Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol collection efficiency

  1. Efficiency of aerosol collection on wires exposed in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, H. Y.; Farlow, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of inertial impaction is briefly presented. Stratospheric aerosol research experiments were performed duplicating Wong et al. experiments. The use of the curve of inertial parameters vs particle collection efficiency, derived from Wong et al., was found to be justified. The results show that stratospheric aerosol particles of all sizes are collectible by wire impaction technique. Curves and tables are presented and used to correct particle counts for collection efficiencies less than 100%.

  2. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed 'collection' or 'coagulation'. Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing at temperatures below 0 C. Theoretical studies have shown that for aerosol particles smaller than 0.1 micrometers, Brownian motion is important, and for particles with diameters larger than 1 micrometer, inertial force dominates. There is a collection efficiency minimum for particles between 0.1-2 micrometers, called the 'Greenfield Gap'. Experimental efforts, however, have been limited to very large drizzle and rain drops until recently, and constrained parameters necessary to describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets have not been available. One reason is that laboratory setups that allow for coagulation to be observed on a single-particle basis have been lacking. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for studying and assessing contact ice nucleation. Contact ice nucleation is currently the least understood ice nucleation mechanism and can be potentially important for mixed-phase cloud formation. The significance of experimentally assessing collection efficiency is therefore two-fold: to first understand the frequency of contacts and to then understand the fraction that lead to ice nucleation. We have constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets and contact freezing. A stream of 30-micron cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles. The outflow

  3. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Oo, K.; Brown, M. D.; Dhaniyala, S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets. The collection efficiency study is a prelude to studying contact nucleation, which is a potentially important ice nucleation mode that is not well-understood. This laboratory setup is a step closer to experimentally assessing the importance of contact nucleation. Water droplets with 20 micron diameter and submicron aerosol particles are brought into contact in an injector situated inside a chilled glass flow tube. The water droplets that collect aerosol particles are allowed to pass through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), which accepts large droplets and rejects aerosol particles that have not coagulated with the water droplets. The collected droplets are sent into the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument which performs in situ chemical analysis of a single particle. The number of aerosol particles collected by the single water droplet is quantified by calibrating the PALMS with known concentrations of aerosol particles. The water droplets contain a known amount of ammonium sulfate for identification purpose in the mass spectrometry. Preliminary results from the experiment will be discussed and compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  4. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed "collection" or "coagulation". Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing. There is a theoretical collection efficiency minimum of particles with diameter between 0.1-2 µm, called the "Greenfield Gap". Experimental effort, however, was limited to drizzle and rain drops until recently, and has not constrained parameters that describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for assessing contact freezing, the least known ice nucleation mechanism today. Experimentally assessing collection efficiency can prove the existence of the "Greenfield Gap" and lay the foundation for studying contact freezing. We recently constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study coagulation experimentally. A stream of 40 µm cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles with known size and concentration. The outflow goes through a series of dryers before entering the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures of both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will

  5. eDPS Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Venzie, J.

    2015-10-13

    The eDPS Aerosol Collection project studies the fundamental physics of electrostatic aerosol collection for national security applications. The interpretation of aerosol data requires understanding and correcting for biases introduced from particle genesis through collection and analysis. The research and development undertaken in this project provides the basis for both the statistical correction of existing equipment and techniques; as well as, the development of new collectors and analytical techniques designed to minimize unwanted biases while improving the efficiency of locating and measuring individual particles of interest.

  6. Experimental study of elementary collection efficiency of aerosols by spray: Design of the experimental device

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Vendel, J.; Garrec. S.L.

    1995-02-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant containment building, in which pressure and temperature could increase because of a overheating reactor accident, can be achieved by spraying water drops. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam on cold water drops. The more stringent thermodynamic conditions are a pressure of 5.10{sup 5} Pa (due to steam emission) and a temperature of 413 K. Moreover its energy dissipation function, the spray leads to the washout of fission product particles emitted in the reactor building atmosphere. The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. The aim of this work is to develop experiments in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols by a single drop. To do this, the experimental device has to be designed with fundamental criteria:-Thermodynamic conditions have to be representative of post-accident atmosphere. Thermodynamic equilibrium has to be attained between the water drops and the gaseous phase. Thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and mechanical effects have to be studied independently. Operating conditions have to be homogenous and constant during each experiment. This paper presents the design of the experimental device. In practice, the consequences on the design of each of the criteria given previously and the necessity of being representative of the real conditions will be described.

  7. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single-droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with an average radius of 21.6 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere particles of known sizes and concentrations. Two relative humidity (RH) conditions, 15 ± 3 % and 88 ± 3 %, hereafter termed "low" and "high", respectively, were varied with different particles sizes and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single-droplet basis. "Coagulated droplets" (droplets that collected aerosols) had mass spectra that contained signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 2.0 × 10-1 to 1.6 for the low-RH case and from 1.5 × 10-2 to 9.0 × 10-2 for the high-RH case. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this study were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first collection experiment performed on a single-droplet basis with atmospherically relevant conditions such as droplet sizes, droplet charges and flow.

  8. Particle Characterization and Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Field-Collected Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.; Moffet, R.; Nizkorodov, S.; Roedel, T.; Sterckx, L.; Tivanski, A.; Knopf, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation is one of the least understood processes resulting in cirrus and mixed-phase clouds which affect the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. In particular, how organic aerosol affect ice nucleation is not well understood. Here we report on heterogeneous ice nucleation from particles collected during the CalNex campaign at the Caltech campus site, Pasadena, on May 19, 2010 at 6am-12pm (A2) and 12pm-6pm (A3) and May 23 at 6am-12pm (B2) and 6pm-12am (B4). The ice nucleation onsets and water uptake were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). The ice nucleation efficiency was related to the particle chemical composition. Single particle characterization was provided by using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). The STXM/NEXAFS analysis indicates that the morning sample (A2) constitutes organic particles and organic particles with soot and inorganic inclusions. The afternoon sample (A3) is dominated by organic particles with a potentially higher degree of oxidation associated with soot. The B2 sample shows a higher number fraction of magnesium-containing particle indicative of a marine source and ~93% of the particles contained sulfur besides oxygen and carbon as derived from CCSEM/EDX analysis. The B4 sample lacks the strong marine influence and shows higher organic content. Above 230 K, we observed water uptake followed by condensation freezing at mean RH of 93-100% and 89-95% for A2 and A3, respectively. This indicates that the aged A3 particles are efficient ice nuclei (IN) for condensation freezing. Below 230 K A2 and A3 induced deposition ice nucleation between 125-155% RHice (at mean values of 134-150% RHice). The B2 and B4

  9. Understanding the Role of Riming in Deep Convection Through Variability in Collection Efficiencies and Aerosol Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; van den Heever, S. C.; Marinescu, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.; Tao, W. K.; Matsui, T.; Wu, D.

    2015-12-01

    In many mixed-phase cloud systems, the riming of cloud droplets is a key microphysical process in the growth of precipitation-sized hydrometeors. The relative importance of riming compared to other hydrometeor growth mechanisms depends on the type of cloud system and the mass, size, and number concentration of cloud droplets and ice species. In a perturbed climate state, the nature of deep convection may be altered through changes in the environmental conditions and aerosol concentrations. Such climate-induced variability can modify the dominant microphysical processes that generate precipitation through changes in hydrometeor size spectra. Such changes could either increase or decrease precipitation production and efficiency as well as impact associated morphology of clouds and convection. If the efficiency of the riming process is modified through these climate changes, it can alter the accumulated precipitation, precipitation intensity, spatial and temporal distribution of cloud and ice water, and the radiation budget through the modification of ice spectra and areal coverage of upper-level anvil clouds. The impacts of variability in aerosol concentration and collision efficiencies on the riming process in deep convection is explored through the use of high-resolution cloud resolving model simulations of a squall line that occurred May 20, 2011 over the U.S. central plains during the MC3E field project. Results thus far have demonstrated that changes in the riming rates strongly impact the intensity and partitioning of squall line precipitation between convective and stratiform, the lofting of condensate to upper levels, the vertical distribution of latent heating, and the area and optical thickness of stratiform anvil clouds. Analyses from direct tests of microphysical processes have revealed that a reduction in riming rates leads to less precipitation, greater amounts of lofted cloud water, and greater ice mass in cirrus anvils. Further, an increase in aerosol

  10. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the Collection Efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Water droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with a radius of ~20 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer Polystyrene Latex Sphere (PSL) particles of variable size and concentrations. Two RH conditions, ~15 and ~88%, hereafter termed "Low" and "High", respectively, were varied with different particles size and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single particle basis. Coagulated droplets had mass spectra that contain signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 5.7 × 10-3 to 4.6 × 10-2 for the Low RH and from 6.4 × 10-3 to 2.2 × 10-2 for the High RH cases. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this work were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first coagulation experiment performed on a single droplet basis.

  11. Comparison of model results of collection efficiency of aerosol particles by individual water droplets and ice crystals in a subsaturated atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K.; Lin, H.

    The aerosol collection efficiencies of water droplets and ice crystals are compared based on the concept of equivalent geometrical kernel K ∗ which is the geometrical sweep-out volume per unit time by the collector. It is thought that the comparison based on this quantity reveals the real difference of the aerosol collecting abilities of different collectors and sheds lights on the precipitation scavenging mechanisms. The collection efficiencies are taken from theoretical model results computed by us previously at relative humidities of 95% for water droplets, columnar and hexagonal plate ice crystals. It is shown that the efficiencies are rather insensitive to collector shape for aerosol particles smaller than 0.01 μm. The shape factor becomes more important for larger aerosol particles, especially in the Greenfield-Gap size range.

  12. Collection efficiency of the Soot-Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-05-26

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of two. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  13. Collection efficiency of the soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) for internally mixed particulate black carbon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Willis, M. D.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E. C.; Williams, L. R.; Lambe, A. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2014-12-18

    The soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) uses an intra-cavity infrared laser to vaporize refractory black carbon (rBC) containing particles, making the particle beam–laser beam overlap critical in determining the collection efficiency (CE) for rBC and associated non-refractory particulate matter (NR-PM). This work evaluates the ability of the SP-AMS to quantify rBC and NR-PM mass in internally mixed particles with different thicknesses of organic coating. Using apparent relative ionization efficiencies for uncoated and thickly coated rBC particles, we report measurements of SP-AMS sensitivity to NR-PM and rBC, for Regal Black, the recommended particulate calibration material. Beam width probe (BWP) measurements aremore » used to illustrate an increase in sensitivity for highly coated particles due to narrowing of the particle beam, which enhances the CE of the SP-AMS by increasing the laser beam–particle beam overlap. Assuming complete overlap for thick coatings, we estimate CE for bare Regal Black particles of 0.6 ± 0.1, which suggests that previously measured SP-AMS sensitivities to Regal Black were underestimated by up to a factor of 2. The efficacy of the BWP measurements is highlighted by studies at a busy road in downtown Toronto and at a non-roadside location, which show particle beam widths similar to, but greater than that of bare Regal Black and coated Regal Black, respectively. Further BWP measurements at field locations will help to constrain the range of CE for fresh and aged rBC-containing particles. The ability of the SP-AMS to quantitatively assess the composition of internally mixed particles is validated through measurements of laboratory-generated organic coated particles, which demonstrate that the SP-AMS can quantify rBC and NR-PM over a wide range of particle compositions and rBC core sizes.« less

  14. Introducing... The MODIS Collection 6 Aerosol Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Mattoo, S.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    As evidenced by more than 1000 publications to date, the MODIS aerosol products are indispensable to research as well as operational applications. The products are used independently, but also in conjunction with other remote sensing instruments and serve as the basis for intercomparisons with models of all scales. In collaboration with our data users, we have made a number of changes to the algorithm and product list, and expect to begin processing “Collection 6” (C006) beginning in early 2011. In addition to more robust means of dealing with degraded or missing reflectance observations, and new protocol for Quality Assurance (QA) characterization and reporting structure, C006 offers new scientific products. C006 will explicitly identify clouds within the aerosol scene, determine distance to nearest cloud for each non-cloudy pixel and provide statistics to help quantify cloud/aerosol interactions. In addition to the traditional retrieval at 10 km resolution focused on climate applications, C006 will provide a 3 km product aimed at characterizing regional and local air quality. The range of valid solar zenith is increased from 72° to 84°, thus increasing retrieval coverage in mid and high latitudes over both land and ocean. Over land, C006 will provide a merged “Dark-target” and “Deep-blue” aerosol product. As for the retrieval over traditional dark targets (land and ocean), the C006 product will benefit from better physical constraints. The lookup tables (central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depth) are more consistent in C006, and the over-ocean retrieval now includes dependence on wind speed. The dark-land retrieval is improved with adjusted aerosol map boundaries. Finally, the entire C006 archive will be produced utilizing collective knowledge of the MODIS instrument behavior over time. Impacts from calibration drifts and instrument response will be minimized such that C006 will be ever closer to characterizing a global aerosol climate data record.

  15. A simple method for estimation of coagulation efficiency in mixed aerosols. [environmental pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmick, R. L.; Boyd, A.; Wolochow, H.

    1975-01-01

    Aerosols of KBr and AgNO3 were mixed, exposed to light in a glass tube and collected in the dark. About 15% of the collected material was reduced to silver upon development. Thus, two aerosols of particles that react to form a photo-reducible compound can be used to measure coagulation efficiency.

  16. High efficiency CIP 10-I personal inhalable aerosol sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görner, P.; Wrobel, R.; Simon, X.

    2009-02-01

    The CIP 10 personal aerosol sampler was first developed by Courbon for sampling the respirable fraction of mining dust. This respirable aerosol sampler was further improved by Fabries, then selectors for sampling thoracic and inhalable aerosols were designed. Kenny et al. evaluated the particle-size dependent sampling efficiency of the inhalable version in a large-scale wind tunnel using a life-size dummy. The authors found that the overall sampling efficiency decreases more rapidly than the CEN-ISO-ACGIH target efficiency curve. Görner and Witschger measured the aspiration efficiency of the CIP 10 omni-directional inlet. They found that the aspiration efficiency was high enough for inhalable aerosol sampling. This result led to the conclusion that the low sampling efficiency is due to some internal losses of the aspirated particles before they reach the final sampling stage, namely the CIP 10 rotating filter. Based on the assumption that the inhalable particles are selected at selector aspiration level, an experimental research project was conducted to improve particle transmission to the collection stage of the sampler. Two different inhalable selectors were designed by Görner and tested in a laboratory wind tunnel. The transmission efficiency of both models was measured by Roger following an experimental protocol described by Witschger. The T-shaped air flow circuit was finally adopted to draw the aspirated particles into the final collection stage of the CIP 10. Actually, in this selector, the almost horizontally aspirated particles should be conducted vertically to the rotating cup. In two previous prototypes, particles could be deposited in certain places by inertia (where the aerosol was forced to deviate drastically) or by sedimentation (where the aerosol decelerated). The aerodynamic behaviour of the adopted solution causes the particles to accelerate radially between two horizontal plates before they enter a vertical tube. This acceleration avoids the

  17. Development and first application of an Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) for quasi online compound specific aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, Thorsten; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Trimborn, Dagmar; Jayne, John; Wahner, Andreas; Worsnop, Doug

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols influence climate and human health on regional and global scales (IPCC, 2007). In many environments organics are a major fraction of the aerosol influencing its properties. Due to the huge variety of organic compounds present in atmospheric aerosol current measurement techniques are far from providing a full speciation of organic aerosol (Hallquist et al., 2009). The development of new techniques for compound specific measurements with high time resolution is a timely issue in organic aerosol research. Here we present first laboratory characterisations of an aerosol collection module (ACM) which was developed to allow for the sampling and transfer of atmospheric PM1 aerosol. The system consists of an aerodynamic lens system focussing particles on a beam. This beam is directed to a 3.4 mm in diameter surface which is cooled to -30 °C with liquid nitrogen. After collection the aerosol sample can be evaporated from the surface by heating it to up to 270 °C. The sample is transferred through a 60cm long line with a carrier gas. In order to test the ACM for linearity and sensitivity we combined it with a GC-MS system. The tests were performed with octadecane aerosol. The octadecane mass as measured with the ACM-GC-MS was compared versus the mass as calculated from SMPS derived total volume. The data correlate well (R2 0.99, slope of linear fit 1.1) indicating 100 % collection efficiency. From 150 °C to 270 °C no effect of desorption temperature on transfer efficiency could be observed. The ACM-GC-MS system was proven to be linear over the mass range 2-100 ng and has a detection limit of ~ 2 ng. First experiments applying the ACM-GC-MS system were conducted at the Jülich Aerosol Chamber. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was formed from ozonolysis of 600 ppbv of b-pinene. The major oxidation product nopinone was detected in the aerosol and could be shown to decrease from 2 % of the total aerosol to 0.5 % of the aerosol over the 48 hours of

  18. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  19. Efficiency tests of samplers for microbiological aerosols, a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, E.; Faengmark, I.

    1984-01-01

    To obtain comparable results from studies using a variety of samplers of microbiological aerosols with different collection performances for various particle sizes, methods reported in the literature were surveyed, evaluated, and tabulated for testing the efficiency of the samplers. It is concluded that these samplers were not thoroughly tested, using reliable methods. Tests were conducted in static air chambers and in various outdoor and work environments. Results are not reliable as it is difficult to achieve stable and reproducible conditions in these test systems. Testing in a wind tunnel is recommended.

  20. A Computationally Efficient Algorithm for Aerosol Phase Equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2004-10-04

    Three-dimensional models of atmospheric inorganic aerosols need an accurate yet computationally efficient thermodynamic module that is repeatedly used to compute internal aerosol phase state equilibrium. In this paper, we describe the development and evaluation of a computationally efficient numerical solver called MESA (Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols). The unique formulation of MESA allows iteration of all the equilibrium equations simultaneously while maintaining overall mass conservation and electroneutrality in both the solid and liquid phases. MESA is unconditionally stable, shows robust convergence, and typically requires only 10 to 20 single-level iterations (where all activity coefficients and aerosol water content are updated) per internal aerosol phase equilibrium calculation. Accuracy of MESA is comparable to that of the highly accurate Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM), which uses a rigorous Gibbs free energy minimization approach. Performance evaluation will be presented for a number of complex multicomponent mixtures commonly found in urban and marine tropospheric aerosols.

  1. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs. PMID:27200479

  2. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Focusing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  3. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  4. Instrument Would Detect and Collect Biological Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savoy, Steve; Mayo, Mike

    2006-01-01

    A proposed compact, portable instrument would sample micron-sized airborne particles, would discriminate between biological ones (e.g., bacteria) and nonbiological ones (e.g., dust particles), and would collect the detected biological particles for further analysis. The instrument is intended to satisfy a growing need for means of rapid, inexpensive collection of bioaerosols in a variety of indoor and outdoor settings. Purposes that could be served by such collection include detecting airborne pathogens inside buildings and their ventilation systems, measuring concentrations of airborne biological contaminants around municipal waste-processing facilities, monitoring airborne effluents from suspected biowarfare facilities, and warning of the presence of airborne biowarfare agents

  5. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  6. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A PORTABLE DEVICE TO COLLECT SULFURIC ACID AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative, interference-free method for collecting sulfuric acid aerosol on a filter was developed and field tested. Since previous research found that severe losses of sulfuric aicd were caused by ammonia, ambient particulate material, and other interferents, a method was n...

  8. Speciation of arsenic in ambient aerosols collected in Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Rabano, E S; Castillo, N T; Torre, K J; Solomon, P A

    1989-01-01

    First-time measurements of the potentially toxic inorganic species of arsenic (arsenite and arsenate) have been obtained in fine (less than 2.5 microns AD) and coarse (greater than 2.5 microns AD) atmospheric particles in the Los Angeles area. A recently developed method that includes procedures for sample collection, preparation, and analysis was used in this study. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected with a high-volume dichotomous virtual impactor that employed polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Results were obtained for the recovery of arsenic standards added to unexposed and collected filters. Data from this study, indicated that the recently developed speciation method can be used to determine concentrations of As(III) and As(V) in atmospheric particulate matter samples. Size-fractionated aerosol samples were collected in the city of Industry during January and February 1987. In most samples, As(III) and As(V) were above the detection limit (approximately 1 ng m-3 of either species) in both aerosol size fractions. A greater portion (about 75 percent) of the two species were observed in the fine particles. The As(III)/As(V) ratio for both particle sizes was close to 1 (i.e., an equal mixture of both species). Comparison of total suspended particulate arsenic measured by the speciation method to that measured by a routine California Air Resources Board-approved procedure showed good agreement (r = 0.94), indicating both methods were approximately equivalent for the collection and analysis of aerosol arsenic. PMID:2709077

  9. An experiment to measure raindrop collection efficiencies: influence of rear capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, A.; Lemaitre, P.; Monier, M.; Porcheron, E.; Flossmann, A. I.; Hervo, M.

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of radioactive aerosol scavenged by rain after the Chernobyl accident highlights certain differences between the modelling studies and the environmental measurements. Part of these discrepancies can probably be attributed to uncertainties in the efficiencies used to calculate aerosol particle collection by raindrops, particularly drops with a diameter larger than one millimetre. In order to improve the issue of these uncertainties, an experimental study was performed to close the gaps still existing for this key microphysical parameter. In the present article, attention is first focused on the efficiency with which aerosol particles, in the accumulation mode are collected by raindrops with a diameter of 2 mm. The collections efficiencies measured for aerosol particle in the sub-micron range are quantitatively consistent with previous theoretical model developed by Beard (1974) and thus highlight the major role of rear capture in the submicron range.

