol-Radiation Interactions and Forcing: Year 2016), a comprehensive observational and modeling programme funded by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and supported by the UK Met Office. 3) LASIC (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds), a funded

  17. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  18. Cloud Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 258.8 East (101.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration

  19. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    technique. A review of developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard wlll be is presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  20. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    nesting technique. A review of developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard will be presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  1. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard will be presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  2. Radar Reflectivity Simulated by a 2-D Spectra Bin Model: Sensitivity of Cloud-aerosol Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Kiaowen; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, Alexander; Simpson, Joanne; Johnson, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model with bin spectra microphysics is used to simulate mesoscale convective systems.The model uses explicit bins to represent size spectra of cloud nuclei, water drops, ice crystals, snow and graupel. Each hydrometeorite category is described by 33 mass bins. The simulations provide a unique data set of simulated raindrop size distribution in a realistic dynamic frame. Calculations of radar parameters using simulated drop size distribution serve as an evaluation of numerical model performance. In addition, the GCE bin spectra modes is a very useful tool to study uncertainties related to radar observations; all the environmental parameters are precisely known. In this presentation, we concentrate on the discussion of Z-R (ZDR-R) relation in the simulated systems. Due to computational limitations, the spectra bin model has been run in two dimensions with 31 stretched vertical layers and 1026 horizontal grid points (1 km resolution). Two different cases, one in midlatitude continent, the other in tropical ocean, have been simulated. The continental case is a strong convection which lasted for two hours. The oceanic case is a persistent system with more than 10 hours' life span. It is shown that the simulated Z-R (ZDR-R) relations generally agree with observations using radar and rain gauge data. The spatial and temporal variations of Z-R relation in different locations are also analyzed. Impact of aerosols on cloud formation and raindrop size distribution was studied. Both clean (low CCN) and dirty (high CCN) cases are simulated. The Z-R relation is shown to vary considerable in the initial CCN concentrations.

  3. Changes in future air quality, deposition, and aerosol-cloud interactions under future climate and emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotfelty, Timothy; Zhang, Yang; Karamchandani, Prakash; Streets, David G.

    2016-08-01

    The prospect of global climate change will have wide scale impacts, such as ecological stress and human health hazards. One aspect of concern is future changes in air quality that will result from changes in both meteorological forcing and air pollutant emissions. In this study, the GU-WRF/Chem model is employed to simulate the impact of changing climate and emissions following the IPCC AR4 SRES A1B scenario. An average of 4 future years (2020, 2030, 2040, and 2050) is compared against an average of 2 current years (2001 and 2010). Under this scenario, by the Mid-21st century global air quality is projected to degrade with a global average increase of 2.5 ppb in the maximum 8-hr O3 level and of 0.3 μg m-3 in 24-hr average PM2.5. However, PM2.5 changes are more regional due to regional variations in primary aerosol emissions and emissions of gaseous precursor for secondary PM2.5. Increasing NOx emissions in this scenario combines with a wetter climate elevating levels of OH, HO2, H2O2, and the nitrate radical and increasing the atmosphere's near surface oxidation state. This differs from findings under the RCP scenarios that experience declines in OH from reduced NOx emissions, stratospheric recovery of O3, and increases in CH4 and VOCs. Increasing NOx and O3 levels enhances the nitrogen and O3 deposition, indicating potentially enhanced crop damage and ecosystem stress under this scenario. The enhanced global aerosol level results in enhancements in aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud optical thickness. This leads to dimming at the Earth's surface with a global average reduction in shortwave radiation of 1.2 W m-2. This enhanced dimming leads to a more moderate warming trend and different trends in radiation than those found in NCAR's CCSM simulation, which does not include the advanced chemistry and aerosol treatment of GU-WRF/Chem and cannot simulate the impacts of changing climate and emissions with the same level of detailed

  4. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  5. Toward a New Era of Research in Aerosol/Cloud/Climate Interactions at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C,; Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Connell, P.; Bergman, D.; Rotman, D.; Wright, D.; McGraw, R.; Schwartz, S.

    2000-09-27

    One of the largest uncertainties in simulations of climate change over the industrial period is the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on the Earth's radiation budget. Much of this uncertainty arises from the limited capability for either precisely linking precursor gases to the formation and size distribution of the aerosols or quantitatively describing the existing levels of global aerosol loading. This project builds on our aerosol and chemistry expertise to address each of these uncertainties in a more quantitative fashion than is currently possible. With the current LDRD support, we are in the process to implement an aerosol microphysics module into our global chemistry model to more fundamentally and completely describe the processes that determine the distribution of atmospheric aerosols. Using this new modeling capability, in conjunction with the most current version of NCAR climate model, we will examine the influence of these processes on aerosol direct and indirect climate forcing.

  6. Observations of fluorescent aerosol-cloud interactions in the free troposphere at the High-Altitude Research Station Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, I.; Lloyd, G.; Herrmann, E.; Hoyle, C. R.; Bower, K. N.; Connolly, P. J.; Flynn, M. J.; Kaye, P. H.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescent nature of aerosol at a high-altitude Alpine site was studied using a wide-band integrated bioaerosol (WIBS-4) single particle multi-channel ultraviolet - light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectrometer. This was supported by comprehensive cloud microphysics and meteorological measurements with the aims of cataloguing concentrations of bio-fluorescent aerosols at this high-altitude site and also investigating possible influences of UV-fluorescent particle types on cloud-aerosol processes. Analysis of background free tropospheric air masses, using a total aerosol inlet, showed there to be a minor increase in the fluorescent aerosol fraction during in-cloud cases compared to out-of-cloud cases. The size dependence of the fluorescent aerosol fraction showed the larger aerosol to be more likely to be fluorescent with 80 % of 10 μm particles being fluorescent. Whilst the fluorescent particles were in the minority (NFl/NAll = 0.27 ± 0.19), a new hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis approach, Crawford et al. (2015) revealed the majority of the fluorescent aerosols were likely to be representative of fluorescent mineral dust. A minor episodic contribution from a cluster likely to be representative of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) was also observed with a wintertime baseline concentration of 0.1 ± 0.4 L-1. Given the low concentration of this cluster and the typically low ice-active fraction of studied PBAP (e.g. pseudomonas syringae), we suggest that the contribution to the observed ice crystal concentration at this location is not significant during the wintertime.

  7. Observations of fluorescent aerosol-cloud interactions in the free troposphere at the Sphinx high Alpine research station, Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, I.; Lloyd, G.; Bower, K. N.; Connolly, P. J.; Flynn, M. J.; Kaye, P. H.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.

    2015-09-01

    The fluorescent nature of aerosol at a high Alpine site was studied using a wide-band integrated bioaerosol (WIBS-4) single particle multi-channel ultra violet-light induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectrometer. This was supported by comprehensive cloud microphysics and meteorological measurements with the aims of cataloguing concentrations of bio-fluorescent aerosols at this high altitude site and also investigating possible influences of UV-fluorescent particle types on cloud-aerosol processes. Analysis of background free tropospheric air masses, using a total aerosol inlet, showed there to be a minor but statistically insignificant increase in the fluorescent aerosol fraction during in-cloud cases compared to out of cloud cases. The size dependence of the fluorescent aerosol fraction showed the larger aerosol to be more likely to be fluorescent with 80 % of 10 μm particles being fluorescent. Whilst the fluorescent particles were in the minority (NFl/NAll = 0.27±0.19), a new hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis approach, Crawford et al. (2015) revealed the majority of the fluorescent aerosol were likely to be representative of fluorescent mineral dust. A minor episodic contribution from a cluster likely to be representative of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) was also observed with a wintertime baseline concentration of 0.1±0.4 L-1. Given the low concentration of this cluster and the typically low ice active fraction of studied PBAP (e.g. pseudomonas syringae) we suggest that the contribution to the observed ice crystal concentration at this location is not significant during the wintertime.

  8. Multi-satellite aerosol observations in the vicinity of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várnai, T.; Marshak, A.; Yang, W.

    2013-04-01

    Improved characterization of aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds is important for better understanding two critical aspects of climate: aerosol-cloud interactions and the direct radiative effect of aerosols. Satellite measurements have provided important insights into aerosol properties near clouds, but also suggested that the observations can be affected by 3-D radiative processes and instrument blurring not considered in current data interpretation methods. This study examines systematic cloud-related changes in particle properties and radiation fields that influence satellite measurements of aerosols in the vicinity of low-level maritime clouds. For this, the paper presents a statistical analysis of a yearlong global dataset of co-located MODIS and CALIOP observations and theoretical simulations. The results reveal that CALIOP-observed aerosol particle size and optical thickness, and MODIS-observed solar reflectance increase systematically in a wide transition zone around clouds. It is estimated that near-cloud changes in particle populations - including both aerosols and undetected cloud particles - are responsible for roughly two thirds of the observed increase in 0.55 μm MODIS reflectance. The results also indicate that 3-D radiative processes significantly contribute to near-cloud reflectance enhancements, while instrument blurring contributes significantly only within 1 km from clouds and then quickly diminishes with distance from clouds.

  9. From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Koren, Ilan; Dagan, Guy; Altaratz, Orit

    2014-06-01

    Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base and cold top. Here, we provide evidence from observations and numerical modeling of a dramatic aerosol effect on warm clouds. We propose that convective-cloud invigoration by aerosols can be viewed as an extension of the concept of aerosol-limited clouds, where cloud development is limited by the availability of cloud-condensation nuclei. A transition from pristine to slightly polluted atmosphere yields estimated negative forcing of ~15 watts per square meter (cooling), suggesting that a substantial part of this anthropogenic forcing over the oceans occurred at the beginning of the industrial era, when the marine atmosphere experienced such transformation. PMID:24904161

  10. Observation of aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City using synergetic ground-based remote sensing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw; Wu, Yonghua; Lightstone, Sam; Gross, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Using UV Raman Lidar for aerosol extinction (αext), and combining microwave radiometer-derived liquid water path (LWP) with multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer-derived cloud optical depth (τcod) to retrieve cloud droplet effective radius (Reff), we observe clear signatures of the Twomey aerosol indirect effect (IE) under certain specialized conditions. The aerosol-cloud index (ACI) or IE slope relating cloud droplet radius to aerosol loading is calculated and shown to be quantitatively consistent with theoretical constraints. To demonstrate consistency, we use both a neural network multiband (default) approach and a dual-channel (DC) approach for the LWP and observe that the DC approach is generally more robust with more successful retrievals leading to a reduction of error in our regression analysis. We also perform an uncertainty analysis of the IE regression slope taking into account the major sources of error in cloud property retrieval and demonstrate that only sufficiently high values of the IE slope should be observable. Finally, based on the results of multiple cases, we observe the importance of vertical wind uptake on the IE signature.

  11. Nonlinear Advection Algorithms Applied to Inter-related Tracers: Errors and Implications for Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2009-02-01

    Monotonicity constraints and gradient preserving flux corrections employed by many advection algorithms used in atmospheric models make these algorithms non-linear. Consequently, any relations among model variables transported separately are not necessarily preserved in such models. These errors cannot be revealed by traditional algorithm testing based on advection of a single tracer. New type of tests are developed and conducted to evaluate the preservation of a sum of several number mixing ratios advected independently of each other, as is the case, for example, in models using bin or sectional representation of aerosol or cloud particle size distribution. The tests show that when three tracers are advected in 1D uniform constant velocity flow, local errors in the sum can be on the order of 10%. When cloud-like interactions are allowed among the tracers, errors in total sum of three mixing ratios can reach up to 30%. Several approaches to eliminate the error are suggested, all based on advecting the sum as a separate variable and then normalizing mixing ratios for individual tracers to match the total sum. A simple scalar normalization preserves the total number mixing ratio and positive definiteness of the variables but the monotonicity constraint for individual tracers is no longer maintained. More involved flux normalization procedures are developed for the flux based advection algorithms to maintain the monotonicity for individual scalars and their sum.

  12. Cloud-resolving modelling of aerosol indirect effects in idealised radiative-convective equilibrium with interactive and fixed sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, M. F.; Yang, C.-E.

    2013-04-01

    The study attempts to evaluate the aerosol indirect effects over tropical oceans in regions of deep convection applying a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model run over a doubly-periodic domain. The Tropics are modelled using a radiative-convective equilibrium idealisation when the radiation, turbulence, cloud microphysics and surface fluxes are explicitly represented while the effects of large-scale circulation are ignored. The aerosol effects are modelled by varying the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at 1% supersaturation, which serves as a proxy for the aerosol amount in the environment, over a wide range, from pristine maritime (50 cm-3) to polluted (1000 cm-3) conditions. No direct effects of aerosol on radiation are included. Two sets of simulations have been run: fixed (non-interactive) sea surface temperature (SST) and interactive SST as predicted by a simple slab-ocean model responding to the surface radiative fluxes and surface enthalpy flux. Both sets of experiments agree on the tendency of increased aerosol concentrations to make the shortwave cloud forcing more negative and reduce the longwave cloud forcing in response to increasing CCN concentration. These, in turn, tend to cool the SST in interactive-SST case. It is interesting that the absolute change of the SST and most other bulk quantities depends only on relative change of CCN concentration; that is, same SST change can be the result of doubling CCN concentration regardless of clean or polluted conditions. It is found that the 10-fold increase of CCN concentration can cool the SST by as much as 1.5 K. This is quite comparable to 2.1-2.3 K SST warming obtained in a simulation for clean maritime conditions, but doubled CO2 concentration. Assuming the aerosol concentration has increased from preindustrial time by 30%, the radiative forcing due to indirect aerosol effects is estimated to be -0.3 W m-2. It is found that the indirect aerosol effect is dominated by the first

  13. Global aerosol effects on convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect cloud properties, and thereby the radiation balance of the planet and the water cycle. The influence of aerosols on clouds is dominated by increase of cloud droplet and ice crystal numbers (CDNC/ICNC) due to enhanced aerosols acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. In deep convective clouds this increase in CDNC/ICNC is hypothesised to increase precipitation because of cloud invigoration through enhanced freezing and associated increased latent heat release caused by delayed warm rain formation. Satellite studies robustly show an increase of cloud top height (CTH) and precipitation with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD, as proxy for aerosol amount). To represent aerosol effects and study their influence on convective clouds in the global climate aerosol model ECHAM-HAM, we substitute the standard convection parameterisation, which uses one mean convective cloud for each grid column, with the convective cloud field model (CCFM), which simulates a spectrum of convective clouds, each with distinct values of radius, mixing ratios, vertical velocity, height and en/detrainment. Aerosol activation and droplet nucleation in convective updrafts at cloud base is the primary driver for microphysical aerosol effects. To produce realistic estimates for vertical velocity at cloud base we use an entraining dry parcel sub cloud model which is triggered by perturbations of sensible and latent heat at the surface. Aerosol activation at cloud base is modelled with a mechanistic, Köhler theory based, scheme, which couples the aerosols to the convective microphysics. Comparison of relationships between CTH and AOD, and precipitation and AOD produced by this novel model and satellite based estimates show general agreement. Through model experiments and analysis of the model cloud processes we are able to investigate the main drivers for the relationship between CTH / precipitation and AOD.

  14. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties over Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Saponaro, Giulia; Virtanen, Timo; Rodriguez, Edith; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Atlaskina, Ksenia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides the spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud properties over a wide area. In our studies large data sets are used for statistical studies on aerosol and cloud interaction in an area over Fennoscandia, the Baltic Sea and adjacent regions over the European mainland. This area spans several regimes with different influences on aerosol cloud interaction such as a the transition from relative clean air over Fennoscandia to more anthropogenically polluted air further south, and the influence maritime air over the Baltic and oceanic air advected from the North Atlantic. Anthropogenic pollution occurs in several parts of the study area, and in particular near densely populated areas and megacities, but also in industrialized areas and areas with dense traffic. The aerosol in such areas is quite different from that produced over the boreal forest and has different effects on air quality and climate. Studies have been made on the effects of aerosols on air quality and on the radiation balance in China. The aim of the study is to study the effect of these different regimes on aerosol-cloud interaction using a large aerosol and cloud data set retrieved with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer (A)ATSR Dual View algorithm (ADV) further developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute and aerosol and cloud data provided by MODIS. Retrieval algorithms for aerosol and clouds have been developed for the (A)ATSR, consisting of a series of instruments of which we use the second and third one: ATSR-2 which flew on the ERS-2 satellite (1995-2003) and AATSR which flew on the ENVISAT satellite (2002-2012) (both from the European Space Agency, ESA). The ADV algorithm provides aerosol data on a global scale with a default resolution of 10x10km2 (L2) and an aggregate product on 1x1 degree (L3). Optional, a 1x1 km2 retrieval products is available over smaller areas for specific studies. Since for the retrieval of AOD no prior knowledge is needed on

  15. Determining Best Estimates and Uncertainties in Cloud Microphysical Parameters from ARM Field Data: Implications for Models, Retrieval Schemes and Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg

    2015-12-28

    We proposed to analyze in-situ cloud data collected during ARM/ASR field campaigns to create databases of cloud microphysical properties and their uncertainties as needed for the development of improved cloud parameterizations for models and remote sensing retrievals, and for evaluation of model simulations and retrievals. In particular, we proposed to analyze data collected over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) during the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) Experiment and the Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign, over the North Slope of Alaska during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), and over the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) during The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), to meet the following 3 objectives; derive statistical databases of single ice particle properties (aspect ratio AR, dominant habit, mass, projected area) and distributions of ice crystals (size distributions SDs, mass-dimension m-D, area-dimension A-D relations, mass-weighted fall speeds, single-scattering properties, total concentrations N, ice mass contents IWC), complete with uncertainty estimates; assess processes by which aerosols modulate cloud properties in arctic stratus and mid-latitude cumuli, and quantify aerosol’s influence in context of varying meteorological and surface conditions; and determine how ice cloud microphysical, single-scattering and fall-out properties and contributions of small ice crystals to such properties vary according to location, environment, surface, meteorological and aerosol conditions, and develop parameterizations of such effects.In this report we describe the accomplishments that we made on all 3 research objectives.

  16. A Simple Model for the Cloud Adjacency Effect and the Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Coakley, James A., Jr.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb,Norman G.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In determining aerosol-cloud interactions, the properties of aerosols must be characterized in the vicinity of clouds. Numerous studies based on satellite observations have reported that aerosol optical depths increase with increasing cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from the humidification and consequent growth of aerosol particles in the moist cloud environment, but part comes from 3D cloud-radiative transfer effects on the retrieved aerosol properties. Often, discerning whether the observed increases in aerosol optical depths are artifacts or real proves difficult. The paper provides a simple model that quantifies the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds that are used in the aerosol retrievals. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from enhanced Rayleigh scattering that results from the presence of the nearby clouds. The enhancement in Rayleigh scattering is estimated using a stochastic cloud model to obtain the radiative flux reflected by broken clouds and comparing this flux with that obtained with the molecules in the atmosphere causing extinction, but no scattering.

  17. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  18. Dark Targets, Aerosols, Clouds and Toys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Today if you use the Thomson-Reuters Science Citations Index to search for "aerosol*", across all scientific disciplines and years, with no constraints, and you sort by number of citations, you will find a 2005 paper published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences in the top 20. This is the "The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation". Although I am the first author, there are in total 12 co-authors who each made a significant intellectual contribution to the paper or to the algorithm, products and validation described. This paper, that algorithm, those people lie at the heart of a lineage of scientists whose collaborations and linked individual pursuits have made a significant contribution to our understanding of radiative transfer and climate, of aerosol properties and the global aerosol system, of cloud physics and aerosol-cloud interaction, and how to measure these parameters and maximize the science that can be obtained from those measurements. The 'lineage' had its origins across the globe, from Soviet Russia to France, from the U.S. to Israel, from the Himalayas, the Sahel, the metropolises of Sao Paulo, Taipei, and the cities of east and south Asia. It came together in the 1990s and 2000s at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, using cultural diversity as a strength to form a common culture of scientific creativity that continues to this day. The original algorithm has spawned daughter algorithms that are being applied to new satellite and airborne sensors. The original MODIS products have been fundamental to analyses as diverse as air quality monitoring and aerosol-cloud forcing. AERONET, designed originally for the need of validation, is now its own thriving institution, and the lineage continues to push forward to provide new technology for the coming generations.

  19. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  20. Impacts of ENSO events on cloud radiative effects in preindustrial conditions: Changes in cloud fraction and their dependence on interactive aerosol emissions and concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Russell, Lynn M.; Xu, Li; Lou, Sijia; Lamjiri, Maryam A.; Somerville, Richard C. J.; Miller, Arthur J.; Cayan, Daniel R.; DeFlorio, Michael J.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Ying; Singh, Balwinder; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Rasch, Philip J.

    2016-06-01

    We use three 150 year preindustrial simulations of the Community Earth System Model to quantify the impacts of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events on shortwave and longwave cloud radiative effects (CRESW and CRELW). Compared to recent observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data set, the model simulation successfully reproduces larger variations of CRESW and CRELW over the tropics. The ENSO cycle is found to dominate interannual variations of cloud radiative effects. Simulated cooling (warming) effects from CRESW (CRELW) are strongest over the tropical western and central Pacific Ocean during warm ENSO events, with the largest difference between 20 and 60 W m-2, with weaker effects of 10-40 W m-2 over Indonesian regions and the subtropical Pacific Ocean. Sensitivity tests show that variations of cloud radiative effects are mainly driven by ENSO-related changes in cloud fraction. The variations in midlevel and high cloud fractions each account for approximately 20-50% of the interannual variations of CRESW over the tropics and almost all of the variations of CRELW between 60°S and 60°N. The variation of low cloud fraction contributes to most of the variations of CRESW over the midlatitude oceans. Variations in natural aerosol concentrations explained 10-30% of the variations of both CRESW and CRELW over the tropical Pacific, Indonesian regions, and the tropical Indian Ocean. Changes in natural aerosol emissions and concentrations enhance 3-5% and 1-3% of the variations of cloud radiative effects averaged over the tropics.

  1. Importance of clouds and aerosols in assessing climate change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, O.; Randall, D. A.; Artaxo, P. P.; Bretherton, C. S.; Feingold, G.; Forster, P.; Kerminen, V.; Kondo, Y.; Liao, H.; Lohmann, U.; Rasch, P. J.; Satheesh, S.; Sherwood, S. C.; Stevens, B. B.; Zhang, X.; Myhre, G.; Shindell, D. T.

    2013-12-01

    Clouds and aerosols continue to contribute the largest uncertainty to estimates and interpretations of the Earth's changing energy budget. This talk will focus on process understanding and will discuss our assessment of how clouds and aerosols contribute and respond to climate change based on observations, theory and models. Many of the cloudiness and humidity changes simulated by climate models in warmer climates are now understood as thermodynamical responses or responses to large-scale circulation changes that do not appear to depend strongly on model parameterizations. For example, multiple lines of evidence now indicate positive feedback contributions from water vapor and lapse rate, and from circulation-driven changes in both the height of high clouds and the latitudinal distribution of clouds. However, some aspects of the overall cloud response vary substantially among models, and these appear to depend strongly on subgrid-scale processes in which there is less confidence. Climate-relevant aerosol processes are better understood, and climate-relevant aerosol properties better observed, than at the time of the Fourth Assessment Report. Our assessment for the effective radiative forcing by aerosol is less negative than before because of a re-evaluation of aerosol absorption, the existence of rapid adjustment of clouds in response to aerosol absorption, and multi-scale assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions. The aerosol forcing continues to dominate the uncertainty in the total anthropogenic forcing, but both models and observations suggest that it has not changed substantially in the global mean over the last couple of decades. Finally many gaps remain in our understanding of the role of clouds and aerosols on the climate system, and we will assess some of the challenges that lie ahead of us.

  2. New ARM Measurements of Clouds, Aerosols, and the Atmospheric State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, J.

    2012-04-01

    The DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has recently enhanced its observational capabilities at its fixed and mobile sites as well as its aerial facility. New capabilities include scanning radars, several types of lidars, an array of aerosol instruments, and in situ cloud probes. All ARM sites have been equipped with dual frequency scanning cloud radars that will provide three-dimensional observations of cloud fields for analysis of cloud field evolution. Sites in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Papua New Guinea have also received scanning centimeter wavelength radars for observing precipitation fields. This combination of radars will provide the means to study the interaction of clouds and precipitation. New lidars include a Raman lidar in Darwin, Australia and High Spectral Resolution Lidars in Barrow and with the second ARM Mobile Facility. Each of these lidars will provide profiles of aerosol extinction while the Raman will also measure profiles of water vapor. ARM has also expanded its capabilities in the realm of aerosol observations. ARM is adding Aerosol Observing Systems to its sites in Darwin and the second mobile facility. These aerosol systems principally provided measurements of aerosol optical properties. In addition, a new Mobile Aerosol Observing System has been developed that includes a variety of instruments to provide information about aerosol chemistry and size distributions. Many of these aerosol instruments are also available for the ARM Aerial Facility. The Aerial Facility also now includes a variety of cloud probes for measuring size distribution and water content. The new array of ARM instruments is intended to build upon the existing ARM capabilities to better study the interactions among aerosol, clouds, and precipitation. Data from these instruments are now available and development of advanced data products is underway.

