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Sample records for aerosol cloud precipitation

  1. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major agent for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosol effects on clouds could further extend to precipitation, both through the formation of cloud particles and by exerting persistent radiative forcing on the climate system that disturbs dynamics. However, the various mechanisms behind these effects, in particular the ones connected to precipitation, are not yet well understood. The atmospheric and climate communities have long been working to gain a better grasp of these critical effects and hence to reduce the significant uncertainties in climate prediction resulting from such a lack of adequate knowledge. Here we review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on convective precipitation processes from theoretical analysis of microphysics, observational evidence, and a range of numerical model simulations. In addition, the discrepancy between results simulated by models, as well as that between simulations and observations, are presented. Specifically, this paper addresses the following topics: (1) fundamental theories of aerosol effects on microphysics and precipitation processes, (2) observational evidence of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes, (3) signatures of the aerosol impact on precipitation from largescale analyses, (4) results from cloud-resolving model simulations, and (5) results from large-scale numerical model simulations. Finally, several future research directions for gaining a better understanding of aerosol--cloud-precipitation interactions are suggested.

  2. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major reason for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosol effects on clouds could further extend to precipitation, both through the formation of cloud particles and by exerting persistent radiative forcing on the climate system that disturbs dynamics. However, the various mechanisms behind these effects, in particular the ones connected to precipitation, are not yet well understood. The atmospheric and climate communities have long been working to gain a better grasp of these critical effects and hence to reduce the significant uncertainties in climate prediction resulting from such a lack of adequate knowledge. The central theme of this paper is to review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes from theoretical analysis of microphysics, observational evidence, and a range of numerical model simulations. In addition, the discrepancy between results simulated by models, as well as that between simulations and observations will be presented. Specifically, this paper will address the following topics: (1) fundamental theories of aerosol effects on microphysics and precipitation processes, (2) observational evidence of the effect of aerosols on precipitation processes, (3) signatures of the aerosol impact on precipitation from large-scale analyses, (4) results from cloud-resolving model simulations, and (5) results from large-scale numerical model simulations. Finally, several future research directions on aerosol - precipitation interactions are suggested.

  3. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in the Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus have a powerful effect on cloud properties. Increased aerosol concentrations resulting from pollution lead to higher cloud droplet concentrations, but smaller droplet sizes. This in turn affects the physical processes inside clouds that lead to the initiation of precipitation. Depending on a number of factors, including aerosol composition, atmospheric stability, and cloud water content, increasing CCN concentrations may either decrease or increase rainfall. In convective clouds, early rain formation is suppressed, which makes more water and energy available to rise higher in the atmosphere and form ice particles. This may invigorate the dynamics of convection, encourage the formation of hail and lightning, and enhance the transport of materials to the upper troposphere. In turn, cloud processing also affects the concentrations, composition, and distribution of atmospheric aerosols. In order to understand and quantify the effects of air pollution on climate, and precipitation in particular, knowledge of natural abundance and characteristics of aerosols is as essential as the observation of perturbed conditions. I will present recent advances in the conceptual understanding of aerosol-precipitation interactions, as well as results of measurements on aerosol and cloud characteristics in pristine and polluted conditions.

  4. Effect of Carbonaceous Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v, V.; Wang, H.; Ganguly, D.; Minghuai, W.; Rasch, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation (i.e., direct radiative effect) in the atmosphere and also affect clouds and precipitation through indirect effects, thus heating the atmosphere but reducing the amount of solar radiation that reaches the earth’s surface. These effects through dynamic feedbacks can also have remote impact over regions far away from their emission sources and hence demand special scientific attention. Previous modeling studies have revealed that large amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols over the Asian region can alter monsoon circulation and precipitation patterns and thereby influence its strength by varying degrees spatially. Most of the studies focused on the direct radiative effect of aerosols and their subsequent effect on monsoon precipitation. We evaluate the changes in clouds and precipitation in Asia due to carbonaceous aerosols using the community atmospheric model (CAM5) which accounts for not only aerosol direct effects, but also aerosol indirect effects on warm, mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. This study focuses on the precipitation efficiency with emphasis on aerosol indirect effects. In addition to carbonaceous aerosol emissions over Asia, the effect of emissions from other regions like North America, North Africa and Europe are also investigated for their influence on precipitation in the Asian region. In addition to the focus on the aerosol effect on monsoon, we also study the seasonality in aerosol induced changes to precipitation efficiency. We present the quantitative estimates of changes in precipitation efficiency related to changes in aerosol loading and compare them with those estimated from satellite observations, and further explore the potential role of aerosol indirect effects to changes in precipitation efficiency.

  5. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  6. Aerosol Cloud-Precipitation Interaction: Facts and Fiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, W. R.; Levin, Z.

    2006-12-01

    In this talk we summarize the major findings and conclusions made in the WMO International Aerosol Precipitation Science Assessment Group (IAPSAG) report on aerosol impacts on precipitation. At the time of writing this abstract external reviews of the report have been received and by the time of the fall AGU meeting the final draft should be completed. The objective of the report is to stress the potential importance to the hydrological cycle of the effects of pollution on clouds and precipitation. We emphasize that once the precipitation cycle is altered in clouds by varying amounts of CCN, GCCN, and IN concentrations, the cloud responses can be vary nonlinear. Thus in some cases precipitation is decreased with increasing aerosols and others it is increased. Examples from modeling studies suggest that increased concentrations of CCN can lead to vertical redistributions in latent heating that can invigorate the updrafts of convective clouds and lead to large heavier raining storm systems. Other modeling studies indicate the opposite response and the indication is that it is due to the complex interplay of cold pools produced by storms and their mesoscale or large-scale environment. Thus it is dangerous to generalize that aerosols will always decrease or increase precipitation as the cloud response is a function of the variable large scale environment and the detailed nature of the cloud systems that form in those environments.

  7. Campaign datasets for ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. Ruby; Mei, Fan; Comstock, Jennifer; DeMott, Paul; Gero, Jonathan; Hubee, John; Matthews, Alyssa; Nalli, Nicholas; Pekour, Mikhail; Prather, Kimberly; Sedlackek, Arthur; Springston, Stephen; Tomlinson, Jason; Chand, Duli

    2015-08-12

    This campaign consisted of the deployment of the DOE ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) G-1 in a field campaign called ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX), which took place in conjunction with CalWater 2- a NOAA field campaign. The joint CalWater 2/ACAPEX field campaign aimed to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. The observational strategy consisted of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor: 1. the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development 2. the long-range transport of aerosols in the eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs 3. how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent.

  8. ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L Ruby

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign contributes to CalWater 2015, a multi-agency field campaign that aims to improve understanding of atmospheric rivers and aerosol sources and transport that influence cloud and precipitation processes. The ultimate goal is to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods in California. With the DOE G-1 aircraft and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) well equipped for making aerosol and cloud measurements, ACAPEX focuses specifically on understanding how aerosols from local pollution and long-range transport affect the amount and phase of precipitation associated with atmospheric rivers. ACAPEX took place between January 12, 2015 and March 8, 2015 as part of CalWater 2015, which included four aircraft (DOE G-1, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] G-IV and P-3, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] ER-2), the NOAA research ship Ron Brown, carrying onboard the AMF2, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored aerosol and precipitation measurements at Bodega Bay, and the California Department of Water Resources extreme precipitation network.

  9. Impact of Aerosols on Convective Clouds and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chen, Jen-Ping; Li, Zhanqing; Wang, Chien; Zhang, Chidong; Li, Xiaowen

    2012-01-01

    Aerosols are a critical.factor in the atmospheric hydrological cycle and radiation budget. As a major agent for clouds to form and a significant attenuator of solar radiation, aerosols affect climate in several ways. Current research suggests that aerosols have a major impact on the dynamics, microphysics, and electrification properties of continental mixed-phase convective clouds. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Such pollution . effects on precipitation potentially have enormous climatic consequences both in terms of feedbacks involving the land surface via rainfall as well as the surface energy budget and changes in latent heat input to the atmosphere. Basically, aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, the warm-rain process, the cold-rain process, cloud-top heights, the depth of the mixed-phase region, and the occurrence of lightning. Recently, many cloud resolution models (CRMs) have been used to examine the role of aerosols on mixed-phase convective clouds. These modeling studies have many differences in terms of model configuration (two- or three-dimensional), domain size, grid spacing (150-3000 m), microphysics (two-moment bulk, simple or sophisticated spectral-bin), turbulence (1st or 1.5 order turbulent kinetic energy (TKE)), radiation, lateral boundary conditions (i.e., closed, radiative open or cyclic), cases (isolated convection, tropical or midlatitude squall lines) and model integration time (e.g., 2.5 to 48 hours). Among these modeling studies, the most striking difference is that cumulative precipitation can either increase or decrease in response to higher concentrations of CCN. In this presentation, we review past efforts and summarize our current understanding of the effect of aerosols on convective precipitation processes. Specifically, this paper addresses the following topics

  10. Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions over Indo-Gangetic Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, S.-C.; Lau, K. .; Holben, B. N.; Hsu, N. C.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    About 60% of world population reside in Asia, in term of which sheer population density presents a major environmental stress. Economic expansion in this region is, in fact, accompanied by increases in bio-fuel burning, industrial pollution, and land cover and land use changes. With a growth rate of approx. 8%/yr for Indian economy, more than 600 million people from Lahore, Pakistan to Calcutta, India over the Indo-Gangetic Basin have particularly witnessed increased frequencies of floods and droughts as well as a dramatic increase in atmospheric loading of aerosols (i.e., anthropogenic and natural aerosol) in recent decades. This regional change (e.g., aerosol, cloud, precipitation, etc.) will constitute a vital part of the global change in the 21st century. Better understanding of the impacts of aerosols in affecting monsoon climate and water cycles is crucial in providing the physical basis to improve monsoon climate prediction and for disaster mitigation. Based on climate model simulations, absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) play a critical role in affecting interannual and intraseasonal variability of the Indian monsoon. An initiative on the integrated (aerosols, clouds, and precipitation) measurements approach over the Indo-Gangetic Basin will be discussed. An array of ground-based (e.g., AERONET, MPLNET, SMART-COMMIT, etc.) and satellite (e.g., Terra, A-Train, etc.) sensors will be utilized to acquire aerosol characteristics, sources/sinks, and transport processes during the pre-monsoon (April-May, aerosol forcing) season, and to obtain cloud and precipitation properties during the monsoon (May-June, water cycle response) season. Close collaboration with other international programs, such as ABC, CLIVAR, GEWEX, and CEOP in the region is anticipated.

  11. Cloud Regimes as a Tool for Systematic Study of Various Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Systematic changes of clouds and precipitation are notoriously difficult to ascribe to aerosols. This presentation will showcase yet one more attempt to at least credibly detect the signal of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. We surmise that the concept of cloud regimes (CRs) is appropriate to conduct such an investigation. Previous studies focused on what we call here dynamical CRs, and while we continue to adopt those too for our analysis, we have found that a different way of organizing cloud systems, namely via microphysical regimes is also promising. Our analysis relies on MODIS Collection 6 Level-3 data for clouds and aerosols, and TRMM-TMPA data for precipitation. The regimes are derived by applying clustering analysis on MODIS joint histograms, and once each grid cell is assigned a regime, aerosol and precipitation data can be spatiotemporally matched and composited by regime. The composites of various cloud and precipitation variables for high (upper quartile of distribution) and low (lower quartile) aerosol loadings can then be contrasted. We seek evidence of aerosol effects both in regimes with large fractions of deep ice-rich clouds, as well as regimes where low liquid phase clouds dominate. Signals can be seen, especially when the analysis is broken by land-ocean and when additional filters are applied, but there are of course caveats which will be discussed.

  12. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. R.; Prather, K.; Ralph, R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, R.; DeMott, P.; Fairall, C.; Fan, J.; Hagos, S.; Hughes, M.; Long, C.; Rutledge, S.; Waliser, D.; Wang, H.

    2014-09-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Understanding and modeling the fundamental processes that govern the large precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. is a critical test for the ability of climate models to predict the regional water cycle, including floods and droughts. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Because of the large lower-tropospheric water vapor content, strong atmospheric winds and neutral moist static stability, some ARs can produce heavy precipitation by orographic enhancement during landfall on the U.S. West Coast. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in that region during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes.

  13. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al ., 2001]." Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 19991. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005

  14. Impact of aerosols on precipitation from deep convective clouds in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mengjiao; Li, Zhanqing; Wan, Bingcheng; Cribb, Maureen

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed the impact of aerosols on precipitation based on 3 years of 3-hourly observations made in heavily polluted eastern China. The probability of precipitation from different cloud types was calculated using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud data and gauge-based hourly precipitation data. Because deep convective clouds have the largest precipitation probability, the influence of aerosols on the precipitation from such clouds was studied in particular. Aerosol properties were taken from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis data set. As aerosol optical depth increased, rainfall amounts from deep convective clouds increased at first and then decreased. The descending part of the trend is likely due to the aerosol radiative effect. Downwelling solar radiative fluxes at the surface decreased as aerosol optical depth increased. The decrease in solar radiation led to a decrease in ground heat fluxes and convective available potential energy, which is unfavorable for development of convective clouds and precipitation. The tendencies for lower cloud top temperatures, lower cloud top pressures, and higher cloud optical depths as a response to larger aerosol optical depths suggest the invigoration effect. Vertical velocity, relative humidity, and air temperature from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis were sorted to help investigate if the trends are dependent on any environmental conditions. How dynamic and microphysical factors strengthen or mitigate the impact of aerosols on clouds and precipitation and more details about their interplay should be studied further using more observations and model simulations.

  15. Long-term impacts of aerosols on vertical development of cloud and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.; Liu Y.; Niu, F.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ding, Y.

    2011-11-13

    Aerosols alter cloud density and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. This leads to changes in cloud microphysics and atmospheric stability, which can either suppress or foster the development of clouds and precipitation. The net effect is largely unknown, but depends on meteorological conditions and aerosol properties. Here, we examine the long-term impact of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and rainfall frequencies, using a 10-year dataset of aerosol, cloud and meteorological variables collected in the Southern Great Plains in the United States. We show that cloud-top height and thickness increase with aerosol concentration measured near the ground in mixed-phase clouds-which contain both liquid water and ice-that have a warm, low base. We attribute the effect, which is most significant in summer, to an aerosol-induced invigoration of upward winds. In contrast, we find no change in cloud-top height and precipitation with aerosol concentration in clouds with no ice or cool bases. We further show that precipitation frequency and rain rate are altered by aerosols. Rain increases with aerosol concentration in deep clouds that have a high liquid-water content, but declines in clouds that have a low liquid-water content. Simulations using a cloud-resolving model confirm these observations. Our findings provide unprecedented insights of the long-term net impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation.

  16. Quantification of Feedbacks in Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmeier, F.; Herger, N.; Ramelli, F.; Lohmann, U.

    2014-12-01

    The notion of clouds as buffered or resilient systems implies that generalized feedback processes unaccounted for in climate simulations may lead to an overestimation of the effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions, i.e. cloud lifetime effects. In this contribution, we study the importance of microphysical feedback processes in response to anthropogenic aerosols in orographic mixed-phase clouds. Our methods can be extended to other cloud regimes as well as dynamical and thermodynamical feedbacks. For our simulations, we use the regional atmospheric model COSMO-ART-M7 in a 2D setup with an idealized mountain. To capture major processes from aerosol emission to precipitation, the model is coupled to a modal aerosol scheme and includes aerosol activation and heterogeneous freezing as well as two-moment cold and warm cloud microphysics. We perform simulations with aerosol conditions that vary in amount and chemical composition and thus perturb the warm- and ice-phase pathways of precipitation formation and their mixed-phase interactions. Our analysis is based on quantifying the interaction strength between aerosol, cloud and precipitation variables by susceptibilities, i.e. relative sensitivities d ln(Y) / d ln(X), where the change in variable Y is a response to a perturbation in variable X. We describe how to decompose susceptibilities into a direct response expected from the parameterization and a contribution from feedbacks. Resilience features similar magnitudes but opposite signs for those contributions, resulting in an overall small susceptibility. We find considerable contributions from feedbacks, which appear more important for warm-phase than for cold-phase processes. We do not observe, however, a trend for resilience in mixed-phase cloud microphysics. Moreover, feedback contributions seem of secondary importance when compared to the strong dependence of susceptibilities on the microphysical state of the cloud.

  17. Effects of aerosol on evaporation, freezing and precipitation in a multiple cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Kim, Byung-Gon; Yum, Seong Soo; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Um, Jun Shik; Li, Zhanqing; Hong, JinKyu; Chang, Ki-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yim

    2017-02-01

    Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation account for a large portion of uncertainties in the prediction of the future course of global hydrologic circulations and climate. As a process of a better understanding of interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation, simulations are performed for a mixed-phase convective multiple-cloud system over the tropics. Studies on single-cloud systems have shown that aerosol-induced increases in freezing, associated increases in parcel buoyancy and thus the intensity of clouds (or updrafts) are a main mechanism which controls aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in convective clouds. However, in the multiple-cloud system that plays much more important roles in global hydrologic circulations and thus climate than single-cloud systems, aerosol effects on condensation play the most important role in aerosol-induced changes in the intensity of clouds and the effects on freezing play a negligible role in those changes. Aerosol-induced enhancement in evaporation intensifies gust fronts and increases the number of subsequently developing clouds, which leads to the substantial increases in condensation and associated intensity of convection. Although aerosol-induced enhancement in freezing takes part in the increases in condensation by inducing stronger convergence around cloud bottom, the increases in condensation are one order of magnitude larger than those in freezing. It is found that while aerosol-induced increases in freezing create intermittent extremely heavy precipitation, aerosol-induced increases in evaporation enhance light and medium precipitation in the multiple-cloud system here. This increase in light and medium precipitation makes it possible that cumulative precipitation increases with increasing aerosol concentration, although the increase is small. It is interesting that the altitude of the maximum of the time- and domain-averaged hydrometeor mass densities is quite robust to increases in aerosol

  18. Aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in the trade wind boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil

    This dissertation includes an overview of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed during the Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment (BACEX, March-April 2010) and a discussion of their interactions. The principal observing platform for the experiment was the Cooperative Institute for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft that was equipped with aerosol, cloud, and precipitation probes, standard meteorological instruments, and a up-looking cloud radar. The temporal variations and vertical distributions of aerosols observed on the 15 flights show a wide range of aerosol conditions that include the most intense African dust event observed at the Barbados surface site during all of 2010. An average CCN varied from 50 cm-3 to 800 cm -3 at super-saturation of 0.6 %, for example. The 10-day backward trajectories show that three distinctive air masses (originality of air mass as well as the vertical structure) dominate over the Eastern Caribbean (e.g., typical maritime air mass, Saharan Air Layer (SAL), Middle latitude dry air) with characteristic aerosol vertical structures. Many clouds in various phases of growth during BACEX are sampled. The maximum cloud depth observed is about less than 3 km and in most of the clouds is less than 1 km. Two types of precipitation features were observed for the shallow marine cumulus clouds with different impacts on boundary layer. In one, precipitation shafts are observed to emanate from the cloud base with evaporation in the sub-cloud layer (stabilize the sub-cloud layer). In the other, precipitation shafts emanate mainly near the cloud top on the downshear side of the cloud and evaporate in the cloud layer, leading to destabilizing the cloud layer and providing moisture to the layer. Only 42-44 % of clouds sampled were purely non-precipitating throughout the clouds; the remainder of the clouds showed precipitation somewhere in the cloud

  19. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  20. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  1. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  2. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; deSzoeke, S.; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, Christine; Mann, Julia; O Connor, Ewan; Hogan, Robin; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palinkonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  3. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM mobile facility deployment

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, Robert; Luke, Ed; Wyant, Matthew; ...

    2014-04-27

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21-month (April 2009-December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols, and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols, and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulusmore » and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back-trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging.The data from Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made with a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a permanent fixed ARM site that became operational in October 2013.« less

  4. Impact of Local Pollution Versus Long Range Transported Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols form cloud droplets and ice crystals in clouds and can profoundly impact precipitation processes. In-situ aircraft measurements of the composition of individual cloud residuals have been used to study the impact of different aerosol sources including sea spray, dust, soot, and biomass burning on cloud microphysics and precipitation processes. Aircraft studies in 2011 as part of the CalWater project showed that long range transport of dust aerosols from as far away as Africa and biological particles can lead to an increase in the amount of snowfall over California. This presentation will describe results from CalWater-2015 involving aircraft and ground-based measurements at a coastal site. A discussion of the aerosol sources measured in clouds will be presented detailing the relative impacts of local versus long range transported pollution aerosols over California.

  5. Analysis of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions based on MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Feng; Zhang, Jiahua; He, Junliang; Zha, Yong; Li, Qiannan; Li, Yunmei

    2017-01-01

    Aerosols exert an indirect impact on climate change via its impact on clouds by altering its radiative and optical properties which, in turn, changes the process of precipitation. Over recent years how to study the indirect climate effect of aerosols has become an important research topic. In this study we attempted to understand the complex mutual interactions among aerosols, clouds and precipitation through analysis of the spatial correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD), cloud effective radius (CER) and precipitation during 2000-2012 in central-eastern China that has one of the highest concentrations of aerosols globally. With the assistance of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived aerosol and cloud product data, this analysis focuses on regional differentiation and seasonal variation of the correlation in which in situ observed precipitation was incorporated. On the basis of the achieved results, we proposed four patterns depicting the mutual interactions between aerosols, clouds and precipitation. They characterize the indirect effects of aerosols on the regional scale. These effects can be summarized as complex seasonal variations and north-south regional differentiation over the study area. The relationship between AOD and CER is predominated mostly by the first indirect effect (the negative correlation between AOD and CER) in the north of the study area in the winter and spring seasons, and over the entire study area in the summer season. The relationship between CER and precipitation is dominated chiefly by the second indirect effect (the positive correlation between CER and precipitation) in the northern area in summer and over the entire study area in autumn. It must be noted that aerosols are not the factor affecting clouds and rainfall singularly. It is the joint effect of aerosols with other factors such as atmospheric dynamics that governs the variation in clouds and rainfall.

  6. Aerosol impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds and precipitation formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.; Gharaylou, M.

    2017-03-01

    Through modifying the number concentration and size of cloud droplets, aerosols have intricate impacts on radiative and microphysical properties of clouds, which together influence precipitation processes. Aerosol-cloud interactions for a mid-latitude convective cloud system are investigated using a two-moment aerosol-aware bulk microphysical scheme implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Three sensitivity experiments with initial identical dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, but different cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were conducted. Increased aerosol number concentration has resulted in more numerous cloud droplets of overall smaller sizes, through which the optical properties of clouds have been changed. While the shortwave cloud forcing is significantly increased in more polluted experiments, changes in the aerosol number concentration have negligible impacts on the longwave cloud forcing. For the first time, it is found that polluted clouds have higher cloud base heights, the feature that is caused by more surface cooling due to a higher shortwave cloud forcing, as well as a drier boundary layer in the polluted experiment compared to the clean. The polluted experiment was also associated with a higher liquid water content (LWC), caused by an increase in the number of condensation of water vapor due to higher concentration of hygroscopic aerosols acting as condensation nuclei. The domain-averaged accumulated precipitation is little changed under both polluted and clean atmosphere. Nevertheless, changes in the rate of precipitation are identified, such that under polluted atmosphere light rain is reduced, while both moderate and heavy rain are intensified, confirming the fact that if an ample influx of water vapor exists, an increment of hygroscopic aerosols can increase the amount of precipitation.

  7. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2015-06-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  8. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under CMA chemical weather modeling system GRAPES/CUACE. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is fed online interactively into a two-moment cloud scheme (WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive the cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred. The results show that interactive aerosols with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content and cloud droplet number concentrations while decrease the mean diameter of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive micro-physical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24% to 48% enhancements of TS scoring for 6-h precipitation in almost all regions. The interactive aerosols with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3°C.

  9. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low clean concentration and a high dirty concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated.

  10. Conditional Impact of Aerosol on Cloud and Precipitation Revealed from Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud and precipitation via various mechanisms by altering both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere and cloud micro- and macro-physics. Apparently, different mechanisms lead to different types of impact that may suppress or foster cloud processes and precipitation. Aerosol reduces the amount of solar radiation reaching ground, reducing sensible and latent heat fluxes. For absorbing aerosol, it warms up the atmosphere. Together, they inhibits convection and convective clouds and precipitation. By serving CCN, it reduces cloud droplet size and suppress drizzle but may enhance heavy precipitation due to the invigoration effect. While it is unclear if aerosol changes total rainfall amount, but it surely change the distribution of precipitation. It is an essential but a challenging task to sort out the various effects. To tackle the problem and unravel various complex relations, data from both long-term routine measurements and intensive field experiments have been analyzed, together with some modeling studies. In this talk, I will summarize major findings drawn from several analyses using long-term acquired in US (ARM) and operational meteorological data in US, experiments in China and global satellite data from CloudSat, CALIPSO and MODIS. The key finding is that absorbing aerosol suppresses both light and heavy rains, whereas scattering aerosol of strong hygroscopicity inhibits light rain but enhance heavy rain.

  11. The VOCALS Regional Experiment: Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R.

    2012-12-01

    Robert Wood, C.S. Bretherton, C. R. Mechoso, R. A. Weller, B. J. Huebert, H. Coe, B. A. Albrecht, P. H. Daum, D. Leon, A. Clarke, P. Zuidema, C. W. Fairall, G. Allen, S. deSzoeke, G. Feingold, J. Kazil, S. Yuter, R. George, A. Berner, C. Terai, G. Painter, H. Wang, M. Wyant, D. Mechem The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) is an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific (SEP), a region dominated by strong coastal upwelling, extensive cold SSTs, and home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northen Chile. A central theme of VOCALS-REx is the improved understanding of links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties. In this presentation, we will present a synthesis of results from VOCALS-REx focusing on the following questions: (a) how are aerosols, clouds and precipitation inter-related in the SEP region? (b) what microphysical-macrophysical interactions are necessary for the formation and maintenance of open cells? (c) how do cloud and MBL properties change across the strong microphysical gradients from the South American coast to the remote ocean?

  12. Aerosol effects on clouds, convection and precipitation in the chemistry-climate model EMAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Steil, B.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation using the EMAC atmospheric chemistry general circulation model. Aerosol-cloud interactions are explicitly considered in two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation schemes, i.e., applying an osmotic model and the κ method. The two schemes have rather different effects on cloud properties such as cloud droplet number and size distribution, cloud water content, and cloud optical properties. Much higher cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) are simulated with the osmotic model compared to the k method, leading to substantially different cloud radiative effects and consequently convection and precipitation, particularly over the continents. The osmotic model simulation yields an about 6.5 W/m2 stronger cooling effect over land than the κ method, with three times higher CDNC. The convective activity in terms of convective available potential energy (CAPE) is decreased by 20%, which corresponds to a decrease in convective precipitation by 23% in favor of large-scale precipitation. Note that in the current model setup only large-scale clouds are directly affected by interactions with aerosols, while in convection and associated precipitation are affected indirectly.

  13. Aerosol-cloud-precipitation system as a predator-prey problem.

    PubMed

    Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham

    2011-07-26

    We show that the aerosol-cloud-precipitation system exhibits characteristics of the predator-prey problem in the field of population dynamics. Both a detailed large eddy simulation of the dynamics and microphysics of a precipitating shallow boundary layer cloud system and a simpler model built upon basic physical principles, reproduce predator-prey behavior with rain acting as the predator and cloud as the prey. The aerosol is shown to modulate the predator-prey response. Steady-state solution to the proposed model shows the known existence of bistability in cloudiness. Three regimes are identified in the time-dependent solutions: (i) the weakly precipitating regime where cloud and rain coexist in a quasi steady state; (ii) the moderately drizzling regime where limit-cycle behavior in the cloud and rain fields is produced; and (iii) the heavily precipitating clouds where collapse of the boundary layer is predicted. The manifestation of predator-prey behavior in the aerosol-cloud-precipitation system is a further example of the self-organizing properties of the system and suggests that exploiting principles of population dynamics may help reduce complex aerosol-cloud-rain interactions to a more tractable problem.

  14. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Clouds and Precipitation: Insights from CalWater 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. R.; Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Prather, K. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field campaign took place in northern California from mid January through early March of 2015. The field campaign, including collaborations between CalWater 2 and ACAPEX, aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs) and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. An observational strategy was employed using land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. During the field campaign, an AR developed in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in early February and made landfall in northern California. In-situ aerosol and cloud measurements from the G-1 aircraft; remote sensing data of clouds and aerosols; and meteorological measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based instruments collected from February 5 - 8, 2015 are analyzed to characterize the large-scale environment and cloud and precipitation forming processes. Modeling experiments are designed using a regional model for simulations with a cloud resolving limited area domain and quasi-global coarser resolution domain to evaluate the impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and to explore the relative contributions of long-range transported and regional aerosols that interacted with the clouds before, during, and after AR landfall. Preliminary results will be discussed in the context of the field data as well as a multi-year simulation of the climatological contributions of long-range transported dust during AR landfall in California.

  15. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing; Niu, F.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Yangang; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Ding, Yanni

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol has complex effects on clouds and precipitation that may augment or offset each other contingent upon a variety of variables. As a result, its long-term impact on climate is largely unknown. Using 10 years of the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) measurements, strong aerosol effects of climatologically significance are detected. With increasing total aerosol number concentration (condensation nucleus, CN) measured near the ground, both cloud top height and precipitation change systematically for mix-phase clouds of warm-base (cloud base <1km) and cold-top (above the freezing level), but not for pure liquid and ice clouds. Cloud thickness can increase systematically with the CN concentration by up to a factor of 2. The response of precipitation to CN depends on cloud liquid water path (LWP). As CN increases, rain occurs more frequently for high LWP but less frequently for low LWP. Such strong signals of aerosol long-term impact on cloud and precipitation have not been reported and have significant implications for climate change studies, especially concerning regional and global climate change induced by pollution.

  16. A modeling study of the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Xiaoning; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Changhai; Gettelman, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (version 3.5) coupled with the Morrison-Gettelman two-moment cloud microphysics scheme is employed to simulate the aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation in two numerical experiments, one representing present-day conditions (year 2000) and the other the pre-industrial conditions (year 1750) over East Asia by considering both direct and indirect aerosol effects. To isolate the aerosol effects, we used the same set of boundary conditions and only altered the aerosol emissions in both experiments. The simulated results show that the cloud microphysical properties are markedly affected by the increase in aerosols, especially for the column cloud droplet number concentration (DNC), liquid water path (LWP), and the cloud droplet effective radius (DER). With increased aerosols, DNC and LWP have been increased by 137% and 28%, respectively, while DER is reduced by 20%. Precipitation rates in East Asia and East China are reduced by 5.8% and 13%, respectively, by both the aerosol's second indirect effect and the radiative forcing that enhanced atmospheric stability associated with the aerosol direct and first indirect effects. The significant reduction in summer precipitation in East Asia is also consistent with the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon, resulting from the decreasing thermodynamic contrast between the Asian landmass and the surrounding oceans induced by the aerosol's radiative effects. The increase in aerosols reduces the surface net shortwave radiative flux over the East Asia landmass, which leads to the reduction of the land surface temperature. With minimal changes in the sea surface temperature, hence, the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon further enhances the reduction of summer precipitation over East Asia.

  17. Combined observational and modeling efforts of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions over Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loftus, Adrian; Tsay, Si-Chee; Nguyen, Xuan Anh

    2016-04-01

    Low-level stratocumulus (Sc) clouds cover more of the Earth's surface than any other cloud type rendering them critical for Earth's energy balance, primarily via reflection of solar radiation, as well as their role in the global hydrological cycle. Stratocumuli are particularly sensitive to changes in aerosol loading on both microphysical and macrophysical scales, yet the complex feedbacks involved in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions remain poorly understood. Moreover, research on these clouds has largely been confined to marine environments, with far fewer studies over land where major sources of anthropogenic aerosols exist. The aerosol burden over Southeast Asia (SEA) in boreal spring, attributed to biomass burning (BB), exhibits highly consistent spatiotemporal distribution patterns, with major variability due to changes in aerosol loading mediated by processes ranging from large-scale climate factors to diurnal meteorological events. Downwind from source regions, the transported BB aerosols often overlap with low-level Sc cloud decks associated with the development of the region's pre-monsoon system, providing a unique, natural laboratory for further exploring their complex micro- and macro-scale relationships. Compared to other locations worldwide, studies of springtime biomass-burning aerosols and the predominately Sc cloud systems over SEA and their ensuing interactions are underrepresented in scientific literature. Measurements of aerosol and cloud properties, whether ground-based or from satellites, generally lack information on microphysical processes; thus cloud-resolving models are often employed to simulate the underlying physical processes in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) cloud model has recently been enhanced with a triple-moment (3M) bulk microphysics scheme as well as the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6 aerosol module. Because the aerosol burden not only affects cloud

  18. Cloud and Precipitation During GoAmazon: The Influence of Aerosol and Thermodynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, L.; Cecchin, M.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Albrecht, R. I.; Comstock, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Mei, F.; Schumacher, C.; Eichholz, C.; Giangrande, S. E.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Thalman, R. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.

    2015-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon, GOAmazon, intensive field campaign, hereafter called IOP1 (February-March) and IOP2 (September - October) 2014, was an opportunity for broad and joint campaigns of the CHUVA, IARA and ACRIDICON-CHUVA projects. GOAmazon intends to study how aerosols and surface fluxes influence cloud cycles under clean conditions, as well as how aerosol and cloud life cycles, including cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions, are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity. This study employs the SIPAM S band radar, the X Band dual polarization radar, GOES images, disdrometers, CCN counters, radiosondes and data collected by G1 and HALO airplanes. As ancillary data, we used the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, the TERRACLASS (INPE) and EVI from MODIS for surface topography, surface type classification and vegetation index, respectively. Cloud and precipitation are studied as function of aerosol concentration as well surface type and thermodynamic properties. Different sensors and space-time scales are employed to compare the life cycle and cloud size distribution using radar and satellite for different atmospheric conditions. For each IOP, the droplet size distribution using the airplanes or the particle size distribution using disdrometers are described discussing the aerosol, thermodynamic, surface type and topography effects on the clouds and precipitation. The typical precipitation behavior, for each IOP, is described using CFADs and reflectivity distributions. For few specific flights, those measuring ice particles, during the wet season (IOP1), some examples and classifications of convective and stratiform clouds are discussed. Finally, the microphysical properties of the clouds are presented using X band dual pol radar hydrometeor classifications and evaluating the effect of aerosol loading on the cloud vertical structure.

  19. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W.-K.; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Mastsui, T.; Lang, S.; Simpson, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 20011. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. ln this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific. In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection.

  20. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  1. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Zhang, X.; Gong, S.; Wang, Y.; Xue, M.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction (ACI) scheme has been developed under a China Meteorological Administration (CMA) chemical weather modeling system, GRAPES/CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System, CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment). Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are interactively fed online into a two-moment cloud scheme (WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme - WDM6) and a convective parameterization to drive cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred.

    The results show that aerosols that interact with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content, and cloud droplet number concentrations, while decreasing the mean diameters of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive microphysical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48 % enhancements of threat score for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The aerosols that interact with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  2. Simulating Aerosol Indirect Effects with Improved Aerosol-Cloud- Precipitation Representations in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Leung, L. Ruby; Fan, Jiwen

    2016-04-27

    This is a collaborative project among North Carolina State University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego to address the critical need for an accurate representation of aerosol indirect effect in climate and Earth system models. In this project, we propose to develop and improve parameterizations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation feedbacks in climate models and apply them to study the effect of aerosols and clouds on radiation and hydrologic cycle. Our overall objective is to develop, improve, and evaluate parameterizations to enable more accurate simulations of these feedbacks in high resolution regional and global climate models.

  3. The Role of Atmospheric Aerosol Concentration on Deep Convective Precipitation: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, Xiaowen; Khain, Alexander; Matsui, Toshihisa; Lang, Stephen; Simpson, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds NRC [2001]." The aerosol effect on Clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect, is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. In this paper, a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with detailed spectral-bin microphysics was used to examine the effect of aerosols on three different deep convective cloud systems that developed in different geographic locations: South Florida, Oklahoma and the Central Pacific, In all three cases, rain reaches the ground earlier for the low CCN (clean) case. Rain suppression is also evident in all three cases with high CCN (dirty) case. However, this suppression only occurs during the first hour of the simulations. During the mature stages of the simulations, the effects of increasing aerosol concentration range from rain suppression in the Oklahoma case, to almost no effect in the Florida case, to rain enhancement in the Pacific case. These results show the complexity of aerosol interactions with convection. The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether high CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Stronger evaporative cooling can produce a stronger cold pool and thus stronger low-level convergence through interactions

  4. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  5. Software to analyze the relationship between aerosol, clouds, and precipitation: SAMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, S.; MacDonald, L. P.; Leaitch, W. R.; Pierce, J. R.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of aircraft-based measurements of clouds is critical for studies of aerosol and of clouds. Many such measurements have been taken, but it is difficult to compare such data across instruments, flights and campaigns. We present a new open-source software program, SAMAC (Software for Airborne Measurements of Aerosol and Clouds), that may enable a more systematic and comparable approach to the analysis of aerosol-cloud-precipitation data. The software offers a cooperative and reproducible approach to the analysis of aircraft measurements of clouds across campaigns. SAMAC is an object-oriented software program in which a cloud is an object; all the data related to a cloud is contained in the cloud object. The cloud objects come with built-in methods and functions that allow for the quick generation of basic plots and calculations, SAMAC provides a quick view of the data set and may be used to compare clouds and to filter for specific characteristics. Other researchers can readily use already submitted algorithms once their data is placed in the cloud structure provided, and they can contribute their own algorithms to the software for others to see and use. This approach would improve comparability, reproducibility and transparency by allowing others to replicate results and test the same algorithms on different data. SAMAC can be downloaded at https://github.com/StephGagne/SAMAC/releases.

  6. The Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Precipitation and Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Forcing Uncertainty in Climatically Important Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regayre, L.; Pringle, K.; Lee, L.; Booth, B.; Browse, J.; Mann, G.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Reddington, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Rap, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud radiative forcing and precipitation sensitivities are quantified within climatically important regions, where surface temperatures and moisture availability are thought to influence large-scale climatic effects. The sensitivity of precipitation and the balance of incoming and outgoing radiation to uncertain historical aerosol emission fluxes and aerosol-cloud parametrisations are quantified and their climatic importance considered. The predictability of monsoon onset and intensity, position of the inter-tropical convergence zone, tropical storm frequency and intensity, heat transport to the Arctic and changes in the mode of the El Niño Southern Oscillation are all limited by the parametric uncertainties examined here. Precipitation and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing sensitivities are found to be both spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Statistical analysis highlights aspects of aerosol-climate research and model development that should be prioritised in order to reduce the impact of uncertainty in regional precipitation and aerosol-cloud forcing on near-term climate projections.

  7. Potential Impacts of Pollution Aerosol and Dust Acting As Cloud-Nucleating Aerosol on Precipitation in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, V.; Cotton, W. R.; Carrio, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The southwest US has huge demands on water resources. The Colorado River Basin (CRB) is potentially affected by anthropogenic aerosol pollution and dust acting as cloud-nucleating aerosol as well as impacting snowpack albedo.The specific objective of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains for the years 2005-2006. We examine the combined effects of anthropogenic pollution aerosol and dust serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), ice nuclei (IN) and giant CCN(GCCN) on precipitation in the CRB. Anthropogenic pollution can enhance droplet concentrations, and decrease collision and coalescence and ice particle riming largely via the "spillover" effect. Dust can serve as IN and enhance precipitation in wintertime orographic clouds. Dust coated with sulfates or originating over dry lake beds can serve as GCCN which when wetted can result in larger cloud droplets and thereby enhance the warm-rain collision and coalescence process and ice particle riming. But smaller dust particles coated with sulfates, can decrease collision and coalescence and ice particle riming similar to anthropogenic pollution aerosols. The Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) version 6.0 is used for this study. RAMS was modified to ingest GEOS-CHEM output data and periodically update aerosol fields. GEOS-CHEM is a chemical transport model which uses assimilated meteorological data from the NASA Goddard Earth Observation System (GEOS). The aerosol data comprise a sum of hydrophobic and hydrophilic black carbon and organic aerosol, hydrophilic SOAs, hydrocarbon oxidation and inorganic aerosols (nitrate, sulfate and ammonium). In addition, a RAMS-based dust source and transport model is used. Preliminary analysis suggests pollution dominates over dust resulting in a decrease in precipitation via the spillover effect. Dust serving as GCCN and IN tend to enhance ice

  8. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitable affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds, Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effect of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bim microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.

  9. The Role of Aerosols in Cloud Growth, Suppression, and Precipitation: Yoram Kaufman and his Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles are produced in the earth's atmosphere through both natural as well as manmade processes, and contribute profoundly to the (i) formation and characteristics of clouds, (ii) lifetime of clouds, (iii) optical and microphysical properties of clouds, (iv) human health through effects on air quality and the size of particulates as well as vectors for transport of pathogens, (v) climate response and feedbacks, (vi) precipitation, and (vii) harmful algal blooms. Without aerosol particles in the Earth's atmosphere, there would be no fogs, no clouds, ,no mists, and probably no rain, as noted as far back as 1880 by Scottish physicist John Aitken. With the modern development of instrumentation, both groundbased, airborne, and satellite-based, much progress has been made in linkng phenomena and processes together, and putting regional air quality characteristics and hypothesized cloud response into closer scrutiny and linkages. In h s presentation I will summarize the wide ranging contributions that Yoram Kaufman has made in ground-based (AERONET), aircraft field campaigns (such as SCAR-B and TARFOX), and, especially, satellite remote sensing (Landsat, MODIS, POLDER) to shed new light on this broad ranging and interdisciplinary field of cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions.

  10. Aerosol Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation in Eastern China: Results from Bin and Bulk Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing; Morrison, H.; Chen, Hongbin; Zhou, Yuquan; Qian, Yun; Wang, Yuan

    2012-01-19

    Using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with a 3 spectral-bin microphysics ('SBM') and measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation 4 Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility field campaign in China (AMF-China), the authors 5 examine aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in the typical cloud regimes of the warm and cold 6 seasons in Southeast China: deep convective clouds (DCC) and stratus clouds (SC), 7 respectively. Comparisons with a two-moment bulk microphysics ('Bulk') are performed 8 to gain insights for improving bulk schemes in estimating AIE in weather and climate 9 simulations. For the first time, measurements of aerosol and cloud properties acquired in 10 China are used to evaluate model simulations to better understand AIE in China. It is 11 found that changes in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration significantly 12 change the timing of storms, the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitation, the 13 frequency distribution of precipitation rate, as well as cloud base and top heights for the 14 DCC, but not for the SC. CCN increase cloud droplet number (Nc) and mass 15 concentrations, decrease raindrop number concentration (Nr), and delay the onset of 16 precipitation. It is indicated much higher Nc and the opposite CCN effects on convection 17 and heavy rain with Bulk compared to SBM stem from the fixed CCN prescribed in Bulk. 18 CCN have a significant effect on ice microphysical properties with SBM but not Bulk 19 and different condensation/deposition freezing parameterizations employed could be the 20 main reason. This study provided insights to further improve the bulk scheme to better 21 account for aerosol-cloud interactions in regional and global climate simulations, which 22 will be the focus for a follow-on paper.

  11. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembel (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  12. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Remer, L.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics is inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, r d a U production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembe1 (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e. pristine ice crystals (columnar and platelike), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "c1ean"concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. In addition, differences and similarities between bulk microphysics and spectral-bin microphysical schemes will be examined and discussed.

  13. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.

    2004-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles (i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail). Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep cloud systems in the west Pacific warm pool region, in the sub-tropics (Florida) and in the mid-latitude using identical thermodynamic conditions but with different concentrations of CCN: a low 'clean' concentration and a high 'dirty' concentration.