  10. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Patadia, F.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-11-01

    The twin Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an extensive data set of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. The C6 aerosol data set will be created from three separate retrieval algorithms that operate over different surface types. These are the two "Dark Target" (DT) algorithms for retrieving (1) over ocean (dark in visible and longer wavelengths) and (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible), plus the "Deep Blue" (DB) algorithm developed originally for retrieving (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on DT-ocean and DT-land (#1 and #2). We have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase poleward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence on the surface reflectance, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. At the same time, we quantified how "upstream" changes to instrument calibration, land/sea masking and cloud masking will also impact the statistics of global AOD, and affect Terra and Aqua differently. For Aqua, all changes will result in reduced

  11. The Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products over land and ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.; Munchak, L. A.; Remer, L. A.; Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    The twin Moderate Imaging resolution Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors have been flying on Terra since 2000 and Aqua since 2002, creating an incredible dataset of global Earth observations. Here, we introduce the Collection 6 (C6) algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size parameters from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there is significant impact on the products and their interpretation. The C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties (1) over ocean (dark in visible and near-IR wavelengths), (2) over vegetated/dark-soiled land (dark in the visible) and (3) over desert/arid land (bright in the visible). Here, we focus on the changes to both "dark target" algorithms (#1 and #2; DT-ocean and DT-land). Affecting both DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, and relaxed the solar zenith angle limit (up to ≤ 84°) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season/location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and additions of important diagnostic information. All together, the changes to the DT algorithms result in reduced global AOD (by 0.02) over ocean and increased AOD (by 0.01) over land, along with some changes in spatial coverage. Preliminary validation shows that compared to surface-based sunphotometer data, the C6 DT-products should compare at least as well as those from C5. However, at the same time as we

  12. The Collection 6 'dark-target' MODIS Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Mattoo, Shana; Munchak, Leigh A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Patadia, Falguni; Gupta, Pawan; Remer, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol retrieval algorithms are applied to Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors on both Terra and Aqua, creating two streams of decade-plus aerosol information. Products of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol size are used for many applications, but the primary concern is that these global products are comprehensive and consistent enough for use in climate studies. One of our major customers is the international modeling comparison study known as AEROCOM, which relies on the MODIS data as a benchmark. In order to keep up with the needs of AEROCOM and other MODIS data users, while utilizing new science and tools, we have improved the algorithms and products. The code, and the associated products, will be known as Collection 6 (C6). While not a major overhaul from the previous Collection 5 (C5) version, there are enough changes that there are significant impacts to the products and their interpretation. In its entirety, the C6 algorithm is comprised of three sub-algorithms for retrieving aerosol properties over different surfaces: These include the dark-target DT algorithms to retrieve over (1) ocean and (2) vegetated-dark-soiled land, plus the (3) Deep Blue (DB) algorithm, originally developed to retrieve over desert-arid land. Focusing on the two DT algorithms, we have updated assumptions for central wavelengths, Rayleigh optical depths and gas (H2O, O3, CO2, etc.) absorption corrections, while relaxing the solar zenith angle limit (up to 84) to increase pole-ward coverage. For DT-land, we have updated the cloud mask to allow heavy smoke retrievals, fine-tuned the assignments for aerosol type as function of season location, corrected bugs in the Quality Assurance (QA) logic, and added diagnostic parameters such as topographic altitude. For DT-ocean, improvements include a revised cloud mask for thin-cirrus detection, inclusion of wind speed dependence in the retrieval, updates to logic of QA Confidence flag (QAC) assignment, and

  13. Aerosol collection and analysis using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Wong, Diane M.; Meyer, Gerald J.; Roelant, Geoffrey J.; Williams, Barry R.; Miles, Ronald W., Jr.; Manning, Christopher J.

    2004-08-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is routinely employed for the identification of organic molecules and, more recently, for the classification of biological materials. We have developed a sample collection method that facilitates infrared analysis of airborne particulates using a diffuse reflectance (DR) technique. Efforts are underway to extend the method to include simultaneous analysis of vapor phase organics by using adsorbent substrates compatible with the DR technique. This series of laboratory results provides proof-of-principle for both the sample collection and data collection processes. Signal processing of the DR spectra is shown to provide rapid qualitative identification of representative aerosol materials, including particulate matter commonly found in the environment. We compare the results for such materials as bacterial spores, pollens and molds, clays and dusts, smoke and soot. Background correction analysis is shown to be useful for differentiation and identification of these constituents. Issues relating to complex mixtures of environmental samples under highly variable conditions are considered. Instrumentation development and materials research are now underway with the aim of constructing a compact sampling system for near real-time monitoring of aerosol and organic pollutants. A miniature, tilt-compensated Fourier transform spectrometer will provide spectroscopic interrogation. A series of advanced digital signal processing methods are also under development to enhance the sensor package. The approach will be useful for industrial applications, chemical and biological agent detection, and environmental monitoring for chemical vapors, hazardous air pollutants, and allergens.

  14. Amphiphobic Polytetrafluoroethylene Membranes for Efficient Organic Aerosol Removal.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shasha; Zhong, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Yong; Xing, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane is an extensively used air filter, but its oleophilicity leads to severe fouling of the membrane surface due to organic aerosol deposition. Herein, we report the fabrication of a new amphiphobic 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFDAE)-grafted ZnO@PTFE membrane with enhanced antifouling functionality and high removal efficiency. We use atomic-layer deposition (ALD) to uniformly coat a layer of nanosized ZnO particles onto porous PTFE matrix to increase surface area and then subsequently graft PFDAE with plasma. Consequently, the membrane surface showed both superhydrophobicity and oleophobicity with a water contact angle (WCA) and an oil contact angle (OCA) of 150° and 125°, respectively. The membrane air permeation rate of 513 (m(3) m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)) was lower than the pristine membrane rate of 550 (m(3) m(-2) h(-1) kPa(-1)), which indicates the surface modification slightly decreased the membrane air permeation. Significantly, the filtration resistance of this amphiphobic membrane to the oil aerosol system was much lower than the initial one. Moreover, the filter exhibited exceptional organic aerosol removal efficiencies that were greater than 99.5%. These results make the amphiphobic PTFE membranes very promising for organic aerosol-laden air-filtration applications. PMID:27002786

  15. Large radiative forcing efficiency of atmospheric aerosols over the Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasbarra, Daniele; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Di Biagio, Claudia; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Marinoni, Angela; Pietro Verza, Gian; Vuillermoz, Elisa

    2014-05-01

    , it becomes relatively large during elevated aerosol cases. The radiative forcing efficiency (radiative effect produced by a unit aerosol optical depth) is significantly larger than at other sites worldwide, reaching values above 360 W/m2 at about 50° solar zenith angle. The maximum radiative effect is about -90±18 Wm-2 (for τ=0.25), corresponding to a reduction by more than 10% of the solar radiation at the surface. During these elevated aerosol events high concentrations of pollutants were measured: PM10 and PM 2.5 showed concentrations higher than 50 ng m-3, while the black carbon concentration reached 3000 ng m-3. The backtrajectory analysis for the elevated aerosol cases shows that the polluted airmasses observed at NCO-P come from Indo-Gangetic plain and Punjab, regions characterized by the highest industrial and demographic concentration of the Indian subcontinent.

  16. Collection efficiency measurements for solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, H. L.; Olsen, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    A system was established for measuring absolute, spectral collection efficiency that is well suited to solar cell research and development. Determination of spectral collection efficiency involves measurements of the incident photon intensity, the device reflection coefficient, and the cell short circuit current. A monochromatic photon flux is obtained with a high intensity Bausch and Lomb monochromator, and an Epply thermopile detector is used to measure incident intensity. Normal incidence reflectivity measurements are achieved with a prism type beam splitter. The experimental approach is discussed, measurements of the reflectivity of evaporated silver films are considered. Collection efficiency measurements of silicon solar cells are presented, and collection efficiency studies of Cu20 solar cells are discussed.

  17. Experimental studies of silver iodide pyrotechnic aerosol ice forming efficiency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilin, A. G.; Drofa, A. S.; Ivanov, V. N.; Savchenko, A. V.; Shilin, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    The study concerns the problems connected with the temporal variability of aerosol ice forming activity at introduction into the sub-cloud layer and the comparison of aerosol efficiency of produced pyrotechnic mixtures with different silver contents.

  18. HOUSTON URBAN PLUME STUDY, 1974. MICROSCOPICAL IDENTIFICATION OF COLLECTED AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An urban plume study was conducted in Houston during July 1974 to gain preliminary data on the concentration and composition of primary and secondary aerosols contributing to Houston's air pollution problem. Selected membrane filter samples containing urban aerosols were analyzed...

  19. Compact Efficient Lidar Receiver for Measuring Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gili, Christopher; De Young, Russell

    2006-01-01

    A small, light weight, and efficient aerosol lidar receiver was constructed and tested. Weight and space savings were realized by using rigid optic tubes and mounting cubes to package the steering optics and detectors in a compact assembly. The receiver had a 1064nm channel using an APD detector. The 532nm channel was split (90/10) into an analog channel (90%) and a photon counting channel (10%). The efficiency of the 1064nm channel with optical filter was 44.0%. The efficiency of the analog 532nm channel was 61.4% with the optical filter, and the efficiency of the 532nm photon counting channel was 7.6% with the optical filter. The results of the atmospheric tests show that the detectors were able to consistently return accurate results. The lidar receiver was able to detect distinct cloud layers, and the lidar returns also agreed across the different detectors. The use of a light weight fiber-coupled telescope reduced weight and allowed great latitude in detector assembly positioning due to the flexibility enabled by the use of fiber optics. The receiver is now ready to be deployed for aircraft or ground based aerosol lidar measurements.

  20. Impact of Relative Humidity and Collection Media on Mycobacteriophage D29 Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Keyang; Wen, Zhanbo; Li, Na; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Hu, Lingfei; Dong, Xiaokai; Lu, Jianchun

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of aerosol generation, methods of sampling, storage conditions, and relative humidity on the culturability of the mycobacteriophage D29. The lytic phage D29 can kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the phage aerosol can be treated as a potential tool for tuberculosis treatment. The culturability of D29 was tested using a test chamber designed for the bioaerosols research against three spray liquids (deionized water, phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], and normal saline), four collection media (suspension medium [SM], nutrient broth, PBS, and deionized water), two sampling systems (the all-glass impinger AGI-30 and the Biosampler) and across a range of humidities (20 to 90%). The effect of storage conditions on the culturability of collected sample was also evaluated for the AGI-30 impinger. The results proved that viable phage D29 particles generated by deionized water were approximately 30- and 300-fold higher than PBS and normal saline, respectively. As collection media, SM buffer and nutrient broth were observed to yield a higher number of plaques compared to PBS and deionized water. No difference was observed in collection efficiency between AGI-30 and Biosampler with two detection methods (culture-based technique and real-time PCR). The culturability of collected D29 in SM buffer or nutrient broth can be maintained up to 12 h irrespective of storage temperature. Relative humidity was found to strongly influence airborne D29 culturability which is 2- to 20-fold higher in low humidity (25%) than medium (55%) or high (85%) humidity. This research will help identify the optimal means for the application of D29 aerosol in animal inhalation experiments. PMID:22194291

  1. Design of Aerosol Particle Coating: Thickness, Texture and Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the performance (e.g. magnetic, plasmonic or opacifying) of a core material while modifying its surface with a shell that facilitates (e.g. by blocking its reactivity) their incorporation into a host liquid or polymer matrix. Here coating of titania (core) aerosol particles with thin silica shells (films or layers) is investigated at non-isothermal conditions by a trimodal aerosol dynamics model, accounting for SiO2 generation by gas phase and surface oxidation of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapor, coagulation and sintering. After TiO2 particles have reached their final primary particle size (e.g. upon completion of sintering during their flame synthesis), coating starts by uniformly mixing them with HMDSO vapor that is oxidized either in the gas phase or on the particles’ surface resulting in SiO2 aerosols or deposits, respectively. Sintering of SiO2 deposited onto the core TiO2 particles takes place transforming rough into smooth coating shells depending on process conditions. The core-shell characteristics (thickness, texture and efficiency) are calculated for two limiting cases of coating shells: perfectly smooth (e.g. hermetic) and fractal-like. At constant TiO2 core particle production rate, the influence of coating weight fraction, surface oxidation and core particle size on coating shell characteristics is investigated and compared to pertinent experimental data through coating diagrams. With an optimal temperature profile for complete precursor conversion, the TiO2 aerosol and SiO2-precursor (HMDSO) vapor concentrations have the strongest influence on product coating shell characteristics. PMID:23729833

  2. NUMERICAL CALCULATION OF INERTIAL ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Unbiased sampling of airborne particulate from a flowing stream requires that the size distribution and concentration of aerosol collected be identical to that of the aerosol in the free stream. ampling errors occur during aspiration of the aerosol from the free stream to he face...

  3. Leaks in nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    Nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters, also known as high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, are commonly used in air cleaning systems for removal of hazardous aerosols. Performance of the filter units is important in assuring health and environmental protection. The filter units are constructed from pleated packs of fiberglass filter media sealed into rigid frames. Results of previous studies on such filter units indicate that their performance may not be completely predicted by ideal performance of the fibrous filter media. In this study, departure from ideal performance is linked to leaks existing in filter units and overall filter unit performance is derived from independent performance of the individual filter unit components. The performance of 14 nuclear grade HEPA filter units (size 1, 25 cfm) with plywood frames was evaluated with a test system that permitted independent determination of penetration as a function of particle size for the whole filter unit, the filter unit frame, and the filter media pack. Tests were performed using a polydisperse aerosol of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate with a count median diameter of 0.2 {mu}m and geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Flow rate and differential pressure were controlled from 1% to 100% of design values. Particle counts were made upstream and downstream of the filter unit with an optical particle counter (OPC). The OPC provided count information in 28 size channels over the particle diameter range from 0.1 to 0.7 {mu}m. Results provide evidence for a two component leak model of filler unit performance with: (1) external leaks through filter unit frames, and (2) internal leaks through defects in the media and through the seal between the media pack and frame. For the filter units evaluated, these leaks dominate overall filter unit performance over much of the flow rate and particle size ranges tested.

  4. Evaluating MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target Over Water Aerosol Products for Multi-sensor Data Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; McHardy, T. M.; Lee, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been widely used in aerosol related climate, visibility, and air quality studies for more than a decade. Recently, the MODIS collection 6 (c6) aerosol products from MODIS-Aqua have been released. The reported changes between Collection 5 and Collection 6 include updates in the retrieving algorithms and a new cloud filtering process for the over-ocean products. Thus it is necessary to fully evaluate the collection 6 products for applications that require high quality MODIS aerosol optical depth data, such as operational aerosol data assimilation. The uncertainties in the MODIS c6 DT over ocean products are studied through both inter-comparing with the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol products and by evaluation against ground truth. Special attention is given to the low bias in MODIS DT products due to the misclassifications of heavy aerosol plumes as clouds. Finally, a quality assured data assimilation grade aerosol optical product is constructed for aerosol data assimilation related applications.

  5. Collection and analysis of inorganic and water soluble organic aerosols over Maryland and Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Phinney, K.; Conny, J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols aloft have slower removal than those near the ground, in part, because dry and wet deposition rates result in longer lifetimes and greater range of influence. Knowledge of deposition rates and range of transport for different species are important for developing local and regional air quality policy. Currently, the vertical distribution of organic aerosols (OA's) and their polar, oxidized fraction is largely unknown. Comprehensive methods to analyze aerosol composition collected in the boundary layer and the lower free troposphere are lacking. During DISCOVER AQ 2011, both the NASA P3 and Cessna 402B collected aerosols, through shrouded aerosol inlets, onto Teflon and quartz fiber filters. Collection occurred in both the boundary layer and lower free troposphere over Maryland and Virginia, USA. After extraction with water and optimizing separation via ion chromatography, commonly identified secondary organic aerosols can be separated based on their functionality as mono-, di-, or polycarboxylic acids. Inorganic aerosol components can simultaneously be separated and identified with the same method. Individual organic acid compound analysis with detection limits in the low ppb range can be achieved when conductivity/ultraviolet/ and mass spectrometric detectors are placed in tandem. Additionally, thermo optical analysis can be used to determine the mass fraction of water soluble organic carbon versus the total collected mass. This research is designed to provide information on the vertical distribution of particulate organic carbon in the atmosphere, its optical properties, information on aerosol transport in the lower free troposphere, and to provide water soluble organic aerosol structural characterization.

  6. Aerosol transport and deposition efficiency in the respiratory airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Laura; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    Prediction of aerosol deposition in the respiratory system is important for improving the efficiency of inhaled drug delivery and for assessing the toxicity of airborne pollutants. Particle deposition in the airways is typically described as a function of the Stokes number based on a reference flow timescale. This choice leads to significant scatter in deposition data since the velocity and length scales experienced by the particles as they are advected through the flow deviate considerably from the reference values in many sections of the airways. Therefore, the use of an instantaneous Stokes number based on the local properties of the flow field is proposed instead. We define the effective Stokes number as the time-average of the instantaneous value. Our results demonstrate that this average, or effective, Stokes number can deviate significantly from the reference value particularly in the intermediate Stokes number range. In addition, the effective Stokes number shows a very clear correlation with deposition efficiency, and is therefore a more appropriate parameter to describe aerosol transport.

  7. Inactivation efficiency to Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli bacterial aerosols of spraying neutral electrolyzed water.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chi-Yu; Yang, Shinhao; Chang, Ming-Yih; Huang, Hsiao-Chien; Luo, Chin-Hsiang; Hung, Po-Chen; Fang, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this study is to apply neutral electrolyzed water (NEW) spraying to inactivate bioaerosols. We evaluated the inactivation efficiency of NEW applied to inactivate two airborne bacterial Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis aerosols inside an environmental-controlled chamber in the study. Generated with electrolyzing 6.15 M sodium chloride brine, the NEW with free available chlorine (FAC) concentration 50, 100, and 200 ppm was pumped with an air pressure of 70 kg/cm2 through nozzle into the chamber to inactive E. coli and B. subtilis aerosols precontaminated air (initial counts of 3 x 10(4) colony-forming units [CFU]/m3). Bacterial aerosols were collected and cultured from chamber before and after NEW spray. The air exchange rate (ACH, hr(-1)) of the chamber was set to simulate fresh air ventilating dilution of indoor environment. First-order concentration decaying coefficients (Ka, min(-1)) of both bacterial aerosols were measured as an index of NEW inactivation efficiency. The result shows that higher FAC concentration of NEW spray caused better inactivation efficiency. The Ka values under ACH 1.0 hr(-1) were 0.537 and 0.598 for E. coli of FAC 50 and 100 ppm spraying, respectively. The Ka values of FAC 100 ppm and 200 ppm spraying for B. subtilis were 0.063 and 0.085 under ACH 1.0 hr(-1), respectively. The results indicated that NEW spray is likely to be effective in inactivation of bacterial airborne contamination. Moreover, it is observed in the study that the increase of ventilation rate and the use of a larger orifice-size nozzle may facilitate the inactivation efficiency. PMID:24558707

  8. An experiment to measure raindrop collection efficiencies: influence of rear capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, A.; Lemaitre, P.; Monier, M.; Porcheron, E.; Flossmann, A. I.; Hervo, M.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of severe accident with loss of containment in a nuclear plant, radionuclides are released into the atmosphere in the form of both gases and aerosol particles (Baklanov and Sørensen, 2001). The analysis of radioactive aerosol scavenged by rain after the Chernobyl accident highlights certain differences between the modelling studies and the environmental measurements. Part of these discrepancies can probably be attributed to uncertainties in the efficiencies used to calculate aerosol particle collection by raindrops, particularly drops with a diameter larger than one millimetre. In order to address the issue of these uncertainties, an experimental study was performed to close the gaps still existing for this key microphysical parameter. In this paper, attention is first focused on the efficiency with which aerosol particles in the accumulation mode are collected by raindrops with a diameter of 2 mm. The collection efficiencies measured for aerosol particle in the sub-micron range are quantitatively consistent with previous theoretical model developed by Beard (1974) and thus highlight the major role of rear capture in the submicron range.

  9. Solid versus Liquid Particle Sampling Efficiency of Three Personal Aerosol Samplers when Facing the Wind

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Anthony, T. Renee; Van Dyke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the facing-the-wind sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers as a function of particle phase (solid versus liquid). Samplers examined were the IOM, Button, and a prototype personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH). The prototype PHISH was designed to interface with the 37-mm closed-face cassette and provide an inhalable sample at 10 l min−1 of flow. Increased flow rate increases the amount of mass collected during a typical work shift and helps to ensure that limits of detection are met, particularly for well-controlled but highly toxic species. Two PHISH prototypes were tested: one with a screened inlet and one with a single-pore open-face inlet. Personal aerosol samplers were tested on a bluff-body disc that was rotated along the facing-the-wind axis to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. When compared to published data for facing-wind aspiration efficiency for a mouth-breathing mannequin, the IOM oversampled relative to mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency for all sizes and particle types (solid and liquid). The sampling efficiency of the Button sampler was closer to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency than the IOM for solid particles, but the screened inlet removed most liquid particles, resulting in a large underestimation compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. The open-face PHISH results showed overestimation for solid particles and underestimation for liquid particles when compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. Substantial (and statistically significant) differences in sampling efficiency were observed between liquid and solid particles, particularly for the Button and screened-PHISH, with a majority of aerosol mass depositing on the screened inlets of these samplers. Our results suggest that large droplets have low penetration efficiencies

  10. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF FILTER-COLLECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has become an effective technique for determining the elemental content of aerosol samples. For quantitative analysis, the aerosol particles must be collected as uniform deposits on the surface of Teflon membrane filters. An energy dispersive XRF spectrom...

  11. Thermophoresis and Its Thermal Parameters for Aerosol Collection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, Michael; Gundel, Lara

    2007-08-01

    The particle collection efficiency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler's heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25mu m in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  12. FRACTIONAL AEROSOL FILTRATION EFFICIENCY OF IN-DUCT VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The filtration efficiency of ventilation air cleaners is highly particle-size dependent over the 0.01 to 3 μm diameter size range. Current standardized test methods, which determine only overall efficiencies for ambient aerosol or other test aerosols, provide data of limited util...

  13. Radionuclides reveal age and source of aerosols collected over central North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Urban, N. R.; Perlinger, J. A.; Owen, R. C.; China, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol filter samples were collected daily during summer 2013, at the Pico Mountain Observatory (PMO, 38.47°N, 28.40°W, 2,225 m a.s.l.), Azores Islands. PMO monitors free troposphere air and aerosols transported from neighboring continents; North America has the most frequent influence due to predominantly westerly winds in mid-latitude regions, while aerosols from Europe and Africa are sampled occasionally. The residence time during long-range transport in the atmosphere has a critical impact on aerosol chemical and physical properties, and it can be estimated by measuring activities of radionuclides attached to aerosols. 210Pb (t1/2 = 22.1 years) and 210Po (t1/2 = 138 days) are daughter nuclides in the decay chain of 222Rn, an inert gas species produced throughout the Earth's crust and emitted into the atmosphere. Due to different rates of decay, the activity ratio of 210Po to 210Pb can be used to estimate atmospheric residence times of the carrier aerosols. 210Po activity counting of 58 samples was conducted to investigate aerosol residence times in this study. 210Po activity was measured twice serially for each aerosol sample to predict the initial activity of 210Po on the sampling date and the activity of very slowly decaying 210Pb. Aerosol ages calculated by the activity ratio of 210Po to 210Pb were compared with air tracer ages simulated using the FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model (FLEXPART) and studied together with aerosol particle physical properties. The activity of terrestrial radionuclides per unit of aerosol mass can also reveal source information of the aerosols. FLEXPART backward trajectories will be used to verify correlations between source regions and activity of radionuclides in aerosols. In previous research related to long-range atmospheric transport to PMO, FLEXPART has proven to be reliable in identifying upwind source regions.