  3. Measurements of aerosol-cloud interactions, including on-line particle chemical composition, at the Jungfraujoch Global Atmospheric Watch Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Alfarra, M. R.; Williams, P. I.; Bower, K. N.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Weingartner, E.; Corrigan, C.; Baltensperger, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research laboratory is located in the Sphinx building, 3580 m asl; 46.55oN, 7.98oE on the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps. The site is exposed to a wide range of conditions and frequently samples long range transported lower free tropospheric air, and is exposed to cloudy conditions. The Paul Scherrer Institute have previously developed a dual inlet system that allows measurements of the total sub-micron aerosol population (dry residuals and interstitial particles) and interstitial particles alone to be made alternately every few minutes. During July 2002 an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was coupled to the dual inlet and was used to sample the composition of both the total particle distribution and the interstitial fraction and hence derive the mass loadings of the dry droplet residuals. In out of cloud conditions the aerosol composition can be linked to air mass history and age of the air mass. Microphysical measurements include cloud droplet size distributions made using an FSSP and also a new phase Doppler anemometry system. A comparison between these probes will be made. Two different types of cloud droplet spectra were observed. In the first type a large number of cloud droplets were measured with a single, narrow drop size distribution and modal diameter of around 10 um. In the second type, a bimodal cloud droplet spectrum occurred with a smaller mode (by number) at around 20 um, in addition to the 10 um mode. The aerosol mass spectrometry shows that the composition of the residuals from the two spectrum types is very different, the former type being composed mainly of sulphate, the latter a combination of nitrate, sulphate and organic material. We have also shown that the organic material observed is highly oxidized. We argue that the bimodality arises as a result of mixing of cloud droplets below the site that have been activated separately: the larger a less numerous mode in the widespread strato-cumulus forming under low

  4. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  5. Distinct Impacts of Aerosols on an Evolving Continental Cloud System during the RACORO Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have been investigated extensively but still remain high uncertainty due to the complexity of cloud microphysical processes under various dynamic and thermodynamic environments. Cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecast (CR-WRF) model implemented with a two-moment bulk microphysics and a modified Goddard radiation scheme is employed to investigate aerosol effects on different cloud regimes and their transitions associated with a continental cloud system occurring from 25 May to 27 May, 2009 during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. The simulated cloud properties and precipitation for the three different cloud regimes, including shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and a stratus exhibit overall agreements with airborne and ground-based observations. Sensitivity studies with different aerosol scenarios reveal that the responses of cloud micro- and macrophysics to aerosol loading depend on the cloud regimes with monotonic or non-monotonic trend. Aerosol radiative effects modify the atmospheric thermodynamic condition and change the atmospheric stability, which induce different response from aerosol indirect effects. Our results also indicate that the overall aerosol effects on a cloud complex are distinct from those of the individual cloud types. The aerosol-cloud interaction for the different cloud regimes should be evaluated to assess the aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings on regional and global climate.

  6. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major agent for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosol effects on clouds could further extend to precipitation, both through the formation of cloud particles and by exerting persistent radiative forcing on the climate system that disturbs dynamics. However, the various mechanisms behind these effects, in particular the ones connected to precipitation, are not yet well understood. The atmospheric and climate communities have long been working to gain a better grasp of these critical effects and hence to reduce the significant uncertainties in climate prediction resulting from such a lack of adequate knowledge. Here we review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on convective precipitation processes from theoretical analysis of microphysics, observational evidence, and a range of numerical model simulations. In addition, the discrepancy between results simulated by models, as well as that between simulations and observations, are presented. Specifically, this paper addresses the following topics: (1) fundamental theories of aerosol effects on microphysics and precipitation processes, (2) observational evidence of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes, (3) signatures of the aerosol impact on precipitation from largescale analyses, (4) results from cloud-resolving model simulations, and (5) results from large-scale numerical model simulations. Finally, several future research directions for gaining a better understanding of aerosol--cloud-precipitation interactions are suggested.

  7. Impact of Aerosol Processing on Orographic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, Sara; Zubler, Elias M.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol particles undergo significant modifications during their residence time in the atmosphere. Physical processes like coagulation, coating and water uptake, and aqueous surface chemistry alter the aerosol size distribution and composition. At this, clouds play a primary role as physical and chemical processing inside cloud droplets contributes considerably to the changes in aerosol particles. A previous study estimates that on global average atmospheric particles are cycled three times through a cloud before being removed from the atmosphere [1]. An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO-CLM. The employed model version includes a two-moment cloud microphysical scheme [2] that has been coupled to the aerosol microphysical scheme M7 [3] as described by Muhlbauer and Lohmann, 2008 [4]. So far, the formation, transfer and removal of cloud-borne aerosol number and mass were not considered in the model. Following the parameterization for cloud-borne particles developed by Hoose et al., 2008 [5], distinction between in-droplet and in-crystal particles is made to more physically account for processes in mixed-phase clouds, such as the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process and contact and immersion freezing. In our model, this approach has been extended to allow for aerosol particles in five different hydrometeors: cloud droplets, rain drops, ice crystals, snow flakes and graupel. We account for nucleation scavenging, freezing and melting processes, autoconversion, accretion, aggregation, riming and selfcollection, collisions between interstitial aerosol particles and hydrometeors, ice multiplication, sedimentation, evaporation and sublimation. The new scheme allows an evaluation of the cloud cycling of aerosol particles by tracking the particles even when scavenged into hydrometeors. Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds have recently been conducted by Hoose et al

  8. Aerosol Microphysical and Macrophysical Effects on Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Li, Z.; Wilcox, E. M.; Oreopoulos, L.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Posselt, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    We illustrate a conceptual model of hydrometeor vertical development inside a convective cloud and its utility in studying of aerosol-DCC interactions. Both case studies and ensemble means are used to investigate aerosol-DCC interactions. We identify a few scenarios where possible signal of aerosol effect on DCC may be extracted. The results show a consistent and physically sound picture of aerosols affecting DCC microphysics as well as macrophysical properties. Specifically, pollutions and smokes are shown to consistently decrease ice particle size. On the contrary, dust particles close to source regions are shown to make cloud ice particle size more maritime like. We postulate that dust may achieve this by acting as either heterogeneous ice nuclei or giant cloud condensation nuclei. This contrast between smoke or pollution and dust also exists for their effects on cloud glaciation temperature. Smoke and pollution aerosols are shown to decrease glaciation temperature while dust particles do the opposite. Possible Implications of our results for studying aerosol indirect forcing, cirrus cloud properties, troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange and cloud latent heating are discussed.

  9. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It allows to describe mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface and to link aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion correction, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependencies; flexible inclusion/omission of chemical species and physicochemical processes; flexible convolution/deconvolution of species and processes; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model

  10. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major reason for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosol effects on clouds could further extend to precipitation, both through the formation of cloud particles and by exerting persistent radiative forcing on the climate system that disturbs dynamics. However, the various mechanisms behind these effects, in particular the ones connected to precipitation, are not yet well understood. The atmospheric and climate communities have long been working to gain a better grasp of these critical effects and hence to reduce the significant uncertainties in climate prediction resulting from such a lack of adequate knowledge. The central theme of this paper is to review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes from theoretical analysis of microphysics, observational evidence, and a range of numerical model simulations. In addition, the discrepancy between results simulated by models, as well as that between simulations and observations will be presented. Specifically, this paper will address the following topics: (1) fundamental theories of aerosol effects on microphysics and precipitation processes, (2) observational evidence of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes, (3) signatures of the aerosol impact on precipitation from large-scale analyses, (4) results from cloud-resolving model simulations, and (5) results from large-scale numerical model simulations. Finally, several future research directions on aerosol - precipitation interactions are suggested.

  11. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions at Puijo measurement station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2014-06-01

    Interactions between aerosols and liquid water clouds were studied during autumns 2010-2011 at a semiurban measurement station on Puijo tower in Kuopio, Finland. Cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopicity and cloud droplet size distribution were measured, with a focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. On average, the polluted air contained more particles than the clean air masses, and generally the concentrations decreased during cloud events. Cloud processing was found to take place, especially in the clean air masses, and to a lesser extent in the polluted air. Some, mostly minor, differences in the average particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail, with a special focus on the emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. This revealed larger variations in particle and cloud properties than the analysis of the whole data set. Clear differences in the total (between 214 and 2200 cm-3) and accumulation mode particle concentrations (between 62 and 169 cm-3) were observed. Particle chemical composition, especially the concentrations of organics (between 0.42 and 1.28 μg m-3) and sulfate (between 0.16 and 4.43 μg m-3), varied considerably. This affected the hygroscopic growth factor: for example, for 100 nm particles the range was from 1.21 to 1.45 at 90% relative humidity. Particularly, large particles, high hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganics were linked with the pollutant plumes. Moreover, the particle hygroscopicity distributions in the polluted air were clearly bimodal, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions also had an impact on cloud droplet

  12. Radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jeff

    1998-11-01

    The effect of aerosols and clouds on Earth's shortwave radiation budget is studied in this thesis. An expression for the global annual mean radiative forcing due to sulfate aerosols is extended for absorbing aerosols using a two-stream approximation. This expression depends on the backscattering fraction of the aerosol which varies with the effective radius of the aerosol size distribution. This variation leads to a factor of 2.0 variation in the radiative forcing of slightly absorbing aerosols. Water vapor condenses onto hygroscopic aerosols which results in a change in size and a change in the concentration of the chemical components of the aerosol. The original Köhler equation accurately describes the equilibrium size of a hygroscopic aerosol. Use of the modified Köhler equation leads to errors due to its thermodynamically inconsistent nature. On a global annual average, the direct radiative forcing of hygroscopic sulfate aerosol is -0.69 W m-2. Over highly polluted regions, the local radiative forcing can be as high as -7 W m-2 which is comparable to the forcing due to increased greenhouse gas concentrations. Using a plane-parallel model, an analytical expression is derived for the cloud radiative forcing ratio which is used as a measure of enhanced shortwave radiation absorption of clouds. With this model, high values of this ratio can be achieved by thick clouds with absorptances of approximately 0.3. High values of the ratio can also be obtained with low level clouds if the transmittance of the atmosphere above the cloud is reduced to approximately 0.8. This can be achieved by a high concentration of strongly absorbing aerosols.

  13. Organic Aerosols as Cloud Condensation Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    The large organic component of the atmospheric aerosol contributes to both natural and anthropogenic cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Moreover, some organic substances may reduce droplet surface tension (Facchini et al. 1999), while others may be partially soluble (Laaksonen et al. 1998), and others may inhibit water condensation. The interaction of organics with water need to be understood in order to better understand the indirect aerosol effect. Therefore, laboratory CCN spectral measurements of organic aerosols are presented. These are measurements of the critical supersaturation (Sc), the supersaturation needed to produce an activated cloud droplet, as a function of the size of the organic particles. Substances include sodium lauryl (dodecyl) sulfate, oxalic, adipic, pinonic, hexadecanedioic, glutaric, stearic, succinic, phthalic, and benzoic acids. These size-Sc relationships are compared with theoretical and measured size-Sc relationships of common inorganic compounds (e.g., NaCl, KI, ammonium and calcium sulfate). Unlike most inorganics some organics display variations in solubility per unit mass as a function of particle size. Those showing relatively greater solubility at smaller sizes may be attributable to surface tension reduction, which is greater for less water dilution, as is the case for smaller particles, which are less diluted at the critical sizes. This was the case for sodium dodecyl sulfate, which does reduce surface tension. Relatively greater solubility for larger particles may be caused by greater dissolution at the higher dilutions that occur with larger particles; this is partial solubility. Measurements are also presented of internal mixtures of various organic and inorganic substances. These measurements were done with two CCN spectrometers (Hudson 1989) operating simultaneously. These two instruments usually displayed similar results in spite of the fact that they have different flow rates and supersaturation profiles. The degree of

  14. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, Christopher R.; Davies, James F.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation.

  15. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ruehl, Christopher R; Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-03-25

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation. PMID:27013731

  16. Analyzing the Effect of Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability and Land Cover on Aerosol-Cloud Interactions During the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    TenHoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are utilized to examine the impact of aerosols on clouds during the Amazonian biomass burning season in Rondnia, Brazil. It is found that increasing background column water vapor (CWV) throughout this transition season between the Amazon dry and wet seasons exerts a strong effect on cloud properties. As a result, aerosol-cloud correlations should be stratified by column water vapor to achieve a more accurate assessment of the effect of aerosols on clouds. Previous studies ignored the systematic changes to meteorological factors during the transition season, leading to possible misinterpretation of their results. Cloud fraction is shown generally to increase with aerosol optical depth (AOD) for both low and high values of column water vapor, whereas the relationship between cloud optical depth (COD) and AOD exhibits a different relationship. COD increases with AOD until AOD approx. 0.25 due to the first indirect (microphysical) effect. At higher values of AOD, COD is found to decrease with increasing AOD, which may be due to: (1) the inhibition of cloud development by absorbing aerosols (radiative effect) and/or (2) a retrieval artifact in which the measured reflectance in the visible is less than expected from a cloud top either from the darkening of clouds through the addition of carbonaceous biomass burning aerosols or subpixel dark surface contamination in the measured cloud reflectance. If (1) is a contributing mechanism, as we suspect, then a linear relationship between the indirect effect and increasing AOD, assumed in a majority of GCMs, is inaccurate since these models do not include treatment of aerosol absorption in and around clouds. The effect of aerosols on both column water vapor and clouds over varying land surface types is also analyzed. The study finds that the difference in column water vapor between forest and

  17. An explicit study of aerosol mass conversion and its parameterization in warm rain formation of cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Fen, J.; Ungar, R. K.

    2013-10-01

    The life time of atmospheric aerosols is highly affected by in-cloud scavenging processes. Aerosol mass conversion from aerosols embedded in cloud droplets into aerosols embedded in raindrops is a pivotal pathway for wet removal of aerosols in clouds. The aerosol mass conversion rate in the bulk microphysics parameterizations is always assumed to be linearly related to the precipitation production rate, which includes the cloud water autoconversion rate and the cloud water accretion rate. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration has typically been considered to be the same as the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration. However, the mass of an aerosol embedded in a cloud droplet is not linearly proportional to the mass of the cloud droplet. A simple linear relationship cannot be drawn between the precipitation production rate and the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate. In this paper, we studied the evolution of aerosol mass concentration conversion rates in a warm rain formation process with a 1.5-dimensional non-hydrostatic convective cloud and aerosol interaction model in the bin microphysics. We found that the ratio of the aerosol mass conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration can be statistically expressed by the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration with an exponential function. We further gave some regression equations to determine aerosol conversions in the warm rain formation under different threshold radii of raindrops and different aerosol size distributions.

  18. The NASA Decadal Survey Aerosol, Cloud, Ecosystems Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Bontempi, Paula; Maring, Hal

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the National Academy of Sciences delivered a Decadal Survey (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond) for NASA, NOAA, and USGS, which is a prioritization of future satellite Earth observations. The recommendations included 15 missions (13 for NASA, two for NOAA), which were prioritized into three groups or tiers. One of the second tier missions is the Aerosol, Cloud, (ocean) Ecosystems (ACE) mission, which focuses on climate forcing, cloud and aerosol properties and interactions, and ocean ecology, carbon cycle science, and fluxes. The baseline instruments recommended for ACE are a cloud radar, an aerosol/cloud lidar, an aerosol/cloud polarimeter, and an ocean radiometer. The instrumental heritage for these measurements are derived from the Cloudsat, CALIPSO, Glory, SeaWiFS and Aqua (MODIS) missions. In 2008, NASA HQ, lead by Hal Maring and Paula Bontempi, organized an interdisciplinary science working group to help formulate the ACE mission by refining the science objectives and approaches, identifying measurement (satellite and field) and mission (e.g., orbit, data processing) requirements, technology requirements, and mission costs. Originally, the disciplines included the cloud, aerosol, and ocean biogeochemistry communities. Subsequently, an ocean-aerosol interaction science working group was formed to ensure the mission addresses the broadest range of science questions possible given the baseline measurements, The ACE mission is a unique opportunity for ocean scientists to work closely with the aerosol and cloud communities. The science working groups are collaborating on science objectives and are defining joint field studies and modeling activities. The presentation will outline the present status of the ACE mission, the science questions each discipline has defined, the measurement requirements identified to date, the current ACE schedule, and future opportunities for broader community

  19. Sensitivity of Homogeneous Freezing to Aerosol Perturbation and Implication for Aerosol Indirect Forcing through Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Shi, X.; Zhang, K.

    2014-12-01

    The susceptibility of cloud properties to aerosol perturbation is critical for the aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Burdens of aerosols such as sulfate have substantially increased from preindustrial time to present-day. However, it is still not clear whether the number of ice crystals (Ni) resulting from homogeneous freezing of sulfate solution droplets is sensitive to the change in sulfate number concentration (Na) in the upper troposphere. Some cloud parcel modeling studies show that Ni is insensitive to Na (Kärcher and Lohmann, 2002; Kay and Wood, 2008), while others show moderate sensitivity of Ni to Na (Liu and Penner, 2005; Barahona and Nenes, 2008). The poorly understood cirrus cloud processes lead to large uncertainties in ice nucleation parameterizations in global climate models, with implications for climate change studies. In this study, we examine the sensitivity of Ni from homogeneous freezing to Na with a cloud parcel model running at different input aerosol and cloud conditions and under different model assumptions. By these sensitivity tests, we are able to reconcile the contrasting results from previous studies on the sensitivity of Ni to Na. Furthermore, the implications of these results on aerosol indirect forcing through ice clouds are quantified by comparing three ice nucleation parameterizations (Liu and Penner, 2005; Barahona and Nenes, 2008; Kärcher and Lohmann, 2002) implemented in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). The global and annual mean longwave aerosol indirect forcing through cirrus clouds ranges from -0.03 (Kärcher and Lohmann, 2002) to ~0.3 W m-2 (Liu and Penner, 2005; Barahona and Nenes, 2008). Future studies should quantify the occurrence frequency of homogeneous nucleation in the upper troposphere and the relative contribution between homogeneous versus heterogeneous freezing to Ni in cirrus clouds to further narrow down the aerosol indirect forcing through cirrus clouds.

  20. Effects of aerosol on evaporation, freezing and precipitation in a multiple cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Kim, Byung-Gon; Yum, Seong Soo; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Um, Jun Shik; Li, Zhanqing; Hong, JinKyu; Chang, Ki-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yim

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation account for a large portion of uncertainties in the prediction of the future course of global hydrologic circulations and climate. As a process of a better understanding of interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation, simulations are performed for a mixed-phase convective multiple-cloud system over the tropics. Studies on single-cloud systems have shown that aerosol-induced increases in freezing, associated increases in parcel buoyancy and thus the intensity of clouds (or updrafts) are a main mechanism which controls aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in convective clouds. However, in the multiple-cloud system that plays much more important roles in global hydrologic circulations and thus climate than single-cloud systems, aerosol effects on condensation play the most important role in aerosol-induced changes in the intensity of clouds and the effects on freezing play a negligible role in those changes. Aerosol-induced enhancement in evaporation intensifies gust fronts and increases the number of subsequently developing clouds, which leads to the substantial increases in condensation and associated intensity of convection. Although aerosol-induced enhancement in freezing takes part in the increases in condensation by inducing stronger convergence around cloud bottom, the increases in condensation are ~one order of magnitude larger than those in freezing. It is found that while aerosol-induced increases in freezing create intermittent extremely heavy precipitation, aerosol-induced increases in evaporation enhance light and medium precipitation in the multiple-cloud system here. This increase in light and medium precipitation makes it possible that cumulative precipitation increases with increasing aerosol concentration, although the increase is small. It is interesting that the altitude of the maximum of the time- and domain-averaged hydrometeor mass densities is quite robust to increases in aerosol

  1. Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Williams, E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. Knowledge of these interactions is fundamental to our understanding of weather and climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Decadal Survey state that these interactions are the largest sources of uncertainties in our current understanding of the climate system. The Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER) responds to the IPCC and Decadal Survey concerns by studying the activation of CCN and their interactions with clouds and storms. CHASER fulfills NASA Earth science research goals in two focus areas of the 2010 Science Plan: (1) Weather and (2) Climate Variability and Change. CHASER is the first satellite capable of measuring all the quantities necessary to determine the interactions of aerosols with clouds and storms. Measurements by current satellites allow the determination of crude profiles of cloud particle size but not of the activated CCN that seed these clouds. CHASER will use an innovative technique and high-heritage instruments to produce the first global maps of activated CCN and the properties of the clouds associated with them. CHASER makes important contributions to our understanding of climate and weather hazards. The high uncertainties of current climate predictions constrain their much-needed use in decision-making aiming at responding to climate change and variability. The CHASER team seeks to mitigate this problem by working with decision-makers. For example, CHASER data will be used to assess hurricane risk. This portion of the project involves social science research that focuses on societal applications as well as on understanding the best ways to transfer and communicate mission data to decision-makers.

  2. Critical evaluation of cloud contamination in MISR aerosol product using collocated MODIS aerosol and cloud products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Liu, B.; Deshmukh, R.

    2012-12-01

    Unique in its ability of observing the atmospheric state in nine angles nearly simultaneously, the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument has been successfully used for various applications including remote sensing of aerosol properties. However, MISR has limited spectral channels compared with other multi-spectral sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which poses a challenge to cloud screening for applications using MISR. This is particularly important for aerosol property retrievals as cloud contamination and cloud artifacts are one of the larger error sources in satellite aerosol products. Using collocated MODIS and MISR data sets, the potential effects of cloud contamination on the MISR aerosol product are studied. Over global oceans, for non-glint regions, the cloud mask from the level 2 MODIS aerosol products (MOD04) is used. Over ocean glint regions as well as land, the level 2 MODIS cloud mask products (MOD35) are used. The relations between cloud coverage and the bias of MISR AOD are examined using collocated the MODIS cloud information and MISR AOD data. In particular, the suspicious high AOD loading band reported by the MISR aerosol product over high latitude southern oceans is investigated. Finally, a level 3 MISR aerosol product with a new cloud screening method is developed and the potential usage of such a product in satellite aerosol data assimilation is explored.

  3. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    Aerosols and clouds play central roles in atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, air pollution, and public health. The mechanistic understanding and predictability of aerosol and cloud properties, interactions, transformations, and effects are, however, still very limited. This is due not only to the limited availability of measurement data, but also to the limited applicability and compatibility of model formalisms used for the analysis, interpretation, and description of heterogeneous and multiphase processes. To support the investigation and elucidation of atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions, we present a comprehensive kinetic model framework with consistent and unambiguous terminology and universally applicable rate equations and parameters. It enables a detailed description of mass transport and chemical reactions at the gas-particle interface, and it allows linking aerosol and cloud surface processes with gas phase and particle bulk processes in systems with multiple chemical components and competing physicochemical processes. The key elements and essential aspects of the presented framework are: a simple and descriptive double-layer surface model (sorption layer and quasi-static layer); straightforward flux-based mass balance and rate equations; clear separation of mass transport and chemical reactions; well-defined and consistent rate parameters (uptake and accommodation coefficients, reaction and transport rate coefficients); clear distinction between gas phase, gas-surface, and surface-bulk transport (gas phase diffusion, surface and bulk accommodation); clear distinction between gas-surface, surface layer, and surface-bulk reactions (Langmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms); mechanistic description of concentration and time dependences (transient and steady-state conditions); flexible addition of unlimited numbers of chemical species and physicochemical processes; optional aggregation or resolution

  4. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  5. Are remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties a suitable proxy for cloud condensation nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions arguably remain the single greatest uncertainty among anthropogenic perturbations of the climate system. The large uncertainties associated with their representation in global aerosol climate models have emphasised the need for observational studies. In-situ measurements provide a detailed description of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties, providing strong observational constraints on aerosol cloud interactions. However, their spatio-temporal sampling is sparse so that "observational" estimates of global aerosol cloud interactions generally rely on co-located satellite retrievals of aerosol radiative properties and cloud properties. In this study I will critically evaluate the suitability of remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol index (AI) and aerosol fine mode optical depth, as proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). This analysis based on the fully self-consistent calculation of aerosol radiative properties and CCN in the aerosol climate model ECHAM-HAM. Correlating simulated aerosol radiative properties with CCN at a range of supersaturations (sampling different sizes/composition of the aerosol spectrum) highlights limitations in the suitability of AOD and AI as proxy for CCN. These discrepancies arise from a range of factors, including the limited representativeness of column-integrated aerosol radiative properties for surface or cloud-base CCN as well as the effects of humidity growth of aerosols, affecting AOD/AI but not CCN. Simulated correlations show a strong regional variability, with significant implications for "observational" estimates of aerosol cloud interactions from remote-sensing as well as in-situ data.

  6. 3D Radiative Aspects of the Increased Aerosol Optical Depth Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Remer, Lorraine; Cahalan, Robert; Coakley, Jim

    2007-01-01

    To characterize aerosol-cloud interactions it is important to correctly retrieve aerosol optical depth in the vicinity of clouds. It is well reported in the literature that aerosol optical depth increases with cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from real physics as humidification; another part, however, comes from 3D cloud effects in the remote sensing retrievals. In many cases it is hard to say whether the retrieved increased values of aerosol optical depth are remote sensing artifacts or real. In the presentation, we will discuss how the 3D cloud affects can be mitigated. We will demonstrate a simple model that can assess the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from the enhanced Rayleigh scattering due to presence of surrounding clouds. A stochastic cloud model of broken cloudiness is used to simulate the upward flux.

  7. Aerosol and cloud retrieval using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2012). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has recently been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick

  8. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  9. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  10. Aerosol cloud processing with the global model ECHAM5-HAM-SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Korhonen, H.; Zubair, M.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their interactions with clouds constitute the largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the Earth's atmosphere. Increasing aerosol number concentrations increases the cloud droplet concentration and droplet surface and hence the cloud albedo. This mechanism is called the aerosol indirect effect on climate. Understanding the changes in cloud droplet number concentrations and size by anthropogenic aerosols are the key factors in the study of future climate change. Therefore the aerosols' formation and growth from nanoparticles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) must be described accurately. The formation and growth of aerosols are shown to be described more accurately with sectional representations than with bulk (total aerosol mass only), modal (lognormal modes describing mass and number size distribution) or moment (processes tied to different moments of particle number size distribution) approaches. Recently the sectional aerosol models have been implemented to global climate models. However, the resolution of sectional models must be optimised to reduce the computational cost. We have implemented the sectional aerosol model SALSA in ECHAM5-HAM. SALSA describes the aerosol population with 20 size sections. The dynamics are optimised for large scale applications and the model includes an improved moving center sectional method. The particulate mass consists of five compounds: sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt and dust. The aerosol processing has been studied extensively and there are many numerical models used to predict CCN number concentrations. However, due to computational limitations many of them are not suitable for utilisation in global climate models. Therefore in most global climate studies on aerosol activation to CCN is examined using cloud activation parameterisations. We study the aerosol cloud processing and its affect on transport of aerosols using Abdul-Razzak-Ghan aerosol cloud activation

  11. Near-cloud aerosols in monsoon environment and its impact on radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konwar, M.; Panicker, A. S.; Axisa, D.; Prabha, T. V.