  14. Stability analysis of predator-prey model on the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistyowati, Rita; Kurniadi, Rizal; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study has been performed on the analysis of the stability of predator-prey models in the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions which initiated by Koren-Feingold. The model consists of two coupled non- linear differential equations describing the development of a population of cloud drop concentration and cloud depth for precipitation. Stability analysis of the models was conducted to understand the stability behavior of systems interactions. In this paper, the analysis focused on the model without delay. The first step was done by determining the equilibrium point of the model equations which yielded 1 non-trivial equilibrium point and 4 trivial equilibrium point. Nontrivial equilibrium point (0,0) associated with the steady state or the absence of precipitation while the non-trivial equilibrium point shows the oscillation behavior in the formation of precipitation. The next step is linearizing the equation around the equilibrium point and calculating of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Evaluation of the eigen values of characteristic equation determined the type of stability. There are saddle node, star point, unstable node, stable node and center. The results of numerical computations was simulated in the form of phase portrait to support the theoretical calculation. Phase portraits show the characteristic of populations growth of cloud depth and drop cloud. In the next research, this analysis will compared to delay model to determine the effect of time delay on the equilibrium point of the system.

  15. Stability analysis of predator-prey model on the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulistyowati, Rita; Kurniadi, Rizal; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2015-09-01

    A preliminary study has been performed on the analysis of the stability of predator-prey models in the case of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions which initiated by Koren-Feingold. The model consists of two coupled non-linear differential equations describing the development of a population of cloud drop concentration and cloud depth for precipitation. Stability analysis of the models was conducted to understand the stability behavior of systems interactions. In this paper, the analysis focused on the model without delay. The first step was done by determining the equilibrium point of the model equations which yielded 1 non-trivial equilibrium point and 4 trivial equilibrium point. Nontrivial equilibrium point (0,0) associated with the steady state or the absence of precipitation while the non-trivial equilibrium point shows the oscillation behavior in the formation of precipitation. The next step is linearizing the equation around the equilibrium point and calculating of eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix. Evaluation of the eigen values of characteristic equation determined the type of stability. There are saddle node, star point, unstable node, stable node and center. The results of numerical computations was simulated in the form of phase portrait to support the theoretical calculation. Phase portraits show the characteristic of populations growth of cloud depth and drop cloud. In the next research, this analysis will compared to delay model to determine the effect of time delay on the equilibrium point of the system.

  16. The Impacts of Chihuahua Desert Aerosol Intrusions on Convective Clouds and Regional Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apodaca, Karina

    Growing up in a desert region influenced by a monsoon system and experiencing, first-hand, dust storms produced by convective thunderstorms stimulated my interest in the study of the impacts of aerosols on clouds. Contrary to other studies which focus more on anthropogenic aerosols, I chose to investigate the role of natural aerosols in the deserts of North America. Moreover, the role played by aerosols in desert regions within the North American Monsoon domain has not received as much attention as in other monsoon regions around the world. This dissertation describes my investigation of the connection between mineral aerosols (dust storms) and monsoon rainfall in the deserts of the Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. To develop the context for the study of the role of mineral dust in summer-time convection on a regional scale, large-scale dynamical processes and their impact on the inter-annual variability of monsoon rainfall were analyzed. I developed the climatology of monsoonal rainfall and dust storms using surface observations to determine which mesoscale features influence North American Monsoon rainfall in the Paso Del Norte region. The strongest correlations were found between sea surface temperatures over the Gulf of California, Gulf of California moisture surges and monsoon rainfall in the Paso Del Norte region. A connection to ENSO could not be clearly established despite analyzing twenty-one years of data. However, by breaking the data into segments, a strong correlation was found for periods of intense rainfall. Twenty-one case studies were identified in which dust storms were produced in conjunction with thunderstorms during the 2005 - 2007 monsoon seasons. However, in some cases all the conditions were there for rainfall to occur but it did not precipitate. I concluded that strong thunderstorm outflow was triggering dust storms. The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem V3.1.1) was used to evaluate

  17. A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

    2013-05-01

    The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosol’s direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

  18. The Role of Aerosols on Precipitation Processes: Cloud Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Li, X.; Matsui, T.

    2012-01-01

    identify the impact of ice processes, radiation and large-scale influence on cloud-aerosol interactive processes, especially regarding surface rainfall amounts and characteristics (i.e., heavy or convective versus light or stratiform types). In addition, an inert tracer was included to follow the vertical redistribution of aerosols by cloud processes. We will also give a brief review from observational evidence on the role of aerosol on precipitation processes.

  19. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Li, X.; Remer, L.

    2003-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitable affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distribution parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effect of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensembel (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bim microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e., pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), groupel and frozen drops/hall] Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e., 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep cloud systems in the west Pacific warm pool region and in the mid-latitude using identical thermodynamic conditions but with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. Besides the initial differences in aerosol concentration, preliminary results indicate that the low CCN concentration case produces rainfall at the surface sooner than the high CCN case but has less cloud water mass aloft. Because the spectral-bim model explicitly calculates and allows for the examination of both the mass and number concentration of cpecies in each size category, a detailed analysis of the instantaneous size spectrum can be obtained for the two cases. It is shown that since the low

  20. The Impact of Aerosols on Cloud and Precipitation Processes: Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Khain, A.; Simpson, S.; Johnson, D.; Li, X.; Remer, L.

    2003-01-01

    Cloud microphysics are inevitably affected by the smoke particle (CCN, cloud condensation nuclei) size distributions below the clouds. Therefore, size distributions parameterized as spectral bin microphysics are needed to explicitly study the effects of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud development, rainfall production, and rainfall rates for convective clouds. Recently, two detailed spectral-bin microphysical schemes were implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. The formulation for the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (i.e., cloud droplets and raindrops), and several types of ice particles [i.e.,pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail]. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing many categories (i.e. 33 bins). Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions.A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region using identical thermodynamic conditions but with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. Besides the initial differences in aerosol concentration, preliminary results indicate that the low CCN concentration case produces rainfall at the surface sooner than the high CCN case but has less cloud water mass aloft. Because the spectral-bin model explicitly calculates and allows for the examination of both the mass and number concentration of species in each size categor, a detailed analysis of the instantaneous size spectrum can be obtained for the two cases. It is shown that since the low CCN case

  1. Integrated Modeling of Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation and Land Processes at Satellite-Resolved Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chin, Mian; Braun, Scott; Case, Jonathan; Hou, Arthur; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Sujay; Lau, William; Matsui, Toshihisa; Miller, Tim; Santanello, Joseph, Jr.; Shi, Jainn; Starr, David; Tao, Qian; Zaitchik, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    In this talk, I will present recent results from a project led at NASA/GSFC, in collaboration with NASA/MSFC and JHU, focused on the development and application of an observation-driven integrated modeling system that represents aerosol, cloud, precipitation and land processes at satellite-resolved scales. The project, known as the NASA Unified WRF (NU-WRF), is funded by NASA's Modeling and Analysis Program, and leverages prior investments from the Air Force Weather Agency and NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). We define "satellite-resolved" scales as being within a typical mesoscale atmospheric modeling grid (roughly 1-25 km), although this work is designed to bridge the continuum between local (microscale), regional (mesoscale) and global (synoptic) processes. NU-WRF is a superset of the standard NCAR Advanced Research WRF model, achieved by fully integrating the GSFC Land Information System (LIS, already coupled to WRF), the WRF/Chem enabled version of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosols Radiation Transport (GOCART) model, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulation Unit (SDSU), and boundary/initial condition preprocessors for MERRA and GEOS-5 into a single software release (with source code available by agreement with NASA/GSFC). I will show examples where the full coupling between aerosol, cloud, precipitation and land processes is critical for predicting local, regional, and global water and energy cycles, including some high-impact phenomena such as floods, hurricanes, mesoscale convective systems, droughts, and monsoons.

  2. A New Approach to using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    this talk. In particular, a new approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  3. A New Approach to using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    , a new approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  4. A New Approach to Using a Cloud-resolving Model to Study the Interactions Between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2005-01-01

    approach to using cloud-resolving models to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation and aerosols will be presented.

  5. Aerosol effects in different types of precipitating clouds in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Ramon; Albrecht, Rachel; Vila, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this research is focused on the influence of aerosol in the formation of different precipitant clouds (warm - wrc, stratiform - str and convective - cnv cloud). The analysis was carried out in the Amazon basin region, also known as 'green ocean' region, due to its low cloud condensation nuclei count over the forested regions, resembling the oceanic regions. The September to December period from 2000 to 2013 were selected for this research. The September to November period was chosen because it belongs to the dry-to-wet transition season (when from forest fires are still active at this region); while December is on wet season, when the 'green ocean' environment is observed. Daily data of atmospheric optical depth (AOD) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, on board AQUA and TERRA satellites, was used to discriminate enviroment as polluted or clean and forested or deforested areas. Cloud type, reflectivity profile, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP) and rain rate (RR) data were retrieved from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission-Precipitation Radar (TRMM-PR) satellite. For wrc type the results suggest that the highest values of rain rate observed for higher AOD values is related to the enhancement of colision and coalescence processes. The explanation for this pattern could be related to cloud drops reaching precipitating drop size and growing in function of a high concentration of small droplets. The results suggests that the increase in Bowen ratio at deforested areas (lower NDVI values) showed lead to the enhancement of updrafts at clouds and more water vapor available for cloud drops generation. It is observed for deforested areas different distribution patterns of LWP and IWP. Lower values are observed for cnv clouds in comparison to forested areas, while the opposite is observed for str clouds. These results suggests that at polluted environments over deforested

  6. Determination of the sources and impacts of aerosols on clouds and orographic precipitation during CalWater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cayan, D. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Comstock, J. M.; Leung, L.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections for the remainder of this century for the U.S. Southwest, including parts of California, suggest a drying trend (reductions ~ 10 -15 %). Thus, understanding factors which could potentially influence the amount and type of precipitation is critical to future water resources in California. Previous studies suggest aerosols transported from the Central Valley into the mountains may be reducing the amount of orographic precipitation in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the key region for water storage in the snowpack. CalWater, which commenced in the Winter of 2009, is an ongoing multi-year, multi-agency field campaign to investigate the primary sources of aerosols influencing clouds and precipitation in this region. Single particle measurements, used in both ground as well as PNNL G1 aircraft measurements, in the recent campaign provide insight into the sources of aerosols impacting the clouds and precipitation. Biomass burning, Central Valley pollution, long range transported Asian dust and pollution, locally generated newly formed particles, and marine aerosols all show strong impacts on the cloud microphysical properties. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the objective and key findings from CalWater measurements of aerosols, precipitation, clouds, and meteorology conducted from 2009-2011 in this region.

  7. A New Approach to Using a Cloud-Resolving Model to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation and Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Atlas, R.; Chern, J.; Shie, C.-H.

    2004-01-01

    Recently Grabowski and Khairoutdinov and Randall have proposed and demonstrated, the feasibility of using 2D CRMs (these did not include detailed land processes and used periodic lateral boundary conditions) as 'super-parameterizations or a multi-scale modeling framework MMF' for cloud processes within atmospheric generation circulation models (GCMs). In the MMF, a fine-resolution 2D CRM takes the place of the single-column parameterization that is used in conventional GCMs. An overview of this approach is given by Randall et al.. Since a CRM can explicitly simulate cloud processes at the natural space and time scales of clouddynamical processes, it's possible to compute statistics of cloud fields, including radiances and radar backscatters, directly simulated/produced by the CRM. A seed fund is available at NASA Goddard to build a MMF based on a 2D GCE model and the Goddard fvGCM. A prototype MMF will be developed at end of 2004. The major objectives are to test and evaluate its performance using the GCE model as the super parameterization and compare its results with other super parameterizations, conventional GCMs and observations. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (WE) model. The GCE model is a CRM and it has been improved and applied to study the precipitation processes in the past two decades. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low 'clean' concentration and a high 'dirty' concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. In addition, the similarities and differences between bulk- and spectral-bin microphysics will be presented,

  8. The source of discrepancies in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions between GCM and A-Train retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michibata, Takuro; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Sato, Yousuke; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions are one of the most uncertain processes in climate models due to their nonlinear complexity. A key complexity arises from the possibility that clouds can respond to perturbed aerosols in two opposite ways, as characterized by the traditional "cloud lifetime" hypothesis and more recent "buffered system" hypothesis. Their importance in climate simulations remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the response of the liquid water path (LWP) to aerosol perturbations for warm clouds from the perspective of general circulation model (GCM) and A-Train remote sensing, through process-oriented model evaluations. A systematic difference is found in the LWP response between the model results and observations. The model results indicate a near-global uniform increase of LWP with increasing aerosol loading, while the sign of the response of the LWP from the A-Train varies from region to region. The satellite-observed response of the LWP is closely related to meteorological and/or macrophysical factors, in addition to the microphysics. The model does not reproduce this variability of cloud susceptibility (i.e., sensitivity of LWP to perturbed aerosols) because the parameterization of the autoconversion process assumes only suppression of rain formation in response to increased cloud droplet number, and does not consider macrophysical aspects that serve as a mechanism for the negative responses of the LWP via enhancements of evaporation and precipitation. Model biases are also found in the precipitation microphysics, which suggests that the model generates rainwater readily even when little cloud water is present. This essentially causes projections of unrealistically frequent and light rain, with high cloud susceptibilities to aerosol perturbations.

  9. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    understanding of the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions and drizzle and entrainment processes in boundary layer clouds for the purpose of developing...thickness, cloud turbulence intensity, and aerosols on precipitation production; 4) study the processing of aerosols by cloud processes ; 5) explore mass...drizzle processes to the artificial introduction of CCN and giant nuclei under differing aerosol backgrounds. In addition, a set of aerosol and cloud

  10. Cloud and Aerosol Properties, Precipitable Water, and Profiles of Temperature and Water Vapor from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael D.; Menzel, W. Paul; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Steven A.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Pincus, Robert; Hubanks, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is an earth-viewing sensor that flies on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively. MODIS scans a swath width of 2330 km that is sufficiently wide to provide nearly complete global coverage every two days from a polar-orbiting, sun-synchronous, platform at an altitude of 705 km. MODIS provides images in 36 spectral bands between 0.415 and 14.235 pm with spatial resolutions of 250 m (2 bands), 500 m (5 bands) and 1000 m (29 bands). These bands have been carefully selected to en- able advanced studies of land, ocean, and atmospheric properties. Twenty-six bands are used to derive atmospheric properties such as cloud mask, atmospheric profiles, aerosol properties, total precipitable water, and cloud properties. In this paper we describe each of these atmospheric data products, including characteristics of each of these products such as file size, spatial resolution used in producing the product, and data availability.

  11. Modification of postfrontal convective clouds and precipitation by natural and anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Daniel; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Shallow postfrontal convective clouds are thought to be sensitive to the aerosol burden. In our case study we present results of model runs, simulating April 25, 2008. On this day a cold front passes Germany from north to south. During this situation the sea salt aerosol transported by the northerly flow into the model domain replaces the preexisting anthropogenic aerosol. We quantify the effect of the aerosol on the microphysical properties of the convective clouds that develop after the passage of the cold front. The model system COSMO-ART (Vogel et al., 2009, Bangert et al., 2010) is a comprehensive online coupled model system to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of reactive gaseous and particulate matter. It is used to quantify the feedback processes between aerosols and the. state of the atmosphere on the continental to the regional scale with two-way interactions between different atmospheric processes. The model system enables further investigations of the aerosol-cloud-interactions and associated feedback processes. The model framework contains a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme (Seifert and Beheng, 2006) in combination with sophisticated activation parameterizations (Bangert et al., 2012). We carried out sensitivity runs. One applies a bulk microphysics scheme as used in the operational forecasts of the German weather service. In two of them the aerosol was. prescribed (continental, maritime) and kept constant in space and time. In the fourth one we used the full capabilities of COSMO-ART to simulate the dynamic behavior of aerosol and its feedback with radiation and cloud microphysics. We compare our model results with radar data, satellite IR images, and rain gauges.

  12. Cloud residues and interstitial aerosols from non-precipitating clouds over an industrial and urban area in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Li, Peiren; Sun, Guode; Zhou, Shengzhen; Yuan, Qi; Wang, Wenxing

    2011-05-01

    Most studies of aerosol-cloud interactions have been conducted in remote locations; few have investigated the characterization of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over highly polluted urban and industrial areas. The present work, based on samples collected at Mt. Tai, a site in northern China affected by nearby urban and industrial air pollutant emissions, illuminates CCN properties in a polluted atmosphere. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to obtain the size, composition, and mixing state of individual cloud residues and interstitial aerosols. Most of the cloud residues displayed distinct rims which were found to consist of soluble organic matter (OM). Nearly all (91.7%) cloud residues were attributed to sulfate-related salts (the remainder was mostly coarse crustal dust particles with nitrate coatings). Half the salt particles were internally mixed with two or more refractory particles (e.g., soot, fly ash, crustal dust, CaSO 4, and OM). A comparison between cloud residues and interstitial particles shows that the former contained more salts and were of larger particle size than the latter. In addition, a somewhat high number scavenging ratio of 0.54 was observed during cloud formation. Therefore, the mixtures of salts with OMs account for most of the cloud-nucleating ability of the entire aerosol population in the polluted air of northern China. We advocate that both size and composition - the two influential, controlling factors for aerosol activation - should be built into all regional climate models of China.

  13. Probable weather modification of aerosol effect on clouds and precipitation over Korea during the January 2013 severe haze episode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, S. H.; Kim, B. G.; Lee, K. M.; Park, R.; Kim, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols effects on clouds and precipitation are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle. However, the level of scientific understanding concerning aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions is still low (Boucher et al., 2013), because these processes are linked to many factors like cloud regime (Stevens and Feingold, 2009) or meteorological condition (Loeb and Schuster 2008, Su et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2008; 2012), leading to a high process complexity (Andersen and Cermak, 2015). In January 2013, heavy air pollution was observed over most parts of northern and central China (Tao et al., 2014; Uno et al., 2014). It was also identified in Korea with a time lag of a couple of days (12 January 2013). The episode has synoptic setting such as weak trough at 850hPa moving through the northern Korean peninsula during 11-12 January, leading to the dominant westerly winds over Korea. PM10 mass concentrations increased significantly over Korea since early 12 January with its average value in excess of 200mg/m3. Interestingly, Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) forecasted precipitation would end at noon of 12 January, but it lasted until 21 LST. In contrast, there was no precipitation over the southern part of the Korean peninsula. Based on the above observation, to understand the aerosols effects on clouds and precipitation in Korea, we have analyzed the relationship of PM10 to MODIS cloud properties (Cloud Optical Depth; COD, cloud effective radius; re, Liquid Water Path; LWP) in terms of north-south gradient. We found the smaller effective radius in the mid-Korean peninsula, with an increase in COD, whereas a larger effective radius and reduced COD shown in the southern-Korean peninsula. It implies the increased aerosol loadings transported from China can modify cloud microphysical properties over middle Korean peninsula. Meteorological environment condition will be also checked out especially including water vapor along with

  14. Effects of turbulence on warm clouds and precipitation with various aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin; Han, Ji-Young

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on warm clouds and precipitation by changing the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration using a two-dimensional dynamic model with bin microphysics. TICE is determined according to the Taylor microscale Reynolds number and the turbulent dissipation rate. The thermodynamic sounding used in this study is characterized by a warm and humid atmosphere with a capping inversion layer, which is suitable for simulating warm clouds. For all CCN concentrations, TICE slightly reduces the liquid water path during the early stage of cloud development and accelerates the onset of surface precipitation. However, changes in the rainwater path and in the amount of surface precipitation that are caused by TICE depend on the CCN concentrations. For high CCN concentrations, the mean cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) decreases and the mean effective radius increases due to TICE. These changes cause an increase in the amount of surface precipitation. However, for low CCN concentrations, changes in the mean CDNC and in the mean effective radius induced by TICE are small and the amount of surface precipitation decreases slightly due to TICE. A decrease in condensation due to the accelerated coalescence between droplets explains the surface precipitation decrease. In addition, an increase in the CCN concentration can lead to an increase in the amount of surface precipitation, and the relationship between the CCN concentration and the amount of surface precipitation is affected by TICE. It is shown that these results depend on the atmospheric relative humidity.

  15. Probing the impact of different aerosol sources on cloud microphysics and precipitation through in-situ measurements of chemical mixing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Heymsfield, A.; Roberts, G. C.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Rosenfeld, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol particles play a crucial role in affecting cloud processes by serving as cloud nuclei. However, our understanding of which particles actually form cloud and ice nuclei limits our ability to treat aerosols properly in climate models. In recent years, it has become possible to measure the chemical composition of individual cloud nuclei within the clouds using on-line mass spectrometry. In-situ high time resolution chemistry can now be compared with cloud physics measurements to directly probe the impact of aerosol chemistry on cloud microphysics. This presentation will describe results from two recent field campaigns, CalWater in northern California and ICE-T in the western Caribbean region. Ground-based and aircraft measurements will be presented of aerosol mixing state, cloud microphysics, and meteorology. Results from single particle mass spectrometry will show the sources of the cloud seeds, including dust, biomass burning, sea spray, and biological particles. Details will be provided on how we are now able to probe the sources and cycling of atmospheric aerosols by measuring individual aerosols, cloud nuclei, and precipitation chemistry. The important role of dust, both Asian and African, and bioparticles in forming ice nuclei will be discussed. Finally, a summary will be provided discussing how these new in-situ measurements are being used to advance our understanding of complex atmospheric processes, and improve our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate.

  16. A Process-Modeling Study of Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in Response to Controlled Seawater Spray in Marine Boundary Layer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Rasch, P. J.; Feingold, G.

    2010-12-01

    Vast areas of the oceanic surface are covered by stratocumulus (Sc) clouds. They significantly enhance the reflection of incoming solar radiation back to space, leading to a considerable cooling of the Earth-atmosphere system. It has been argued that a 4% increase in the areal coverage or a 0.06 increase in cloud albedo of Sc clouds can offset the warming by atmospheric CO2 doubling (Randall et al. 1984; Latham et al. 2008). Acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol particles can modify cloud albedo, cloud longevity and precipitation efficiency. Recent observational and modeling studies have suggested that aerosol, through its effect on precipitation, can alter cloud cellular structures in marine Sc region, representing a powerful modification of clouds by aerosol. The possibility of mitigating global warming by spraying sea-salt particles into marine boundary layer to brighten Sc clouds was raised by Latham (1990). The idea has been evaluated by several global climate model studies but their inability to represent cloud-scale dynamics and microphysics raises questions about the validity of the results. Using a high-resolution version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, we investigate the impact of seawater spray on the formation and evolution of marine Sc through aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions and dynamical feedback. We will demonstrate how injected aerosol particles are transported from the ocean surface into clouds and affect cloud microphysics and macrophysics under various meteorological conditions. We will also use simulation results to explore whether the influx of sea-salt aerosols always enhances cloud albedo and how the performance depends on the distribution of sprayers.

  17. Multi-sensor online visualization and analysis of precipitation, moisture, clouds, and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, A. V.; Liu, Z.; Leptoukh, G. J.

    2009-04-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information Services Center (GES DISC) is home of satellite data archives including those from Terra, Aqua, and TRMM satellites. The GES DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) provides unique facility of visualization and analysis, and data downloading capability of geophysical parameters retrieved from these satellites. In this poster presentation, accompanied by a computer demonstration, analysis of a variety of case studies of tropical and mid-latitude rain systems and associated moisture, clouds, and aerosols fields will be demonstrated by using Giovanni.

  18. Observing wind, aerosol particles, cloud and precipitation: Finland's new ground-based remote-sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, A.; O'Connor, E. J.; Komppula, M.; Korhonen, K.; Pfüller, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Wood, C. R.; Bauer-Pfundstein, M.; Poikonen, A.; Karppinen, T.; Lonka, H.; Kurri, M.; Heinonen, J.; Moisseev, D.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Nordbo, A.; Rodriguez, E.; Lihavainen, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laurila, T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute, in collaboration with the University of Helsinki, has established a new ground-based remote-sensing network in Finland. The network consists of five topographically, ecologically and climatically different sites distributed from southern to northern Finland. The main goal of the network is to monitor air pollution and boundary layer properties in near real time, with a Doppler lidar and ceilometer at each site. In addition to these operational tasks, two sites are members of the Aerosols, Clouds and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network (ACTRIS); a Ka band cloud radar at Sodankylä will provide cloud retrievals within CloudNet, and a multi-wavelength Raman lidar, PollyXT (POrtabLe Lidar sYstem eXTended), in Kuopio provides optical and microphysical aerosol properties through EARLINET (the European Aerosol Research Lidar Network). Three C-band weather radars are located in the Helsinki metropolitan area and are deployed for operational and research applications. We performed two inter-comparison campaigns to investigate the Doppler lidar performance, compare the backscatter signal and wind profiles, and to optimize the lidar sensitivity through adjusting the telescope focus length and data-integration time to ensure sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in low-aerosol-content environments. In terms of statistical characterization, the wind-profile comparison showed good agreement between different lidars. Initially, there was a discrepancy in the SNR and attenuated backscatter coefficient profiles which arose from an incorrectly reported telescope focus setting from one instrument, together with the need to calibrate. After diagnosing the true telescope focus length, calculating a new attenuated backscatter coefficient profile with the new telescope function and taking into account calibration, the resulting attenuated backscatter profiles all showed good agreement with each other. It was thought that harsh Finnish

  19. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, Allen B.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-01-03

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  20. Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution vs. long-range transported dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Q.

    2013-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on 16 February (FEB16) and 2 March (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust or dust/biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust/biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a 40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet, and cloud dynamics. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental conditions for

  1. Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter and spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and the Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in order to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases (from the CalWater 2011 field campaign) with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on 16 February (FEB16) and 2 March (MAR02). In both cases, observations show the presence of dust and biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust and biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada for both FEB16 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by a few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present, but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology, including cloud dynamics and the strength of the Sierra Barrier Jet. This study further underscores the importance of the interactions between local pollution, dust, and environmental

  2. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    nesting technique. A review of developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard will be presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  3. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    technique. A review of developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard wlll be is presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  4. Using Multi-scale Modeling System to Study the Interactions between Clouds, Precipitation, Aerosols, Radiation and Land Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    developments, improvements and applications of cloud models (GCE and WRF) at Goddard will be presented in this talk. In particular, a new approach to using multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, aerosols and land will be presented.

  5. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: Analysis of Results from the ARM Mobile Facility Deployment to the Azores (2009/2010)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Robert

    2013-05-31

    The project focuses upon dataset analysis and synthesis of datasets from the AMF deployment entitled “Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL)” at Graciosa Island in the Azores. Wood is serving a PI for this AMF deployment.

  6. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A. B.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust or dust/biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust/biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB06 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including

  7. UCLALES-SALSA v1.0: a large-eddy model with interactive sectional microphysics for aerosol, clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, Juha; Maalick, Zubair; Raatikainen, Tomi; Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Romakkaniemi, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Challenges in understanding the aerosol-cloud interactions and their impacts on global climate highlight the need for improved knowledge of the underlying physical processes and feedbacks as well as their interactions with cloud and boundary layer dynamics. To pursue this goal, increasingly sophisticated cloud-scale models are needed to complement the limited supply of observations of the interactions between aerosols and clouds. For this purpose, a new large-eddy simulation (LES) model, coupled with an interactive sectional description for aerosols and clouds, is introduced. The new model builds and extends upon the well-characterized UCLA Large-Eddy Simulation Code (UCLALES) and the Sectional Aerosol module for Large-Scale Applications (SALSA), hereafter denoted as UCLALES-SALSA. Novel strategies for the aerosol, cloud and precipitation bin discretisation are presented. These enable tracking the effects of cloud processing and wet scavenging on the aerosol size distribution as accurately as possible, while keeping the computational cost of the model as low as possible. The model is tested with two different simulation set-ups: a marine stratocumulus case in the DYCOMS-II campaign and another case focusing on the formation and evolution of a nocturnal radiation fog. It is shown that, in both cases, the size-resolved interactions between aerosols and clouds have a critical influence on the dynamics of the boundary layer. The results demonstrate the importance of accurately representing the wet scavenging of aerosol in the model. Specifically, in a case with marine stratocumulus, precipitation and the subsequent removal of cloud activating particles lead to thinning of the cloud deck and the formation of a decoupled boundary layer structure. In radiation fog, the growth and sedimentation of droplets strongly affect their radiative properties, which in turn drive new droplet formation. The size-resolved diagnostics provided by the model enable investigations of these

  8. How Does a Raindrop Grow?: Precipitation in natural clouds may develop from ice crystals or from large hygroscopic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Braham, R R

    1959-01-16

    On the basis of presently available data, combined with present-day knowledge of the physics and chemistry of cloud particle development, it is possible to make the following generalizations about the mode of precipitation in natural clouds. 1) The all-water mechanism begins to operate as soon as a parcel of cloud air is formed and continues to operate throughout the life of the cloud. The ice-crystal mechanism, on the other hand, can begin to operate only after the top of the cloud has reached levels where ice nuclei can be effective (about -15 degrees C). Some clouds never reach this height; any precipitation from them must be through the all-water mechanism. In cold climates and at high levels in the atmosphere, the cloud bases may be very close to this critical temperature. In the tropics, approximately 25,000 feet separate the bases of low clouds from the natural ice level. 2) The number of large hygroscopic nuclei in maritime air over tropical oceans is entirely adequate to rain-out any cloud with a base below about 10,000 feet, provided the cloud duration and cloud depth is sufficient for the precipitation process to operate. Extensive trajectories over land will decrease the number of sea-salt particles, both because of sedimentation and removal in rain. Measurements show an order-of-magnitude decrease in the number of large particles as maritime air moves from the Gulf of Mexico to the vicinity of St. Louis, during the summer months. Measurements in Arizona and New Mexico show even smaller chloride concentrations, presumably because of the long overland trajectories required in reaching these areas. The maritime particles lost in overland trajectories apparently are more than replaced by particles of land origin. The latter are usually of mixed composition and are less favorable for the formation of outsized solution droplets. 3) Ice nuclei, required for the formation of ice crystals and for droplet freezing, are rather rare at temperatures higher than

  9. Satellite Remote Sensing and Mesoscale Modeling of Biomass Burning Aerosols over the Southeast Asian Maritime Continent: Climatic Implications of Smokes on Regional Energy Balance, Cloud Formations and Precipitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, N.

    2015-12-01

    The influences of anthropogenic aerosols have been suggested as an important reason for climate changes over Southeast Asia (SE Asia, 10°S~20°N and 90°E~135°E). Accurate observations and modelling of aerosols effects on the weather and climate patterns is crucial for a better understanding and mitigation of anthropogenic climate change. This study uses NASA satellite observations along with online-coupled Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to evaluate aerosols impacts on climate over SE Asia. We assess the direct and semi-direct radiative effects of smoke particles over this region during September, 2009 when a significant El Niño event caused the highest biomass burning activity during the last 15 years. Quantification efforts are made to assess how changes of radiative and non radiative parameters (sensible and latent heat) due to smoke aerosols would affect regional climate process such as precipitations, clouds and planetary boundary layer process. Comparison of model simulations for the current land cover conditions against surface meteorological observations and satellite observations of precipitations and cloudiness show satisfactory performance of the model over our study area. In order to quantitatively validate the model results, several experiments will be performed to test the aerosols radiative feedback under different radiation schemes and with/without considering aerosol effects explicitly in the model. Relevant ground-based data (e.g. AERONET), along with aerosol vertical profile data from CALIPSO, will also be applied.

  10. The Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The goals and measurement strategy of the Aerosol/Cloud/Ecosystems Mission (ACE) are described. ACE will help to answer fundamental science questions associated with aerosols, clouds, air quality and global ocean ecosystems. Specifically, the goals of ACE are: 1) to quantify aerosol-cloud interactions and to assess the impact of aerosols on the hydrological cycle and 2) determine Ocean Carbon Cycling and other ocean biological processes. It is expected that ACE will: narrow the uncertainty in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction and quantify the role of aerosols in climate change; measure the ocean ecosystem changes and precisely quantify ocean carbon uptake; and, improve air quality forecasting by determining the height and type of aerosols being transported long distances. Overviews are provided of the aerosol-cloud community measurement strategy, aerosol and cloud observations over South Asia, and ocean biology research goals. Instruments used in the measurement strategy of the ACE mission are also highlighted, including: multi-beam lidar, multiwavelength high spectra resolution lidar, the ocean color instrument (ORCA)--a spectroradiometer for ocean remote sensing, dual frequency cloud radar and high- and low-frequency micron-wave radiometer. Future steps for the ACE mission include refining measurement requirements and carrying out additional instrument and payload studies.

  11. The Effects of Transpacific Transported Aerosol on Clouds in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K.; Creamean, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Cazorla, A.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; White, A. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cahill, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Chand, D.; Schmid, B.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are frequently lofted high into the atmosphere and can travel large distances within several days. Long-range transported aerosols can have large impacts on radiative and microphysical cloud properties and can affect precipitation on both regional and global scales. Research flights were conducted out of Sacramento, California onboard the DOE G-1 aircraft during the CalWater 2011 flight campaign, which aimed to understand the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation in California. To investigate aerosol effects on clouds, measurements of cloud microphysical properties were coupled with an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS), which characterized the chemical composition of aerosols and cloud residues. California Central Valley pollution aerosols were hypothesized to have a large impact on orographic clouds in the California Sierra Nevada Mountains; however transpacific transported aerosols were observed in cloud residues on several flights. Our observations indicate that dust from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East initiated ice formation in upper level clouds, while Asian soot from biomass burning served as cloud condensation nuclei in clouds with large concentrations of small liquid droplets. Previous work has linked large concentrations of small droplets to suppression of orographic precipitation, while ice formation has been shown to enhance precipitation. Therefore, the overall impact of these competing effects on precipitation in the Sierra Nevada is highly uncertain. The varying impacts of long-range transported aerosols on clouds and precipitation in California are presented.

  12. Impact of Aerosol Processing on Orographic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, Sara; Zubler, Elias M.; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    . [6]. Our investigation regarding the influence of aerosol processing will focus on the regional scale using a cloud-system resolving model with a much higher resolution. Emphasis will be placed on orographic mixed-phase precipitation. Different two-dimensional simulations of idealized orographic clouds will be conducted to estimate the effect of aerosol processing on orographic cloud formation and precipitation. Here, cloud lifetime, location and extent as well as the cloud type will be of particular interest. In a supplementary study, the new parameterization will be compared to observations of total and interstitial aerosol concentrations and size distribution at the remote high alpine research station Jungfraujoch in Switzerland. In addition, our simulations will be compared to recent simulations of aerosol processing in warm, mixed-phase and cold clouds, which have been carried out at the location of Jungfraujoch station [5]. References: [1] Pruppacher & Jaenicke (1995), The processing of water vapor and aerosols by atmospheric clouds, a global estimate, Atmos. Res., 38, 283295. [2] Seifert & Beheng (2006), A two-moment microphysics parameterization for mixed-phase clouds. Part 1: Model description, Meteorol. Atmos. Phys., 92, 4566. [3] Vignati et al. (2004), An efficient size-resolved aerosol microphysics module for large-scale transport models, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D22202 [4] Muhlbauer & Lohmann (2008), Sensitivity studies of the role of aerosols in warm-phase orographic precipitation in different flow regimes, J. Atmos. Sci., 65, 25222542. [5] Hoose et al. (2008), Aerosol processing in mixed-phase clouds in ECHAM5HAM: Model description and comparison to observations, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D071210. [6] Hoose et al. (2008), Global simulations of aerosol processing in clouds, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 69396963.

  13. The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Remer, L.; Kahn, R.; Starr, D.; Hildebrand, P.; Colarco, P.; Diner, D.; Vane, D.; Im, E.; Behrenfeld, M.; Stephens, G.; Maring, H.; Bontempi, P.; Martins, J. V.

    2008-12-01

    The Aerosol, Clouds and Ecosystem (ACE) Mission is a second tier Decadal Survey mission designed to characterize the role of aerosols in climate forcing, especially their impact on precipitation and cloud formation. ACE also includes ocean biosphere measurements (chlorophyll and dissolved organic materials) which will be greatly improved by simultaneous measurements of aerosols. The nominal ACE payload includes lidar and multiangle spectropolarimetric polarimetric measurements of aerosols, radar measurements of clouds and multi-band spectrometer for the measurement of ocean ecosystems. An enhancement to ACE payload under consideration includes µ-wave radiometer measurements of cloud ice and water outside the nadir path of the radar/lidar beams. This talk will cover ACE instrument and science options, updates on the science team definition activity and science potential.

  14. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-01-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented in the regional weather forecast and climate model COSMO. The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snow flakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snow flakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. However, the processes not only impact the total aerosol number and mass, but also the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble accumulation mode and generating coarse mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases the cloud droplet number concentration with possible implications for the ice

  15. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  16. Investigation of the relationships between DCS cloud properties, lifecycle, and precipitation with meteorological regimes and aerosol sources at the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xiquan

    2016-10-26

    In this proposed research, we will investigate how different meteorological regimes and aerosol sources affect DCS properties, diurnal and life cycles, and precipitation using multiple observational platforms (surface, satellite, and aircraft) and NARR reanalysis at the ARM SGP site. The Feng et al. (2011, 2012) DCS results will serve as a starting point for this proposed research, and help us to address some fundamental issues of DCSs, such as convective initiation, rain rate, areal extent (including stratiform and convective regions), and longevity. Convective properties will be stratified by meteorological regime (synoptic/mesoscale patterns) identified by reanalysis. Aerosol information obtained from the ARM SGP site will also be stratified by meteorological regimes to understand their effects on convection. Finally, the aircraft in-situ measurements and various radar observations and retrievals during the MC3E campaign will provide a “cloud-truth” dataset and are an invaluable data source for verifying the findings and investigating the proposed hypotheses in Objective 1.

  17. Precipitation driving of droplet concentration variability in marine low clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Robert; Leon, David; Lebsock, Matthew; Snider, Jefferson; Clarke, Antony D.

    2012-10-01

    The concentration Nd of cloud droplets in marine low clouds is a primary determinant of their ability to reflect sunlight and modulates their ability to precipitate. Previous studies have focused upon aerosol source variability as the key driver of variability in Nd. Here, we use a highly simplified aerosol budget model to examine the impact of precipitation on Nd. This model considers: precipitation (coalescence) scavenging, constrained using new satellite measurements of light precipitation; entrainment of aerosol from above cloud combined with constant aerosol concentration based on recent field observations of aerosol particles in the free troposphere; and sea-surface aerosol production estimated using a wind speed dependent source function. Despite the highly simplified nature of this model, it skillfully predicts the geographical variability ofNd in regions of extensive marine low clouds. Inclusion of precipitation results in reduction in Nd by factors of 2-3 over the remote oceans. Within 500 km of coastlines the reduction in Nd due to precipitation is weak but in these regions the model is not able to accurately predict Ndbecause of strong pollution sources. In general, neither free-tropospheric nor surface CCN sources alone are sufficient to maintainNd against precipitation losses. The results demonstrate that even the light precipitation rates typical of marine stratocumulus profoundly impact the radiative properties of marine low clouds.

  18. Putting the clouds back in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.

    2015-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) are the consequence of perturbed aerosols affecting cloud drop and crystal number, with corresponding microphysical and radiative effects. ACI are sensitive to both cloud microphysical processes (the "C" in ACI) and aerosol emissions and processes (the "A" in ACI). This work highlights the importance of cloud microphysical processes, using idealized and global tests of a cloud microphysics scheme used for global climate prediction. Uncertainties in key cloud microphysical processes examined with sensitivity tests cause uncertainties of nearly -30 to +60 % in ACI, similar to or stronger than uncertainties identified due to natural aerosol emissions (-30 to +30 %). The different dimensions and sensitivities of ACI to microphysical processes identified in previous work are analyzed in detail, showing that precipitation processes are critical for understanding ACI and that uncertain cloud lifetime effects are nearly one-third of simulated ACI. Buffering of different processes is important, as is the mixed phase and coupling of the microphysics to the condensation and turbulence schemes in the model.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Cermak, Jan

    2014-05-01

    This study determines the spatial and temporal distribution of regions with frequent aerosol-cloud interactions (aci) and identifies their meteorological determinants based on CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) data products. Atmospheric aerosols influence the microphysical structure of clouds, while both also respond to meteorological conditions. The potential radiative adjustments to changes in a cloud system associated with aerosol-cloud interactions are grouped and termed as effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions (ERFaci). It is difficult to distinguish, to what extent radiative forcing and precipitation patterns of clouds are a result of cloud feedbacks to aerosols or the existing meteorological conditions. A complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-meteorology interactions is crucial as the uncertainty range of ERFaci in climate change modeling could be significantly reduced. In the present study it is suggested that presence of hydrated aerosols is an implication for aci. Knowledge of their vertical and horizontal distribution and frequency over the globe would be important for understanding ERFaci. To identify regions with aerosol-cloud transitions the CAD score (cloud-aerosol discrimination) of the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol LIdar with Orthogonal Polarization) instrument on the CALIPSO satellite is used. It separates aerosols and clouds according to the probability distribution functions of 5 parameters (attenuated backscatter, total color ratio, volume depolarization ratio, altitude and latitude) and assigns the likelihood of cloud or aerosol presence. This parameter is used to calculate relative frequencies of aci on a global scale from 2006 to 2013.

  20. Corrigendum to Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 81–101, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, A.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-05-01

    In the paper “Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust” by J. Fan et al., wrong versions of Fig. 8 and Fig. 12 were published. Please find the correct figures below.

  1. Non-precipitating cumulus cloud study

    SciTech Connect

    Alkezweeny, A.J.

    1984-10-01

    This document describes the field experiment that was conducted in Kentucky during the period from July 20 to August 24, 1983. The objectives were to determine the vertical transport of acidic pollutants by cumulus convection and formation of acidic substances in non-precipitating clouds. The study is a research component of Task Group C (Atmospheric Processes) of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program. To examine the vertical transport, an SF/sub 6/ tracer was released from one aircraft, sampled by another aircraft, and sampled on the ground. The results show that pollutants from the boundary layer are lifted to the cloud layer. From there, they are intermittently transported both to the ground and to higher elevations, possibly in the vertical updrafts of towering cumulus clouds. A series of instrumented aircraft flights around the clouds were conducted to study the formation of acidic aerosols. The concentrations of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, NH/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/ and trace metals were measured by filter techniques. Furthermore, NO/sub x/, O/sub 3/, light scattering, and basic meteorological parameters were measured in real-time. Detailed chemical composition of aerosols and NH/sub 3/ was also measured on the ground. Preliminary results show that the molar ratio of SO/sub 2//SO/sub 2/ + SO/sub 4/) at cloud tops is higher than at cloud bases. This indicates that sulfate aerosols were formed in the clouds. The NH/sub 3/ concentration shows higher values at nighttime than daytime and decreases sharply with increasing altitude. 3 references.

  2. Performance of McRAS-AC in the GEOS-5 AGCM: Part 1, Aerosol-Activated Cloud Microphysics, Precipitation, Radiative Effects, and Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Lee, D.; Oreopoulos, L.; Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.; Suarez, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A revised version of the Microphysics of clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert and Aerosol-Cloud interaction (McRAS-AC), including, among others, the Barahona and Nenes ice nucleation parameterization, is implemented in the GEOS-5 AGCM. Various fields from a 10-year long integration of the AGCM with McRAS-AC were compared with their counterparts from an integration of the baseline GEOS-5 AGCM, and with satellite data as observations. Generally using McRAS-AC reduced biases in cloud fields and cloud radiative effects are much better over most of the regions of the Earth. Two weaknesses are identified in the McRAS-AC runs, namely, too few cloud particles around 40S-60S, and too high cloud water path during northern hemisphere summer over the Gulf Stream and North Pacific. Sensitivity analyses showed that these biases potentially originated from biases in the aerosol input. The first bias is largely eliminated in a sensitivity test using 50% smaller aerosol particles, while the second bias is much reduced when interactive aerosol chemistry was turned on. The main drawback of McRAS-AC is dearth of low-level marine stratus clouds, probably due to lack of dry-convection, not yet implemented into the cloud scheme. Despite these biases, McRAS-AC does simulate realistic clouds and their optical properties that can improve with better aerosol-input and thereby has the potential to be a valuable tool for climate modeling research because of its aerosol indirect effect simulation capabilities involving prediction of cloud particle number concentration and effective particle size for both convective and stratiform clouds is quite realistic.