  14. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Chen, Da-Ren

    2012-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  15. A New Electrospray Aerosol Generator with High Particle Transmission Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huijing; Patel, Anand C; Holtzman, Michael J; Chen, Da-Ren

    2011-01-01

    A new single-capillary electrospray (ES) aerosol generator has been developed for monodisperse particle production with maximal transmission efficiency. The new generator consists of both a spray chamber in a point-to-orifice-plate configuration and a charge reduction chamber that can hold up to 4 Nuclespot ionizers (Model P-2042, NRD Inc.). The 2 chambers are partitioned by an orifice plate. To optimize the particle transmission efficiency of the prototype, a systematic study was performed on the generator by varying the system setup and operation. Two key dimensions of the generator setup, the orifice diameter and the distance from the capillary tip to the orifice plate, were varied. Fluorescence analysis was applied to characterize the loss of ES-generated particles at different locations of the prototype. It was found that particle loss in the generator could be reduced by either increasing the orifice diameter or decreasing the distance between the capillary tip and the orifice plate. Increasing either the total radioactivity of the ionizers or the flowrate of the particle carrier gas also further decreased the particle loss in the system. The maximum particle transmission efficiency of 88.0% was obtained with the spray chamber fully opened to the charge reduction chamber, the capillary tip at the same level as the orifice plate, and 4 bipolar ionizers installed. PMID:22829715

  16. Study on collection efficiency of fission products by spray: Experimental device and modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, D.; Roblot, D.; Vendel, J.; Billarand, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Consequences of an hypothetical overheating reactor accident in nuclear power plants can be limited by spraying cold water drops into containment building. The spray reduces the pressure and the temperature levels by condensation of steam and leads to the washout of fission products (aerosols and gaseous iodine). The present study includes a large program devoted to the evaluation of realistic washout rates. An experimental device (named CARAIDAS) was designed and built in order to determine the collection efficiency of aerosols and iodine absorption by drops with representative conditions of post-accident atmosphere. This experimental device is presented in the paper and more particularly: (1) the experimental enclosure in which representative thermodynamic conditions can be achieved, (2) the monosized drops generator, the drops diameter measurement and the drops collector, (3) the cesium iodide aerosols generator and the aerosols measurements. Modelling of steam condensation on drops aerosols collection and iodine absorption are described. First experimental and code results on drops and aerosols behaviour are compared. 8 refs., 18 figs.

  17. A Computationally Efficient Multicomponent Equilibrium Solver for Aerosols (MESA)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Easter, Richard C.; Peters, Len K.

    2005-12-23

    deliquescence points as well as mass growth factors for the sulfate-rich systems. The MESA-MTEM configuration required only 5 to 10 single-level iterations to obtain the equilibrium solution for ~44% of the 328 multiphase problems solved in the 16 test cases at RH values ranging between 20% and 90%, while ~85% of the problems solved required less than 20 iterations. Based on the accuracy and computational efficiency considerations, the MESA-MTEM configuration is attractive for use in 3-D aerosol/air quality models.

  18. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm: Critical Evaluation and Plans for Collection 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    For ten years the MODIS aerosol algorithm has been applied to measured MODIS radiances to produce a continuous set of aerosol products, over land and ocean. The MODIS aerosol products are widely used by the scientific and applied science communities for variety of purposes that span operational air quality forecasting in estimates o[ clear-sky direct radiative effects over ocean and aerosol-cloud interactions. The products undergo continual evaluation, including self-consistency checks and comparisons with highly accurate ground-based instruments. The result of these evaluation exercises is a quantitative understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the retrieval, where and when the products are accurate and the situations where and when accuracy degrades. We intend 10 present results of the most recent critical evaluations including the first comparison of the over ocean products against the shipboard aerosol optical depth measurements of the Marine Aerosol Network (MAN), the demonstration of the lack of sensitivity to size parameter in the over land products and identification of residual problems and regional issues. While the current data set is undergoing evaluation, we are preparing for the next data processing, labeled Collection 6. Collection 6 will include transparent Quality Flags, a 3 km aerosol product and the 500m resolution cloud mask used within the aerosol n:bicvu|. These new products and adjustments to algorithm assumptions should provide users with more options and greater control, as they adapt the product for their own purposes.

  19. A Fast and Efficient Version of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) Global Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yunha; Adams, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops more computationally efficient versions of the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithms, collectively called Fast TOMAS. Several methods for speeding up the algorithm were attempted, but only reducing the number of size sections was adopted. Fast TOMAS models, coupled to the GISS GCM II-prime, require a new coagulation algorithm with less restrictive size resolution assumptions but only minor changes in other processes. Fast TOMAS models have been evaluated in a box model against analytical solutions of coagulation and condensation and in a 3-D model against the original TOMAS (TOMAS-30) model. Condensation and coagulation in the Fast TOMAS models agree well with the analytical solution but show slightly more bias than the TOMAS-30 box model. In the 3-D model, errors resulting from decreased size resolution in each process (i.e., emissions, cloud processing wet deposition, microphysics) are quantified in a series of model sensitivity simulations. Errors resulting from lower size resolution in condensation and coagulation, defined as the microphysics error, affect number and mass concentrations by only a few percent. The microphysics error in CN70CN100 (number concentrations of particles larger than 70100 nm diameter), proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, range from 5 to 5 in most regions. The largest errors are associated with decreasing the size resolution in the cloud processing wet deposition calculations, defined as cloud-processing error, and range from 20 to 15 in most regions for CN70CN100 concentrations. Overall, the Fast TOMAS models increase the computational speed by 2 to 3 times with only small numerical errors stemming from condensation and coagulation calculations when compared to TOMAS-30. The faster versions of the TOMAS model allow for the longer, multi-year simulations required to assess aerosol effects on cloud lifetime and precipitation.

  20. High-solids paint overspray aerosols in a spray painting booth: particle size analysis and scrubber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.L.; D'arcy, J.B.; Schreck, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Particle size distributions of high-solids acrylic-enamel paint overspray aerosols were determined isokinetically in a typical downdraft spray painting booth in which a 7-stage cascade impactor was used. Three different industrial paint atomizers were used, and the paint aerosols were characterized before and after a paint both scrubber. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of a metallic basecoat and an acrylic clearcoat paint aerosol from air-atomized spray guns ranged from 4-12 ..mu..m and was dependent on atomization pressure. When the paint booth was operated under controlled conditions simulating those in a plant, the collection efficiency of paint overspray aerosols by a paint scrubber was found to be size dependent and decreased sharply for particles smaller than 2 ..mu..m to as low as 64% for clearcoat paint particles of 0.6 ..mu..m. Improvement in the overall particulate removal efficiency can be achieved by optimizing the spray painting operations so as to produce the least amount of fine overspray paint aerosols less than 2 ..mu..m. Maintaining a higher static pressure drop across the paint both scrubber also will improve scrubber performance.

  1. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory (38°28'15''N, 28°24'14''W; 2225 m amsl) on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic ~3900 km east and downwind of North America. Filter-collected aerosol during summer 2012 was analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3. Organic aerosol contributed the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol was positively correlated with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from 9/24 and 9/25 aerosol samples collected during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the air masses were very aged (> 12 days). About 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra between m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. WSOC have an average O/C ratio of ~0.45, relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol which might be the result of evaporation and fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplumes and MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with WSOC biomass burning markers and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at Pico had undergone cloud processing. The air masses on 9/25 were more aged (~15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and species characteristic for marine aerosol (e.g. fatty acids). The change in air masses for

  2. High-Efficiency Generation and Delivery of Aerosols Through Nasal Cannula During Noninvasive Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Walenga, Ross L.; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated the delivery of pharmaceutical aerosols through nasal cannula and the feasibility of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) with a nasal interface. The objectives of this study were to develop a device for generating submicrometer aerosols with minimal depositional loss in the formation process and to improve aerosol delivery efficiencies through nasal cannulas. Methods A combination of in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that used the strengths of each method was applied. Aerosols were formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer, mixed with ventilation gas, and heated to produce submicrometer sizes. An improved version of the mixer and heater unit was developed based on CFD simulations, and performance was verified with experiments. Aerosol delivery was considered through a commercial large-bore adult cannula, a divided (D) design for use with ECG, and a divided and streamlined (DS) design. Results The improved mixer design reduced the total deposition fraction (DF) of drug within the mixer by a factor of 3 compared with an initial version, had a total DF of approximately 10%, and produced submicrometer aerosols at flow rates of 10 and 15 L/min. Compared with the commercial and D designs for submicrometer aerosols, the DS cannula reduced depositional losses by a factor of 2–3 and retained only approximately 5% or less of the nebulized dose at all flow rates considered. For conventional-sized aerosols (3.9 and 4.7 μm), the DS device provided delivery efficiencies of approximately 80% and above at flow rates of 2–15 L/min. Conclusions Submicrometer aerosols can be formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer and delivered through a nasal cannula with total delivery efficiencies of 80–90%. Streamlining the nasal cannula significantly improved the delivery efficiency of both submicrometer and micrometer aerosols; however, use of submicrometer particles with ECG delivery

  3. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  4. Global and regional validation of the Collection 6 MODIS dark target aerosol products, and comparison to Collection 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, L. A.; Levy, R. C.; Mattoo, S.

    2014-12-01

    The MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark targets aerosol algorithms include several updates, including multiple wind speed look up tables over ocean and improved sensor calibration. We analyze the entirety of the MODIS-Aqua aerosol record against AERONET to characterize uncertainty in the products, and relate the new collection to the well-characterized Collection 5 (C5) products to understand specific improvements. Over land, ~70% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds, which is comparable to C5; however, a slight overestimation of AOD at low optical depths and a slight underestimation at high optical depths that was observed in C5 has been eliminated in C6. The highest agreement with AERONET occurs in the Eastern U.S. and Europe. Regions with large surface reflectance, such as the Western U.S., or higher aerosol loading, including much of Africa and South America, remain a challenge. Over ocean, the inclusion of wind speed in the surface characterization has removed a wind speed dependant bias, and globally, ~63% of high quality AOD retrievals at 0.55 μm are within the C5 expected error bounds. The dust outflow regions off the coast of Africa show the poorest agreement with AERONET. The aerosol products validate acceptably for science, though users should be aware of some regional biases we present in this work.

  5. Elemental composition and Its seasonal variation of bulk aerosols collected at the Okinawa archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Akihide; Oshiro, Seiji; Azechi, Sotaro; Handa, Daishi; Arakaki, Takemitsu

    2010-05-01

    Okinawa is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km south east of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutions in East Asia, because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. In the present study, elemental composition and its seasonal variation of bulk aerosols collected at the Okinawa archipelago was investigated by a X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). From these results, chemical properties of aerosols transported to Okinawa archipelago and long-range transport of metal pollutions were discussed. We continuously collected bulk aerosols for 7 days at a time during 2008 - 2009. The samplings were performed by using the same type of high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS), respectively. XRF allows us to analyze bulk aerosols rapidly without any pretreatment. However, it is very difficult to determine trace metals in aerosol samples accurately. The concentration ratios to Al for 15-20 elements, whose accuracy was evaluated using standard reference materials (NIES No.28) and measuring by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after acid-digestion, were obtained by XRF. From seasonal variations obtained, the concentration rations to Al for Pb and As in aerosol particles were clearly higher in winter than in summer. These results suggest that North-west wind blown in winter would transport pollutant aerosols to Okinawa archipelago from East Asia.

  6. Comparison of three methods for measuring light absorption by collected aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ramsey-Bell, D C; Couture, G

    1985-08-01

    Three instruments for measuring absorption of visible light by atmospheric aerosols are compared: the visual comparator; plate diffuser; and photoacoustic spectrometer. Two versions of the photoacoustic spectrometer are tested, one built of acrylic plastic and the other of aluminum. One version of the visual comparator uses Millipore filters for a crucial reflective surface, another a mirror. Several materials collected on Nuclepore filters are used in the comparison. Laboratory generated samples consist of carbon and carbon overlaid with ammonium sulfate. Atmospheric aerosols were collected in Tucson and on an Arizona mountain peak. All methods give reasonably consistent results, even when applied to the lightly absorbing nonurban atmospheric samples. PMID:18223896

  7. Achieving energy efficiency during collective communications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav; Sosonkina, Masha; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-09-13

    Energy consumption has become a major design constraint in modern computing systems. With the advent of petaflops architectures, power-efficient software stacks have become imperative for scalability. Techniques such as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (called DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (called throttling) are often used to reduce the power consumption of the compute nodes. To avoid significant performance losses, these techniques should be used judiciously during parallel application execution. For example, its communication phases may be good candidates to apply the DVFS and CPU throttling without incurring a considerable performance loss. They are often considered as indivisible operations although little attention is being devoted to the energy saving potential of their algorithmic steps. In this work, two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather, are investigated as to their augmentation with energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. The experiments prove the viability of such a fine-grain approach. They also validate a theoretical power consumption estimate for multicore nodes proposed here. While keeping the performance loss low, the obtained energy savings were always significantly higher than those achieved when DVFS or throttling were switched on across the entire application run

  8. Regional Influence of Aerosol Emissions from Wildfires Driven by Combustion Efficiency: Insights from the BBOP Campaign.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sonya; Zhou, Shan; Onasch, Timothy B; Jaffe, Daniel A; Kleinman, Lawrence; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Briggs, Nicole L; Hee, Jonathan; Fortner, Edward; Shilling, John E; Worsnop, Douglas; Yokelson, Robert J; Parworth, Caroline; Ge, Xinlei; Xu, Jianzhong; Butterfield, Zachary; Chand, Duli; Dubey, Manvendra K; Pekour, Mikhail S; Springston, Stephen; Zhang, Qi

    2016-08-16

    Wildfires are important contributors to atmospheric aerosols and a large source of emissions that impact regional air quality and global climate. In this study, the regional and nearfield influences of wildfire emissions on ambient aerosol concentration and chemical properties in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States were studied using real-time measurements from a fixed ground site located in Central Oregon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (∼2700 m a.s.l.) as well as near their sources using an aircraft. The regional characteristics of biomass burning aerosols were found to depend strongly on the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), an index of the combustion processes of a fire. Organic aerosol emissions had negative correlations with MCE, whereas the oxidation state of organic aerosol increased with MCE and plume aging. The relationships between the aerosol properties and MCE were consistent between fresh emissions (∼1 h old) and emissions sampled after atmospheric transport (6-45 h), suggesting that biomass burning organic aerosol concentration and chemical properties were strongly influenced by combustion processes at the source and conserved to a significant extent during regional transport. These results suggest that MCE can be a useful metric for describing aerosol properties of wildfire emissions and their impacts on regional air quality and global climate. PMID:27398804

  9. Air sampling filtration media: Collection efficiency for respirable size-selective sampling

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Monaghan, Keenan; Lee, Taekhee; Kashon, Mike; Harper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The collection efficiencies of commonly used membrane air sampling filters in the ultrafine particle size range were investigated. Mixed cellulose ester (MCE; 0.45, 0.8, 1.2, and 5 μm pore sizes), polycarbonate (0.4, 0.8, 2, and 5 μm pore sizes), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE; 0.45, 1, 2, and 5 μm pore sizes), polyvinyl chloride (PVC; 0.8 and 5 μm pore sizes), and silver membrane (0.45, 0.8, 1.2, and 5 μm pore sizes) filters were exposed to polydisperse sodium chloride (NaCl) particles in the size range of 10–400 nm. Test aerosols were nebulized and introduced into a calm air chamber through a diffusion dryer and aerosol neutralizer. The testing filters (37 mm diameter) were mounted in a conductive polypropylene filter-holder (cassette) within a metal testing tube. The experiments were conducted at flow rates between 1.7 and 11.2 l min−1. The particle size distributions of NaCl challenge aerosol were measured upstream and downstream of the test filters by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Three different filters of each type with at least three repetitions for each pore size were tested. In general, the collection efficiency varied with airflow, pore size, and sampling duration. In addition, both collection efficiency and pressure drop increased with decreased pore size and increased sampling flow rate, but they differed among filter types and manufacturer. The present study confirmed that the MCE, PTFE, and PVC filters have a relatively high collection efficiency for challenge particles much smaller than their nominal pore size and are considerably more efficient than polycarbonate and silver membrane filters, especially at larger nominal pore sizes. PMID:26834310

  10. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol. PMID:19204482

  11. MODIS aerosol products in Collection 6:Moving towards multisensor fusion and interdisciplinary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoo, S.; Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    As the Terra satellite turns 10, so do the MODIS aerosol products. During the past ten years the MODIS products have evolved and expanded to include opportunities and capabilities nonexistent in the at-launch version. We are anticipating the next step, Collection 6, becoming available in late 2010. The new products in the Collection 6 MODIS aerosol suite of products will include: 1) Fine mode aerosol optical depth over land from the PARASOL POLDER data set, merged into the MODIS data product. This is a direct capture of the PARASOL product that will be placed in the MODIS data files. It is not a separate derivation using PARASOL radiances and polarization. The incorporation of the PARASOL product over land is collocated to the MODIS 10 km product pixel, and is provided as a convenience to MODIS users. 2) Aerosol optical depth over land at 3 km resolution for Air Quality monitoring. 3) Cloud mask and distance to the nearest cloud calculated and presented for every 500 m “cloud-free” pixel that allows better control of cloud contamination in the basic aerosol products. This information is also summarized statistically at the 10 km product resolution, and will be available for both land and ocean. 4) A Quality Assurance (QA) flag in simple plain integers that does not require a binary reader to decode.

  12. THERMOPHORESIS AND ITS THERMAL PARAMETERS FOR AEROSOL COLLECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.; Apte, M.; Gundel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The particle collection effi ciency of a prototype environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) sampler based on the use of thermophoresis is determined by optimizing the operational voltage that determines its thermal gradient. This sampler’s heating element was made of three sets of thermophoretic (TP) wires 25μm in diameter suspended across a channel cut in a printed circuit board and mounted with collection surfaces on both sides. The separation between the heating element and the room temperature collection surface was determined in a numerical simulation based on the Brock-Talbot model. Other thermal parameters of this TP ETS sampler were predicted by the Brock-Talbot model for TP deposition. From the normalized results the optimal collection ratio was expressed in terms of operational voltage and fi lter mass. Prior to the Brock-Talbot model simulation for this sampler, 1.0V was used arbitrarily. The operational voltage was raised to 3.0V, and the collection effi ciency was increased by a factor of fi ve for both theory and experiment.

  13. Water-soluble material on aerosols collected within volcanic eruption clouds ( Fuego, Pacaya, Santiaguito, Guatamala).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Zielinski, R.A.; Rose, W.I., Jr.; Huebert, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    In Feb. and March of 1978, filter samplers mounted on an aircraft were used to collect the aerosol fraction of the eruption clouds from three active Guatemalan volcanoes (Fuego, Pacaya, and Santiaguito). The elements dissolved in the aqueous extracts represent components of water-soluble material either formed directly in the eruption cloud or derived from interaction of ash particles and aerosol components of the plume. Calculations of enrichment factors, based upon concentration ratios, showed the elements most enriched in the extracts relative to bulk ash composition were Cd, Cu, V, F, Cl, Zn, and Pb.-from Authors

  14. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  15. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  16. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2011-12-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the top (TOA) and at the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. In this study we have considered six main types of atmospheric aerosols: desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere. The ΔF averages obtained vary from -148 ± 44 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in Central Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.86 ± 0.51) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system, contributing to the greenhouse gas effect.

  17. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the Top (TOA) and at the Bottom Of Atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. Six main types of atmospheric aerosols have been compared (desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere) in similar observational conditions (i.e., for solar zenith angles between 55° and 65°) in order to compare the nearly same solar geometry. The instantaneous ΔF averages obtained vary from -122 ± 37 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in West Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.9 ± 0.5) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system.

  18. Investigation of anthropogenic-origin-metals in the atmospheric aerosols collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Azechi, S.; Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Kasaba, T.; Arakaki, T.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are important to atmospheric chemistry, and affect our lives. Aerosols include fine particles, which consist of inorganic compounds, organic substances, heavy metals, etc. Aerosols can be roughly separated into natural and anthropogenic origins. For example, natural origins include wind-blown sea-salt, Asian dust (called Kosa in Japan), etc. Anthropogenic origins include burning of fossil fuel and agricultural biomass, automobiles, industrial activities, etc. In Japan, Kosa is the most well-known aerosol. This study investigated anthropogenic-origin-metals present in the aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) in Okinawa Island, Japan with a high volume air sampler. Samples analyzed for this study were collected between January 2008 and August 2014. A 1/8 of aerosol filter was digested by the mixture of acids and oxidant (nitric acid/hydrogen fluoride/hydrogen peroxide). The sample was filtered by 0.45 μm membrane filter before analyses. Metal ion concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Na, Mg, K) and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometer (Al, Fe, Ca, Ti, Mn, V, Cu, Cd, Zn, Pb). Air mass movement was analyzed by NOAA's HYSPRIT model. Results showed that concentrations of heavy metals were high during winter and spring, and the lowest in summer. V/Mn ratios were used as an indicator for heavy oil burning. High V/Mn ratios were observed during maritime air mass periods. On the other hand, Pb/Zn ratio was used as an indicator for leaded gasoline usage, which was high when air mass was coming from Asian continent during winter and spring. Average Pb/Zn ratio was 0.65. Non-sea-salt K (nss-K) was used as an indicator for biomass burning, and showed good correlation with total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations. However, nss-K and crustal-origin-metals also showed good correlation. Thus, we have to be careful when considering whether nss-K is from

  19. Efficient High Performance Collective Communication for Distributed Memory Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Qasim

    2009-01-01

    Collective communication allows efficient communication and synchronization among a collection of processes, unlike point-to-point communication that only involves a pair of communicating processes. Achieving high performance for both kernels and full-scale applications running on a distributed memory system requires an efficient implementation of…

  20. COMMENTS ON "SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANONITRATES IN AMBIENT AEROSOL COLLECTED IN HOUSTON, TEXAS," AEROSOL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, 36:983-992 (2002)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A previous article in this journal reported the results of an FTIR analysis of the ambient aerosol collected during a file study in Houston, Texas during August and September of 2000. The emphasis of that article was on the organonitrates collected during the study. In the disc...

  1. High-Collection-Efficiency Fluorescence Detection Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanisco, Thomas; Cazorla, Maria; Swanson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A new fluorescence cell has been developed for the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of formaldehyde. The cell is used to sample a flow of air that contains trace concentrations of formaldehyde. The cell provides a hermetically sealed volume in which a flow of air containing formaldehyde can be illuminated by a laser. The cell includes the optics for transmitting the laser beam that is used to excite the formaldehyde and for collecting the resulting fluorescence. The novelty of the cell is its small size and simple design that provides a more robust and cheaper alternative to the state of the art. Despite its simplicity, the cell provides the same sensitivity to detection as larger, more complicated cells.

  2. Influence of multidroplet size distribution on icing collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, H.-P.; Kimble, K. R.; Frost, W.; Shaw, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Calculation of collection efficiencies of two-dimensional airfoils for a monodispersed droplet icing cloud and a multidispersed droplet is carried out. Comparison is made with the experimental results reported in the NACA Technical Note series. The results of the study show considerably improved agreement with experiment when multidroplet size distributions are employed. The study then investigates the effect of collection efficiency on airborne particle droplet size sampling instruments. The biased effect introduced due to sampling from different collection volumes is predicted.