    2015-02-01

    In order to understand the near-cloud aerosol properties and their impact on radiative forcing, we utilized in situ aircraft measurements of aerosol particles and cloud droplets during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment carried out over the Indian subcontinent in the monsoon season. From the measurement of aerosol size distribution of diameter range from 0.1 to 50 µm, we reported that aerosol concentrations could be enhanced by 81% and the effective diameter (deff, µm) by a factor of 2 near the cloud edges when compared with regions far from the cloud. These enhanced aerosol concentrations are a function of the relative humidity (RH) in the cloud-free zone, attributed to mixing and entrainment processes in the cloud edges. It is also found that for warm clouds, RH increases exponentially in the near-cloud regions. In addition, deff was increased linearly with RH. Through model simulations, we found that aerosol optical depth decreases with distance from the cloud edge. Further, aerosols in cloud edges were found to increase the reflected flux by 20% compared to cloud-free regions, thus brightening the near-cloud areas.

  12. Advancements in the Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Microphysics in the GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Sud, Y.; Barahona, D.; Nemes, A.; Bhattacharjee, P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite numerous challenges, the physical parameterization of cloud-aerosol interactions in atmospheric GCMs has become a top priority for advancement because of our need to simulate and understand past, current, and future indirect effects of aerosols on clouds. The challenges stem from the involvement of wide range of cloud-scale dynamics and aerosol activation physical processes. Cloud dynamics modulate cloud areal extent and condensate, while aerosol activation depends on aerosol mass load, size distribution, internal mixing state, and nucleating properties, and ultimately determines cloud optical properties via particle sizes. Both macro- and micro-scale processes are obviously important for cloud-radiation interactions. We will present the main features of cloud microphysical properties in the GEOS- 5 Atmospheric GCM (AGCM) as simulated by the McRAS-AC (Microphysics of Clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert and Aerosol-Cloud interaction) scheme. McRAS-AC uses Fountoukis and Nenes (2005) aerosol activation for liquid clouds, and has an option for either Liu and Penner (2005) or Barahona and Nenes (2008, 2009) aerosol activation for ice clouds. Aerosol loading (on-line or climatological) comes from GOCART, with an assumed log-normal size distribution. Other features of McRAS-AC are level-by-level cloud-scale thermodynamics, and Seifert-Beheng (2001)-type precipitation microphysics, particularly from moist convection. Results from Single-Column Model simulations will be shown to demonstrate how cloud radiative properties, lifetimes, and precipitation are influenced by different parameterization assumptions. Corresponding fields from year-long simulations of the full AGCM will also be presented with geographical distributions of cloud effective particle sizes compared to satellite retrievals. While the primary emphasis will be on current climate, simulation results with perturbed aerosol loadings will also be shown to expose the radiative sensitivity of the

  13. Impact of clouds and precipitation on atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronache, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols have a significant impact on the dynamics and microphysics of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. High aerosol concentrations provide enhanced cloud condensation nuclei that can lead to the invigoration of convection and increase of surface rainfall. Such effects are dependent on environmental conditions and aerosol properties. Clouds are not only affected by aerosol, they also alter aerosol properties by various processes. Cloud processing of aerosol includes: convective redistribution, modification in the number and size of aerosol particles, chemical processing, new particle formation around clouds, and aerosol removal by rainfall to the surface. Among these processes, the wet removal during intense rain events, in polluted continental regions, can lead to spikes in acidic deposition into environment. In this study, we address the effects of clouds and precipitation on the aerosol distribution in cases of convective precipitation events in eastern US. We examine the effects of clouds and precipitation on various aerosol species, as well as their temporal and spatial variability.

  14. Sensitivity of PARASOL multi-angle photopolarimetric aerosol retrievals to cloud contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stap, F. A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Röckmann, T.

    2015-03-01

    An important problem in satellite remote sensing of aerosols is related to the need to perform an adequate cloud screening. If a cloud screening is applied that is not strict enough, the ground scene has the probability of residual cloud cover which causes large errors on the retrieved aerosol parameters. On the other hand, if the cloud-screening procedure is too strict, too many clear sky cases, especially near-cloud scenes, will falsely be flagged cloudy. The detrimental effects of cloud contamination as well as the importance of aerosol cloud interactions that can be studied in these near-cloud scenes call for new approaches to cloud screening. Multi-angle multi-wavelength photopolarimetric measurements have a unique capability to distinguish between scattering by (liquid) cloud droplets and aerosol particles. In this paper the sensitivity of aerosol retrievals from multi-angle photopolarimetric measurements to cloud contamination is investigated and the ability to intrinsically filter the cloud-contaminated scenes based on a goodness-of-fit criteria is evaluated. Hereto, an aerosol retrieval algorithm is applied to a partially clouded over-ocean synthetic data set as well as non-cloud-screened over-ocean POLDER-3/PARASOL observations. It is found that a goodness-of-fit filter, together with a filter on the coarse mode refractive index (mrcoarse > 1.335) and a cirrus screening, adequately rejects the cloud-contaminated scenes. No bias or larger SD are found in the retrieved parameters for this intrinsic cloud filter compared to the parameters retrieved in a priori cloud-screened data set (using MODIS/AQUA cloud masks) of PARASOL observations. Moreover, less high-aerosol load scenes are misinterpreted as cloud contaminated. The retrieved aerosol optical thickness, single scattering albedo and Ångström exponent show good agreement with AERONET observations. Furthermore, the synthetic retrievals give confidence in the ability of the algorithm to correctly

  15. Aerosol-cloud closure study using RPAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmer, R.; Roberts, G.; Sanchez, K. J.; Nicoll, K.; Preissler, J.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Sciare, J.; Bronz, M.; Hattenberger, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Lauda, S.; Hashimshoni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancements in Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) have increased their possible uses in many fields for the past two decades. For atmospheric research, ultra-light RPAS (< 2.5kg) are now able to fly at altitudes greater than 3 km and even in cloud, which opens new opportunities to understand aerosol-cloud interactions. We are deploying the RPAS as part of the European project BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic Emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic Understanding). Field experiments in Cyprus and Ireland have already been conducted to study aerosol-cloud interactions in climatically different environments. The RPAS are being utilized in this study with the purpose of complementing ground-based observations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to conduct aerosol-cloud closure studies Cloud microphysical properties such as cloud drop number concentration and size can be predicted directly from the measured CCN spectrum and the observed updraft, the vertical component of the wind vector [e.g., Conant et al, 2004]. On the RPAS, updraft measurements are obtained from a 5-hole probe synchronized with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The RPA (remotely piloted aircraft) are programmed to fly at a level leg just below cloud base to measure updraft measurements while a scanning CCN counter is stationed at ground level. Vertical profiles confirm that CCN measurements on the ground are representative to those at cloud base. An aerosol-cloud parcel model is implemented to model the cloud droplet spectra associated with measured updraft velocities. The model represents the particle size domain with internally mixed chemical components, using a fixed-sectional approach [L. M. Russell and Seinfeld, 1998]. The model employs a dual moment (number and mass) algorithm to calculate growth of particles from one section to the next for non-evaporating species. Temperature profiles, cloud base, updraft velocities and aerosol size and composition, all

  16. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  17. Assessment of dust aerosol effect on cloud properties over Northwest China using CERES SSF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, T.; Su, J.; Minnis, P.; Lin, B.; Hu, Y.; Yi, Y.

    Dust aerosols not only have direct effects on the climate through reflection and absorption of the short and long wave radiation but also modify cloud properties such as the number concentration and size of cloud droplets indirect effect and contribute to diabatic heating in the atmosphere that often enhances cloud evaporation and reduces the cloud water path In this study indirect and semi-direct effects of dust aerosols are analyzed over eastern Asia using two years June 2002 to June 2004 of CERES Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy Budget Scanner and MODIS MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua Edition 1B SSF Single Scanner Footprint data sets The statistical analysis shows evidence for both indirect and semi-direct effect of Asia dust aerosols The dust appears to reduce the ice cloud effective particle diameter and increase high cloud amount On average ice cloud effective particle diameters of cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions dusty cloud are 11 smaller than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments The water paths of dusty clouds are also considerably smaller than those of dust-free clouds Dust aerosols could warm clouds thereby increasing the evaporation of cloud droplets resulting in reduced cloud water path semi-direct effect The semi-direct effect may be dominated the interaction between dust aerosols and clouds over arid and semi-arid areas and partly contribute to reduced precipitation

  18. Are Satellite-Retrieved Correlations Between Cloud-Top-Height and Aerosol Optical Depth Evidence of Aerosol Invigoration of Convection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, P.; Gryspeerdt, E.; Grandey, B. S.; Wagner, T. M.; Kipling, Z.

    2013-12-01

    A robust negative correlation between cloud top pressure (CTP) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) has been documented in a number of studies and triggered hypotheses on aerosol invigoration of convective clouds. However, correlation based analysis is limited in its explanatory power as it does not directly establish physical causality between the correlated properties which may be cross-correlated with other meteorological factors. In this study we combine the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM with mechanistic coupling of the aerosol microphysics (HAM) to the two-moment cloud microphysics in the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) and satellite data from SEVIRI, MODIS, ISCCP, CALIOP and CloudSat. CCFM explicitly simulates a spectrum of convective cloud top heights within each grid box, providing enhanced realism over traditional mass flux schemes. Consistency is established through sampling of the models at satellite overpass times and the use of ISCCP and COSP satellite simulators in the model. We employ this setup to investigate the contributions of aerosol-cloud interactions and meteorological cross-correlations to AOD--CTP correlations. Our analysis shows that a significant fraction of the observed AOD-CTP relationship is driven by the meteorological link between CTP and cloud fraction (CF), which itself is strongly linked to AOD via the humidification of aerosol in humid (hence preferentially cloudy) environments. Our results shed light on this controversial issue with potentially significant climate implications and emphasise the difficulty to constrain for meteorological variability in observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions.

  19. Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

    2002-03-08

    Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

  20. Smoke and Pollution Aerosol Effect on Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  1. Cloud/Aerosol Parameterizations: Application and Improvement of General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Joyce

    2012-06-30

    One of the biggest uncertainties associated with climate models and climate forcing is the treatment of aerosols and their effects on clouds. The effect of aerosols on clouds can be divided into two components: The first indirect effect is the forcing associated with increases in droplet concentrations; the second indirect effect is the forcing associated with changes in liquid water path, cloud morphology, and cloud lifetime. Both are highly uncertain. This project applied a cloud-resolving model to understand the response of clouds under a variety of conditions to changes in aerosols. These responses are categorized according to the large-scale meteorological conditions that lead to the response. Meteorological conditions were sampled from various fields, which, together with a global aerosol model determination of the change in aerosols from present day to pre-industrial conditions, was used to determine a first order estimate of the response of global cloud fields to changes in aerosols. The response of the clouds in the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to our global aerosol model were tested by examining whether the response is similar to that of the cloud resolving model and methods for improving the representation of clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions were examined.

  2. Aerosol Indirect Effect on Warm Clouds over Eastern China Using Combined CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol, one of key components of the climate system, is highly variable, both temporally and spatially. It often exerts great influences on the cloud-precipitation chain processes by serving as CCN/IN, altering cloud microphysics and its life cycle. Yet, the aerosol indirect effect on clouds remains largely unknown, because the initial changes in clouds due to aerosols may be enhanced or dampened by such feedback processes as modified cloud dynamics, or evaporation of the smaller droplets due to the competition for water vapor. In this study, we attempted to quantify the aerosol effects on warm cloud over eastern China, based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO and CPR/CLOUDSAT during the period 2006 to 2010. The seasonality of aerosol from ground-based PM10 is quite different from that estimated from MODIS AOD. This result is corroborated by lower level profile of aerosol occurrence frequency from CALIOP, indicating the significant role CALIOP could play in aerosol-cloud interaction. The combined use of CALIOP and CPR facilitate the process to exactly determine the (vertical) position of warm cloud relative to aerosol, out of six scenarios in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status, which shows as follows: AO (Aerosol only), CO (Cloud only), SASC (Single aerosol-single cloud), SADC (single aerosol-double cloud), DASC (double aerosol-single cloud), and others. Results shows that about 54% of all the cases belong to mixed status, among all the collocated aerosol-cloud cases. Under mixed condition, a boomerang shape is observed, i.e., reduced cloud droplet radius (CDR) is associated with increasing aerosol at moderate aerosol pollution (AOD<0.4), becoming saturated at AOD of 0.5, followed by an increase in CDR with aerosol. In contrast, there is no such boomerang shape found for (aerosol-cloud) separated cases. We categorize dataset into warm-season and cold-season subsets to figure out how the

  3. Observational Study and Parameterization of Aerosol-fog Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J.; Guo, X.; Liu, Y.; Fang, C.; Su, Z.; Chen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that human activities such as increased aerosols affect fog occurrence and properties significantly, and accurate numerical fog forecasting depends on, to a large extent, parameterization of fog microphysics and aerosol-fog interactions. Furthermore, fogs can be considered as clouds near the ground, and enjoy an advantage of permitting comprehensive long-term in-situ measurements that clouds do not. Knowledge learned from studying aerosol-fog interactions will provide useful insights into aerosol-cloud interactions. To serve the twofold objectives of understanding and improving parameterizations of aerosol-fog interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions, this study examines the data collected from fogs, with a focus but not limited to the data collected in Beijing, China. Data examined include aerosol particle size distributions measured by a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP-100X), fog droplet size distributions measured by a Fog Monitor (FM-120), Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN), liquid water path measured by radiometers and visibility sensors, along with meteorological variables measured by a Tethered Balloon Sounding System (XLS-Ⅱ) and Automatic Weather Station (AWS). The results will be compared with low-level clouds for similarities and differences between fogs and clouds.

  4. Assessment of the Interactions Among Tropospheric Aerosol Loading, Radiative Balance and Clouds Through Examination of Their Multi-decadal Trends

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. Anthropogenic emissions of prima...

  5. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Johnson, Jill S; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Schmidt, K Sebastian

    2016-05-24

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol-cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution to represent clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol-cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol-cloud radiation system. PMID:26831092

  6. Emulation of Cloud-Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effects (ECLAIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, E. M.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Lee, L.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Resolving sub-grid-scale interactions between clouds and aerosols is one of the biggest challenges facing climate models in the 21st century. By carefully selecting boundary conditions to represent grid boxes in larger-scale models, an emulator of a cloud-resolving model can be created and implemented in a regional or global model. Emulators can estimate the output of a model, based on a statistical analysis of outputs from simulations with known inputs. This method may reduce uncertainties in a range of cloud-scale processes, including calculations of aerosol indirect radiative effects, precipitation rates, and wet removal rates of aerosol. The Finnish Academy has recently funded the Emulation of Cloud-Aerosol Indirect Radiative Effects (ECLAIRE) project, whose aim is to construct emulators of cloud-scale processes from the WRF-Chem model and implement them into the ECHAM climate model. This poster will describe the goals and proposed methods of the project, together with any initial results.

  7. Cloud Forming Potential of Aminium Carboxylate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Hernandez, M. E.; McKeown, M.; Taylor, N.; Collins, D. R.; Lavi, A.; Rudich, Y.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect visibility, air quality, human health, climate, and in particular the aerosol direct and indirect forcings represent the largest uncertainty in climate projections. In this paper, we present laboratory measurements of the hygroscopic growth factors (HGf) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of a series of aminium carboxylate salt aerosols, utilizing a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and a CCN counter. HGf measurements were conducted for size-selected aerosols with diameters ranging from 46 nm to 151 nm and at relative humidity (RH%) values ranging from 10 to 90%. In addition, we have calculated the CCN activation diameters for the aminium carboxylate aerosols and derived the hygroscopicity parameter (k or kappa) values for all species using three methods, i.e., the mixing rule approximation, HGf, and CCN results. Our results show that variations in the ratio of acid to base directly affect the activation diameter, HGf, and (k) values of the aminium carboxylate aerosols. Atmospheric implications of the variations in the chemical composition of aminium carboxylate aerosols on their cloud forming potential will be discussed.

  8. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  9. Using High-Resolution Airborne Remote Sensing to Study Aerosol Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert; Munchak, Leigh; Mattoo, Shana; Marshak, Alexander; Wilcox, Eric; Gao, Lan; Yorks, John; Platnick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The horizontal space in between clear and cloudy air is very complex. This so-called twilight zone includes activated aerosols that are not quite clouds, thin cloud fragments that are not easily observable, and dying clouds that have not quite disappeared. This is a huge challenge for satellite remote sensing, specifically for retrieval of aerosol properties. Identifying what is cloud versus what is not cloud is critically important for attributing radiative effects and forcings to aerosols. At the same time, the radiative interactions between clouds and the surrounding media (molecules, surface and aerosols themselves) will contaminate retrieval of aerosol properties, even in clear skies. Most studies on aerosol cloud interactions are relevant to moderate resolution imagery (e.g. 500 m) from sensors such as MODIS. Since standard aerosol retrieval algorithms tend to keep a distance (e.g. 1 km) from the nearest detected cloud, it is impossible to evaluate what happens closer to the cloud. During Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), the NASA ER-2 flew with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), providing MODIS-like spectral observations at high (50 m) spatial resolution. We have applied MODIS-like aerosol retrieval for the eMAS data, providing new detail to characterization of aerosol near clouds. Interpretation and evaluation of these eMAS aerosol retrievals is aided by independent MODIS-like cloud retrievals, as well as profiles from the co-flying Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Understanding aerosolcloud retrieval at high resolution will lead to better characterization and interpretation of long-term, global products from lower resolution (e.g.MODIS) satellite retrievals.

  10. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  11. Towards global constraints of aerosol-convection interactions from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions arguably remain the single greatest uncertainty among anthropogenic perturbations of the climate system. In particular interactions between aerosols and convection remain highly uncertain. In this presentation, I will critically review some of the achievements made towards constraining aerosol-convection interactions from satellite remote sensing and their role in the evaluation of global aerosol-climate models. This will particularly focus on model-data synergies in the assessment of observational constraints, from the suitability of satellite retrieved aerosol properties as proxy for cloud condensation nuclei, all the way to the difficulty to constrain meteorological co-variability in observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. Most of the satellite-based work on aerosol-convection interactions has been based on data from sun-synchronous polar orbiting satellites. While these instruments often offer superior data quality, they capture only a certain stage of the convective life-cycle. A life-cycle based approach to aerosol-convection interactions, combining results from polar orbiting instruments with non sun-synchronous or geostationary data provides entirely novel insights into the convective lifecycle and aerosol-convection interactions, which we apply to constrain aerosol-precipitation interactions.

  12. On the role of thermodynamics and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions over thunderstorm activity during GoAmazon and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C. A.; Hoeller, H.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Eichholz, C.; Oliveira, R. A. J.; Sperling, V.; Carvalho, I.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Amaral, L. F.; Cecchin, M.; Saraiva, J.; Saraiva, I.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Based on satellite data, total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning activity climatological annual cycle over the GoAmazon area of interest (from T0 to T3 sites) shows that lightning activity is moderate (up to 10 flashes per day - fl day-1) throughout the wet (December-March) and dry (April-August) seasons, with T3 always being a little greater than T1 and T0 sites, respectively. During the dry-to-wet transition season (September-October), however, lightning activity peaks up to 25 fl day-1 at T1, followed by T3 (20 fl day-1) and T0 (15 fl day-1). The diurnal cycle reveals that the onset of deep convection during this same season starts one hour and peaks two hours earlier than the wet season. In the Amazon, cloud updrafts are primarily controlled by the local environment thermodynamics. During the dry-to-wet transition season, thermodynamics is significantly changed by land cover land cover where cloud base heights are elevated over deforested areas potentially increasing the strength of updrafts due to a better processing of the convective available potential energy, and therefore also increasing cloud electrification. The total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) LIghtning NET(LINET - Nowcast) installed in September-October 2014 for GoAmazon IOP2 and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments and the set of weather radars revealed that the thunderstorm enhancement over T1 (Manaus) during the dry-to-wet season is driven by the interaction between river breeze and the main easterly winds over Amazon basin, resulting in a locally forced convergent flow on the east side of Rio Negro which drives deep afternoon convection. In terms of atmospheric pollution, the dry-to-wet season is also marked by increased biomass burning, and the city of Manaus (T1) is a local polluted heat island. We will also present quantified thermodynamical and microphysical differences between the thunderstorms that developed over T0, T1 and T2. Our hypothesis is that cloud charge centers, total

  13. An attempt to quantify aerosol-cloud effects in fields of precipitating trade wind cumuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Axel; Heus, Thijs

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol indirect effects are notoriously difficult to understand and quantify. Using large-eddy simulations (LES) we attempt to quantify the impact of aerosols on the albedo and the precipitation formation in trade wind cumulus clouds. Having performed a set of large-domain Giga-LES runs we are able to capture the mesoscale self-organization of the cloud field. Our simulations show that self-organization is intrinsically tied to precipitation formation in this cloud regime making previous studies that did not consider cloud organization questionable. We find that aerosols, here modeled just as a perturbation in cloud droplet number concentration, have a significant impact on the transient behavior, i.e., how fast rain is formed and self-organization of the cloud field takes place. Though, for longer integration times, all simulations approach the same radiative-convective equilibrium and aerosol effects become small. The sensitivity to aerosols becomes even smaller when we include explicit cloud-radiation interaction as this leads to a much faster and more vigorous response of the cloud layer. Overall we find that aerosol-cloud interactions, like cloud lifetime effects etc., are small or even negative when the cloud field is close to equilibrium. Consequently, the Twomey effect does already provide an upper bound on the albedo effects of aerosol perturbations. Our analysis also highlights that current parameterizations that predict only the grid-box mean of the cloud field and do not take into account cloud organization are not able to describe aerosol indirect effects correctly, but overestimate them due to that lack of cloud dynamical and mesoscale buffering.

  14. Simulation of the aerosol effect on the microphysical properties of shallow stratocumulus clouds over East Asia using a bin-based meso-scale cloud model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, I.-J.; Iguchi, T.; Kim, S.-W.; Yoon, S.-C.; Nakajima, T.

    2010-10-01

    aerosol-cloud interaction.

  15. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics. Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the corresponding atmosphere layer

  16. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Bréon, François-Marie

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics. Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the corresponding atmosphere layer

  17. Breakdown of model aircraft radome dielectric shell in artificial charged aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnikov, A. G.; Chernenskii, L. L.; Orlov, A. V.; Antonenko, S. S.

    2011-10-01

    The breakdown of a model aircraft radome dielectric shell in artificial charged aqueous aerosol clouds has been experimentally studied. It is established that, in most cases, electric breakdown of a model shell takes place without explicit discharge development between a charged aqueous aerosol cloud and a model antenna arranged under the radome shell. The probabilities of the dielectric shell breakdown have been determined for various radome models. A possible mechanism of the shell breakdown in hollow dielectric radomes interacting with charged aqueous aerosol clouds and electric discharges in these clouds is proposed that takes into account the accumulation of charges of opposite signs on the internal and external surface of the radome.

  18. 17 years of aerosol and clouds from the ATSR Series of Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in Earth's climate by scattering and absorbing incoming sunlight and affecting the formation and radiative properties of clouds. The extent to which aerosols affect cloud remains one of the largest sources of uncertainty amongst all influences on climate change. Now, a new comprehensive datasets has been developed under the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme to quantify how changes in aerosol levels affect these clouds. The unique dataset is constructed from the Optimal Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC) algorithm used in (A)ATSR (Along Track Scanning Radiometer) retrievals of aerosols generated in the Aerosol CCI and the CC4CL ( Community Code for CLimate) for cloud retrieval in the Cloud CCI. The ATSR instrument is a dual viewing instrument with on board visible and infra red calibration systems making it an ideal instrument to study trends of Aerosol and Clouds and their interactions. The data set begins in 1995 and ends in 2012. A new instrument in the series SLSTR(Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer) will be launch in 2015. The Aerosol and Clouds are retreived using similar algorithms to maximise the consistency of the results These state-of-the-art retrievals have been merged together to quantify the susceptibility of cloud properties to changes in aerosol concentration. Aerosol-cloud susceptibilities are calculated from several thousand samples in each 1x1 degree globally gridded region. Two-D histograms of the aerosol and cloud properties are also included to facilitate seamless comparisons between other satellite and modelling data sets. The analysis of these two long term records will be discussed individually and the initial comparisons between these new joint products and models will be presented.

  19. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): Demonstrating New Techniques for Cloud and Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Palm, S. P.; Hlavka, D. L.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Selmer, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar that provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CATS payload has been operating since early February 2015 from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS was designed to operate for six months, and up to three years, providing a combination of operational science, in-space technology demonstration, and technology risk reduction for future Earth Science missions. One of the primary project goals of CATS is to demonstrate technology in support of future space-based lidar mission development. The CATS instrument has been demonstrating the high repetition rate laser and photon counting detection approach to lidar observations, in contrast to the low repetition rate, high energy technique employed by CALIPSO. Due to this technique, cloud and aerosol profile data exhibit high spatial and temporal resolution, which was never before possible from a space-based platform. Another important science goal of the CATS-FO project is accurate determination of aerosol type on a global scale. CATS provided the first space-based depolarization measurements at multiple wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm), and first measurements at 1064 nm from space. The ratio of the depolarization measurements at these two wavelengths enables significant improvement in aerosol typing. The CATS retrievals at 1064 nm also provide improvements to detecting aerosols above clouds. The CATS layer identification algorithm is a threshold-based layer detection method that uses the 1064 nm attenuated scattering ratio and also includes a routine to identify clouds embedded within aerosol layers. This technique allows CATS to detect the full extent of the aerosol layers above the cloud, and differentiate these two layers so that the optical properties can be more accurately determined.

  20. Variability of Aerosol and its Impact on Cloud Properties Over Different Cities of Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan

    Interaction between aerosols and clouds is the subject of considerable scientific research, due to the importance of clouds in controlling climate. Aerosols vary in time in space and can lead to variations in cloud microphysics. This paper is a pilot study to examine the temporal and spatial variation of aerosol particles and their impact on different cloud optical properties in the territory of Pakistan using the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite data and Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) data. We also use Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for trajectory analysis to obtain origin of air masses in order to understand the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol concentrations. We validate data of MODIS and MISR by using linear correlation and regression analysis, which shows that there is an excellent agreement between data of these instruments. Seasonal study of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) shows that maximum value is found in monsoon season (June-August) over all study areas. We analyze the relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and some cloud parameters like water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud top temperature (CTT) and cloud top pressure (CTP). We construct the regional correlation maps and time series plots for aerosol and cloud parameters mandatory for the better understanding of aerosol-cloud interaction. Our analyses show that there is a strong positive correlation between AOD and water vapor in all cities. The correlation between AOD and CF is positive for the cities where the air masses are moist while the correlation is negative for cities where air masses are relatively dry and with lower aerosol abundance. It shows that these correlations depend on meteorological conditions. Similarly as AOD increases Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) is decreasing while Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) is increasing. Key Words: MODIS, MISR, HYSPLIT, AOD, CF, CTP

  1. Aerosol and Plasma Measurements in Noctilucent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop rocket-borne probes to detect charged aerosol layers in the mesosphere. These include sporadic E layers, which have their origin in meteoric dust, and noctilucent clouds, which form in the arctic summer and are composed of ice crystals. The probe being developed consists of a charge collecting patch connected to a sensitive electrometer which measures the charge deposited on the patch by impacting aerosols. The ambient electrons and light ions in the mesosphere are prevented from being collected by a magnetic field. The magnetic force causes these lighter particles to turn so that they miss the collecting patch.