  3. Evidence of Mineral Dust Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Qilong; Li, Rui; Lin, Bing; Joseph, Everette; Wang, Shuyu; Hu, Yongxiang; Morris, Vernon; Chang, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-platform and multi-sensor observations are employed to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective systems. It is clearly evident that for a given convection strength,small hydrometeors were more prevalent in the stratiform rain regions with dust than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust sector, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation process of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the precipitation size spectrum from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately suppressing precipitation.

  4. Evaluating cloud precipitation efficiency with satellite retrievals of water isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Noone, D. C.; Wood, R.

    2015-12-01

    The efficiency with which clouds precipitate is believed to influence climate by modifying cloud lifetime and, ultimately, cloud amount. Aerosols can influence this linkage by reducing the effective radii of cloud droplets and suppressing precipitation. This relationship, however, is not unidirectional. Cloud precipitation efficiency can also regulate particle concentrations, since precipitation effectively scavenges aerosols from the atmosphere. One challenge in studying how aerosols, clouds, and precipitation processes interrelate is that observational constraints are difficult to attain. This work evaluates the ability of isotope ratios in water vapor to quantify cloud precipitation efficiency across the tropical and subtropical oceans. Theory suggests isotope ratios will record the precipitation efficiency of a convective plume, since heavier isotopologues precipitate preferentially; and a recent analysis of in situ measurements from the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO, Hawaii, USA) verifies this to be the case. The challenge now lies in understanding whether satellite retrievals of isotope ratios in water vapor are sensitive enough to track precipitation efficiency globally. To answer this question, vertical profiles of the D/H ratio derived from NASA's Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) are first compared with the MLO in situ measurements. A qualitative match indicates the satellite retrievals can distinguish high from low precipitation efficiency convection. To expand the analysis geographically, TES profiles between 40°S and 40°N are compared with estimates of precipitation efficiency derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and ECMWF's ERA-Interim. Retrievals are binned by lower-tropospheric humidity and by vertical velocity in order to minimize large-scale thermodynamical influences. Co-located cloud retrievals provide the context necessary to evaluate the utility of these new estimates in elucidating cloud feedbacks on climate.

  5. Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Triggered by Strong Aerosol Emissions in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous process-oriented modeling studies have highlighted the dependence of effectiveness of cloud brightening by aerosols on cloud regimes in warm marine boundary layer. Cloud microphysical processes in clouds that contain ice, and hence the mechanisms that drive aerosol-cloud interactions, are more complicated than in warm clouds. Interactions between ice particles and liquid drops add additional levels of complexity to aerosol effects. A cloud-resolving model is used to study aerosol-cloud interactions in the Arctic triggered by strong aerosol emissions, through either geoengineering injection or concentrated sources such as shipping and fires. An updated cloud microphysical scheme with prognostic aerosol and cloud particle numbers is employed. Model simulations are performed in pure super-cooled liquid and mixed-phase clouds, separately, with or without an injection of aerosols into either a clean or a more polluted Arctic boundary layer. Vertical mixing and cloud scavenging of particles injected from the surface is still quite efficient in the less turbulent cold environment. Overall, the injection of aerosols into the Arctic boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. The pure liquid clouds are more susceptible to the increase in aerosol number concentration than the mixed-phase clouds. Rain production processes are more effectively suppressed by aerosol injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. Aerosol injection into a clean boundary layer results in a greater cloud albedo increase than injection into a polluted one, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, the impact of dynamical feedback due to precipitation changes is small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation

  6. Impacts of long range transported dust and biological particles on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Creamean, J.; Suski, K. J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Fitzgerald, E.; DeMott, P. J.; Cazorla, A.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols play a profound role in impacting cloud properties and precipitation processes. Some studies suggest air pollution aerosols suppress orographic precipitation, whereas other studies show a precipitation enhancement during periods with long range dust transport. To gain a more complete understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions, we have performed two field studies, CalWater and ICE-T, probing clouds over California and the Caribbean. Ground and aircraft measurements were used to characterize the sources of aerosols seeding clouds and the resulting impact on cloud microphysics. This presentation will focus on how dust and biological aerosols transported from the Sahara, Middle East, and Asia appeared in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated ice nuclei (IN) concentrations. Our results suggest that dust and biological IN are persistent components of the upper atmosphere and thus could be playing important roles in affecting orographic precipitation processes over many regions of the world.

  7. Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Hoose, Corinna

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds by uptake into cloud particles, collision-coalescence, chemical processing inside the cloud particles and release back into the atmosphere has important effects on aerosol concentration, size distribution, chemical composition and mixing state. Aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei. Cloud droplets can take up further aerosol particles by collisions. Atmospheric gases may also be transferred into the cloud droplets and undergo chemical reactions, e.g. the production of atmospheric sulphate. Aerosol particles are also processed in ice crystals. They may be taken up by homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets below -38° C or by heterogeneous freezing above -38° C. This includes immersion freezing of already immersed aerosol particles in the droplets and contact freezing of particles colliding with a droplet. Many clouds do not form precipitation and also much of the precipitation evaporates before it reaches the ground. The water soluble part of the aerosol particles concentrates in the hydrometeors and together with the insoluble part forms a single, mixed, larger particle, which is released. We have implemented aerosol processing into the current version of the general circulation model ECHAM6 (Stevens et al., 2013) coupled to the aerosol module HAM (Stier et al., 2005). ECHAM6-HAM solves prognostic equations for the cloud droplet number and ice crystal number concentrations. In the standard version of HAM, seven modes are used to describe the total aerosol. The modes are divided into soluble/mixed and insoluble modes and the number concentrations and masses of different chemical components (sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt and mineral dust) are prognostic variables. We extended this by an explicit representation of aerosol particles in cloud droplets and ice crystals in stratiform clouds similar to Hoose et al. (2008a,b). Aerosol particles in cloud droplets are represented by 5 tracers for the

  8. CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Properties Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol properties. Characterizing this zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects as well as for improving satellite measurements of aerosol properties. We present a statistical analysis of a global dataset of CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) Lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone extends as far as 15 km away from clouds and it is ubiquitous over all oceans. The use of only high confidence level cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD) data confirms the findings. However, the results underline the need for caution to avoid biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  9. Aerosol-CAPE-Cloud Interactions over Gangetic Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, S. N.; Sarangi, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the last few decades exponential growth of population and rapid industrialization has resulted in high aerosol loading over Gangetic basin (GB) in Northern India. Gangetic basin is the food basket of India and its agricultural yield is mainly dependent on South Asian summer monsoon. Hence, understanding the aerosol-cloud-rainfall interactions is crucial and demand utmost attention. In this study, we have used more than a decade (2002-2013) of Radiosonde measurements from 5 WMO stations over the GB to illustrate enhancement of CAPE and cloud thickness with increase in AOD under deep cloudy conditions. Enhancement in mean atmospheric temperature below cloud layer at higher aerosol loading was also observed. These observations suggest that increase in aerosols increases the atmospheric temperature below cloud base and causes increase in CAPE, which, in turn, invigorates the cloud dynamics and eventually resultsin deeper cloud systems. Simultaneously, analysis of decade long satellite and in-situ observational datasets provided compelling evidence of aerosol-induced cloud invigoration, from cloud macrophysical as well as microphysical observations, which fostered a net atmospheric cooling nearly twice compared to the aerosol direct effect. Moreover, a striking positive association between aerosol loading and daily surface rainfall during Indian summer monsoon was found. The observed aerosol-induced heating of lower atmosphere, intensification of cloud dynamics, deepening of clouds, intensification of precipitation rate and daily rainfall coherently suggested an increase in surface water with increase in aerosol loading. Hence, this study not only demonstrates the importance of aerosol-induced microphysical perturbations during Indian summer monsoon but also is a major step forward in understanding the impact of aerosols on surface water under continental conditions.

  10. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  11. Comparative Climate Responses of Anthropogenic Greenhouse Gases, All Major Aerosol Components, Black Carbon, and Methane, Accounting for the Evolution of the Aerosol Mixing State and of Clouds/Precipitation from Multiple Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2005-12-01

    Several modeling studies to date have simulated the global climate response of anthropogenic greenhouse gases and bulk (non-size-resolved) sulfate or generic aerosol particles together, but no study has examined the climate response of greenhouse gases simultaneously with all major size- and composition resolved aerosol particle components. Such a study is important for improving our understanding of the effects of anthropogenic pollutants on climate. Here, the GATOR-GCMOM model is used to study the global climate response of (a) all major greenhouse gases and size-resolved aerosol components, (b) all major greenhouse gases alone, (c) fossil-fuel soot (black carbon, primary organic matter, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate), and (d) methane. Aerosol components treated in all simulations included water, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sulfuric acid, bisulfate, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, hydrogen ion, soil dust, and pollen/spores. Fossil-fuel soot (FFS) was emitted into its own size distribution. All other components, including biofuel and biomass soot, sea-spray, soil dust, etc., were emitted into a second distribution (MIX). The FFS distribution grew by condensation of secondary organic matter and sulfuric acid, hydration of water, and dissolution of nitric acid, ammonia, and hydrochloric acid. It self-coagulated and heterocoagulated with the MIX distribution, which also grew by condensation, hydration, and dissolution. Treatment of separate distributions for FFS allowed FFS to evolve from an external mixture to an internal mixture. In both distributions, black carbon was treated as a core component for optical calculations. Both aerosol distributions served as CCN during explicit size-resolved cloud formation. The resulting clouds grew by coagulation and condensation, coagulated with interstitial aerosol particles, and fell to the surface as rain and snow, carrying aerosol constituents with them. Thus, cloud

  12. Clouds Aerosols Internal Affaires: Increasing Cloud Fraction and Enhancing the Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, Ilan; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine; Rosenfeld, Danny; Rudich, Yinon

    2004-01-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment have more numerous, smaller cloud droplets that can increase the cloud lifetime and liquid water content. Such changes in the cloud droplet properties may suppress low precipitation allowing development of a stronger convection and higher freezing level. Delaying the washout of the cloud water (and aerosol), and the stronger convection will result in higher clouds with longer life time and larger anvils. We show these effects by using large statistics of the new, 1km resolution data from MODIS on the Terra satellite. We isolate the aerosol effects from meteorology by regression and showing that aerosol microphysical effects increases cloud fraction by average of 30 presents for all cloud types and increases convective cloud top pressure by average of 35mb. We analyze the aerosol cloud interaction separately for high pressure trade wind cloud systems and separately for deep convective cloud systems. The resultant aerosol radiative effect on climate for the high pressure cloud system is: -10 to -13 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and -11 to -14 W/sq m at the surface. For deeper convective clouds the forcing is: -4 to -5 W/sq m at the TOA and -6 to -7 W/sq m at the surface.

  13. The effect of subtropical aerosol loading on equatorial precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, G.; Chemke, R.

    2016-10-01

    Cloud-aerosol interactions are considered as one of the largest sources of uncertainties in the study of climate change. Here another possible cloud-aerosol effect on climate is proposed. A series of large eddy simulations (LES) with bin microphysics reveal a sensitivity of the total atmospheric water vapor amount to aerosol concentration. Under polluted conditions the rain is suppressed and the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere increases with time compared to clean precipitating conditions. Theoretical examination of this aerosol effect on water vapor transport from the subtropics to the tropics, and hence on the equatorial rain and Hadley circulation, is conducted using an idealized general circulation model (GCM). It is shown that a reduction in the subtropical rain amount results in increased water vapor advection to the tropics and enhanced equatorial rain and Hadley circulation. This joins previously proposed mechanisms on the radiative aerosol effect on the general circulation.

  14. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  15. Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

    2012-09-12

    It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

  16. Observations of Aerosol Conditions Associated with Precipitation Events in the Remote Sierra Nevada Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Kingsmill, D.; Roberts, G. C.; Noblitt, S.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent investigations of atmospheric aerosols have suggested their importance in affecting clouds and precipitation patterns, especially in regions where anthropogenic contributions to aerosol loadings are large. Aerosols entrained into precipitating clouds have been shown to either enhance or suppress precipitation based on the characteristics of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) introduced. Due to the inherent chemical dependence of CCN activity, the chemical composition of aerosols introduced into precipitating clouds will determine their effect on precipitation. This presentation will utilize ground-based chemical and physical measurements of aerosols and precipitation from multiple winter seasons gathered at Sugar Pine Dam (Foresthill, CA) as part of the CalWater experiment. The coupled behavior of landfalling frontal systems, regional terrain-parallel flow along the windward slopes of the Sierra Nevada (i.e., the Sierra Barrier Jet), and observed aerosol conditions in the Sierra Nevada foothills will be demonstrated and related issues explored. Temporally correlated changes in aerosol chemical composition with approaching winter storms may provide key insights into the evolution of the Sierra Barrier Jet, a dynamic feature that can have a major influence on orographically-forced precipitation in this region, and could provide clues to the coupling of Central Valley pollution with winter-time orographic precipitation episodes (or lack thereof). Gaining an overall understanding of the frequency and magnitude of the entrainment of Central Valley pollutants on winter storm systems will ultimately provide an estimate of how much aerosols affect precipitation in California.

  17. Explicit numerical study of aerosol-cloud interactions in boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunova, Irena T.

    Aerosol-cloud interactions, the mechanisms by which aerosols impact clouds and precipitation and clouds impact aerosols as they are released upon droplet evaporation, are investigated by means of explicit high-resolution (3 km) numerical simulations with the Mesoscale Compressible Community (MC2) model. This model, which is non-hydrostatic and compressible, was extended by including separate continuity equations for dry and activated multi-modal aerosol, and for chemical species. The sources and sinks include: particle activation, solute transfer between drops, generation of extra soluble material in clouds via oxidation of dissolved SO2, and particle regeneration. The cloud processes are represented by an advanced double-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Three summertime cases have been evaluated: a marine stratus and a cold frontal system over the Bay of Fundy near Nova Scotia, formed on 1 Sep 1995 and extensively sampled as a part of the Radiation, Aerosol, and Cloud Experiment (RACE); and a continental stratocumulus, formed over the southern coast of Lake Erie on 11 July 2001. The marine stratus and the frontal system have been examined for the effects of aerosol on cloud properties and thoroughly evaluated against the available observations. The frontal system and the continental stratocumulus have been evaluated for the effects of cloud processing on the aerosol spectrum. The marine stratus simulations suggest a significant impact of the aerosol on cloud properties. A simulation with mechanistic activation and a uni-modal aerosol showed the best agreement with observations in regards to cloud-base and cloud-top height, droplet concentration, and liquid water content. A simulation with a simple activation parameterization failed to simulate essential bulk cloud properties: droplet concentration was significantly underpredicted and the vertical structure of the cloud was inconsistent with the observations. A simulation with a mechanistic

  18. Aerosol Indirect Forcing Dictated by Warm Low-Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, M.; Chen, Y. C.; Stephens, G. L.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol indirect forcing is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in estimating the extent of global warming. Increased aerosol levels can enhance the solar reflection from warm liquid clouds countering greenhouse gas warming. However, very little is actually known about the strength of the indirect effects for mixed-phase stratiform clouds as well as other cloud types such as cumulus, altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection, and cirrus. These mixed-phase cloud types are ubiquitous and typically overlooked in satellite estimates of the indirect forcing. In this study we assess the responses of each major cloud type to changes in aerosol loading and provide an estimate of their contribution to the global mean indirect forcing. Satellite data is collected from several co-located sensors in the A-train for the period starting in January of 2007 - 2010. Cloud layers are classified according to the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR CloudSat product. Radiative fluxes are obtained from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and examined as a function of the aerosol loading obtained from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. For low-level cloud regimes (e.g., stratus, stratocumulus, cumulus) we show that the longwave contribution to the net indirect effect is insignificant and dominated by changes in reflected shortwave radiation which also becomes insignificant as cloud top temperature decreases below 0°C. An increase in the aerosol loading in mixed-phase stratocumulus leads to more ice and precipitation that depletes cloud water and limits cloud brightening. For the more convective type clouds (e.g., altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection), increased aerosol loading can invigorate deep convection and promote deeper clouds with higher cloud albedo (cooling effect) and cloud tops that emit less longwave radiation to space (warming effect). As a consequence, the shortwave and longwave indirect radiative effects tend to cancel for the

  19. Detecting Aerosol Effect on Deep Precipitation Systems: A Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Khain, A.; Kummerow, C.; Simpson, J.

    2006-05-01

    Urban cities produce high concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols. These aerosols are generally hygroscopic and may serve as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). This study focuses on the aerosol indirect effect on the deep convective systems over the land. These deep convective systems contribute to the majority of the summer time rainfall and are important for local hydrological cycle and weather forecast. In a companion presentation (Tao et al.) in this session, the mechanisms of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in deep convective systems are explored using cloud-resolving model simulations. Here these model results will be analyzed to provide guidance to the detection of the impact of aerosols as CCN on summer time, deep convections using the currently available observation methods. The two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model with an explicit microphysical scheme has been used to simulate the aerosol effect on deep precipitation systems. This model simulates the size distributions of aerosol particles, as well as cloud, rain, ice crystals, snow, graupel, and hail explicitly. Two case studies are analyzed: a midlatitude summer time squall in Oklahoma, and a sea breeze convection in Florida. It is shown that increasing the CCN number concentration does not affect the rainfall structure and rain duration in these two cases. The total surface rainfall rate is reduced in the squall case, but remains essentially the same in the sea breeze case. For the long-lived squall system with a significant portion of the stratiform rain, the surface rainfall PDF (probability density function) distribution is more sensitive to the change of the initial CCN concentrations compared with the total surface rainfall. The possibility of detecting the aerosol indirect effect in deep precipitation systems from the space is also studied in this presentation. The hydrometeors fields from the GCE model simulations are used as inputs to a microwave radiative transfer model

  20. Distinct Impacts of Aerosols on an Evolving Continental Cloud System during the RACORO Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, R.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have been investigated extensively but still remain high uncertainty due to the complexity of cloud microphysical processes under various dynamic and thermodynamic environments. Cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecast (CR-WRF) model implemented with a two-moment bulk microphysics and a modified Goddard radiation scheme is employed to investigate aerosol effects on different cloud regimes and their transitions associated with a continental cloud system occurring from 25 May to 27 May, 2009 during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Routine AAF Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign. The simulated cloud properties and precipitation for the three different cloud regimes, including shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and a stratus exhibit overall agreements with airborne and ground-based observations. Sensitivity studies with different aerosol scenarios reveal that the responses of cloud micro- and macrophysics to aerosol loading depend on the cloud regimes with monotonic or non-monotonic trend. Aerosol radiative effects modify the atmospheric thermodynamic condition and change the atmospheric stability, which induce different response from aerosol indirect effects. Our results also indicate that the overall aerosol effects on a cloud complex are distinct from those of the individual cloud types. The aerosol-cloud interaction for the different cloud regimes should be evaluated to assess the aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings on regional and global climate.

  1. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. Richard; Liu, Peter; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, Ann -Marie; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ronfeld, Debbie; Shupe, Matthew D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matt; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.

  2. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    DOE PAGES

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; ...

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41more » stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.« less

  3. Properties of aerosol processed by ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Y.; Adler, G.; Moise, T.; Erlick-Haspel, C.

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that highly porous aerosol (HPA) can form in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere when ice particles encounter sub-saturation leading to ice sublimation similar to freeze drying. This process can occur at the lower layers of cirrus clouds (few km), at anvils of high convective clouds and thunderstorms, in clouds forming in atmospheric gravitational waves, in contrails and in high convective clouds injecting to the stratosphere. A new experimental system that simulates freeze drying of proxies for atmospheric aerosol at atmospheric pressure was constructed and various proxies for atmospheric soluble aerosol were studied. The properties of resulting HPA were characterized by various methods. It was found that the resulting aerosol have larger sizes (extent depends on substance and mixing), lower density (largevoid fraction), lower optical extinction and higher CCN activity and IN activity. Implication of HPA's unique properties and their atmospheric consequences to aerosol processing in ice clouds and to cloud cycles will be discussed.

  4. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

  5. Combined Observational and Modeling Efforts to Better Understand Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions Over Land: Preliminary Results from 7-SEAS/BASELInE 2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, Adrian M.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2015-01-01

    This talk presents some of the detailed observations of low-level stratocumulus over northern Vietnam during 7-SEASBASELInE 2013 by SMARTLabs' ACHIEVE W-band cloud radar and other remote sensing instruments. These observations are the first of their kind for this region and will aid in ongoing studies of biomass-burning aerosol impacts on local and regional weather and climate. Preliminary results from simulations using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) with recently implemented triple-moment bulk microphysics to examine the sensitivity of low-level stratocumulus over land to aerosols are also presented. Recommendations for future observational activities in the 7-SEAS northern region in collaboration with international partners will also be discussed.

  6. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  7. Aerosol indirect effect dictated by liquid clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew W.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols have been shown to enhance the solar reflection from warm liquid clouds and mask part of the warming due to the buildup of greenhouse gases. However, very little is known about the effects of aerosol on mixed-phase stratiform clouds as well as other cloud regimes including cumulus, altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection, and anvil cirrus. These additional cloud categories are ubiquitous and typically overlooked in satellite-based assessments of the global aerosol indirect forcing. Here we provide their contribution to the aerosol indirect forcing estimate using satellite data collected from several colocated sensors in the A-train for the period 2006-2010. Cloud type is determined according to the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR CloudSat product, and the observations are matched to the radiative flux measurements from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and aerosol retrievals from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). The oceanic mean aerosol indirect forcing is estimated to be -0.20 ± 0.31 W m-2 with warm low-level cloud largely dictating the strength of the response (-0.36 ± 0.21 W m-2) due to their abundance and strong cloud albedo effect. Contributions from mixed-phase low-level cloud (0.01 ± 0.06 W m-2) and convective cloud (0.15 ± 0.23 W m-2) are positive and buffer the system due to strong aerosol-cloud feedbacks that reduce the cloud albedo effect and/or lead to convective invigoration causing a countering positive longwave warming response. By combining all major cloud categories together, aerosol indirect forcing decreases and now contains positive values in the uncertainty estimate.

  8. Precipitation effects of giant cloud condensation nuclei artificially introduced into stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E.; Albrecht, B. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chen, Y.-C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Sorooshian, A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Song, S.; Fang, M.; Russell, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    To study the effect of giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN) on precipitation processes in stratocumulus clouds, 1-10 μm diameter salt particles (salt powder) were released from an aircraft while flying near cloud top on 3 August 2011 off the central coast of California. The seeded area was subsequently sampled from the aircraft that was equipped with aerosol, cloud, and precipitation probes and an upward-facing cloud radar. During post-seeding sampling, made 30-60 min after seeding, the mean cloud droplet size increased, the droplet number concentration decreased, and large drop (e.g., diameter larger than 10 μm) concentration increased. Average drizzle rates increased from about 0.05 to 0.20 mm h-1, and liquid water path decreased from about 52 to 43 g m-2. Strong radar returns associated with drizzle were observed on the post-seeding cloud-base level-leg flights and were accompanied by a substantial depletion of the cloud liquid water content. The changes were large enough to suggest that the salt particles with concentrations estimated to be 10-2 to 10-4 cm-3 resulted in a four-fold increase in the cloud base rainfall rate and depletion of the cloud water due to rainout. In contrast, a case is shown where the cloud was already precipitating (on 10 August) and the effect of adding GCCN to the cloud was insignificant.

  9. Precipitation effects of giant cloud condensation nuclei artificially introduced into stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, E.; Albrecht, B. A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Chen, Y.-C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Sorooshian, A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Song, S.; Fang, M.; Russell, L. M.

    2015-05-01

    To study the effect of giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN) on precipitation processes in stratocumulus clouds, 1-10 μm diameter salt particles (salt powder) were released from an aircraft while flying near the cloud top on 3 August 2011 off the central coast of California. The seeded area was subsequently sampled from the aircraft that was equipped with aerosol, cloud, and precipitation probes and an upward-facing cloud radar. During post-seeding sampling, made 30-60 min after seeding, the mean cloud droplet size increased, the droplet number concentration decreased, and large drop (e.g., diameter larger than 10 μm) concentration increased. Average drizzle rates increased from about 0.05 to 0.20 mm h-1, and the liquid water path decreased from about 52 to 43 g m-2. Strong radar returns associated with drizzle were observed on the post-seeding cloud-base level-leg flights and were accompanied by a substantial depletion of the cloud liquid water content. The changes were large enough to suggest that the salt particles with concentrations estimated to be 10-2 to 10-4 cm-3 resulted in a four-fold increase in the cloud-base rainfall rate and depletion of the cloud water due to rainout. In contrast, a case is shown where the cloud was already precipitating (on 10 August) and the effect of adding GCCN to the cloud was insignificant.

  10. Improvement of MODIS aerosol retrievals near clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Marshak, Alexander; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb, Norman G.; Várnai, Tamás.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2013-08-01

    retrieval of aerosol properties near clouds from reflected sunlight is challenging. Sunlight reflected from clouds can effectively enhance the reflectance in nearby clear regions. Ignoring cloud 3-D radiative effects can lead to large biases in aerosol retrievals, risking an incorrect interpretation of satellite observations on aerosol-cloud interaction. Earlier, we developed a simple model to compute the cloud-induced clear-sky radiance enhancement that is due to radiative interaction between boundary layer clouds and the molecular layer above. This paper focuses on the application and implementation of the correction algorithm. This is the first time that this method is being applied to a full Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) granule. The process of the correction includes converting Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System broadband flux to visible narrowband flux, computing the clear-sky radiance enhancement, and retrieving aerosol properties. We find that the correction leads to smaller values in aerosol optical depth (AOD), Ångström exponent, and the small mode aerosol fraction of the total AOD. It also makes the average aerosol particle size larger near clouds than far away from clouds, which is more realistic than the opposite behavior observed in operational retrievals. We discuss issues in the current correction method as well as our plans to validate the algorithm.

  11. Changes in Stratiform Clouds of Mesoscale Convective Complex Introduced by Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, B.; Min, Q.-L.; Li, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols influence the earth s climate through direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects. There are large uncertainties in quantifying these effects due to limited measurements and observations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. As a major terrestrial source of atmospheric aerosols, dusts may serve as a significant climate forcing for the changing climate because of its effect on solar and thermal radiation as well as on clouds and precipitation processes. Latest satellites measurements enable us to determine dust aerosol loadings and cloud distributions and can potentially be used to reduce the uncertainties in the estimations of aerosol effects on climate. This study uses sensors on various satellites to investigate the impact of mineral dust on cloud microphysical and precipitation processes in mesoscale convective complex (MCC). A trans-Atlantic dust outbreak of Saharan origin occurring in early March 2004 is considered. For the observed MCCs under a given convective strength, small hydrometeors were found more prevalent in the dusty stratiform regions than in those regions that were dust free. Evidence of abundant cloud ice particles in the dust regions, particularly at altitudes where heterogeneous nucleation of mineral dust prevails, further supports the observed changes of clouds and precipitation. The consequences of the microphysical effects of the dust aerosols were to shift the size spectrum of precipitation-sized hydrometeors from heavy precipitation to light precipitation and ultimately to suppress precipitation and increase the lifecycle of cloud systems, especially over stratiform areas.

  12. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  13. Impacts of Asian Dust on Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation during an Atmospheric River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Creamean, J. M.; Williams, C. R.; Gaston, C. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers constitute a significant source of precipitation in the mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere over relatively short time periods, but questions remain about the influence of external factors, such as aerosols, on precipitation locally and regionally. During the CalWater Early Start Campaign (Feb-Mar 2009) sampling aerosol measurements (aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry - ATOFMS, aerosol number concentration, CCN concentrations, aerosol size distributions, and PM2.5 mass concentrations) were combined with S-band profiling radar, meteorological, and disdrometer measurements at a remote site in the Central California Sierra Nevada to characterize atmospheric rivers. Aerosol measurements were made of clear air at the site, while rainwater samples were collected. The rainwater samples were then aerosolized and characterized on site using an ATOFMS. S-band radar measured the microphysics of the precipitating cloud and disdrometer measurements characterized the subsequent hydrometeors. During the study an atmospheric river and transported dust interacted, altering cloud properties and shifting the chemical composition of the aerosolized precipitation to markers indicative of transported Asia dust. In contrast, an atmospheric river characterized 8 days earlier was not impacted by Asian dust, leading to different cloud properties and rain water chemical composition. This study examined the impacts of long range transport on precipitation in the Sierras. A greater understanding of the impact of Asian dust on these processes is necessary to properly evaluate long term climate change in the middle latitudes and properly account for transported aerosols in cloud and precipitation models.

  14. Explicit Simulation of Aerosol Physics in a Cloud-Resolving Model: Aerosol Transport and Processing in the Free Troposphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, Annica M. L.; Wang, Chien; Ström, Johan; Krejci, Radovan

    2006-02-01

    Large concentrations of small aerosols have been previously observed in the vicinity of anvils of convective clouds. A 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) including an explicit size-resolving aerosol module has been used to examine the origin of these aerosols. Five different types of aerosols are considered: nucleation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 0 d 5.84 nm), Aitken mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by 5.84 nm d 31.0 nm), accumulation mode sulfate aerosols (here defined by d 31.0 nm), mixed aerosols, and black carbon aerosols.The model results suggest that approximately 10% of the initial boundary layer number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols and black carbon aerosols are present at the top of the convective cloud as the cloud reaches its decaying state. The simulated average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols in the cloud anvil (1.6 × 104 cm-3) is in the same order of magnitude as observations. Thus, the model results strongly suggest that vertical convective transport, particularly during the active period of the convection, is responsible for a major part of the appearance of high concentrations of small aerosols (corresponding to the Aitken mode in the model) observed in the vicinity of cloud anvils.There is some formation of new aerosols within the cloud, but the formation is small. Nucleation mode aerosols are also efficiently scavenged through impaction scavenging by precipitation. Accumulation mode and mixed mode aerosols are efficiently scavenged through nucleation scavenging and their concentrations in the cloud anvil are either very low (mixed mode) or practically zero (accumulation mode).In addition to the 3D CRM, a box model, including important features of the aerosol module of the 3D model, has been used to study the formation of new aerosols after the cloud has evaporated. The possibility of these aerosols to grow to suitable cloud condensation or ice nuclei size is also examined. Concentrations of nucleation mode aerosols

  15. A Framework for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russchenberg, H. W. J.; Sarna, K.

    2014-12-01

    A broad range of strategies have been used to study Aerosol-Cloud Interactions (ACI). However, the wide scope of methods and scales used makes it difficult to quantitatively compare result from different studies. In this paper, we propose a method of aerosol-cloud interaction monitoring based on widely available remote sensing instruments and easily applicable at many different observatories. This method provides a way of identifying cases where a change in the aerosol environment causes a change in the cloud. In this scheme we attempt to use (as far as possible) the observed signal from lidar and radar. For an aerosol proxy we use the attenuated backscatter (sensitive to aerosol concentration) and to obtain information about changes in the cloud we use the radar reflectivity factor (sensitive to cloud droplet size and concentration). Assuming a positive dependence between the number concentration of cloud droplets and the number concentration of aerosol we expect that an increase of the attenuated backscatter coefficient will correspond to a small increase of the radar reflectivity factor (due to the increase of cloud droplets concentration). However, the slope of this correlation will vary. A number of factors, such as meteorology or cloud drop microphysical properties, can influence changes in a cloud. For that reason we put a constraint on the liquid water content using liquid water path information from microwave radiometers. This limitation ensures that the variability in the cloud will be primarily due to changes in microphysical properties associated with the variation in aerosols. Further, we limit the cases only to non-precipitating, low-level stratiform and stratocumulus clouds without drizzle. Although this method is based on a synergy of instruments, we use widely available systems for an efficient evaluation of the aerosol influence on the cloud. The main advantages of this scheme are the use of direct observables from widely spread remote sensing

  16. Large-Scale Covariability Between Aerosol and Precipitation Over the 7-SEAS Region: Observations and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Zhang, Chidong; Jeong, Myeong Jae; Gautam, Ritesh; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hansell, Richard A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jonathan H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the seven scientific areas of interests of the 7-SEAS field campaign is to evaluate the impact of aerosol on cloud and precipitation (http://7-seas.gsfc.nasa.gov). However, large-scale covariability between aerosol, cloud and precipitation is complicated not only by ambient environment and a variety of aerosol effects, but also by effects from rain washout and climate factors. This study characterizes large-scale aerosol-cloud-precipitation covariability through synergy of long-term multi ]sensor satellite observations with model simulations over the 7-SEAS region [10S-30N, 95E-130E]. Results show that climate factors such as ENSO significantly modulate aerosol and precipitation over the region simultaneously. After removal of climate factor effects, aerosol and precipitation are significantly anti-correlated over the southern part of the region, where high aerosols loading is associated with overall reduced total precipitation with intensified rain rates and decreased rain frequency, decreased tropospheric latent heating, suppressed cloud top height and increased outgoing longwave radiation, enhanced clear-sky shortwave TOA flux but reduced all-sky shortwave TOA flux in deep convective regimes; but such covariability becomes less notable over the northern counterpart of the region where low ]level stratus are found. Using CO as a proxy of biomass burning aerosols to minimize the washout effect, large-scale covariability between CO and precipitation was also investigated and similar large-scale covariability observed. Model simulations with NCAR CAM5 were found to show similar effects to observations in the spatio-temporal patterns. Results from both observations and simulations are valuable for improving our understanding of this region's meteorological system and the roles of aerosol within it. Key words: aerosol; precipitation; large-scale covariability; aerosol effects; washout; climate factors; 7- SEAS; CO; CAM5

  17. Cloud and Aerosol Characterization During CAEsAR 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.; Tesche, M.; Krejci, R.; Baumgardner, D.; Walther, A.; Rosati, B.; Widequist, U.; Tunved, P.; O'Connor, E.; Ström, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Cloud and Aerosol Experiment at Åre (CAEsAR 2014) campaign took place from June to October 2014 at Mt. Åreskutan, Sweden, a remote mountain site in Northern Sweden. The campaign was designed to study the physical and chemical properties of clouds and aerosols under orographic forcing. A unique and comprehensive set-up allowed an in-situ characterization of both constituents at a mountain top station at 1200 m a.s.l. including instruments to measure cloud droplet size distribution, meteorological parameters, cloud residual properties (using a counterflow virtual impactor inlet), cloud water composition and various aerosol chemical and microphysical properties (e.g. size, optical and hygroscopic properties). At the same time, a remote sensing site was installed below the mountain site at 420 m a.s.l. in the immediate vicinity (< 3 km horizontally), with vertical profiling from an aerosol lidar, winds and turbulence from a scanning Doppler lidar, a Sun photometer measuring aerosol columnar optical properties, and a precipitation sampler taking rain water for chemical analysis. In addition, regular radiosoundings were performed from the valley. Here, we present the results of this intensive campaign which includes approx. 900 hours of in-cloud sampling. Various unique cloud features were frequently observed such as dynamically-driven droplet growth, bimodal droplet distributions, and the activation of particles down to approx. 20 nm in dry particle diameter. During the campaign, a forest fire smoke plume was transported over the site with measureable impacts on the cloud properties. This data will be used to constrain cloud and aerosol models, as well as to validate satellite retrievals. A first comparison to VIIRS and MODIS satellite retrievals will also be shown.

  18. Precipitating Condensation Clouds in Substellar Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Andrew S.; Marley, Mark S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present a method to calculate vertical profiles of particle size distributions in condensation clouds of giant planets and brown dwarfs. The method assumes a balance between turbulent diffusion and precipitation in horizontally uniform cloud decks. Calculations for the Jovian ammonia cloud are compared with previous methods. An adjustable parameter describing the efficiency of precipitation allows the new model to span the range of predictions from previous models. Calculations for the Jovian ammonia cloud are found to be consistent with observational constraints. Example calculations are provided for water, silicate, and iron clouds on brown dwarfs and on a cool extrasolar giant planet.

  19. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Lorenzo; Bréon, François-Marie

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics. Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the corresponding atmosphere layer

  20. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds over the South-East Atlantic. We use aerosol and cloud parameters derived from MODIS observations, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of the layer altitudes, to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties. The CALIPSO products are used to differentiate between cases of mixed cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This technique allows us to obtain more reliable estimates of the aerosol indirect effect than from simple relationships based on vertically integrated measurements of aerosol and cloud properties. Indeed, it permits us to somewhat distinguish the effects of aerosol and meteorology on the clouds, although it is not possible to fully ascertain the relative contribution of each on the derived statistics. Consistently with the results from previous studies, our statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), which is inconsistent with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). We hypothesise that the observed reduction in LWP is the consequence of dry air entrainment at cloud top. The combined effect of CDR decrease and LWP decrease leads to rather small sensitivity of the Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) to an increase in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidences an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprisingly, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top than in cases of physical interaction. This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence: absorbing particles above the cloud top may heat the corresponding atmosphere layer

  1. Constraining the aerosol influence on cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, E.; Quaas, J.; Bellouin, N.

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions have the potential to modify many different cloud properties. There is significant uncertainty in the strength of these aerosol-cloud interactions in analyses of observational data, partly due to the difficulty in separating aerosol effects on clouds from correlations generated by local meteorology. The relationship between aerosol and cloud fraction (CF) is particularly important to determine, due to the strong correlation of CF to other cloud properties and its large impact on radiation. It has also been one of the hardest to quantify from satellites due to the strong meteorological covariations involved. This work presents a new method to analyze the relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and CF. By including information about the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), the impact of the meteorological covariations is significantly reduced. This method shows that much of the AOD-CF correlation is explained by relationships other than that mediated by CDNC. By accounting for these, the strength of the global mean AOD-CF relationship is reduced by around 80%. This suggests that the majority of the AOD-CF relationship is due to meteorological covariations, especially in the shallow cumulus regime. Requiring CDNC to mediate the AOD-CF relationship implies an effective anthropogenic radiative forcing from an aerosol influence on liquid CF of -0.48 W m-2 (-0.1 to -0.64 W m-2), although some uncertainty remains due to possible biases in the CDNC retrievals in broken cloud scenes.

  2. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    SciTech Connect

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  3. On the role of thermodynamics and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions over thunderstorm activity during GoAmazon and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, R. I.; Morales, C. A.; Hoeller, H.; Braga, R. C.; Machado, L.; Wendisch, M.; Andreae, M. O.; Rosenfeld, D.; Poeschl, U.; Biscaro, T.; Lima, W.; Eichholz, C.; Oliveira, R. A. J.; Sperling, V.; Carvalho, I.; Calheiros, A. J. P.; Amaral, L. F.; Cecchin, M.; Saraiva, J.; Saraiva, I.; Schumacher, C.; Funk, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    Based on satellite data, total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) lightning activity climatological annual cycle over the GoAmazon area of interest (from T0 to T3 sites) shows that lightning activity is moderate (up to 10 flashes per day - fl day-1) throughout the wet (December-March) and dry (April-August) seasons, with T3 always being a little greater than T1 and T0 sites, respectively. During the dry-to-wet transition season (September-October), however, lightning activity peaks up to 25 fl day-1 at T1, followed by T3 (20 fl day-1) and T0 (15 fl day-1). The diurnal cycle reveals that the onset of deep convection during this same season starts one hour and peaks two hours earlier than the wet season. In the Amazon, cloud updrafts are primarily controlled by the local environment thermodynamics. During the dry-to-wet transition season, thermodynamics is significantly changed by land cover land cover where cloud base heights are elevated over deforested areas potentially increasing the strength of updrafts due to a better processing of the convective available potential energy, and therefore also increasing cloud electrification. The total (intracloud and cloud-to-ground) LIghtning NET(LINET - Nowcast) installed in September-October 2014 for GoAmazon IOP2 and ACRIDICON-CHUVA field experiments and the set of weather radars revealed that the thunderstorm enhancement over T1 (Manaus) during the dry-to-wet season is driven by the interaction between river breeze and the main easterly winds over Amazon basin, resulting in a locally forced convergent flow on the east side of Rio Negro which drives deep afternoon convection. In terms of atmospheric pollution, the dry-to-wet season is also marked by increased biomass burning, and the city of Manaus (T1) is a local polluted heat island. We will also present quantified thermodynamical and microphysical differences between the thunderstorms that developed over T0, T1 and T2. Our hypothesis is that cloud charge centers, total

  4. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have

  5. Aerosol-cloud interaction using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo H.; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. The interactions between aerosol particles and cloud drops is critical to identifying how much they reflect solar radiation. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2013). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show

  6. Influences from soluble and insoluble aerosols on precipitation and lightning in deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Vaughan; Formenton, Marco; Lienert, Barry

    2013-04-01

    Observations reported in past studies in the literature have revealed correlations between measures of aerosol loading and lightning occurrence. Recent advances in simulating cloud-microphysical processes have highlighted their control by aerosol conditions. New hypotheses about aerosol-precipitation-lightning interactions have emerged. Most deep convective clouds globally have warm bases with precipitation controlled by coalescence and by loadings of soluble aerosols, which form droplets. However, those over mountainous continental regions often have cooler bases and can generate much hail that reaches the ground. Cold-base convective clouds were observed to produce lightning over the High Plains of the USA during the Severe Thunderstorms Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS) in the summer of 2000. Cold-base thunderstorms can be without an active coalescence process, due to the low adiabatic liquid water content limiting droplet sizes. There is then the potential for a greater influence from ice-nucleating insoluble aerosols on ice-precipitation production, charge separation and lightning, relative to soluble aerosols. In the presentation, an aerosol-cloud model (hybrid bin/2-moment bulk microphysics, prognostic aerosol component with 6 aerosol species) with a new electrification component is described. The model treats non-inductive charge separation and has a lightning discharge scheme. A simulation of a STEPS case of a cold-base thunderstorm is validated against aircraft, radar and electrical observations. Sensitivity tests are presented to show the roles of ice multiplication and ice-nucleating aerosols, such as dust and soot from biomass-burning plumes, in controlling ice-precipitation production and lightning frequencies for the cold-base thunderstorm. Their influence is compared with that from soluble aerosol loadings. The roles of cloud-base temperature and wet growth of hail and graupel are discussed.

  7. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments.

  8. Assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions during southern African biomass burning activity, employing cloud parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiston, Modise; McFiggans, Gordon; Schultz, David

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we perform a simulation of the spatial distributions of particle and gas concentrations from a significantly large source of pollution event during a dry season in southern Africa and their interactions with cloud processes. Specific focus is on the extent to which cloud-aerosol interactions are affected by various inputs (i.e. emissions) and parameterizations and feedback mechanisms in a coupled mesoscale chemistry-meteorology model -herein Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). The southern African dry season (May-Sep) is characterised by biomass burning (BB) type of pollution. During this period, BB particles are frequently observed over the subcontinent, at the same time a persistent deck of stratocumulus covers the south West African coast, favouring long-range transport over the Atlantic Ocean of aerosols above clouds. While anthropogenic pollutants tend to spread more over the entire domain, biomass pollutants are concentrated around the burning areas, especially the savannah and tropical rainforest of the Congo Basin. BB is linked to agricultural practice at latitudes south of 10° N. During an intense burning event, there is a clear signal of strong interactions of aerosols and cloud microphysics. These species interfere with the radiative budget, and directly affect the amount of solar radiation reflected and scattered back to space and partly absorbed by the atmosphere. Aerosols also affect cloud microphysics by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), modifying precipitation pattern and the cloud albedo. Key area is to understand the role of pollution on convective cloud processes and its impacts on cloud dynamics. The hypothesis is that an environment of potentially high pollution enables the probability of interactions between co-located aerosols and cloud layers. To investigate this hypothesis, we outline an approach to integrate three elements: i) focusing on regime(s) where there are strong indications of

  9. Factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate, and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashino, T.; Casella, D.; Mugnai, A.; Sano, P.; Smith, E. A.; Tripoli, G.