  3. Particle Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleason, Colin; Harrington, Charles; Schuff, Katie; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosols collected in the historic Stockade District of Schenectady, New York, was performed using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) spectroscopy. This is part of a systematic study in the Mohawk River Valley of upstate New York to identify the sources and understand the transport, transformation, and effects of airborne pollutants and the connection between aerosols, the deposition of pollution, and the uptake of pollutants by wildlife and vegetation. The atmospheric aerosols were collected with a nine-stage cascade impactor that allows for the analysis of the particulate matter as a function of particle size. The samples were bombarded with 2-MeV proton beams from the Union College Pelletron Accelerator and the energy spectra of the X-rays were measured with a silicon drift detector. The X-ray spectra were analyzed using GUPIX software to extract the elemental concentrations of the particulate matter. The sample collection and analysis will be described, and preliminary results will be presented.

  4. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 μm), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 μm) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  5. Chemical Analysis of Fractionated Halogens in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuhako, A.; Miyagi, Y.; Somada, Y.; Azechi, S.; Handa, D.; Oshiro, Y.; Murayama, H.; Arakaki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Halogens (Cl, Br and I) play important roles in the atmosphere, e.g. ozone depletion by Br during spring in Polar Regions. Sources of halogens in atmospheric aerosols are mainly from ocean. But, for example, when we analyzed Br- with ion chromatography, its concentrations were almost always below the detection limit, which is also much lower than the estimated concentrations from sodium ion concentrations. We hypothesized that portions of halogens are escaped to the atmosphere, similar to chlorine loss, changed their chemical forms to such as BrO3- and IO3-, and/or even formed precipitates. There was few reported data so far about fractionated halogen concentrations in atmospheric aerosols. Thus, purpose of this study was to determine halogen concentrations in different fractions; free ion, water-soluble chemically transformed ions and precipitates using the authentic aerosols. Moreover, we analyzed seasonal variation for each fraction. Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) of Okinawa, Japan during January 2010 and August 2013. A high volume air sampler was used for collecting total particulate matters on quartz filters on a weekly basis. Ultrapure water was used to extract water-soluble factions of halogens. The extracted solutions were filtered with the membrane filter and used for chemical analysis with ion chromatography and ICP-MS. Moreover, the total halogens in aerosols were obtained after digesting aerosols with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) using the microwave and analysis with ICP-MS. For Cl, water-soluble Cl- accounted for about 70% of the estimates with Na content. No other forms of water-soluble Cl were found. About 30% of Cl was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For Br, water-soluble Br accounted for about 43% of the estimates with Na content, and within the 43%, about 10% of Br was not in the form of Br-. About 46% of Br was assumed volatilized to the gas-phase. For I

  6. Raman microscopy of size-segregated aerosol particles, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kasper-Giebl, Anneliese; Kistler, Magdalena; Matzl, Julia; Schauer, Gerhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Lohninger, Johann; Lendl, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Size classified aerosol samples were collected using low pressure impactors in July 2013 at the high alpine background site Sonnnblick. The Sonnblick Observatory is located in the Austrian Alps, at the summit of Sonnblick 3100 m asl. Sampling was performed in parallel on the platform of the Observatory and after the aerosol inlet. The inlet is constructed as a whole air inlet and is operated at an overall sampling flow of 137 lpm and heated to 30 °C. Size cuts of the eight stage low pressure impactors were from 0.1 to 12.8 µm a.d.. Alumina foils were used as sample substrates for the impactor stages. In addition to the size classified aerosol sampling overall aerosol mass (Sharp Monitor 5030, Thermo Scientific) and number concentrations (TSI, CPC 3022a; TCC-3, Klotz) were determined. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the alumina foils at a resolution of about 0.5 µm. The Raman microscope is equipped with a laser with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm and a grating with 300 gr/mm. Both optical images and the related chemical images were combined and a chemometric investigation of the combined images was done using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs). Based on the well-known environment, a basic assignment of Raman signals of single particles is possible at a sufficient certainty. Main aerosol constituents e.g. like sulfates, black carbon and mineral particles could be identified. First results of the chemical imaging of size-segregated aerosol, collected at the Sonnblick Observatory, will be discussed with respect to standardized long-term measurements at the sampling station. Further, advantages and disadvantages of chemical imaging with subsequent chemometric investigation of the single images will be discussed and compared to the established methods of aerosol analysis. The chemometric analysis of the dataset is focused on mixing and variation of single compounds at

  7. Radiocarbon Analysis of Elemental Carbon and Total Organic Carbon in Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakaki, T.; Handa, D.; Nakajima, H.; Kumata, H.; Suzuki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2008-12-01

    A study was initiated to understand the sources and behaviors of carbon-containing compounds in the atmospheric aerosols in East Asian region. As an initial attempt, we collected airborne particulate matter (APM) with diameter <10 micrometer (PM10) in Okinawa, Japan and analyzed 14C/12C ratio in EC and total organic carbon (TOC) to apportion source of biomass and fossil fuel combustion in PM10 aerosols. Okinawa is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia. Aerosol particles were collected at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) in Okinawa, Japan. Each sample was collected for two weeks with a high-volume air sampler at a rate of 1000 L min-1 to collect aerosol particles on a quartz filter, which was pre-combusted before use to eliminate residual organic compounds. Radiocarbon is measured in AMS facility (NIES-TERRA) at National Institute for Environmental Studies after preparing graphite. The results showed that during Asian dust events in March and April, both APM and EC in PM10 aerosols collected in Okinawa, Japan were much higher than those of non-Asian dust event. The percent modern carbon (pMC) of EC and TOC was much smaller for the PM10 aerosols collected during Asian dust events than those of non-dust event. When maritime air mass prevailed, biomass originated organic compounds were the major TOC in the aerosols. We will report data on 14C/12C ratio of EC and TOC in PM10 aerosols collected at CHAAMS during March to October, 2008

  8. A new method of satellite-based haze aerosol monitoring over the North China Plain and a comparison with MODIS Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xing; Shi, Wenzhong; Luo, Nana; Zhao, Wenji

    2016-05-01

    With worldwide urbanization, hazy weather has been increasingly frequent, especially in the North China Plain. However, haze aerosol monitoring remains a challenge. In this paper, MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements were used to develop an enhanced haze aerosol retrieval algorithm (EHARA). This method can work not only on hazy days but also on normal weather days. Based on 12-year (2002-2014) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) aerosol property data, empirical single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (AF) values were chosen to assist haze aerosol retrieval. For validation, EHARA aerosol optical thickness (AOT) values, along with MODIS Collection 6 (C6) dark-pixel and deep blue aerosol products, were compared with AERONET data. The results show that the EHARA can achieve greater AOT spatial coverage under hazy conditions with a high accuracy (73% within error range) and work a higher resolution (1-km). Additionally, this paper presents a comprehensive discussion of the differences between and limitations of the EHARA and the MODIS C6 DT land algorithms.

  9. An automated baseline correction protocol for infrared spectra of atmospheric aerosols collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiakova, Adele; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of research on statistical applications for characterization of atmospheric aerosol Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters (e.g., Russell et al., 2011; Ruthenburg et al., 2014) and a rising interest in analyzing FT-IR samples collected by air quality monitoring networks call for an automated PTFE baseline correction solution. The existing polynomial technique (Takahama et al., 2013) is not scalable to a project with a large number of aerosol samples because it contains many parameters and requires expert intervention. Therefore, the question of how to develop an automated method for baseline correcting hundreds to thousands of ambient aerosol spectra given the variability in both environmental mixture composition and PTFE baselines remains. This study approaches the question by detailing the statistical protocol, which allows for the precise definition of analyte and background subregions, applies nonparametric smoothing splines to reproduce sample-specific PTFE variations, and integrates performance metrics from atmospheric aerosol and blank samples alike in the smoothing parameter selection. Referencing 794 atmospheric aerosol samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011, we start by identifying key FT-IR signal characteristics, such as non-negative absorbance or analyte segment transformation, to capture sample-specific transitions between background and analyte. While referring to qualitative properties of PTFE background, the goal of smoothing splines interpolation is to learn the baseline structure in the background region to predict the baseline structure in the analyte region. We then validate the model by comparing smoothing splines baseline-corrected spectra with uncorrected and polynomial baseline (PB)-corrected equivalents via three statistical applications: (1) clustering analysis, (2) functional group quantification

  10. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric

  11. Conditions for collection efficiencies greater than one hundred percent

    SciTech Connect

    Brueggemann, R.; Zollondz, J.H.; Main, C.; Gao, W.

    1997-07-01

    An account is given for the conditions under which the collection efficiency is hydrogenated amorphous silicon pin-diodes increases to values larger than 100%. By specific bias illumination through the p-side bias generated photocarriers are collected under certain probe beam conditions of the collection efficiency measurement, leading to apparent large collection efficiencies. By numerical modeling they investigated the influence of the diode thickness, bias photon flux and probe absorption coefficient as well as applied voltage for possible sensor applications which may utilize this optical amplifying principle. The alternative with bias light through the n-side and probe light through the p-side is also explored. Collection efficiency values determined by the photogating of bias generated holes become only slightly larger than 100% in contrast to the electron case where values in excess of 3,000% are presented.

  12. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 8±6%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices. PMID:26148643

  13. Pollution transport efficiency toward the Arctic: Sensitivity to aerosol scavenging and source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Bey, Isabelle

    2011-04-01

    The processes driving current changes in Arctic atmospheric composition and climate are still uncertain. In particular the relative contributions of major source regions from the midlatitudes remain a matter of debate in the literature. The objectives of this study are to better quantify the relative contributions of different processes governing the transport of pollution from the midlatitudes to the Arctic and the relative contributions of different geopolitical source regions. We use a suite of observational data sets (including the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) campaigns and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) satellite instrument) to constrain a global aerosol simulation from the ECHAM5-HAMMOZ model. Preliminary comparison of model results with vertical profiles of sulfate and black carbon (BC) collected during the ARCTAS campaigns and with aerosol extinction time series retrieved from CALIOP indicates that the model underestimates export of aerosols from the planetary boundary layer to the free troposphere in the midlatitudes and long-range transport of aerosols from the midlatitudes toward the Arctic. In contrast, observed CO profiles are relatively well simulated, which points to a possible problem with wet scavenging. Decreasing the prescribed aerosol scavenging coefficients within the range of experimental data available in the literature significantly improves the agreement with observations. Sulfate and BC burdens in the Arctic increase by a factor 5-6. Annual global lifetimes of sulfate and BC increase from 3.1 to 4.6 days and from 4.4 to 5.9 days, respectively. Using the improved simulation, we find that 59% of sulfate in the Arctic troposphere comes from the oxidation of SO2 emitted in Siberia (19%), Europe (18%), Asia (13%), and North America (9%). Anthropogenic and biomass burning BC emitted in Siberia, Asia, Europe, and North America contributes 29, 27, 25, and

  14. Aerosol radiative forcing efficiency in the UV-B region over central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Lanzaco, Bethania L.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2016-07-01

    AEROSOL Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and global UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiance measurements and calculations were combined to investigate the effects of aerosol loading on the ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) reaching the surface under cloudless conditions in Córdoba, Argentina. The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and the aerosol forcing efficiency (ARFE) were calculated for an extended period of time (2000-2013) at a ground-based monitoring site affected by different types and loading of aerosols. The ARFE was evaluated by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 340 nm retrieved by AERONET at the Cordoba CETT site. The individual and combined effects of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the ARFE were also analyzed. In addition, and for comparison purposes, the MODIS AOD at 550 nm was used as input in a machine learning method to better characterize the aerosol load at 340 nm and evaluate the ARFE retrieved from AOD satellite measurements. The ARFE at the surface calculated using AOD data from AERONET ranged from (-0.11 ± 0.01) to (-1.76 ± 0.20) Wm-2 with an average of -0.61 Wm-2; however, when using AOD data from MODIS (TERRA/AQUA satellites), it ranged from (-0.22 ± 0.03) to (-0.65 ± 0.07) Wm-2 with an average value of -0.43 Wm-2. At the same SZA and SSA, the maximum difference between ground and satellite-based was 0.22 Wm-2.

  15. Efficient Nose-to-Lung (N2L) Aerosol Delivery with a Dry Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Golshahi, Laleh; Behara, Srinivas R.B.; Tian, Geng; Farkas, Dale R.; Hindle, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Delivering aerosols to the lungs through the nasal route has a number of advantages, but its use has been limited by high depositional loss in the extrathoracic airways. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nose-to-lung (N2L) delivery of excipient enhanced growth (EEG) formulation aerosols generated with a new inline dry powder inhaler (DPI). The device was also adapted to enable aerosol delivery to a patient simultaneously receiving respiratory support from high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. Methods: The inhaler delivered the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which was formulated as submicrometer combination particles containing a hygroscopic excipient prepared by spray-drying. Nose-to-lung delivery was assessed using in vitro and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in an airway model that continued through the upper tracheobronchial region. Results: The best performing device contained a 2.3 mm flow control orifice and a 3D rod array with a 3-4-3 rod pattern. Based on in vitro experiments, the emitted dose from the streamlined nasal cannula had a fine particle fraction <5 μm of 95.9% and mass median aerodynamic diameter of 1.4 μm, which was considered ideal for nose-to-lung EEG delivery. With the 2.3-343 device, condensational growth in the airways increased the aerosol size to 2.5–2.7 μm and extrathoracic deposition was <10%. CFD results closely matched the in vitro experiments and predicted that nasal deposition was <2%. Conclusions: The developed DPI produced high efficiency aerosolization with significant size increase of the aerosol within the airways that can be used to enable nose-to-lung delivery and aerosol administration during HFNC therapy. PMID:25192072

  16. Validation and uncertainty estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-07-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (τM) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56τM)/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20τM, comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  17. Validation and Uncertainty Estimates for MODIS Collection 6 "Deep Blue" Aerosol Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.

    2013-01-01

    The "Deep Blue" aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm was introduced in Collection 5 of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) product suite, and complemented the existing "Dark Target" land and ocean algorithms by retrieving AOD over bright arid land surfaces, such as deserts. The forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS products will include a "second generation" Deep Blue algorithm, expanding coverage to all cloud-free and snow-free land surfaces. The Deep Blue dataset will also provide an estimate of the absolute uncertainty on AOD at 550 nm for each retrieval. This study describes the validation of Deep Blue Collection 6 AOD at 550 nm (Tau(sub M)) from MODIS Aqua against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data from 60 sites to quantify these uncertainties. The highest quality (denoted quality assurance flag value 3) data are shown to have an absolute uncertainty of approximately (0.086+0.56Tau(sub M))/AMF, where AMF is the geometric air mass factor. For a typical AMF of 2.8, this is approximately 0.03+0.20Tau(sub M), comparable in quality to other satellite AOD datasets. Regional variability of retrieval performance and comparisons against Collection 5 results are also discussed.

  18. Model Evaluation of Aerosol Wet Scavenging in Deep Convective Clouds Based on Observations Collected during the DC3 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Ghan, S. J.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barth, M. C.; Fan, J.; Morrison, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Bela, M. M.; Markovic, M. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Deep convective storms greatly influence the vertical distribution of aerosols by transporting aerosols from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and by removing aerosols through wet scavenging processes. Model representation of wet scavenging is a major uncertainty in simulating the vertical distribution of aerosols due partly to limited constraints by observations. The effect of wet scavenging on ambient aerosols in deep mid-latitude continental convective clouds is studied for a severe storm case in the vicinity of the ARM Southern Great Plains site on May 29, 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Project (DC3) field campaign. A new budget analysis approach is developed to characterize the convective transport to the upper troposphere based on the vertical distribution of several slowly reacting and nearly insoluble trace gases (i.e., CO, acetone, and benzene). A similar budget framework is applied to aerosols combined with the known transport efficiency to estimate wet-scavenging efficiency. The chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) simulates the storm initiation timing and structure reasonably well when compared against radar observations from the NSSL national 3-D reflectivity Mosaic data. Simulated vertical profiles of humidity and temperature also closely agree with radiosonde measurements before and during the storm. High scavenging efficiencies (~80%) for aerosol number (Dp < 2.5μm) and mass (Dp < 1μm) are obtained from the observations. Both observation analyses and the simulation show that, between the two dominant aerosol species, organic aerosol shows a slightly higher scavenging efficiency than sulfate aerosol, and higher scavenging efficiency is found for larger particle sizes (0.15 - 2.5μm versus 0.03 - 0.15μm). However, the model underestimates the wet scavenging efficiency (by up to 50%), in general, for both mass and number concentrations. The effect of neglecting secondary

  19. Molecular Characterization of Marine Organic Aerosols Collected during a Round-the-World Cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, P.; Kawamura, K.; Miura, K.

    2010-12-01

    Total suspended particles (TSP) were collected on board the R/V Hakuho Maru during a round-the-world cruise (KH89-2) and were characterized for organic molecular compositions using solvent extraction/derivatization and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. More than 140 organic species were detected in the marine aerosols and were grouped into 11 organic compound classes, including aliphatic lipids, anhydrosugars and sugar alcohols, lignin/resin acids, sterols, hopanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydroxy-/polyacids, aromatic acids, as well as secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers from the photooxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds. Concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 0.94 to 98 ng m-3 (average 31 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in coastal regions (California Coast, South China Sea, and Western North Pacific) than in open marine areas (North Pacific and North Atlantic), suggesting that long-range atmospheric transport from the continents is the main source of marine organic aerosols. Isoprene SOA tracers, i.e., 2-methylglyceric acid, C5-alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols, were detected in all the samples (0.11-22 ng m-3, average 3.6 ng m-3) with higher concentrations in the tropical regions. They accounted for 0.48-29% of the total identified organics. Organic compounds were further categorized into several groups to clarify their sources. In the North Pacific and North Atlantic, secondary oxidation products (30-31%), fossil fuel combustion products (27-28%), as well as marine natural emissions (22-34%) were found as major contributors to the marine aerosols. In California Coast, North Indian Ocean and South China Sea, secondary oxidation products can contribute 44-55% of the total identified organics, followed by terrestrial natural emissions (12-27%), while biomass burning emissions were found to contribute only 1-2%. However, in the western North Pacific near the Asian continent, fossil fuel combustion (27%) and

  20. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities.

    PubMed

    Newton, G J; Hoover, M D; Barr, E B; Wong, B A; Ritter, P D

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates. PMID:3425551

  1. Collection and characterization of aerosols from metal cutting techniques typically used in decommissioning nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1987-11-01

    This study was designed to collect and characterize aerosols released during metal cutting activities typically used in decommissioning radioactively contaminated facilities. Such information can guide in the selection of appropriate control technologies for these airborne materials. Mechanical cutting tools evaluated included a multi-wheel pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, and large and small grinding wheels. Melting-vaporization cutting techniques included an oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. With the exception of the multi-wheel pipe cutter, all devices created aerosols in the respirable size range (less than 10 micron aerodynamic diameter). Time required to cut 2-in. (5-cm) Schedule 40, Type 304L, stainless steel ranged from about 0.6 min for the plasma torch to about 3.0 min for the reciprocating saw. Aerosol production rate ranged from less than 10 mg/min for the reciprocating saw to more than 3000 mg/min for the electric arc cut rod. Particles from mechanical tools were irregular in shape, whereas particles from vaporization tools were spheres and ultrafine branched-chain aggregates.

  2. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  3. Chemical and statistical interpretation of sized aerosol particles collected at an urban site in Thessaloniki, Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsitouridou, Roxani; Papazova, Petia; Simeonova, Pavlina; Simeonov, Vasil

    2013-01-01

    The size distribution of aerosol particles (PM0.015-PM18) in relation to their soluble inorganic species and total water soluble organic compounds (WSOC) was investigated at an urban site of Thessaloniki, Northern Greece. The sampling period was from February to July 2007. The determined compounds were compared with mass concentrations of the PM fractions for nano (N: 0.015 < Dp < 0.06), ultrafine (UFP: 0.015 < Dp < 0.125), fine (FP: 0.015 < Dp < 2.0) and coarse particles (CP: 2.0 < Dp < 8.0) in order to perform mass closure of the water soluble content for the respective fractions. Electrolytes were the dominant species in all fractions (24-27%), followed by WSOC (16-23%). The water soluble inorganic and organic content was found to account for 53% of the nanoparticle, 48% of the ultrafine particle, 45% of the fine particle and 44% of the coarse particle mass. Correlations between the analyzed species were performed and the effect of local and long-range transported emissions was examined by wind direction and backward air mass trajectories. Multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) of the collected data was performed in order to reveal the specific data structure. Possible sources of air pollution were identified and an attempt is made to find patterns of similarity between the different sized aerosols and the seasons of monitoring. It was proven that several major latent factors are responsible for the data structure despite the size of the aerosols - mineral (soil) dust, sea sprays, secondary emissions, combustion sources and industrial impact. The seasonal separation proved to be not very specific. PMID:24007436

  4. Mathematical Model for Determinating the Efficiency of Separation of Aerosols in Dry and Sprayed Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Iskhakov, A. R.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent fl ow of aerosols in a cylindrical channel has been investigated. Differential equations of transfer of dispersed particles have been considered, and a two-dimensional equation with a mass source has been solved. Different numerical experiments have been conducted on the basis of the model proposed. Air with water droplets was used as a gas-liquid mixture in the calculations. The influence of the spraying of the channel, the fl ow velocity, the diameter of dispersed particles, and the water concentration on the separation efficiency of an aerosol have been studied. Agreement with experimental data has been shown. A mathematical model has been developed that can be used in designing gas-cleaning apparatuses for enterprises of various industries.

  5. Individual Particle TOF-SIMS Imaging Analysis of Aerosol Collected During the April 2001 Asian Dust Event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, R. E.

    2002-12-01

    Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy can provide information regarding the surface chemistry, including both organic and inorganic compounds, of individual atmospheric aerosol in themicrometer size range. X-ray analysis has commonly been used to analyze the composition of single particles but has several important limitations. Principally, X-ray analysis cannot be used to study organic compounds in the aerosol, it offers low sensitivity for light elements common in crustal material and it cannot distinguish isotopes. TOF-SIMS has the potential to provide superior performance in these areas. We have developed statistical image processing methods to allow extraction of individual particle mass spectra from TOF-SIMS images. In mid April 2001 a strong Asian dust event was tracked by the NASA TOMS satellite across the Pacific Ocean and into the continental United States. While Asian dust deposition is common in Hawaii, strong events characterized by significant visibility degradation have been much less frequently reported in the Rocky Mountain west. Samples were taken during and after the event at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC). Size segregated samples were collected on Al substrates using an 8 stage cascade impactor and total aerosol samples were collected with 47 mm Fluoropore filters. Surface and depth profile analysis of the particles was performed using a Phi Trift I TOF-SIMS instrument. Statistical methods, including PCA, mixture models and neural networks, were used to extract spectra of individual particles from the TOF-SIMS images and to classify particles based on their surface chemistry and depth profiles. Differences in both the chemistry and size distribution of the particles could be seen between the aerosol collected during the Asian dust event and aerosol collected post-event at the University of Utah site. Positive TOF-SIMS spectra of SLC urban aerosol were dominated by sub-micrometer organics, and negative spectra

  6. Particle Collection Efficiency of a Lens-Liquid Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ross Y. M.; Ng, Moses L. F.; Chao, Christopher Y. H.; Li, Z. G.