  2. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  3. Separating Real and Apparent Effects of Cloud, Humidity, and Dynamics on Aerosol Optical Thickness near Cloud Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Li, Zhanqing

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is one of aerosol parameters that can be measured on a routine basis with reasonable accuracy from Sun-photometric observations at the surface. However, AOT-derived near clouds is fraught with various real effects and artifacts, posing a big challenge for studying aerosol and cloud interactions. Recently, several studies have reported correlations between AOT and cloud cover, pointing to potential cloud contamination and the aerosol humidification effect; however, not many quantitative assessments have been made. In this study, various potential causes of apparent correlations are investigated in order to separate the real effects from the artifacts, using well-maintained observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network, Total Sky Imager, airborne nephelometer, etc., over the Southern Great Plains site operated by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. It was found that aerosol humidification effects can explain about one fourth of the correlation between the cloud cover and AOT. New particle genesis, cloud-processed particles, atmospheric dynamics, and aerosol indirect effects are likely to be contributing to as much as the remaining three fourth of the relationship between cloud cover and AOT.

  4. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  5. Simultaneous observations of aerosols, clouds, and radiometric fluxes using light-weight autonomous UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G.; Ramanathan, V.; Corrigan, C.; Ramana, M.; Nguyen, H.

    2006-12-01

    The Maldives Air Campaign (MAC) demonstrated a novel application of stacked autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAVs) for atmospheric science research; see abstract by Ramanathan et al. in this session. Simultaneous observations from three AUAVs of aerosols, clouds and radiometric fluxes provide insight into aerosol-cloud interactions and subsequent effects on cloud radiative properties. Ground-based measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) also quantify the cloud-nucleating ability of the boundary layer aerosols. During the experiment, long-range transport of aerosols from the Arabian Peninsula and India was observed and its impact of cloud physical and radiometric properties has been detected. To accomplish this campaign, aerosol, cloud, radiometric instruments, and an integrated data acquisition system have been miniaturized with a total payload weight and power less than 5 kg and 50 W, respectively. The AUAV payloads are mission-specific and outfitted to perform a defined set of measurements depending on the scientific goals. These measurements include aerosol concentration, aerosol size distribution, aerosol absorption, cloud drop concentration and size distribution, solar radiation fluxes (visible and broadband), atmospheric turbulence, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity. The data collected during the MAC campaign has been validated using standard calibration routines in conjunction with comparisons to ground- based instruments in both laboratory and in situ (in aircraft) settings. All instruments have been thoroughly tested and calibrated prior to deployment.

  6. Aerosols, Clouds, and Climate: From Micro to Macro (422nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yangang

    2007-02-21

    Including aerosols, clouds and precipitation, particles in the atmosphere interact with one another and affect the Earth’s climate through a myriad of complex processes acting over a wide range of scales -- from the sub-micrometer to the global scale of over 10,000 kilometers. Looking at these phenomena from microscopic through macroscopic points of view, this lecture will examine aerosols-clouds-climate interactions, address the indirect impact of anthropogenic aerosol particles on the Earth’s climate by altering properties of cloud and precipitation, and explore important feedback mechanisms helping to shape the Earth’s climate.

  7. Aerosol-cloud associations over Gangetic Basin during a typical monsoon depression event using WRF-Chem simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Chandan; Tripathi, S. N.; Tripathi, Shivam; Barth, Mary C.

    2015-10-01

    To study aerosol-cloud interactions over the Gangetic Basin of India, the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been applied to a typical monsoon depression event prevalent between the 23 and 29 August 2009. This event was sampled during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement EXperiment (CAIPEEX) aircraft campaign, providing measurements of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties from two sorties. Comparison of the simulated meteorological, thermodynamical, and aerosol fields against satellite and in situ aircraft measurements illustrated that the westward propagation of the monsoon depression and the cloud, aerosol, and rainfall spatial distribution was simulated reasonably well using anthropogenic emission rates from Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate project along with cityZEN projects (MACCity)+Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B anthropogenic emission rates. However,the magnitude of aerosol optical depth was underestimated by up to 50%. A simulation with aerosol emissions increased by a factor of 6 over the CAIPEEX campaign domain increased the simulated aerosol concentrations to values close to the observations, mainly within boundary layer. Comparison of the low-aerosol simulation and high-aerosol simulation for the two sorties illustrated that more anthropogenic aerosols increased the cloud condensing nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplet mass concentrations. The number of simulated cloud droplets increased while the cloud droplet effective radii decreased, highlighting the importance of CCN-cloud feedbacks over this region. The increase in simulated anthropogenic aerosols (including absorbing aerosols) also increased the temperature of air parcels below clouds and thus the convective available potential energy (CAPE). The increase in CAPE intensified the updraft and invigorated the cloud, inducing formation of deeper clouds with more ice-phase hydrometeors for both cases

  8. Aerosols, cloud microphysics, and fractional cloudiness.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, B A

    1989-09-15

    Increases in aerosol concentrations over the oceans may increase the amount of low-level cloudiness through a reduction in drizzle-a process that regulates the liquid-water content and the energetics of shallow marine clouds. The resulting increase in the global albedo would be in addition to the increase due to enhancement in reflectivity associated with a decrease in droplet size and would contribute to a cooling of the earth's surface. PMID:17747885

  9. Climate Effects of Cloud Modified CCN-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, S. R., Jr.; Hudson, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) play an important role in the climate system through the indirect aerosol effect (IAE). IAE is one of the least understood aspects of the climate system as many cloud processes are complicated. Many studies of aerosol-cloud interaction involve CCN interaction with cloud droplet concentrations (Nc), cloud microphysics, and radiative properties. However, fewer studies investigate how cloud processes modify CCN. Upon evaporation from non-precipitating clouds, CCN distributions develop bimodal shaped distributions (Hoppel et al. 1986). Activated CCN participate in cloud processing that is either chemical: aqueous oxidation; or physical: Brownian scavenging, collision and coalescence. Chemical processing does not change CCN concentration (NCCN) but reduces critical supersaturations (Sc; larger size) (Feingold and Kreidenweis, 2000) while physical processing reduces NCCN and Sc. These processes create the minima in the bimodal CCN distributions (Hudson et al., 2015). Updraft velocity (W) and NCCN are major factors on how these modified CCN distributions affect clouds. Panel a shows two nearby CCN distributions in the MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE), which have similar concentrations, but the bimodal one (red) has been modified by cloud processing. In a simplified cloud droplet model, the modified CCN then produces higher Nc (panel b) and smaller droplet mean diameters (MD; panel c) when compared to the unmodified CCN (black) for W lower than 50 cm/s. The better CCN (lower Sc) increase competition among droplets reducing MD and droplet distribution spread (σ) which acts to reduce drizzle. Competition is created by limited available condensate due to lower S created by the low W (<50 cm/s) typical of stratus. The increased Nc of the modified CCN in stratus then increases IAE in the climate system. At higher W (>50 cm/s) typical of cumuli, Ncis reduced and MD is increased from the modified CCN distribution (panels b & c). Here

  10. Aerosol/cloud Base Droplet Size Distribution Characteristics and the Onset of Coalescence in Shallow and Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruintjes, R. T.; Lawson, P.; Lance, S.; Axisa, D.; Woods, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is clear that aerosols contribute to the observed differences in cloud droplet size distributions between maritime and continental and between non-polluted and polluted convection. In addition, other factors such as cloud base temperature, boundary layer depth, thermodynamic profile (updraft speeds) that vary between land and ocean regions, could also be contributing to the observed differences or acting in concert with aerosol effects. In addition, the initial cloud droplet spectra at cloud base to a large extent determines the microphysical processes of precipitation formation (water and ice) at higher levels in the clouds and thus the vertical transport of aerosols and gases in deep convective clouds. During the 2013 NASA SEAC4RS field campaign we have collected a large amount of microphysical data in both shallow and deep convective clouds. This data will be compared to data from other field campaigns to detect specific characteristics of the cloud base droplet size distribution and relate it to onset and evolution of the coalescence process in clouds. The presentation will provide a survey of the cloud droplet size distributions at cloud base in both shallow and deep convective clouds and will relate them to environmental parameters to better understand aerosol-cloud interactions and the other parameters that play a role in the onset of coalescence in convective clouds. We will relate the airborne aerosol variations (size and concentration in different environments) to the cloud droplet size distribution. Model simulations using a detailed coalescence model will be used to obtain a better understanding of the onset of the coalescence process.

  11. Sulfur aerosol in the clouds of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-08-01

    The photochemical model for the middle atmosphere of Venus (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2012] Icarus, 218, 230-246) predicts sulfur aerosol as a product of the OCS photolysis at 55-60 km. The calculated mass loading is much smaller than that of the mode 1 particles in the upper cloud layer. The chemical kinetic model for the lower atmosphere (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2013], Icarus, 225, 570-580) results in a constant mixing ratio of 20 ppm for OCS + XSX. This means the S8 mixing ratio of 2.5 ppm near the model upper boundary at 47 km. Using this abundance, the calculated profile of the sulfur aerosol has a bottom that coincides with the lower boundary of modes 2 and 3 and constitutes ∼10% of the total mass loading in the lower cloud layer. Sulfur aerosol cannot be the near UV absorber because its abundance is too low at the cloud tops and disagrees with the profile of the absorber observed by Venera 14.

  12. Mass spectrometric airborne measurements of submicron aerosol and cloud residual composition in tropic deep convection during ACRIDICON-CHUVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Christiane; Schneider, Johannes; Mertes, Stephan; Kästner, Udo; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Sauer, Daniel; Fütterer, Daniel; Walser, Adrian; Borrmann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Airborne measurements of submicron aerosol and cloud particles were conducted in the region of Manaus (Amazonas, Brazil) during the ACRIDICON-CHUVA campaign in September 2014. ACRIDICON-CHUVA aimed at the investigation of convective cloud systems in order to get a better understanding and quantification of aerosol-cloud-interactions and radiative effects of convective clouds. For that, data from airborne measurements within convective cloud systems are combined with satellite and ground-based data. We used a C-ToF-AMS (Compact-Time-of-Flight-Aerosol-Mass-Spectrometer) to obtain information on aerosol composition and vertical profiles of different aerosol species, like organics, sulphate, nitrate, ammonium and chloride. The instrument was operated behind two different inlets: The HASI (HALO Aerosol Submicrometer Inlet) samples aerosol particles, whereas the CVI (Counterflow Virtual Impactor) samples cloud droplets and ice particles during in-cloud measurements, such that cloud residual particles can be analyzed. Differences in aerosol composition inside and outside of clouds and cloud properties over forested or deforested region were investigated. Additionally, the in- and outflow of convective clouds was sampled on dedicated cloud missions in order to study the evolution of the clouds and the processing of aerosol particles. First results show high organic aerosol mass concentrations (typically 15 μg/m3 and during one flight up to 25 μg/m3). Although high amounts of organic aerosol in tropic air over rainforest regions were expected, such high mass concentrations were not anticipated. Next to that, high sulphate aerosol mass concentrations (about 4 μg/m3) were measured at low altitudes (up to 5 km). During some flights organic and nitrate aerosol was observed with higher mass concentrations at high altitudes (10-12 km) than at lower altitudes, indicating redistribution of boundary layer particles by convection. The cloud residuals measured during in-cloud

  13. Multi-sensor quantification of aerosol-induced variability in warm clouds over eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu; Guo, Jianping; Zhang, Jiahua; Huang, Jingfeng; Min, Min; Chen, Tianmeng; Liu, Huan; Deng, Minjun; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-07-01

    Aerosol-cloud (AC) interactions remain uncharacterized due to difficulties in obtaining accurate aerosol and cloud observations. In this study, we quantified the aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on warm clouds over Eastern China based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO, and CPR/CLOUDSAT between June 2006 and December 2010. The seasonality of aerosols from ground-based PM10 (aerosol particles with diameter of 10 μm or less) significantly differed from that estimated using MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD). This result was supported by the lower level frequency profile of aerosol occurrence from CALIOP, indicative of the significant role of CALIOP in the AC interaction. To focus on warm clouds, cloud layers with base (top) altitudes above 7 (10) km were excluded. The combination of CALIOP and CPR was applied to determine the exact position of warm clouds relative to aerosols out of the following six scenarios in terms of AC mixing states: 1) aerosol only (AO); 2) cloud only (CO); 3) single aerosol layer-single cloud layer (SASC); 4) single aerosol layer-double cloud layers (SADC); 5) double aerosol layers - single cloud layer (DASC); and 6) others. The cases with vertical distance between aerosol and cloud layer less (more) than 100 m (700 m) were marked mixed (separated), and the rest as uncertain. Results showed that only 8.95% (7.53%) belonged to the mixed (separated and uncertain) state among all of the collocated AC overlapping cases, including SASC, SADC, and DASC. Under mixed conditions, the cloud droplet effective radius (CDR) decreased with increasing AOD at moderate aerosol loading (AOD<0.4), and then became saturated at an AOD of around 0.5, followed by an increase in CDR with increasing AOD, known as boomerang shape. Under separated conditions, no apparent changes in CDR with AOD were observed. We categorized the AC dataset into summer- and winter-season subsets to determine how the boomerang shape varied with season. The

  14. Towards a true aerosol-and-cloud retrieval scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gareth; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam; McGarragh, Greg; Jerg, Matthias; Siddans, Richard; Grainger, Don

    2014-05-01

    The Optimal Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC) - formally the Oxford-RAL Aerosol and Cloud retrieval - offers a framework that can provide consistent and well characterised properties of both aerosols and clouds from a range of imaging satellite instruments. Several practical issues stand in the way of achieving the potential of this combined scheme however; in particular the sometimes conflicting priorities and requirements of aerosol and cloud retrieval problems, and the question of the unambiguous identification of aerosol and cloud pixels. This presentation will present recent developments made to the ORAC scheme for both aerosol and cloud, and detail how these are being integrated into a single retrieval framework. The implementation of a probabilistic method for pixel identification will also be presented, for both cloud detection and aerosol/cloud type selection. The method is based on Bayesian methods applied the optimal estimation retrieval output of ORAC and is particularly aimed at providing additional information in the so-called "twilight zone", where pixels can't be unambiguously identified as either aerosol or cloud and traditional cloud or aerosol products do not provide results.

  15. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds, over South-East Atlantic. We use MODIS retrievals to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of cloud and aerosol layer altitudes. The latter are used to differentiate between cases of mixed and interacting cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This strategy allows, to a certain extent, to isolate real aerosol-induced effect from meteorology. Similar to previous studies, statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), in evident contrast with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). Because of this water loss, probably due to the entrainment of dry air at cloud top, Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) is found to be almost insensitive to changes in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidenced an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprising, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top, than in cases of physical interaction, This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence. Heating the atmosphere above the inversion, absorbing particles above cloud top may decrease the vertical temperature gradient, increase the low tropospheric stability and provide favorable conditions for low cloud formation. We also focus on the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on precipitation, through the statistical analysis of CDR-COT co-variations. A COT value of 10 is found to be the threshold beyond which precipitation mostly forms, in both clean and polluted environments. For larger COT, polluted clouds showed evidence of

  16. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  17. EDITORIAL: Cloud-rain interactions: as complex as it gets Cloud-rain interactions: as complex as it gets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ilan; Wang, Chien

    2008-12-01

    The effect of aerosol on clouds and precipitation poses one of the largest uncertainties in the estimation of the anthropogenic contribution to climate change. Often the local effect of aerosol on the radiation field both directly and indirectly by changing cloud properties can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the effect of greenhouse gases. Recent works also suggest that some of the local aerosol effects such as the heating of the atmosphere from aerosol absorption can have a large-scale impact. However, due to the inhomogeneous distribution and short lifetime of aerosols, the inherent complexity of cloud microphysics and dynamics, and the strong coupling of aerosol-related processes with meteorology, it is still challenging to estimate the overall effect that aerosols exert on the radiation field and climate. The climatic effect of aerosol-cloud interaction is not limited to the radiation field. By changing the cloud microphysical and radiative properties, aerosols may affect precipitation amount and patterns. Precipitation processes are located at the end of the 'food chain' of aerosol-cloud processes. Rain rates and patterns are the final result of many cloud processes and feedbacks, some of which are affected by aerosols. Changes in precipitation patterns could lead to serious hydrological consequences. For example if the same amount of rain precipitates in shorter time, e.g. heavier rain rates, the probability of floods increases, a larger portion of the water is drained by rapid surface run-off and the amount of water penetrating the subsurface and available as an underground reservoir of drinking water is reduced. Moreover, the subsurface water distribution depends heavily on topography and geomorphology. Therefore small changes in the timing or location of precipitation may dramatically alter the surface and subsurface water distribution and affect the water reservoir. In studying aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions, the largest

  18. Sulfate aerosol distributions and cloud variations during El Nino anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F. ); Hicks, B. )

    1993-02-20

    The effects of aerosols on cloud characteristics, albedo, rainfall amount, and overall climate changes were investigated by assessing the qualitative associations and quantitative correlations between the relevant variables during El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) perturbations. Both historical records and data from recent field measurements for the Pacific Ocean region were used for the investigation. The results show that ENSO perturbations could change sulfate aerosol production and distribution over the surveyed regions. Strong correlations were observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and sulfate aerosol concentrations, and between cloud amount and albedo. Weak but significant correlations were also observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and cloud amounts, and between sulfate aerosol concentrations and rainfall amounts. Although sulfate aerosols appeared to have a strong impact on cloud microphysics, the present data confirm that cloud dynamics play the pivotal role in control of cloud types and cloud amount in the studied regions. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations observed in marine stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Covert, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between measurements of cloud droplet number concentration and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, as inferred from aerosol size spectra, was investigated at a {open_quote}clean air{close_quote}, marine site (Cheeka Peak) located near the coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Preliminary results demonstrated that cloud droplet number increased and droplet diameter decreased as aerosol number concentration (CCN) increased. These results support predictions of a climate cooling due to any future increases in marine aerosol concentrations.

  20. The Deep South Clouds & Aerosols project: Improving the modelling of clouds in the Southern Ocean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Olaf; McDonald, Adrian; Harvey, Mike; Davies, Roger; Katurji, Marwan; Varma, Vidya; Williams, Jonny

    2016-04-01

    Southern-Hemisphere climate projections are subject to persistent climate model biases affecting the large majority of contemporary climate models, which degrade the reliability of these projections, particularly at the regional scale. Southern-Hemisphere specific problems include the fact that satellite-based observations comparisons with model output indicate that cloud occurrence above the Southern Ocean is substantially underestimated, with consequences for the radiation balance, sea surface temperatures, sea ice, and the position of storm tracks. The Southern-Ocean and Antarctic region is generally characterized by an acute paucity of surface-based and airborne observations, further complicating the situation. In recognition of this and other Southern-Hemisphere specific problems with climate modelling, the New Zealand Government has launched the Deep South National Science Challenge, whose purpose is to develop a new Earth System Model which reduces these very large radiative forcing problems associated with erroneous clouds. The plan is to conduct a campaign of targeted observations in the Southern Ocean region, leveraging off international measurement campaigns in this area, and using these and existing measurements of cloud and aerosol properties to improve the representation of clouds in the nascent New Zealand Earth System Model. Observations and model development will target aerosol physics and chemistry, particularly sulphate, sea salt, and non-sulphate organic aerosol, its interactions with clouds, and cloud microphysics. The hypothesis is that the cloud schemes in most GCMs are trained on Northern-Hemisphere data characterized by substantial anthropogenic or terrestrial aerosol-related influences which are almost completely absent in the Deep South.

  1. CALIPSO Observations of Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wood, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses spaceborne lidar data to study how near-cloud aerosol statistics of attenuated backscatter depend on cloud fraction. The results for a large region around the Azores show that: (1) far-from-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with lower cloud fractions, while near-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with higher cloud fractions; (2) near-cloud enhancements of attenuated backscatter occur for any cloud fraction but are most pronounced for higher cloud fractions; (3) the difference in the enhancements for different cloud fractions is most significant within 5km from clouds; (4) near-cloud enhancements can be well approximated by logarithmic functions of cloud fraction and distance to clouds. These findings demonstrate that if variability in cloud fraction across the scenes used to composite aerosol statistics are not considered, a sampling artifact will affect these statistics calculated as a function of distance to clouds. For the Azores-region dataset examined here, this artifact occurs mostly within 5 km from clouds, and exaggerates the near-cloud enhancements of lidar backscatter and color ratio by about 30. This shows that for accurate characterization of the changes in aerosol properties with distance to clouds, it is important to account for the impact of changes in cloud fraction.

  2. Some Technical Aspects of a CALIOP and MODIS Data Analysis that Examines Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    CALIOP shows stronger near-cloud changes in aerosol properties at higher cloud fractions. Cloud fraction variations explain a third of near-cloud changes in overall aerosol statistics. Cloud fraction and aerosol particle size distribution have a complex relationship.

  3. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  4. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; McGouldrick, K.; Wilquet, V.; Wilson, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. This paper gives a summary of new observations and modelling efforts that will form the basis for a relevant chapter in the Venus III book. Venus Express observations reveal significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology [1]. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression [2, 3]. UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics [4]. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator [5]. Based on Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and midwavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets [6]. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60 to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4

  5. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Dmitri; Ignatiev, Nikolay; McGouldrick, Kevin; Wilquet, Valerie; Wilson, Colin

    2015-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. Venus Express observations revealed significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression. The UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator. Based on the Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and mid-wavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60% to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4 concentration with a decreasing altitude (from 70-75% at about 90 km to 85% at 70 km of altitude) and (2) Many SOIR/SPICAV data cannot be fitted when using

  6. CALIPSO: Global Aerosol and Cloud Observations from Lidar and Passive Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Winker, D. M.; Pelon, J. R.; McCormick, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations) is an approved satellite mission being developed through collaboration between NASA and the French space agency CNES. The mission is scheduled for launch in 2004 and will operate for 3 years as part of a five-satellite formation called the Aqua constellation. This constellation will provide a unique data set on aerosol and cloud optical and physical properties and aerosol-cloud interactions that will substantially increase our understanding of the climate system and the potential for climate change.

  7. Research Spotlight: Is there a relationship between aerosol and cloud properties?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi; Ofori, Leslie; Tretkoff, Ernie

    The interaction of aerosols and clouds is a significant uncertainty in studies of anthropogenic forcing of climate. To learn more about the effects of fine aerosols on cloud microphysics, Costantino and Bréon performed a multisensor analysis of the atmosphere off the southwest coast of Africa. They chose this particular area because it is often affected by smoke from biomass burning. The aerosol particles from this smoke are transported by trade winds into the atmosphere, where they come in contact with low-level stratocumulus clouds.

  8. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  9. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; et al

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  10. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  11. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Mastsui, T.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 20011. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. ln this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific. In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection.

  12. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Dmitri; Ignatiev, Nikolay; McGouldrick, Kevin; Wilquet, Valerie; Wilson, Colin

    2015-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. Venus Express observations revealed significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression. The UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator. Based on the Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and mid-wavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60% to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4 concentration with a decreasing altitude (from 70-75% at about 90 km to 85% at 70 km of altitude) and (2) Many SOIR/SPICAV data cannot be fitted when using

  13. Quantifying Aerosol influences on the Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Sena, Elisa; Yamaguchi, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Although evidence of aerosol influences on the microphysical properties of shallow liquid cloud fields abounds, a rigorous assessment of aerosol effects on the radiative properties of these clouds has proved to be elusive because of adjustments in the evolving cloud system. We will demonstrate through large numbers of idealized large eddy simulation and 14 years of surface-based remote sensing at a continental US site that the existence of a detectable cloud microphysical response to aerosol perturbations is neither a necessary, nor a sufficient condition for detectability of a radiative response. We will use a new framework that focuses on the cloud field properties that most influence shortwave radiation, e.g., cloud fraction, albedo, and liquid water path. In this framework, scene albedo is shown to be a robust function of cloud fraction for a variety of cloud systems, and appears to be insensitive to averaging scale. The albedo-cloud fraction framework will be used to quantify the cloud radiative effect of shallow liquid clouds and to demonstrate (i) the primacy of cloud field properties such as cloud fraction and liquid water path for driving the cloud radiative effect; and (ii) that the co-variability between meteorological and aerosol drivers has a strong influence on the detectability of the cloud radiative effect, regardless of whether a microphysical response is detected. A broad methodology for systematically quantifying the cloud radiative effect will be presented.

  14. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zuidema, P; Chiu, C; Fairall, CW; Ghan, SJ; Kollias, P; McFarguhar, GM; Mechem, DB; Romps, DM; Wong, H; Yuter, SE; Alvarado, MJ; DeSzoeke, SP; Feingold, G; Haywood, JM; Lewis, ER; McComiskey, A; Redemann, J; Turner, DD; Wood, R; Zhu, P

    2015-12-01

    Southern Africa is the world’s largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth’s major subtropical stratocumulus decks. Global aerosol model results highlight that the largest positive top-of-atmosphere forcing in the world occurs in the southeast Atlantic, but this region exhibits large differences in magnitude and sign between reputable models, in part because of high variability in the underlying model cloud distributions. Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of shortwave-absorbing aerosol during transport, how much of the aerosol mixes into the cloudy boundary layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. In addition, the ability of the BB aerosol to absorb shortwave radiation is known to vary seasonally as the fuel type on land changes.

  15. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pöschl, U.; Rap, A.; Forster, P. M.