    2008-12-01

    This paper discusses factors controlling cloud microphysics, precipitation rate and brightness temperature of tropical convective and stratiform clouds. Tropical convective and stratiform clouds are important in radiative forcing of climates and distribution of precipitation over the ocean. The possible effects of climate change on these clouds are still not well understood. Recent studies show that the higher CCN concentration in a convective cloud can lead to more vigorous updrafts and a higher evaporation/precipitation ratio. The stronger updraft often means stronger downdraft and gust fronts, which can trigger convection nearby. This implies that increases in CCN concentration can result in an increase in area coverage and persistence of tropical cirrus and stratiform clouds. The increased cloudiness would then be expected to lower sensible and latent heat flux from the ocean by lowering sea surface temperature, affecting the future development of convective clouds. The sea surface temperature may also change in a local area due to change of ocean circulation in climate change scenarios. Satellite remote sensing is a powerful tool to study tropical and global precipitation distribution. Many physically-based passive-microwave (MW) satellite precipitation algorithms make use of cloud radiation databases (CRDs), which typically consist of microphysical profiles from cloud resolving model (CRMs) and simulated MW brightness temperature (Tb). Thus, it is important to validate Tb simulated by a CRM against the observed Tb. Also, it is important to study how any changes in the tropical clouds due to aerosols and sea surface temperature translate into the precipitation and brightness temperature. The case study chosen is KWAJEX campaign that took place from 23 July to 14 September 1999. Authors have developed microphysical physical framework (Advanced Microphysics Prediction System) to predict ice particle properties explicitly in a CRM (University of Wisconsin

  10. Effects of externally-through-internally-mixed soot inclusions within clouds and precipitation on global climate.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Mark Z

    2006-06-01

    This paper examines the incremental global climate response of black carbon (BC), the main component of soot, due to absorption and scattering by BC inclusions within cloud and precipitation particles. Modeled soot is emitted as an externally mixed aerosol particle. It evolves to an internal mixture through condensation, hydration, dissolution, dissociation, crystallization, aqueous chemistry, coagulation, and cloud processing. Size-resolved cloud liquid and ice particles grow by condensation onto size-resolved soot and other particles. Cloud particles grow to precipitation by coagulation and the Bergeron process. Cloud and precipitation particles also undergo freezing, melting, evaporation, sublimation, and coagulation with interstitial aerosol particles. Soot, which is tracked in cloud and precipitation particles of all sizes, is removed by rainout, washout, sedimentation, and dry deposition. Two methods of treating the optics of BC in size-resolved cloud liquid, ice and graupel are compared: the core-shell approximation (CSA) and the iterative dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA). The 10-year global near-surface incremental temperature response due to fossil fuel (ff), biofuel (bf), and biomass burning (bb) BC within clouds with the DEMA was slightly stronger than that with the CSA, but both enhancements were <+0.05 K. The ff+bf portion may be approximately 60% of the total, suggesting that BC inclusions within clouds may enhance the near-surface temperature response of ff+bf soot due to all processes (estimated as approximately 0.27 K), by <10%, strengthening the possible climate impact of BC. BC cloud absorption was also found to increase water vapor, decrease precipitation, and decrease cloud fraction. The increase in water vapor at the expense of precipitation contributed to warming in addition to that of the cloud BC absorption itself. Aerosol-hydrometeor coagulation followed by hydrometeor evaporation may have caused almost twice the BC internal

  11. Impact of Asian Aerosols on Precipitation Over California: An Observational and Model Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naeger, Aaron R.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Zavodsky, Bradley T.; Creamean, Jessie M.

    2015-01-01

    Dust and pollution emissions from Asia are often transported across the Pacific Ocean to over the western United States. Therefore, it is essential to fully understand the impact of these aerosols on clouds and precipitation forming over the eastern Pacific and western United States, especially during atmospheric river events that account for up to half of California's annual precipitation and can lead to widespread flooding. In order for numerical modeling simulations to accurately represent the present and future regional climate of the western United States, we must account for the aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions associated with Asian dust and pollution aerosols. Therefore, we have constructed a detailed study utilizing multi-sensor satellite observations, NOAA-led field campaign measurements, and targeted numerical modeling studies where Asian aerosols interacted with cloud and precipitation processes over the western United States. In particular, we utilize aerosol optical depth retrievals from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), NOAA Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-11), and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) to effectively detect and monitor the trans-Pacific transport of Asian dust and pollution. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals are used in assimilating the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) in order to provide the model with an accurate representation of the aerosol spatial distribution across the Pacific. We conduct WRF-Chem model simulations of several cold-season atmospheric river events that interacted with Asian aerosols and brought significant precipitation over California during February-March 2011 when the NOAA CalWater field campaign was ongoing. The CalWater field campaign consisted of aircraft and surface measurements of aerosol and precipitation processes that help extensively validate our WRF

  12. Detrainment and aerosol redistribution in shallow convective clouds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. Y.; Norgren, M.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Small, J. D.; Sorooshian, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Feingold, G.; Ervens, B.; Murphy, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical transport associated with cumulus clouds is important to the redistribution of aerosol particles, gases and energy, with subsequent consequences for many aspects of the climate system. Previous studies have suggested that detrainment from clouds can be comparable to the updraft mass flux, and thus contribute to vertical transport. In this study, we describe a new method to deduce the amounts of gross detrainment and entrainment experienced by non-precipitating cumulus clouds using aircraft observations. The method is applied to aircraft observations from the Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) which took place in the Houston, Texas region during which 176 small, non-precipitating cumulus were sampled. Our analysis suggests that, on average, these clouds were comprised of 30 to 70% mixed-layer air, with entrained air comprising most of the remainder. The mass fraction of detrained air was less than 2% for a majority of the clouds, although 15% of them did exhibit detrained air fractions larger than 10%. Entrained and detrained air mass fractions both increased with altitude, and the largest detrainment events were almost all associated with air that was at their level of neutral buoyancy, findings that are all consistent with previous studies. To address aerosol redistribution more specifically, aerosol size distributions on clear and cloudy days are compared, with substantial enhancements at higher altitudes found for cloudy days due to a combination of vertical transport and in situ sulfate and organic chemistry.

  13. Biomass Burning Aerosol Impact on Orographic Cloud Formation on Kilimanjaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, U. S.; Wu, Y.; Christopher, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to large scale climate change impacts, regional climate forcing due to land cover and land use change and biomass burning aerosols may also be relevant in understanding observed changes at Kilimanjaro. Analysis of satellite detected fires conducted for 2007 show substantial biomass burning in the vicinity of Kilimanjaro and maximum mid visible MODIS retrieved aerosol optical depth over Kilimanjaro during the month of July. For selected case days in 2007, numerical simulations were conducted using WRF Chem to assess the impact of biomass burning aerosols on orographic cloud formation on Kilimanjaro. Numerical modeling experiments with and without smoke emissions were conducted. Satellite derived smoke emissions are utilized in numerical model experiments considering biomass burning aerosol effects. Nested grid configuration was used in the experiments to establish a fine grid of 100 km x 100 km domain and 1 km grid spacing over the complex terrain of Kilimanjaro. For case days considered, numerical model simulations show substantial impact of biomass burning aerosols on orographic cloud formation. There is a net increase in cloud liquid water path with maximum increase in excess of 10%. Orographic precipitation also show increase in rainfall of up to 10% at higher elevations. Whereas there is average reduction in downwelling solar radiation 18 Wm-2 up to elevations of 5000m, impacts at the mountain peaks are minimal. Processes leading to the differences in cloud formation and results from numerical simulations are conducted for additional case study days during other seasons and will be discussed

  14. Reformulating Aerosol Thermodynamics and Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.

    2006-12-01

    Modeling aerosol composition and cloud microphysics is rather complex due to the required thermodynamics, even if chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium is assumed. We show, however, that for deliquescent atmospheric aerosols thermodynamics can be considerably simplified, if we reformulate chemical equilibrium to include water purely based on thermodynamic principles. In chemical and thermodynamical equilibrium, the relative humidity (RH) fixes the molality of atmospheric aerosols. Although this fact is in theory well known, it has hardly been utilized in aerosol modeling nor has been the fact that for the same reason also the aerosol activity (including activity coefficients) and water content are fixed (by RH) for a given aerosol concentration and type. The only model that successfully utilizes this fact is the computationally very efficient EQuilibrium Simplified thermodynamic gas/Aerosol partitioning Model, EQSAM (Metzger et al., 2002a), EQSAM2 (Metzger et al., 2006). In both versions the entire gas/liquid/solid aerosol equilibrium partitioning is solved analytically and hence non-iteratively a substantial advantage in aerosol composition modeling. Here we briefly present the theoretical framework of EQSAM2, which differs from EQSAM in a way that the calculation of the water activity of saturated binary or mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions of multi-component aerosols has been generalized by including the Kelvin-term, thus allowing for any solute activity above the deliquescence relative humidity, including supersaturation. With application of our new concept to a numerical whether prediction (NWP) model, we demonstrate its wide implications for the computation of various aerosol and cloud properties, as our new concept allows to consistently and efficiently link the modeling of aerosol thermodynamics and cloud microphysics through the aerosol water mass, which therefore deserves special attention in atmospheric chemistry, air pollution, NWP and climate

  15. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  16. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  17. Aerosols and Precipitation Retrievals over Eureka by Remote Sensing: Validation of Space Based Profiling Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, J. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Hudak, D. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Ivanescu, L.; Eloranta, E.; Duck, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols and precipitation are among the agents responsible for the ongoing changes in the Arctic climate and the hydrological cycle. The seasonal variations of Arctic aerosols (Arctic haze for e.g.) are linked to the transport efficiency as well as precipitation (wet) scavenging. Aside from affecting aerosol concentrations, precipitation is an important hydrological variable that affects the moisture budget of the atmosphere. Aerosols, in turn, influence the vertical distribution of clouds and this induces changes in the precipitation pattern. The spatial and temporal sparsity of precipitation measurements over the Arctic region means that satellite remote sensing techniques take on an importance that considerably exceeds their role south of the Arctic circle. Radar reflectivity and snow profiles from CloudSat (in support of cloud and precipitation analyses) and backscattering measurements from CALIOP (investigations of aerosol and small cloud particle properties) can be used to study Arctic winter clouds and precipitation and the role of aerosols in their formation. In this study we attempt to validate satellite-based profiling retrievals of precipitation parameters using AHSRL (Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar), CRL (CANDAC Raman Lidar) and MMCR (Milli-Meter Cloud Radar) profiles acquired at the PEARL high-Arctic site in Eureka (80 °N, 86 °W), Nunavut, Canada. As part of the process of validating the profiling retrievals we aspire to learn more about the mechanisms controlling aerosol, cloud and precipitation inter-dynamics. In addition, ground-based, high-frequency observations of precipitation will be used for characterizing precipitation totals as well as the conditional probability of the type of precipitation (rain or snow) and thus to help understand and validate comparable information extracted from the satellite retrievals. We also aim to characterize different particle types using AHSRL and CRL depolarization profiles, MMCR Doppler velocity

  18. Aerosol and cloud retrieval using AATSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Virtanen, Timo; Saponaro, Giulia; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    Aerosols and clouds play an important role in terrestrial atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, chemistry, and radiative transfer and are key elements of the water and energy cycles. Accurate evaluation of the effects of aerosols and clouds on climate requires global information on aerosol properties. Such global information can only be provided using satellite remote sensing. Among the satellite instruments used for aerosol and cloud retrieval is the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) on board the European Space Agency (ESA) satellite ENVISAT. Many instruments and retrieval techniques have been developed and applied to satellite data to derive cloud data products (Kokhanonsky et al., 2009). However, many problems still remain to be solved. They are mostly related to the usage of homogeneous, single-layered cloud model. Further issues exist for studies of thin clouds, where both cloud inhomogeniety, cloud fraction and the underlying surface bi-directional reflectance must be accounted for in the retrieval process. The aerosol retrieval algorithm (dual-view over land and single-view over ocean) was constructed for ATSR-2 data (e.g. Veefkind et al. 1998). The most recent version of ADV (AATSR Dual View) is described in Kolmenen et al. (2012). The ATSR dual-view allows retrieval without prior information about land surface reflectance. A semi-analytical cloud retrieval algorithm using backscattered radiation in 0.4-2.4 μm spectral region has recently been implemented to ADV for the determination of the optical thickness, the liquid water path, and the effective size of droplets from spectral measurements of the intensity of light reflected from water clouds with large optical thickness. In AacDV (AATSR aerosol and cloud Dual View) aerosol and cloud retrievals are combined. Cloud retrieval starts when cloud tests for aerosol retrieval show the presence of clouds. The algorithm was early introduced in Kokhanovsky et al. (2003). It works well for thick

  19. Aerosol indirect effect on warm clouds over South-East Atlantic, from co-located MODIS and CALIPSO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we provide a comprehensive analysis of aerosol interaction with warm boundary layer clouds, over South-East Atlantic. We use MODIS retrievals to derive statistical relationships between aerosol concentration and cloud properties, together with co-located CALIPSO estimates of cloud and aerosol layer altitudes. The latter are used to differentiate between cases of mixed and interacting cloud-aerosol layers from cases where the aerosol is located well-above the cloud top. This strategy allows, to a certain extent, to isolate real aerosol-induced effect from meteorology. Similar to previous studies, statistics clearly show that aerosol affects cloud microphysics, decreasing the Cloud Droplet Radius (CDR). The same data indicate a concomitant strong decrease in cloud Liquid Water Path (LWP), in evident contrast with the hypothesis of aerosol inhibition of precipitation (Albrecht, 1989). Because of this water loss, probably due to the entrainment of dry air at cloud top, Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) is found to be almost insensitive to changes in aerosol concentration. The analysis of MODIS-CALIPSO coincidences also evidenced an aerosol enhancement of low cloud cover. Surprising, the Cloud Fraction (CLF) response to aerosol invigoration is much stronger when (absorbing) particles are located above cloud top, than in cases of physical interaction, This result suggests a relevant aerosol radiative effect on low cloud occurrence. Heating the atmosphere above the inversion, absorbing particles above cloud top may decrease the vertical temperature gradient, increase the low tropospheric stability and provide favorable conditions for low cloud formation. We also focus on the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on precipitation, through the statistical analysis of CDR-COT co-variations. A COT value of 10 is found to be the threshold beyond which precipitation mostly forms, in both clean and polluted environments. For larger COT, polluted clouds showed evidence of

  20. Study of Aerosol/Cloud/Radiation Interactions over the ARM SGP Site

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Chin, S

    2006-03-14

    While considerable advances in the understanding of atmospheric processes and feedbacks in the climate system have led to a better representation of these mechanisms in general circulation models (GCMs), the greatest uncertainty in predictability of future climate arises from clouds and their interactions with radiation. To explore this uncertainty, cloud resolving model has been evolved as one of the main tools for understanding and testing cloud feedback processes in climate models, whereas the indirect effects of aerosols are closely linked with cloud feedback processes. In this study we incorporated an existing parameterization of cloud drop concentration (Chuang et al., 2002a) together with aerosol prediction from a global chemistry/aerosol model (IMPACT) (Rotman et al., 2004; Chuang et al., 2002b; Chuang et al., 2005) into LLNL cloud resolving model (Chin, 1994; Chin et al., 1995; Chin and Wilhelmson, 1998) to investigate the effects of aerosols on cloud/precipitation properties and the resulting radiation fields over the Southern Great Plains.

  1. Weekly variability of precipitation induced by anthropogenic aerosols: A case study in Korea in summer 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Soo Ya; Jeong, Jaein I.; Park, R.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Song-You

    2016-01-06

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the weekly variability of precipitation in Korea in summer 2004 by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. We con-duct two WRF simulations including a baseline simulation with empirically based cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and a sensitivity simulation with our implementation to account for the effect of aerosols on CCN number concentrations. The first simulation underestimates observed precipitation amounts, particularly in northeastern coastal areas of Korea, whereas the latter shows higher precipitation amounts that are in better agree-ment with the observations. In addition, the sensitivity model with the aerosol effects reproduces the observed weekly variability, particularly for precipitation frequency with a high R at 0.85, showing 20% increase of precipita-tion events during the weekend than those during weekdays. We find that the aerosol effect results in higher CCN number concentrations during the weekdays and a three-fold increase of the cloud water mixing ratio through en-hanced condensation. As a result, the amount of warm rain is generally suppressed because of the low auto-conversion process from cloud water to rain water under high aerosol conditions. The inefficient conversion, how-ever, leads to higher vertical development of clouds in the mid-atmosphere with stronger updrafts in the sensitivity model, which increases by 21% cold-phase hydrometeors including ice, snow, and graupel relative to the baseline model and ultimately results in higher precipitation amounts in summer.

  2. Weekly variability of precipitation induced by anthropogenic aerosols: A case study in Korea in summer 2004.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Ya; Jeong, Jaein I; Park, Rokjin J; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Hong, Song-You

    2016-01-15

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the weekly variability of precipitation in Korea in summer 2004 by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. We conduct two WRF simulations including a baseline simulation with empirically based cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and a sensitivity simulation with our implementation to account for the effect of aerosols on CCN number concentrations. The first simulation underestimates observed precipitation amounts, particularly in northeastern coastal areas of Korea, whereas the latter shows higher precipitation amounts that are in better agreement with the observations. In addition, the sensitivity model with the aerosol effects reproduces the observed weekly variability, particularly for precipitation frequency with a high R at 0.85, showing 20% increase of precipitation events during the weekend than those during weekdays. We find that the aerosol effect results in higher CCN number concentrations during the weekdays and a three-fold increase of the cloud water mixing ratio through enhanced condensation. As a result, the amount of warm rain is generally suppressed because of the low auto-conversion process from cloud water to rain water under high aerosol conditions. The inefficient conversion, however, leads to higher vertical development of clouds in the mid-atmosphere with stronger updrafts in the sensitivity model, which increases by 21% cold-phase hydrometeors including ice, snow, and graupel relative to the baseline model and ultimately results in higher precipitation amounts in summer.

  3. Retrieving co-occurring cloud and precipitation properties of warm marine boundary layer clouds with A-Train data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Avey, Stephanie; Cooper, Steven; Lebsock, Matthew; Tanelli, Simone; Dobrowalski, Greg

    2016-04-01

    In marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds the formation of precipitation from the cloud droplet distribution in the presence of variable aerosol plays a fundamental role in determining the coupling of these clouds to their environment and ultimately to the climate system. Here the degree to which A-Train satellite measurements can diagnose simultaneously occurring cloud and precipitation properties in MBL clouds is examined. Beginning with the measurements provided by CloudSat and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (including a newly available microwave brightness temperature from CloudSat), and a climatology of MBL cloud properties from past field campaigns, an assumption is made that any hydrometeor volume could contain both cloud droplet and precipitation droplet modes. Bayesian optimal estimation is then used to derive atmospheric states by inverting a measurement vector carefully accounting for uncertainties due to instrument noise, forward model error, and assumptions. It is found that in many cases where significant precipitation coexists with cloud, due to forward model error driven by uncertainties in assumptions, the uncertainty in retrieved cloud properties is greater than the variance in the prior climatology. It is often necessary to average several thousand (hundred) precipitating (weakly precipitating) profiles to obtain meaningful information regarding the properties important to microphysical processes. Regardless, if such process level information is deemed necessary for better constraining predictive models of the climate system, measurement systems specifically designed to accomplish such retrievals must be considered for the future.

  4. The impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Andrew S; Kirkpatrick, Michael P; Stevens, David E; Toon, Owen B

    2004-12-23

    Some of the global warming from anthropogenic greenhouse gases is offset by increased reflection of solar radiation by clouds with smaller droplets that form in air polluted with aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation nuclei. The resulting cooling tendency, termed the indirect aerosol forcing, is thought to be comparable in magnitude to the forcing by anthropogenic CO2, but it is difficult to estimate because the physical processes that determine global aerosol and cloud populations are poorly understood. Smaller cloud droplets not only reflect sunlight more effectively, but also inhibit precipitation, which is expected to result in increased cloud water. Such an increase in cloud water would result in even more reflective clouds, further increasing the indirect forcing. Marine boundary-layer clouds polluted by aerosol particles, however, are not generally observed to hold more water. Here we simulate stratocumulus clouds with a fluid dynamics model that includes detailed treatments of cloud microphysics and radiative transfer. Our simulations show that the response of cloud water to suppression of precipitation from increased droplet concentrations is determined by a competition between moistening from decreased surface precipitation and drying from increased entrainment of overlying air. Only when the overlying air is humid or droplet concentrations are very low does sufficient precipitation reach the surface to allow cloud water to increase with droplet concentrations. Otherwise, the response of cloud water to aerosol-induced suppression of precipitation is dominated by enhanced entrainment of overlying dry air. In this scenario, cloud water is reduced as droplet concentrations increase, which diminishes the indirect climate forcing.

  5. Mars water-ice clouds and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, J A; Komguem, L; Dickinson, C; Cook, C; Illnicki, M; Seabrook, J; Popovici, V; Duck, T J; Davy, R; Taylor, P A; Pathak, J; Fisher, D; Carswell, A I; Daly, M; Hipkin, V; Zent, A P; Hecht, M H; Wood, S E; Tamppari, L K; Renno, N; Moores, J E; Lemmon, M T; Daerden, F; Smith, P H

    2009-07-03

    The light detection and ranging instrument on the Phoenix mission observed water-ice clouds in the atmosphere of Mars that were similar to cirrus clouds on Earth. Fall streaks in the cloud structure traced the precipitation of ice crystals toward the ground. Measurements of atmospheric dust indicated that the planetary boundary layer (PBL) on Mars was well mixed, up to heights of around 4 kilometers, by the summer daytime turbulence and convection. The water-ice clouds were detected at the top of the PBL and near the ground each night in late summer after the air temperature started decreasing. The interpretation is that water vapor mixed upward by daytime turbulence and convection forms ice crystal clouds at night that precipitate back toward the surface.

  6. Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-08-01

    Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (Spop), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation (λ), as both Spop and λ strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. Spop in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of Spop and to examine Spop in high-resolution models.

  7. The Relationships Between Insoluble Precipitation Residues, Clouds, and Precipitation Over California's Southern Sierra Nevada During Winter Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creamean, Jessie M.; White, Allen B.; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Ice formation in orographic mixed-phase clouds can enhance precipitation and depends on the type of aerosols that serve as ice nucleating particles (INP). The resulting precipitation from these clouds is a viable source of water, especially for regions such as the California Sierra Nevada. Thus, a better understanding of the sources of INP that impact orographic clouds is important for assessing water availability in California. This study presents a multi-site, multi-year analysis of single particle insoluble residues in precipitation samples that likely influenced cloud ice and precipitation formation above Yosemite National Park. Dust and biological particles represented the dominant fraction of the residues (64% on average). Cloud glaciation, determined using GOES satellite observations, not only depended on high cloud tops (greater than 6.2 km) and low temperatures (less than -26 C), but also on the composition of the dust and biological residues. The greatest prevalence of ice-phase clouds occurred in conjunction with biologically-rich residues and mineral dust rich in calcium, followed by iron and aluminosilicates. Dust and biological particles are known to be efficient INP, thus these residues are what likely influenced ice formation in clouds above the sites and subsequent precipitation quantities reaching the surface during events with similar meteorology. The goal of this study is to use precipitation chemistry information to gain a better understanding of the potential sources of INP in the south-central Sierra Nevada, where cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions are under-studied and where mixed-phase orographic clouds represent a key element in the generation of precipitation and thus the water supply in California.

  8. The relationships between insoluble precipitation residues, clouds, and precipitation over California's southern Sierra Nevada during winter storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, Jessie M.; White, Allen B.; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2016-09-01

    Ice formation in orographic mixed-phase clouds can enhance precipitation and depends on the type of aerosols that serve as ice nucleating particles (INPs). The resulting precipitation from these clouds is a viable source of water, especially for regions such as the California Sierra Nevada. Thus, a better understanding of the sources of INPs that impact orographic clouds is important for assessing water availability in California. This study presents a multi-site, multi-year analysis of single-particle insoluble residues in precipitation samples that likely influenced cloud ice and precipitation formation above Yosemite National Park. Dust and biological particles represented the dominant fraction of the residues (64% on average). Cloud glaciation, determined using satellite observations, not only depended on high cloud tops (>5.9 km) and low temperatures (<-23 °C), but also on the presence of what were likely dust and biological INPs. The greatest prevalence of ice-phase clouds occurred in conjunction with biologically-rich residues and mineral dust rich in calcium, followed by iron and aluminosilicates. Dust and biological particles are known to be efficient INPs, thus these residues likely influenced ice formation in clouds above the sites and subsequent precipitation quantities reaching the surface during events with similar meteorology. The goal of this study is to use precipitation chemistry information to gain a better understanding of the potential sources of INPs in the south-central Sierra Nevada, where cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions are poorly understood and where mixed-phase orographic clouds represent a key element in the generation of precipitation and thus the water supply in California.

  9. CCN and IN Effects on Cloud Properties and Precipitation - Case Studies from CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to modify cloud microphysical processes, which could potentially change the location, intensity, and type of precipitation. Dust aerosols are often observed over California in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia. Although anthropogenic pollution has been postulated to contribute to reduction of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the effects of dust aerosols on the winter clouds and precipitation has not been examined in detail particularly with model simulations. We incorporate recent progress in ice nucleation parameterizations to link dust with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with WRF, to exclusively look into how dust can possibly affect cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cases under different environmental conditions with atmospheric river (AR) and Sierra barrier jet (SBJ) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. It is shown that increasing IN concentrations or adding a dust layer at 4-6 km as IN enhances surface rain and snow due to enhanced production of ice and snow in clouds. However, increasing CCN suppresses surface rain and snow, and significantly redistributes surface precipitation upwind and downwind of the mountains, with important implication to improving our understanding of the impacts of aerosols on orographic precipitation and water supply in the region.

  10. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-05

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. We note that consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equalmore » to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.« less

  11. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-05

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. We note that consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equal to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.

  12. Satellite estimates of precipitation susceptibility in low-level marine stratiform clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, C. R.; Wood, R.; Kubar, T. L.

    2015-09-01

    Quantifying the sensitivity of warm rain to aerosols is important for constraining climate model estimates of aerosol indirect effects. In this study, the precipitation sensitivity to cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) in satellite retrievals is quantified by applying the precipitation susceptibility metric to a combined CloudSat/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data set of stratus and stratocumulus clouds that cover the tropical and subtropical Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Consistent with previous observational studies of marine stratocumulus, precipitation susceptibility decreases with increasing liquid water path (LWP), and the susceptibility of the mean precipitation rate R is nearly equal to the sum of the susceptibilities of precipitation intensity and of probability of precipitation. Consistent with previous modeling studies, the satellite retrievals reveal that precipitation susceptibility varies not only with LWP but also with Nd. Puzzlingly, negative values of precipitation susceptibility are found at low LWP and high Nd. There is marked regional variation in precipitation susceptibility values that cannot simply be explained by regional variations in LWP and Nd. This suggests other controls on precipitation apart from LWP and Nd and that precipitation susceptibility will need to be quantified and understood at the regional scale when relating to its role in controlling possible aerosol-induced cloud lifetime effects.

  13. Aerosol Indirect Effect on Warm Clouds over Eastern China Using Combined CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol, one of key components of the climate system, is highly variable, both temporally and spatially. It often exerts great influences on the cloud-precipitation chain processes by serving as CCN/IN, altering cloud microphysics and its life cycle. Yet, the aerosol indirect effect on clouds remains largely unknown, because the initial changes in clouds due to aerosols may be enhanced or dampened by such feedback processes as modified cloud dynamics, or evaporation of the smaller droplets due to the competition for water vapor. In this study, we attempted to quantify the aerosol effects on warm cloud over eastern China, based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO and CPR/CLOUDSAT during the period 2006 to 2010. The seasonality of aerosol from ground-based PM10 is quite different from that estimated from MODIS AOD. This result is corroborated by lower level profile of aerosol occurrence frequency from CALIOP, indicating the significant role CALIOP could play in aerosol-cloud interaction. The combined use of CALIOP and CPR facilitate the process to exactly determine the (vertical) position of warm cloud relative to aerosol, out of six scenarios in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status, which shows as follows: AO (Aerosol only), CO (Cloud only), SASC (Single aerosol-single cloud), SADC (single aerosol-double cloud), DASC (double aerosol-single cloud), and others. Results shows that about 54% of all the cases belong to mixed status, among all the collocated aerosol-cloud cases. Under mixed condition, a boomerang shape is observed, i.e., reduced cloud droplet radius (CDR) is associated with increasing aerosol at moderate aerosol pollution (AOD<0.4), becoming saturated at AOD of 0.5, followed by an increase in CDR with aerosol. In contrast, there is no such boomerang shape found for (aerosol-cloud) separated cases. We categorize dataset into warm-season and cold-season subsets to figure out how the

  14. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-13

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for low aerosol concentration; here, [Formula: see text] is the phase-relaxation time and [Formula: see text] is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as [Formula: see text], and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  15. MCS precipitation and downburst intensity response to increased aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavner, M.; Cotton, W. R.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States as well as producers of severe weather such as hail, tornados and straight-line wind events known as derechos. Past studies have shown that changes in aerosol concentrations serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) alter the MCS hydrometeor characteristics which in turn modify precipitation yield, downdraft velocity, cold-pool strength, storm propagation and the potential for severe weather to occur. In this study, the sensitivity of MCS precipitation characteristics and convective downburst velocities associated with a derecho to changes in CCN concentrations were examined by simulating a case study using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The case study of the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS was chosen since it produced a swath of widespread wind damage in association with an embedded large-scale bow echo, over a broad region from the High Plains of western Kansas to the foothills of the Appalachians. The sensitivity of the storm to changes in CCN concentrations was examined by conducting a set of three simulations which differed in the initial aerosol concentration based on output from the 3D chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem. Results from this study indicate that while increasing CCN concentrations led to an increase in precipitation rates, the changes to the derecho strength were not linear. A moderate increase in aerosol concentration reduced the derecho strength, while the simulation with the highest aerosol concentrations increased the derecho intensity. These changes are attributed to the impact of enhanced CCN concentration on the production of convective downbursts. An analysis of aerosol loading impacts on these MCS features will be presented.

  16. A full spectral cumulus cloud parameterisation including aerosol effects: The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, T. M.; Graf, H. F.; Yano, J. I.

    2009-04-01

    The convective cloud field model is a convection parameterisation based on the representation of a full cumulus cloud spectrum using a dynamical quasi-equilibrium closure. It employs a one dimensional entraining parcel model whose properties are simulated on a refined vertical resolution (~100 m) in order to capture the complex cloud microphysical processes in convective clouds. We introduced an enhanced microphysics compared to those currently used in convection parameterisations, containing warm and mixed phase cloud microphysics processes and incorporates aerosol effects by linking the cloud droplet number concentration to the aerosol amount. Similar to the Arakawa and Schubert (1974) quasi-equilibrium closure we allow for the mutual influence of clouds via the environment. Instead of assuming instantaneous stabilisation of the environment though, the clouds are dynamically interacting for the length of the large scale model time step without necessarily adopting an equilibrium situation. The model is evaluated in single column mode (SCM) for continental and tropical convection using the ARM SGP and TWP-ICE cases. Moreover it is evaluated in global mode using the global atmospheric circulation model ECHAM5. For the SCM cases the precipitation, heating and moistening rates for the simulated period is better represented than with the Tiedtke massflux scheme which is the usual convection parameterisation within ECHAM5. Moreover, we find a clear response to an enhanced aerosol loading which generally leads to a reduction of convective precipitation. Globally, the CCFM produces slightly higher convective precipitation rates and especially responds better to convective instability over lower latitudes and the storm track regions.

  17. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  18. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  19. Impacts of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions on Climate Change in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, S.; Jung, Y.; Baek, H.; Cho, C.

    2013-12-01

    Climate impact by anthropogenic drivers gives high concerns in climate change simulation. IPCC AR4 emphasized the role of aerosol on climate besides the GHGs due to its negative significant radiative forcing. We find that climate feedback of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia through direct and indirect (aerosol-cloud interaction) radiative process using HadGEM2-AO developed by the UK Met office. Due to the industrial revolution and population growth, total anthropogenic aerosol emissions have grown dramatically over East Asia; sulfate aerosol is the dominant component accounting for about 50% of total aerosol optical depth at 550nm (Figure 1). An increased amount of aerosols might increase the CCN number concentration and lead to more, but smaller, cloud droplets for fixed liquid water content. This increases the albedo of the cloud, resulting in enhance reflection and a cooling effect. And smaller drops require longer growth times to reach size at which they easily fall as precipitation. This effect called the cloud lifetime effect may enhance the cloud cover (Figure 2), with a persistent positive correlation between cloud cover and aerosol optical depth. Particularly, aerosols have an influence on the amount of cloud cover (SC, ST, and NS) through the interaction with precipitation efficiency of low level clouds. As a result of perturbations of East Asia aerosols from preindustrial to present day, a net radiative flux at the top of atmosphere is estimated to be -4 W/m2, with a regional mean surface cooling of 1.2 K. More detailed analysis will be shown at the conference. Fig. 1. (a) Total AOD distributions (b) Changes in decadal mean AOD over East Asia. Fig 2. Cloud cover distributions classified by ISCCP cloud types.

  20. Interannual Variations in Aerosol Sources and Their Impact on Orographic Precipitation over California's Central Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, J.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Minnis, P.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater I field campaign (2009-2011), the impacts of aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada Mountains. In 2009, the precipitation collected on the ground was influenced by both local biomass burning and long-range transported dust and biological particles, while in 2010, by mostly local sources of biomass burning and pollution, and in 2011 by mostly long-range transport of dust and biological particles from distant sources. Although vast differences in the sources of residues were observed from year-to-year, dust and biological residues were omnipresent (on average, 55% of the total residues combined) and were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems and larger quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15°C), suggesting biological components were more efficient IN than mineral dust. On the other hand, when precipitation quantities were lower, local biomass burning and pollution residues were observed (on average 31% and 9%, respectively), suggesting these residues potentially served as CCN at the base of shallow cloud systems and that lower level polluted clouds of storm systems produced less precipitation than non-polluted (i.e., marine) clouds. The direct connection of the sources of aerosols within clouds and precipitation type and quantity can be used in models to better assess how local emissions versus long-range transported dust and biological aerosols play a role in impacting regional weather and climate, ultimately with the goal of more accurate predictive weather forecast models and water resource

  1. Marine Aerosols: Hygroscopocity and Aerosol-Cloud Relationships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    MSc) clouds. A CIRPAS Twin Otter field experiment took place in July-August 2011 over the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Monterey, CA...large eddy simulation (LES) and field measurements, the latter including Twin Otter missions such as MASE I and MASE II and those involving other...properties in ship tracks, which have continued to serve as a well-defined example of marine aerosol-cloud perturbations. The Twin Otter payload has

  2. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: a regional modelling study using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Berg, L. K.; Leung, L. R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-06-01

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the relative impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 October-16 November 2008). Two distinct regions are identified. The near-coast polluted region is characterized by the strong suppression of non-sea-salt particle activation due to sea-salt particles, a dominant role of first over second indirect effects, low surface precipitation rates, and limited impact of aerosols associated with anthropogenic emissions on clouds. The effects of natural marine aerosols on cloud properties (e.g., cloud optical depth and cloud-top and cloud-base heights), precipitation, and the top of atmosphere and surface shortwave fluxes counteract those of anthropogenic aerosols over this region. The relatively clean remote region is characterized by large contributions of aerosols from non-local sources (lateral boundaries), much stronger drizzle at the surface, and high aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions under a scenario of five-fold increase in anthropogenic emissions. Clouds in this clean region are quite sensitive (e.g., a 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% increase in surface albedo) to a moderate increase (25% of the reference case) in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration produced by a five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions. The reduction of precipitation due to this increase in anthropogenic aerosols more than doubles the aerosol lifetime in the clean marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol, which ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-physical properties, leading to strong

  3. Smoke and Pollution Aerosol Effect on Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  4. Effects of Aerosols on Autumn Precipitation over Mid-Eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Qian, Yun; Ge, Jinming; Su, Jing

    2014-09-20

    Long-term observational data indicated a decreasing trend for the amount of autumn precipitation (i.e. 54.3 mm per decade) over Mid-Eastern China, especially after 1980s (~ 5.6% per decade). To examine the cause of the decreasing trend, the mechanisms associated with the change of autumn precipitation were investigated from the perspective of water vapor transportation, atmospheric stability and cloud microphysics. Results show that the decrease of convective available potential energy (i.e. 12.81 J kg-1/ decade) and change of cloud microphysics, which were closely related to the increase of aerosol loading during the past twenty years, were the two primary factors responsible for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Ours results showed that increased aerosol could enhance the atmospheric stability thus weaken the convection. Meanwhile, more aerosols also led to a significant decline of raindrop concentration and to a delay of raindrop formation because of smaller size of cloud droplets. Thus, increased aerosols produced by air pollution could be one of the major reasons for the decrease of autumn precipitation. Furthermore, we found that the aerosol effects on precipitation in autumn was more significant than in other seasons, partly due to the relatively more stable synoptic system in autumn. The impact of large-scale circulation dominated in autumn and the dynamic influence on precipitation was more important than the thermodynamic activity.

  5. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity of Aerosols during GoAmazon 2014/15 Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Martin, S. T.; Kleinman, L.; Thalman, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol indirect effects, which represent the impact of aerosols on climate through influencing the properties of clouds, remain one of the main uncertainties in climate predictions (Stocker et al. 2013). Reducing this large uncertainty requires both improved understanding and representation of aerosol properties and processes in climate models, including the cloud activation properties of aerosols. The Atmospheric System Research (ASR) science program plan of January 2010 states that: “A key requirement for simulating aerosol-cloud interactions is the ability to calculate cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei (CCN and IN, respectively) concentrations as a function of supersaturation from the chemical and microphysical properties of the aerosol.” The Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon 2014/15) study seeks to understand how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity (Manaus)—in particular, the differences in cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions between polluted and pristine conditions. One key question of GoAmazon2014/5 is: “What is the influence of the Manaus pollution plume on the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activities of the aerosol particles and the secondary organic material in the particles?” To address this question, we measured size-resolved CCN spectra, a critical measurement for GoAmazon2014/5.

  6. Regional climate effects of aerosols on precipitation and snowpack in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Su, H.; Jiang, J. H.; Zhao, C.; Qian, Y.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Water sources in California are derived predominantly from precipitation (mostly during the winter time) and storage in the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. With California facing one of the most severe droughts on record, it is important to understand the factors influencing precipitation and snowpack for water management and hydropower operation. Recent observational and numerical modeling studies have shown that aerosol pollutants can substantially change precipitation and snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. However, previous studies focused only on one of the aerosol effects or just focus on a single event. A complete view on regional climate effects of aerosol on precipitation and snowpack in California is not delivered yet. In this study, we use a fully coupled aerosol-meteorology-snowpack model (WRF-Chem-SNICAR) to investigate aerosol impacts on regional climate in California, with a focus on precipitation and snowpack. We will evaluate the performance of the WRF-Chem-SNICAR model on simulating regional climate in California. Sensitivity experiments will be conducted to disentangle the relative roles of each aerosol effect, such as aerosol radiation interaction vs. aerosol cloud interaction and aerosol snowpack interaction, local emission vs. long-range transport etc.

  7. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd

  8. Path-analysis based validation of aerosol-precipitation micro-scale interaction using observational evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Prashant; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols can modulate variability of Indian summer monsoon by perturbing the radiative balance of the atmosphere, affecting the land-ocean processes and altering the cloud-microphysics at varying spatio-temporal scale, ranging from fast (less than a day) to slow (months) temporal effects. In the literature, overall interaction between AOD and Precipitation was quantified as correlation coefficients (Ramchandran and Kedia, 2013; Gryspeerdt et al., 2012; Gryspeerdt et al., 2014), however the segregation of the interaction was required to better understand the presence/absence of pathway mediated through changes in cloud-microphysics and atmospheric stability. In this work, effects of aerosols on precipitation, mediated through changes in cloud-microphysics and atmospheric stability, on daily time-scales, are studied and quantified using coincident observational data of aerosols, clouds and rainfall, using Path-analysis (Wright, 1969). MODIS, ERA-interim and IMD data-sets for years 2000-2009 for Aerosol optical depth (AOD), Column water vapour (CWV), Cloud droplet effective radius (CDERL), Convective available potential energy (CAPE) and Precipitation, over Indian region were used for the analysis. Cause-effect model was built to validate and quantify the effects of AOD on precipitation, mediated through CDERL and CAPE. To contrast cause-effect mechanism in presence and absence of aerosol fields, high AOD-low Precipitation and low AOD-low Precipitation clusters were formed. Cluster-averaged time series were used to calculate the lagged correlation (AOD leading) and provided as input to Path-analysis. "AOD-CDERL-Precipitation" and "AOD-CAPE-Precipitation" pathways were found to be statistically significant for high AOD-low Precipitation clusters while both were absent for low AOD-low Precipitation clusters, for years 2003 and 2004. For other years statistically significant pathway between AOD and Precipitation could not be found. In "AOD-CDERL-Precipitation" pathway

  9. Multistatic aerosol-cloud lidar in space: A theoretical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Alexandrov, Mikhail D.; Cairns, Brian; Travis, Larry D.

    2016-11-01

    Accurate aerosol and cloud retrievals from space remain quite challenging and typically involve solving a severely ill-posed inverse scattering problem. In this Perspective, we formulate in general terms an aerosol and aerosol-cloud interaction space mission concept intended to provide detailed horizontal and vertical profiles of aerosol physical characteristics as well as identify mutually induced changes in the properties of aerosols and clouds. We argue that a natural and feasible way of addressing the ill-posedness of the inverse scattering problem while having an exquisite vertical-profiling capability is to fly a multistatic (including bistatic) lidar system. We analyze theoretically the capabilities of a formation-flying constellation of a primary satellite equipped with a conventional monostatic (backscattering) lidar and one or more additional platforms each hosting a receiver of the scattered laser light. If successfully implemented, this concept would combine the measurement capabilities of a passive multi-angle multi-spectral polarimeter with the vertical profiling capability of a lidar; address the ill-posedness of the inverse problem caused by the highly limited information content of monostatic lidar measurements; address the ill-posedness of the inverse problem caused by vertical integration and surface reflection in passive photopolarimetric measurements; help relax polarization accuracy requirements; eliminate the need for exquisite radiative-transfer modeling of the atmosphere-surface system in data analyses; yield the day-and-night observation capability; provide direct characterization of ground-level aerosols as atmospheric pollutants; and yield direct measurements of polarized bidirectional surface reflectance. We demonstrate, in particular, that supplementing the conventional backscattering lidar with just one additional receiver flown in formation at a scattering angle close to 170° can dramatically increase the information content of the

  10. The Impact of humidity above stratiform clouds on indirect aerosol climate forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, A S; Kirkpatrick, M P; Stevens, D E; Toon, O B

    2004-12-20

    Some of the global warming effect of anthropogenic greenhouse gases is offset by increased solar reflection from clouds with smaller droplets that form on increased numbers of cloud condensation nuclei in polluted air. The global magnitude of the resulting indirect aerosol climate forcing is estimated to be comparable (and opposed) to the anthropogenic carbon dioxide forcing, but estimates are highly uncertain because of complexities in characterizing the physical process that determine global aerosol and cloud populations and their interactions. Beyond reflecting sunlight more effectively, smaller droplets are less efficient at producing precipitation, and decreased precipitation is expected to result in increased cloud water and cloud cover, further increasing the indirect forcing. Yet polluted marine boundary-layer clouds are not generally observed to hold more water. Here we use model simulations of stratocumulus clouds to show that suppression of precipitation from increased droplet concentrations leads to increased cloud water only when sufficient precipitation reaches the surface, a condition favored when the overlying air is moist. Otherwise, aerosol induced suppression of precipitation enhances entrainment of overlying dry air, thereby reducing cloud water and diminishing the indirect climate forcing.

  11. Distinct Impacts of Aerosols on an Evolving Continental Cloud Complex during the RACORO Field Campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Yun; Wang, Yuan; Pan, Bowen; ...