    2011-09-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that indoor air quality has substantial impact on the health of building occupants [1]. Possible sources of indoor air contamination include hazardous gases as well as particulate matters (PMs) [2]. Experimental studies show that the size distribution of PMs in indoor air ranges from tens of nanometers to a few hundreds of micrometers [3]. Vacuum cleaners can be used as a major tool to collect PMs from floor/carpets, which are the main sources of indoor PMs. However, the particle collection efficiency of typical cyclonic filters in the vacuums drops significantly for particles of diameter below 10 μm. In this work, we propose a lens-liquid filtration system (see Figure 1), where the flow channel is formed by a liquid free surface and a planar plate with fin/lens structures. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed by using FLUENT to optimize the structure of the proposed system toward high particle collection efficiency and satisfactory pressure drop. Numerical simulations show that the system can collect 250 nm diameter particles with collection efficiency of 50%.

  7. Typical household vacuum cleaners: the collection efficiency and emissions characteristics for fine particles.

    PubMed

    Lioy, P J; Wainman, T; Zhang, J; Goldsmith, S

    1999-02-01

    The issue of fine particle (PM2.5) exposures and their potential health effects is a focus of scientific research because of the recently promulgated National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM2.5. Before final implementation, the health and exposure basis for the standard will be reviewed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency within the next five years. As part of this process, it is necessary to understand total particle exposure issues and to determine the relative importance of the origin of PM2.5 exposure in various micro-environments. The results presented in this study examine emissions of fine particles from a previously uncharacterized indoor source: the residential vacuum cleaner. Eleven standard vacuum cleaners were tested for the emission rate of fine particles by their individual motors and for their efficiency in collecting laboratory-generated fine particles. An aerosol generator was used to introduce fine potassium chloride (KCl) particles into the vacuum cleaner inlet for the collection efficiency tests. Measurements of the motor emissions, which include carbon, and the KCl aerosol were made using a continuous HIAC/Royco 5130 A light-scattering particle detector. All tests were conducted in a metal chamber specifically designed to completely contain the vacuum cleaner and operate it in a stationary position. For the tested vacuum cleaners, fine particle motor emissions ranged from 9.6 x 10(4) to 3.34 x 10(8) particles/min, which were estimated to be 0.028 to 176 micrograms/min for mass emissions, respectively. The vast majority of particles released were in the range of 0.3-0.5 micron in diameter. The lowest particle emission rate was obtained for a vacuum cleaner that had a high efficiency (HEPA) filter placed after the vacuum cleaner bag and the motor within a sealed exhaust system. This vacuum cleaner removed the KCl particles that escaped the vacuum cleaner bag and the particles emitted by the motor. Results obtained for the KCl

  8. Electron Microanalysis of Aerosols Collected at Mauna Loa Observatory During an Asian Dust Storm Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conny, J. M.; Willis, R. D.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Colton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Located in the remote marine free troposphere, the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) represents a clean airshed that can be used to study anthropogenic pollution influences and long-range transport of aerosol particles from the Asian mainland. Because of the global nature of Asian dust storms, the radiative properties of these particles transported long-range can significantly impact global climate. It has been proposed that aerosols transported to MLO during upslope wind conditions (typically daytime) are local in origin while aerosols transported during downslope conditions (typically nighttime) represent long-range transport in the free troposphere. Twelve PM10 samples (six daytime/nightime pairs) were collected on polycarbonate filters for 72 hours each between March 15 and April 26, 2011. Bulk samples of dust from local sources (road dust, parking lot, lava fields) were collected as well in order to assess the PM10 contribution from local dusts. On March 19-20 the Korea Meteorological Administration documented a significant dust event over the Korean peninsula. Back-trajectory analyses from MLO coupled with local wind speed and wind direction data suggest that this dust event may have been captured during the MLO sampling campaign. MLO samples were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) and particles were sorted into compositionally-distinct particle types which were then compared across the sample set. Concentrations of particle types expected to be associated with Asian dust were observed to peak in one pair of daytime/nighttime samples collected between March 22 and March 28. Manual microscopic characterization of suspected Asian dust particles and local dust particles was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in conjunction with EDX and focussed ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) in an effort to characterize differences in physicochemical or radiative properties of

  9. Microanalysis of the aerosol collected over south-central New Mexico during the alive field experiment, May-December 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.; Schnell, Russel C.; Kahl, Jonathan D.; Boatman, Joe F.; Garvey, Dennis M.

    Thirty-eight size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in the lower troposphere over the high desert of south-central New Mexico, using cascade impactors mounted onboard two research aircraft. Four of these samples were collected in early May, sixteen in mid-July, and the remaining ones in December 1989, during three segments of the ALIVE field initiative. Analytical electron microscope analyses of aerosol deposits and individual particles from these samples were performed to physically and chemically characterize the major particulate species present in the aerosol. Air-mass trajectories arriving at the sampling area in the May program were quite different from those calculated for the July period. In general, the May trajectories showed strong westerly winds, while the July winds were weaker and southerly, consistently passing over or very near the border cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Aerosol samples collected during the May period were predominantly fine (0.1-0.5 μm dia.), liquid H 2SO 4 droplets. Samples from the July experiment were comprised mostly of fine, solid (NH 4) 2SO 4 or mostly neutralized sulfate particles. In both sampling periods, numerous other particle classes were observed, including many types with probable terrestrial or anthropogenic sources. The numbers of these particles, however, were small when compared with the sulfates. Composite particle types, including sulfate/crustal and sulfate/carbonaceous, were also found to be present. The major differences in aerosol composition between the May and July samples (i.e. the extensive neutralization of sulfates in the July samples) can be explained by considering the different aerosol transport pathways and the proximity of the July aerosol to the El Paso/Juarez urban plume. Winds during the December experiment were quite variable, and may have contributed to the widely varying aerosol compositions observed in these samples. When the aircraft sampled the El Paso

  10. Composition of Stratospheric Aerosol Particles collected during the SOLVE campaign 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Katharina; Nathalie, Benker; Martin, Ebert; Ralf, Weigel; Wilson James, C.; Stephan, Borrmann; Stephan, Weinbruch

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric Aerosol particles were collected during the SAGE III Ozone loss and validation Experiment (SOLVE) in January-March 2000 in Kiruna/ Sweden onboard the scientific ER-2 aircraft with the Multi-Sample Aerosol Collection System. The particles are deposited on Cu transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. Particles of six samples from different flights (including one PSC sample) were analyzed by TEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray detection (EDX) regarding their size, chemical composition and morphology. Most particles are sulfates (formed from droplets of sulfuric acid) which are not resistant to the electron beam. In addition, refractory particles in the size range of 100-500 nm are found. They are either embedded in the sulfates or occur as single particles. The refractory particles are mainly carbonaceous showing only C and O as major peaks in their X-ray spectra. Some particles contain minor amounts of Si and Fe. Both, the O/C (median from 0.10-0.40), as well as Si/C (median from 0.05-0.32) ratios are increasing with time, from the middle of January to the end of February. The largest Fe/C ratio (median: 0.37) is found in a sample of the end of January. Based on the nanostructure and the absence of potassium as a tracer, biomass burning can be excluded as a source. Soot from diesel engines as well as from aircrafts show a nanostructure which is not found in the refractory particles. Due to the fact that large volcanic eruptions, which introduced material directly into the stratosphere, were missing since the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, they are a very unlikely source of the refractory particles. The most likely source of the refractory particles is thus extraterrestrial material.

  11. Source and composition of size fractionated aerosols collected in the Central Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.; Kelly, P. B.; Buchholz, B. A.; Clifford, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Central Valley in California has historically had high levels of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), resulting in significant adverse health effects. The three sources of atmospheric PM in the Central Valley are vehicle exhaust emissions, agricultural activity and residential wood burning. Ambient PM was collected during the winter of 2011 and 2012 in Davis, CA using a DRUM impact analyzer to determine the contributions of the various sources to the size fractionated aerosols. Laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOF MS) and radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) were performed on size fractionated atmospheric PM. The results show that as particle size decreases the amount of organic carbon increases. In the smallest size fraction (0.09 - 1.2 μm) the organic carbon encompasses approximately 70% of the LDI-TOF signal intensity. A comparison of the size fraction PM LDI-TOF spectra showed that there was a significant difference in the chemical composition with particle size. Three distinct chemical composition modes were observed in the LDI-TOF analysis: 0.09 to 0.34 μm, 0.34 to 0.56 μm and >0.56 μm. The particles <0.34 μm were found to be statistically different than those >0.5 μm. The chemical difference in the PM is driven by the large amount of secondary organic aerosol. Dicarboxylic acids, aromatic acids and nitrated aromatics were predominately found in particles <0.34 μm. The effect on human health of these compounds needs to be further explored. The difference in the chemical composition between the respirable and larger PM needs to be considered when associating health effects with PM exposure. The radiocarbon AMS analysis showed that the size fractionated total carbonaceous particulate matter was mainly biogenic in origin, having an average fraction modern (F14C) = 0.753 × 0.006. The F14C from both sample collections were similar and there wasn't a significant change in fraction modern as particle size

  12. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  13. Single-particle Analyses of Compositions, Morphology, and Viscosity of Aerosol Particles Collected During GoAmazon2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Gong, Z.; Bateman, A. P.; Martin, S. T.; Cirino, G. G.; Artaxo, P.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Single-particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows composition and morphology of individual aerosol particles collected during the GoAmazon2014 campaign. These TEM results indicate aerosol types and mixing states, both of which are important for evaluating particle optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity. The samples were collected at the T3 site, which is located in the Amazon forest with influences from the urban pollution plume from Manaus. Samples were also collected from the T0 site, which is in the middle of the jungle with minimal to no influences of anthropogenic sources. The aerosol particles mainly originated from 1) anthropogenic pollution (e.g., nanosphere soot, sulfate), 2) biogenic emissions (e.g., primary biogenic particles, organic aerosols), and 3) long-range transport (e.g., sea salts). We found that the biogenic organic aerosol particles contain homogeneously distributed potassium. Particle viscosity is important for evaluating gas-particle interactions and atmospheric chemistry for the particles. Viscosity can be estimated from the rebounding behavior at controlled relative humidities, i.e., highly viscous particles display less rebound on a plate than low-viscosity particles. We collected 1) aerosol particles from a plate (non-rebounded), 2) those that had rebounded from the plate and were then captured onto an adjacent sampling plate, and 3) particles from ambient air using a separate impactor sampler. Preliminary results show that more than 90% of non-rebounded particles consisted of nanosphere soot with or without coatings. The coatings mostly consisted of organic matter. Although rebounded particles also contain nanosphere soot (number fraction 64-69%), they were mostly internally mixed with sulfate, organic matter, or their mixtures. TEM tilted images suggested that the rebounded particles were less deformed on the substrate, whereas the non-rebounded particles were more deformed, which could

  14. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Juenemann, P J; Tom, H; Boudreau, R J; Chandler, R P; Loken, M K

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using [99mTc]DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, we have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of [99mTc]DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. Use of higher concentration of ethanol to the nebulizer solution did not further improve delivery efficiency. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of [99mTc]DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution. PMID:3889235

  15. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  16. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  17. Estimation of aerosol mass scattering efficiencies under high mass loading: case study for the megacity of Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Chen, Changhong; Gao, Jian; Wang, Shuxiao; Watson, John G; Wang, Hongli; Deng, Jianguo; Wang, Buying; Zhou, Min; Chow, Judith C; Pitchford, Marc L; Hao, Jiming

    2015-01-20

    Aerosol mass scattering efficiency (MSE), used for the scattering coefficient apportionment of aerosol species, is often studied under the condition of low aerosol mass loading in developed countries. Severe pollution episodes with high particle concentration frequently happened in eastern urban China in recent years. Based on synchronous measurement of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties at the megacity of Shanghai for two months during autumn 2012, we studied MSE characteristics at high aerosol mass loading. Their relationships with mass concentrations and size distributions were examined. It was found that MSE values from the original US IMPROVE algorithm could not represent the actual aerosol characteristics in eastern China. It results in an underestimation of the measured ambient scattering coefficient by 36%. MSE values in Shanghai were estimated to be 3.5 ± 0.55 m(2)/g for ammonia sulfate, 4.3 ± 0.63 m(2)/g for ammonia nitrate, and 4.5 ± 0.73 m(2)/g for organic matter, respectively. MSEs for three components increased rapidly with increasing mass concentration in low aerosol mass loading, then kept at a stable level after a threshold mass concentration of 12–24 μg/m(3). During severe pollution episodes, particle growth from an initial peak diameter of 200–300 nm to a peak diameter of 500–600 nm accounts for the rapid increase in MSEs at high aerosol mass loading, that is, particle diameter becomes closer to the wavelength of visible lights. This study provides insights of aerosol scattering properties at high aerosol concentrations and implies the necessity of MSE localization for extinction apportionment, especially for the polluted regions. PMID:25495050

  18. Comparison of spring and autumn time collected outdoor aerosol particles analyzed with depth-resolving SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goschnick, J.; Natzeck, C.; Sommer, M.

    1999-04-01

    Aerosol particles were collected in a size-classified way at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe during two autumn days of fine weather in September 1997 in order to analyze the depth distribution of the chemical inventory. The fine particles (<1 μm diameter) had a nitrogen- and sulfur-dominated shell with a thickness of 13 nm around a carbon core and mainly originate from traffic soot. The coarse particles (>1 μm diameter) consisted of soil dust or fly ash and sodium salt containing particles. Again the particle composition in greater depth was found to be different to the surface region, where nitrogen and sulfur as well as carbon were enriched. The surface-near nitrogen and sulfur could be attributed to ammonium sulfate, maybe deposited by particulate material formed from ammonia and SO x in the atmosphere. The results agree to a large degree with the analysis of outdoor particles collected at the same location but in spring time four years ago. However, the autumn particles of 1997 exhibited with 600 nm twice the diameter for the most frequent size compared to the particles sampled in spring of 1993.

  19. Global dust sources detection using MODIS Deep Blue Collection 6 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Ginoux, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Remote sensing sensors are the most useful tool to locate dust sources. These sensors include microwaves, visible channels, and lidar. On the global scale, major dust source regions have been identified using polar orbiting satellite instruments. The MODIS Deep Blue algorithm has been particularly useful to detect small-scale sources such as floodplains, alluvial fans, rivers, and wadis , as well as to identify anthropogenic sources from agriculture. The recent release of Collection 6 MODIS aerosol products allows to extend dust source detection to the entire land surfaces, which is quite useful to identify mid to high latitude dust sources and detect not only dust from agriculture but fugitive dust from transport and industrial activities. This presentation will overview the advantages and drawbacks of using MODIS Deep Blue for dust detection, compare to other instruments (polar orbiting and geostationary). The results of Collection 6 with a new dust screening will be compared against AERONET. Applications to long range transport of anthropogenic dust will be presented.

  20. Efficient extraction method to collect sugar from sweet sorghum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sweet sorghum is a domesticated grass containing a sugar-rich juice that can be readily utilized for ethanol production. Most of the sugar is stored inside the cells of the stalk tissue and can be difficult to release, a necessary step before conventional fermentation. While this crop holds much promise as an arid land sugar source for biofuel production, a number of challenges must be overcome. One lies in the inherent labile nature of the sugars in the stalks leading to a short usable storage time. Also, collection of sugars from the sweet sorghum stalks is usually accomplished by mechanical squeezing, but generally does not collect all of the available sugars. Results In this paper, we present two methods that address these challenges for utilization of sweet sorghum for biofuel production. The first method demonstrates a means to store sweet sorghum stalks in the field under semi-arid conditions. The second provides an efficient water extraction method that can collect as much of the available sugar as feasible. Operating parameters investigated include temperature, stalk size, and solid–liquid ratio that impact both the rate of sugar release and the maximal amount recovered with a goal of low water use. The most desirable conditions include 30°C, 0.6 ratio of solid to liquid (w/w), which collects 90 % of the available sugar. Variations in extraction methods did not alter the efficiency of the eventual ethanol fermentation. Conclusions The water extraction method has the potential to be used for sugar extraction from both fresh sweet sorghum stalks and dried ones. When combined with current sugar extraction methods, the overall ethanol production efficiency would increase compared to current field practices. PMID:23305036

  1. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Aerosols from Collection 6 Aqua and Terra MODIS e-Deep Blue Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettenhausen, C.; Hsu, N. Y. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Lee, J.; Carletta, N.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols continue to attract a significant amount of attention from researchers worldwide due to their extensive effects on Earth's climate, ecology, public health, and even energy production. In order to truly understand these effects, a long, stable, and well-calibrated data record is required. Since 2000 and 2002, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites together with the e-Deep Blue aerosol retrieval algorithm have been providing such a data record. After a multi-year development effort, the production of both Aqua and Terra MODIS Collection 6 (C6) atmosphere products successfully completed earlier this year and the data was released to the public shortly thereafter. The C6 Deep Blue products (now enhanced Deep Blue or e-Deep Blue) have been significantly improved over the previous Collection 5.1 version. In this poster we provide an overview of the latest C6 e-Deep Blue products and the improvements implemented since the previous collection including coverage over dark surfaces and updates to the Terra calibration. Validation results utilizing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data are also summarized. We then use the C6 e-Deep Blue products from both Aqua and Terra to explore the spatial characteristics in addition to the seasonal and inter-annual variability of aerosols on both regional and global scales. We also use this as an opportunity to compare these results and investigate any differences found between the two instruments.

  2. Robust and efficient quantum private comparison of equality with collective detection over collective-noise channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Wen, QiaoYan; Liu, Bin; Gao, Fei; Sun, Ying

    2013-09-01

    We present a protocol for quantum private comparison of equality (QPCE) with the help of a semi-honest third party (TP). Instead of employing the entanglement, we use single photons to achieve the comparison in this protocol. By utilizing collective eavesdropping detection strategy, our protocol has the advantage of higher qubit efficiency and lower cost of implementation. In addition to this protocol, we further introduce three robust versions which can be immune to collective dephasing noise, collective-rotation noise and all types of unitary collective noise, respectively. Finally, we show that our protocols can be secure against the attacks from both the outside eavesdroppers and the inside participants by using the theorems on quantum operation discrimination.

  3. Aerosol-Assisted Solid Debris Collection for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S L; Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Ivanov, V V; Astanovitskiy, A L; Lewis, L A; Rundberg, R S

    2010-05-21

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been completed and has made its first shots on-target. While upcoming experiments will be focused on achieving ignition, a variety of subsequent experiments are planned for the facility, including measurement of cross sections, astrophysical measurements, and investigation of hydrodynamic instability in the target capsule. In order to successfully execute several of these planned experiments, the ability to collect solid debris following a NIF capsule shot will be required. The ability to collect and analyze solid debris generated in a shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will greatly expand the number of nuclear reactions studied for diagnostic purposes. Currently, reactions are limited to only those producing noble gases for cryogenic collection and counting with the Radchem Apparatus for Gas Sampling (RAGS). The radchem solid collection diagnostic has already been identified by NIF to be valuable for the determination and understanding of mix generated in the target capsule's ablation. LLNL is currently developing this solid debris collection capability at NIF, and is in the stage of testing credible designs. Some of these designs explore the use of x-ray generated aerosols to assist in collection of solid debris. However, the variety of harsh experimental conditions this solid collection device will encounter in NIF are challenging to replicate. Experiments performed by Gary Grim et al. at Sandia National Laboratory's RHEPP1 facility have shown that ablation causes a cloud of material removed from an exposed surface to move normal to and away from the surface. This ablation is certain to be a concern in the NIF target chamber from the prompt x-rays, gamma rays, etc. generated in the shot. The cloud of ablated material could interfere with the collection of the desired reaction debris by slowing down the debris so that the kinetic energy is too low to allow implantation, or by stopping the debris from reaching the

  4. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sirr, S.A.; Juenemann, P.J.; Tom, H.; Boudreau, R.J.; Chandler, R.P.; Loken, M.K.

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, the authors have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution.

  5. Efficient parallel global garbage collection on massively parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Tomio; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Akinori

    1994-12-31

    On distributed-memory high-performance MPPs where processors are interconnected by an asynchronous network, efficient Garbage Collection (GC) becomes difficult due to inter-node references and references within pending, unprocessed messages. The parallel global GC algorithm (1) takes advantage of reference locality, (2) efficiently traverses references over nodes, (3) admits minimum pause time of ongoing computations, and (4) has been shown to scale up to 1024 node MPPs. The algorithm employs a global weight counting scheme to substantially reduce message traffic. The two methods for confirming the arrival of pending messages are used: one counts numbers of messages and the other uses network `bulldozing.` Performance evaluation in actual implementations on a multicomputer with 32-1024 nodes, Fujitsu AP1000, reveals various favorable properties of the algorithm.

  6. Method for the determination of photomultiplier collection efficiency, F.

    PubMed

    Wright, A G

    2010-04-10

    Photomultiplier collection efficiency, F, is a fundamental, but difficult, parameter to measure with certainty. A method for its determination, based on the gain of the first dynode, has been devised and applied to two different types of photomultiplier. The measurements are substantially free from the sources of error, which have compromised previously reported results by other authors. F may be determined by the proposed method with an accuracy of better than +/-3% for any photomultiplier tube with sufficient gain to uncover its single electron response. PMID:20390005

  7. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-04-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; turning on organic-inorganic interactions only when the water content associated with organic compounds is significant; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 29.7 with ±15% deviation from benchmark results. These speedup methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  8. A computationally-efficient secondary organic aerosol module for three-dimensional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-07-01

    Accurately simulating secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in three-dimensional (3-D) air quality models is challenging due to the complexity of the physics and chemistry involved and the high computational demand required. A computationally-efficient yet accurate SOA module is necessary in 3-D applications for long-term simulations and real-time air quality forecasting. A coupled gas and aerosol box model (i.e., 0-D CMAQ-MADRID 2) is used to optimize relevant processes in order to develop such a SOA module. Solving the partitioning equations for condensable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and calculating their activity coefficients in the multicomponent mixtures are identified to be the most computationally-expensive processes. The two processes can be speeded up by relaxing the error tolerance levels and reducing the maximum number of iterations of the numerical solver for the partitioning equations for organic species; conditionally activating organic-inorganic interactions; and parameterizing the calculation of activity coefficients for organic mixtures in the hydrophilic module. The optimal speed-up method can reduce the total CPU cost by up to a factor of 31.4 from benchmark under the rural conditions with 2 ppb isoprene and by factors of 10 71 under various test conditions with 2 10 ppb isoprene and >40% relative humidity while maintaining ±15% deviation. These speed-up methods are applicable to other SOA modules that are based on partitioning theories.