    2011-03-01

    Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (particles upon which cloud drops form) so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to cloud drops has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and a global aerosol model, we show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half of global cloud condensation nuclei. The evaluated model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel) carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.34 W m-2 due to changes in cloud albedo, with pollution sources alone causing a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.23 W m-2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from pollution sources means that whilst they account for only one-third of the emitted mass from these sources they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of small pollution particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  16. Dependence of the effect of aerosols on cirrus clouds on background vertical velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo

    2012-07-01

    Cirrus clouds cover approximately 20-25% of the globe and thus play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget. This important role in the radiation budget played by cirrus clouds indicates that aerosol effects on cirrus clouds can have a substantial impact on the variation of global radiative forcing if the ice-water path (IWP) changes. This study examines the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) through changes in the IWP for cirrus cloud cases. This study also examines the dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions in cirrus clouds on the large-scale vertical motion. We use a cloud-system resolving model (CSRM) coupled with a double-moment representation of cloud microphysics. Intensified interactions among the cloud ice number concentration (CINC), deposition and dynamics play a critical role in the IWP increases due to aerosol increases from the preindustrial (PI) level to the present-day (PD) level with a low large-scale vertical velocity. Increased aerosols lead to an increased CINC, providing an increased surface area for water vapor deposition. The increased surface area leads to increased deposition despite decreased supersaturation with increasing aerosols. The increased deposition causes an increased depositional heating which produces stronger updrafts, and these stronger updrafts lead to the increased IWP. However, with a high large-scale vertical velocity, the effect of increased CINC on deposition was not able to offset the effect of decreasing supersaturation with increasing aerosols. The effect of decreasing supersaturation on deposition dominant over that of increasing CINC leads to smaller deposition and IWP at high aerosol with the PD aerosol than at low aerosol with the PI aerosol. The conversion of ice crystals to aggregates through autoconversion and accretion plays a negligible role in the IWP responses to aerosols, as does the sedimentation of aggregates. The sedimentation of ice crystals plays a more important role in the IWP response to

  17. Optical properties of aerosol contaminated cloud derived from MODIS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Lelli, Luca; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosols above/within cloud can reduce the amount of up-welling radiation in visible (VIS) and short-wave infrared and darken the spectral reflectance when compared with a spectrum of a clean cloud observed by satellite instruments (Jethva et al., 2013). Cloud properties retrieval for aerosol contaminated cases is a great challenge. Even small additional injection of aerosol particles into clouds in the cleanest regions of Earth's atmosphere will cause significant effect on those clouds and on climate forcing (Koren et al., 2014; Rosenfeld et al., 2014) because the micro-physical cloud process are non-linear with respect to the aerosol loading. The current cloud products like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) ignoring the aerosol effect for the retrieval, which may cause significant error in the satellite-derived cloud properties. In this paper, a new cloud properties retrieval method, considering aerosol effect, based on the weighting-function (WF) method, is presented. The retrieval results shows that the WF retrieved cloud properties (e.g COT) agrees quite well with MODIS COT product for relative clear atmosphere (AOT ≤ 0.4) while there is a large difference for large aerosol loading. The MODIS COT product is underestimated for at least 2 - 3 times for AOT>0.4, and this underestimation increases with the increase of AOT.

  18. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  19. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; McGouldrick, K.; Wilquet, V.; Wilson, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. This paper gives a summary of new observations and modelling efforts that will form the basis for a relevant chapter in the Venus III book. Venus Express observations reveal significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology [1]. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression [2, 3]. UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics [4]. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator [5]. Based on Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and midwavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets [6]. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60 to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4

  20. Satellite Observations of the Effect of Natural and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is critical to quantifying anthropogenic climate change, to determine climate sensitivity from observations and to understand the hydrological cycle. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate.

  1. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  2. A ten-year global record of absorbing aerosols above clouds from OMI's near-UV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, Hiren; Torrres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction continues to be one of the leading uncertain components of climate models, primarily due to the lack of an adequate knowledge of the complex microphysical and radiative processes associated with the aerosolcloud system. The situations when aerosols and clouds are found in the same atmospheric column, for instance, when light-absorbing aerosols such as biomass burning generated carbonaceous particles or wind-blown dust overlay low-level cloud decks, are commonly found over several regional of the world. Contrary to the cloud-free scenario over dark surface, for which aerosols are known to produce a net cooling effect (negative radiative forcing) on climate, the overlapping situation of absorbing aerosols over cloud can potentially exert a significant level of atmospheric absorption and produces a positive radiative forcing at top-of-atmosphere. The magnitude of direct radiative effects of aerosols above cloud depends directly on the aerosol loading, microphysical-optical properties of the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud deck, and geometric cloud fraction. We help in addressing this problem by introducing a novel product of optical depth of absorbing aerosols above clouds retrieved from near-UV observations made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board NASA's Aura platform. The presence of absorbing aerosols above cloud reduces the upwelling radiation reflected by cloud and produces a strong `color ratio' effect in the near-UV region, which can be unambiguously detected in the OMI measurements. Physically based on this effect, the OMACA algorithm retrieves the optical depths of aerosols and clouds simultaneously under a prescribed state of atmosphere. The algorithm architecture and results from a ten-year global record including global climatology of frequency of occurrence and above-cloud aerosol optical depth, and a discussion on related future field campaigns are presented.

  3. Arctic aerosol and cloud measurements performed during IAOOS 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariage, Vincent; Pelon, Jacques; Blouzon, Frédéric; Geyskens, Nicolas; Amarouche, Nadir; Drezen, Christine; Calzas, Michel; Victori, Stéphane; Garracio, Magali; Desautez, Alain; Pascal, Nicolas; Foujols, Thomas; Sarkissian, Alain; Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Sennechael, Nathalie; Provost, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Better understanding of atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions and in particular of the role of aerosols and clouds in this Earth system is of prime importance in the Arctic. In the frame of the French IAOOS Equipex project, a new observational network is planned to be developed for ocean-ice-atmosphere climate survey over the Arctic, starting in 2015, to complement satellite observations. Eye-safe lidar measurements will allow us to profile aerosols and clouds for the atmospheric part, with the objective to perform regular measurements and characterize the vertical structure and optical properties. Radiation and meteorological parameters will be measured at the surface. A first buoy has been prototyped and deployed in April 2014 at the Barneo site set by the Russian teams at the North Pole. Measurements with the first autonomous backscatter lidar ever deployed in the arctic have been taken from April to end of November 2014 before the buoy was lost. Four profiles a day have been performed allowing a good sampling of cloud variability. Observations have shown that the occurrence of low level clouds was higher than 90% during summer. The project is presented, instrument performance is described and first results are discussed.

  4. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  5. Cloud residues and interstitial aerosols from non-precipitating clouds over an industrial and urban area in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Li, Peiren; Sun, Guode; Zhou, Shengzhen; Yuan, Qi; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-05-01

    Most studies of aerosol-cloud interactions have been conducted in remote locations; few have investigated the characterization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over highly polluted urban and industrial areas. The present work, based on samples collected at Mt. Tai, a site in northern China affected by nearby urban and industrial air pollutant emissions, illuminates CCN properties in a polluted atmosphere. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to obtain the size, composition, and mixing state of individual cloud residues and interstitial aerosols. Most of the cloud residues displayed distinct rims which were found to consist of soluble organic matter (OM). Nearly all (91.7%) cloud residues were attributed to sulfate-related salts (the remainder was mostly coarse crustal dust particles with nitrate coatings). Half the salt particles were internally mixed with two or more refractory particles (e.g., soot, fly ash, crustal dust, CaSO 4, and OM). A comparison between cloud residues and interstitial particles shows that the former contained more salts and were of larger particle size than the latter. In addition, a somewhat high number scavenging ratio of 0.54 was observed during cloud formation. Therefore, the mixtures of salts with OMs account for most of the cloud-nucleating ability of the entire aerosol population in the polluted air of northern China. We advocate that both size and composition - the two influential, controlling factors for aerosol activation - should be built into all regional climate models of China.

  6. Impact of Cloud-Borne Aerosol Representation on Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.

    2006-09-21

    Aerosol particles attached to cloud droplets are much more likely to be removed from the atmosphere and are much less efficient at scattering sunlight than if unattached. Models used to estimate direct and indirect effects of aerosols employ a variety of representations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol model with a relatively complete treatment of cloud-borne particles to estimate the sensitivity of simulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representation of cloud-borne particles. We find that neglecting transport of cloud-borne particles introduces little error, but that diagnosing cloud-borne particles produces global mean biases of 20% and local errors of up to 40% for many variables of interest. A treatment that predicts the total mass concentration of cloud-borne particles for each mode yields smaller errors and runs 20% faster than the complete treatment.

  7. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition

  8. Changes in Stratiform Clouds of Mesoscale Convective Complex Introduced by Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, B.; Min, Q.-L.; Li, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols influence the earth s climate through direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects. There are large uncertainties in quantifying these effects due to limited measurements and observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. As a major terrestrial source of atmospheric aerosols, dusts may serve as a significant climate forcing for the changing climate because of its effect on solar and thermal radiation as well as on clouds and precipitation processes. Latest satellites measurements enable us to determine dust aerosol loadings and cloud distributions and can potentially be used to reduce the uncertainties in the estimations of aerosol effects on climate. This study uses sensors on various satellites to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective complex (MCC). A trans-Atlantic dust outbreak of Saharan origin occurring in early March 2004 is considered. For the observed MCCs under a given convective strength, small hydrometeors were found more prevalent in the dusty stratiform regions than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust regions, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of clouds and precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the size spectrum of precipitation-sized hydrometeors from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately to suppress precipitation and increase the lifecycle of cloud systems, especially over stratiform areas.

  9. Integrated Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Product using CERES, MODIS, CALIPSO and CloudSat Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Yan; Gibson, Sharon; Yi, Yuhong; Trepte, Qing; Wielicki, Bruce; Kato, Seiji; Winker, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the development of the first integrated data set of global vertical profiles of clouds, aerosols, and radiation using the combined NASA A-Train data from the Aqua Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and CloudSat. As part of this effort, cloud data from the CALIPSO lidar and the CloudSat radar are merged with the integrated column cloud properties from the CERES-MODIS analyses. The active and passive datasets are compared to determine commonalities and differences in order to facilitate the development of a 3- dimensional cloud and aerosol dataset that will then be integrated into the CERES broadband radiance footprint. Preliminary results from the comparisons for April 2007 reveal that the CERES-MODIS global cloud amounts are, on average, 0.14 less and 0.15 greater than those from CALIPSO and CloudSat, respectively. These new data will provide unprecedented ability to test and improve global cloud and aerosol models, to investigate aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcing, and to validate the accuracy of global aerosol, cloud, and radiation data sets especially in polar regions and for multi-layered cloud conditions.

  10. Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Hoose, Corinna

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds by uptake into cloud particles, collision-coalescence, chemical processing inside the cloud particles and release back into the atmosphere has important effects on aerosol concentration, size distribution, chemical composition and mixing state. Aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei. Cloud droplets can take up further aerosol particles by collisions. Atmospheric gases may also be transferred into the cloud droplets and undergo chemical reactions, e.g. the production of atmospheric sulphate. Aerosol particles are also processed in ice crystals. They may be taken up by homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets below -38° C or by heterogeneous freezing above -38° C. This includes immersion freezing of already immersed aerosol particles in the droplets and contact freezing of particles colliding with a droplet. Many clouds do not form precipitation and also much of the precipitation evaporates before it reaches the ground. The water soluble part of the aerosol particles concentrates in the hydrometeors and together with the insoluble part forms a single, mixed, larger particle, which is released. We have implemented aerosol processing into the current version of the general circulation model ECHAM6 (Stevens et al., 2013) coupled to the aerosol module HAM (Stier et al., 2005). ECHAM6-HAM solves prognostic equations for the cloud droplet number and ice crystal number concentrations. In the standard version of HAM, seven modes are used to describe the total aerosol. The modes are divided into soluble/mixed and insoluble modes and the number concentrations and masses of different chemical components (sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt and mineral dust) are prognostic variables. We extended this by an explicit representation of aerosol particles in cloud droplets and ice crystals in stratiform clouds similar to Hoose et al. (2008a,b). Aerosol particles in cloud droplets are represented by 5 tracers for the

  11. Combined Observational and Modeling Efforts to Better Understand Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions Over Land: Preliminary Results from 7-SEAS/BASELInE 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Adrian M.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents some of the detailed observations of low-level stratocumulus over northern Vietnam during 7-SEASBASELInE 2013 by SMARTLabs' ACHIEVE W-band cloud radar and other remote sensing instruments. These observations are the first of their kind for this region and will aid in ongoing studies of biomass-burning aerosol impacts on local and regional weather and climate. Preliminary results from simulations using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) with recently implemented triple-moment bulk microphysics to examine the sensitivity of low-level stratocumulus over land to aerosols are also presented. Recommendations for future observational activities in the 7-SEAS northern region in collaboration with international partners will also be discussed.

  12. Effects of aerosols and relative humidity on cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-07-01

    The influences of the aerosol type and concentration and relative humidity (RH) on cumulus clouds have been investigated using a two-dimensional spectral-bin cloud model. Three simulations are conducted to represent the polluted continental, clean continental, and marine aerosol types. Under the same initial dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, the maritime aerosol case results in more intensive radar reflectivity in both developing and mature stages than the continental aerosol cases, because of enhanced warm rain by collisions and ice processes by deposition growth due to larger droplet sizes and higher supersaturation, respectively. The considerable delay in convective development due to reduced droplet condensation is responsible for the longer cloud lifetime in the marine aerosol case. For the continental case, the most noticeable effects of increasing aerosol number concentrations (with 15 different initial values) are the increases of the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud water content but a decrease in the effective droplet radius. More latent heat release from increasing condensation results in stronger convection and more melting precipitation at the higher aerosol concentrations. Melting precipitation and secondary clouds primarily contribute to enhanced precipitation with increasing aerosols. The precipitation, however, decreases with increasing aerosol in the extremely high aerosol cases (over 5 × 104 cm-3) due to suppression of convection from depleted water vapor and inefficient coalescence. When the initial aerosol concentration exceeds a critical level, most of the cloud properties become less sensitive to aerosols, implying that the aerosol effect on deep convection is more pronounced in relatively clean air than in heavily polluted air. The aerosol effect on the cloud properties is strongly dependent on RH. As the surface RH increases from 40 to 70%, the cloud changes from shallow warm to deep convective types due to a significant

  13. Cloud Cover Increase with Increasing Aerosol Absorptivity: A Counterexample to the Conventional Semidirect Aerosol Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine the aerosol semidirect effect using a general circulation model and four cases of the single-scattering albedo of dust aerosols. Contrary to the expected decrease in low cloud cover due to heating by tropospheric aerosols, we find a significant increase with increasing absorptivity of soil dust particles in regions with high dust load, except during Northern Hemisphere winter. The strongest sensitivity of cloud cover to dust absorption is found over land during Northern Hemisphere summer. Here even medium and high cloud cover increase where the dust load is highest. The cloud cover change is directly linked to the change in relative humidity in the troposphere as a result of contrasting changes in specific humidity and temperature. More absorption by aerosols leads to larger diabatic heating and increased warming of the column, decreasing relative humidity. However, a corresponding increase in the specific humidity exceeds the temperature effect on relative humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific humidity where cloud cover strongly increases is attributed to an enhanced convergence of moisture driven by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due to aerosol heating consistent with the conventional description of the semidirect effect, we conclude that the link between aerosols and clouds is more varied, depending also on changes in the atmospheric circulation and the specific humidity induced by the aerosols. Other absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are expected to have a similar effect.

  14. Absorbing Aerosols Above Cloud: Detection, Quantitative Retrieval, and Radiative Forcing from Satellite-based Passive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    , respectively. This study constitutes the first attempt to use non-polarized and non-lidar reflectance observations-both of them shown to have above-cloud aerosols retrieval capability, to retrieve above-cloud AOT by a passive non-polarized sensor. The uncertainty analysis suggests that the present method should retrieve above-cloud AOT within -10% to 50% which mainly arises due to uncertainty associated with the single-scattering albedo assumption. Although, currently tested by making use of OMI and MODIS measurements, the present color ratio method can be equally applied to the other satellite measurements that carry similar or near-by channels in VIS region of the spectrum such as MISR and NPP/VIIRS. The capability of quantifying the above-cloud aerosol load will facilitate several aspects of cloud-aerosol interaction research such as estimation of the direct radiative forcing of aerosols above clouds; the sign of which can be opposite (warming) to cloud-free aerosol forcing (cooling), aerosol transport, indirect effects of aerosols on clouds, and hydrological cycle.

  15. Combined observational and modeling based study of the relationship between aerosols and super-cooled cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, T.; Lohmann, U.; Choi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observational and modeling studies indicate that aerosols may have a strong effect on Earth's energy budget via their influence on mixed-phase clouds. Global climate studies have predicted aerosol interaction with mixed-phase clouds to warm the current climate, but estimates are uncertain because mixed-phase cloud processes in GCMs are highly parameterized and have to date been poorly constrained by satellite data. Here, we present global and regional distributions of the frequency of supercooled cloud water and its link to aerosols from two global climate models (GCMs), compared to a new satellite data set. Both GCMs link ice formation at temperatures between -40 and 0 degrees C to the simulated concentrations of aerosols with ice nucleating ability (IN), assigning different freezing efficiencies to the different insoluble aerosol species (mineral dust, bio-aerosols and soot). Consequently, both models generally simulate an anti-correlation between aerosol abundance and supercooled liquid water in clouds, a finding that was recently qualitatively confirmed by satellite observations. By studying the relationship between aerosols and the supercooled cloud fraction (SCF) from the GCMs and from the NASA spaceborne lidar instrument CALIOP (cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization), we get strong indications of how aerosols may influence mixed-phase clouds. Furthermore, based on the guidance from the satellite data, we perform global sensitivity simulations of the radiative effects associated with aerosol influence on mixed-phase clouds. We argue that with the new validation of SCF and its link to aerosols, GCM estimates of aerosol effects on climate via their influence on mixed-phase clouds may become more reliable.

  16. Aerosol Indirect Forcing Dictated by Warm Low-Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, M.; Chen, Y. C.; Stephens, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol indirect forcing is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in estimating the extent of global warming. Increased aerosol levels can enhance the solar reflection from warm liquid clouds countering greenhouse gas warming. However, very little is actually known about the strength of the indirect effects for mixed-phase stratiform clouds as well as other cloud types such as cumulus, altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection, and cirrus. These mixed-phase cloud types are ubiquitous and typically overlooked in satellite estimates of the indirect forcing. In this study we assess the responses of each major cloud type to changes in aerosol loading and provide an estimate of their contribution to the global mean indirect forcing. Satellite data is collected from several co-located sensors in the A-train for the period starting in January of 2007 - 2010. Cloud layers are classified according to the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR CloudSat product. Radiative fluxes are obtained from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and examined as a function of the aerosol loading obtained from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. For low-level cloud regimes (e.g., stratus, stratocumulus, cumulus) we show that the longwave contribution to the net indirect effect is insignificant and dominated by changes in reflected shortwave radiation which also becomes insignificant as cloud top temperature decreases below 0°C. An increase in the aerosol loading in mixed-phase stratocumulus leads to more ice and precipitation that depletes cloud water and limits cloud brightening. For the more convective type clouds (e.g., altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection), increased aerosol loading can invigorate deep convection and promote deeper clouds with higher cloud albedo (cooling effect) and cloud tops that emit less longwave radiation to space (warming effect). As a consequence, the shortwave and longwave indirect radiative effects tend to cancel for the

  17. Inter-comparison of CALIPSO and CloudSat retrieved profiles of aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters with aircraft profiles over a tropical region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmakumari, B.; Harikishan, G.; Maheskumar, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Satellites play a major role in understanding the spatial and vertical distribution of aerosols and cloud microphysical parameters over a large area. However, the inherent limitations in satellite retrievals can be improved through inter-comparisons with airborne platforms. Over the Indian sub-continent, the vertical profiles retrieved from space-borne lidar such as CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) on board the satellite CALIPSO and Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board the satellite CloudSat were inter- compared with the aircraft observations conducted during Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX). In the absence of high clouds, both aircraft and CALIOP showed similar features of aerosol layering and water-ice cloud signatures. As CALIOP could not penetrate the thick clouds, the aerosol information below the cloud is missed. While the aircraft could measure high concentrations below the cloud base and above the low clouds in the presence of high clouds. The aircraft derived liquid water content (LWC) and droplet effective radii (Re) showed steady increase from cloud base to cloud top with a variable cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). While the CloudSat derived LWC, CDNC and Re showed increase from the cloud top to cloud base in contradiction to the aircraft measurements. The CloudSat profiles are underestimated as compared to the corresponding aircraft profiles. Validation of satellite retrieved vertical profiles with aircraft measurements is very much essential over the tropics to improve the retrieval algorithms and to constrain the uncertainties in the regional cloud parameterization schemes.

  18. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

  19. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other

  20. Evaluation of cloud microphysical schemes on aerosol indirect effects from different scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, C. J.; Chen, Y. H.; Hashino, T.; Tsai, I. C.; Chen, W. T.; Chen, J. P.; Hsu, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of aerosol indirect effects in climate modeling remain unresolved and of large uncertainties. The complicated aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in climate model are suggested to be quite sensitive to some tunable microphysical parameters such as the threshold radius associated with autoconversion of cloud droplets to rain droplets. More fundamental studies regarding to different microphysical processes used in various cloud microphysical schemes should be devoted, evaluated and investigated. In this study, we apply a synergy of different scale models with the same cloud and aerosol microphysical schemes (Chen and Liu, 2004; Cheng et al., 2007; and Chen et al., 2013) to understand and evaluate how cloud microphysical processes can be influenced by different microphysical schemes and their interaction with aerosols and radiation. These models include Kinematic Driver (KiD), Single Column Model of Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM), Large Eddy Simulation (LES), and NCAR CESM model. Simulation results from these models will be further validated and compared to either field campaign or satellite observations depending on the scale of the models. Off-line satellite simulator approach (i.e. Joint-Simulator) will also be applied for evaluating cloud microphysics against CloudSat and CALIPSO. Such type of synergy of models can be very useful for improvement, development and evaluation of physical parameterizations for global climate prediction and weather forecast in the near future especially for processes related to cloud macrophysics and microphysics.

  1. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressure contains information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressure is close to the aerosol layer pressure, especially for optically thick aerosol layers. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressure may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO and AAI data, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given.

  2. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short

  3. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  4. Sulfate aerosols and polar stratospheric cloud formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, M.A. )

    1994-04-22

    Before the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole, it was generally assumed that gas-phase chemical reactions controlled the abundance of stratospheric ozone. However, the massive springtime ozone losses over Antarctica first reported by Farman et al in 1985 could not be explained on the basis of gas-phase chemistry alone. In 1986, Solomon et al suggested that chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) could be important for the observed ozone losses. Since that time, an explosion of laboratory, field, and theoretical research in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry has occurred. Recent work has indicated that the most important heterogeneous reaction on PSCs is ClONO[sub 2] + HCl [yields] Cl[sub 2] + HNO[sub 3]. This reaction converts inert chlorine into photochemically active Cl[sub 2]. Photolysis of Cl[sub 2] then leads to chlorine radicals capable of destroying ozone through very efficient catalytic chain reactions. New observations during the second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition found stoichiometric loss of ClONO[sub 2] and HCl in air processed by PSCs in accordance with reaction 1. Attention is turning toward understanding what kinds of aerosols form in the stratospheric, their formation mechanism, surface area, and specific chemical reactivity. Some of the latest findings, which underline the importance of aerosols, were presented at a recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration workshop in Boulder, Colorado.

  5. A Study of Cloud Processing of Organic Aerosols Using Models and CHAPS Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ervens, Barbara

    2012-01-17

    The main theme of our work has been the identification of parameters that mostly affect the formation and modification of aerosol particles and their interaction with water vapor. Our detailed process model studies led to simplifications/parameterizations of these effects that bridge detailed aerosol information from laboratory and field studies and the need for computationally efficient expressions in complex atmospheric models. One focus of our studies has been organic aerosol mass that is formed in the atmosphere by physical and/or chemical processes (secondary organic aerosol, SOA) and represents a large fraction of atmospheric particulate matter. Most current models only describe SOA formation by condensation of low volatility (or semivolatile) gas phase products and neglect processes in the aqueous phase of particles or cloud droplets that differently affect aerosol size and vertical distribution and chemical composition (hygroscopicity). We developed and applied models of aqueous phase SOA formation in cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA). Placing our model results into the context of laboratory, model and field studies suggests a potentially significant contribution of aqSOA to the global organic mass loading. The second focus of our work has been the analysis of ambient data of particles that might act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at different locations and emission scenarios. Our model studies showed that the description of particle chemical composition and mixing state can often be greatly simplified, in particular in aged aerosol. While over the past years many CCN studies have been successful performed by using such simplified composition/mixing state assumptions, much more uncertainty exists in aerosol-cloud interactions in cold clouds (ice or mixed-phase). Therefore we extended our parcel model that describes warm cloud formation by ice microphysics and explored microphysical parameters that determine the phase state and lifetime of

  6. Using OMI Observations to Measure Aerosol Absorption of Biomass Burning Aerosols Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Jethva, Hiren

    2011-01-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosol layers above clouds is unambiguously detected by the TOMS/OMI UV Aerosol Index (AI) that uses satellite observations at two near-UV channels. A sensitivity study using radiative transfer calculations shows that the AI signal of resulting from the presence of aerosols above clouds is mainly driven by the aerosol absorption optical depth and the optical depth of the underlying cloud. Based on these results, an inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of aerosol layers above clouds. In this presentation we will discuss the sensitivity analysis, describe the retrieval approach, and present results of applications of the retrieval method to OMI observations over the South Atlantic Ocean. Preliminary error analyses, to be discussed, indicate that the AOD can be underestimated (up to -30%) or overestimated (up to 60%) depending on algorithmic assumptions.

  7. Cosmic ray decreases affect atmospheric aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Henrik; Bondo, Torsten; Svensmark, Jacob

    2009-08-01

    Close passages of coronal mass ejections from the sun are signaled at the Earth's surface by Forbush decreases in cosmic ray counts. We find that low clouds contain less liquid water following Forbush decreases, and for the most influential events the liquid water in the oceanic atmosphere can diminish by as much as 7%. Cloud water content as gauged by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) reaches a minimum ≈7 days after the Forbush minimum in cosmic rays, and so does the fraction of low clouds seen by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and in the International Satellite Cloud Climate Project (ISCCP). Parallel observations by the aerosol robotic network AERONET reveal falls in the relative abundance of fine aerosol particles which, in normal circumstances, could have evolved into cloud condensation nuclei. Thus a link between the sun, cosmic rays, aerosols, and liquid-water clouds appears to exist on a global scale.