    2016-08-26

    In this study, a continental cloud complex, consisting of shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and stratus, is simulated by a cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecasting Model to investigate the aerosol microphysical effect (AME) and aerosol radiative effect (ARE) on the various cloud regimes and their transitions during the Department of Energy Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) campaign. Under an elevated aerosol loading with AME only, a reduced cloudiness for the shallow cumuli and stratus resulted from more droplet evaporation competing with suppressed precipitation, but an enhanced cloudinessmore » for the DCC is attributed to more condensation. With the inclusion of ARE, the shallow cumuli are suppressed owing to the thermodynamic effects of light-absorbing aerosols. The responses of DCC and stratus to aerosols are monotonic with AME only but nonmonotonic with both AME and ARE. The DCC is invigorated because of favorable convection and moisture conditions at night induced by daytime ARE, via the so-called aerosol-enhanced conditional instability mechanism. Finally, the results reveal that the overall aerosol effects on the cloud complex are distinct from the individual cloud types, highlighting that the aerosol–cloud interactions for diverse cloud regimes and their transitions need to be evaluated to assess the regional and global climatic impacts.« less

  12. Distinct Impacts of Aerosols on an Evolving Continental Cloud Complex during the RACORO Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yun; Wang, Yuan; Pan, Bowen; Hu, Jiaxi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-08-26

    In this study, a continental cloud complex, consisting of shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and stratus, is simulated by a cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecasting Model to investigate the aerosol microphysical effect (AME) and aerosol radiative effect (ARE) on the various cloud regimes and their transitions during the Department of Energy Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) campaign. Under an elevated aerosol loading with AME only, a reduced cloudiness for the shallow cumuli and stratus resulted from more droplet evaporation competing with suppressed precipitation, but an enhanced cloudiness for the DCC is attributed to more condensation. With the inclusion of ARE, the shallow cumuli are suppressed owing to the thermodynamic effects of light-absorbing aerosols. The responses of DCC and stratus to aerosols are monotonic with AME only but nonmonotonic with both AME and ARE. The DCC is invigorated because of favorable convection and moisture conditions at night induced by daytime ARE, via the so-called aerosol-enhanced conditional instability mechanism. Finally, the results reveal that the overall aerosol effects on the cloud complex are distinct from the individual cloud types, highlighting that the aerosol–cloud interactions for diverse cloud regimes and their transitions need to be evaluated to assess the regional and global climatic impacts.

  13. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-09

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30 degrees S-20 degrees S), smoke (20 degrees S-5 degrees N), mineral dust (5 degrees N-25 degrees N), and pollution aerosols (30 degrees N- 60 degrees N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 +/- 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect.

  14. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-01-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30°S–20°S), smoke (20°S–5°N), mineral dust (5°N–25°N), and pollution aerosols (30°N– 60°N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2–0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is –11 ± 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect. PMID:16076949

  15. Cloud Forming Potential of Aminium Carboxylate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Hernandez, M. E.; McKeown, M.; Taylor, N.; Collins, D. R.; Lavi, A.; Rudich, Y.; Zhang, R.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect visibility, air quality, human health, climate, and in particular the aerosol direct and indirect forcings represent the largest uncertainty in climate projections. In this paper, we present laboratory measurements of the hygroscopic growth factors (HGf) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of a series of aminium carboxylate salt aerosols, utilizing a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and a CCN counter. HGf measurements were conducted for size-selected aerosols with diameters ranging from 46 nm to 151 nm and at relative humidity (RH%) values ranging from 10 to 90%. In addition, we have calculated the CCN activation diameters for the aminium carboxylate aerosols and derived the hygroscopicity parameter (k or kappa) values for all species using three methods, i.e., the mixing rule approximation, HGf, and CCN results. Our results show that variations in the ratio of acid to base directly affect the activation diameter, HGf, and (k) values of the aminium carboxylate aerosols. Atmospheric implications of the variations in the chemical composition of aminium carboxylate aerosols on their cloud forming potential will be discussed.

  16. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large-scale precipitation change.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien

    2015-12-28

    The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol-induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol-cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data.

  17. Coupling Spectral-bin Cloud Microphysics with the MOSAIC Aerosol Model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and Results for Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, Richard C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-08-23

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly-coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  18. Coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics with the MOSAIC aerosol model in WRF-Chem: Methodology and results for marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenhua; Fan, Jiwen; Easter, R. C.; Yang, Qing; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction processes can be represented more physically with bin cloud microphysics relative to bulk microphysical parameterizations. However, due to computational power limitations in the past, bin cloud microphysics was often run with very simple aerosol treatments. The purpose of this study is to represent better aerosol-cloud interaction processes in the Chemistry version of Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) at convection-permitting scales by coupling spectral-bin cloud microphysics (SBM) with the MOSAIC sectional aerosol model. A flexible interface is built that exchanges cloud and aerosol information between them. The interface contains a new bin aerosol activation approach, which replaces the treatments in the original SBM. It also includes the modified aerosol resuspension and in-cloud wet removal processes with the droplet loss tendencies and precipitation fluxes from SBM. The newly coupled system is evaluated for two marine stratocumulus cases over the Southeast Pacific Ocean with either a simplified aerosol setup or full-chemistry. We compare the aerosol activation process in the newly coupled SBM-MOSAIC against the SBM simulation without chemistry using a simplified aerosol setup, and the results show consistent activation rates. A longer time simulation reinforces that aerosol resuspension through cloud drop evaporation plays an important role in replenishing aerosols and impacts cloud and precipitation in marine stratocumulus clouds. Evaluation of the coupled SBM-MOSAIC with full-chemistry using aircraft measurements suggests that the new model works realistically for the marine stratocumulus clouds, and improves the simulation of cloud microphysical properties compared to a simulation using MOSAIC coupled with the Morrison two-moment microphysics.

  19. Impact of interannual variations in aerosol particle sources on orographic precipitation over California's Central Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, J. M.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, P.; Prather, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater field campaign (2009-2011), the variability and associated impacts of different aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer for precipitation chemistry, S-band profiling radar for precipitation classification, remote sensing measurements of cloud properties, and surface meteorological measurements. The composition of insoluble residues in precipitation samples collected at a surface site contained mostly local biomass burning and long-range transported dust and biological particles (2009), local sources of biomass burning and pollution (2010), and long-range transport from distant sources (2011). Although differences in the sources were observed from year-to-year, the most consistent source of dust and biological residues were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems with significant quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant (up to 40%) during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15 °C), supporting the important role bioparticles can play as ice nucleating particles. On the other hand, lower percentages of residues from local biomass burning and pollution were observed over the three winter seasons (on average 31 and 9%, respectively). When precipitation quantities were relatively low, these residues most likely served as CCN, forming smaller more numerous cloud droplets at the base of shallow cloud systems, and resulting in less efficient riming processes. The correlation between the source of aerosols within clouds and precipitation type and quantity will be further probed in models to understand the

  20. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: a regional modelling study using WRF-Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Gustafson, W. I., Jr.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Berg, L. K.; Leung, L. R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-01

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the relative impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 October-16 November 2008). Two distinct regions are identified. The near-coast polluted region is characterized by low surface precipitation rates, the strong suppression of non-sea-salt particle activation due to sea-salt particles, a predominant albedo effect in aerosol indirect effects, and limited impact of aerosols associated with anthropogenic emissions on clouds. Opposite sensitivities to natural marine and anthropogenic aerosol perturbations are seen in cloud properties (e.g., cloud optical depth and cloud-top and cloud-base heights), precipitation, and the top-of-atmosphere and surface shortwave fluxes over this region. The relatively clean remote region is characterized by large contributions of aerosols from non-regional sources (lateral boundaries) and much stronger drizzle at the surface. Under a scenario of five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions, this relatively clean region shows large cloud responses, for example, a 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% increase in albedo in response to a moderate increase (25% of the reference case) in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. The reduction of precipitation due to this increase in anthropogenic aerosols more than doubles the aerosol lifetime in the clean marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol, which ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-physical properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The high sensitivity is also related to

  1. Impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on stratocumulus and precipitation in the Southeast Pacific: a regional modelling study using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q.; Gustafson, W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Berg, L. K.; Leung, L. R.; Morrison, H.

    2012-09-28

    Cloud-system resolving simulations with the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem) model are used to quantify the relative impacts of regional anthropogenic and oceanic emissions on changes in aerosol properties, cloud macro- and microphysics, and cloud radiative forcing over the Southeast Pacific (SEP) during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) (15 October–16 November 2008). Two distinct regions are identified. The near-coast polluted region is characterized by low surface precipitation rates, the strong suppression of non-sea-salt particle activation due to sea-salt particles, a predominant albedo effect in aerosol indirect effects, and limited impact of aerosols associated with anthropogenic emissions on clouds. Opposite sensitivities to natural marine and anthropogenic aerosol perturbations are seen in cloud properties (e.g., cloud optical depth and cloud-top and cloud-base heights), precipitation, and the top-of-atmosphere and surface shortwave fluxes over this region. The relatively clean remote region is characterized by large contributions of aerosols from non-regional sources (lateral boundaries) and much stronger drizzle at the surface. Under a scenario of five-fold increase in regional anthropogenic emissions, this relatively clean region shows large cloud responses, for example, a 13% increase in cloud-top height and a 9% increase in albedo in response to a moderate increase (25% of the reference case) in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration. The reduction of precipitation due to this increase in anthropogenic aerosols more than doubles the aerosol lifetime in the clean marine boundary layer. Therefore, the aerosol impacts on precipitation are amplified by the positive feedback of precipitation on aerosol, which ultimately alters the cloud micro- and macro-physical properties, leading to strong aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. The high sensitivity is also related

  2. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  3. Effect of aerosol number concentration on cloud droplet dispersion: An LES study and implications for aerosol indirect forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Through three-dimensional LES simulations of marine stratocumulus we explore the factors that control the cloud spectral relative dispersion (ratio of cloud droplet spectral width to the mean radius of the distribution) as a function of aerosol number concentration and the extent to which the relative dispersion either enhances or mitigates the Twomey effect. We find that relative dispersion decreases with increasing aerosol number concentration (for aerosol number concentrations less than about 1000 cm- 3) because smaller droplets resulting from higher aerosol number concentrations inhibit precipitation and lead to: (1) less spectral broadening by suppressed collision and coalescence processes; and (2) more spectral narrowing by droplet condensational growth at higher updraft velocity, because reduced drizzle latent heating at cloud top results in increased boundary layer turbulent kinetic energy production by buoyancy and thereby stronger turbulence. Increased spectral broadening owing to increased cloud-top entrainment mixing, also as a result of increased boundary layer turbulence, is relatively insignificant compared with (1) and (2). The coefficient k, an important parameter that relates cloud droplet effective radius and volume mean radius in large-scale models, is a function of skewness and relative dispersion of the distribution and is negatively correlated with relative dispersion. Increasing k with increasing aerosol number concentration leads to maximum enhancement of the cloud susceptibility (the change of cloud optical depth due to change of cloud droplet number concentration) over that attributable to the Twomey effect alone by about 4.2% and 39% for simulated FIRE and ASTEX cases, respectively.

  4. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B

    2014-12-28

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects.

  5. Illinois Precipitation Research: A Focus on Cloud and Precipitation Modification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changnon, Stanley A.; Czys, Robert R.; Scott, Robert W.; Westcott, Nancy E.

    1991-05-01

    At the heart of the 40-year atmospheric research endeavors of the Illinois State Water Survey have been studies to understand precipitation processes in order to learn how precipitation is modified purposefully and accidentally, and to measure the physical and socio-economic consequences of cloud and precipitation modification. Major field and laboratory activities of past years or briefly treated as a basis for describing the key findings of the past ten years. Recent studies of inadvertent and purposeful cloud and rain modification and their effects are emphasized, including a 1989 field project conducted in Illinois and key findings from an on-going exploratory experiment addressing cloud and rain modification. Results are encouraging for the use of dynamic seeding on summer cumuliform clouds of the Midwest.Typical in-cloud results at 10°C reveal multiple updrafts that tend to be filled with large amounts of supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Natural ice production is vigorous, and initial concentrations are larger than expected from ice nuclei. However, natural ice production is not so vigorous as to preclude opportunities for seeding. Radar-based studies of such clouds reveal that their echo cores usually can be identified prior to desired seeding times, which is significant for the evaluation of their behavior. Cell characteristics show considerable variance under different types of meteorological conditions. Analysis of cell mergers reveals that under conditions of weak vertical shear, mid-level intercell flow at 4 km occurs as the reflectivity bridge between cells rapidly intensifies. The degree of intensification of single-echo cores after they merge is strongly related to the age and vigor of the cores before they join. Hence, cloud growth may be enhanced if seeding can encourage echo cores to merge at critical times. Forecasting research has developed a technique for objectively distinguishing between operational seeding and nonoperational days and for

  6. Indian Summer Monsoon Drought 2009: Role of Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Anupam; Taraphdar, Sourav; Halder, Madhuparna; Pokhrel, S.; Chaudhari, H. S.; Salunke, K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Rao, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Cloud dynamics played a fundamental role in defining Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall during drought in 2009. The anomalously negative precipitation was consistent with cloud properties. Although, aerosols inhibited the growth of cloud effective radius in the background of sparse water vapor, their role is secondary. The primary role, however, is played by the interactive feedback between cloud microphysics and dynamics owing to reduced efficient cloud droplet growth, lesser latent heating release and shortage of water content. Cloud microphysical processes were instrumental for the occurrence of ISM drought 2009.

  7. Aerosol-cloud interactions studied with the chemistry-climate model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Tost, H.; Steil, B.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-08-01

    This study uses the EMAC atmospheric chemistry-climate model to simulate cloud properties and estimate cloud radiative effects induced by aerosols. We have tested two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation parameterizations, i.e., the standard STN (osmotic coefficient model) and hybrid (HYB, replacing the osmotic coefficient by the κ hygroscopicity parameter) schemes to calculate aerosol hygroscopicity and critical supersaturation, and consider aerosol-cloud feedbacks with a focus on warm clouds. Both prognostic schemes (STN and HYB) account for aerosol number, size and composition effects on droplet nucleation, and are tested in combination with two different cloud cover parameterizations, i.e., a relative humidity threshold and a statistical cloud cover scheme (RH-CLC and ST-CLC). The use of either STN and HYB leads to very different cloud radiative effects, particularly over the continents. The STN scheme predicts highly effective CCN activation in warm clouds and hazes/fogs near the surface. The enhanced CCN activity increases the cloud albedo effect of aerosols and cools the Earth's surface. The cooler surface enhances the hydrostatic stability of the lower continental troposphere and thereby reduces convection and convective precipitation. In contrast, the HYB simulations calculate lower, more realistic CCN activation and consequent cloud albedo effect, leading to relatively stronger convection and high cloud formation. The enhanced high clouds increase greenhouse warming and moderate the cooling effect of the low clouds. With respect to the cloud radiative effects, the statistical ST-CLC scheme shows much higher sensitivity to aerosol-cloud coupling for all continental regions than the RH-CLC threshold scheme, most pronounced for low clouds but also for high clouds. Simulations of the short wave cloud radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere in ST-CLC are a factor of 2-8 more sensitive to aerosol coupling than the RH-CLC configurations. The long wave

  8. Interannual Variations in Aerosol Sources and Their Impact on Orographic Precipitation Over California's Central Sierra Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creamean, J. M.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Prather, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater I field campaign (2009-2011), the impacts of aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada. In 2009, the precipitation collected on the ground was influenced by both local biomass burning (up to 79% of the insoluble residues found in precipitation) and long-range transported dust and biological particles (up to 80% combined), while in 2010, by mostly local sources of biomass burning and pollution (30-79% combined), and in 2011 by mostly long-range transport from distant sources (up to 100% dust and biological). Although vast differences in the source of residues was observed from year-to-year, dust and biological residues were omnipresent (on average, 55% of the total residues combined) and were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems and larger quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15 C), suggesting these particles were more efficient IN compared to mineral dust. On the other hand, lower percentages of residues from local biomass burning and pollution were observed (on average 31% and 9%, respectively), yet these residues potentially served as CCN at the base of shallow cloud systems when precipitation quantities were low. The direct connection of the source of aerosols within clouds and precipitation type and quantity can be used in models to better assess how local emissions versus long-range transported dust and biological aerosols play a role in impacting regional weather and climate, ultimately with the goal of more accurate predictive weather forecast models and water resource management.

  9. The Explicit-Cloud Parameterized-Pollutant Hybrid Approach for Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Multiscale Modelling Framework Models: Tracer Transport Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2008-05-30

    All estimates of aerosol indirect effects on the global energy balance have either completely neglected the influence of aerosol on convective clouds or treated the influence in a highly parameterized manner. Embedding cloud-resolving models (CRMs) within each grid cell of a global model provides a multiscale modelling framework for treating both the influence of aerosols on convective as well as stratiform clouds and the influence of all clouds on the aerosol, but treating the interactions explicitly by simulating all aerosol processes in the CRM would be computationally prohibitive. An alternate approach is to use horizontal statistics (e.g., cloud mass flux, cloud fraction, and precipitation) from the CRM simulation to drive a single-column parameterization of cloud effects on the aerosol and then use the aerosol profile to simulate aerosol effects on clouds within the CRM. Here we test this concept for vertical transport by clouds, using a CRM with tracer transport simulated explicitly to serve as a benchmark. We show that this parameterization, driven by the CRM’s cloud mass fluxes, reproduces the tracer transport by the CRM significantly better than a single column model that uses a conventional convective cloud parameterization.

  10. Impact of Asian aerosols on air quality over the United States: A perspective from aerosol-cloud-radiation coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Z.; Yu, H.; Chin, M.

    2013-12-01

    It has well been established, through satellite/ground observations, that dust and aerosols from various Asian sources can travel across the Pacific and reach North America (NA) at least on episode bases. Once reaching NA, these inflow aerosols would compete with local emissions to influence atmospheric composition and air quality over the United States (US). The previous studies, typically based on one or multiple satellite measurements in combination with global/regional model simulations, suggest that the impact of Asian dust/aerosols on US air quality tend to be small since most inflow aerosols stay aloft. On the other hand, aerosols affect many key meteorological processes that will ultimately channel down to impact air quality. Aerosols absorb and scatter solar radiation that change the atmospheric stability, thus temperature, wind, and planetary boundary layer structure that would directly alter air quality. Aerosols can serve as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei to modify cloud properties and precipitation that would also affect aerosol removal and concentration. This indirect impact of Asian aerosol inflow on US air quality may be substantial and need to be investigated. This study employs the NASA Unified WRF (NU-WRF) to address the question from the aerosol-radiation-cloud interaction perspective. The simulation period was selected from April to June of 2010 during which the Asian dust continuously reached NA based on CALIPSO satellite observation. The preliminary results show that the directly-transported Asian aerosol increases surface PM2.5 concentration by less than 2 μg/m3 over the west coast areas of US, and the aerosol-radiation-cloud feedback has a profound effect on air quality over the central to eastern US. A more detailed analysis links this finding to a series of meteorological conditions modified by aerosol effects.

  11. Dust and biological aerosols from the Sahara and Asia influence precipitation in the western U.S.

    PubMed

    Creamean, Jessie M; Suski, Kaitlyn J; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J; Sullivan, Ryan C; White, Allen B; Ralph, F Martin; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M; Tomlinson, Jason M; Prather, Kimberly A

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California's Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources and hydropower for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation, whereas few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols probably serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  12. Dark Targets, Aerosols, Clouds and Toys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Today if you use the Thomson-Reuters Science Citations Index to search for "aerosol*", across all scientific disciplines and years, with no constraints, and you sort by number of citations, you will find a 2005 paper published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences in the top 20. This is the "The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation". Although I am the first author, there are in total 12 co-authors who each made a significant intellectual contribution to the paper or to the algorithm, products and validation described. This paper, that algorithm, those people lie at the heart of a lineage of scientists whose collaborations and linked individual pursuits have made a significant contribution to our understanding of radiative transfer and climate, of aerosol properties and the global aerosol system, of cloud physics and aerosol-cloud interaction, and how to measure these parameters and maximize the science that can be obtained from those measurements. The 'lineage' had its origins across the globe, from Soviet Russia to France, from the U.S. to Israel, from the Himalayas, the Sahel, the metropolises of Sao Paulo, Taipei, and the cities of east and south Asia. It came together in the 1990s and 2000s at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, using cultural diversity as a strength to form a common culture of scientific creativity that continues to this day. The original algorithm has spawned daughter algorithms that are being applied to new satellite and airborne sensors. The original MODIS products have been fundamental to analyses as diverse as air quality monitoring and aerosol-cloud forcing. AERONET, designed originally for the need of validation, is now its own thriving institution, and the lineage continues to push forward to provide new technology for the coming generations.

  13. Atmospheric Feedbacks, Aerosol Forcings, and Tropical Precipitation Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y.; Frierson, D. M.; Kang, S.

    2011-12-01

    It is well known that variations in climate sensitivity among global climate models (GCMs) are largely attributable to differences in atmospheric feedbacks that affect the top of the atmosphere radiation budget. Here, we demonstrate how the hemispheric asymmetry of these feedbacks influence cross-equatorial energy transport, and thus explain differences in models projection of tropical precipitation. The framework we use is based on fundamental energetic constraints of the system: since both moisture transports and energy transports within the deep tropical atmosphere are governed by the Hadley circulation, a southward shift of the intertropical conversion zone (ITCZ) is associated with a northward transport of moist static energy. This situation is typically associated with enhanced heating of the Southern Hemisphere, often due to hemispheric differences in aerosols, clouds, water vapor, surface albedo changes. We find that the ITCZ appears to shift southward in the 20th century in both rain gauges (GHCN) and reanalysis (20CRP) data. Most of the global climate models (GCMs) in the CMIP3 archive reproduce the direction of this shift. However, they all underestimate the shift with greatly varying degree. Using the energetic framework, we conclude that (1) aerosol cooling in the northern hemisphere shifts the ITCZ south in all of the GCMs (2) differences in feedbacks (particularly cloud feedbacks) in GCMs are responsible for the spread in the ITCZ shifts. This result emphasizes that biases in feedbacks and forcings will not only affect global mean temperature, but will also influence climate in various latitudes through energy transport.

  14. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  15. Aerosol and Plasma Measurements in Noctilucent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop rocket-borne probes to detect charged aerosol layers in the mesosphere. These include sporadic E layers, which have their origin in meteoric dust, and noctilucent clouds, which form in the arctic summer and are composed of ice crystals. The probe being developed consists of a charge collecting patch connected to a sensitive electrometer which measures the charge deposited on the patch by impacting aerosols. The ambient electrons and light ions in the mesosphere are prevented from being collected by a magnetic field. The magnetic force causes these lighter particles to turn so that they miss the collecting patch.

  16. The Effect of Aerosol-Cloud-Vegetation Interactions and Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability on Warm Cloud Development during the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of aerosols on the hydrological cycle remains one of the largest uncertainties in our climate system. Biomass burning, from both deforestation and annual agricultural burning, is the largest anthropogenic source of these aerosols in the Southern Hemisphere. Biomass burning aerosols have competing effects on clouds: Depending on the level of aerosol loading and the background cloud characteristics, biomass burning aerosols have been shown in observational studies to invigorate or inhibit cloud formation and/or growth through microphysical and absorptive pathways, respectively. Many of these previous studies have employed all days during the Amazonian burning season months of August through October to formulate aerosol-cloud correlations, assuming relatively constant meteorological conditions exist throughout these months. This study investigates how intraseasonal trends of precipitable water vapor and aerosol loading between August and October impact these aerosol-cloud correlations. Other factors affecting aerosol-cloud relationships, such as atmospheric stability, are also investigated. This study is focused on a small 3 degree NE x 4 degree WE region in Rondonia, Brazil that encompasses extensive, contiguous areas of both forested and deforested land. High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites, as well as aerosol and water vapor data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are used collectively to explore the effect of aerosols on water vapor loading and warm cloud development over the Amazon. The difference in aerosol effects on the local hydrological cycle over forested and deforested areas is also examined. This final exercise provides insight into the relationship between aerosols, land-atmosphere processes, and warm clouds.

  17. Have we Been Looking for the Aerosols Indirect Effects on Climate in the Wrong Clouds and at the Wrong Place?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, D.

    2002-12-01

    The albedo of marine stratocumulus clouds has the largest susceptibility (i.e., the Twomey effect) to air pollution aerosols. Because these clouds cover a large portion of the oceans, the potential climatic impacts were thought to be very large. Appropriately, this kind of clouds has been the prime subject of studies at the fringes of the oceans. The results generally confirmed the expected changes in cloud properties when interacting with polluted air masses coming off the continents. However, recent satellite observations suggest that the air pollution is washed down quite effectively by precipitation from clouds of modest depth over ocean, mainly because the large salt CCN from sea spray trigger the drop coalescence in spite of the suppression effect of the air pollution particles. Once this cleansing process starts it becomes increasingly faster, because subsequent generations of clouds are formed in cleaner air and precipitate faster. Therefore, most of the ocean areas, which are far from the continents, are effectively protected from the anthropogenic aerosol air pollution at the boundary layer, which feeds the stratocumulus and convective clouds. This is a situation where the physical large susceptibility of the marine stratocumulus clouds to the air pollution aerosols does not translate to climate sensitivity. In contrast, these "lost" indirect aerosol effects seem to be found over land. Satellite observations of "pollution tracks" in clouds over land show that the continental clouds become microphysically "continental" mainly due to anthropogenic aerosols. Clouds over sparsely inhabited land areas such as large parts of Canada and Australia can remain microphysically "maritime" thousands of km away from ocean. Therefore, the susceptibility of stratocumulus clouds over land can translate to rather large climate sensitivity. In addition, the pollution aerosols have been observed to suppress precipitation from deeper clouds over land (but not over ocean

  18. Using the Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) to investigate aerosol-convection interactions in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipling, Zak; Stier, Philip; Wagner, Till

    2014-05-01

    Convection plays an important role in the climate system through its effects on radiation, precipitation, large-scale dynamics and vertical transport of aerosols and trace gases. The effects of aerosols on the development of convective cloud and precipitation are a source of considerable uncertainty in current climate modelling. Most current global climate models use 'mass-flux' convection schemes, which represent the ensemble of convective clouds in a GCM column by a single 'mean' updraught. In addition to over-simplifying the representation of such clouds, this presents particular problems in the context of aerosol-convection interactions: firstly because the relationship between aerosol and the droplet size distribution depends on the vertical velocity distribution, about which little or no information is available, and secondly because the effects of convective transport and scavenging may vary nonlinearly over the ensemble (e.g. between precipitating and non-precipitating clouds and due to different loadings). The Convective Cloud Field Model (CCFM) addresses these limitations by simulating a spectrum of updraughts with different cross-sectional areas within each GCM column, based on the quasi-equilibrium approach of Arakawa and Schubert. For each cloud type, an entraining Lagrangian parcel model is initiated by perturbations at the surface, allowing a realistic vertical velocity to develop by cloud base so that detailed size-resolved microphysics can be represented within the cloud above. These different cloud types interact via competition for resolved-scale convective available potential energy (CAPE). Transport of water, aerosol and other tracers is calculated separately for each cloud type, allowing for different entrainment and scavenging behaviours. By using CCFM embedded within the ECHAM6-HAM aerosol-climate model, we show how this approach can both improve the distribution of convective precipitation events compared to a typical mass-flux scheme, and

  19. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution, a satellite-based study on aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in the South-East Atlantic with explicit consideration of meteorological conditions is presented. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions remain difficult to quantify and contribute the largest uncertainty to global radiative forcing. These uncertainties make them one of the most important factors for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Interactions are highly complex as microphysical and macrostructural cloud adjustments to aerosol perturbations do not transpire in a black box but are highly dependent on a variety of factors like cloud regime, meteorology and aerosol properties. To gain understanding of the processes that govern ACI in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. This process study uses multiple statistical approaches to untangle the various influences on ACI. Stratocumulus clouds in the South-East Atlantic are investigated over a time span of 10 years using daily Terra MODIS L3 data for aerosol and cloud parameters. Together with ERA-Interim reanalysis data of cloud-relevant meteorological parameters, statistical relationships between aerosol and cloud properties are derived for different weather types on the basis of a kmeans cluster analysis, in addition to bivariate relationships. Also, the influence of aerosol loading on aerosol-cloud relationships is investigated. Relationships between aerosol and cloud microphysical properties are established. Macrostructural cloud adjustments are more ambiguous, as the observed positive relationship between aerosol and cloud liquid water path (LWP) is inconsistent with the Albrecht hypothesis (more cloud water due to drizzle suppression). Adjustments of cloud optical thickness (COT) to aerosol perturbations are negligible as COT is highly dependent on LWP. Strong relationships between aerosol and cloud fraction are identified, but might be spurious and

  20. Sources and evolution of cloud-active aerosol in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Noblitt, S.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Cahill, J. F.; Prather, K. A.; Collett, J. L.; Henry, C.

    2011-12-01

    To assess the sources of cloud-active aerosol and their influence on the hydrological cycle in California, the CalWater Experiment took place in winter 2011 in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. During this experiment, we coupled the capabilities of demonstrated miniaturized instrumentation - cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), water condensation nuclei (WCN) and microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) - to provide direct chemical measurements of cloud active aerosols. Ion concentrations of CCN droplets attribute the anthropogenic, marine and secondary organic contributions to cloud-active aerosols. Detailed spectra from an Aerosol-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer provide additional information on the sources of aerosol. Storm fronts and changes in atmospheric boundary layer brought aerosol and anions associated with Central Valley pollution to the field site with CCN concentrations reaching several thousand cm-3. Hygroscopicity parameters indicate aging of the organic fraction during aerosol transport from the Central Valley to the mountains. Otherwise, CCN concentrations were low when high pressure systems prevented boundary layer development and intrusion of the Central Valley pollution to the site. MCE results show that nitrates and sulfates comprise most of the fraction of the aerosol anion mass (PM1). During the passage of storm fronts, which transported pollution from the Central Valley upslope, nitrate concentrations peaked at several μ g m-3. Low supersaturation CCN concentrations coincide with increases in aerosol nitrate, which suggests that nitrate has a role in cloud formation of giant CCN and, furthermore, in precipitation processes in the Sierra Nevada. CCN spectra show large variations depending on the aerosol sources and sometimes exhibit bi-modal distributions with minima at 0.3% Sc -- similar to the so-called 'Hoppel minima' associated to number size distributions. During these bi-modal events, sulfate also increases supporting the

  1. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    provide a means for evaluating and developing parameterizations for models that predict cloud microphysical processes. Observations of the...observed during BACEX was associated with African dust above the boundary layer. On two days when convection was completely suppressed, an African... dust event associated with record Aerosol Optical Depths (AODs) for Barbados during this time of the year was observed. The vertical structure of the

  2. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Larson, Vincent E.; Wong, May; Thayer-Calder, Katherine; Ghan, Steven J.

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  3. Satellite Observations of the Effect of Natural and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2006-01-01

    Our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols (smoke, pollution, dust or sea salt particles, small enough to be suspended in the air), their evolution, composition, variability in space and time and interaction with clouds and precipitation is still lacking despite decades of research. Understanding the global aerosol system is critical to quantifying anthropogenic climate change, to determine climate sensitivity from observations and to understand the hydrological cycle. While a single instrument was used to demonstrate 50 years ago that the global CO2 levels are rising, posing threat of global warming, we need an array of satellites and field measurements coupled with chemical transport models to understand the global aerosol system. This complexity of the aerosol problem results from their short lifetime (1 week) and variable chemical composition. A new generation of satellites provides exciting opportunities to measure the global distribution of aerosols, distinguishing natural from anthropogenic aerosol and measuring their interaction with clouds and climate.

  4. Cloud and Precipitation Properties Merged Dataset from Vertically Pointing ARM Radars During GOAmazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toto, T.; Giangrande, S. E.; Troyan, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Johnson, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Green Ocean Amazon (GOAmazon) field campaign is in its first year of a two-year deployment in the Amazon Basin to study aerosol and cloud lifecycles as they relate to cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Insights from GOAmazon datasets will fill gaps in our understanding, ultimately improving constraints in tropical rain forest climate model parameterizations. As part of GOAmazon, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) has been collecting a unique set of observations near Manacapuru, Brazil, a site known to experience both the pristine condition of its locale as well as, at times, the effects of the Manaus, Brazil, mega city pollution plume. In order to understand the effects of anthropogenic aerosol on clouds, radiative balance and climate, documentation of cloud and precipitation properties in the absence and presence of the Manaus plume is a necessary complement to the aerosol measurements collected during the campaign. The AMF is uniquely equipped to capture the most complete and continuous record of cloud and precipitation column properties using the UHF (915 MHz) ARM zenith radar (UAZR) and vertically pointing W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar (WACR). Together, these radars provide multiple methods (e.g., moment-based, dual-frequency, and Doppler spectral techniques) to retrieve properties of the cloud field that may be influenced by aerosols. This includes drop size distribution, dynamical and microphysical properties (e.g., vertical air motion, latent heat retrievals), and associated uncertainties. Additional quality assurance is available from independent rain gauge and column platforms. Here, we merge data from the UAZR and WACR (WACR-ARSCL VAP) radars, along with ARM Sounding observations and optical parsivel measurement constraints, to present a first look at select convective and stratiform events, their precipitation properties and statistical profile characterization.

  5. Global CALIPSO Observations of Aerosol Changes Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Marshak, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have found that clouds are surrounded by a transition zone of rapidly changing aerosol optical properties and particle size. Characterizing this transition zone is important for better understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and aerosol radiative effects, and also for improving satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. This letter presents a statistical analysis of a monthlong global data set of Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) lidar observations over oceans. The results show that the transition zone is ubiquitous over all oceans and extends up to 15 km away from clouds. They also show that near-cloud enhancements in backscatter and particle size are strongest at low altitudes, slightly below the top of the nearest clouds. Also, the enhancements are similar near illuminated and shadowy cloud sides, which confirms that the asymmetry of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer reflectances found in an earlier study comes from 3-D radiative processes and not from differences in aerosol properties. Finally, the effects of CALIPSO aerosol detection and cloud identification uncertainties are discussed. The findings underline the importance of accounting for the transition zone to avoid potential biases in studies of satellite aerosol products, aerosol-cloud interactions, and aerosol direct radiative effects.

  6. Aerosol Impacts on Cloud Properties Observed during CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K.; Prather, K. A.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Jonsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    In February and March of 2011, an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS) was deployed on the DOE G-1 during CalWater, a multiyear field campaign aimed at understanding the effects of aerosols and atmospheric rivers on precipitation in California. Flights were conducted out of Sacramento and traversed the western coast of California to the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. Initial results show that when heavily processed Asian dust was present, clouds contained more ice than when dust wasn't present, showing that cloud processed Asian dust acts as an efficient ice nucleus. In one particular cloud, salty, processed dust was at the core of most cloud droplets, while aged soot remained unactivated in the interstitial aerosol. These results show that atmospheric aging can have varying effects on CCN and IN abilities. Further analysis of chemical mixing state and atmospheric aging effects on cloud properties are presented.

  7. Assessment of aerosol-cloud interactions in the ECHAM6-HAM GCM and the Aerosol_cci/Cloud_cci (A)ATSR dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Christensen, Matthew; Poulsen, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) are uncertain and the estimates of the ACI effective radiative forcing magnitude show a large variability. Studies using present day variability in satellite data to infer ACI, or that constrain model parameterizations to better agree with satellite observations find a less negative ACI radiative forcing than purely model based studies. Next to the problematic use of present day variability as a substitute for anthropogenic change, the scale at which the analysis of the responses of cloud properties to changes in aerosol is done could be a reason for the discrepancy in forcing estimates if the analysis/observational scales differ substantially from the process scale. The projects of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA aim at producing long time series of satellite data of essential climate variables and give the opportunity to produce products for susceptibilities of aerosol properties from Aerosol_cci and cloud properties from Cloud_cci from high resolution datasets. Within the Aerosol_cci project these susceptibilities derived from high resolution (A)ATSR datasets with a nearest neighbour approach are compared to susceptibilities from the global aerosol climate model ECHAM6-HAM. Next to the new satellite products a relatively fine analysis scale is used and the clouds are separated in different environmental regimes to reduce smoothing or spurious effects by aggregation of data. Susceptibilities and forcing estimates differ between the (A)ATSR datasets and ECHAM6-HAM with the model showing stronger susceptibilities and ACI radiative forcing in agreement with previous estimates in the literature. There is a large difference in susceptibilities between precipitating and non-precipitating clouds in the satellite as well as the model data but there is no decrease in liquid water path with increasing aerosol index as has been reported in the literature for A-train satellite data. The liquid water path susceptibility of

  8. Attribution of the United States "warming hole": aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-11-06

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20(th) century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. "warming hole"). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the "warming hole". We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed "warming hole" can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin.

  9. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the “warming hole”. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed “warming hole” can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  10. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-01-01

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol’s thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ∼27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3–5 W⋅m−2) and a surface cooling (−5 to −8 W⋅m−2). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  11. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  12. Multi-wavelength dual polarisation lidar for monitoring precipitation process in the cloud seeding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, P.; Sheela, K. Anitha; Ramakrishna Rao, D.; Malladi, Satyanarayana

    2016-05-01

    In recent years weather modification activities are being pursued in many countries through cloud seeding techniques to facilitate the increased and timely precipitation from the clouds. In order to induce and accelerate the precipitation process clouds are artificially seeded with suitable materials like silver iodide, sodium chloride or other hygroscopic materials. The success of cloud seeding can be predicted with confidence if the precipitation process involving aerosol, the ice water balance, water vapor content and size of the seeding material in relation to aerosol in the cloud is monitored in real time and optimized. A project on the enhancement of rain fall through cloud seeding is being implemented jointly with Kerala State Electricity Board Ltd. Trivandrum, Kerala, India at the catchment areas of the reservoir of one of the Hydro electric projects. The dual polarization lidar is being used to monitor and measure the microphysical properties, the extinction coefficient, size distribution and related parameters of the clouds. The lidar makes use of the Mie, Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques for the various measurement proposed. The measurements with the dual polarization lidar as above are being carried out in real time to obtain the various parameters during cloud seeding operations. In this paper we present the details of the multi-wavelength dual polarization lidar being used and the methodology to monitor the various cloud parameters involved in the precipitation process. The necessary retrieval algorithms for deriving the microphysical properties of clouds, aerosols characteristics and water vapor profiles are incorporated as a software package working under Lab-view for online and off line analysis. Details on the simulation studies and the theoretical model developed in this regard for the optimization of various parameters are discussed.

  13. Aerosol-cloud interactions in the ECHAM6-HAM2 GCM and Aerosol_cci/Cloud_cci satellite products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    The first indirect aerosol effect or cloud albedo effect can be estimated as a radiative forcing. While the sign of this forcing is agreed to be negative, model-based estimates of its magnitude show a large variability. The responses of cloud liquid water content and cloud cover to aerosol increases also referred to as secondary indirect aerosol effects or fast adjustments are uncertain as well. In studies that use the variability in the present day satellite data to infer aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI), or that constrain model parameterizations to better agree with satellite observations a less negative ACI radiative forcing is found. The projects of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) programme of ESA aim at producing long time series of satellite data of essential climate variables with specific information on errors and uncertainties. The quantification of uncertainty in satellite retrievals provides an opportunity to get insights in the discrepancy between model based and satellite based estimates of ACI. Within the Aerosol_cci project susceptibilities of cloud properties from Cloud_cci to aerosol properties from Aerosol_cci datasets are to be compared to susceptibilities from the aerosol climate model ECHAM6-HAM2. Particularly interesting relationships for the first indirect aerosol effect and the second aerosol indirect effect will be investigated. Satellite studies show a strong effect of aerosol on cloud amount, which could be a methodological artefact such as aerosol swelling or meteorological covariation. The immediate vicinity of clouds needs to be excluded due to these potential cloud contaminations although it would be the most interesting region for associations between aerosol and clouds. As the resolution of the data can have an impact on statistical correlations between cloud and aerosol properties, the assessment will be done on different scales. First results will be presented at the conference.

  14. Sulfate aerosol distributions and cloud variations during El Nino anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F. ); Hicks, B. )

    1993-02-20

    The effects of aerosols on cloud characteristics, albedo, rainfall amount, and overall climate changes were investigated by assessing the qualitative associations and quantitative correlations between the relevant variables during El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) perturbations. Both historical records and data from recent field measurements for the Pacific Ocean region were used for the investigation. The results show that ENSO perturbations could change sulfate aerosol production and distribution over the surveyed regions. Strong correlations were observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and sulfate aerosol concentrations, and between cloud amount and albedo. Weak but significant correlations were also observed between condensation nucleus concentrations and cloud amounts, and between sulfate aerosol concentrations and rainfall amounts. Although sulfate aerosols appeared to have a strong impact on cloud microphysics, the present data confirm that cloud dynamics play the pivotal role in control of cloud types and cloud amount in the studied regions. 31 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions Over the North Pacific Ocean: an Integrated Assessment Using Aircraft, Satellites and a Global Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Mauger, G.; Lariviere, O.; Roberts, G.; Ramanathan, V.; Ming, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Interactions between aerosols and the cloud systems of the North Pacific Ocean were observed by aircraft during the Cloud Indirect Forcing Experiment (CIFEX) in April 2004. The CIFEX project seeks to determine the impact of aerosol indirect effects on the radiative forcing of highly reflective North Pacific clouds under the influence of aerosols traveling across the ocean basin from Asia. Toward this end, CIFEX aircraft observations from the Northeast Pacific of aerosol and cloud microphysics are blended with coincident satellite observations of cloud properties from MODIS and cloud radiative forcing from CERES. The satellite observations are then compared with global model simulations of aerosol indirect forcing over the entire North Pacific basin. During April 2004 the U. Wyoming King Air research aircraft sampled aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters including aerosol and cloud particle sizes and concentrations, cloud liquid water amounts, and cloud structure using the Wyoming Cloud Radar. A range of clean and polluted conditions were observed by the aircraft during the period, in addition to two major Asian dust storm events. CN concentrations below stratus clouds varied from 25 to 300 cm-3. A variety of cloud systems were sampled as well, ranging from shallow stratus and stratocumulus clouds to mixed-phase precipitating cumulus. Under pristine conditions, many shallow clouds were observed to be drizzling, suggesting that Northern Pacific Ocean cloud systems may be highly susceptible to the influence of aerosols. Clouds in this region are responsible for a large cooling of the ocean surface. The magnitude of shortwave cloud radiative cooling exceeded -80 W m-2 over much of the North Pacific during the experiment. Stratus cloud drop concentrations varied from 25 to 150 cm-3 and are correlated with the concentration of accumulation mode aerosols below cloud base. Mean cloud albedos vary from 0.3 to 0.5 for these same clouds, and MODIS observations of cloud

  16. A Novel Tool for Simulating Aerosol-cloud Interactions with a Sectional Model Implemented to a Large-Eddy Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonttila, J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Kokkola, H.; Maalick, Z.; Korhonen, H.; Liqing, H.

    2015-12-01

    A new cloud-resolving model setup for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, with a special emphasis on partitioning and wet deposition of semi-volatile aerosol species, is presented. The model is based on modified versions of two well-established model components: the Large-Eddy Simulator (LES) UCLALES, and the sectional aerosol model SALSA, previously employed in the ECHAM climate model family. Implementation of the UCLALES-SALSA is described in detail. As the basis for this work, SALSA has been extended to include a sectional representation of the size distributions of cloud droplets and precipitation. Microphysical processes operating on clouds and precipitation have also been added. Given our main motivation, the cloud droplet size bins are defined according to the dry particle diameter. The droplet wet diameter is solved dynamically through condensation equations, but represents an average droplet diameter inside each size bin. This approach allows for accurate tracking of the aerosol properties inside clouds, but minimizes the computational cost. Since the actual cloud droplet diameter is not fully resolved inside the size bins, processes such as precipitation formation rely on parameterizations. For realistic growth of drizzle drops to rain, which is critical for the aerosol wet deposition, the precipitation size bins are defined according to the actual drop size. With these additions, the implementation of the SALSA model replaces most of the microphysical and thermodynamical components within the LES. The cloud properties and aerosol-cloud interactions simulated by the model are analysed and evaluated against detailed cloud microphysical boxmodel results and in-situ aerosol-cloud interaction observations from the Puijo measurement station in Kuopio, Finland. The ability of the model to reproduce the impacts of wet deposition on the aerosol population is demonstrated.