  9. Relationship between indoor and outdoor bioaerosols collected with a button inhalable aerosol sampler in urban homes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T.; Grinshpun, S. A.; Martuzevicius, D.; Adhikari, A.; Crawford, C. M.; Luo, J.; Reponen, T.

    2007-01-01

    This field study investigated the relationship between indoor and outdoor concentrations of airborne actinomycetes, fungal spores, and pollen. Air samples were collected for 24 h with a button inhalable aerosol sampler inside and outside of six single-family homes located in the Cincinnati area (overall, 15 pairs of samples were taken in each home). The measurements were conducted during three seasons – spring and fall 2004, and winter 2005. The concentration of culturable actinomycetes was mostly below the detection limit. The median indoor/outdoor ratio (I/O) for actinomycetes was the highest: 2.857. The indoor of fungal and pollen concentrations followed the outdoor concentrations while indoor levels were mostly lower than the outdoor ones. The I/O ratio of total fungal spores (median = 0.345) in six homes was greater than that of pollen grains (median = 0.025). The low I/O ratios obtained for pollen during the peak ambient pollination season (spring) suggest that only a small fraction penetrated from outdoor to indoor environment. This is attributed to the larger size of pollen grains. Higher indoor concentration levels and variability in the I/O ratio observed for airborne fungi may be associated with indoor sources and/or higher outdoor-to-indoor penetration of fungal spores compared to pollen grains. PMID:16420496

  10. Charged aerosol collection in the mesosphere during MIDAS/SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Byron; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    2001-10-01

    A charged aerosol detector was flown during the MIDAS/SOLSTICE rocket campaign in June 2001 over Andoya, Norway. The probe is a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons and light ions. This probe was first used on a sounding rocket over White Sands in 1998, where it measured a sharp positively charged layer at 86.5 km [Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 3825 (2000)]. The first MIDAS launch was into a triple layered PMSE which extended from 82 to 90 km. On upleg, the probe measured a broad region of negatively charged particles inside a local ion and electron biteout at approximately 85 km. The second launch was into a very strong single-layered PMSE. On upleg, the probe measured another broad region of negative particles within the PMSE. On downleg, more negatively charged particles were seen in the PMSE, this time in a broad region with a very sharp upper boundary. During both flights the probe also measured a positively charged background which was well-correlated with an onboard positive ion probe. Also seen was a photoelectron signal due to solar UV. These other signals show that the probe functioned as expected during flight. Further analysis is underway.

  11. FEASIBILITY OF THE AEROSOL-TO-LIQUID PARTICLE EXTRACTION SYSTEM (ALPES) FOR COLLECTION OF VIABLE FRANCISELLA SP.

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkamp, M

    2006-08-07

    Several Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area have tested positive for Francisella tularensis and there is a need to determine whether natural occurring Francisella-related microorganism(s) may be responsible for these observed positive reactions. The collection, culturing and characterization of Francisella-related natural microorganisms will provide the knowledge base to improve the future selectivity of Biowatch monitoring for Francisella. The aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPES) is a high-efficiency, dual mechanism collection system that utilizes a liquid collection medium for capture of airborne microorganisms. Since the viability of microorganisms is preserved better in liquid medium than on air filters, this project was undertaken to determine whether Francisella philomiragia and Francisella tularensis LVS maintain acceptable viability in the continuous liquid recirculation, high direct current voltage and residual ozone concentrations which occur during ALPES operation. Throughout a series of preliminary trial runs with representative gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms, several design modifications and improvements to the ALPES optimized liquid handling, electrical stability, sampling and overall performance for biological sampling. Initial testing with Francisella philomiragia showed viability was preserved better in PBS buffer than HBSS buffer. Trial runs at starting cell concentrations of 1.8 x 10{sup 6} and 2.5 x 10{sup 4} CFU/L showed less than a 1-log decrease in viability for F. philomiragia after 24 h in the ALPES. Francisella tularensis LVS (live vaccine strain) was used as a surrogate for virulent F. tularensis in ALPES trial runs conducted at starting cell concentrations of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/L. F. tularensis LVS was slow-growing and required highly selective growth media to prevent overgrowth by collected airborne microorganisms. In addition, one ALPES unit intake was HEPA filtered during

  12. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  13. Compositional variability of the aerosols collected on Kerkennah Islands (central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabelsi, A.; Masmoudi, M.; Quisefit, J. P.; Alfaro, S. C.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the seasonal variability of the aerosol concentrations and origins in central Tunisia. Four field campaigns were carried out in 2010/2011 to collect air-suspended particles on the Kerkennah Islands. The elemental composition (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, V, and As) of the particles collected in summer (June and July), autumn (September and November), winter (February and March), and spring (April and May) is determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. Examination of the enrichment factors (EF) of all elements indicate that Al, Fe, Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Cr are mainly derived from soil sources, whereas Na and Cl are mostly of marine origin. Other elements such as K and Mg or S and P have multiple origins (Marine/crustal and crustal/anthropogenic, respectively). Finally, V, Cu, Ni, As, and Pb appear to be produced by anthropogenic activities. Based on the inter-elemental correlations, the mass concentrations of mineral dust (MD), sea-salt (SS) and anthropogenic (non-crustal and non-marine) sulfates (NSS) are quantified. MD, SS and NSS display significant inter-seasonal differences: on the one hand, MD and SS are the highest in spring and the lowest in winter, probably because of the seasonal change in meteorological conditions. On the other hand, NSS and Cu concentrations are above their autumn and winter values in spring and summer, which suggests the existence of a common source of the combustion type for these two pollutants.

  14. Charged Aerosol Collection Inside PMSEs by a Magnetically Shielded Rocket Probe during MIDAS/SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2001-12-01

    A charged aerosol detector was flown during the MIDAS/SOLSTICE rocket campaign in June 2001 over Andoya, Norway. The probe is a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons and light ions. This probe was first used on a sounding rocket over White Sands, NM in 1998, where it measured a thin positively charged layer 500 m thick at an altitude of 86.5 km, followed by a broad negatively charged layer which extended a few kilometers lower [Geophys. Res. Lett. 27, 3825 (2000)]. The flights aboard the two MIDAS payloads were the second use of the probes. The first MIDAS launch was into a triple layered PMSE that extended from 82 to 90 km. On both upleg and downleg, the detector saw finely detailed positive charge structures within the PMSE. These uniquely shaped layers were completely correlated with simultaneously collected positive ion data. On downleg, the probe measured a thin burst of negatively charged particles at 83 km. The second MIDAS flight was fired into a very strong single-layered PMSE. On downleg, thin bursts of negative charge were seen from 87 km to 83 km. Also, a single thick layer of negative charge was measured at 82 km. This layer had a very sharp upper boundary and extended downward over the next km. During both flights the probe also measured a smooth, positively charged background which was well correlated with the positive ion probe. Also seen was a photoelectron signal due to solar UV. Cloud cover prevented lidar support for either launch. This work was funded by NASA.

  15. Technical Note: A novel rocket-based in situ collection technique for mesospheric and stratospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, W.; Achtert, P.; Ivchenko, N.; Magnusson, P.; Kuremyr, T.; Shepenkov, V.; Tibert, G.

    2013-03-01

    A technique for collecting aerosol particles between altitudes of 17 and 85 km is described. Spin-stabilized collection probes are ejected from a sounding rocket allowing for multi-point measurements. Each probe is equipped with 110 collection samples that are 3 mm in diameter. The collection samples are one of three types: standard transmission electron microscopy carbon grids, glass fibre filter paper or silicone gel. Collection samples are exposed over a 50 m to 5 km height range with a total of 45 separate ranges. Post-flight electron microscopy will give size-resolved information on particle number, shape and elemental composition. Each collection probe is equipped with a suite of sensors to capture the probe's status during the fall. Parachute recovery systems along with GPS-based localization will ensure that each probe can be located and recovered for post-flight analysis.

  16. AEROSOL DEPOSITION EFFICIENCIES AND UPSTREAM RELEASE POSITIONS FOR DIFFERENT INHALATION MODES IN AN UPPER BRONCHIAL AIRWAY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol Deposition Efficiencies and Upstream Release Positions for Different Inhalation Modes in an Upper Bronchial Airway Model

    Zhe Zhang, Clement Kleinstreuer, and Chong S. Kim

    Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Ch...

  17. Hygroscopic and Chemical Properties of Aerosols collected near a Copper Smelter: Implications for Public and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sorooshian, Armin; Csavina, Janae; Shingler, Taylor; Dey, Stephen; Brechtel, Fred J.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate matter emissions near active copper smelters and mine tailings in the southwestern United States pose a potential threat to nearby environments owing to toxic species that can be inhaled and deposited in various regions of the body depending on the composition and size of the particles, which are linked by particle hygroscopic properties. This study reports the first simultaneous measurements of size-resolved chemical and hygroscopic properties of particles next to an active copper smelter and mine tailings by the towns of Hayden and Winkelman in southern Arizona. Size-resolved particulate matter samples collected near an active copper smelter were examined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, and a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer. Aerosol particles collected at the measurement site are enriched in metals and metalloids (e.g. arsenic, lead, and cadmium) and water-uptake measurements of aqueous extracts of collected samples indicate that the particle diameter range of particles most enriched with these species (0.18–0.55 µm) overlaps with the most hygroscopic mode at a relative humidity of 90% (0.10–0.32 µm). These measurements have implications for public health, microphysical effects of aerosols, and regional impacts owing to the transport and deposition of contaminated aerosol particles. PMID:22852879

  18. CCN activation and efficiency of nucleation and impaction removal process of biomass burning aerosols in Brazil: preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Gácita, Madeleine; Longo, Karla M.; Freitas, Saulo R.; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-04-01

    The biomass burning activity constitutes an important source of aerosols and trace gases to the atmosphere globally. In South America, during the dry season, aerosols prevenient from biomass burning are typically transported to long distances from its sources before being removed though contributing significantly to the aerosol budget on a continental scale. The uncertainties in the magnitude of the impacts on the hydrological cycle, the radiation budget and the biogeochemical cycles on a continental scale are still noteworthy. The still unknowns on the efficiency of biomass burning aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the effectiveness of the nucleation and impaction scavenging mechanisms in removing them from the atmosphere contribute to such uncertainties. In the present work, the explicit modelling of the early stages of cloud development using a parcel model for the typical conditions of the dry season and dry-to-wet transition periods in Amazonia allowed an estimation of the efficiency of nucleation scavenging process and the ability of South American biomass burning aerosol to act as CCN. Additionally, the impaction scavenging was simulated for the same aerosol population following a method based on the widely used concept of the efficiency of collision between a raindrop and an aerosol particle. DMPS and H-TDMA data available in the literature for biomass burning aerosol population in the region indicated the presence of a nearly hydrophobic fraction (on average, with specific hygroscopic parameter κ=0.04, and relative abundance of 73 %) and nearly hygroscopic fraction (κ=0.13, 27 %), externally mixed. The hygroscopic parameters and relative abundances of each hygroscopic group, as well as the weighted average specific hygroscopic parameter for the entire population κ=0.06, were used in calculations of aerosol activation and population mass and number concentration scavenged by nucleation. Results from both groups of simulations are

  19. Aerosols Collected at a Tropical Marine Environment: Size-Resolved Chemical Composition Using IC, TOC, and Thermal-Optical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-García, F.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Repollet-Pedrosa, M.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Ramírez-Santa Cruz, C.; Puxbaum, H.

    2009-05-01

    Size-resolved chemical characterization was performed on aerosol samples collected at two different marine sites in the tropics: Dian Point (DP), Antigua and Cape San Juan (CSJ), Puerto Rico. A 13-stage Dekati low- pressure impactor (Dp 0.1 to 10 μm), a 10-stage micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (Dp 0.054 to 18 μm), and stacked-filter units (Dp < 1.7 μm) were used to collect the samples. Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO2-, NO3-, SO42-, acetate, formate, malonate, and oxalate were determined using ion chromatography (IC). Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) was used to determine the concentrations of aerosol total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and elemental carbon (EC). Five-day back trajectories calculated using NOAA's HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model identified air masses coming from the North Atlantic (maritime air), Northwest Africa (desert dust), and North America (anthropogenic pollution). Size-resolved chemical characterization of aerosol samples using IC and TOA confirmed that aerosols become aged as they are transported to the Caribbean and their composition depends on the air mass origin. Gravimetric analyses showed that average fine mass concentrations for CSJ station were higher than for DP station (CSJ: 1.9 μg m-3; DP: 1.2 μg m-3). The aerosol chemical composition changed with air masses of different origin and with different pollution levels. In both locations the predominant water-soluble ions in the fine aerosol fraction were Cl-, Na+, and SO42-. Sulphate was observed in higher concentrations during the polluted case and particulate organic matter concentrations were higher for the maritime case. During desert dust events an increase in Ca2+ and Mg2+ of 4 and 2 times, respectively, was observed mainly in the coarse mode. Results for the size-resolved chemical composition and complete aerosol chemical apportionment including the residual mass will be presented.

  20. Bromide content of sea-salt aerosol particles collected over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, R.; von Glasow, R.; Sander, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2002-10-01

    Bromide can be depleted from sea-salt aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and converted to reactive gas-phase species like Br, BrO, and HOBr, which affect ozone chemistry. Air pollution can enhance the bromine release from sea-salt aerosols and thus inject additional bromine into the MBL. During the winter monsoon the northern Indian Ocean is strongly affected by air pollution from the Indian subcontinent and Asia. As part of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), aerosol particles were sampled with stacked filter units (SFU) on the NCAR Hercules C-130 aircraft during February-March 1999. We determined the vertical and latitudinal distribution of the major inorganic aerosol components (NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and the Br- content of the coarse aerosol to examine the role of the bromine release on the gas-phase chemistry in the marine boundary layer over the tropical Indian Ocean. The aerosol mass and composition varied significantly with air mass origin and sampling location. In the northern part of the Indian Ocean (5°-15°N, 66°-73°E), high concentrations of pollution-derived inorganic species were found in the marine boundary layer extending from the sea surface to about 1.2 km above sea level. In this layer, the average mass concentration of all aerosol species detected by our technique was comparable to pollution levels observed in industrialized regions. In the Southern Hemisphere (1°-9°S, 66°- 73°E), the aerosol concentrations rapidly declined to remote background levels. A chloride loss from the coarse aerosol particles was observed in parallel to the latitudinal gradient of the non sea salt SO42- burden. In most of the samples, Br- was depleted from the sea-salt aerosols. However, we found an enrichment in bromide in aerosols affected by air masses originating over strong pollution sources in India (Bombay, Calcutta). In these cases the additional pollution-derived Br from organo-halogen additives in petrol

  1. Chemical characterization of submicron aerosol particles collected over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, R.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Andreae, M. O.

    2002-08-01

    Submicron aerosol particles (Dp < 1 μm) were sampled with stacked filter units on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Hercules C-130 aircraft during February-March 1999 as a contribution to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). We determined the vertical and spatial distribution of the major aerosol components (NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, methyl sulfonic acid, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, oxalate, organic carbon, and black carbon) over the Indian Ocean to examine the role of pollution aerosols on indirect and direct radiative forcing. High pollution levels were observed over the entire northern Indian Ocean down to the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) located between the equator and 10°S. In the northern part of the Indian Ocean (5°-15°N, 66°-73°E), high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol and pollution-derived inorganic species were found in a layer extending from the sea surface to about 3.5 km asl. In this layer, the average mass concentration of all aerosol species detected by our technique ranged between 7 and 34 μg m-3, comparable to pollution levels observed in industrialized regions. In the Southern Hemisphere (1°-9°S, 66°-73°E), the aerosol concentrations rapidly declined to remote background levels of about 2 μg m-3. The concentrations of non-sea-salt sulfate (the main light scattering component) ranged from maximum values of 12.7 μg m-3 in the Northern Hemisphere to 0.2 μg m-3 in the Southern Hemisphere. Carbonaceous aerosol contributes between 40% and 60% to the fine aerosol mass of all determined components. An unusually high fraction of black carbon (up to 16% in the polluted areas) is responsible for its high light absorption coefficient.

  2. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected at Lhasa City in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Duo, Bu; Zhang, Yunchen; Kong, Lingdong; Fu, Hongbo; Hu, Yunjie; Chen, Jianmin; Li, Lin; Qiong, A

    2015-03-01

    To understand the composition and major sources of aerosol particles in Lhasa City on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), individual particles were collected from 2 February to 8 March, 2013 in Tibet University. The mean concentrations of both PM2.5 and PM10 during the sampling were 25.7±21.7 and 57.2±46.7 μg/m3, respectively, much lower than those of other cities in East and South Asia, but higher than those in the remote region in TP like Nam Co, indicating minor urban pollution. Combining the observations with the meteorological parameters and back trajectory analysis, it was concluded that local sources controlled the pollution during the sampling. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectra (EDS) was used to study 408 particles sampled on four days. Based on the EDS analysis, a total of 8 different particle categories were classified for all 408 particles, including Si-rich, Ca-rich, soot, K-rich, Fe-rich, Pb-rich, Al-rich and other particles. The dominant elements were Si, Al and Ca, which were mainly attributed to mineral dust in the earth's crust such as feldspar and clay. Fe-, Pb-, K-, Al-rich particles and soot mainly originated from anthropogenic sources like firework combustion and biomass burning during the sampling. During the sampling, the pollution mainly came from mineral dust, while the celebration ceremony and religious ritual produced a large quantity of anthropogenic metal-bearing particles on 9 and 25 February 2013. Cement particles also had a minor influence. The data obtained in this study can be useful for developing pollution control strategies. PMID:25766026

  3. Investigation of spatial variations in collection efficiency of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltner, Jason Fredrick

    2001-11-01

    In an effort to investigate spatial variations in solar cells, an apparatus which is capable of mapping collection efficiency with micron resolution and near- solar intensity has been developed. Local reductions in collection are observed in CdTe- and Cu(In1- xGax)Se2- based devices, and are characterized by measuring the response as a function of cell bias and incident laser intensity. By modeling this data with an equivalent circuit, it is clear that the majority of local variations in the response are due to series resistance variations. Further, direct evidence is given for bandgap variations in CdTe solar cells, which are correlated with high resistance regions in some devices. The bandgap variation is attributed to diffusion of S into CdTe, forming the lower bandgap CdTe1- xSx, during the post-deposition CdCl2 treatment commonly used to improve performance. Investigation of the impact of CdCl2 on a CdTe solar cell indicates that the treatment reduces the number of variations seen with above-bandgap photon energies, but also increases local variations in bandgap. The latter effect has been attributed to non-uniform penetration of CdCl2 to the device interface. Finally, elevated-temperature stress on CdTe devices is shown to preferentially degrade regions which exhibit decreases in bandgap, and hence increased S alloying.

  4. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  5. Long-term observation of water-soluble chemical components in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, Daishi; Somada, Yuka; Ijyu, Moriaki; Azechi, Sotaro; Nakaema, Fumiya; Arakaki, Takemitsu; Tanahara, Akira

    2010-05-01

    The economic development and population growth in recent Asia spread air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. The study of the long-range transported air pollution from Asian continent has gained a special attention in Japan because of increase in photochemical oxidants in relatively remote islands. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the bulk aerosols collected at the Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. We will report water-soluble chemical components data of anions, cations and DOC in bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS during August, 2005 to April, 2010. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components showed that the concentrations were relatively low in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian Continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components were much higher compared to the other directions. In addition, we calculated background concentration of water-soluble chemical components at Okinawa

  6. Behavior of Particulate Mercury in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at 2 Sites in Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Oshiro, Y.; Tsuhako, A.; Murayama, H.; Tanahara, A.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is toxic to animals. Mercury is emitted to the atmosphere mainly from two sources; natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include volcanic eruption, forest fire and so on. Anthropogenic sources include fossil fuel combustion, metal and cement production and so on. There are three forms of mercury in the atmosphere: gaseous elemental mercury, reactive gaseous mercury and particulate mercury. Gaseous elemental mercury is the most abundant form in the atmosphere, and has long atmospheric lifetime, ca. a few years. This study focuses on particulate mercury, which has a relatively short lifetime, ca. a few days, in the atmosphere because it reflects characteristics of nearby emission sources. Objectives of this study were to elucidate the behavior of particulate mercury in aerosols and to understand relationships between mercury and other metals and water-soluble anions. Aerosol samples were collected at two sites; Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Jan.2008-Nov.2012), northern tip of Okinawa island, and University of the Ryukyus (UR, Jan.2008-Nov.2012), central and more populated area of Okinawa island. They were collected by using identical high-volume air samplers on quartz filters. Concentrations of particulate mercury in aerosols were determined by using a MA-3000 (Nippon Instruments Corporation). The results showed that particulate Hg concentrations were mostly higher for the aerosols collected at UR site than those at CHAAMS site, suggesting locally emitted Hg. Samples collected at UR showed clear seasonal variation, the lowest in summer and the highest winter. On the other hand, the CHAAMS samples showed lower concentration in winter and higher concentration in summer, but the difference was relatively small. Both UR and CHAAMS samples had similar concentration levels in summer season. Back trajectory analysis showed that particulate Hg at CHAAMS site during summer was not from Asian continent. Since samples

  7. Comparison Between NPP-VIIRS Aerosol Data Products and the MODIS AQUA Deep Blue Collection 6 Dataset Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Lee, J.; Kondragunta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosols are small particles suspended in the atmosphere and have a variety of natural and man-made sources. Knowledge of aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a measure of the amount of aerosol in the atmosphere, and its change over time, is important for multiple reasons. These include climate change, air quality (pollution) monitoring, monitoring hazards such as dust storms and volcanic ash, monitoring smoke from biomass burning, determining potential energy yields from solar plants, determining visibility at sea, estimating fertilization of oceans and rainforests by transported mineral dust, understanding changes in weather brought upon by the interaction of aerosols and clouds, and more. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine AOD. This study compares the VIIRS dataset to ground-based measurements of AOD, along with a state-of-the-art satellite AOD dataset (the new version of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer Deep Blue algorithm) to assess its reliability. The Suomi-NPP satellite was launched late in 2011, carrying several instruments designed to continue the biogeophysical data records of current and previous satellite sensors. The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard Suomi-NPP is being used, among other things, to determine aerosol optical depth (AOD), and related activities since launch have been focused towards validating and understanding this new dataset through comparisons with other satellite and ground-based products. The operational VIIRS AOD product is compared over land with AOD derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations using the Deep Blue (DB) algorithm from the forthcoming Collection 6 of MODIS data

  8. Thermogravimetric characteristics of water-soluble organic matter from atmospheric aerosols collected in a rural-coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Regina M. B. O.; Duarte, Armando C.