  8. Comparing the relationships between aerosol optical depth and cloud properties in observations and global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Quaas, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols impact the climate both directly, through their interaction with radiation and indirectly, via their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying cloud properties. The influence of aerosols on cloud properties is highly uncertain. Many relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties have been observed using satellite data, but previous work has shown that some of these relationships are the product of the strong AOD-cloud fraction (CF) relationship. The confounding influence of local meteorology obscures the magnitude of any aerosol impact on CF, and so also the impact of aerosol on other cloud properties. For example, both AOD and CF are strongly influenced by relative humidity, which can generate a correlation between them. Previous studies have used reanalysis data to account for confounding meteorological variables. This requires knowledge of the relevant meteorological variables and is limited by the accuracy of the reanalysis data. Recent work has shown that by using the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) to mediate the AOD-CF relationship, the impact of relative humidity can be significantly reduced. This method removes the limitations imposed by the finite accuracy of reanalysis data. In this work we investigate the impact of the CDNC mediation on the AOD-CF relationship and on the relationship between AOD and other cloud properties in global atmospheric models. By comparing pre-industrial and present day runs, we investigate the success of the CDNC mediated AOD-CF relationship to predict the change in CF from the pre-industrial to the present day using only observations of the present day relationships between clouds and aerosol properties. This helps to determine whether the satellite-derived relationship provides a constraint on the aerosol indirect forcing due to changes in CF.

  9. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  10. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  11. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al ., 2001]." Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 19991. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005

  12. Global cloud condensation nuclei influenced by carbonaceous combustion aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pöschl, U.; Rap, A.; Forster, P. M.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon in carbonaceous combustion aerosol warms the climate by absorbing solar radiation, meaning reductions in black carbon emissions are often perceived as an attractive global warming mitigation option. However, carbonaceous combustion aerosol can also act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) so they also cool the climate by increasing cloud albedo. The net radiative effect of carbonaceous combustion aerosol is uncertain because their contribution to CCN has not been evaluated on the global scale. By combining extensive observations of CCN concentrations with the GLOMAP global aerosol model, we find that the model is biased low (normalised mean bias = -77 %) unless carbonaceous combustion aerosol act as CCN. We show that carbonaceous combustion aerosol accounts for more than half (52-64 %) of global CCN with the range due to uncertainty in the emitted size distribution of carbonaceous combustion particles. The model predicts that wildfire and pollution (fossil fuel and biofuel) carbonaceous combustion aerosol causes a global mean cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect of -0.34 W m-2, with stronger cooling if we assume smaller particle emission size. We calculate that carbonaceous combustion aerosol from pollution sources cause a global mean aerosol indirect effect of -0.23 W m-2. The small size of carbonaceous combustion particles from fossil fuel sources means that whilst pollution sources account for only one-third of the emitted mass they cause two-thirds of the cloud albedo aerosol indirect effect that is due to carbonaceous combustion aerosol. This cooling effect must be accounted for, along with other cloud effects not studied here, to ensure that black carbon emissions controls that reduce the high number concentrations of fossil fuel particles have the desired net effect on climate.

  13. Development of Multi-Wavelength Raman Lidar and its Application on Aerosol and Cloud Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Yingjian; Wang, Zhenzhu; Tao, Zongming; Wu, Decheng; Wang, Bangxin; Zhong, Zhiqing; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-06-01

    A movable multi-wavelength Raman lidar (TMPRL) was built in Hefei, China. Emitting with three wavelengths at 1064, 532, and 355nm, receiving three above Mie scattering signals and two nitrogen Raman signals at 386 and 607nm, and depolarization signal at 532nm, TMPRL has the capacity to investigate the height resolved optical and microphysical properties of aerosol and cloud. The retrieval algorithms of optical parameters base on Mie-Raman technique and the microphysical parameters based on Bayesian optimization method were also developed and applied to observed lidar data. Designing to make unattended operation and 24/7 continuous working, TMPRL has joined several field campaigns to study on the aerosol, cloud and their interaction researches. Some observed results of aerosol and cloud optical properties and the first attempt to validate the vertical aerosol size distribution retrieved by TMPRL and in-situ measurement by airplane are presented and discussed.

  14. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  15. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  16. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Johnson, Jill S.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol‑cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution to represent clouds and aerosol‑cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol‑cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol‑cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol‑cloud radiation system.

  17. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Johnson, Jill S.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol−cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution to represent clouds and aerosol−cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol−cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol−cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol−cloud radiation system. PMID:26831092

  18. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  19. Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2009-02-01

    The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to

  20. Cloud and aerosol studies using combined CPL and MAS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Rodier, Sharon; Hu, Yongxiang; McGill, Matthew J.; Holz, Robert E.

    2004-11-01

    Current uncertainties in the role of aerosols and clouds in the Earth's climate system limit our abilities to model the climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties of adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. The A-train satellites (Aqua, CALIPSO, CloudSat, PARASOL, and Aura) will provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. The various active and passive sensors of the A-train will use a variety of measurement techniques to provide comprehensive observations of the multi-dimensional properties of clouds and aerosols. However, to fully achieve the potential of this ensemble requires a robust data analysis framework to optimally and efficiently map these individual measurements into a comprehensive set of cloud and aerosol physical properties. In this work we introduce the Multi-Instrument Data Analysis and Synthesis (MIDAS) project, whose goal is to develop a suite of physically sound and computationally efficient algorithms that will combine active and passive remote sensing data in order to produce improved assessments of aerosol and cloud radiative and microphysical properties. These algorithms include (a) the development of an intelligent feature detection algorithm that combines inputs from both active and passive sensors, and (b) identifying recognizable multi-instrument signatures related to aerosol and cloud type derived from clusters of image pixels and the associated vertical profile information. Classification of these signatures will lead to the automated identification of aerosol and cloud types. Testing of these new algorithms is done using currently existing and readily available active and passive measurements from the Cloud Physics Lidar and the MODIS Airborne Simulator, which simulate, respectively, the CALIPSO and MODIS A-train instruments.

  1. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals in Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Biomass Burning Region in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guo-Yong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol amount in clear regions of a cloudy atmosphere is a critical parameter in studying the interaction between aerosols and clouds. Since the global cloud cover is about 50%, cloudy scenes are often encountered in any satellite images. Aerosols are more or less transparent, while clouds are extremely reflective in the visible spectrum of solar radiation. The radiative transfer in clear-cloudy condition is highly three- dimensional (3D). This paper focuses on estimating the 3D effects on aerosol optical thickness retrievals using Monte Carlo simulations. An ASTER image of cumulus cloud fields in the biomass burning region in Brazil is simulated in this study. The MODIS products (i-e., cloud optical thickness, particle effective radius, cloud top pressure, surface reflectance, etc.) are used to construct the cloud property and surface reflectance fields. To estimate the cloud 3-D effects, we assume a plane-parallel stratification of aerosol properties in the 60 km x 60 km ASTER image. The simulated solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere is compared with plane-parallel calculations. Furthermore, the 3D cloud radiative effects on aerosol optical thickness retrieval are estimated.

  2. Cloud and Precipitation During GoAmazon: The Influence of Aerosol and Thermodynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Cecchin, M.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Albrecht, R. I.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Mei, F.; Schumacher, C.; Eichholz, C.; Giangrande, S. E.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Thalman, R. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon, GOAmazon, intensive field campaign, hereafter called IOP1 (February-March) and IOP2 (September - October) 2014, was an opportunity for broad and joint campaigns of the CHUVA, IARA and ACRIDICON-CHUVA projects. GOAmazon intends to study how aerosols and surface fluxes influence cloud cycles under clean conditions, as well as how aerosol and cloud life cycles, including cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions, are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity. This study employs the SIPAM S band radar, the X Band dual polarization radar, GOES images, disdrometers, CCN counters, radiosondes and data collected by G1 and HALO airplanes. As ancillary data, we used the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the TERRACLASS (INPE) and EVI from MODIS for surface topography, surface type classification and vegetation index, respectively. Cloud and precipitation are studied as function of aerosol concentration as well surface type and thermodynamic properties. Different sensors and space-time scales are employed to compare the life cycle and cloud size distribution using radar and satellite for different atmospheric conditions. For each IOP, the droplet size distribution using the airplanes or the particle size distribution using disdrometers are described discussing the aerosol, thermodynamic, surface type and topography effects on the clouds and precipitation. The typical precipitation behavior, for each IOP, is described using CFADs and reflectivity distributions. For few specific flights, those measuring ice particles, during the wet season (IOP1), some examples and classifications of convective and stratiform clouds are discussed. Finally, the microphysical properties of the clouds are presented using X band dual pol radar hydrometeor classifications and evaluating the effect of aerosol loading on the cloud vertical structure.

  3. Improved representation of stratocumulus clouds and the anthropogenic aerosol effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Hoose, Corinna; Frontoso, Grazia M.

    2014-05-01

    Stratocumulus clouds are important for future climate predictions as they have a strong cooling effect and the feedback of low clouds is believed to be a major cause of the model spread in climate sensitivity. Stratocumulus clouds are difficult to represent in a general circulation model because of their small vertical extent. Stratocumulus regions are also areas of a strong anthropogenic aerosol effect. Simulations of the anthropogenic aerosol effect can be expected to depend on the representation of stratocumulus clouds in climate models. We address the representation of several of the physical processes that have to be accounted for when modeling stratocumuli in the general circulation model ECHAM6 (Stevens et al., 2013) coupled to the aerosol module HAM2 (Zhang et al., 2012). As a 'long tail' stability function can lead to excessive mixing at high stabilities we replaced it with a 'sharp' stability function. The stratocumulus cloud cover and liquid water path increase, similar to previous studies, with the 'sharp' stability function in ECHAM6-HAM2. We also study the impact of increased vertical resolution in the lower troposphere in ECHAM6-HAM2 on stratocumulus clouds. First results show improvements for the cloud height and thickness with increased vertical resolution. To simulate a realistic mixing state and size of particles released by evaporation of clouds and precipitation we include aerosol processing in stratiform clouds. First results from multi-year simulations show that using a 'sharp' stability function decreases the anthropogenic aerosol effect from -1.5 W/m2 to -1.2 W/m2 and in-cloud aerosol processing to -0.8 W/m2. This strong decrease is due to an increase in the background aerosol load. Increased vertical resolution doesn't seem to affect the anthropogenic aerosol effect in the global average. Further results on the impact of changing the vertical resolution, a different stability function and in-cloud aerosol processing in ECHAM6-HAM2 on the

  4. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on Clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. In this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific, In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection. The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether high CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Stronger evaporative cooling can produce a stronger cold pool and thus stronger low-level convergence through interactions

  5. CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N.; Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Fischer, D.; Fischer, J.; Kremic, T.; Agrawal, A.; Andreae, M.; Bierbaum, R.; Blakeslee, R.; Boerner, A.; Bowles, N.; Christian, H.; Dunion, J.; Horvath, A.; Huang, X.; Khain, A.; Kinne, S.; Lemos, M.-C.; Penner, J.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. Knowledge of these interactions is foundational to our understanding of weather and climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Decadal Survey (NRC 2007) indicate that the uncertainty in how clouds adjust to aerosol perturbations dominates the uncertainty in the overall quantification of the radiative forcing attributable to human activities. The Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER) mission concept responds to the IPCC and Decadal Survey concerns by studying the activation of CCN and their interactions with clouds and storms. CHASER proposes to revolutionize our understanding of the interactions of aerosols with clouds by making the first global measurements of the fundamental physical entity linking them: activated cloud condensation nuclei. The CHASER mission was conceptualized to measure all quantities necessary for determining the interactions of aerosols with clouds and storms. Measurements by current satellites allow the determination of crude profiles of cloud particle size but not of the activated CCN that seed them. CHASER uses a new technique (Freud et al. 2011; Rosenfeld et al. 2012) and high-heritage instruments to produce the first global maps of activated CCN and the properties of the clouds associated with them. CHASER measures the CCN concentration and cloud thermodynamic forcing simultaneously, allowing their effects to be distinguished. Changes in the behavior of a group of weather systems in which only one of the quantities varies (a partial derivative of the intensity with the desirable quantity) allow the determination of each effect statistically. The high uncertainties of current climate predictions limit their much-needed use in decision-making. CHASER mitigates this

  6. The Impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, A S; Kirkpatrick, M P; Stevens, D E; Toon, O B

    2004-12-20

    Some of the global warming effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases is offset by increased solar reflection from clouds with smaller droplets that form on increased numbers of cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air. The global magnitude of the resulting indirect aerosol climate forcing is estimated to be comparable (and opposed) to the anthropogenic carbon dioxide forcing, but estimates are highly uncertain because of complexities in characterizing the physical process that determine global aerosol and cloud populations and their interactions. Beyond reflecting sunlight more effectively, smaller droplets are less efficient at producing precipitation, and decreased precipitation is expected to result in increased cloud water and cloud cover, further increasing the indirect forcing. Yet polluted marine boundary-layer clouds are not generally observed to hold more water. Here we use model simulations of stratocumulus clouds to show that suppression of precipitation from increased droplet concentrations leads to increased cloud water only when sufficient precipitation reaches the surface, a condition favored when the overlying air is moist. Otherwise, aerosol induced suppression of precipitation enhances entrainment of overlying dry air, thereby reducing cloud water and diminishing the indirect climate forcing.

  7. Cloud, Aerosol, and Volcanic Ash Retrievals Using ASTR and SLSTR with ORAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarragh, Gregory; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam; Thomas, Gareth; Christensen, Matt; Sus, Oliver; Schlundt, Cornelia; Stapelberg, Stefan; Stengel, Martin; Grainger, Don

    2015-12-01

    The Optimal Retrieval of Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC) is a generalized optimal estimation system that retrieves cloud, aerosol and volcanic ash parameters using satellite imager measurements in the visible to infrared. Use of the same algorithm for different sensors and parameters leads to consistency that facilitates inter-comparison and interaction studies. ORAC currently supports ATSR, AVHRR, MODIS and SEVIRI. In this proceeding we discuss the ORAC retrieval algorithm applied to ATSR data including the retrieval methodology, the forward model, uncertainty characterization and discrimination/classification techniques. Application of ORAC to SLSTR data is discussed including the additional features that SLSTR provides relative to the ATSR heritage. The ORAC level 2 and level 3 results are discussed and an application of level 3 results to the study of cloud/aerosol interactions is presented.

  8. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  9. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  10. Assessing aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Wang, Minghuai; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Barahona, Donifan; Kooperman, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and influencing the hydrological cycle. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei for ice crystal formation, thus affecting the physical properties of ice clouds. Because the related dynamical and microphysical processes happen at very small spatial and temporal scales, it is a great challenge to accurately represent them in global climate models. Consequently, the aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds (ice AIE) estimated by global climate models is associated with large uncertainties. In order to better understand these processes and improve ice cloud parameterization in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5 (CAM5), we analyze in-situ measurements from various research campaigns, and use the derived statistical information to evaluate and constrain the model [1]. We also make use of new model capabilities (prescribed aerosols and nudging) to estimate the aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds, and quantify the uncertainties associated with ice nucleation processes. In this study, a new approach is applied to separate the impact of aerosols on warm and cold clouds by using the prescribed-aerosol capability in CAM5 [2]. This capability allows a single simulation to simultaneously include up to three aerosol fields: online calculated, as well as prescribed pre-industrial (PI) and present-day conditions (PD). In a set of sensitivity simulations, we use the same aerosol fields to drive droplet activation in warm clouds, and different (PD and PI) conditions for different components of the ice nucleation parameterization in pure ice clouds, so as to investigate various ice nucleation mechanisms in an isolated manner. We also applied nudging in our simulations, which helps to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in much shorter simulation period [3] and isolate the impact of aerosols on ice clouds from other factors, such as temperature and relative humidity change. The

  11. Aerosol size distribution variability as a function of distance to Caribbean Trade Wind Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Robles, M.; Rauber, R.; di Girolamo, L.; Jensen, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Shallow maritime cumuli continually modify aerosol size distributions in the trade wind regime, which leads to sampling problems due to this continual aerosol-cloud interaction. Because of the ubiquity of trade wind clouds across the world’s tropical oceans, understanding the relationship between trade wind cumuli and aerosol spectra in the trade wind layer is required to evaluate the role of aerosols in Earth's radiation balance and climate. Studies in the past typically select either cloudy or cloud free areas to obtain aerosol size distributions. However, conclusions of past studies point to the fact that distance to cloud is an important parameter to consider when reporting aerosol size distributions. In this work, data collected from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Hercules C-130 during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during November 2004 - January 2005 in the trades over the western Atlantic, is used to study the variations of deliquesced and dry particle size distributions of sub-micron (dry radius, r = 0.05 - 1.0 μm) and giant (1 < r ≤ 10 μm) particles as function of distance to cloud and altitude above the ocean surface. Data collected from 13 research flights using aircraft mounted probes, PCASP/SPP-200 and FSSP/SPP-100, are used to obtain variations in particle spectra as a function of distance to cloud between 600m and 2000m above the ocean surface. Statistical summaries of the aerosol characteristics of the trade wind environment in the vicinity of clouds observed during RICO will be presented.

  12. Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds: The Software Package OPAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, M.; Koepke, P.; Schult, I.

    1998-05-01

    The software package OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) is described. It easily provides optical properties in the solar and terrestrial spectral range of atmospheric particulate matter. Microphysical and optical properties of six water clouds, three ice clouds, and 10 aerosol components, which are considered as typical cases, are stored as ASCII files. The optical properties are the extinction, scattering, and absorption coefficients, the single scattering albedo, the asymmetry parameter, and the phase function. They are calculated on the basis of the microphysical data (size distribution and spectral refractive index) under the assumption of spherical particles in case of aerosols and cloud droplets and assuming hexagonal columns in case of cirrus clouds. Data are given for up to 61 wavelengths between 0.25 and 40 m and up to eight values of the relative humidity. The software package also allows calculation of derived optical properties like mass extinction coefficients and Ångström coefficients.Real aerosol in the atmosphere always is a mixture of different components. Thus, in OPAC it is made possible to get optical properties of any mixtures of the basic components and to calculate optical depths on the base of exponential aerosol height profiles. Typical mixtures of aerosol components as well as typical height profiles are proposed as default values, but mixtures and profiles for the description of individual cases may also be achieved simply.

  13. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  14. Cassini/CIRS capabilities for aerosol, cloud, and surface measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelson, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Information that should be revealed by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) about the aerosol, cloud, and surface properties of Titan are addressed. Limb sounding data will be used to determine aerosol abundances, scale heights, and gradients between 80 and 400 km for various latitudes. Stratospheric condensate cloud top altitudes and column abundances will be inferred as functions of latitude. A search for new species will be conducted. Thermal maps between 500 and 550/cm will be used to investigate tropospheric methane clouds and surface topography; time resolution provided by different orbits will be used to distinguish the two.

  15. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds. PMID:17695910

  16. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd

  17. Eye safe short range standoff aerosol cloud finder.

    SciTech Connect

    Bambha, Ray P.; Schroder, Kevin L.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2005-02-01

    Because many solid objects, both stationary and mobile, will be present in an indoor environment, the design of an indoor aerosol cloud finding lidar (light detection and ranging) instrument presents a number of challenges. The cloud finder must be able to discriminate between these solid objects and aerosol clouds as small as 1-meter in depth in order to probe suspect clouds. While a near IR ({approx}1.5-{micro}m) laser is desirable for eye-safety, aerosol scattering cross sections are significantly lower in the near-IR than at visible or W wavelengths. The receiver must deal with a large dynamic range since the backscatter from solid object will be orders of magnitude larger than for aerosol clouds. Fast electronics with significant noise contributions will be required to obtain the necessary temporal resolution. We have developed a laboratory instrument to detect aerosol clouds in the presence of solid objects. In parallel, we have developed a lidar performance model for performing trade studies. Careful attention was paid to component details so that results obtained in this study could be applied towards the development of a practical instrument. The amplitude and temporal shape of the signal return are analyzed for discrimination of aerosol clouds in an indoor environment. We have assessed the feasibility and performance of candidate approaches for a fieldable instrument. With the near-IR PMT and a 1.5-{micro}m laser source providing 20-{micro}J pulses, we estimate a bio-aerosol detection limit of 3000 particles/l.

  18. Aerosol Climate Interactions in Climate System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiehl, J. T.

    2002-12-01

    Aerosols are widely recognized as an important process in Earth's climate system. Observations over the past decade have improved our understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols. Recently, field observations have highlighted the pervasiveness of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere. These aerosols are of particular interest, since they alter the vertical distribution of shortwave radiative heating between the surface and atmosphere. Given this increased knowledge of aerosols from various field programs, interest is focusing on how to integrate this understanding into global climate models. These types of models provide the best tool available to comprehensively study the potential effects of aerosols on Earth's climate system. Results from climate system model simulations that include aerosol effects will be presented to illustrate key aerosol climate interactions. These simulations employ idealized and realistic distributions of absorbing aerosols. The idealized aerosol simulations provide insight into the role of aerosol shortwave absorption on the global hydrologic cycle. The realistic aerosol distributions provide insight into the local response of aerosol forcing in the Indian subcontinent region. Emphasis from these simulations will be on the hydrologic cycle, since water availability is of emerging global environmental concern. This presentation will also consider what more is needed to significantly improve our ability to model aerosol processes in climate system models. Uncertainty in aerosol climate interactions remains a major source of uncertainty in our ability to project future climate change. Focus will be on interactions between aerosols and various physical, chemical and biogeochemical aspects of the Earth system.

  19. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  20. Simulating Feedbacks Between Stratocumulus Cloud Dynamics, Microphysics and Aerosols Over Large Scales.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosvenor, D. P.; Field, P.; Hill, A. A.; Shipway, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    The response of a stratocumulus cloud deck to aerosols involves a complex interplay between cloud microphysics, precipitation, cold pool dynamical interactions between neighboring cells, cloud top entrainment and the boundary layer structure over larger scales. Such feedbacks are thought to be involved in, for example, the formation of Pockets of Open Cells (POCs), which represent a large albedo change relative to the closed cell regime. However, they are not represented in GCM parameterizations and have also so far have not been simulated adequately in mesoscale models, which is a necessary step in order to develop parameterizations. We will show results from high resolution (<1 km) mesoscale simulations of stratocumulus using a new multi-moment microphysics scheme coupled to the UK Met Office Unified Model. The new scheme represents the processing of aerosol by clouds, allowing examination of the feedbacks between cloud dynamics, microphysics and aerosol. Results will be shown for domains of order 1000km that are driven by meteorological analysis, allowing realistic forcing and large scale interactions, in contrast to idealized LES simulations. Additionally, a representation of sub-grid vertical velocities based on resolved motions has been implemented, which will allow consistent droplet activation across a range of horizontal model resolutions. A cloud scheme to account for sub-grid humidity variability was also added and was found to be necessary in order to simulate realistic clouds.

  1. Use of Observation-Based Aerosol Fields for Detailed Cloud-Scale Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlind, A. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Ackerman, A. S.; Endo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Within the realm of detailed large-eddy simulation studies with size-resolved microphysics, substantial uncertainties exist regarding the ability of any given model to accurately reproduce basic aspects of cloud microphysics that interact with ambient aerosol properties, such as precipitation formation and evolution. Modeling studies intended to reproduce specific observed cloud fields must also to some degree simplify the complexity of aerosol conditions, and usually lack sufficient measurements to well constrain the most relevant aerosol properties. Here we describe derivation and use of spatiotemporally varying fields of multi-modal aerosol size distributions for 60-hour simulations of boundary-layer clouds observed over Oklahoma during the RACORO campaign. Cases include forced as well as freely convecting shallow clouds, and some warm precipitation. We investigate the sensitivity of simulations to observation-derived aerosol inputs, including hygroscopicity parameter and size distribution properties. Sensitivity is examined in the context of the ability of the simulations to accurately reproduce relevant macrophysical and microphysical cloud properties observed, including droplet size dispersion.

  2. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; et al

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41more » stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.« less

  3. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. Richard; Liu, Peter; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, Ann -Marie; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ronfeld, Debbie; Shupe, Matthew D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matt; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.

  4. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

  5. Aerosol and cloud typing with an automated 24/7 aerosol lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Holger; Seifert, Patric; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    contribution, the application of this methodology for several case studies and the statistical analysis from the two field campaigns will be shown. For future applications it is planned to implement this approach in the CLOUDNET retrieval at sites for which an appropriate lidar is available to make use of the full instrument synergy which is required for advanced aerosol-cloud-interaction studies.

  6. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  7. Studies of Ice Nucleating Aerosol Particles in Arctic Cloud Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, David C.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this research is to improve the understanding of ice nucleating aerosol particles (IN) and the role they play in ice formation in Arctic clouds. IN are important for global climate issues in a variety of ways. The primary effect is their role in determining the phase (liquid or solid) of cloud particles. The microscale impact is on cloud particle size, growth rate, shape, fall speed, concentration, radiative properties, and scavenging of gases and aerosols. On a larger scale, ice formation affects the development of precipitation (rate, amount, type, and distribution), latent heat release (rate and altitude), ambient humidity, the persistence of clouds, and cloud albedo. The overall goals of our FIRE 3 research are to characterize the concentrations and variability of Arctic IN during the winter-spring transition, to compare IN measurements with ice concentrations in Arctic clouds, and to examine selected IN samples for particle morphology and chemical there are distinguishable chemical signatures. The results can be combined with other measurements of aerosols, gaseous species, and cloud characteristics in order to understand the processes that determine the phase and concentration of cloud particles.

  8. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  10. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  11. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  12. Aerosol and Cloud Properties during the Cloud Cheju ABC Plume -Asian Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX) 2008: Linking between Ground-based and UAV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Yoon, S.; Venkata Ramana, M.; Ramanathan, V.; Nguyen, H.; Park, S.; Kim, M.