  17. Some Technical Aspects of a CALIOP and MODIS Data Analysis that Examines Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnai, Tamas; Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    CALIOP shows stronger near-cloud changes in aerosol properties at higher cloud fractions. Cloud fraction variations explain a third of near-cloud changes in overall aerosol statistics. Cloud fraction and aerosol particle size distribution have a complex relationship.

  18. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  19. The ACRIDICON-CHUVA observational study of tropical convective clouds and precipitation using the new German research aircraft HALO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendisch, Manfred; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Albrecht, Rachel; Schlager, Hans; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Krämer, Martina

    2015-04-01

    An extensive airborne/ground-based measurement campaign to study tropical convective clouds is introduced. It was performed in Brazil with focus on the Amazon rainforest from 1 September to 4 October 2014. The project combined the joint German-Brazilian ACRIDICON (Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems) and CHUVA (Machado et al.2014) projects. ACRIDICON aimed at the quantification of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions and their thermodynamic, dynamic and radiative effects in convective cloud systems by in-situ aircraft observations and indirect measurements (aircraft, satellite, and ground-based). The ACRIDICON-CHUVA campaign was conducted in cooperation with the second Intensive Operational Phase (IOP) of the GOAmazon (Green Ocean Amazon) program. The focus in this presentation is on the airborne observations within ACRIDICON-CHUVA. The German HALO (High Altitude and Long-Range Research Aircraft) was based in Manaus (Amazonas State); it carried out 14 research flights (96 flight hours in total). HALO was equipped with remote sensing and in-situ instrumentation for meteorological, trace gas, aerosol, cloud, and precipitation measurements. Five mission objectives were pursued: (1) cloud vertical evolution (cloud profiling), (2) aerosol processing (inflow and outflow), (3) satellite validation, (4) vertical transport and mixing (tracer experiment), and (5) clouds over forested and deforested areas. The five cloud missions collected data in clean atmospheric conditions and in contrasting polluted (urban and biomass burning) environments.

  20. CALIPSO observations of near-cloud aerosol properties as a function of cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Várnai, Tamás.; Wood, Robert

    2014-12-01

    This paper uses spaceborne lidar data to study how near-cloud aerosol statistics of attenuated backscatter depend on cloud fraction. The results for a large region around the Azores show that (1) far-from-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with lower cloud fractions, while near-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with higher cloud fractions; (2) near-cloud enhancements of attenuated backscatter occur for any cloud fraction but are most pronounced for higher cloud fractions; (3) the difference in the enhancements for different cloud fractions is most significant within 5 km from clouds; (4) near-cloud enhancements can be well approximated by logarithmic functions of cloud fraction and distance to clouds. These findings demonstrate that if variability in cloud fraction across the scenes used for composite aerosol statistics is not considered, a sampling artifact will affect these statistics calculated as a function of distance to clouds. For the Azores region data set examined here, this artifact occurs mostly within 5 km from clouds and exaggerates the near-cloud enhancements of lidar backscatter and color ratio by about 30%. This shows that for accurate characterization of the changes in aerosol properties with distance to clouds, it is important to account for the impact of changes in cloud fraction.

  1. CALIPSO Observations of Near-Cloud Aerosol Properties as a Function of Cloud Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Wood, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses spaceborne lidar data to study how near-cloud aerosol statistics of attenuated backscatter depend on cloud fraction. The results for a large region around the Azores show that: (1) far-from-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with lower cloud fractions, while near-cloud aerosol statistics are dominated by samples from scenes with higher cloud fractions; (2) near-cloud enhancements of attenuated backscatter occur for any cloud fraction but are most pronounced for higher cloud fractions; (3) the difference in the enhancements for different cloud fractions is most significant within 5km from clouds; (4) near-cloud enhancements can be well approximated by logarithmic functions of cloud fraction and distance to clouds. These findings demonstrate that if variability in cloud fraction across the scenes used to composite aerosol statistics are not considered, a sampling artifact will affect these statistics calculated as a function of distance to clouds. For the Azores-region dataset examined here, this artifact occurs mostly within 5 km from clouds, and exaggerates the near-cloud enhancements of lidar backscatter and color ratio by about 30. This shows that for accurate characterization of the changes in aerosol properties with distance to clouds, it is important to account for the impact of changes in cloud fraction.

  2. Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

    2014-11-17

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

  3. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  4. Volumetric Geophysical Retrievals in Precipitating Cloud Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, S. M.; North, K. W.; Jensen, M. P.; Kollias, P.; Williams, C. R.; Bharadwaj, N.; Fridlind, A. M.; Widener, K.; Giangrande, S.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud and climate modeling efforts focused around the Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) require the retrieval of high quality geophysical parameters pertinent to storm microphysical and dynamical properties. The installation of high resolution polarimetric X- and C-Band scanning radars have greatly enhanced measurements at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plain site, however, the volumetric data collected by these sensors is only indirectly related to storm properties. This presentation will outline efforts towards creating a suite of model-like Value Added Products (VAPs) for MC3E derived using existing and new retrieval techniques. Particular focus will be on retrieval of storm dynamics, precipitation microphysics and rainfall accumulations from the scanning radar measurements. Algorithm details and verification efforts will be showcased as well as a timetable for data availability.

  5. Precipitation growth in convective clouds. [hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the equations of both the growth and motion of hailstones in updrafts and of cloud water contents which vary linearly with height were used to investigate hail growth in a model cloud. A strong correlation was found between the hail embyro starting position and its trajectory and final size. A simple model of the evolution of particle size distribution by coalescence and spontaneous and binary disintegrations was formulated. Solutions for the mean mass of the distribution and the equilibrium size distribution were obtained for the case of constant collection kernel and disintegration parameters. Azimuthal scans of Doppler velocity at a number of elevation angles were used to calculate high resolution vertical profiles of particle speed and horizontal divergence (the vertical air velocity) in a region of widespread precipitation trailing a mid-latitude squall line.

  6. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  7. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Dmitri; Ignatiev, Nikolay; McGouldrick, Kevin; Wilquet, Valerie; Wilson, Colin

    2015-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. Venus Express observations revealed significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression. The UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator. Based on the Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and mid-wavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60% to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4 concentration with a decreasing altitude (from 70-75% at about 90 km to 85% at 70 km of altitude) and (2) Many SOIR/SPICAV data cannot be fitted when using

  8. Clouds and aerosols on Venus: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, D. V.; Ignatiev, N. I.; McGouldrick, K.; Wilquet, V.; Wilson, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade demonstrated significant progress in understanding of the Venus cloud system. This paper gives a summary of new observations and modelling efforts that will form the basis for a relevant chapter in the Venus III book. Venus Express observations reveal significant latitudinal variations and temporal changes in the global cloud top morphology [1]. The cloud top altitude varies from ~72 km in the low and middle latitudes to ~64 km in the polar region, correlated with decrease of the aerosol scale height from 4 ± 1.6 km to 1.7 ± 2.4 km marking a vast polar depression [2, 3]. UV imaging shows the middle latitudes and polar regions in unprecedented detail. The eye of the Southern polar vortex was found to be a strongly variable feature with complex morphology and dynamics [4]. Solar and stellar occultations give access to a vertical profiling of the light absorption by the aerosols in the upper haze. The aerosol loading in the mesosphere of Venus investigated by SPICAV experiment onboard Venus Express between 2006 and 2010 was highly variable on both short and long time scales. The extinction at a given altitude can vary with a factor of 10 for occultations separated by a few Earth days. The extinction at a given altitude is also significantly lower towards the poles (by a factor 10 at least) compared to the values around the equator, while there is apparently no correlation between the extinction and the latitude in the region comprised between ±40° around the equator [5]. Based on Mie theory and on the observed spectral dependence of light extinction in spectra recorded simultaneously in the UV (SPICAV-UV), in the near IR (SPICAV-IR), and in the short-and midwavelength IR (SPICAV-SOIR), the size distribution of aerosols in the upper haze of Venus was retrieved, assuming H2SO4/water composition of the droplets [6]. The optical model includes H2SO4 concentrations from 60 to 85%. A number of results are strikingly new: (1) an increase of the H2SO4

  9. The Southern Ocean Clouds, Radiation, Aerosol Transport Experimental Study (SOCRATES): An Observational Campaign for Determining Role of Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation in Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarquhar, G. M.; Wood, R.; Bretherton, C. S.; Alexander, S.; Jakob, C.; Marchand, R.; Protat, A.; Quinn, P.; Siems, S. T.; Weller, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean (SO) region is one of the cloudiest on Earth, and as such clouds determine its albedo and play a major role in climate. Evidence shows Earth's climate sensitivity and the Intertropical Convergence Zone location depend upon SO clouds. But, climate models are challenged by uncertainties and biases in the simulation of clouds, aerosols, and air-sea exchanges in this region which trace back to a poor process-level understanding. Due to the SO's remote location, there have been sparse observations of clouds, aerosols, precipitation, radiation and the air-sea interface apart from those from satellites. Plans for an upcoming observational program, SOCRATES, are outlined. Based on feedback on observational and modeling requirements from a 2014 workshop conducted at the University of Washington, a plan is described for obtaining a comprehensive dataset on the boundary-layer structure and associated vertical distributions of liquid and mixed-phase cloud and aerosol properties across a range of synoptic settings, especially in the cold sector of cyclonic storms. Four science themes are developed: improved climate model simulation of SO cloud and boundary layer structure in a rapidly varying synoptic setting; understanding seasonal and synoptic variability in SO cloud condensation and ice nucleus concentration and the role of local biogenic sources; understanding supercooled liquid and mixed-phase clouds and their impacts; and advancing retrievals of clouds, precipitation, aerosols, radiation and surface fluxes. Testable hypotheses for each theme are identified. The observational strategy consists of long-term ground-based observations from Macquarie Island and Davis, continuous data collection onboard Antarctic supply ships, satellite retrievals, and a dedicated field campaign covering 2 distinct seasons using in-situ and remote sensors on low- and high-altitude aircraft, UAVs, and a ship-borne platform. A timeline for these activities is proposed.

  10. Global observations of cloud-sensitive aerosol loadings in low-level marine clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, H.; Cermak, J.; Fuchs, J.; Schwarz, K.

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol-cloud interaction is a key component of the Earth's radiative budget and hydrological cycle, but many facets of its mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In this study, global satellite-derived aerosol and cloud products are used to identify at what aerosol loading cloud droplet size shows the greatest sensitivity to changes in aerosol loading (ACSmax). While, on average, cloud droplet size is most sensitive at relatively low aerosol loadings, distinct spatial and temporal patterns exist. Possible determinants for these are identified with reanalysis data. The magnitude of ACSmax is found to be constrained by the total columnar water vapor. Seasonal patterns of water vapor are reflected in the seasonal patterns of ACSmax. Also, situations with enhanced turbulent mixing are connected to higher ACSmax, possibly due to intensified aerosol activation. Of the analyzed aerosol species, dust seems to impact ACSmax the most, as dust particles increase the retrieved aerosol loading without substantially increasing the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei.

  11. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition

  12. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in

  13. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  14. Role of aerosols in modulating cloud properties during active-break cycle of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Chakraborty, A.; Venugopal, V.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the weather research and forecast model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem), is used to understand the impact of aerosol-cloud interaction during the active-break cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Two sets of simulations are performed, one with a fixed aerosol concentration (ConstantAero) and the other with an observation-based prescription of the rate of change of aerosol concentration as a function of precipitation (VaryingAero). This prescription is derived based on satellite-retrieved daily rainrate and concurrent observations of aerosol optical depth from aerosol robotic network. The proposed modification is necessitated by the lack of realistic emission estimates over the Indian region as well as the presence of inherent biases in monsoon simulation in WRF-Chem. In the VaryingAero simulation, unlike in the ConstantAero run, we find that the break-to-active monsoon phase has more cloud liquid water (CLW) and less rain efficiency than in the active-to-break phase. This is primarily due to the indirect effect of increased aerosol loading in the break phase. This result is in accordance with the observed behaviour of CLW estimtes from microwave imager (TRMM 2A12) and radar reflectivity (TRMM precipitation radar). We also find that the proposed interactive aerosol loading results in higher spatial variability in CLW and enhances the likelihood of increased cloud cover via formation of larger clouds. The modification also alters the diurnal cycle of clouds in break and break-to-active phases as compared to other phases due to aerosol loading, with a stronger diurnal cycle of upper level clouds in these phases in the VaryingAero model as compared to ConstantAero model.

  15. From aerosol-limited to invigoration of warm convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Koren, Ilan; Dagan, Guy; Altaratz, Orit

    2014-06-06

    Among all cloud-aerosol interactions, the invigoration effect is the most elusive. Most of the studies that do suggest this effect link it to deep convective clouds with a warm base and cold top. Here, we provide evidence from observations and numerical modeling of a dramatic aerosol effect on warm clouds. We propose that convective-cloud invigoration by aerosols can be viewed as an extension of the concept of aerosol-limited clouds, where cloud development is limited by the availability of cloud-condensation nuclei. A transition from pristine to slightly polluted atmosphere yields estimated negative forcing of ~15 watts per square meter (cooling), suggesting that a substantial part of this anthropogenic forcing over the oceans occurred at the beginning of the industrial era, when the marine atmosphere experienced such transformation.

  16. Approaches to Observe Anthropogenic Aerosol-Cloud Interactions.

    PubMed

    Quaas, Johannes

    Anthropogenic aerosol particles exert an-quantitatively very uncertain-effective radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions via an immediate altering of cloud albedo on the one hand and via rapid adjustments by alteration of cloud processes and by changes in thermodynamic profiles on the other hand. Large variability in cloud cover and properties and the therefore low signal-to-noise ratio for aerosol-induced perturbations hamper the identification of effects in observations. Six approaches are discussed as a means to isolate the impact of anthropogenic aerosol on clouds from natural cloud variability to estimate or constrain the effective forcing. These are (i) intentional cloud modification, (ii) ship tracks, (iii) differences between the hemispheres, (iv) trace gases, (v) weekly cycles and (vi) trends. Ship track analysis is recommendable for detailed process understanding, and the analysis of weekly cycles and long-term trends is most promising to derive estimates or constraints on the effective radiative forcing.

  17. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, K.; Praveen, P. S.; Thomas, R. M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wilcox, E.; Bender, F. A.-M.

    2015-10-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood, as changes in atmospheric conditions due to aerosol may change the expected magnitude of indirect effects by altering cloud properties in unexpected ways. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season. In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements of atmospheric precipitable water vapor and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds were made, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol. Here we present evidence of a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP which becomes clear after the data are filtered to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region. We then use the aircraft and ground observatory measurements to explore the mechanisms behind the observed aerosol-LWP correlation. We determine that increased boundary-layer humidity lowering the cloud base is responsible for the observed increase in cloud liquid water. Large-scale analysis indicates that high pollution cases originate with a highly-polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly direction. This polluted mass exhibits higher temperatures and humidity than the clean case, the former of which may be attributable to heating due to aerosol absorption of solar radiation over the subcontinent. While high temperature conditions dispersed along with the high-aerosol

  18. Sensitivity of warm-frontal processes to cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igel, Adele L.; Van Den Heever, Susan C.; Naud, Catherine M.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Posselt, Derek J.

    2013-01-01

    An extratropical cyclone that crossed the United States on 9-11 April 2009 was successfully simulated at high resolution (3-km horizontal grid spacing) using the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System. The sensitivity of the associated warm front to increasing pollution levels was then explored by conducting the same experiment with three different background profiles of cloud-nucleating aerosol concentration. To the authors' knowledge, no study has examined the indirect effects of aerosols on warm fronts. The budgets of ice, cloud water, and rain in the simulation with the lowest aerosol concentrations were examined. The ice mass was found to be produced in equal amounts through vapor deposition and riming, and the melting of ice produced approximately 75% of the total rain. Conversion of cloud water to rain accounted for the other 25%. When cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations were increased, significant changes were seen in the budget terms, but total precipitation remained relatively constant. Vapor deposition onto ice increased, but riming of cloud water decreased such that there was only a small change in the total ice production and hence there was no significant change in melting. These responses can be understood in terms of a buffering effect in which smaller cloud droplets in the mixed-phase region lead to both an enhanced vapor deposition and decreased riming efficiency with increasing aerosol concentrations. Overall, while large changes were seen in the microphysical structure of the frontal cloud, cloud-nucleating aerosols had little impact on the precipitation production of the warm front.

  19. Anthropogenic aerosols and the distribution of past large‐scale precipitation change

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The climate response of precipitation to the effects of anthropogenic aerosols is a critical while not yet fully understood aspect in climate science. Results of selected models that participated the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 and the data from the Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project suggest that, throughout the tropics and also in the extratropical Northern Hemisphere, aerosols have largely dominated the distribution of precipitation changes in reference to the preindustrial era in the second half of the last century. Aerosol‐induced cooling has offset some of the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the tropics to the Arctic and thus formed the gradients of surface temperature anomaly that enable the revealed precipitation change patterns to occur. Improved representation of aerosol‐cloud interaction has been demonstrated as the key factor for models to reproduce consistent distributions of past precipitation change with the reanalysis data. PMID:27134319

  20. Springtime precipitation effects on the abundance of fluorescent biological aerosol particles and HULIS in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Siyao; Ren, Hong; Fan, Songyun; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Fu, Pingqing

    2016-07-01

    Bioaerosols and humic-like substances (HULIS) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, which can affect regional climate by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and some of which can damage human health. Up to date, release of bioaerosols and HULIS initiated by precipitation is still poorly understood. Here we present different release processes for bioaerosols, non-bioaerosols and HULIS during a precipitation event in Beijing, China. Large fungal-spore-like aerosols were emitted at the onset and later weak stage of precipitation, the number concentration of which increased by more than two folds, while the number concentration of bacteria-like particles doubled when the precipitation strengthened. Besides, a good correlation between protein-like substances that were measured simultaneously by on-line and off-line fluorescence techniques consolidated their applications to measure bioaerosols. Furthermore, our EEM results suggest that the relative contribution of water-soluble HULIS to microbial materials was enhanced gradually by the rain event.

  1. Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

    2010-07-29

    A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different “parcels”, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform

  2. Modelling Volcanic Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Warm Cumulus Cloud Using the High Resolution Nested Suite of the UK Met Office Unified Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A. K.; Field, P.; Carslaw, K. S.; Hill, A. A.; Shipway, B. J.; Grosvenor, D. P.; Marsham, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The impacts that aerosols have on clouds and clouds have on aerosols remain the largest uncertainty in terms of the effect on radiative forcing. Regional and global models are unable to resolve these small scale interactions, while high resolution eddy-resolving models are unable to capture the larger scale dynamics of the atmosphere and can only be run over a limited size domain for a limited time. Here we present results using the high resolution (1km, 0.3km) nested version of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM) which bridges the scale gap between models. A new microphysics scheme, Cloud and AeroSol Interactive Microphysics (CASIM) is coupled to a chemistry and aerosol scheme (GLOMAP-mode) which allows for fully interactive aerosol and cloud microphysics.Results showing the effect of volcanic aerosol from the slowly degassing Kilauea volcano, Hawaii on trade wind cumuli will be presented. The presence of a subtropical high pressure in the summer allows the study of aerosol-cloud interactions in a uniform unpolluted marine background environment without the complications of anthropogenic pollution. Satellite data has shown that cumulus clouds affected by the volcanic plume had smaller cloud droplets, reduced precipitation efficiency, increased cloud amount and higher cloud tops. Other researchers have hypothesised that that the observed changes in cloud properties cannot be explained by the orographic effect of the island or the sea surface temperature anomaly. We present results using CASIM in the UM at high resolution to systematically compare the relative effects of dynamical and aerosol-cloud interactions. Initial results show that the orography of the island does not have a significant impact on the cumulus cloud further downwind from the island but there is an effect in the immediate vicinity of the island. Initial results also indicate that 1km resolution is not high enough to resolve small cumulus cloud.

  3. Space-borne observations of aerosol - cloud relations for cloud systems of different heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulos, S.; Georgoulias, A. K.; Kourtidis, K.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we examine the aerosol - cloud relations over three major urban clusters of China, representative of three different climatic regimes, under different water vapor conditions and cloud heights, using Aerosol Optical Depth at 550 nm (AOD), Cloud Fraction (CC), Cloud Optical Depth (COD), Water Vapor (WV) and Cloud Top Pressure (CTP) data from the MODIS instrument. Over all regions and for all seasons, CC is found to increase with increasing AOD, WV and cloud height. Aerosols, at low WV environments and under constant CTP, have less impact on CC than at high WV environments. Furthermore, AOD has a varying influence on COD depending on CTP. Finally, COD is found to increase with height for low and middle height clouds, and with increasing AOD, especially at low AOD. Our results demonstrate that the role of WV in the observed satellite-based aerosol - cloud relations is significant for all cloud heights.

  4. Climate Response to Warm Cloud-Aerosol Interactions: Comparisons With Direct Aerosol and Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Ming, Y.

    2006-12-01

    We employ the NOAA/ GFDL global atmospheric model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean to investigate the mechanisms and quantitative aspects underlying the radiative perturbations and climate response arising due to cloud-aerosol interactions in low-lying clouds. The aerosol species considered include sulfate, sea-salt and carbonaceous species, whose space-time distributions are determined offline by the MOZART 2 chemistry- transport model based on emissions data. The model's prognostic cloud scheme of liquid water and amount is expanded to include cloud droplet concentration in a way that importantly allows them to be computed using the same large-scale and convective updraft velocity field. The equilibrium response of the model's global climate system to the change in aerosols from pre- industrial to present-day is evaluated, in terms of the forcing applied and the role of the large- and cloud-scale feedback mechanisms. The cloud characteristics simulated are compared against observations, while the model's response is compared with that obtained from using a diagnostic aerosol-cloud relationship to highlight the significance of specific cloud microphysical processes. The spatial distributions of the thermal and hydrologic responses are also compared with those resulting from simulations performed for the pre-industrial to present-day direct aerosol effect. The temperature responses in the low and high latitudes, including changes in the large-scale precipitation pattern, are contrasted with those due to the well-mixed greenhouse gases. The forcing-response relationship is examined for the radiative perturbations investigated, with surface radiative forcing included in these considerations. We finally investigate the concept of linear additivity of the responses in various climate variables for the set of radiative perturbations considered above, extending from the global- and zonal-mean to continental scales.

  5. A New WRF-Chem Treatment for Studying Regional Scale Impacts of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in Parameterized Cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Easter, Richard C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A new treatment of cloud-aerosol interactions within parameterized shallow and deep convection has been implemented in WRF-Chem that can be used to better understand the aerosol lifecycle over regional to synoptic scales. The modifications to the model to represent cloud-aerosol interactions include treatment of the cloud dropletnumber mixing ratio; key cloud microphysical and macrophysical parameters (including the updraft fractional area, updraft and downdraft mass fluxes, and entrainment) averaged over the population of shallow clouds, or a single deep convective cloud; and vertical transport, activation/resuspension, aqueous chemistry, and wet removal of aerosol and trace gases in warm clouds. Thesechanges have been implemented in both the WRF-Chem chemistry packages as well as the Kain-Fritsch cumulus parameterization that has been modified to better represent shallow convective clouds. Preliminary testing of the modified WRF-Chem has been completed using observations from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) as well as a high-resolution simulation that does not include parameterized convection. The simulation results are used to investigate the impact of cloud-aerosol interactions on the regional scale transport of black carbon (BC), organic aerosol (OA), and sulfate aerosol. Based on the simulations presented here, changes in the column integrated BC can be as large as -50% when cloud-aerosol interactions are considered (due largely to wet removal), or as large as +35% for sulfate in non-precipitating conditions due to the sulfate production in the parameterized clouds. The modifications to WRF-Chem version 3.2.1 are found to account for changes in the cloud drop number concentration (CDNC) and changes in the chemical composition of cloud-drop residuals in a way that is consistent with observations collected during CHAPS. Efforts are currently underway to port the changes described here to WRF-Chem version 3.5, and it is anticipated that they

  6. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  7. Satellite remote sensing of aerosol and cloud properties over Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sogacheva, Larisa; Kolmonen, Pekka; Saponaro, Giulia; Virtanen, Timo; Rodriguez, Edith; Sundström, Anu-Maija; Atlaskina, Ksenia; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing provides the spatial distribution of aerosol and cloud properties over a wide area. In our studies large data sets are used for statistical studies on aerosol and cloud interaction in an area over Fennoscandia, the Baltic Sea and adjacent regions over the European mainland. This area spans several regimes with different influences on aerosol cloud interaction such as a the transition from relative clean air over Fennoscandia to more anthropogenically polluted air further south, and the influence maritime air over the Baltic and oceanic air advected from the North Atlantic. Anthropogenic pollution occurs in several parts of the study area, and in particular near densely populated areas and megacities, but also in industrialized areas and areas with dense traffic. The aerosol in such areas is quite different from that produced over the boreal forest and has different effects on air quality and climate. Studies have been made on the effects of aerosols on air quality and on the radiation balance in China. The aim of the study is to study the effect of these different regimes on aerosol-cloud interaction using a large aerosol and cloud data set retrieved with the (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometer (A)ATSR Dual View algorithm (ADV) further developed at Finnish Meteorological Institute and aerosol and cloud data provided by MODIS. Retrieval algorithms for aerosol and clouds have been developed for the (A)ATSR, consisting of a series of instruments of which we use the second and third one: ATSR-2 which flew on the ERS-2 satellite (1995-2003) and AATSR which flew on the ENVISAT satellite (2002-2012) (both from the European Space Agency, ESA). The ADV algorithm provides aerosol data on a global scale with a default resolution of 10x10km2 (L2) and an aggregate product on 1x1 degree (L3). Optional, a 1x1 km2 retrieval products is available over smaller areas for specific studies. Since for the retrieval of AOD no prior knowledge is needed on

  8. Long-term in situ measurements of the cloud-precipitation microphysical properties over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jinfang; Wang, Donghai; Zhai, Guoqing

    2011-10-01

    A database of cloud-precipitation microphysical characteristics is established, using in situ data during 1960-2008. Main features of aerosol, ice nuclei (IN), cloud droplet, fog, ice crystal, snow crystal, and raindrop are presented based on the analyses of the database. In addition, a statistical analysis has been performed. The results show that the overall average aerosol concentration in diameter greater than 0.3 μm is 166.9 cm -3 and the average maximum values of IN concentration can reach 78.9 L -1 at - 20 °C, with an overall average of 22.9 L -1. In addition, cumuliform clouds have higher overall average cloud droplet number concentration (N c) of 907.7 cm -3, and that of stratiform clouds, is 120.9 cm -3; cumuliform clouds (stratiform clouds) have an average liquid water content (LWC) of 0.875 (0.140) g m -3, with a peak value of 2.000 (0.520) g m -3. The gamma size distributions are shown to be suitable for most of the observed spectra in stratiform clouds. Both the exponential and gamma size distributions are applicable to fit the raindrops originating from stratiform clouds. Good agreement is obtained when the gamma size distribution is applied to fit the raindrops originating from both convective and mixing (stratiform and cumuliform) clouds. The exponential size distributions are suitable for both ice crystal and snow crystal fitting.

  9. Impact of interannual variations in sources of insoluble aerosol species on orographic precipitation over California's central Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creamean, J. M.; Ault, A. P.; White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, P.; Prather, K. A.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) have the potential to profoundly influence precipitation processes. Furthermore, changes in orographic precipitation have broad implications for reservoir storage and flood risks. As part of the CalWater field campaign (2009-2011), the variability and associated impacts of different aerosol sources on precipitation were investigated in the California Sierra Nevada using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer for precipitation chemistry, S-band profiling radar for precipitation classification, remote sensing measurements of cloud properties, and surface meteorological measurements. The composition of insoluble residues in precipitation samples collected at a surface site contained mostly local biomass burning and long-range-transported dust and biological particles (2009), local sources of biomass burning and pollution (2010), and long-range transport (2011). Although differences in the sources of insoluble residues were observed from year to year, the most consistent source of dust and biological residues were associated with storms consisting of deep convective cloud systems with significant quantities of precipitation initiated in the ice phase. Further, biological residues were dominant (up to 40%) during storms with relatively warm cloud temperatures (up to -15 °C), supporting the important role bioparticles can play as ice nucleating particles. On the other hand, lower percentages of residues from local biomass burning and pollution were observed over the three winter seasons (on average 31 and 9%, respectively). When precipitation quantities were relatively low, these insoluble residues most likely served as CCN, forming smaller more numerous cloud droplets at the base of shallow cloud systems, and resulting in less efficient riming processes. Ultimately, the goal is to use such observations to improve the mechanistic linkages between aerosol sources and precipitation processes

  10. Observations of rapid aerosol optical depth enhancements in the vicinity of polluted cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Arola, A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Crumeyrolle, S. N.; Berkoff, T. A.; Welton, E. J.; Lolli, S.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Anderson, B. E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Minnis, P.; Pickering, K. E.; Loughner, C. P.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.

    2014-11-01

    During the July 2011 Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field experiment in Maryland, significant enhancements in Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometer measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) were observed in the immediate vicinity of non-precipitating cumulus clouds on some days. Both measured Ångström exponents and aerosol size distribution retrievals made before, during and after cumulus development often suggest little change in fine mode particle size; therefore, implying possible new particle formation in addition to cloud processing and humidification of existing particles. In addition to sun-sky radiometer measurements of large enhancements of fine mode AOD, lidar measurements made from both ground-based and aircraft-based instruments during the experiment also measured large increases in aerosol signal at altitudes associated with the presence of fair weather cumulus clouds. These data show modifications of the aerosol vertical profile as a result of the aerosol enhancements at and below cloud altitudes. The airborne lidar data were utilized to estimate the spatial extent of these aerosol enhancements, finding increased AOD, backscatter and extinction out to 2.5 km distance from the cloud edge. Furthermore, in situ measurements made from aircraft vertical profiles over an AERONET site during the experiment also showed large increases in aerosol scattering and aerosol volume after cloud formation as compared to before. The 15-year AERONET database of AOD measurements at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Maryland site, was investigated in order to obtain a climatological perspective of this phenomenon of AOD enhancement. Analysis of the diurnal cycle of AOD in summer showed significant increases in AOD from morning to late afternoon, corresponding to the diurnal cycle of cumulus development.

  11. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  12. LES simulation of cloud-aerosols-chemistry interactions in Western Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, M.; Brosse, F.; Mari, C. H.; Couvreux, F.

    2014-12-01

    Low clouds have a major impact on the radiative balance of the earth, in particular in tropical areas. The Southern West Africa (SWA) area encounters during boreal summer frequent formations of stratus and/or cumulus clouds over a large extent. These cloud bands, still badly represented in climatic models, can lead to large errors in the estimation of the cloud radiative forcing. Moreover, these cloud bands can evolve or not in cumulus congestus clouds leading to precipitations. The SWA area is characterized by a large diversity of natural and anthropic emissions of gaseous chemical species and aerosol particles. These emissions have a potential large impact on the number concentration and chemical composition of aerosol particles over the SWA zone. This impact is direct through emissions of primary particles, and indirect through the formation of secondary particles from gaseous precursors. A part of these particles will act as cloud condensation nuclei, thus, influencing the cloud microphysics characteristics. In order to improve our understanding of these complex processes, an airborne campaign is planed in summer 2015 over SWA zone in the framework of the European project DACCIWA (Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa). To prepare the campaign and begin to investigate the cloud-chemistry-aerosols interactions, a LES simulation on a case study designed from an AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses) case has been performed with the 3D online-chemistry Meso-NH model. The LES simulation captures the chemical segregation due to thermals in the rising convective boundary layer. Comparing simulation with or without cloud chemistry highlights the effect of aqueous phase chemistry on gaseous precursors of aerosol particles.

  13. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Wilcox, Eric M.; Bender, Frida A.-M.

    2016-04-01

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m-2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol-LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a northwesterly

  14. Aerosol and CCN properties at Princess Elisabeth station, East Antarctica: seasonality, new particle formation events and properties around precipitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangold, Alexander; Laffineur, Quentin; De Backer, Hugo; Herenz, Paul; Wex, Heike; Gossart, Alexandra; Souverijns, Niels; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Since 2010, several complementary ground-based instruments for measuring the aerosol composition of the Antarctic atmosphere have been operated at the Belgian Antarctic research station Princess Elisabeth, in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (71.95° S, 23.35° E, 1390 m asl.). In addition, three ground-based remote sensing instruments for cloud and precipitation observations have been installed for continuous operation, including a ceilometer (cloud base height, type, vertical extent), a 24 Ghz micro-rain radar (vertical profiles of radar effective reflectivity and Doppler velocity), and a pyrometer (cloud base temperature). The station is inhabited from November to end of February and operates under remote control during the other months. In this contribution, the general aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) properties will be described with a special focus on new particle formation events and around precipitation events. New particle formation events are important for the atmospheric aerosol budget and they also show that aerosols are not only transported to Antarctica but are also produced there, also inland. Aerosols are essential for cloud formation and therefore also for precipitation, which is the only source for mass gain of the Antarctic ice sheet. Measured aerosol properties comprise size distribution, total number, total mass concentration, mass concentration of light-absorbing aerosol and absorption coefficient and total scattering coefficient. In addition, a CCN counter has been operated during austral summers 2013/14, 2014/15 and 2015/16. The baseline total number concentration N-total was around some hundreds of particles/cm3. During new particle formation events N-total increased to some thousands of particles/cm3. Simultaneous measurements of N-total, size distribution and CCN number revealed that mostly the number of particles smaller than 100 nm increased and that the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei increased only very

  15. EDITORIAL: Aerosol cloud interactions—a challenge for measurements and modeling at the cutting edge of cloud climate interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spichtinger, Peter; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2008-04-01

    Research in aerosol properties and cloud characteristics have historically been considered two separate disciplines within the field of atmospheric science. As such, it has been uncommon for a single researcher, or even research group, to have considerable expertise in both subject areas. The recent attention paid to global climate change has shown that clouds can have a considerable effect on the Earth's climate and that one of the most uncertain aspects in their formation, persistence, and ultimate dissipation is the role played by aerosols. This highlights the need for researchers in both disciplines to interact more closely than they have in the past. This is the vision behind this focus issue of Environmental Research Letters. Certain interactions between aerosols and clouds are relatively well studied and understood. For example, it is known that an increase in the aerosol concentration will increase the number of droplets in warm clouds, decrease their average size, reduce the rate of precipitation, and extend the lifetime. Other effects are not as well known. For example, persistent ice super-saturated conditions are observed in the upper troposphere that appear to exceed our understanding of the conditions required for cirrus cloud formation. Further, the interplay of dynamics versus effects purely attributed to aerosols remains highly uncertain. The purpose of this focus issue is to consider the current state of knowledge of aerosol/cloud interactions, to define the contemporary uncertainties, and to outline research foci as we strive to better understand the Earth's climate system. This focus issue brings together laboratory experiments, field data, and model studies. The authors address issues associated with warm liquid water, cold ice, and intermediate temperature mixed-phase clouds. The topics include the uncertainty associated with the effect of black carbon and organics, aerosol types of anthropogenic interest, on droplet and ice formation. Phases

  16. A Simple Model for the Cloud Adjacency Effect and the Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Coakley, James A., Jr.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb,Norman G.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In determining aerosol-cloud interactions, the properties of aerosols must be characterized in the vicinity of clouds. Numerous studies based on satellite observations have reported that aerosol optical depths increase with increasing cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from the humidification and consequent growth of aerosol particles in the moist cloud environment, but part comes from 3D cloud-radiative transfer effects on the retrieved aerosol properties. Often, discerning whether the observed increases in aerosol optical depths are artifacts or real proves difficult. The paper provides a simple model that quantifies the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds that are used in the aerosol retrievals. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from enhanced Rayleigh scattering that results from the presence of the nearby clouds. The enhancement in Rayleigh scattering is estimated using a stochastic cloud model to obtain the radiative flux reflected by broken clouds and comparing this flux with that obtained with the molecules in the atmosphere causing extinction, but no scattering.

  17. Integrated approach towards understanding interactions of mineral dust aerosol with warm clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Prashant

    2011-12-01

    to biases as it generates a bimodal size distribution with a broad range of hygroscopicity. It is found that smaller particles generated in the more hygroscopic peak follow CCN activation by KT, while the larger peak is less hydrophilic with activation similar to dry generated dust that follow FHH-AT. Droplet activation kinetics measurements demonstrate that dry generated mineral aerosol display retarded activation kinetics with an equivalent water vapor uptake coefficient that is 30 - 80% lower relative to ammonium sulfate aerosol. Wet generated mineral aerosols, however, display similar activation kinetics to ammonium sulfate. These results suggest that at least a monolayer of water vapor (the rate-limiting step for adsorption) persists during the timescale of aerosol generation in the experiment, and questions the atmospheric relevance of studies on mineral aerosol generated from wet atomization method. A new parameterization of cloud droplet formation from insoluble dust CCN for regional and global climate models is also developed. The parameterization framework considers cloud droplet formation from dust CCN activating via FHH-AT, and soluble aerosol with activation described through KT. The parameterization is validated against a numerical parcel model, agreeing with predictions to within 10% (R2 ˜ 0.98). The potential role of dust GCCN activating by FHH-AT within warm stratocumulus and convective clouds is also evaluated. It is found that under pristine aerosol conditions, dust GCCN can act as collector drops with implications to dust-cloud-precipitation linkages. Biases introduced from describing dust GCCN activation by KT are also addressed. The results demonstrate that dust particles do not require deliquescent material to act as CCN in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the impact of dust particles as giant CCN on warm cloud and precipitation must be considered. Finally, the new parameterization of cloud droplet formation can be implemented in regional and

  18. The role of carbonaceous aerosols on short-term variations of precipitation over North Africa

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Jin -Ho; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; ...

    2016-06-16

    Northern Africa has been subject to extensive droughts in the late 20th century, which are frequently linked to changes in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. However, climate models forced by observed Sea Surface Temperatures have been unable to reproduce the magnitude of rainfall reduction over the last several decades. In this study, we propose that aerosol indirect effects (AIE) may be an important feedback mechanism to contribute this recent reduction. The climate model used here has a fully predictive aerosol life cycle. Results are presented for a set of sensitivity experiments designed tomore » distinguish the role of aerosol direct/semi-­direct and indirect effects on regional precipitation. Changes in cloud lifetime due to the presence of carbonaceous aerosols are proposed as a key mechanism to explain the reduced rainfall over the tropical and North Africa.« less

  19. The role of carbonaceous aerosols on short-term variations of precipitation over North Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin -Ho; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Vinoj, V.; Ganguly, Dilip

    2016-06-16

    Northern Africa has been subject to extensive droughts in the late 20th century, which are frequently linked to changes in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in both the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. However, climate models forced by observed Sea Surface Temperatures have been unable to reproduce the magnitude of rainfall reduction over the last several decades. In this study, we propose that aerosol indirect effects (AIE) may be an important feedback mechanism to contribute this recent reduction. The climate model used here has a fully predictive aerosol life cycle. Results are presented for a set of sensitivity experiments designed to distinguish the role of aerosol direct/semi-­direct and indirect effects on regional precipitation. Changes in cloud lifetime due to the presence of carbonaceous aerosols are proposed as a key mechanism to explain the reduced rainfall over the tropical and North Africa.

  20. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

  1. Interactions between biomass-burning aerosols and clouds over Southeast Asia: current status, challenges, and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Sayer, Andrew M; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Loftus, Adrian M; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Hsu, N Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chantara, Somporn

    2014-12-01

    The interactions between aerosols, clouds, and precipitation remain among the largest sources of uncertainty in the Earth's energy budget. Biomass-burning aerosols are a key feature of the global aerosol system, with significant annually-repeating fires in several parts of the world, including Southeast Asia (SEA). SEA in particular provides a "natural laboratory" for these studies, as smoke travels from source regions downwind in which it is coupled to persistent stratocumulus decks. However, SEA has been under-exploited for these studies. This review summarizes previous related field campaigns in SEA, with a focus on the ongoing Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS) and results from the most recent BASELInE deployment. Progress from remote sensing and modeling studies, along with the challenges faced for these studies, are also discussed. We suggest that improvements to our knowledge of these aerosol/cloud effects require the synergistic use of field measurements with remote sensing and modeling tools.

  2. Effects of Aerosol Pollution on Clouds over Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sechrist, B.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties - principally cloud fraction and cloud optical depth (COD) - is examined using satellite retrievals from the MODIS satellites over Los Angeles and Beijing. Ten Hoeve et al. (2011, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 11(7), 3021-3036) used satellite data to examine the impact of aerosols on warm clouds around Rondonia, Brazil, during the biomass burning season. They found that the COD-AOD relationship exhibits a 'boomerang' shape in which COD initially increases with increasing AOD but then decreases as AOD continues to increase beyond some critical level. This result is thought to reflect the balance between the microphysical and radiative components of a cloud's response to aerosols. The microphysical process dominates at low AOD, while the radiative process dominates at high AOD. This study is analogous to Ten Hoeve et al., but for aerosols derived primarily from fossil fuel combustion rather than biomass burning. Preliminary results will be presented.

  3. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressure contains information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressure is close to the aerosol layer pressure, especially for optically thick aerosol layers. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressure may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO and AAI data, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given.

  4. Using OMI Observations to Measure Aerosol Absorption of Biomass Burning Aerosols Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Jethva, Hiren

    2011-01-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosol layers above clouds is unambiguously detected by the TOMS/OMI UV Aerosol Index (AI) that uses satellite observations at two near-UV channels. A sensitivity study using radiative transfer calculations shows that the AI signal of resulting from the presence of aerosols above clouds is mainly driven by the aerosol absorption optical depth and the optical depth of the underlying cloud. Based on these results, an inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of aerosol layers above clouds. In this presentation we will discuss the sensitivity analysis, describe the retrieval approach, and present results of applications of the retrieval method to OMI observations over the South Atlantic Ocean. Preliminary error analyses, to be discussed, indicate that the AOD can be underestimated (up to -30%) or overestimated (up to 60%) depending on algorithmic assumptions.

  5. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  6. Aerosol and Cloud-Nucleating Particle Observations during an Atmospheric River Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, P. J.; McCluskey, C. S.; Petters, M.; Suski, K. J.; Levin, E. J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Schill, G. P.; Rocci, K.; Boose, Y.; Martin, A.; Cornwell, G.; Al-Mashat, H.; Moore, K.; Prather, K. A.; Rothfuss, N.; Taylor, H.; Leung, L. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Mei, F.; Hubbe, J. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; Creamean, J.; White, A. B.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The multi-agency CalWater 2015 project occurred over North Central CA and the Eastern Pacific during January to March 2015 (Spackman et al., this session). The goals of the campaign were to document the structure of atmospheric rivers (ARs) that deliver much of the water vapor associated with major winter storms along the U.S. West Coast and to investigate the modulating effect of aerosols on precipitation. Aerosol sources that may influence orographic cloud properties for air lifted over the mountains in California in winter include pollution, biomass burning, soil dusts and marine aerosols, but their roles will also be influenced by transport, vertical stratification, and scavenging processes. We present results from a comprehensive study of aerosol distributions, compositions, and cloud nucleating properties during an intense winter storm during February 2015, including data from an NSF-supported measurement site at Bodega Bay, from the DOE-ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment that included sampling on the NOAA RV Ron Brown offshore and the G-1 aircraft over ocean and land, and with context provided by other NOAA aircraft and remote sensing facilities. With a special focus on the coastal site, we discuss changes in aerosol distributions, aerosol hygroscopicity, and number concentrations of fluorescent particles, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and ice nucleating particles (INPs) during the AR event. We compare with periods preceding and following the event. For example, total aerosol number and surface area concentrations at below 0.5 μm diameter decreased from typical values of a few thousand cm-3 and 100 μm2 cm-3, respectively, to a few hundred cm-3 and 10 μm2cm-3 at Bodega Bay during the AR event. CCN concentrations were similarly lower, but hygroscopicity parameter (kappa) increased from typical values of 0.2 to values > 0.5 during the AR.INP and fluorescent particle number concentrations were generally lower during the AR event than at any other

  7. A numerical study of aerosol effects on the dynamics and microphysics of a deep convective cloud in a continental environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhiqiang; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Yin, Yan; Davies, Stewart

    2006-03-01

    The effects of aerosols on a deep convective cloud in a midlatitude continental environment are studied using an axisymmetric cloud model with a sectional treatment of aerosol and hydrometeor microphysical processes. Simulations are conducted using observations from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiments (CCOPE). The isolated cloud occurred in an environment with low wind shear and with relatively dry air in the midtroposphere and upper troposphere. By varying the concentration of aerosol particles in the accumulation mode within realistic limits for a continental environment, the simulated cloud exhibited different properties. The overall impact as the aerosol concentration increased is that (1) the cloud development was inhibited; (2) the precipitation was suppressed; (3) the maximum values of liquid water content decreased, but the maximum values of droplet number concentration increased before the dissipating stage; (4) a clear tendency was found for ice crystals to be larger and less numerous in the anvil cloud; and (5) there was a significant reduction of the inflow in the lower 2 km of the atmosphere. In the relatively dry environment in the midtroposphere, the latent heat changes associated with the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen mechanism played an important role in the upper part of the cloud at altitudes below the homogeneous freezing level. In particular, immersion freezing and latent heat release were much more rapid in the base simulation than in the increased aerosol simulation. Less latent heat release and insufficient inflow together impeded the development of the cloud with the higher aerosol loading. Our simulations suggest that continental clouds existing below the homogeneous freezing level could show an opposite response of cloud top height and anvil crystal concentrations to changes in aerosol to what has previously been reported for clouds ascending to higher levels.