    The influence of chemical composition on the thermal degradation behaviour of water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from fine atmospheric aerosols collected over a period of 12 months was investigated by using thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. The obtained results were further compared to those of Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and Fulvic Acid (SRFA) standards, which were obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Prior to the TG analyses, the WSOC samples were separated into hydrophobic acids and hydrophilic acids fractions by using a XAD-8/XAD-4 isolation procedure. The data reported in this study were illustrative of the very complex nature of aerosol WSOC hydrophobic acids samples (three to six peaks of thermal degradation) in comparison to that of SRHA and SRFA standards (two degradation peaks). A pseudo-first order mathematical approach was applied to estimate the apparent activation energy of the different multi-step degradation regions. It was found that the degradation processes of the SRHA and SRFA standards occurred with lower apparent activation energies than those obtained for the aerosol WSOC hydrophobic acids samples, although these latter samples appear to exhibit the most thermally labile structural component. The WSOC hydrophobic acids showed a trend towards high apparent activation energies at high temperatures, thus suggesting the decomposition of very stable structural units with relatively strong bond energies above ca. 460 °C. The thermal profiles presented in this study are unique in showing the annual evolution of the thermal-oxidative properties of the fine aerosol WSOC hydrophobic acids samples, and in providing important supplementary information on the structural stability of the bulk aerosol WSOC.

  9. Levoglucosan and Lipid Class Compounds in the Asian Dusts and Marine Aerosols Collected During the ACE-Asia Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Simoneit, B. R.; Kawamura, K.; Mochida, M.; Lee, M.; Lee, G.; Huebert, B. J.

    2002-12-01

    In order to characterize organic aerosols in the Asian Pacific region, we collected filter samples at Gosan (formerly Kosan) and Sapporo sites as well as on mobile platforms (R.V. R.H. Brown and NCAR C-130) in the western North Pacific. The aerosol extracts were analyzed by capillary GC-MS employing a TMS derivatization technique. We identified over 100 organic compounds in the samples. They are categorized into seven different classes in terms of functional groups and sources. First, sugar-type compounds were detected in the aerosols, including levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan, which are tracers for biomass burning. Second, a homologous series of fatty acids (C12-C30) and fatty alcohols (C12-C30) mainly from plant waxes and marine lipids were present. The third group includes dicarboxylic acids (>C3) and other atmospheric oxidation products. Although oxalic (C2) and malonic (C3) acids were not detected by this method, they are very abundant in the aerosols. The fourth group includes n-alkanes (C18-C35) which usually showed a strong odd/even predominance, suggesting an important contribution from higher plant waxes. The fifth includes polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from phenanthrene to coronene, all combustion products of petroleum and mainly coal. Saccharides were the sixth group and consisted mainly of a- and b- glucose, sucrose and its alditol, and minor amounts of xylitol, sorbitol and arabitol. These saccharides are tracers for soil dust. Phthalates were detected as the seventh class, with a dominance of dioctyl phthalate. The results suggest that organic aerosols originate primarily from (1) natural emissions of terrestrial plant wax and marine lipids, (2) smoke from biomass burning (mainly non-conifer fuels), (3) soil resuspension due to spring agricultural activity, (4) urban/industrial emissions from fossil fuel use (coal), and (5) secondary reaction products. These compounds are transported by the strong westerly winds and therefore

  10. Optimized sparse-particle aerosol representations for modeling cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierce, Laura; McGraw, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Sparse representations of atmospheric aerosols are needed for efficient regional- and global-scale chemical transport models. Here we introduce a new framework for representing aerosol distributions, based on the method of moments. Given a set of moment constraints, we show how linear programming can be used to identify collections of sparse particles that approximately maximize distributional entropy. The collections of sparse particles derived from this approach reproduce CCN activity of the exact model aerosol distributions with high accuracy. Additionally, the linear programming techniques described in this study can be used to bound key aerosol properties, such as the number concentration of CCN. Unlike the commonly used sparse representations, such as modal and sectional schemes, the maximum-entropy moment-based approach is not constrained to pre-determined size bins or assumed distribution shapes. This study is a first step toward a new aerosol simulation scheme that will track multivariate aerosol distributions with sufficient computational efficiency for large-scale simulations.

  11. Mass concentration and mineralogical characteristics of aerosol particles collected at Dunhuang during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. X.; Cao, J. J.; Li, X. X.; Okuda, T.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Measurements were performed in spring 2001 and 2002 to determine the characteristics of soil dust in the Chinese desert region of Dunhuang, one of the ground sites of the Asia-Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The mean mass concentrations of total suspended particle matter during the spring of 2001 and 2002 were 317 mu g m(-3) and 307 mu g m(-3) respectively. Eleven dust storm events were observed with a mean aerosol concentration of 1095 mu g m(-3), while the non-dusty days with calm or weak wind speed had a background aerosol loading of 196 mu g m(-3) on average in the springtime. The main minerals detected in the aerosol samples by X-ray diffraction were illite, kaolinite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar, calcite and dolomite. Gypsum, halite and amphibole were also detected in a few samples. The mineralogical data also show that Asian dust is characterized by a kaolinite to chlorite (K/C) ratio lower than 1 whereas Saharan dust exhibits a K/C ratio larger than 2. Air mass back- trajectory analysis show that three families of pathways are associated with the aerosol particle transport to Dunhuang, but these have similar K/C ratios, which further demonstrates that the mineralogical characteristics of Asian dust are different from African dust.

  12. Impacts of Long-Range Transport of Metals from East Asia in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Okinawa Archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Sotaro; S, Yuka; I, Moriaki; N, Fumiya; H, Daishi; A, Takemitsu; T, Akira

    2010-05-01

    Economy of East Asia has been growing rapidly, and atmospheric aerosols discharged from this region have been transported to Japan. Okinawa island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km of south Korea. Its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same type of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of acid-digested metals using atomic absorption spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of metals in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island during June, 2008 to June 2009. We also determined 'background' concentration of metals in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island to elucidate the influence of the transport processes and distances from Asian continent on metal concentrations.

  13. Spatial distribution and temporal variation of chemical species in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at the Okinawa archipelago, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Somada, Y.; Ijyu, M.; Azechi, S.; Nakaema, F.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2009-12-01

    The economic development and population growth in recent Asia have been increasing air pollution. A computer simulation study showed that air pollutants emitted from Asian continent could spread quickly within northern hemisphere. We initiated a study to elucidate the special distribution and chemical characterization of atmospheric aerosols around Okinawa archipelago, Japan. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location in Asia is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same types of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa Island), Kume Island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS) and Minami-daitou Island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. We report and discuss spatial distribution and temporal variation of chemical species concentrations in bulk atmospheric aerosols collected during July, 2008 to July, 2009. We determine “background” concentration of chemical components in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume Island and Minami-daito Island to elucidate the influence of the long-range transport of chemical species from Asian continent.

  14. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Nakajima, H.; Nakaema, F.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2008-12-01

    The economic development and population growth in recent Asia spread air pollution. Emission rate of air pollutants from Asia, in particular oxides of nitrogen, surpassed those from North America and Europe and should continue to exceed them for decades. The study of the air pollution transported from Asian continent has gained a special attention in Japan. Okinawa Island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km south of South Korea. Its location is ideal in observing East Asian atmospheric aerosols because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air masses which have been affected by anthropogenic activities. In 2005, Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS) was established by the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) at the northern tip of Okinawa Island, Japan to monitor the air quality of Asia. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler. Sampling duration was one week for each sample. We determined the concentrations of water-soluble anions, cations and dissolved organic carbon in the bulk aerosols collected at the CHAAMS, using ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectrometry, and total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. Seasonal variation of water-soluble chemical components showed that the concentrations were relatively low in summer, higher in fall and winter, and the highest in spring. When air mass came from Asian Continent, the concentrations of water-soluble chemical components were much higher compared to the other directions.

  15. Measurement of aerosol organic compounds during TexAQS 2006 using a novel collection/thermal-desorption PTR-ITMS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornberry, T.; Murphy, D. M.; Thomson, D. S.; Welsh-Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Bates, T. S.; Coffman, D.; Lerner, B.; Williams, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    Knowledge of the organic species present in atmospheric aerosols is needed in order to understand their effect on aerosol microphysical and optical properties, to resolve outstanding questions about important organic aerosol sources and formation mechanisms, and to elucidate the role of aerosols in the chemistry of the atmosphere through their interaction with gas-phase compounds. The measurement of aerosol organic compounds poses a significant experimental challenge due to the complexity and large number of organic species and the low concentration at which individual species are present. A new instrument that utilizes proton- transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to probe the organic composition of atmospheric aerosols has been developed to investigate semi-volatile and condensed-phase organic species in the atmosphere. Aerosols are collected by impaction and then thermally desorbed into a carrier gas that transports the organic analyte molecules into a drift tube where they are ionized by reaction with H3O+ ions. Analyte ions are detected using an ion trap mass spectrometer. The instrument was deployed for the first time during summer 2006 in the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2006) aboard NOAA R.V. Ronald H. Brown. Signals significantly above detection limit were observed at a number of masses during periods of elevated photochemical activity when aerosol loading increased in the 0.5-1 μm size range and aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements indicated increased organic mass. Different masses exhibited different temporal behaviors, indicating varying composition of the aerosol organic fraction even during periods when the AMS organic mass (OA) loading was relatively constant. Plumes of aerosol-phase pyridine were observed during sampling near the entrance to the Houston Ship Channel, indicating a relatively local source and rapid partitioning to the aerosol phase. These field results and results of laboratory instrument performance experiments

  16. 78 FR 72874 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block... information and reporting guidance concerning the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG...: ``Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program Status Report''; (3) Type of...

  17. Electron Microscopy Characterization of Aerosols Collected at Mauna Loa Observatory During Asian Dust Storm Event

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a significant influence on global climate due to their ability to absorb and scatter incoming solar radiation. Size, composition, and morphology affect a particle’s radiative properties and these can be characterized by electron microscopy. Lo...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office

  19. Comparison of organic compositions in dust storm and normal aerosol samples collected at Gosan, Jeju Island, during spring 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Lee, Meehye

    To better understand the current physical and chemical properties of East Asian aerosols, an intensive observation of atmospheric particles was conducted at Gosan site, Jeju Island, South Korea during 2005 spring. Total suspended particle (TSP) samples were collected using pre-combusted quartz filters and a high-volume air sampler with the time intervals ranging from 3 h to 48 h. The kinds and amount of various organic compounds were measured in the samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among the 99 target compounds detected, saccharides (average, 130 ± 14 ng m -3), fatty acids (73 ± 7 ng m -3), alcohols (41 ± 4 ng m -3), n-alkanes (32 ± 3 ng m -3), and phthalates (21 ± 2 ng m -3) were found to be major compound classes with polyols/polyacids, lignin and resin products, PAHs, sterols and aromatic acids being minor. Compared to the previous results reported for 2001 late spring samples, no significant changes were found in the levels of their concentrations and compositions for 4 years, although the economy in East Asia, especially in China, has sharply expanded from 2001 to 2005. During the campaign at Gosan site, we encountered two distinct dust storm episodes with high TSP concentrations. The first dust event occurred on March 28, which was characterized by a predominance of secondary organic aerosols. The second event that occurred on the next day (March 29) was found to be characterized by primary organic aerosols associated with forest fires in Siberia/northeastern China. A significant variation in the molecular compositions, which was found within a day, suggests that the compositions of East Asian aerosols are heterogeneous due to multi-contributions from different source regions together with different pathways of long-range atmospheric transport of particles.

  20. Analyses of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Okinawa Archipelago, Japan by Using X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2012-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of bulk atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents in the bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (referred to "SRM", NIES No.28 of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies) on quartz filters for calibration curves in two different methods; 1) water-insoluble materials were collected after dispersing SRM in pure water and filtered with the quartz filters ("wet method"), and 2) SRM was dispersed in air in the plastic container and the aerosols were collected by using the low-volume air sampler ("dry method"). Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosols on the filter were seen in the following 9 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, and Pb (with wet method) and 12 metals; K, Ti, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb, Sr, Ca, Mn, Zn, and Cu (with dry method). Furthermore, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals determined by the XRF method in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at the three islands during June 2008 to June 2010, and for CHAAMS during June 2008 to October 2012.

  1. Efficiency of five chemical protective clothing materials against nano and submicron aerosols when submitted to mechanical deformations.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Mehdi; Hallé, Stéphane; Tuduri, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Due to their potential toxicity, the use of nanoparticles in the workplace is a growing concern. Some studies indicate that nanoparticles can penetrate the skin and lead to adverse health effects. Since chemical protective clothing is the last barrier to protect the skin, this study aims to better understand nanoparticle penetration behaviour in dermal protective clothing under mechanical deformation. For this purpose, five of the most common types of fabrics used in protective clothing, one woven and four nonwoven, were chosen and submitted to different simulated exposure conditions. They were tested against polydispersed NaCl aerosols having an electrical-mobility diameter between 14 and 400 nm. A bench-scale exposure setup and a sampling protocol was developed to measure the level of penetration of the aerosols through the material samples of disposable coveralls and lab coat, while subjecting them to mechanical deformations to simulate the conditions of usage in the workplace. Particle size distribution of the aerosol was determined upstream and downstream using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The measured efficiencies demonstrated that the performances of nonwoven materials were similar. Three nonwovens had efficiencies above 99%, while the woven fabric was by far, the least effective. Moreover, the results established that mechanical deformations, as simulated for this study, did not have a significant effect on the fabrics' efficiencies. PMID:26786065

  2. Dry powder aerosols of polyethylenimine (PEI)-based gene vectors mediate efficient gene delivery to the lung.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Corinna; Hasenpusch, Guenther; Uezguen, Senta; Aneja, Manish Kumar; Reinhardt, Dietrich; Kirch, Julian; Schneider, Marc; Claus, Sarah; Friess, Wolfgang; Rudolph, Carsten

    2011-08-25

    Aerosol gene delivery holds great therapeutical potential for many inherited and acquired pulmonary diseases. The physical instability of aqueous suspensions of non-viral vector complexes is a major limitation for their successful application. In this study, we investigated dry powder aerosols as novel gene vector formulations for gene transfer in vitro and murine lungs in vivo. Lyophilization was used to produce dry powder cakes followed by powderization to produce dry powder aerosols. Different sugars, namely lactose, sucrose and trehalose, were tested as lyoprotectants for gene delivery complexes consisting of branched polyethylenimine 25 kDa and plasmid DNA. Biophysical particle characterization demonstrated that lyophilization and powderization in the presence of lyoprotectants were well tolerated. In vitro transfection efficiency remained unaffected by the choice of lyoprotectant and subsequent lyophilization and/or powderization. In vivo screening of powderized samples, by applying the powder with an insufflator, resulted in highest gene expression with lactose as lyoprotectant. Delivering a plasmid coding for murine erythropoietin together with lactose as lyoprotectant resulted in increased blood hematocrit values post application thereby demonstrating the potential of dry powder aerosol as a promising method for pulmonary gene delivery. PMID:21600251

  3. RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System for detection of Bacillus anthracis spores from aerosol collection samples: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Ted; Ryan, Valorie; Spaulding, Usha K; Clemens, Kristine M; Ota, Irene M; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2013-01-01

    The RAZOR EX Anthrax Air Detection System was validated in a collaborative study for the detection of Bacillus anthracis in aerosol collection buffer. Phosphate-buffered saline was charged with 1 mg/mL standardized dust to simulate an authentic aerosol collection sample. The dust-charged buffer was spiked with either B. anthracis Ames at 2000 spores/mL or Bacillus cereus at 20 000 spores/mL. Twelve collaborators participated in the study, with four collaborators at each of three sites. Each collaborator tested 12 replicates of B. anthracis in dust-charged buffer and 12 replicates of B. cereus in dust-charged buffer. All samples sets were randomized and blind-coded. All collaborators produced valid data sets (no collaborators displayed systematic errors) and there was only one invalid data point. After unblinding, the analysis revealed a cross-collaborator probability of detection (CPOD) of 1.00 (144 positive results from 144 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.975-1.00) for the B. anthracis samples and a CPOD of 0.00 (0 positive results from 143 replicates, 95% confidence interval 0.00-0.0262) for the B. cereus samples. These data meet the requirements of AOAC Standard Method Performance Requirement 2010.003, developed by the Stakeholder Panel on Agent Detection Assays. PMID:23767365

  4. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  5. Recovery Efficiency and Limit of Detection of Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from Environmental Surface Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A.; Beard, Jeremy K.; Hein, Misty J.; Larsen, Lloyd D.; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H. D. Alan; Deye, Gregory J.; Arduino, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm2). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm2) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm2) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm2) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm2 for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans. PMID:19429546

  6. 78 FR 49736 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block... information and reporting guidance concerning the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG... information collection request contains: (1) 1910-5150; (2) ``Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block...

  7. Characterization of individual aerosol particles collected during a haze episode in Incheon, Korea using the quantitative ED-EPMA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, H.; Ryu, J.; Maskey, S.; Jung, H.-J.; Ro, C.-U.

    2010-11-01

    Haze is an atmospheric phenomenon that leads to low visibility, and is mostly due to elevated levels of fine particulate matter. It can have effects on cloud formation, public health, agriculture, and even the global climate. Although urban haze has been increasing in occurrence over the past several years over the Seoul-Incheon metropolis, Korea, studies of the morphology and chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles by single-particle analysis during haze episodes have rarely been conducted. Herein, a quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe microanalysis (ED-EPMA), called low-Z particle EPMA, was used to analyze individual aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea on 13-18 October 2008 (a typical haze episode occurred from 15 to 18 October). Overall, 3600 particles in 12 aerosol samples collected on haze and non-haze days were measured by low-Z particle EPMA. Based on quantitative X-ray analysis, together with secondary electron images of individual particles, we successfully identified the aerosol particle types as follows: elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing, genuine (fresh) and reacted (aged) sea-salt, mineral dust (such as aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3/CaMg(CO3)2, etc.), and K-containing, Fe-rich, and fly ash particles. By analyzing the relative abundances of different particle types, it was concluded that (a) on non-haze days, reacted sea-salts and reacted mineral dust particles were abundant in both the PM2.5-10 and PM1.0-2.5 fractions (with relative abundances of 65.0% and 57.7%, respectively); whereas on haze days, the relative abundances of OC and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles were significantly elevated, indicating that organic matter and secondary aerosols were abundant in the atmosphere when haze occurred. (b) in PM2.5-10 fractions, sea-salt and mineral dust particles reacted with NOx/HNO3 significantly outnumbered those reacted with SO2/H2SO4, no matter whether they were collected on haze

  8. Improving collection efficiency through remote monitoring of charity assets.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Fraser; Erdogan, Gunes; Cherrett, Tom; Bektas, Tolga; Davies, Nigel; Shingleton, Duncan; Speed, Chris; Dickinson, Janet; Norgate, Sarah

    2014-02-01

    Collection costs associated with servicing a major UK charity's donation banks and collecting unsold goods from their retail shops can account for up to 20% of the overall income gained. Bank and shop collections are commingled and are typically made on fixed days of the week irrespective of the amounts of materials waiting to be collected. Using collection records from a major UK charity, this paper considers what vehicle routing and scheduling benefits could accrue if bank and shop servicing requirements were monitored, the former using remote sensing technology to allow more proactive collection scheduling. A vehicle routing and scheduling algorithm employing tabu search methods was developed, and suggested time and distance savings of up to 30% over the current fixed schedules when a minimum bank and shop fill level of between 50% and 60% was used as a collection trigger. For the case study investigated, this led to a potential revenue gain of 5% for the charity and estimated CO2 savings of around 0.5 tonnes per week across the fleet of six heterogeneous vehicles. PMID:24332998

  9. Synthesis of Spherical Carbon Nitride-Based Polymer Composites by Continuous Aerosol-Photopolymerization with Efficient Light Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Poostforooshan, Jalal; Badiei, Alireza; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Weber, Alfred P

    2016-08-24

    Here we report a novel, facile, and sustainable approach for the preparation of spherical submicrometer carbon nitride-based polymer composites by a continuous aerosol-photopolymerization process. In this regard, spherical mesoporous carbon nitride (SMCN) nanoparticles were initially prepared via a nanocasting approach using spray-drying synthesized spherical mesoporous silica (SMS) nanoparticles as hard templates. In addition to experimental characterization, the effect of porosity on the light absorption enhancement and consequently the generation rate of electron-hole pairs inside the SMCN was simulated using a three-dimensional finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method. To produce the carbon nitride-based polymer composite, SMCN nanoparticles exhibit excellent performance in photopolymerization of butyl acrylate (PBuA) monomer in the presence of n-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) as a co-initiator in a continuous aerosol-based process. In this one-pot synthesis, SMCN nanoparticles act not only as photoinitiators but at the same time as fillers and templates. The average aerosol residence time in the photoreactor is about 90 s. The presented aerosol-photopolymerization process avoids the need for solvent and surfactant, operates at room temperature, and, more importantly, is suitable to produce the spherical composite with hydrophobic polymers. Furthermore, we simulated the condition of SMCN nanoparticles during illumination in the gas phase process, which can freely rotate. The results demonstrated that the hole (h(+)) density is almost equally distributed in the whole part of the SMCN nanoparticles due to their rotation, leading to efficient light harvesting and more homogeneous photoreaction. The combination of the outstanding features of environmentally friendly SMCN, photopolymerization, and aerosol processing might open new avenues, especially in green chemistry, to produce novel polymer composites with multifunctional properties. PMID:27483090

  10. Assessing Modeled CO2 Retention and Rebreathing of a Facemask Designed for Efficient Delivery of Aerosols to Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Christian; Sventitskiy, Alexander; Cehelsky, Jeffrey E.; Patters, Andrea B.; Tservistas, Markus; Hahn, Michael C.; Juhl, Gerd; DeVincenzo, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. New aerosol drugs for infants may require more efficient delivery systems, including face masks. Maximizing delivery efficiency requires tight-fitting masks with minimal internal mask volumes, which could cause carbon dioxide (CO2) retention. An RNA-interference-based antiviral for treatment of respiratory syncytial virus in populations that may include young children is designed for aerosol administration. CO2 accumulation within inhalation face masks has not been evaluated. Methods. We simulated airflow and CO2 concentrations accumulating over time within a new facemask designed for infants and young children (PARI SMARTMASK® Baby). A one-dimensional model was first examined, followed by 3-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics analyses. Normal infant breathing patterns and respiratory distress were simulated. Results. The maximum average modeled CO2 concentration within the mask reached steady state (3.2% and 3% for normal and distressed breathing patterns resp.) after approximately the 5th respiratory cycle. After steady state, the mean CO2 concentration inspired into the nostril was 2.24% and 2.26% for normal and distressed breathing patterns, respectively. Conclusion. The mask is predicted to cause minimal CO2 retention and rebreathing. Infants with normal and distressed breathing should tolerate the mask intermittently delivering aerosols over brief time frames. PMID:22792479

  11. Aerosol mixing state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T. B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2013-05-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic hygroscopicity parameter, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions (forg) are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which predictions of the hygroscopicity parameter are compared against κ*. Strong diurnal changes in aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN at 0.51% ± 0.06% supersaturation can surpass by more than a factor of two the corresponding concentrations of 100 nm particles. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 LT throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as "internally mixed". Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour" and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing state and the presence of refractory material not measured

  12. Common inorganic ions are efficient catalysts for organic reactions in atmospheric aerosols and other natural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, B.; Dziedzic, P.; Córdova, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, inorganic ammonium ions, NH4+, and carbonate ions, CO32-, are reported for the first time as catalysts for organic reactions in atmospheric aerosols and other natural environments at the Earth's surface. These reactions include the formation of C-C and C-O bonds by aldol condensation and acetal formation, and reveal a new aspect of the interactions between organic and inorganic materials in natural environments. The catalytic properties of inorganic ammonium ions, in particular, were not previously known in chemistry. The reactions were found to be as fast in tropospheric ammonium sulfate composition as in concentrated sulfuric acid. The ubiquitous presence and large concentrations of ammonium ions in tropospheric aerosols would make of ammonium catalysis a main consumption pathway for organic compounds in these aerosols, while acid catalysis would have a minor contribution. In particular, ammonium catalysis would account quantitatively for the aging of carbonyl compounds into secondary ''fulvic'' compounds in tropospheric aerosols, a transformation affecting the optical properties of these aerosols. In general, ammonium catalysis is likely to be responsible for many observations previously attributed to acid catalysis in the troposphere.