    2009-12-01

    Cheju Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) Plume-Monsoon Experiment (CAPMEX), comprehsensive ground-based measurements and a series of data-gathering flights by specially equipped autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAVs) for aerosol and cloud, had conducted at Jeju (formerly, Cheju), South Korea during August-September 2008, to improve our understanding of how the reduction of anthropogenic emissions in China (so-called “great shutdown” ) during and after the Summer Beijing Olympic Games 2008 effcts on the air quliaty and radiation budgets and how atmospheric brown clouds (ABCs) influences solar radiation budget off Asian continent. Large numbers of in-situ and remote sensing instruments at the Gosan ABC observatory and miniaturized instruments on the aircraft measure a range of properties such as the quantity of soot, size-segregated aerosol particle numbers, total particle numbers, size-segregated cloud droplet numbers (only AUAV), aerosol scattering properties (only ground), aerosol vertical distribution, column-integrated aerosol properties, and meteorological variables. By integrating ground-level and high-elevation AUAV measurements with NASA-satellite observations (e.g., MODIS, CALIPSO), we investigate the long range transport of aerosols, the impact of ABCs on clouds, and the role of biogenic and anthropogenic aerosols on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In this talk, we will present the results from CAPMEX focusing on: (1) the characteristics of aerosol optical, physical and chemical properties at Gosan observatory, (2) aerosol solar heating calculated from the ground-based micro-pulse lidar and AERONET sun/sky radiometer synergy, and comparison with direct measurements from UAV, and (3) aerosol-cloud interactions in conjunction with measurements by satellites and Gosan observatory.

  13. The Current Status of Remote Sensing of Aerosols and Clouds in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yong; Li, Chi

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a critical role in the global radiation balance, while they are still not well understood due to their mal-distribution and rapid variation in terms of both spatial and temporal dimensions, therefore regarded as one of the main uncertainties in meteorological and other related fields of research, urgently calling for comprehensive observations and studies, including remote sensing techniques. Unlike laboratory sampling and analysis, remote sensing is a modern observation technique detecting electromagnetic signals interacted with aerosols. Satellite remote sensing is an ideal way to gain knowledge of aerosol properties, e.g. the aerosol optical depth (AOD), for its large spatial coverage and high cycling frequency. But many research works have shown that for China, the most popular AOD products were an overestimation for small AOD and underestimation for high AOD. Both daily and monthly AOD retrievals showed poor performance in extreme aerosol conditions, e.g. under dust events or heavy urban/industrial haze. This is because of complex heterogeneity of land surface in China. In recent years Chinese researchers have made great contributions to the developments and applications of remote sensing technique for aerosol observation and cloud research. In this paper, main progresses are comprehensively summarized, which can be divided in terms of three main research directions — satellite retrieval, ground based observation, and product evaluation and applications. The current ongoing projects about the aerosol and cloud research in China are also presented Keywords: Aerosol remote sensing, satellite retrieval, ground based observation, China

  14. Cloud-Ground Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 30 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth.

    Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms.

    This image of the North Polar water-ice clouds shows how surface topography can affect the linear form. Notice that the crater at the bottom of the image is causing a deflection in the linear form.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 100.7 East (259.3 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  15. Multi-sensor cloud and aerosol retrieval simulator and remote sensing from model parameters - Part 2: Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wind, Galina; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.; Platnick, Steven; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert C.

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-sensor Cloud Retrieval Simulator (MCRS) produces a "simulated radiance" product from any high-resolution general circulation model with interactive aerosol as if a specific sensor such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were viewing a combination of the atmospheric column and land-ocean surface at a specific location. Previously the MCRS code only included contributions from atmosphere and clouds in its radiance calculations and did not incorporate properties of aerosols. In this paper we added a new aerosol properties module to the MCRS code that allows users to insert a mixture of up to 15 different aerosol species in any of 36 vertical layers.This new MCRS code is now known as MCARS (Multi-sensor Cloud and Aerosol Retrieval Simulator). Inclusion of an aerosol module into MCARS not only allows for extensive, tightly controlled testing of various aspects of satellite operational cloud and aerosol properties retrieval algorithms, but also provides a platform for comparing cloud and aerosol models against satellite measurements. This kind of two-way platform can improve the efficacy of model parameterizations of measured satellite radiances, allowing the assessment of model skill consistently with the retrieval algorithm. The MCARS code provides dynamic controls for appearance of cloud and aerosol layers. Thereby detailed quantitative studies of the impacts of various atmospheric components can be controlled.In this paper we illustrate the operation of MCARS by deriving simulated radiances from various data field output by the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) model. The model aerosol fields are prepared for translation to simulated radiance using the same model subgrid variability parameterizations as are used for cloud and atmospheric properties profiles, namely the ICA technique. After MCARS computes modeled sensor radiances equivalent to their observed counterparts, these radiances are presented as input to

  16. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud-free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressures contain information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud-free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressures are close to those of the aerosol layer for optically thick aerosols. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressures may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO cloud data and AAI, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given, which can be beneficial for aviation safety and operations in case of e.g. volcanic ash plumes.

  17. Effects of aerosol organics on cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration and first indirect aerosol effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Lee, Y.- N.; Daum, Peter H.; Jayne, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-03

    Abstract. Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN properties were measured on the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus/ Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosols measured during MASE included free tropospheric aerosols, marine boundary layer aerosols, and aerosols with high organic concentration within a thin layer above the cloud. Closure analysis was carried out for all three types of aerosols by comparing the measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation to those predicted based on size distribution and chemical composition using K¨ohler theory. The effect of aerosol organic species on predicted CCN concentration was examined using a single hygroscopicity parameterization.

  18. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-11-01

    Nucleation from the gas phase is an important source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei, which form cloud droplets. We have implemented in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM a new scheme for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water based on laboratory data, and nucleation of an organic compound and sulfuric acid using a parametrization of cluster activation based on field measurements. We give details of the implementation, compare results with observations, and investigate the role of the individual aerosol nucleation mechanisms for clouds and the Earth's radiative forcing. The results of our simulations are most consistent with observations when neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid proceed throughout the troposphere and nucleation due to cluster activation is limited to the forested boundary layer. The globally averaged annual mean contributions of the individual nucleation processes to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation via the direct, semi-direct, indirect cloud-albedo and cloud-lifetime effects in our simulations are -1.15 W/m2 for charged H2SO4/H2O nucleation, -0.235 W/m2 for cluster activation, and -0.05 W/m2 for neutral H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The overall effect of nucleation is -2.55 W/m2, which exceeds the sum of the individual terms due to feedbacks and interactions in the model. Aerosol nucleation contributes over the oceans with -2.18 W/m2 to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation, compared to -0.37 W/m2 over land. We explain the higher effect of aerosol nucleation on Earth's radiative forcing over the oceans with the larger area covered by ocean clouds, due to the larger contrast in albedo between clouds and the ocean surface compared to continents, and the larger susceptibility of pristine clouds owing to the saturation of effects. The large effect of charged nucleation in our simulations is not in contradiction with small effects seen in local

  19. Aerosol nucleation and its role for clouds and Earth's radiative forcing in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Zhang, K.; Quaas, J.; Kinne, S.; O'Donnell, D.; Rast, S.; Esch, M.; Ferrachat, S.; Lohmann, U.; Feichter, J.

    2010-05-01

    Nucleation from the gas phase is an important source of aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, contributing to the number of cloud condensation nuclei, which form cloud droplets. We have implemented in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM a new scheme for neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid and water based on laboratory data, and nucleation of an organic compound and sulfuric acid using a parametrization of cluster activation based on field measurements. We give details of the implementation, compare results with observations, and investigate the role of the individual aerosol nucleation mechanisms for clouds and the Earth's radiative budget. The results of our simulations are most consistent with observations when neutral and charged nucleation of sulfuric acid proceed throughout the troposphere and nucleation due to cluster activation is limited to the forested boundary layer. The globally averaged annual mean contributions of the individual nucleation processes to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation via the direct, semi-direct, indirect cloud-albedo and cloud-lifetime effects in our simulations are -1.15 W/m2 for charged H2SO4/H2O nucleation, -0.235 W/m2 for cluster activation, and -0.05 W/m2 for neutral H2SO4/H2O nucleation. The overall effect of nucleation is -2.55 W/m2, which exceeds the sum of the individual terms due to feedbacks and interactions in the model. Aerosol nucleation contributes over the oceans with -2.18 W/m2 to total absorbed solar short-wave radiation, compared to -0.37 W/m2 over land. We explain the higher effect of aerosol nucleation on Earth's radiative budget over the oceans with the larger area covered by ocean clouds, due to the larger contrast in albedo between clouds and the ocean surface compared to continents, and the larger susceptibility of pristine clouds owing to the saturation of effects. The large effect of charged nucleation in our simulations is not in contradiction with small effects seen in local

  20. Clouds, aerosols, and photochemistry in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Strobel, D. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is made of the development status of concepts for cloud and aerosol compositions, vertical and horizontal distributions, and microphysical properties, in the Jovian upper troposphere and stratosphere. Attention is given to several key photochemical species' relationships to aerosol formation as well as their transport process implications, treating photochemistry in the context of comparative planetology and noting differences and similarities among the outer planet atmospheres; since this approach emphasizes observational data, a variegated assortment of ground-based and spacecraft observations is assembled. Current views on the tropospheric distribution of clouds are challenged, and a rationale is presented for alternative accounts.

  1. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitable affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds, Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effect of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bim microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  2. Science Plan Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, T

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles impact human health in urban environments, while on regional and global scales they can affect climate patterns, the hydrological cycle, and the intensity of radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of aerosol formation processes and the links between aerosol dynamics and biosphere-atmosphere-climate interactions, great challenges remain in the analysis of related processes on a global scale. Boreal forests, situated in a circumpolar belt in the northern latitudes throughout the United States, Canada, Russia and Scandinavia, are among the most active areas of atmospheric aerosol formation among all biomes. The formation of aerosol particles and their growth to the sizes of cloud condensation nuclei in these areas are associated with biogenic volatile organic emissions from vegetation and soil.

  3. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  4. Remote Sensing of Non-Aerosol (anomalous) Absorption in Cloud Free Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Dubovik, Oleg; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of sunlight with atmospheric gases, aerosols and clouds is fundamental to the understanding of climate and its variation. Several studies questioned our understanding of atmospheric absorption of sunlight in cloudy or in cloud free atmospheres. Uncertainty in instruments' accuracy and in the analysis methods makes this problem difficult to resolve. Here we use several years of measurements of sky and sun spectral brightness by selected instruments of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), that have known and high measurement accuracy. The measurements taken in several locations around the world show that in the atmospheric windows 0.44, 0.06, 0.86 and 1.02 microns the only significant absorbers in cloud free atmosphere is aerosol and ozone. This conclusions is reached using a method developed to distinguish between absorption associated with the presence of aerosol and absorption that is not related to the presence of aerosol. Non-aerosol absorption, defined as spectrally independent or smoothly variable, was found to have an optical thickness smaller than 0.002 corresponding to absorption of sunlight less than 1W/sq m, or essentially zero.

  5. Enhanced shortwave cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Slingo, A.

    1995-05-01

    It has been suggested that anthropogenic aerosols in the troposphere can influence the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their reflectivity, thereby exerting a radiative influence on climate. This article presents the theoretical basis for of this so-called indirect forcing and reviews pertinent observational evidence and climate model calculations of its magnitude and geographical distribution. We restrict consideration to liquid-water clouds.

  6. An Observational Study of the Relationship between Cloud, Aerosol and Meteorology in Broken Low-Level Cloud Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    Global satellite analyses showing strong correlations between aerosol optical depth and 3 cloud cover have stirred much debate recently. While it is tempting to interpret the results as evidence of aerosol enhancement of cloud cover, other factors such as the influence of meteorology on both the aerosol and cloud distributions can also play a role, as both aerosols and clouds depend upon local meteorology. This study uses satellite observations to examine aerosol-cloud relationships for broken low-level cloud regions off the coast of Africa. The analysis approach minimizes the influence of large-scale meteorology by restricting the spatial and temporal domains in which the aerosol and cloud properties are compared. While distributions of several meteorological variables within 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions are nearly identical under low and high aerosol optical depth, the corresponding distributions of single-layer low cloud properties and top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes differ markedly, consistent with earlier studies showing increased cloud cover with aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, fine-mode fraction and Angstrom Exponent are also larger in conditions of higher aerosol optical depth, even though no evidence of systematic latitudinal or longitudinal gradients between the low and high aerosol optical depth populations are observed. When the analysis is repeated for all 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions over the global oceans (after removing cases in which significant meteorological differences are found between the low and high aerosol populations), results are qualitatively similar to those off the coast of Africa.

  7. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong; Li, Xiaowen

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical.factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major agent for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosols have a major impact on the dynamics, microphysics, and electrification properties of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Such pollution . effects on precipitation potentially have enormous climatic consequences both in terms of feedbacks involving the land surface via rainfall as well as the surface energy budget and changes in latent heat input to the atmosphere. Basically, aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, the warm-rain process, the cold-rain process, cloud-top heights, the depth of the mixed-phase region, and the occurrence of lightning. Recently, many cloud resolution models (CRMs) have been used to examine the role of aerosols on mixed-phase convective clouds. These modeling studies have many differences in terms of model configuration (two- or three-dimensional), domain size, grid spacing (150-3000 m), microphysics (two-moment bulk, simple or sophisticated spectral-bin), turbulence (1st or 1.5 order turbulent kinetic energy (TKE)), radiation, lateral boundary conditions (i.e., closed, radiative open or cyclic), cases (isolated convection, tropical or midlatitude squall lines) and model integration time (e.g., 2.5 to 48 hours). Among these modeling studies, the most striking difference is that cumulative precipitation can either increase or decrease in response to higher concentrations of CCN. In this presentation, we review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on convective precipitation processes. Specifically, this paper addresses the following topics

  8. New capabilities for space-based cloud and aerosols measurements: The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Hlavka, D. L.; Palm, S. P.; Hart, W. D.; Nowottnick, E. P.; Vaughan, M.; Rodier, S. D.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Buchard-Marchant, V.

    2013-12-01

    Current uncertainties in cloud and aerosol properties limit our ability to accurately model the Earth's climate system and predict climate change. These limitations are due primarily to difficulties in adequately measuring aerosols and clouds on a global scale. NASA's A-Train satellites provide an unprecedented opportunity to address these uncertainties. In particular, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO) satellite provides vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties. The CALIOP lidar onboard CALIPSO has reached its seventh year of operation, well past its expected lifetime. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2016 or later. If the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational, there will be a gap in global lidar measurements. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), built at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a payload for the International Space Station (ISS), is set to launch in the summer of 2014. CATS is an elastic backscatter lidar with three wavelengths (1064, 532, 355 nm) and HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all three wavelengths. The ISS orbit is a 51 degree inclination orbit at an altitude of about 405 km. This orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three day repeat cycle. Thus, science applications of CATS include cloud and aerosol climate studies, air quality monitoring, and smoke/volcanic plume tracking. The primary science objectives of CATS include: continuing the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud vertical profile data record, providing near real time data to support operational applications such as air quality modeling, and advancing technology in support of future mission development using the HSRL channel. Furthermore, the vertical profiles of cloud and aerosol properties provided by CATS will complement current and future passive satellite

  9. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Hoose, C.; Heikkilä, U.; van Donkelaar, A.; Ferrachat, S.

    2009-10-01

    A diagnostic nucleation scavenging scheme, which determines stratiform cloud scavenging ratios for both aerosol mass and number distributions, based on cloud droplet, and ice crystal number concentrations, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM global climate model. This is coupled with a size-dependent in-cloud impaction scavenging parameterization for both cloud droplet-aerosol, and ice crystal-aerosol collisions. Sensitivity studies are presented, which compare aerosol concentrations, and deposition between a variety of in-cloud scavenging approaches, including prescribed fractions, several diagnostic schemes, and a prognostic aerosol cloud processing treatment that passes aerosol in-droplet and in-ice crystal concentrations between model time steps. For one sensitivity study, assuming 100% of the in-cloud aerosol is scavenged into the cloud droplets and ice crystals, the annual global mean accumulation mode number burden is decreased by 65%, relative to a simulation with prognostic aerosol cloud processing. Diagnosing separate nucleation scavenging ratios for aerosol number and mass distributions, as opposed to equating the aerosol mass scavenging to the number scavenging ratios, reduces the annual global mean sulfate burden by near to 10%. The annual global mean sea salt burden is 30% lower for the diagnostic approach, which does not carry aerosol in-droplet and in-crystal concentrations between model time-steps as compared to the prognostic scheme. Implementation of in-cloud impaction scavenging reduced the annual, global mean black carbon burden by 30% for the prognostic aerosol cloud processing scheme. Better agreement with observations of black carbon profiles from aircraft (changes near to one order of magnitude for mixed phase clouds), 210Pb surface layer concentrations and wet deposition, and the geographic distribution of aerosol optical depth are found for the new diagnostic scavenging as compared to prescribed ratio scavenging scheme of the standard ECHAM

  10. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Prediction Error from Application of Kohler Theory: Importance for the Aerosol Indirect Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Nenes, Athanasios; Adams, Peter J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2007-01-01

    In situ observations of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the GISS GCM Model II' with an online aerosol simulation and explicit aerosol-cloud interactions are used to quantify the uncertainty in radiative forcing and autoconversion rate from application of Kohler theory. Simulations suggest that application of Koehler theory introduces a 10-20% uncertainty in global average indirect forcing and 2-11% uncertainty in autoconversion. Regionally, the uncertainty in indirect forcing ranges between 10-20%, and 5-50% for autoconversion. These results are insensitive to the range of updraft velocity and water vapor uptake coefficient considered. This study suggests that Koehler theory (as implemented in climate models) is not a significant source of uncertainty for aerosol indirect forcing but can be substantial for assessments of aerosol effects on the hydrological cycle in climatically sensitive regions of the globe. This implies that improvements in the representation of GCM subgrid processes and aerosol size distribution will mostly benefit indirect forcing assessments. Predictions of autoconversion, by nature, will be subject to considerable uncertainty; its reduction may require explicit representation of size-resolved aerosol composition and mixing state.

  11. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  12. Modeling Electrical Structure of the Artificial Charged Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydenko, S.; Iudin, D.; Klimashov, V.; Kostinskiy, A. J.; Syssoev, V.

    2014-12-01

    The electric structure of the unipolar charged aerosol cloud is considered. The cloud of the volume about 30 cubic meters is generated in the open atmosphere by the original aeroelectrical facility consisting of the source of the aquated ions and the high-voltage discharger. Representing the charge density distribution as a superposition of regular and irregular parts, a model of the electrical structure of the cloud is developed. The regular part is calculated under the stationary current approximation taking into account the source current structure, the shape of the cloud, and results of the multi-point measurements of the electric field and conductivity in the vicinity of the cloud. The irregular part describes random spatiotemporal fluctuations of the charge density which are assumed to be proportional to the aerosol number density. It is shown that a quasi-electrostatic field of the charged aerosol is characterized by significant spatial fluctuations showing the scale invariance. The mean-square fluctuations of the voltage between different parts of the cloud are proportional to the square root of its linear dimensions and may reach significant values even in the absence of the regular field. The basic parameters of the fluctuating spatial structure of the electric field inside the charged aerosol cloud are estimated. It is shown that the charge density fluctuations could lead to a significant (up to 2,5 times) local enhancement of the electric field as compared to the field of the regular part of the charge density. The above effect could serve as one of the important mechanisms of the spark initiation.

  13. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  14. Vertical transport and processing of aerosols in a mixed-phase convective cloud and the feedback on cloud development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Carslaw, K. S.; Feingold, G.

    2005-01-01

    A modelling study of vertical transport and processing of sulphate aerosol by a mixed-phase convective cloud, and the feedback of the cloud-processed aerosols on the development of cloud microphysical properties and precipitation is presented. An axisymmetric dynamic cloud model with bin-resolved microphysics and aqueousphase chemistry is developed and is used to examine the relative importance of microphysical and chemical processes on the aerosol budget, the fate of the aerosol material inside hydrometeors, and the size distributions of cloud-processed sulphate aerosols. Numerical simulations are conducted for a moderately deep convective cloud observed during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments. The results show that aerosol particles that have been transported from the boundary layer, detrained, and then re-entrained at midcloud levels account for a large fraction of the aerosol inside hydrometeors (~40% by mass). Convective transport by the simulated cloud enhances upper-tropospheric aerosol number and mass concentrations by factors of 2-3 and 3-4, respectively. Sensitivity studies suggest that, for the simulated case, aqueous chemistry does not modify the evolution of the cloud significantly. Finally, ice-phase hydrometeor development is very sensitive to aerosol concentrations at midcloud levels. The latter result suggests that the occurrence of mid-tropospheric aerosol layers that have been advected through long-range transport could strongly affect cloud microphysical processes and precipitation formation.

  15. Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, M. Patrick; Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will describe the planned 3-year Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO) mission, its instrumentation and implementation. It will use LITE and other data, plus analyses, to show the feasibility of such a mission. PICASSO is being proposed for NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program with launch predicted in 2003.

  16. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  17. Aerosol - cloud - water vapor relations for cloud systems of different heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulos, Stavros; Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Georgoulias, Aristeidis

    2016-04-01

    Here we examine the annual and seasonal aerosol - cloud relations over three major urban clusters of China, for different cloud heights and atmospheric water vapor amounts, using a decade of Aerosol Optical Depth at 550nm (AOD), Cloud Cover (CC), Cloud Optical Depth (COD), Water Vapor (WV) and Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) data from the MODIS instrument. Over all regions (spanning from temperate to tropical monsoon climates) and for all seasons, CC is found to increase with AOD, WV and cloud height. Aerosols, at low WV environments and under constant cloud height, have less impact on CC than at high WV environments. In addition, AOD has a varying influence on COD depending on CTP. Finally, COD is found to increase with height for low and middle height clouds, and with increasing AOD, especially at low AOD, the latter being in line with the expected first indirect effect. This research has been financed under the FP7 Programme MarcoPolo (Grand Number 606953, Theme SPA.2013.3.2-01).

  18. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  19. Importance of including ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) aerosols for ice cloud parameterization in GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. S.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Walker, Greg K.; Yang, R.; Wang, Jun

    2010-02-22

    A common deficiency of many cloud-physics parameterizations including the NASA’s microphysics of clouds with aerosol- cloud interactions (hereafter called McRAS-AC) is that they simulate less (larger) than the observed ice cloud particle number (size). A single column model (SCM) of McRAS-AC and Global Circulation Model (GCM) physics together with an adiabatic parcel model (APM) for ice-cloud nucleation (IN) of aerosols were used to systematically examine the influence of ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) aerosols, not included in the present formulations of McRAS-AC. Specifically, the influence of (NH4)2SO4 aerosols on the optical properties of both liquid and ice clouds were analyzed. First an (NH4)2SO4 parameterization was included in the APM to assess its effect vis-à-vis that of the other aerosols. Subsequently, several evaluation tests were conducted over the ARM-SGP and thirteen other locations (sorted into pristine and polluted conditions) distributed over marine and continental sites with the SCM. The statistics of the simulated cloud climatology were evaluated against the available ground and satellite data. The results showed that inclusion of (NH4)2SO4 in the SCM made a remarkable improvement in the simulated effective radius of ice clouds. However, the corresponding ice-cloud optical thickness increased more than is observed. This can be caused by lack of cloud advection and evaporation. We argue that this deficiency can be mitigated by adjusting the other tunable parameters of McRAS-AC such as precipitation efficiency. Inclusion of ice cloud particle splintering introduced through well- established empirical equations is found to further improve the results. Preliminary tests show that these changes make a substantial improvement in simulating the cloud optical properties in the GCM, particularly by simulating a far more realistic cloud distribution over the ITCZ.

  20. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Adams, A.; Toohey, D. W.; Anderson, J.; Shank, L.; Howell, S.; Clarke, A. D.; Wood, R.