  8. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-01-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability. PMID:27929097

  9. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  10. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H

    2016-12-08

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  11. Role of clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interaction in 20th century simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, L.; Rind, D. H.; Bauer, S.; Del Genio, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations of aerosols, clouds and their interaction contribute to the major source of uncertainty in predicting the changing Earth's energy and in estimating future climate. Anthropogenic contribution of aerosols affects the properties of clouds through aerosol indirect effects. Three different versions of NASA GISS global climate model are presented for simulation of the twentieth century climate change. All versions have fully interactive tracers of aerosols and chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. All chemical species are simulated prognostically consistent with atmospheric physics in the model and the emissions of short-lived precursors [Shindell et al., 2006]. One version does not include the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. The other two versions include a parameterization of the interactive first indirect aerosol effect on clouds following Menon et al. [2010]. One of these two models has the Multiconfiguration Aerosol Tracker of Mixing state (MATRIX) that permits detailed treatment of aerosol mixing state, size, and aerosol-cloud activation. The main purpose of this study is evaluation of aerosol-clouds interactions and feedbacks, as well as cloud and aerosol radiative forcings, for the twentieth century climate under different assumptions and parameterizations for aerosol, clouds and their interactions in the climate models. The change of global surface air temperature based on linear trend ranges from +0.8°C to +1.2°C between 1850 and 2012. Water cloud optical thickness increases with increasing temperature in all versions with the largest increase in models with interactive indirect effect of aerosols on clouds, which leads to the total (shortwave and longwave) cloud radiative cooling trend at the top of the atmosphere. Menon, S., D. Koch, G. Beig, S. Sahu, J. Fasullo, and D. Orlikowski (2010), Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10,4559-4571, doi:10.5194/acp-10-4559-2010. Shindell, D., G. Faluvegi

  12. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    DOE PAGES

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; ...

    2016-04-27

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV)more » and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m–2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol–LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the observatory from a

  13. Observed correlations between aerosol and cloud properties in an Indian Ocean trade cumulus regime

    SciTech Connect

    Pistone, Kristina; Praveen, Puppala S.; Thomas, Rick M.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Wilcox, Eric M.; Bender, Frida A.-M.

    2016-04-27

    There are many contributing factors which determine the micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds, including atmospheric vertical structure, dominant meteorological conditions, and aerosol concentration, all of which may be coupled to one another. In the quest to determine aerosol effects on clouds, these potential relationships must be understood. Here we describe several observed correlations between aerosol conditions and cloud and atmospheric properties in the Indian Ocean winter monsoon season.

    In the CARDEX (Cloud, Aerosol, Radiative forcing, Dynamics EXperiment) field campaign conducted in February and March 2012 in the northern Indian Ocean, continuous measurements were made of atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and the liquid water path (LWP) of trade cumulus clouds, concurrent with measurements of water vapor flux, cloud and aerosol vertical profiles, meteorological data, and surface and total-column aerosol from instrumentation at a ground observatory and on small unmanned aircraft. We present observations which indicate a positive correlation between aerosol and cloud LWP only when considering cases with low atmospheric water vapor (PWV < 40 kg m–2), a criterion which acts to filter the data to control for the natural meteorological variability in the region.

    We then use the aircraft and ground-based measurements to explore possible mechanisms behind this observed aerosol–LWP correlation. The increase in cloud liquid water is found to coincide with a lowering of the cloud base, which is itself attributable to increased boundary layer humidity in polluted conditions. High pollution is found to correlate with both higher temperatures and higher humidity measured throughout the boundary layer. A large-scale analysis, using satellite observations and meteorological reanalysis, corroborates these covariations: high-pollution cases are shown to originate as a highly polluted boundary layer air mass approaching the

  14. A Multi-Frequency Wide-Swath Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gary; McLinden, Matthew; Venkatesh, Vijay; Coon, Michael; Perrine, Martin; Park, Richard; Cooley, Michael; Stenger, Pete; Spence, Thomas; Retelny, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave radars have proven their effectiveness in cloud and precipitation observations. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS) Aerosol, Cloud and Ecosystems (ACE) mission calls for a dual-frequency cloud radar (W band 94 GHz and Ka-band 35 GHz) for global measurements of cloud microphysical properties. Recently, there have been discussions of utilizing a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) radar for a combined ACE and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) follow-on mission that has evolved into the Cloud and Precipitation Process Mission (CaPPM) concept. In this presentation we will give an overview of the technology development efforts at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (NGES) through projects funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). Our primary objective of this research is to advance the key enabling technologies for a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) shared-aperture spaceborne imaging radar to provide unprecedented, simultaneous multi-frequency measurements that will enhance understanding of the effects of clouds and precipitation and their interaction on Earth climate change. Research effort has been focused on concept design and trade studies of the tri-frequency radar; investigating architectures that provide tri-band shared-aperture capability; advancing the development of the Ka band active electronically scanned array (AESA) transmitreceive (TR) module, and development of the advanced radar backend electronics.

  15. Models to support active sensing of biological aerosol clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrea M.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Chaudhry, Zahra; Boggs, Nathan T.; Brown, David M.; Thomas, Michael E.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic backscatter LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) is a promising approach for stand-off detection of biological aerosol clouds. Comprehensive models that explain the scattering behavior from the aerosol cloud are needed to understand and predict the scattering signatures of biological aerosols under varying atmospheric conditions and against different aerosol backgrounds. Elastic signatures are dependent on many parameters of the aerosol cloud, with two major components being the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosols. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has been in a unique position to measure the size distributions of released biological simulant clouds using a wide assortment of aerosol characterization systems that are available on the commercial market. In conjunction with the size distribution measurements, JHU/APL has also been making a dedicated effort to properly measure the refractive indices of the released materials using a thin-film absorption technique and laboratory characterization of the released materials. Intimate knowledge of the size distributions and refractive indices of the biological aerosols provides JHU/APL with powerful tools to build elastic scattering models, with the purpose of understanding, and ultimately, predicting the active signatures of biological clouds.

  16. Shortwave and longwave radiative forcings of aerosols depending on the vertical stratification of aerosols and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Eiji; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2017-02-01

    We investigate four scenarios for estimating shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) using the global data set of the vertical distributions for aerosols and clouds of CALIPSO and CloudSat Level 2 products. One scenario is clear-sky (cloud-free) condition and three scenarios are cloudy-sky condition: the case that aerosols exists above clouds (AAC case), and the case that aerosols exist below high clouds such as cirrus, but without clouds below the aerosol layers (ABC case), and the case that aerosols are not observed in cloudy-sky condition. In clear-sky and ABC cases, aerosols mainly scatter sunlight and SWDARFs show negative values, except for bright surfaces, such as desert regions and the North and South Poles. In AAC case, aerosols absorb the reflected light from underlying low-level clouds to TOA, so that SWDARF at TOA shows positive value. Mineral dust absorbs the Earth's radiation and LWDARF indicates strong positive over Saharan and Arabian deserts. The global mean values of SW plus LW DARFs are -2.77, -0.77, and -1.40 Wm-2 under clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky conditions.

  17. Interactions between aerosol absorption, thermodynamics, dynamics, and microphysics and their impacts on a multiple-cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Li, Zhanqing; Mok, Jungbin; Ahn, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Byung-Gon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Yoo, Hye Lim

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates how the increasing concentration of black carbon aerosols, which act as radiation absorbers as well as agents for the cloud-particle nucleation, affects stability, dynamics and microphysics in a multiple-cloud system using simulations. Simulations show that despite increases in stability due to increasing concentrations of black carbon aerosols, there are increases in the averaged updraft mass fluxes (over the whole simulation domain and period). This is because aerosol-enhanced evaporative cooling intensifies convergence near the surface. This increase in the intensity of convergence induces an increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds, leading to the increase in the averaged updraft mass fluxes. The increase in the frequency of updrafts induces that in the number of condensation entities and this leads to more condensation and cloud liquid that acts to be a source of the accretion of cloud liquid by precipitation. Hence, eventually, there is more accretion that offsets suppressed autoconversion, which results in negligible changes in cumulative precipitation as aerosol concentrations increase. The increase in the frequency of updrafts with the low range of speeds alters the cloud-system organization (represented by cloud-depth spatiotemporal distributions and cloud-cell population) by supporting more low-depth clouds. The altered organization in turn alters precipitation spatiotemporal distributions by generating more weak precipitation events. Aerosol-induced reduction in solar radiation that reaches the surface induces more occurrences of small-value surface heat fluxes, which in turn supports the more low-depth clouds and weak precipitation together with the greater occurrence of low-speed updrafts.

  18. Evidence for Natural Variability in Marine Stratocumulus Cloud Properties Due to Cloud-Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Bruce; Sharon, Tarah; Jonsson, Haf; Minnis, Patrick; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk; Khaiyer, Mandana M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, aircraft observations from the Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter are used to characterize the variability in drizzle, cloud, and aerosol properties associated with cloud rifts and the surrounding solid clouds observed off the coast of California. A flight made on 16 July 1999 provided measurements directly across an interface between solid and rift cloud conditions. Aircraft instrumentation allowed for measurements of aerosol, cloud droplet, and drizzle spectra. CCN concentrations were measured in addition to standard thermodynamic variables and the winds. A Forward Scatter Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) measured size distribution of cloud-sized droplets. A Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP) was used to measure distributions of drizzle-sized droplets. Aerosol distributions were obtained from a Cloud Aerosol Scatterprobe (CAS). The CAS probe measured aerosols, cloud droplets and drizzle-sized drops; for this study. The CAS probe was used to measure aerosols in the size range of 0.5 micron - 1 micron. Smaller aerosols were characterized using an Ultrafine Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) sensor. The CPC was used to measure particles with diameters greater than 0.003 micron. By subtracting different count concentrations measured with the CPC, this probe was capable of identifying ultrafine particles those falling in the size range of 3 nanometers - 7 nanometers that are believed to be associated with new particle production.

  19. A numerical study of aerosol influence on mixed-phase stratiform clouds through modulation of the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2012-08-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out in a high-resolution two dimensional framework to increase our understanding of aerosol indirect effects in mixed-phase stratiform clouds. Aerosol characteristics explored include insoluble particle type, soluble mass fraction, the influence of aerosol-induced freezing point depression and the influence of aerosol number concentration. These experiments were completed with an emphasis on the liquid phase, with droplet freezing the mechanism for ice production. Of the aerosol properties investigated, aerosol insoluble mass type and its associated freezing efficiency was found to be most relevant to cloud lifetime. Secondary effects from aerosol soluble mass fraction and number concentration also alter cloud characteristics and lifetime. These alterations occur via various mechanisms, including changes to the amount of nucleated ice, influence on liquid phase precipitation and ice riming rates, and changes to liquid droplet growth rates. Simulation of the same environment leads to large variability of cloud thickness and lifetime, ranging from rapid and complete glaciation of the cloud to the production of a long-lived, thick stratiform mixed-phase cloud. In the end, these processes are summarized into a diagram that includes internal feedback loops that act within the cloud system.

  20. The hydrological assessment of aerosol effects by the idealized airborne cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, B.; Chae, S.; Lee, C.; Choi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The main source of aerosols over East Asia including the Korean Peninsula is the anthropogenic emission of atmospheric pollutants transported from Chinese industrial areas. For this reason, the researches of aerosol effects are very active in East Asian countries. In case of South Korea, aircraft measurement campaigns and airborne cloud seeding experiments for the meteorological and environmental research have been conducted over the local area of Korean Peninsula since the year of 2010. This project is related with the weather modification research to build up strategies for the regulation or enhancement of precipitation and snowpack for a severe drought in South Korea during a winter season. For this study, the aerosol effect on precipitation by the airborne cloud seeding was simulated using WRF-CHEM model with RADM2/MADE,SORGAM modules. Emission data of 10000μg/(m2s) of unspeciated primary PM2.5 were input at 0.5km altitude for aerosol scenario cases which is the height of airborne cloud seeding experiment. For the control run, the original WRF model with no chemistry/aerosol modules was used. Also, the hydrological model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, USDA/ARS) is incorporated to evaluate this aerosol effects hydrologically for the enhancement of precipitation or snowfall from the results of WRF-CHEM model. The target area is the Andong dam basin (1,584 km2) which is known as one of the important water resources in southern part of South Korea. The date was chosen based on the conditions of airborne cloud seeding experiment (RH>50%, Low Temp.<-3°C, Wind Speeds<5m/s, etc). During the 24 forecasting hour, the aerosol scenario case showed more amounts of accumulated precipitation (about 12%) than those of control run. According to the analysis of SWAT, the enhancement of precipitation in aerosol scenario cases of WRF-CHEM model could influence the increase of about 1.0×106m3 water resources when we assumed the 10% of effective area over the Andong dam

  1. Characterization of cumulus cloud fields using trajectories in the center of gravity versus water mass phase space: 2. Aerosol effects on warm convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiblum, Reuven H.; Altaratz, Orit; Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Kostinski, Alexander B.; Khain, Alexander P.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Fredj, Erick; Dagan, Guy; Pinto, Lital; Yaish, Ricki; Chen, Qian

    2016-06-01

    In Part I of this work a 3-D cloud tracking algorithm and phase space of center of gravity altitude versus cloud liquid water mass (CvM space) were introduced and described in detail. We showed how new physical insight can be gained by following cloud trajectories in the CvM space. Here this approach is used to investigate aerosol effects on cloud fields of warm cumuli. We show a clear effect of the aerosol loading on the shape and size of CvM clusters. We also find fundamental differences in the CvM space between simulations using bin versus bulk microphysical schemes, with the bin scheme precipitation expressing much higher sensitivity to changes in aerosol concentrations. Using the bin microphysical scheme, we find that the increase in cloud center of gravity altitude with increase in aerosol concentrations occurs for a wide range of cloud sizes. This is attributed to reduced sedimentation, increased buoyancy and vertical velocities, and increased environmental instability, all of which are tightly coupled to inhibition of precipitation processes and subsequent feedbacks of clouds on their environment. Many of the physical processes shown here are consistent with processes typically associated with cloud invigoration.

  2. Impact of aerosol and freezing level on orographic clouds: A sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hui; Yin, Yan; Chen, Qian; Zhao, Pengguo

    2016-07-01

    The response of clouds and precipitation to changes in aerosol properties is variable with the ambient meteorological conditions, which is important for the distribution of water resources, especially in mountain regions. In this study, a detailed bin microphysics scheme is coupled into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate how orographic clouds and precipitation respond to changes in aerosols under different thermodynamic profiles. The model results suggest that when the initial aerosol number concentration changes from a clean continental background (4679 cm- 3) to a polluted urban environment (23,600 cm- 3), the accumulated surface precipitation amount can be increased up to 14% mainly due to the enhanced riming process which results from more droplets of 10-30 μm in diameter. When the freezing level is lowered from 2.85 km to 0.9 km (above 1000 hPa level), the growth of ice-phase particles via riming process is enhanced, leading to more precipitation. However, the response of surface precipitation amount to increase in aerosol particle concentration is not linear with lowering freezing level, and there is a maximum precipitation enhancement caused by aerosols (about 14%) as the freezing level is at 1.4 km. Further sensitivity tests show that, the response of riming growth to increase in aerosol particle concentration becomes more significant with lowering the freezing level, but this effect becomes less significant as the freezing level is further lowered due to the limited liquid water. Moreover, the growth of raindrops through collision and coalescence is suppressed with lowering freezing level, due to the shorter distance between the melting level and the ground.

  3. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  4. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  5. A new approach to modeling aerosol effects on East Asian climate: Parametric uncertainties associated with emissions, cloud microphysics, and their interactions: AEROSOL EFFECTS ON EAST ASIAN CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Yang, Ben; Liu, Xiaohong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-09

    In this study, we adopt a parametric sensitivity analysis framework that integrates the quasi-Monte Carlo parameter sampling approach and a surrogate model to examine aerosol effects on the East Asian Monsoon climate simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). A total number of 256 CAM5 simulations are conducted to quantify the model responses to the uncertain parameters associated with cloud microphysics parameterizations and aerosol (e.g., sulfate, black carbon (BC), and dust) emission factors and their interactions. Results show that the interaction terms among parameters are important for quantifying the sensitivity of fields of interest, especially precipitation, to the parameters. The relative importance of cloud-microphysics parameters and emission factors (strength) depends on evaluation metrics or the model fields we focused on, and the presence of uncertainty in cloud microphysics imposes an additional challenge in quantifying the impact of aerosols on cloud and climate. Due to their different optical and microphysical properties and spatial distributions, sulfate, BC, and dust aerosols have very different impacts on East Asian Monsoon through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. The climatic effects of aerosol do not always have a monotonic response to the change of emission factors. The spatial patterns of both sign and magnitude of aerosol-induced changes in radiative fluxes, cloud, and precipitation could be different, depending on the aerosol types, when parameters are sampled in different ranges of values. We also identify the different cloud microphysical parameters that show the most significant impact on climatic effect induced by sulfate, BC and dust, respectively, in East Asia.

  6. Global estimation of above-cloud aerosols using spaceborne LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Wood, R.; Anderson, T. L.; Satheesh, S. K.; Leahy, L.

    2008-12-01

    Estimates of global mean direct climate forcing by absorbing aerosols located above boundary layer clouds are large, uncertain, and almost entirely unconstrained by observations. Spaceborne lidar offers a new opportunity of estimating the aerosols at global scale. Here we use two recently available techniques quantifying the above-cloud aerosols using liquid water clouds as lidar targets from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) [Chand et al., 2008]. Both methods can quantify aerosols above clouds and are based on their self-calibrating techniques. We used one year of global data between 70N-70S to show that day time calibration constants are different than night time calibrations constants. A clear latitudinal dependence is observed in the calibrations constants in CALIPSO observations. Using these 'self-calibration' constants, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom exponent (AE) of 'above- cloud' aerosols are quantified. Biomass burning is a major source of fine mode aerosols in different regions of world. For example, it is observed that June is the onset of the biomass burning fires in Southern Africa, peaking in August and September and then slowly decreasing until November, with a corresponding signature in aerosol optical depth. Layers with aerosol optical depth greater than 0.3 are commonly observed up to several thousand kilometers away from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean. The 'above-cloud' AOD as high as 1.5 is observed in the peak months. Despite of large variations is AOD, mean AE of these aerosols is about 1.6, without any systematic variability away from the source region. The results estimating the aerosols above clouds, including other regions at global scale, will be presented in the AGU meeting. Chand, D., T. L. Anderson, R. Wood, R. J. Charlson, Y. Hu, Z. Liu, and M. Vaughan (2008), Quantifying above-cloud aerosol using spaceborne lidar for improved understanding of cloudy-sky direct climate forcing, J

  7. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, A. M. L.; Engström, A.; Söderberg, A.

    2010-03-01

    A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008). However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1) account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2) better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3) increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the Aitken mode (here

  8. Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2011-11-04

    Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

  9. Aerosol patterns and aerosol-cloud-interactions off the West African Coast based on the A-train formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Julia; Bendix, Jörg; Cermak, Jan

    2013-04-01

    In this study, spatial and temporal aerosol patterns off the Western African coast are characterized and related to cloud properties, based on satellite data Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in atmospheric processes and influence our environmental system in a complex way. Their identification, characterization, transport patterns as well as their interactions with clouds pose major challenges. Especially the last aspect reveals major uncertainties in terms of the Earth's radiation budget as reported in the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC, 2007). Western and Southern Africa are dominated by two well-known source types of atmospheric aerosols. First, the Saharan Desert is the world's largest aeolian dust emitting source region. Second, biomass burning aerosol is commonly transported off-shore further south (Kaufman et al., 2005). Both aerosol types influence Earth's climate in different manners and can be detected by the MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) sensor onboard the EOS platforms as they propagate to the Central and Southern Atlantic. The motivation of this study was to reveal the seasonal pattern of the Saharan dust transport based on an observation period of 11 years and trying to explain the meteorological mechanisms. North African dust plumes are transported along a latitude of 19°N in July and 6°N in January. The seasonally fluctuating intensities adapt to the annual cycle of wind and precipitation regimes. A strong relationship is found between the spatial shift of the Azores High and the Saharan dust load over the middle Atlantic Ocean. Monthly Aerosol Optical Thickness products of Terra MODIS and NCEP-DOE (National Centers for Environmental Predictions) Reanalysis II data are used for this purpose. The relationship between aerosol and cloud droplet parameters is blurred by high sensitivities to aerosol size and composition (Feingold, 2003; McFiggans et al., 2006) as well as meteorological context (Ackerman et al., 2004

  10. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  11. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number.

    PubMed

    Saide, Pablo E; Carmichael, Gregory R; Spak, Scott N; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J Kirk

    2012-07-24

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (N(d)) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent N(d) observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions.

  12. Super-droplet method as a versatile numerical approach for representing aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaruga, Anna; Arabas, Sylwester; Pawlowska, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol interacts with clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Its physical and chemical properties are one of the factors defining cloud droplet size distribution. On the other hand, clouds process atmospheric aerosol taking part in its wet deposition and CCN regeneration through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle. Physical and chemical properties of the regenerated CCN may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions. The main challenge of representing these aerosol-cloud interactions in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track the properties of the drop nuclei throughout the cloud lifecycle. A class of methods allowing such studies is the Lagrangian particle-based simulation technique. In a simulation of cloud, each modeled particle represents a multiplicity of particles of the same nucleus type, position and size. During the simulation particle sizes change in a continuous way from CCN-sized to rain drop particles. Tracking microphysical properties of modeled particles is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. Super-droplet method is a Lagrangian technique introduced by Shima et al. (2009) featuring an efficient Monte-Carlo type solver for particle coalescence. In this study a new implementation of the super-droplet method, using the kappa-Koehler parametrisation of aerosol composition and an aqueous chemistry module for representing irreversible oxidation, will be presented. Components of the developed model will be discussed using a single-eddy prescribed-flow framework, focusing solely on the microphysical aspects of simulations. Example case will mimic a Stratocumulus cloud and depict cloud-aerosol interactions resolved by the model.

  13. Examination of the potential impacts of dust and pollution aerosol acting as cloud nucleating aerosol on water resources in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Vandana

    In this study we examine the cumulative effect of dust acting as cloud nucleating aerosol (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN), and ice nuclei (IN)) along with anthropogenic aerosol pollution acting primarily as CCN, over the entire Colorado Rocky Mountains from the months of October to April in the year 2004-2005; the snow year. This ˜6.5 months analysis provides a range of snowfall totals and variability in dust and anthropogenic aerosol pollution. The specific objectives of this research is to quantify the impacts of both dust and pollution aerosols on wintertime precipitation in the Colorado Mountains using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). In general, dust enhances precipitation primarily by acting as IN, while aerosol pollution reduces water resources in the CRB via the so-called "spill-over" effect, by enhancing cloud droplet concentrations and reducing riming rates. Dust is more episodic and aerosol pollution is more pervasive throughout the winter season. Combined response to dust and aerosol pollution is a net reduction of water resources in the CRB. The question is by how much are those water resources affected? Our best estimate is that total winter-season precipitation loss for for the CRB the 2004-2005 winter season due to the combined influence of aerosol pollution and dust is 5,380,00 acre-feet of water. Sensitivity studies for different cases have also been run for the specific cases in 2004-2005 winter season to analyze the impact of changing dust and aerosol ratios on precipitation in the Colorado River Basin. The dust is varied from 3 to 10 times in the experiments and the response is found to be non monotonic and depends on various environmental factors. The sensitivity studies show that adding dust in a wet system increases precipitation when IN affects are dominant. For a relatively dry system high concentrations of dust can result in over-seeding the clouds and reductions in precipitation

  14. On the iron chloride aerosol in the clouds of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron chloride in the Venus clouds is under discussion for three decades, and the saturated vapor pressure of this species is of crucial importance for its modeling. There is a great scatter in the published data, and the preferable results are by Rustad and Gregory (1983, J. Chem. Eng. Data 28, 151-155) and those based on thermodynamic parameters by Chase (1998, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data Monograph 9). Using these data, loss by coagulation with sulfuric acid, transport by eddy diffusion, and the Stokes precipitation, the model confirms conclusions of our early study (Krasnopolsky 1985, Planet. Space Sci. 33, 109-117) that FeCl3 in the Venus clouds (1) agrees with the near UV and blue reflectivity of Venus (Zasova et al. 1981, Adv. Space Res. 1, #9, 13-16), (2) was observed by the direct X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, (3) explains the altitude profiles of the mode 1 aerosol in the middle and lower cloud layers and (4) the decrease in the NUV absorption below 60 km. Here we add to these conclusions that (5) the delivery of FeCl3 into the upper cloud layer and the production of sulfuric acid are just in proportion of 1: 100 by mass that is required to fit the observed NUV albedo. Furthermore, (6) the mode 1 and 2 particle sizes fit this proportion as well. Finally, (7) the required Fe2Cl6 mixing ratio is 17 ppbv in the atmosphere and the FeCl3 mole fraction is 19 ppbv in the Venus surface rocks.

  15. Sensitivity of Boreal-Summer Circulation and Precipitation to Atmospheric Aerosols in Selected Regions. Part 2; The Americas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G.

    2009-01-01

    Aerosol perturbations over selected land regions are imposed in Version-4 of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-4) general circulation model (GCM) to assess the influence of increasing aerosol concentrations on regional circulation patterns and precipitation in four selected regions: India, Africa, and North and South America. Part 1 of this paper addresses the responses to aerosol perturbations in India and Africa. This paper presents the same for aerosol perturbations over the Americas. GEOS-4 is forced with prescribed aerosols based on climatological data, which interact with clouds using a prognostic scheme for cloud microphysics including aerosol nucleation of water and ice cloud hydrometeors. In clear-sky conditions the aerosols interact with radiation. Thus the model includes comprehensive physics describing the aerosol direct and indirect effects on climate (hereafter ADE and AIE respectively). Each simulation is started from analyzed initial conditions for 1 May and was integrated through June-July-August of each of the six years: 1982 1987 to provide a 6-ensemble set. Results are presented for the difference between simulations with double the climatological aerosol concentration and one-half the climatological aerosol concentration for three experiments: two where the ADE and AIE are applied separately and one in which both the ADE and AIE are applied. The ADE and AIE both yield reductions in net radiation at the top of the atmosphere and surface while the direct absorption of shortwave radiation contributes a net radiative heating in the atmosphere. A large net heating of the atmosphere is also apparent over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean that is attributable to the large aerosol perturbation imposed over Africa. This atmospheric warming and the depression of the surface pressure over North America contribute to a northward shift of the inter-Tropical Convergence Zone over northern America, an increase in precipitation over Central America

  16. Evaluating Cloud and Precipitation Processes in Numerical Models using Current and Potential Future Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Tanelli, S.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Petersen, W. A.; Kummerow, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud, aerosol and precipitation processes play a fundamental role in the water and energy cycle. It is critical to accurately represent these microphysical processes in numerical models if we are to better predict cloud and precipitation properties on weather through climate timescales. Much has been learned about cloud properties and precipitation characteristics from NASA satellite missions such as TRMM, CloudSat, and more recently GPM. Furthermore, data from these missions have been successfully utilized in evaluating the microphysical schemes in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and global models. However, there are still many uncertainties associated with these microphysics schemes. These uncertainties can be attributed, at least in part, to the fact that microphysical processes cannot be directly observed or measured, but instead have to be inferred from those cloud properties that can be measured. Evaluation of microphysical parameterizations are becoming increasingly important as enhanced computational capabilities are facilitating the use of more sophisticated schemes in CRMs, and as future global models are being run on what has traditionally been regarded as cloud-resolving scales using CRM microphysical schemes. In this talk we will demonstrate how TRMM, CloudSat and GPM data have been used to evaluate different aspects of current CRM microphysical schemes, providing examples of where these approaches have been successful. We will also highlight CRM microphysical processes that have not been well evaluated and suggest approaches for addressing such issues. Finally, we will introduce a potential NASA satellite mission, the Cloud and Precipitation Processes Mission (CAPPM), which would facilitate the development and evaluation of different microphysical-dynamical feedbacks in numerical models.

  17. Chapter 3: Evaluating the impacts of carbonaceous aerosols on clouds and climate

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2007-09-03

    Any attempt to reconcile observed surface temperature changes within the last 150 years to changes simulated by climate models that include various atmospheric forcings is sensitive to the changes attributed to aerosols and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, which are the main contributors that may well balance the positive forcings associated with greenhouse gases, absorbing aerosols, ozone related changes, etc. These aerosol effects on climate, from various modeling studies discussed in Menon (2004), range from +0.8 to -2.4 W m{sup -2}, with an implied value of -1.0 W m{sup -2} (range from -0.5 to -4.5 W m{sup -2}) for the aerosol indirect effects. Quantifying the contribution of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions remain complicated for several reasons some of which are related to aerosol distributions and some to the processes used to represent their effects on clouds. Aerosol effects on low lying marine stratocumulus clouds that cover much of the Earth's surface (about 70%) have been the focus of most of prior aerosol-cloud interaction effect simulations. Since cumulus clouds (shallow and deep convective) are short lived and cover about 15 to 20% of the Earth's surface, they are not usually considered as radiatively important. However, the large amount of latent heat released from convective towers, and corresponding changes in precipitation, especially in biomass regions due to convective heating effects (Graf et al. 2004), suggest that these cloud systems and aerosol effects on them, must be examined more closely. The radiative heating effects for mature deep convective systems can account for 10-30% of maximum latent heating effects and thus cannot be ignored (Jensen and Del Genio 2003). The first study that isolated the sensitivity of cumulus clouds to aerosols was from Nober et al. (2003) who found a reduction in precipitation in biomass burning regions and shifts in circulation patterns. Aerosol effects on convection have been included in other

  18. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and cloud observations in trade wind cumulus clouds using the CIRPAS aircraft with the cloud radar was designed and carried out. The observational...gradients in cloud properties off the coast. Further from the South Florida area of fair-weather cumulus clouds (Jan. 2008) where clouds with both...marine and continental characteristics were observed. This was followed by a set of observations made in 2010 of cumulus clouds in off of Barbados

  19. A numerical study of aerosol influence on mixed-phase stratiform clouds through modulation of the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2013-02-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out in a high-resolution two-dimensional framework to increase our understanding of aerosol indirect effects in mixed-phase stratiform clouds. Aerosol characteristics explored include insoluble particle type, soluble mass fraction, influence of aerosol-induced freezing point depression and influence of aerosol number concentration. Simulations were analyzed with a focus on the processes related to liquid phase microphysics, and ice formation was limited to droplet freezing. Of the aerosol properties investigated, aerosol insoluble mass type and its associated freezing efficiency was found to be most relevant to cloud lifetime. Secondary effects from aerosol soluble mass fraction and number concentration also alter cloud characteristics and lifetime. These alterations occur via various mechanisms, including changes to the amount of nucleated ice, influence on liquid phase precipitation and ice riming rates, and changes to liquid droplet nucleation and growth rates. Alteration of the aerosol properties in simulations with identical initial and boundary conditions results in large variability in simulated cloud thickness and lifetime, ranging from rapid and complete glaciation of liquid to the production of long-lived, thick stratiform mixed-phase cloud.

  20. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Ferrare; David D. Turner

    2011-09-01

    Project goals: (1) Use the routine surface and airborne measurements at the ARM SGP site, and the routine surface measurements at the NSA site, to continue our evaluations of model aerosol simulations; (2) Determine the degree to which the Raman lidar measurements of water vapor and aerosol scattering and extinction can be used to remotely characterize the aerosol humidification factor; (3) Use the high temporal resolution CARL data to examine how aerosol properties vary near clouds; and (4) Use the high temporal resolution CARL and Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) data to quantify entrainment in optically thin continental cumulus clouds.

  1. Influence of meteorological conditions on correlation between aerosol and cloud in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lamei; Zhang, Jiahua; Yao, Fengmei; Han, Xinlei; Igbawua, Tertsea; Liu, Yuqin; Zhang, Da

    2017-04-01

    Aerosols can affect the atmospheric radiation balance through direct and indirect effects. The formation and development of cloud and precipitation influenced by aerosols differ significantly from each other in different meteorological conditions. In this work, we used the MODIS's daily Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), Cloud Effective Radius (CER), Cloud Top Temperature (CTT), Cloud Water Path (CWP) and ECMWF's Relative Humidity (RH), Vertical Velocity (VV) and Horizontal Wind (HW) (from 2005 to 2008) to reveal the influence of meteorological factors on the distribution of aerosols, and also the correlation between aerosols and clouds. The study was designed in such a way that, the RH, VV, Upwind (UW), Downwind (DW) and CWP were divided into several intervals, to quantify the relationship between AOD and CER by controlling one single variable or two comprehensive variables over the mountains and plains. At the same time, the effect of wind speed and direction on polluted conditions was analyzed through the superposed spatial distribution map of wind and AOD. The conclusions are as follows: (1) The wind coming from mountains dispelled aerosols while the sea breeze invigorated aerosols, and the upwind showed a markedly negative relevance with AOD. (2) The strong upwind contributed to the positive relationship between AOD and CER, and the correlation rose by 38% after excluding the condition where CWP < 34 g/m2. (3) For the horizontal wind, only the zonal wind over the plains had obvious effects on the correlation, while the meridonal wind did not show evident influence. (4) For the plains, when CWP values were within the interval of 0-34 g/m2 and 74-150 g/m2, the correlation was positive, while in 34-74 g/m2, it was negative. However, it is generally positive either over the mountains or in clean conditions. Moreover, the influence of RH on the correlation was consistent with that of CWP.

  2. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  3. CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N.; Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Fischer, D.; Fischer, J.; Kremic, T.; Agrawal, A.; Andreae, M.; Bierbaum, R.; Blakeslee, R.; Boerner, A.; Bowles, N.; Christian, H.; Dunion, J.; Horvath, A.; Huang, X.; Khain, A.; Kinne, S.; Lemos, M.-C.; Penner, J.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. Knowledge of these interactions is foundational to our understanding of weather and climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Decadal Survey (NRC 2007) indicate that the uncertainty in how clouds adjust to aerosol perturbations dominates the uncertainty in the overall quantification of the radiative forcing attributable to human activities. The Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER) mission concept responds to the IPCC and Decadal Survey concerns by studying the activation of CCN and their interactions with clouds and storms. CHASER proposes to revolutionize our understanding of the interactions of aerosols with clouds by making the first global measurements of the fundamental physical entity linking them: activated cloud condensation nuclei. The CHASER mission was conceptualized to measure all quantities necessary for determining the interactions of aerosols with clouds and storms. Measurements by current satellites allow the determination of crude profiles of cloud particle size but not of the activated CCN that seed them. CHASER uses a new technique (Freud et al. 2011; Rosenfeld et al. 2012) and high-heritage instruments to produce the first global maps of activated CCN and the properties of the clouds associated with them. CHASER measures the CCN concentration and cloud thermodynamic forcing simultaneously, allowing their effects to be distinguished. Changes in the behavior of a group of weather systems in which only one of the quantities varies (a partial derivative of the intensity with the desirable quantity) allow the determination of each effect statistically. The high uncertainties of current climate predictions limit their much-needed use in decision-making. CHASER mitigates this

  4. Numerical simulations of stratocumulus cloud response to aerosol perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrejczuk, Miroslaw; Gadian, Alan; Blyth, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Geoengineering of the Earth clouds is proposed as a one of the methods to offset global warming. Idealized climate model simulations indicate that such an approach may work and stratocumulus cloud seeding may delay global warming by as much as 25 years. However cloud-aerosol interaction is not fully understood yet, and its representation in climate model are very simplified, what may lead to significant uncertainty in climate model predictions. Problem with quantifying aerosol distribution/composition/concentration -> cloud droplet number relation is more general and even higher resolution model models with more sophisticated microphysics have problem with capturing this relation. Stratocumulus clouds are especially difficult to model because these are long living clouds and aerosol can affect these clouds significantly both locally and globally. Before investigating effect of aerosol perturbation on stratocumulus clouds, models should be able to capture observed relation between aerosol and cloud droplets. Although there are indications that cloud seeding may effect cloud albedo based on results from parcel model(1), assumption made in this type of models about homogeneity and neglected effect of dynamics may affect model results. In the presentation new approach to microphysics, which is represented in Lagrangian framework, with two way coupling between Lagrangian parcels and Large Eddy Simulations model dynamics and theromodynamics(2) will be discussed. Results from this model will be presented and validated against observations from VOCALS field campaign. Model response to aerosol perturbation and its effect on cloud albedo will be shown for cases with high and low initial cloud droplet concentration. (1) Bower, K. N., Choularton, T. W., Latham, J., Sahraei, J. and Salter, S. H. (2006), Computational assessment of a proposed technique for global warming mitigation via albedo-enhancement of marine stratocumulus clouds. Atmos. Res. 82, 328-336. (2) M. Andrejczuk

  5. From Regional Cloud-Albedo to a Global Albedo Footprint - Studying Aerosol Effects on the Radiation Budget Using the Relation Between Albedo and Cloud Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, F.; Engström, A.; Karlsson, J.; Wood, R.; Charlson, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's albedo is the primary determinant of the amount of energy absorbed by the Earth-atmosphere system. The main factor controlling albedo is the amount of clouds present, but aerosols can affect and alter both clear-sky and cloudy-sky reflectance. How albedo depends on cloud fraction and how albedo varies at a given cloud fraction and a given cloud water content, reveals information about these aerosol effects on the radiation budget. Hence, the relation between total albedo and cloud fraction can be used for illustration and quantification of aerosol effects, and as a diagnostic tool, to test model performance. Here, we show examples of the utilisation of this relation focusing on satellite observations from CERES and MODIS on Aqua, as well as from Calipso and CloudSat, and performing comparisons with climate models on the way: In low-cloud regions in the subtropics, we find that climate models well represent a near-constant regional cloud albedo, and this representation has improved from CMIP3 to CMIP5. CMIP5 models indicate more reflective clouds in present-day climate than pre-industrial, as a result of increased aerosol burdens. On monthly mean time scale, models are found to over-estimate the regional cloud-brightening due to aerosols. On the global scale we find an increasing cloud albedo with increasing cloud fraction - a relation that is very well defined in observations, and less so in CMIP5 models. Cloud brightening from pre-industrial to present day is also seen on global scale. Further, controlling for both cloud fraction and cloud water content we can trace small variations in albedo, or perturbations of solar reflectivity, that create a near-global coherent geographical pattern that is consistent with aerosol impacts on climate, with albedo enhancement in regions dominant of known aerosol sources and suppression of albedo in regions associated with high rates of aerosol removal (deduced using CloudSat precipitation estimates). This mapping can be

  6. On the source of organic acid aerosol layers above clouds.

    PubMed

    Sorooshian, Armin; Lu, Miao-Ling; Brechtel, Fred J; Jonsson, Haflidi; Feingold, Graham; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2007-07-01

    During the July 2005 Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and the August-September 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS), the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter probed aerosols and cumulus clouds in the eastern Pacific Ocean off the coast of northern California and in southeastern Texas, respectively. An on-board particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) quantified inorganic and organic acid species with < or = 5-min time resolution. Ubiquitous organic aerosol layers above cloud with enhanced organic acid levels were observed in both locations. The data suggest that aqueous-phase reactions to produce organic acids, mainly oxalic acid, followed by droplet evaporation is a source of elevated organic acid aerosol levels above cloud. Oxalic acid is observed to be produced more efficiently relative to sulfate as the cloud liquid water content increases, corresponding to larger and less acidic droplets. As derived from large eddy simulations of stratocumulus underthe conditions of MASE, both Lagrangian trajectory analysis and diurnal cloudtop evolution provide evidence that a significant fraction of the aerosol mass concentration above cloud can be accounted for by evaporated droplet residual particles. Methanesulfonate data suggest that entrainment of free tropospheric aerosol can also be a source of organic acids above boundary layer clouds.

  7. The cloud-aerosol-radiation (CAR) ensemble modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.-Z.; Zhang, F.

    2013-08-01

    A cloud-aerosol-radiation (CAR) ensemble modeling system has been developed to incorporate the largest choices of alternate parameterizations for cloud properties (cover, water, radius, optics, geometry), aerosol properties (type, profile, optics), radiation transfers (solar, infrared), and their interactions. These schemes form the most comprehensive collection currently available in the literature, including those used by the world's leading general circulation models (GCMs). CAR provides a unique framework to determine (via intercomparison across all schemes), reduce (via optimized ensemble simulations), and attribute specific key factors for (via physical process sensitivity analyses) the model discrepancies and uncertainties in representing greenhouse gas, aerosol, and cloud radiative forcing effects. This study presents a general description of the CAR system and illustrates its capabilities for climate modeling applications, especially in the context of estimating climate sensitivity and uncertainty range caused by cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions. For demonstration purposes, the evaluation is based on several CAR standalone and coupled climate model experiments, each comparing a limited subset of the full system ensemble with up to 896 members. It is shown that the quantification of radiative forcings and climate impacts strongly depends on the choices of the cloud, aerosol, and radiation schemes. The prevailing schemes used in current GCMs are likely insufficient in variety and physically biased in a significant way. There exists large room for improvement by optimally combining radiation transfer with cloud property schemes.

  8. Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR) ensemble modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.-Z.; Zhang, F.

    2013-04-01

    A Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation (CAR) ensemble modeling system has been developed to incorporate the largest choices of alternative parameterizations for cloud properties (cover, water, radius, optics, geometry), aerosol properties (type, profile, optics), radiation transfers (solar, infrared), and their interactions. These schemes form the most comprehensive collection currently available in the literature, including those used by the world leading general circulation models (GCMs). The CAR provides a unique framework to determine (via intercomparison across all schemes), reduce (via optimized ensemble simulations), and attribute specific key factors for (via physical process sensitivity analyses) the model discrepancies and uncertainties in representing greenhouse gas, aerosol and cloud radiative forcing effects. This study presents a general description of the CAR system and illustrates its capabilities for climate modeling applications, especially in the context of estimating climate sensitivity and uncertainty range caused by cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions. For demonstration purpose, the evaluation is based on several CAR standalone and coupled climate model experiments, each comparing a limited subset of the full system ensemble with up to 896 members. It is shown that the quantification of radiative forcings and climate impacts strongly depends on the choices of the cloud, aerosol and radiation schemes. The prevailing schemes used in current GCMs are likely insufficient in variety and physically biased in a significant way. There exists large room for improvement by optimally combining radiation transfer with cloud property schemes.

  9. Aerosol and Cloud Microphysical Characteristics of Rifts and Gradients in Maritime Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharon, Tarah M.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Minnis, Patrick; Khaiyer, Mandana M.; Van Reken, Timothy; Seinfeld, John; Flagan, Rick

    2008-01-01

    A cloud rift is characterized as a large-scale, persistent area of broken, low reflectivity stratocumulus clouds usually surrounded by a solid deck of stratocumulus. A rift observed off the coast of Monterey Bay, California on 16 July 1999 was studied to compare the aerosol and cloud microphysical properties in the rift with those of the surrounding solid stratus deck. Variables measured from an instrumented aircraft included temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water. These measurements characterized the thermodynamic properties of the solid deck and rift areas. Microphysical measurements made included aerosol, cloud drop and drizzle drop concentrations and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The microphysical characteristics in a solid stratus deck differ substantially from those of a broken, cellular rift where cloud droplet concentrations are a factor of 2 lower than those in the solid cloud. Further, CCN concentrations were found to be about 3 times greater in the solid cloud area compared with those in the rift and aerosol concentrations showed a similar difference as well. Although drizzle was observed near cloud top in parts of the solid stratus cloud, the largest drizzle rates were associated with the broken clouds within the rift area. In addition to marked differences in particle concentrations, evidence of a mesoscale circulation near the solid cloud rift boundary is presented. This mesoscale circulation provides a mechanism for maintaining a rift, but further study is required to understand the initiation of a rift and the conditions that may cause it to fill.

  10. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Schultz, D. M.; McFiggans, G.

    2015-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 km and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average reduction of downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface of -24.7 W m-2 over the three case studies. However, around 21.7 W m-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively interacting aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase net shortwave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that largely counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was difficult to quantify, being extremely sensitive to the model resolution and use of convective parameterisation. The 1 km domain simulated clouds less horizontally spread, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Not having a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain reduced total cloud cover, but also total precipitation. BB aerosol particles acted as CCN, increasing the droplet number concentration of clouds. However, the changes to cloud properties had negligible impact on net radiative balance on either domain, with or without convective parameterisation. Sensitivity to the uncertainties relating to the semi

  11. CalWater 2015 — Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosol Impacts on Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field experiment was conducted between January and March and consisted of more than fifty science flights, a major research cruise, and continuous ground-based observations coordinated to study phenomena driving the incidence of extreme precipitation events and the variability of water supply along the West Coast of the United States. CalWater 2015 examined key processes linked to (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major winter storms, and (2) aerosols, originating from local sources as well as from remote continents, within and between storms and their modulating effects on precipitation on the U.S. West Coast. As part of a large interagency field effort including NOAA, DOE, NASA, NSF, and the Naval Research Laboratory, four research aircraft from three government agencies were deployed in coordination with the oceangoing NOAA Ronald H. Brown and were equipped with meteorological and chemical observing systems in near-shore regions of California and the eastern Pacific. At the same time, ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network on the U.S. West Coast and a major NSF-supported observing site for aerosols and microphysics at Bodega Bay, California provided continuous near surface-level meteorological and chemical observations, respectively, during CalWater 2015. The DOE-sponsored ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) was executed in close coordination with NOAA and NASA facilities and deployed airborne and ship-based observing systems. This presentation summarizes the objectives, implementation strategy, data acquisitions, and some preliminary results from CalWater 2015 addressing science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic

  12. Eye safe short range standoff aerosol cloud finder.

    SciTech Connect

    Bambha, Ray P.; Schroder, Kevin L.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2005-02-01

    Because many solid objects, both stationary and mobile, will be present in an indoor environment, the design of an indoor aerosol cloud finding lidar (light detection and ranging) instrument presents a number of challenges. The cloud finder must be able to discriminate between these solid objects and aerosol clouds as small as 1-meter in depth in order to probe suspect clouds. While a near IR ({approx}1.5-{micro}m) laser is desirable for eye-safety, aerosol scattering cross sections are significantly lower in the near-IR than at visible or W wavelengths. The receiver must deal with a large dynamic range since the backscatter from solid object will be orders of magnitude larger than for aerosol clouds. Fast electronics with significant noise contributions will be required to obtain the necessary temporal resolution. We have developed a laboratory instrument to detect aerosol clouds in the presence of solid objects. In parallel, we have developed a lidar performance model for performing trade studies. Careful attention was paid to component details so that results obtained in this study could be applied towards the development of a practical instrument. The amplitude and temporal shape of the signal return are analyzed for discrimination of aerosol clouds in an indoor environment. We have assessed the feasibility and performance of candidate approaches for a fieldable instrument. With the near-IR PMT and a 1.5-{micro}m laser source providing 20-{micro}J pulses, we estimate a bio-aerosol detection limit of 3000 particles/l.

  13. The NASA Decadal Survey Aerosol, Cloud, Ecosystems Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Bontempi, Paula; Maring, Hal

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, the National Academy of Sciences delivered a Decadal Survey (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond) for NASA, NOAA, and USGS, which is a prioritization of future satellite Earth observations. The recommendations included 15 missions (13 for NASA, two for NOAA), which were prioritized into three groups or tiers. One of the second tier missions is the Aerosol, Cloud, (ocean) Ecosystems (ACE) mission, which focuses on climate forcing, cloud and aerosol properties and interactions, and ocean ecology, carbon cycle science, and fluxes. The baseline instruments recommended for ACE are a cloud radar, an aerosol/cloud lidar, an aerosol/cloud polarimeter, and an ocean radiometer. The instrumental heritage for these measurements are derived from the Cloudsat, CALIPSO, Glory, SeaWiFS and Aqua (MODIS) missions. In 2008, NASA HQ, lead by Hal Maring and Paula Bontempi, organized an interdisciplinary science working group to help formulate the ACE mission by refining the science objectives and approaches, identifying measurement (satellite and field) and mission (e.g., orbit, data processing) requirements, technology requirements, and mission costs. Originally, the disciplines included the cloud, aerosol, and ocean biogeochemistry communities. Subsequently, an ocean-aerosol interaction science working group was formed to ensure the mission addresses the broadest range of science questions possible given the baseline measurements, The ACE mission is a unique opportunity for ocean scientists to work closely with the aerosol and cloud communities. The science working groups are collaborating on science objectives and are defining joint field studies and modeling activities. The presentation will outline the present status of the ACE mission, the science questions each discipline has defined, the measurement requirements identified to date, the current ACE schedule, and future opportunities for broader community

  14. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  15. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  16. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  17. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  18. Implications of using transmitted vs. reflected light for determining cloud properties, cloud radiative effects and aerosol-cloud-interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, S. E.; Redemann, J.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Flynn, C. J.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.; Woods, S.; Lawson, P.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Light transmitted through clouds is sensitive to a different cloud volume than reflected light at cloud top. This difference in sampling volumes has implications when calculating the radiative effects of clouds (CRE) and aerosol-cloud-interactions (ACI). We present a comparison of retrieved cloud properties and the corresponding CRE and ACI based on transmitted and reflected light for a cloud sampled during the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS, 2013) field campaign. Measurements of zenith radiances were obtained from the NASA DC-8 aircraft using the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) instrument. 4STAR was deployed on an airborne platform during SEAC4RS alongside the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR). To retrieve cloud properties from transmitted shortwave radiation, we use a retrieval utilizing spectrally resolved measurements. Spectral features in shortwave radiation transmitted through clouds are sensitive to changes in cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase. The spectral features due to absorption and scattering processes by liquid water and ice cloud particles include shifts in spectral slopes, curvatures, maxima, and minima of cloud-transmitted radiance. These spectral features have been quantified by 15 parameters used to retrieve cloud properties from the 4STAR zenith radiances. Retrieved cloud optical thicknesses and effective radii based on transmitted shortwave radiation are compared to their counterparts obtained from reflected shortwave radiation measured above cloud with MODIS and with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), and SSFR operating aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Remotely sensed cloud particle effective radius are combined with in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol particles from the NASA Langley Aerosol Research Group Experiment (LARGE) CCN Counter

  19. Marine boundary layer cloud regimes and POC formation in a CRM coupled to a bulk aerosol scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, A. H.; Bretherton, C. S.; Wood, R.; Muhlbauer, A.

    2013-12-01

    A cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled to a new intermediate-complexity bulk aerosol scheme is used to study aerosol-boundary-layer-cloud-precipitation interactions and the development of pockets of open cells (POCs) in subtropical stratocumulus cloud layers. The aerosol scheme prognoses mass and number concentration of a single lognormal accumulation mode with surface and entrainment sources, evolving subject to processing of activated aerosol and scavenging of dry aerosol by clouds and rain. The CRM with the aerosol scheme is applied to a range of steadily forced cases idealized from a well-observed POC. The long-term system evolution is explored with extended two-dimensional (2-D) simulations of up to 20 days, mostly with diurnally averaged insolation and 24 km wide domains, and one 10 day three-dimensional (3-D) simulation. Both 2-D and 3-D simulations support the Baker-Charlson hypothesis of two distinct aerosol-cloud "regimes" (deep/high-aerosol/non-drizzling and shallow/low-aerosol/drizzling) that persist for days; transitions between these regimes, driven by either precipitation scavenging or aerosol entrainment from the free-troposphere (FT), occur on a timescale of ten hours. The system is analyzed using a two-dimensional phase plane with inversion height and boundary layer average aerosol concentrations as state variables; depending on the specified subsidence rate and availability of FT aerosol, these regimes are either stable equilibria or distinct legs of a slow limit cycle. The same steadily forced modeling framework is applied to the coupled development and evolution of a POC and the surrounding overcast boundary layer in a larger 192 km wide domain. An initial 50% aerosol reduction is applied to half of the model domain. This has little effect until the stratocumulus thickens enough to drizzle, at which time the low-aerosol portion transitions into open-cell convection, forming a POC. Reduced entrainment in the POC induces a negative feedback

  20. Analysis of Arctic Cloud Thermodynamic Phase Susceptibility to Aerosols.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopman, Q.; Garrett, T. J.; Riedi, J.; Eckhardt, S.; Stohl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Even if Arctic is remote from industrialized areas, this region is influenced by elevated concentration of aerosols from mid-latitude, especially during winter. This is mainly due to the decrease of wet scavenging and the surface temperature inversion, both acting as a trap for the atmospheric particles. Aerosols play a key role on cloud's microphysics, because they act as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) or Ice Nuclei (IN). Both nuclei influence directly on cloud's presence and formation, potentially impacting also thermodynamic phase transition through different mechanisms, which in turn affect cloud radiative properties and forcing. In our study we used two sets of data: i) A combination of POLDER-3/PARASOL and MODIS/AQUA satellite measurements to retrieve cloud properties; ii) The numerical transport model FLEXPART which use carbon monoxide tracer to inform on concentration of biomass burning and anthropogenic aerosols. The main advantage of combining these two sets of data is to obtain large statistics about clouds that have been potentially influenced by varied concentrations of aerosol. We report here results of a study in which we analyze potential interaction between clouds and aerosols from biomass burning and anthropogenic sources. We first analyzed the temperature at which thermodynamic phase transition is most likely to occur according to the types and concentrations of aerosols. It is shown a correlation between the temperature of thermodynamic phase transition and aerosols concentrations and type. Unlike we could have expected from previous studies, preliminary analyses suggest that aerosols from anthropogenic sources accelerate the liquid-ice transition whereas aerosols from biomass burning inhibit the transition from water to ice. Different hypotheses can be responsible for this observation and we analyze parameters that can play a role on the transition temperature shift and how aerosols act as an inhibitor or activator of the phase transition, for

  1. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  2. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2012-01-04

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a boundary layer (BL) contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (D{sub p} > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25 % of aerosol with D{sub p} > 100 nm are interstitial (not activated). A direct comparison of pre-cloud and in-cloud aerosol yields a higher estimate. Artifacts in the measurement of interstitial aerosol due to droplet shatter and evaporation are discussed. Within each of 102 constant altitude cloud transects, CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated. An examination of one cloud as a case study shows that the

  3. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, S.T.; Bailey, P.L.; Gille, J.C.; Lee, E.C.; Mergenthaler, J.L.; Roche, A.E.; Kumer, J.B.; Fishbein, E.F.; Waters, J.W.; Lahoz, W.A.

    1994-10-15

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605 cm{sup {minus}1} (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 {mu}m) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheroidal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculation and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles. 47 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Spectral signatures of polar stratospheric clouds and sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Bailey, P. L.; Gille, J. C.; Lee, E. C.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Roche, A. E.; Kumer, J. B.; Fishbein, E. F.; Waters, J. W.; Lahoz, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Multiwavelength observations of Antarctic and midlatitude aerosol by the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are used to demonstrate a technique that identifies the location of polar stratospheric clouds. The technique discussed uses the normalized area of the triangle formed by the aerosol extinctions at 925, 1257, and 1605/cm (10.8, 8.0, and 6.2 micrometers) to derive a spectral aerosol measure M of the aerosol spectrum. Mie calculations for spherical particles and T-matrix calculations for spheriodal particles are used to generate theoretical spectral extinction curves for sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles. The values of the spectral aerosol measure M for the sulfate and polar stratospheric cloud particles are shown to be different. Aerosol extinction data, corresponding to temperatures between 180 and 220 K at a pressure of 46 hPa (near 21-km altitude) for 18 August 1992, are used to demonstrate the technique. Thermodynamic calculations, based upon frost-point calculations and laboratory phase-equilibrium studies of nitric acid trihydrate, are used to predict the location of nitric acid trihydrate cloud particles.

  5. Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei at the ARM mobile facility over the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy; Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan

    2014-04-01

    A multiplatform data set from the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) Graciosa, Azores, 2009-2010 field campaign was used to investigate how continental aerosols can influence MBL cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration (NCCN). The seasonal variations of aerosol properties have shown that the winter and early spring months had the highest mean surface wind speed (> 5 m s-1) and greatest contribution of sea salt to aerosol optical depth (AOD), while continental fine mode aerosols were the main contributors to AOD during the warm season months (May-September). Five aerosol events consisting of mineral dust, pollution, biomass smoke, and volcanic ash particles were selected as case studies using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility measurements. The aerosols in Case I were found to primarily consist of coarse mode, Saharan mineral dust. For Case II, the aerosols were also coarse mode but consisted of volcanic ash. Case III had fine mode biomass smoke and pollution aerosol influences while Cases IV and V consisted of mixtures of North American pollution and Saharan dust that was advected by an extratropical cyclone to the Azores. Cases I, IV, and V exhibited weak correlations between aerosol loading and NCCN due to mineral dust influences, while Cases II and III had a strong relationship with NCCN likely due to the sulfate content in the volcanic ash and pollution particles. The permanent Eastern North Atlantic ARM facility over the Azores will aid in a future long-term study of aerosol effects on NCCN.

  6. Correlation between model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and satellite-derived cloud optical depths: Indication of indirect effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Luo, C.; Saylor, R.; Streets, D.; Huang, Y.; Bergin, M.; Giorgi, F.

    2002-05-01

    We consider two independently derived data sets. The first represents the annually averaged distribution of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia as derived by a coupled regional climate/chemical transport model. The other is the annually averaged distributions of cloud optical depths and cloud amount over East Asia derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. We find a remarkable similarity in the distributions of model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and ISCCP-reported cloud optical depths, with both exhibiting a region of enhanced values extending over the east central portion of China, between the Sichuan Basin and the Yangtze Delta, and then in an easterly direction over the East China Sea, Japan, and South Korea, and the western edge of the Pacific Ocean. Linear regression between the estimated aerosol column burdens and the cloud optical depths yields an r2 > 0.6, indicating that the correlations are statistically significant at a confidence level that is >99.9% and that more than 60% of the variation in the cloud optical depths is related to variations in the anthropogenic aerosol abundances. Multivariate analysis involving the distributions of boundary layer relative humidity and precipitation over East Asia, as well as that of the model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and the ISCCP-reported cloud properties, indicates that the relationship between anthropogenic aerosols and cloud optical depth is unique to these two variables and not symptomatic of a more general mechanism involving the hydrologic cycle. Trend analysis of the ISCCP data suggests that there was an upward trend in cloud optical depths over areas in East Asia impacted by air pollution during the early 1990s that would have corresponded to the likely increase in anthropogenic aerosol concentrations over this period in East Asia in response to growing anthropogenic emissions. A likely explanation for these findings is that there

  7. Impact of Non-Uniform Beam Filling on Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Radar Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Sacco, Gian Franco; Durden, Stephen L.; Haddad, Ziad S.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the performance of classification and retrieval algorithms for spaceborne cloud and precipitation radars such as the Global Precipitation Measurement mission Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR), and notional radar for the Aerosol/Clouds/Ecosystem (ACE) mission and related concepts. Spaceborne radar measurements are simulated either from Airborne Precipitation Radar 2nd Generation observations, or from atmospheric model outputs via instrument simulators contained in the NASA Earth Observing Systems Simulators Suite (NEOS(sup 3)). Both methods account for the three dimensional nature of the scattering field at resolutions smaller than that of the spaceborne radar under consideration. We will focus on the impact of non-homogeneities of the field of hydrometeors within the beam. We will discuss also the performance of methods to identify and mitigate such conditions, and the resulting improvements in retrieval accuracy. The classification and retrieval algorithms analyzed in this study are those derived from APR-2's Suite of Processing and Retrieval Algorithms (ASPRA); here generalized to operate on an arbitrary set of radar configuration parameters to study the expected performance of spaceborne cloud and precipitation radars. The presentation will highlight which findings extend to other algorithm families and which ones do not.

  8. Aerosol-cloud closure study using RPAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calmer, R.; Roberts, G.; Sanchez, K. J.; Nicoll, K.; Preissler, J.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Sciare, J.; Bronz, M.; Hattenberger, G.; Rosenfeld, D.; Lauda, S.; Hashimshoni, E.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancements in Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) have increased their possible uses in many fields for the past two decades. For atmospheric research, ultra-light RPAS (< 2.5kg) are now able to fly at altitudes greater than 3 km and even in cloud, which opens new opportunities to understand aerosol-cloud interactions. We are deploying the RPAS as part of the European project BACCHUS (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic Emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic Understanding). Field experiments in Cyprus and Ireland have already been conducted to study aerosol-cloud interactions in climatically different environments. The RPAS are being utilized in this study with the purpose of complementing ground-based observations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to conduct aerosol-cloud closure studies Cloud microphysical properties such as cloud drop number concentration and size can be predicted directly from the measured CCN spectrum and the observed updraft, the vertical component of the wind vector [e.g., Conant et al, 2004]. On the RPAS, updraft measurements are obtained from a 5-hole probe synchronized with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The RPA (remotely piloted aircraft) are programmed to fly at a level leg just below cloud base to measure updraft measurements while a scanning CCN counter is stationed at ground level. Vertical profiles confirm that CCN measurements on the ground are representative to those at cloud base. An aerosol-cloud parcel model is implemented to model the cloud droplet spectra associated with measured updraft velocities. The model represents the particle size domain with internally mixed chemical components, using a fixed-sectional approach [L. M. Russell and Seinfeld, 1998]. The model employs a dual moment (number and mass) algorithm to calculate growth of particles from one section to the next for non-evaporating species. Temperature profiles, cloud base, updraft velocities and aerosol size and composition, all

  9. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud-free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressures contain information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud-free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressures are close to those of the aerosol layer for optically thick aerosols. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressures may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO cloud data and AAI, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given, which can be beneficial for aviation safety and operations in case of e.g. volcanic ash plumes.

  10. Importance of including ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) aerosols for ice cloud parameterization in GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, P. S.; Sud, Y. C.; Liu, X.; Walker, G. K.; Yang, R.; Wang, J.

    2010-02-01

    A common deficiency of many cloud-physics parameterizations including the NASA's microphysics of clouds with aerosol-cloud interactions (hereafter called McRAS-AC) is that they simulate lesser (larger) than the observed ice cloud particle number (size). A single column model (SCM) of McRAS-AC physics of the GEOS4 Global Circulation Model (GCM) together with an adiabatic parcel model (APM) for ice-cloud nucleation (IN) of aerosols were used to systematically examine the influence of introducing ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 aerosols in McRAS-AC and its influence on the optical properties of both liquid and ice clouds. First an (NH4)2SO4 parameterization was included in the APM to assess its effect on clouds vis-à-vis that of the other aerosols. Subsequently, several evaluation tests were conducted over the ARM Southern Great Plain (SGP) and thirteen other locations (sorted into pristine and polluted conditions) distributed over marine and continental sites with the SCM. The statistics of the simulated cloud climatology were evaluated against the available ground and satellite data. The results showed that inclusion of (NH4)2SO4 into McRAS-AC of the SCM made a remarkable improvement in the simulated effective radius of ice cloud particulates. However, the corresponding ice-cloud optical thickness increased even more than the observed. This can be caused by lack of horizontal cloud advection not performed in the SCM. Adjusting the other tunable parameters such as precipitation efficiency can mitigate this deficiency. Inclusion of ice cloud particle splintering invoked empirically further reduced simulation biases. Overall, these changes make a substantial improvement in simulated cloud optical properties and cloud distribution particularly over the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the GCM.

  11. Cloud and aerosol occurrences in the UTLS region across Pakistan during summer monsoon seasons using CALIPSO and CloudSat observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishtie, Farrukh

    2016-04-01

    As part of the A-train NASA constellation, Coudsat and CALIPSO provide an unprecedented vertical observation of clouds and aerosols. Using observational data from both of these satellites, we conduct a multi-year analysis from 2006-2014, of the UTLS (Upper Troposphere and the Lower Stratosphere) region. We map out cloud and aerosol occurrences in this region across Pakistan, specifically around the summer monsoon season. Over the past five years, Pakistan has faced tremendous challenges due to massive flooding as well as earlier brief monsoon seasons of low precipitation and short drought periods. Hence, this motivates the present study towards understanding the deep convective and related dynamics in this season which can possibly influence cloud and aerosol transport in the region. Further, while global studies are conducted, the goal of this study is to conduct a detailed study of cloud, aerosols and their interplay, across Pakistan. Due to a dearth of ground observations, this study provides a dedicated focus on the UTLS domain. Vertical profiling satellites in this region are deemed important as there are no ground observations being done. This is important as both the properties and dynamics of clouds and aerosols have to be studied in a wider context in order to better understand the monsoon season and its onset in this region. With the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask (VFM), Total Attenuated Backscatter (TAB) and Depolarization Ratio (DR) as well as the combined CloudSat's 2B-GEOPROF-LIDAR (Radar-Lidar Cloud Geometrical Profile) and 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR (Radar-Lidar Cloud Classification) products, we find the presence of thin cirrus clouds in the UTLS region in the periods of June-September from the 2006-2014 period. There are marked differences in day observations as compared to night in both of these satellite retrievals, with the latter period finding more occurrences of clouds in the UTLS region. Dedicated CloudSat products 2B-CLDCLASS (cloud classification

  12. Effect of aerosol subgrid variability on aerosol optical depth and cloud condensation nuclei: implications for global aerosol modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigum, Natalie; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental limitation of grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid boxes, which can lead to discrepancies in simulated aerosol climate effects between high- and low-resolution models. This study investigates the impact of neglecting subgrid variability in present-day global microphysical aerosol models on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We introduce a novel technique to isolate the effect of aerosol variability from other sources of model variability by varying the resolution of aerosol and trace gas fields while maintaining a constant resolution in the rest of the model. We compare WRF-Chem (Weather and Research Forecast model) runs in which aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km and again at 10 km resolutions; in both simulations the other model components, such as meteorology and dynamics, are kept at the 10 km baseline resolution. We find that AOD is underestimated by 13 % and CCN is overestimated by 27 % when aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km resolution compared to 10 km. The processes most affected by neglecting aerosol subgrid variability are gas-phase chemistry and aerosol uptake of water through aerosol-gas equilibrium reactions. The inherent non-linearities in these processes result in large changes in aerosol properties when aerosol and gaseous species are artificially mixed over large spatial scales. These changes in aerosol and gas concentrations are exaggerated by convective transport, which transports these altered concentrations to altitudes where their effect is more pronounced. These results demonstrate that aerosol variability can have a large impact on simulating aerosol climate effects, even when meteorology and dynamics are held constant. Future aerosol model development should focus on accounting for the effect of subgrid variability on these

  13. Effects of aerosol organics on cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration and first indirect aerosol effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Lee, Y.- N.; Daum, Peter H.; Jayne, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-03

    Abstract. Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN properties were measured on the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus/ Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosols measured during MASE included free tropospheric aerosols, marine boundary layer aerosols, and aerosols with high organic concentration within a thin layer above the cloud. Closure analysis was carried out for all three types of aerosols by comparing the measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation to those predicted based on size distribution and chemical composition using K¨ohler theory. The effect of aerosol organic species on predicted CCN concentration was examined using a single hygroscopicity parameterization.

  14. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-21

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO{sub 2} from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25% of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50% of aerosol with D{sub p} > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two

  15. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O3 and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO2 from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 °C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of ~150 cm-3, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that ~25 % of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50 % of aerosol with Dp > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two approaches possibly representing

  16. Role of Clouds, Aerosols, and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction in 20th Century Simulations with GISS ModelE2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarenko, Larissa; Rind, David; Bauer, Susanne; Del Genio, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    We use the new version of NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model, modelE2 with 2º by 2.5º horizontal resolution and 40 vertical layers, with the model top at 0.1 hPa [Schmidt et al., 2014]. We use two different treatments of the atmospheric composition and aerosol indirect effect: (1) TCAD(I) version has fully interactive Tracers of Aerosols and Chemistry in both the troposphere and stratosphere. This model predicts total aerosol number and mass concentrations [Shindell et al., 2013]; (2) TCAM is the aerosol microphysics and chemistry model based on the quadrature methods of moments [Bauer et al., 2008]. Both TCADI and TCAM models include the first indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [Menon et al., 2010]; the TCAD model includes only the direct aerosol effect. We consider the results of the TCAD, TCADI and TCAM models coupled to "Russell ocean model" [Russell et al., 1995], E2-R. We examine the climate response for the "historical period" that include the natural and anthropogenic forcings for 1850 to 2012. The effect of clouds, their feedbacks, as well as the aerosol-cloud interactions are assessed for the transient climate change.

  17. Observed aerosol effects on marine cloud nucleation and supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Sorooshian, Armin; Seinfeld, John H.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Nenes, Athanasios; Leaitch, W. Richard; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Ahlm, Lars; Chen, Yi-Chun; Coggon, Matthew; Corrigan, Ashley; Craven, Jill S.; Flagan, Richard C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hawkins, Lelia N.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Jung, Eunsil; Lin, Jack J.; Metcalf, Andrew R.; Modini, Robin; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; Roberts, Greg C.; Shingler, Taylor; Song, Siwon; Wang, Zhen; Wonaschütz, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer include primary organic and salt particles from sea spray and combustion-derived particles from ships and coastal cities. These particle types serve as nuclei for marine cloud droplet activation, although the particles that activate depend on the particle size and composition as well as the supersaturation that results from cloud updraft velocities. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) 2011 was a targeted aircraft campaign to assess how different particle types nucleate cloud droplets. As part of E-PEACE 2011, we studied the role of marine particles as cloud droplet nuclei and used emitted particle sources to separate particle-induced feedbacks from dynamical variability. The emitted particle sources included shipboard smoke-generated particles with 0.05-1 μm diameters (which produced tracks measured by satellite and had drop composition characteristic of organic smoke) and combustion particles from container ships with 0.05-0.2 μm diameters (which were measured in a variety of conditions with droplets containing both organic and sulfate components) [1]. Three central aspects of the collaborative E-PEACE results are: (1) the size and chemical composition of the emitted smoke particles compared to ship-track-forming cargo ship emissions as well as background marine particles, with particular attention to the role of organic particles, (2) the characteristics of cloud track formation for smoke and cargo ships, as well as the role of multi-layered low clouds, and (3) the implications of these findings for quantifying aerosol indirect effects. For comparison with the E-PEACE results, the preliminary results of the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) 2012 provided evidence of the cloud-nucleating roles of both marine organic particles and coastal urban pollution, with simultaneous measurements of the effective supersaturations of the clouds in the

  18. Impact of volcanic ash plume aerosol on cloud microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, G.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; Berresheim, H.; Varghese, S.; Martin, D.; Flanagan, R.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2012-03-01

    This study focuses on the dispersion of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume over the west of Ireland, at the Mace Head Supersite, and its influence on cloud formation and microphysics during one significant event spanning May 16th and May 17th, 2010. Ground-based remote sensing of cloud microphysics was performed using a K a-band Doppler cloud RADAR, a LIDAR-ceilometer and a multi-channel microwave-radiometer combined with the synergistic analysis scheme SYRSOC ( Synergistic Remote Sensing Of Cloud). For this case study of volcanic aerosol interaction with clouds, cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), liquid water content (LWC), and droplet effective radius ( reff) and the relative dispersion were retrieved. A unique cloud type formed over Mace Head characterized by layer-averaged maximum, mean and standard deviation values of the CDNC, reff and LWC: Nmax = 948 cm -3, N¯=297cm, σ=250cm, reff max = 35.5 μm, r¯=4.8μm, σ=4.4μm, LWC=0.23gm, LWC¯=0.055gm, σ=0.054gm, respectively. The high CDNC, for marine clean air, were associated with large accumulation mode diameter (395 nm) and a hygroscopic growth factor consistent with sulphuric acid aerosol, despite being almost exclusively internally mixed in submicron sizes. Additionally, the Condensation Nuclei (CN, d > 10 nm) to Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) ratio, CCN:CN ˜1 at the moderately low supersaturation of 0.25%. This case study illustrates the influence of volcanic aerosols on cloud formation and microphysics and shows that volcanic aerosol can be an efficient CCN.

  19. Characteristics of Interstitial Aerosol in Cold and Warm Clouds during the Ice-T Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaniyala, S.; He, M.; Moharreri, A.; Craig, L.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate calculation of the contribution of aerosols to the radiative forcing budget requires an understanding of the aerosol role in cloud formation. From a global climate perspective, aerosol-cloud processes must be represented by simple parametric models that can relate aerosol properties to the characteristics of the clouds formed. The development and testing of such simple models requires aerosol-cloud data from a large number of clouds systems. While reasonably accurate cloud data is currently available from a large number of well-established cloud probes, information about aerosol particles in clouds is largely unavailable because of the problem of artifacts in aerosol measurements from the shatter of cloud droplets. During the recent ICE-T campaign (Summer 2011), several different interstitial aerosol inlets were deployed and aerosol measurements were made in a variety of tropical convective clouds, focused particularly on conditions that permit the formation of ice within these systems. The flight operations were based in St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands and sampling was largely conducted within ~ 600 miles of this location. The use of new samplers that permit shatter-free sampling of aerosol particles in cold and clouds has allowed for the collection of significant data on interstitial aerosol in tropical convective clouds. Of particular interest are measurements of aerosol size distributions inside and outside clouds made with a fast mobility spectrometer. Size distributions were obtained at 20-30 second resolution, permitting direct measurements of the scavenged aerosol population in clouds and the differences in the scavenged fraction as a function of cloud properties. As part of this presentation, the characteristics of interstitial aerosol in various cloud conditions will be presented and the transformation of aerosol population during cloud processing will be discussed.

  20. Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David, D.; Ferrare, Richard, A.

    2011-07-06

    The 'Evaluating Global Aerosol Models and Aerosol and Water Vapor Properties Near Clouds' project focused extensively on the analysis and utilization of water vapor and aerosol profiles derived from the ARM Raman lidar at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. A wide range of different tasks were performed during this project, all of which improved quality of the data products derived from the lidar or advanced the understanding of atmospheric processes over the site. These activities included: upgrading the Raman lidar to improve its sensitivity; participating in field experiments to validate the lidar aerosol and water vapor retrievals; using the lidar aerosol profiles to evaluate the accuracy of the vertical distribution of aerosols in global aerosol model simulations; examining the correlation between relative humidity and aerosol extinction, and how these change, due to horizontal distance away from cumulus clouds; inferring boundary layer turbulence structure in convective boundary layers from the high-time-resolution lidar water vapor measurements; retrieving cumulus entrainment rates in boundary layer cumulus clouds; and participating in a field experiment that provided data to help validate both the entrainment rate retrievals and the turbulent profiles derived from lidar observations.

  1. Clouds, aerosols, and photochemistry in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Strobel, D. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment is made of the development status of concepts for cloud and aerosol compositions, vertical and horizontal distributions, and microphysical properties, in the Jovian upper troposphere and stratosphere. Attention is given to several key photochemical species' relationships to aerosol formation as well as their transport process implications, treating photochemistry in the context of comparative planetology and noting differences and similarities among the outer planet atmospheres; since this approach emphasizes observational data, a variegated assortment of ground-based and spacecraft observations is assembled. Current views on the tropospheric distribution of clouds are challenged, and a rationale is presented for alternative accounts.

  2. Clouds, aerosols, and photochemistry in the Jovian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, R. A.; Strobel, D. F.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-03-01

    An assessment is made of the development status of concepts for cloud and aerosol compositions, vertical and horizontal distributions, and microphysical properties, in the Jovian upper troposphere and stratosphere. Attention is given to several key photochemical species' relationships to aerosol formation as well as their transport process implications, treating photochemistry in the context of comparative planetology and noting differences and similarities among the outer planet atmospheres; since this approach emphasizes observational data, a variegated assortment of ground-based and spacecraft observations is assembled. Current views on the tropospheric distribution of clouds are challenged, and a rationale is presented for alternative accounts.

  3. Modeling Cloud and Precipitation Processes - Considerations for Future Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Tao, W. K.; Saleeby, S. M.; Wu, D.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid developments in computing resources have allowed for cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations to be conducted over larger domains at higher spatial and temporal resolutions. Indeed, global CRMs are now a reality. Within such modeling frameworks, microphysical processes cannot be isolated from the vertical velocity that drives them, from the impact of energy exchanges due to phase changes, nor from the precipitation they produce, as has historically been the case with more highly parameterized frameworks. The increasing utilization of such high resolution, large-domain CRMs therefore introduces a new set of observational challenges. Instead of only taking into account global distributions of clouds and precipitation, observational strategies now need to be adapted to focus on the actual microphysical processes and feedbacks that are responsible for such cloud and precipitation distributions. Incorrectly representing such processes and feedbacks has significant implications for precipitation rates, efficiency and partitioning; the horizontal and vertical distribution of clouds; anvil ice properties; the partitioning between the liquid water and ice phase; and the location and amount of latent energy release associated with phase changes, all of which have subsequent implications for the global energy and water budget. Numerous microphysical and dynamical processes, and the feedbacks between them, are not well represented in CRMs. However, correctly simulating the magnitude of vertical velocity, as well as various ice processes appear to be particularly challenging. This talk will focus on the range of precipitation and cloud responses obtained within CRM simulations due to changes in the manner various ice processes are represented including melting, riming and shedding. Those parameters causing the greatest simulated cloud and precipitation responses will be identified. Factors impacting the representation of vertical velocity will also be addressed. Finally

  4. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  5. Comprehensive mapping and characteristic regimes of aerosol effects on the formation and evolution of pyro-convective clouds

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, D.; Cheng, Y.; Reutter, P.; ...

    2015-09-21

    Here, a recent parcel model study (Reutter et al., 2009) showed three deterministic regimes of initial cloud droplet formation, characterized by different ratios of aerosol concentrations (NCN) to updraft velocities. This analysis, however, did not reveal how these regimes evolve during the subsequent cloud development. To address this issue, we employed the Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM) with full microphysics and extended the model simulation from the cloud base to the entire column of a single pyro-convective mixed-phase cloud. A series of 2-D simulations (over 1000) were performed over a wide range of NCN and dynamic conditions. Themore » integrated concentration of hydrometeors over the full spatial and temporal scales was used to evaluate the aerosol and dynamic effects. The results show the following. (1) The three regimes for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation in the parcel model (namely aerosol-limited, updraft-limited, and transitional regimes) still exist within our simulations, but net production of raindrops and frozen particles occurs mostly within the updraft-limited regime. (2) Generally, elevated aerosols enhance the formation of cloud droplets and frozen particles. The response of raindrops and precipitation to aerosols is more complex and can be either positive or negative as a function of aerosol concentrations. The most negative effect was found for values of NCN of ~ 1000 to 3000 cm–3. (3) The nonlinear properties of aerosol–cloud interactions challenge the conclusions drawn from limited case studies in terms of their representativeness, and ensemble studies over a wide range of aerosol concentrations and other influencing factors are strongly recommended for a more robust assessment of the aerosol effects.« less

  6. Comprehensive mapping and characteristic regimes of aerosol effects on the formation and evolution of pyro-convective clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.; Cheng, Y.; Reutter, P.; Trentmann, J.; Burrows, S. M.; Spichtinger, P.; Nordmann, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Poschl, U.; Su, H.

    2015-09-21

    Here, a recent parcel model study (Reutter et al., 2009) showed three deterministic regimes of initial cloud droplet formation, characterized by different ratios of aerosol concentrations (NCN) to updraft velocities. This analysis, however, did not reveal how these regimes evolve during the subsequent cloud development. To address this issue, we employed the Active Tracer High Resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM) with full microphysics and extended the model simulation from the cloud base to the entire column of a single pyro-convective mixed-phase cloud. A series of 2-D simulations (over 1000) were performed over a wide range of NCN and dynamic conditions. The integrated concentration of hydrometeors over the full spatial and temporal scales was used to evaluate the aerosol and dynamic effects. The results show the following. (1) The three regimes for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation in the parcel model (namely aerosol-limited, updraft-limited, and transitional regimes) still exist within our simulations, but net production of raindrops and frozen particles occurs mostly within the updraft-limited regime. (2) Generally, elevated aerosols enhance the formation of cloud droplets and frozen particles. The response of raindrops and precipitation to aerosols is more complex and can be either positive or negative as a function of aerosol concentrations. The most negative effect was found for values of NCN of ~ 1000 to 3000 cm–3. (3) The nonlinear properties of aerosol–cloud interactions challenge the conclusions drawn from limited case studies in terms of their representativeness, and ensemble studies over a wide range of aerosol concentrations and other influencing factors are strongly recommended for a more robust assessment of the aerosol effects.

  7. A CloudSat Perspective of the Atmospheric Water Cycle and Precipitation: Recent Progress and Grand Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Im, Eastwood; Vane, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Summary Global - mean precipitation - is controlled by Earth's energy balance and is a quantifiable consequence of the water vapor feedback. Predictability rests on the degree to which the water vapor feedback is predictable. Regional scale - to a significant extent, changes are shaped by atmospheric circulation changes but we do not know the extent to which regional scale changes are predictable. The impacts of changes to atmospheric circulation on regional scale water cycle changes can be dramatic. Process - scale - significant biases to the CHARACTER of precipitation (frequency and intensity) is related to how the precipitation process is parameterized in models. Aerosol - We still do not know the extent to which the water cycle is influenced by aerosol but anecdotal evidence is building. The character of precipitation is affected by the way aerosol influence clouds and thus affects the forcing of the climate system through the albedo effect. Observations - we still have a way to go and need to approach the problem in a more integrated way (tie clouds, aerosol and precipitation together and then link to soil moisture, etc). Globally our capabilities seriously lag behind the science and model development.

  8. An Observational Study of the Relationship between Cloud, Aerosol and Meteorology in Broken Low-Level Cloud Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, Norman G.; Schuster, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    Global satellite analyses showing strong correlations between aerosol optical depth and 3 cloud cover have stirred much debate recently. While it is tempting to interpret the results as evidence of aerosol enhancement of cloud cover, other factors such as the influence of meteorology on both the aerosol and cloud distributions can also play a role, as both aerosols and clouds depend upon local meteorology. This study uses satellite observations to examine aerosol-cloud relationships for broken low-level cloud regions off the coast of Africa. The analysis approach minimizes the influence of large-scale meteorology by restricting the spatial and temporal domains in which the aerosol and cloud properties are compared. While distributions of several meteorological variables within 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions are nearly identical under low and high aerosol optical depth, the corresponding distributions of single-layer low cloud properties and top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes differ markedly, consistent with earlier studies showing increased cloud cover with aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, fine-mode fraction and Angstrom Exponent are also larger in conditions of higher aerosol optical depth, even though no evidence of systematic latitudinal or longitudinal gradients between the low and high aerosol optical depth populations are observed. When the analysis is repeated for all 5deg 5deg latitude-longitude regions over the global oceans (after removing cases in which significant meteorological differences are found between the low and high aerosol populations), results are qualitatively similar to those off the coast of Africa.

  9. Enhanced shortwave cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Slingo, A.

    1995-05-01

    It has been suggested that anthropogenic aerosols in the troposphere can influence the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their reflectivity, thereby exerting a radiative influence on climate. This article presents the theoretical basis for of this so-called indirect forcing and reviews pertinent observational evidence and climate model calculations of its magnitude and geographical distribution. We restrict consideration to liquid-water clouds.

  10. Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interactions in Atmospheric Forecast Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    combustion, biomass burning, and biogenic activity are sources of particulate oxalic acid ; photooxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs...acids are likely particle-phase compounds formed by cloud and fog processing. Oxalic acid , which has also been shown to be formed by aqueous-phase...chemistry in cloud droplets, remains in the aerosol phase after subsequent droplet evaporation. In the aqueous phase, oxalic acid is formed by oxidation

  11. A Coupled GCM-Cloud Resolving Modeling System to Study Precipitation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiundar; Atlas, Robert; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Lin, Xin

    2006-01-01

    Recent GEWEX Cloud System Study (GCSS) model comparison projects have indicated that cloud resolving models (CRMs) agree with observations better than traditional single column models in simulating various types of clouds and cloud systems from different geographic locations. Current and future NASA satellite programs can provide cloud, precipitation, aerosol and other data at very fine spatial and temporal scales. It requires a coupled global circulation model (GCM) and cloud-scale model (termed a super-parameterization or multi-scale modeling framework, MMF) to use these satellite data to improve the understanding of the physical processes that are responsible for the variation in global and regional climate and hydrological systems. The use of a GCM will enable global coverage and the use of a CRM will allow for better and more sophisticated physical parameterization. NASA Satellite and field campaign cloud related data sets can provide initial conditions as well as validation for both the MMF and CRMs. Also we have implemented a Land Information System (LIS that includes the CLM and NOAH land surface models into the MMF. The Goddard MMF is based on the 2D Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model and the Goddard finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) This modeling system has been applied and tested its performance for two different climate scenarios, El Nino (1998) and La Nina (1999). The coupled new modeling system produced more realistic propagation and intensity of tropical rainfall systems and intraseasonal oscillations, and diurnal variation of precipitation that are very difficult to forecast using even the state-of-the-art GCMs. In this talk I will present: (1) a brief review on GCE model and its applications on precipitation processes (both Microphysical and land processes) and (2) The Goddard MMF and the Major difference between two existing MMFs (CSU MMF and Goddard MMF) and preliminary results (the comparison with traditional GCMs).

  12. Cloud water measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal during the Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herckes, P.; Ervens, B.; Wang, Y.; Eagar, J.; Leaitch, R.; Macdonald, A.; Sjostedt, S.; Abbatt, J.

    2011-12-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are produced in high yields from both anthropogenic (aromatics) and biogenic (isoprene) precursors. The role of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the aqueous phase of cloud water and aerosols has received great attention over the past years. In addition, gas phase oxidation and photolysis of these compounds yield radicals and, thus, impact the oxidant budgets. While the reactivity of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in both the gas and aqueous phases is nearly identical, the much higher solubility of glyoxal leads to its more efficient removal in the presence of clouds. Thus, the amount of cloud water (liquid water content, LWC) and cloud processing time will affect the concentration ratios and thus the reaction rates of oxidation processes in the gas and aqueous phase, respectively. The Whistler Aerosol and Cloud Study (WACS) investigated the interactions between clouds and biogenic aerosol in summer 2010 in Whistler (Canada). During this study, cloud samples were collected at two locations, Whistler peak and a mid mountain station Raven's Nest. Cloud samples were extensively chemically characterized including the measurements of glyoxal and methylglyoxal using liquid chromatography coupled to UV and mass spectrometric detection after derivatization. Concentrations were variable on the order of micromoles, accounting for 1% of the dissolved organic matter in clouds. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations at both locations are predicted by means of model studies using VOC measurements and liquid water contents as input data. These concentrations and their ratios are compared to those in different regions. It will be discussed how cloud liquid water content, cloud processing time and amount and mixture of precursors (emissions) affect these concentration ratios. Finally, the role of different emission scenarios and the presence of clouds for SOA formation and radical budgets will be briefly assessed.

  13. Springtime precipitation effects on the abundance of fluorescent biological aerosol particles and HULIS in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Siyao; Ren, Hong; Fan, Songyun; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Fu, Pingqing

    2016-01-01

    Bioaerosols an