    2009-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world’s largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. Anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles such as smelters, power plants and urban pollution are expected to impact properties of the eastern portion of the stratocumulus deck. During the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field experiment, aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer, an aerosol mass spectrometer, and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights and about forty individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. This applied for particles larger than 0.05 and 0.1 µm in diameter, but not for total particles larger than 0.01 µm diameter. This suggests pollution contributed aged accumulation-mode aerosols to the stratocumulus layer, but fresher nuclei-mode particles were generated from other sources as well. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 µm size range was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius. These variables were especially well correlated on individual flights with near constant liquid water content (LWC), but were also statistically significant for the data set as a whole. When data were stratified into different LWC

  1. The Invigoration of Deep Convective Clouds Over the Atlantic: Aerosol Effect, Meteorology or Retrieval Artifact?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    Associations between cloud properties and aerosol loading are frequently observed in products derived from satellite measurements. These observed trends between clouds and aerosol optical depth suggest aerosol modification of cloud dynamics, yet there are uncertainties involved in satellite retrievals that have the potential to lead to incorrect conclusions. Two of the most challenging problems are addressed here: the potential for retrieved aerosol optical depth to be cloud-contaminated, and as a result, artificially correlated with cloud parameters; and the potential for correlations between aerosol and cloud parameters to be erroneously considered to be causal. Here these issues are tackled directly by studying the effects of the aerosol on convective clouds in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite remote sensing, a chemical transport model, and a reanalysis of meteorological fields. Results show that there is a robust positive correlation between cloud fraction or cloud top height and the aerosol optical depth, regardless of whether a stringent filtering of aerosol measurements in the vicinity of clouds is applied, or not. These same positive correlations emerge when replacing the observed aerosol field with that derived from a chemical transport model. Model-reanalysis data is used to address the causality question by providing meteorological context for the satellite observations. A correlation exercise between the full suite of meteorological fields derived from model reanalysis and satellite-derived cloud fields shows that observed cloud top height and cloud fraction correlate best with model pressure updraft velocity and relative humidity. Observed aerosol optical depth does correlate with meteorological parameters but usually different parameters from those that correlate with observed cloud fields. The result is a near-orthogonal influence of aerosol and meteorological fields on cloud top height and cloud fraction. The results strengthen the case

  2. Aerosol and cloud forcing in the Indo-Gangetic plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol and cloud direct radiative forcings are investigated in the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) for a 5-year time period (Jan 2001-Dec 2005) using ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for the first time. Aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra, single scattering albedo, SSA, asymmetry parameter) from AERONET along with cloud parameters (cloud optical depth, COD and cloud effective radius, Reff) derived from MODIS are incorporated in SBDART radiative transfer model to estimate the clear sky (FCLR) and cloudy-sky (FCLO) forcing for the whole time period in the shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) regions at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface (S). Whenever AERONET data are unavailable for the optical properties, we have used OPAC model to simulate SSA and g to fill in the data gaps. SW FCLR,TOA/S show strong seasonal variability with TOA forcing flipping to even positive sign in some months. In the winter season, although black carbon contributes to only 11% to the AOD, its contribution to the FCLR,S is 33%. Large difference between TOA and S forcing (>25 W m-2) leads to strong atmospheric heating in the region. Annual mean heating rate is ~0.9 K day-1 with highest value observed in the monsoon season, which could significantly affect the long-term regional hydrological cycle. The SW atmospheric heating is partly compensated by LW cooling in the winter season only, whereas in the other seasons, LW forcing adds to the atmospheric heating. Aerosols reduce surface-reaching solar radiation by 20-30% in the IGP. The variability of cloud parameters in the IGP is less as compared to that over oceans, but cloud fraction varies in a wide range (0.08-0.99) during the time period, which ultimately changes the TOA and S forcing significantly, particularly in the monsoon season. The detailed results of the aerosol and cloud radiative forcing and their implications in modifying the

  3. Characteristics of the Pinatubo Aerosol Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Weiguo

    Optical depths at visible and infrared wavelengths obtained in Tucson, Arizona before and after the Pinatubo eruption in June 1991 have been used to investigate the characteristics of the stratospheric aerosols due to the Pinatubo eruption. The intrusion of the Pinatubo aerosols over Tucson first occurred on July 26, 1991 when the spectral optical depth values rose to two to four times their normal values. In general, there was a pattern of increase between June 1991 and April 1992, and a gradual decrease after April 1992. The stratospheric Pinatubo aerosol in April 1992 was characterized by a typical columnar total number density on the order of 8.78 times 10 ^6 particles cm^{-2} in the size range of 0.2-0.7mu m. The total number density decreased to the order of 9.28 times 10^5 particles cm^{-2} by April 1994. Simulations of the size distribution using a simple polydisperse coagulation and fallout model showed that both of the processes played a very important role in the evolution and transport of the particles in the interval from April 1992 to March 1993. A strong seasonal variation was observed in the aerosol optical depth data. The values are higher in the winter and spring and lower in the summer and fall. This variation is explained by more effective transport of particles from the tropics poleward in the winter and spring than in the summer and fall. We also observed that there was a reduction in stratospheric ozone associated with the Pinatubo aerosols, possibly because of the extra sites available for heterogeneous chemical reactions. The reduction was more noticeable in the spring and summer than in other seasons. The magnitude of the ozone reduction was in a good agreement with other studies.

  4. New spectral methods in cloud and aerosol remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. Sebastian; McBride, Patrick; Pilewskie, Peter; Feingold, Graham; Jiang, Hongli

    2010-05-01

    We present new remote sensing techniques that rely on spectral observations of clouds and aerosols in the solar wavelength range. As a first example, we show how the effects of heterogeneous clouds, aerosols of changing optical properties, and the surface within one pixel can be distinguished by means of their spectral signatures. This example is based on data from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS, Houston, Texas, 2006), Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of polluted boundary layer clouds, and 3-dimensional radiative transfer calculations. In a second example, we show that the uncertainty of cloud retrievals can be improved considerably by exploiting the spectral information around liquid water absorption features in the near-infrared wavelength range. This is illustrated with spectral transmittance data from the NOAA International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic LOwer Troposphere (ICEALOT, 2008). In contrast to reflected radiance, transmitted radiance is only weakly sensitive to cloud effective drop radius, and only cloud optical thickness can be obtained from the standard dual-channel technique. We show that effective radius and liquid water path can also be retrieved with the new spectral approach, and validate our results with microwave liquid water path measurements.

  5. Aerosol and Trace Gas Processing by Clouds During the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Lee, Y.; Ogren, J.; Andrews, B.

    2008-12-01

    Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and pact scavenging. The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) aimed at characterizing freshly emitted aerosols above, within and below fields of cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus) in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. The experiment took place in June 2007. Evolution of aerosol and cloud properties downwind of the Oklahoma City is of particular interest in this project. These observations of a mid-size and mid-latitude city can be used in the development and evaluation of regional-scale and global climate model cumulus parameterizations that describes the transport and transformations of these aerosols by fair-weather cumulus. The Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was one of the main platforms used in CHAPS. It carried a suite of instruments to measure properties of interstitial aerosols behind an isokinetic inlet and a set of duplicate instruments to determine properties of activated particles behind a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of interstitial particles out of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point temperature were measured. This presentation will focus on results related to the transformation and transport of aerosols and trace gases observed in fair-weather cumulus and compare these results with concurrent observations made outside these clouds. Our interest will focus on the differences in particle size and composition under varying conditions. The role of

  6. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): a New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Matthew J.; Yorks, John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time data capability of the ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as air quality and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a summary of the science

  7. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols are a critical factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major agent for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosols have a major impact on the dynamics, microphysics, and electrification properties of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Such pollution effects on precipitation potentially have enormous climatic consequences both in terms of feedbacks involving the land surface via rainfall as well as the surface energy budget and changes in latent heat input to the atmosphere. In this presentation, we will present the modeling results for three different convective cases, two over land (over Africa and one over central US) and one over ocean (west Pacific). Specifically, this modeling paper will examine the physical processes (latent heating release, cool pool dynamic and ice processes) that determine the invigoration of convection and enhancement of surface rainfall due to increase of CCN concentration.

  8. Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During May 2003 Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, H.; Penner, J.E.; Herzog, M.

    2005-03-18

    The effect of aerosols on the clouds, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is highly uncertain (Penner et al. 2001). The estimation of the AIE can vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m2 in Global Climate Models (GCM). Therefore, it is very important to investigate these interactions and cloud-related physical processes further. The Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in May 2003 dedicated some effort towards the measurement of the Cloud Condensation Nucleus concentration (CCN) as a function of super-saturation and in relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. Furthermore, airborn measurement for the cloud droplet concentration was also available. Therefore this AIOP provides a good opportunity to examine the AIE. In this study, we use a Cloud Resolving Model (CRM), i.e., Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), to discuss the effect of aerosol loadings on cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and concentration. The case we examine is a stratiform cloud that occurred on May 17, 2003.

  9. Aerosol-stratocumulus-radiation Interactions over Southeast Pacific and Their Implications to SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; Wang, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-stratocumulus-radiation interactions over Southeast Pacific and their implications to SST CMIP5 models commonly simulate warmer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over stratocumulus-topped regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific, SEP), which is consistent with the underestimation of radiative forcing by stratocumulus. Recently we used WRF model together with VOCALS observations to illustrate that the aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions may lessen the SST bias. However, that study used prescribed SST and thus did not allow proper atmosphere-ocean coupling, which past studies have shown to be important. Here we further examine the aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction by allowing SST feedback, using the WRF model coupled with a simple ocean-mixed layer scheme.The study will provide insight into the importance of SST feedback to the aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction.

  10. The Role of Aerosols on Precipitation Processes: Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Matsui, T.

    2012-01-01

    identify the impact of ice processes, radiation and large-scale influence on cloud-aerosol interactive processes, especially regarding surface rainfall amounts and characteristics (i.e., heavy or convective versus light or stratiform types). In addition, an inert tracer was included to follow the vertical redistribution of aerosols by cloud processes. We will also give a brief review from observational evidence on the role of aerosol on precipitation processes.

  11. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  12. Aerosol Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation in Eastern China: Results from Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing; Morrison, H.; Chen, Hongbin; Zhou, Yuquan; Qian, Yun; Wang, Yuan

    2012-01-19

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a 3 spectral-bin microphysics ('SBM') and measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation 4 Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility field campaign in China (AMF-China), the authors 5 examine aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in the typical cloud regimes of the warm and cold 6 seasons in Southeast China: deep convective clouds (DCC) and stratus clouds (SC), 7 respectively. Comparisons with a two-moment bulk microphysics ('Bulk') are performed 8 to gain insights for improving bulk schemes in estimating AIE in weather and climate 9 simulations. For the first time, measurements of aerosol and cloud properties acquired in 10 China are used to evaluate model simulations to better understand AIE in China. It is 11 found that changes in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration significantly 12 change the timing of storms, the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation, the 13 frequency distribution of precipitation rate, as well as cloud base and top heights for the 14 DCC, but not for the SC. CCN increase cloud droplet number (Nc) and mass 15 concentrations, decrease raindrop number concentration (Nr), and delay the onset of 16 precipitation. It is indicated much higher Nc and the opposite CCN effects on convection 17 and heavy rain with Bulk compared to SBM stem from the fixed CCN prescribed in Bulk. 18 CCN have a significant effect on ice microphysical properties with SBM but not Bulk 19 and different condensation/deposition freezing parameterizations employed could be the 20 main reason. This study provided insights to further improve the bulk scheme to better 21 account for aerosol-cloud interactions in regional and global climate simulations, which 22 will be the focus for a follow-on paper.

  13. Laser Remote Sensing from ISS: the CATS-CALIPSO Cloud and Aerosol Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodier, S. D.; Palm, S. P.; Jensen, M. H.; Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    systems. We use simulated CATS level 1B data to provide an initial assessment of CALIPSO-like CATS level 2 data quality, and highlight those areas where the CALIPSO-like analyses of the CATS multi-beam measurements are likely to contribute to improved understanding of cloud and aerosol interactions, transport and formation processes.

  14. Miniaturized aerosol, cloud and radiometric payloads for small unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G.; Corrigan, C.; Ramana, M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2007-12-01

    Miniaturized aerosol, cloud and radiometric payloads were developed to advance atmospheric observations using small autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (AUAVs). The observing system consisted of three vertically- stacked AUAVs to allow simultaneous sampling of the earth's atmosphere - offering new insights to radiation budgets and aerosol-cloud interactions. To accomplish this campaign, aerosol, cloud, radiometric instruments, and an integrated data acquisition system have been miniaturized with a total payload weight less than 4 kg and power less than 30 W. Due to size and weight limitations of the lightweight AUAV platform, the payloads are mission-specific and outfitted to perform a defined set of measurements depending on the scientific goals. These measurements include aerosol concentration, aerosol size distribution, aerosol absorption, cloud drop concentration and size distribution, solar radiation fluxes (visible and broadband), temperature, pressure, and relative humidity. The data integrity has been validated using standard calibration routines in conjunction with ground-based and laboratory instruments, as well as inter-aircraft comparisons. The instrument suite includes commercially-available instruments that have been repackaged or redesigned to minimize weight and volume and improve their performance. Several instruments have been completely redesigned including an aerosol inlet, absorption photometer based on an aethelometer and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) counter. Re-engineering of the absorption photometer's optics and electronics improved its performance at three wavelengths. The CCN instrument has been reduced to less than 2kg (compared to 28 kg) without compromising performance utilizing theory and model simulations to optimize design and define operating limits. A shrouded aerosol inlet was specifically designed for the AUAVs to minimize sample biases in aerosol number and size distributions. The radiometric sensors perform well during

  15. Aerosol First Indirect Effects on Non-Precipitating Low-Level Liquid Cloud Properties as Simulated by CAM5 at ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Klein, Stephen A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Boyle, James; Zhang, Yuying

    2012-04-28

    We quantitatively examine the aerosol first indirect effects (FIE) for non-precipitating low-level single-layer liquid phase clouds simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) running in the weather forecast mode at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites. The FIE is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud droplet effective radius for a relative change in aerosol accumulation mode number concentration under conditions of fixed liquid water content (LWC). CAM5 simulates aerosol-cloud interactions reasonably well for this specific cloud type, and the simulated FIE is consistent with the long-term observations at the examined locations. The FIE in CAM5 generally decreases with LWC at coastal ARM sites, and is larger by using cloud condensation nuclei rather than aerosol accumulation mode number concentration as the choice of aerosol amount. However, it has no significant variations with location and has no systematic strong seasonal variations at examined ARM sites.

  16. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Hoose, C.; Heikkilä, U.; van Donkelaar, A.; Ferrachat, S.

    2010-02-01

    A diagnostic cloud nucleation scavenging scheme, which determines stratiform cloud scavenging ratios for both aerosol mass and number distributions, based on cloud droplet, and ice crystal number concentrations, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM global climate model. This scheme is coupled with a size-dependent in-cloud impaction scavenging parameterization for both cloud droplet-aerosol, and ice crystal-aerosol collisions. The aerosol mass scavenged in stratiform clouds is found to be primarily (>90%) scavenged by cloud nucleation processes for all aerosol species, except for dust (50%). The aerosol number scavenged is primarily (>90%) attributed to impaction. 99% of this impaction scavenging occurs in clouds with temperatures less than 273 K. Sensitivity studies are presented, which compare aerosol concentrations, burdens, and deposition for a variety of in-cloud scavenging approaches: prescribed fractions, a more computationally expensive prognostic aerosol cloud processing treatment, and the new diagnostic scheme, also with modified assumptions about in-cloud impaction and nucleation scavenging. Our results show that while uncertainties in the representation of in-cloud scavenging processes can lead to differences in the range of 20-30% for the predicted annual, global mean aerosol mass burdens, and near to 50% for accumulation mode aerosol number burden, the differences in predicted aerosol mass concentrations can be up to one order of magnitude, particularly for regions of the middle troposphere with temperatures below 273 K where mixed and ice phase clouds exist. Different parameterizations for impaction scavenging changed the predicted global, annual mean number removal attributed to ice clouds by seven-fold, and the global, annual dust mass removal attributed to impaction by two orders of magnitude. Closer agreement with observations of black carbon profiles from aircraft (increases near to one order of magnitude for mixed phase clouds), mid

  17. Aerosol effect on the mobility of cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Dagan, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Cloud droplet mobility is referred to here as a measure of the droplets’ ability to move with ambient air. We claim that an important part of the aerosol effect on convective clouds is driven by changes in droplet mobility. We show that the mass-weighted average droplet terminal velocity, defined here as the ‘effective terminal velocity’ (η) and its spread ({σ }η ) serve as direct measures of this effect. Moreover, we develop analytical estimations for η and {σ }η to show that changes in the relative dispersion of η ({\\varepsilon }η ={σ }η /η ) can serve as a sensitive predictor of the onset of droplet-collection processes.

  18. Sensitivity Studies on the Influence of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Development Using WRF Mesoscale Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, G.; Eidhammer, T.; Rasmussen, R.

    2011-12-01

    Using the WRF model in simulations of shallow and deep precipitating cloud systems, we investigated the sensitivity to aerosols initiating as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. A global climatological dataset of sulfates, sea salts, and dust was used as input for a control experiment. Sensitivity experiments with significantly more polluted conditions were conducted to analyze the resulting impacts to cloud and precipitation formation. Simulations were performed using the WRF model with explicit treatment of aerosols added to the Thompson et al (2008) bulk microphysics scheme. The modified scheme achieves droplet formation using pre-tabulated CCN activation tables provided by a parcel model. The ice nucleation is parameterized as a function of dust aerosols as well as homogeneous freezing of deliquesced aerosols. The basic processes of aerosol activation and removal by wet scavenging are considered, but aerosol characteristic size or hygroscopicity does not change due to evaporating droplets. In other words, aerosol processing was ignored. Unique aspects of this study include the usage of one to four kilometer grid spacings and the direct parameterization of ice nucleation from aerosols rather than typical temperature and/or supersaturation relationships alone. Initial results from simulations of a deep winter cloud system and its interaction with significant orography show contrasting sensitivities in regions of warm rain versus mixed liquid and ice conditions. The classical view of higher precipitation amounts in relatively clean maritime clouds with fewer but larger droplets is confirmed for regions dominated by the warm-rain process. However, due to complex interactions with the ice phase and snow riming, the simulations revealed the reverse situation in high terrain areas dominated by snow reaching the surface. Results of other cloud systems will be summarized at the conference.

  19. Remote sensing of clouds and aerosols with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neronov, Andrii; Malyshev, Denys; Dmytriiev, Anton

    2014-05-01

    Remote sensing of atmosphere is conventionally done via a study of extinction/scattering of light from natural (Sun, Moon) or artificial (laser) sources. Cherenkov emission from extensive air showers generated by cosmic rays provides one more natural light source distributed throughout the atmosphere. We show that Cherenkov light carries information on three-dimensional distribution of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere and on the size distribution and scattering phase function of cloud/aerosol particles. Therefore, it could be used for the atmospheric sounding. The new atmospheric sounding method could be implemented via an adjustment of technique of imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The atmospheric sounding data collected in this way could be used both for atmospheric science and for the improvement of the quality of astronomical gamma-ray observations.

  20. Cloud-Driven Changes in Aerosol Optical Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2007-09-30

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  1. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

    2011-12-02

    This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3) of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), and GOES-10) are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October-16 November 2008) WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter) is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter) with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties), and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL) depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with observations

  2. Relationship between low-cloud presence and the amount of overlying aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy Chung, Chul; Lewinschal, Anna; Wilcox, Eric

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are often advected above cloud decks, and the amount of aerosols over cloud has been assumed to be similar to that at the same heights in nearby clear sky. In this assumption, cloud and aerosol above cloud-top height are considered randomly located with respect to each other. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) data are analyzed here to investigate this assumption on global scales. The CALIPSO data reveal that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) above low cloud tends to be smaller than in nearby clear sky during the daytime, and the opposite is true during the nighttime. In particular, over oceanic regions with wide-spread low cloud, such as the tropical southeastern Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, the daytime AOD above low cloud is often 40 % smaller than in surrounding clear skies.

  3. Quantifying Above-Cloud Aerosols through Integrating Multi-Sensor Measurements from A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying above-cloud aerosols can help improve the assessment of aerosol intercontinental transport and climate impacts. Large-scale measurements of aerosol above low-level clouds had been generally unexplored until very recently when CALIPSO lidar started to acquire aerosol and cloud profiles in June 2006. Despite CALIPSO s unique capability of measuring above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD), such observations are substantially limited in spatial coverage because of the lidar s near-zero swath. We developed an approach that integrates measurements from A-Train satellite sensors (including CALIPSO lidar, OMI, and MODIS) to extend CALIPSO above-cloud AOD observations to substantially larger areas. We first examine relationships between collocated CALIPSO above-cloud AOD and OMI absorbing aerosol index (AI, a qualitative measure of AOD for elevated dust and smoke aerosol) as a function of MODIS cloud optical depth (COD) by using 8-month data in the Saharan dust outflow and southwest African smoke outflow regions. The analysis shows that for a given cloud albedo, above-cloud AOD correlates positively with AI in a linear manner. We then apply the derived relationships with MODIS COD and OMI AI measurements to derive above-cloud AOD over the whole outflow regions. In this talk, we will present spatial and day-to-day variations of the above-cloud AOD and the estimated direct radiative forcing by the above-cloud aerosols.

  4. Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) 2011: Design and Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Sorooshian, A.; Seinfeld, J.; Albrecht, B. A.; Nenes, A.; Ahlm, L.; Chen, Y.; Craven, J. S.; Coggon, M.; Frossard, A. A.; Jung, E.; Lin, J. J.; Metcalf, A. R.; Modini, R.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Shingler, T.; Song, S.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschuetz, A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions are widely held to be the largest single source of uncertainty in climate model projections of future climate change due to increasing anthropogenic emissions. The underlying causes of this uncertainty among modeled predictions of climate are the gaps in our fundamental understanding of cloud processes. There has been significant progress with both observations and models on these important questions. However, while the qualitative aspects of the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds are well known, the quantitative representation of these processes is nontrivial and limits our ability to represent them in global climate models. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE) 2011 was a targeted aircraft campaign with embedded modeling studies, using the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft and the R/V Point Sur in July 2011 off the coast of Monterey, California, with a full payload of instruments to measure particle and cloud number, mass, composition, and water uptake distributions. To date, the global models lack (i) accurate aerosol particle activation, with the resulting implications for the profiles of supersaturation, vertical velocity, liquid water content, and drop distribution; (ii) realistic microphysical growth and precipitation processes that control the formation and impacts of drizzle on cloud structure, lifetime, and particle concentration; and (iii) eddy-based transport processes that control the effects of entrainment on cloud thickness and lifetime as well as the dispersion of aerosol plumes. These are basic scientific issues that have not been addressed by climate models or by geoengineering proposals that involve perturbing marine stratocumulus. In this talk, we summarize three central aspects of the collaborative E-PEACE design and the resulting highlights: 1. Controlled particle sources were used to separate particle-induced feedbacks

  5. Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate

    ScienceCinema

    Berg, Larry

    2014-06-02

    Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

  6. Aerosols and Clouds: In Cahoots to Change Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry

    2014-03-29

    Key knowledge gaps persist despite advances in the scientific understanding of how aerosols and clouds evolve and affect climate. The Two-Column Aerosol Project, or TCAP, was designed to provide a detailed set of observations to tackle this area of unknowns. Led by PNNL atmospheric scientist Larry Berg, ARM's Climate Research Facility was deployed in Cape Cod, Massachusetts for the 12-month duration of TCAP, which came to a close in June 2013. "We are developing new tools to look at particle chemistry, like our mass spectrometer used in TCAP that can tell us the individual chemical composition of an aerosol," said Berg. "Then, we'll run our models and compare it with the data that we have to make sure we're getting correct answers and make sure our climate models are reflecting the best information."

  7. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, r d a U production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembe1 (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and platelike), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  8. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles (i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail). Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep cloud systems in the west Pacific warm pool region, in the sub-tropics (Florida) and in the mid-latitude using identical thermodynamic conditions but with different concentrations of CCN: a low 'clean' concentration and a high 'dirty' concentration.

  9. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembel (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  10. Influence of Aerosols on the Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing from North Pacific Oceanic Clouds: Results from the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Roberts, Greg; Ramanathan, V.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols over the Northeastern Pacific Ocean enhance the cloud drop number concentration and reduce the drop size for marine stratocumulus and cumulus clouds. These microphysical effects result in brighter clouds, as evidenced by a combination of aircraft and satellite observations. In-situ measurements from the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX) indicate that the mean cloud drop number concentration in low clouds over the polluted marine boundary layer is greater by 53 cm(sup -3) compared to clean clouds, and the mean cloud drop effective radius is smaller by 4 micrometers. We link these in-situ measurements of cloud modification by aerosols, for the first time, with collocated satellite broadband radiative flux observations from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System to show that these microphysical effects of aerosols enhance the top-of-atmosphere cooling by -.9.9 plus or minus 4.3 W m(sup -2) for overcast conditions.

  11. The Influence of Aerosols on the Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing from North Pacific Oceanic Clouds: Results from the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Eric M.; Roberts, Greg; Ramanathan, V.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols over the Northeastern Pacific Ocean enhance the cloud drop number concentration and reduce the drop size for marine stratocumulus and cumulus clouds. These microphysical effects result in brighter clouds, as evidenced by a combination of aircraft and satellite observations. In-situ measurements from the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX) indicate that the mean cloud drop number concentration in low clouds over the polluted marine boundary layer is greater by 53/cu cm compared to clean clouds, and the mean cloud drop effective radius is smaller by 4 microns. We link these in-situ measurements of cloud modification by aerosols, for the first time, with collocated satellite broadband radiative flux observations from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) to show that these microphysical effects of aerosols enhance the top-of-atmosphere cooling by -9.9+/-4.3 W/sq m for overcast conditions.

  12. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  13. On COBACC (COntinental Biosphere-Aerosol-Cloud-Climate) feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, Markku

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of GHGs have increased substantially during the past century. Elevated concentrations of CO2 and methane are the most important forcing agents causing global warming. However, it is not straightforward to attribute or predict the climate change in detail, as the internal variability of climate is only partially understood, aerosol forcings are still highly uncertain, and there are many feedback mechanisms that are difficult to quantify. It has been recognized for decades that the biosphere plays an important role in climate. For example, Kulmala et al. (2004) suggested a negative climate feedback mechanism whereby higher temperatures and CO2-levels boost continental biomass production, leading to increased biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, tending to cause cooling. This COBACC (COntinental Biosphere-Aerosol-Cloud-Climate) feedback is similar to the so-called CLAW-hypothesis by Charlson et al. (1987) which connects the ocean biochemistry and climate via a negative feedback loop involving CCN production due to sulphur emissions from plankton. The first quantification of the COBACC feedback loop (Kulmala et al. 2014) was based on continuous comprehensive observations at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) station in Hyytiälä, Finland, and showed that a 10 ppm increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration leads to a significant (several percent) increase in both carbon sink and aerosol source. These effects operate through changes in gross primary production, volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions and secondary aerosol formation associated with atmospheric oxidation of VOCs. Here we will describe the present knowledge from processes level understanding to whole COBACC feedback including some hints on biogenic and anthropogenic contributions to global aerosol number load. References: Charlson, R. J. et al. Nature 326, 655 1987 Kulmala, M. et al. Atmos

  14. Global and regional modeling of clouds and aerosols in the marine boundary layer during VOCALS: the VOCA intercomparison

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wyant, M. C.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Wood, Robert; Carmichael, Gregory; Clarke, A. D.; Fast, Jerome D.; George, R.; Gustafson, William I.; Hannay, Cecile; Lauer, Axel; et al

    2015-01-09

    A diverse collection of models are used to simulate the marine boundary layer in the southeast Pacific region during the period of the October–November 2008 VOCALS REx (VAMOS Ocean Cloud Atmosphere Land Study Regional Experiment) field campaign. Regional models simulate the period continuously in boundary-forced free-running mode, while global forecast models and GCMs (general circulation models) are run in forecast mode. The models are compared to extensive observations along a line at 20° S extending westward from the South American coast. Most of the models simulate cloud and aerosol characteristics and gradients across the region that are recognizably similar tomore » observations, despite the complex interaction of processes involved in the problem, many of which are parameterized or poorly resolved. Some models simulate the regional low cloud cover well, though many models underestimate MBL (marine boundary layer) depth near the coast. Most models qualitatively simulate the observed offshore gradients of SO2, sulfate aerosol, CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentration in the MBL as well as differences in concentration between the MBL and the free troposphere. Most models also qualitatively capture the decrease in cloud droplet number away from the coast. However, there are large quantitative intermodel differences in both means and gradients of these quantities. Many models are able to represent episodic offsh