  13. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98... process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank...

  14. 40 CFR Table II-2 to Subpart II - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Processes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Wastewater Treatment Pt. 98... process type Cover type Methane collection efficiency Covered anaerobic lagoon (biogas capture) Bank...

  15. Development of infrared photothermal deflection spectroscopy (mirage effect) for analysis of condensed-phase aerosols collected in a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor.

    PubMed

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Bialkowski, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    The potential of mid-infrared photothermal deflection spectrometry for aerosol analysis is demonstrated. Ammonium nitrate aerosols are deposited on a flat substrate using a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Photothermal spectroscopy with optical beam deflection (mirage effect) is used to detect deposited aerosols. Photothermal deflection from aerosols is measured by using pulsed infrared laser light to heat up aerosols collected on the substrate. The deflection signal is obtained by measuring the position of a spot from a beam of light as it passes near the heated surface. The results indicate non-rotating impaction as the preferred MOUDI impaction method. Energy-dependent photothermal measurement shows a linear relationship between signal and laser intensity, and no loss of signal with time is observed. The detection limit from the signal-mass curve is 7.31 ng. For 30 minutes collection time and 30 L/min flow rate of the impactor, the limit of detection in terms of aerosol mass concentration is 0.65 microg m(-3). PMID:19094392

  16. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of spray volume and droplet size are critical to evaluating the movement and transport of applied sprays associated with both crop production and protection practices and vector control applications for public health. Any sampling device used for this purpose will have an efficiency of...

  17. Effect of MODIS Terra radiometric calibration improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products: Validation and Terra/Aqua consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by ˜0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and ˜0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by ˜10% and ˜5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  18. Effect of MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration Improvements on Collection 6 Deep Blue Aerosol Products: Validation and Terra/Aqua Consistency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Bettenhausen, C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Meister, G.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Blue (DB) algorithm's primary data product is midvisible aerosol optical depth (AOD). DB applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements provides a data record since early 2000 for MODIS Terra and mid-2002 for MODIS Aqua. In the previous data version (Collection 5, C5), DB production from Terra was halted in 2007 due to sensor degradation; the new Collection 6 (C6) has both improved science algorithms and sensor radiometric calibration. This includes additional calibration corrections developed by the Ocean Biology Processing Group to address MODIS Terra's gain, polarization sensitivity, and detector response versus scan angle, meaning DB can now be applied to the whole Terra record. Through validation with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data, it is shown that the C6 DB Terra AOD quality is stable throughout the mission to date. Compared to the C5 calibration, in recent years the RMS error compared to AERONET is smaller by approximately 0.04 over bright (e.g., desert) and approximately 0.01-0.02 over darker (e.g., vegetated) land surfaces, and the fraction of points in agreement with AERONET within expected retrieval uncertainty higher by approximately 10% and approximately 5%, respectively. Comparisons to the Aqua C6 time series reveal a high level of correspondence between the two MODIS DB data records, with a small positive (Terra-Aqua) average AOD offset <0.01. The analysis demonstrates both the efficacy of the new radiometric calibration efforts and that the C6 MODIS Terra DB AOD data remain stable (to better than 0.01 AOD) throughout the mission to date, suitable for quantitative scientific analyses.

  19. Aerosol mixing-state, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; McMurry, P. H.; Smith, J. N.; Nenes, A.

    2012-06-01

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. κ-Köhler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, κ*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTDMA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, forg, are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which κAMS is inferred and compared against κ*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased κ* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% ± 0.06%. We also find that at 06:00-08:00 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as internally-mixed. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning "rush hour", and the entire campaign. We show that κ* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for κ* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the AMS

  20. Aerosol mixingstate, hygroscopic growth and cloud activation efficiency during MIRAGE 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Sara; Raatikainen, T.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Alexander, M. L.; Stolzenberg, Mark; McMurry, Peter; Smith, James N.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2013-05-15

    Observations of aerosol hygroscopic growth and CCN activation spectra for submicron particles are reported for the T1 ground site outside of Mexico City during the MIRAGE 2006 campaign. K¨ohler theory is used to evaluate the characteristic water uptake coefficient, k*, for the CCN active aerosol population using both size-resolved HTMDA and size-resolved CCNc measurements. Organic mass fractions, (forg), are evaluated from size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements, from which kAMS is inferred and compared against k*. Strong diurnal profiles of aerosol water uptake parameters and aerosol composition are observed. We find that new particle formation (NPF) events are correlated with an increased k* and CCN-active fraction during the daytime, with greater impact on smaller particles. During NPF events, the number concentration of 40 nm particles acting as CCN can surpass by more than a factor of two the concentrations of 100 nm particles acting as CCN, at supersaturations of 0.51% +/- 0.06%. We also find that at 0600-0800 in the morning throughout the campaign, fresh traffic emissions result in substantial changes to the chemical distribution of the aerosol, with on average 65% externally-mixed fraction for 40 nm particles and 30% externally-mixed fraction for 100 nm particles, whereas at midday nearly all particles of both sizes can be described as “internally-mixed”. Average activation spectra and growth factor distributions are analyzed for different time periods characterizing the daytime (with and without NPF events), the early morning “rush hour”, and the entire campaign. We show that k* derived from CCNc measurements decreases as a function of size during all time periods, while the CCN-active fraction increases as a function of size. Size-resolved AMS measurements do not predict the observed trend for k* versus particle size, which can be attributed to unresolved mixing-state and the presence of refractory material not measured by the

  1. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-07-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated biogenic secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species.

  2. Efficient Scheme for Perfect Collective Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Gong, Q H; Ficek, Z; He, Q Y

    2015-01-01

    A practical scheme for the demonstration of perfect one-sided device-independent quantum secret sharing is proposed. The scheme involves a three-mode optomechanical system in which a pair of independent cavity modes is driven by short laser pulses and interact with a movable mirror. We demonstrate that by tuning the laser frequency to the blue (anti-Stokes) sideband of the average frequency of the cavity modes, the modes become mutually coherent and then may collectively steer the mirror mode to a perfect Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state. The scheme is shown to be experimentally feasible, it is robust against the frequency difference between the modes, mechanical thermal noise and damping, and coupling strengths of the cavity modes to the mirror. PMID:26212901

  3. Efficient Scheme for Perfect Collective Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Gong, Q. H.; Ficek, Z.; He, Q. Y.

    2015-07-01

    A practical scheme for the demonstration of perfect one-sided device-independent quantum secret sharing is proposed. The scheme involves a three-mode optomechanical system in which a pair of independent cavity modes is driven by short laser pulses and interact with a movable mirror. We demonstrate that by tuning the laser frequency to the blue (anti-Stokes) sideband of the average frequency of the cavity modes, the modes become mutually coherent and then may collectively steer the mirror mode to a perfect Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state. The scheme is shown to be experimentally feasible, it is robust against the frequency difference between the modes, mechanical thermal noise and damping, and coupling strengths of the cavity modes to the mirror.

  4. Elemental composition of size-fractionated urban aerosol collected in Florence, Italy; preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Carmine, P.; Lucarelli, F.; Mandò, P. A.; Valerio, M.; Prati, P.; Zucchiatti, A.

    1999-04-01

    An extensive investigation is in progress aiming at the characterisation of the air particulate composition in Florence. We present here the preliminary results concerning the analysis of size-fractionated aerosol samples taken by two-stage streaker samplers in two sites characterised by different urban settings (one in a heavy traffic area, one in a green area). The sampling period (21 January-22 February) includes two days during which the Municipality of Florence has banned the circulation of non-catalytic cars, due to the increase of NO 2 above the "recommended safety values". Hourly concentrations of 20 elements from Na to Pb were determined using the external beam PIXE facility of the I.N.F.N. Van de Graaff accelerator at the Physics Department of the Florence University. Factor analysis on the data set confirms that traffic is the main source of atmospheric pollution in Florence. The ban of non-catalytic cars seems to have produced no effect on the concentration of detected elements (in particular Pb and Br).

  5. Assessment of the MODIS-Terra Collection 006 aerosol optical depth data over the greater Mediterranean basin and inter-comparison against MODIS C005 and AERONET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsikas, Marios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew; Hsu, Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the key factors determining the Earth's solar radiation budget. The aerosol radiative effects are strongly dependent on aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a good measure of atmospheric aerosol loading. Therefore, understanding better the spatial and temporal patterns of AOD at both global and regional scales is important for more accurate estimations of aerosol radiative effects. Nowadays, improved globally distributed AOD products are available largely based on satellite observations. Currently, one of the most acknowledged accurate AOD dataset is the one derived from measurements of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard the twin Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellite platforms. The MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm, which is used to produce AOD data, is continuously improved and updated, leading to releases of successive series, named as Collections. Recently, MODIS Collection 6 (C006) dataset has been made available. Despite their advantages, satellite AOD products have to be assessed through comparisons against ground based AOD products, such as those from AERosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The aim of the present study is to assess the newest MODIS C006 AOD product over the greater Mediterranean basin. The assessment is performed through comparisons of the MODIS-Terra C006 Level-3 AOD data against corresponding data from the previous C005 MODIS dataset, as well as versus AOD data from AERONET stations within the study region. The study period extends from 2001 to 2012 and our comparisons are performed on a monthly basis. Emphasis is given on differences between the MODIS C006 AOD data and corresponding previous C005 data, as to their spatial and temporal, seasonal and inter-annual, patterns. The results show a better agreement of MODIS C006 than C005 AOD data with AERONET, while the C006 data offer a complete spatial coverage of the study region, specifically over the northern African

  6. 78 FR 29749 - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Agency Information Collection Extension AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Submission for Office of... Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE- 2G), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue...

  7. 76 FR 47605 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEMs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Energy Efficient Mortgages.... This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Energy Efficient Mortgages. OMB... Administration (FHA), with the authority to insure mortgages where the costs of energy efficient improvements...

  8. 78 FR 34089 - Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Status Report AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice and request for comments....

  9. Efficient Formation of Stratospheric Aerosol for Climate Engineering by Emission of Condensible Vapor from Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Heckendorn, Patricia; Peter. Thomas; Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent analysis suggests that the effectiveness of stratospheric aerosol climate engineering through emission of non-condensable vapors such as SO2 is limited because the slow conversion to H2SO4 tends to produce aerosol particles that are too large; SO2 injection may be so inefficient that it is difficult to counteract the radiative forcing due to a CO2 doubling. Here we describe an alternate method in which aerosol is formed rapidly in the plume following injection of H2SO4, a condensable vapor, from an aircraft. This method gives better control of particle size and can produce larger radiative forcing with lower sulfur loadings than SO2 injection. Relative to SO2 injection, it may reduce some of the adverse effects of geoengineering such as radiative heating of the lower stratosphere. This method does not, however, alter the fact that such a geoengineered radiative forcing can, at best, only partially compensate for the climate changes produced by CO2.

  10. A Comparison of the Efficiency Between Fog Collecting Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eljenholm, C. M.; Coffey, E. M.; Fernandez, D.; Hernandez, C.; Mairs, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation is the most recognized source of water; however, significant amounts of water reside in the air in the form of fog. Standard fog collectors designed by Schemenauer (Schemenauer and Cereceda, 1993) utilize a 1.00 square meter of a specific polypropylene fabric called Coresa with a 35% Raschel shade coefficient to capture and coalesce tiny fog droplets into larger drops that fall into a trough and are measured by a tipping bucket rain gauge. In this study, we compare three different types of mesh; the Chilean Coresa mesh mentioned above, a German mesh called FogHa-Tin, and an optimized mesh designed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a POSS-PEMA dipped metallic mesh (Park et al, 2013). These meshes vary greatly in composition, as well as price. In order to determine which mesh is most optimal for fog collection in a variety of meteorological conditions, standard collectors of each type described above with a mesh area of 1.00 square meter have been placed at five locations around central California with accompanying meteorological instrumentation. This project will report on the effectiveness of each of these passive fog collectors in conjunction with accompanying meteorological data.

  11. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with long range transported biomass burning plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-09-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m a.m.s.l. on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory (38°28'15'' N; 28°24'14'' W) is located ∼3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances, mainly from North America. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon and inorganic ion species. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3; on average organic aerosol contributes the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol measurements were positively correlated (with an r2 ≥ 0.80) with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, aerosol light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) species extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. These aged WSOC compounds have an average O / C ratio of ∼0.45, which is relatively low compared to O / C ratios of other aged aerosol and might be the result of evaporation and increased fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in

  12. Unattended Monitoring of HEU Production in Gaseous Centrifuge Enrichment Plants using Automated Aerosol Collection and Laser-based Enrichment Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-08-11

    Nuclear power is enjoying rapid growth as government energy policies and public demand shift toward low carbon energy production. Pivotal to the global nuclear power renaissance is the development and deployment of robust safeguards instrumentation that allows the limited resources of the IAEA to keep pace with the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle. Undeclared production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) remains a primary proliferation concern for modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), due to their massive separative work unit (SWU) processing power and comparably short cascade equilibrium timescale. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an unattended safeguards instrument, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely detection of HEU production within a GCEP. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulates, followed by laser spectroscopy to characterize the uranium enrichment level. Our prior investigation demonstrated single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and relative isotope ratio uncertainty better than 10% using gadolinium as a surrogate for uranium. In this paper we present measurement results on standard samples containing traces of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium, as well as measurements on aerodynamic size uranium particles mixed in background materials (e.g., dust, minerals, soils). Improvements and optimizations in the detection electronics, signal timing, calibration, and laser alignment have lead to significant improvements in detection sensitivity and enrichment accuracy, contributing to an overall reduction in the false alarm probability. The sample substrate media was also found to play a significant role in facilitating laser-induced vaporization and the production of energetic plasma conditions, resulting in ablation optimization and further improvements in the isotope abundance sensitivity.

  13. Chemical analysis of refractory stratospheric aerosol particles collected within the arctic vortex and inside polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Martin; Weigel, Ralf; Kandler, Konrad; Günther, Gebhard; Molleker, Sergej; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Vogel, Bärbel; Weinbruch, Stephan; Borrmann, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric aerosol particles with diameters larger than about 10 nm were collected within the arctic vortex during two polar flight campaigns: RECONCILE in winter 2010 and ESSenCe in winter 2011. Impactors were installed on board the aircraft M-55 Geophysica, which was operated from Kiruna, Sweden. Flights were performed at a height of up to 21 km and some of the particle samples were taken within distinct polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The chemical composition, size and morphology of refractory particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. During ESSenCe no refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were sampled. In total 116 small silicate, Fe-rich, Pb-rich and aluminum oxide spheres were found. In contrast to ESSenCe in early winter, during the late-winter RECONCILE mission the air masses were subsiding inside the Arctic winter vortex from the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, thus initializing a transport of refractory aerosol particles into the lower stratosphere. During RECONCILE, 759 refractory particles with diameters above 500 nm were found consisting of silicates, silicate / carbon mixtures, Fe-rich particles, Ca-rich particles and complex metal mixtures. In the size range below 500 nm the presence of soot was also proven. While the data base is still sparse, the general tendency of a lower abundance of refractory particles during PSC events compared to non-PSC situations was observed. The detection of large refractory particles in the stratosphere, as well as the experimental finding that these particles were not observed in the particle samples (upper size limit ˜ 5 µm) taken during PSC events, strengthens the hypothesis that such particles are present in the lower polar stratosphere in late winter and have provided a surface for heterogeneous nucleation during PSC formation.

  14. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  15. AUTORAMP - an automatic unit for unattended aerosol collection, gamma-ray analysis and data transmission from remote locations

    SciTech Connect

    Latner, N.; Sanderson, C.G.; Negro, V.C.

    1997-12-31

    The Environmental Measurements Laboratory has designed, developed and field tested a fully automated and completely unattended multisample, surface-air monitoring system. This system, AUTORAMP, collects large-volume aerosol samples on discrete pleated cartridge filters, measures these samples in a near ideal geometry with a refrigerator-cooled Germanium gamma-ray detector, and immediately transmits the resulting spectra through a telephone/modem connection or a satellite link. Using a sample tray loaded with 31 filters, the system will allow for more than six months of unattended operation with weekly sampling, or one month of daily sampling. Remote control of all operating functions is possible through the communications link. For a 24-h collection, at 12,000 m{sup 3} d{sup -1} and a 18-h gamma-ray count, this system can detect as little as 2.7 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of the short-lived {sup 140}Ba and 5.4 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} of {sup 137}Cs.

  16. Molecular characterization of free tropospheric aerosol collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory: a case study with a long-range transported biomass burning plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Hueber, J.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M. P.; Ampadu, M. T.; Olsen, S.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2015-05-01

    Free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory located at 2225 m above mean sea level on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic. The observatory is located ~ 3900 km east and downwind of North America, which enables studies of free tropospheric air transported over long distances. Aerosol samples collected on filters from June to October 2012 were analyzed to characterize organic carbon, elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 ± 0.7 μg m-3. On average, organic aerosol components represent the largest mass fraction of the total measured aerosol (60 ± 51%), followed by sulfate (23 ± 28%), nitrate (13 ± 10%), chloride (2 ± 3%), and elemental carbon (2 ± 2%). Water-soluble organic matter (WSOM) extracted from two aerosol samples (9/24 and 9/25) collected consecutively during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Approximately 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra in the range of m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas had unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. FLEXPART retroplume analyses showed the sampled air masses were very aged (average plume age > 12 days). These aged aerosol WSOM compounds had an average O/C ratio of ~ 0.45, which is relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol. The increase in aerosol loading during the measurement period of 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplume analysis and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire counts. This was confirmed with biomass burning markers detected in the WSOM and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of phenolic species suggests

  17. Spermine-alt-poly(ethylene glycol) polyspermine as a safe and efficient aerosol gene carrier for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2014-07-01

    The clinical success of gene therapy critically depends upon the safety and efficiency of delivery system used. Although polyethylenimine (PEI) has been commonly used as an efficient cationic polymeric gene carrier due to its high transfection efficiency, its cytotoxicity and nondegradability limit the polymer's therapeutic applications in clinical trials. In this study, biocompatible polyspermine based on spermine (SPE) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) diacrylate (SPE-alt-PEG) was synthesized using a Michael-type addition reaction, and its ability as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy was evaluated. SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine was complexed with plasmid DNA, and the resulting complexes were characterized by particle size and surface charge by dynamic light scattering, complex formation and DNA protection ability by gel retardation, and complex shape by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. The SPE-alt-PEG copolymer showed low cytotoxicity, and SPE-alt-PEG/DNA complexes showed efficacious transfection efficiency compared with 25 kDa PEI (PEI 25K). Also SPE-alt-PEG/GFP complexes were efficiently transferred into the lungs after aerosol administration without toxicity, and delivery of Pdcd4 gene as a therapeutic gene with SPE-alt-PEG polyspermine greatly reduced tumor size as well as tumor numbers in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice compared relative to the effect observed for PEI 25K. These results suggest that SPE-alt-PEG has potential as a gene carrier for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:23929634

  18. Ionization collection efficiencies of some ionization chambers in pulsed and continuous radiation beams.

    PubMed

    Holt, J G; Stanton, R E; Sell, R E

    1978-01-01

    The most commonly used method of calibrating high-energy photon or electron beams consists in converting cavity ionization to dose by the application of the appropriate Clambda or CE multipled by the 60Co correction factor. The correct interpretation of calibration data for pulsed photon or electron beams requires a knowledge of the charge collection efficiencies of the ionization chambers used. The results are presented of efficiency measurements for both pulsed and continuous beams made with these chambers: 0.6-cm3 Farmer, 0.5-cm3 Spokas, 3-cm3 Shonka, 1-cm3 PTW, and 1-cm3 Memorial pancake. The dependence of collection efficiency on collection voltage, dose rate, and dose per pulse is demonstrated. These results are shown to agree with Boag's formulas for collection efficiency. Attention is drawn to the fact that several kinds of dosimeters provide only minimal collection voltages for efficient collection of charge at high dose rates, especially in Linac electron beams. It is recommended to check the collection efficiency of chambers which are to be used at high dose rates, and a simple method for this purpose is described. PMID:683147

  19. Effect of temperature on carbon nanoparticle collection efficiency using photoelectric ESP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojin; Jung, Jae Hee; Song, Dong Keun; Kim, Hakjoon; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-03-01

    The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) technique is a promising method for enhancing the particulate matter (PM) emission reduction efficiency of diesel engines, and is much better than the diesel particulate filter (DPF) technique. However, the ESP's low efficiency in collecting PM with diameters less than several tens of nanometers remains a problem because the particle charging efficiency decreases as the size of the nanoparticles decreases. To improve the collection efficiency of nanosized PM, we used a photoelectric charger to increase the charging efficiency of nanoparticles ahead of the ESP system. Carbon nanoparticles produced using a spark discharge generator were used to evaluate the collection efficiency of the combined photoelectric charger and ESP system. The particle sizes were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer system at various experimental temperatures similar to the temperature of DPF systems commonly used in diesel engines. We succeeded in obtaining improved collection efficiencies at increased inner temperatures of the photoelectric charging chamber. As the temperature increased from 694 degrees C to 839 degrees C at the inlet of the photoelectric chamber, the efficiency of PM collection improved significantly to 28.5% for a particle diameter of 18.4 nm. PMID:19157512

  20. Vehicle routing for the eco-efficient collection of household plastic waste.

    PubMed

    Bing, Xiaoyun; de Keizer, Marlies; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, Jacqueline M; van der Vorst, Jack G A J

    2014-04-01

    Plastic waste is a special category of municipal solid waste. Plastic waste collection is featured with various alternatives of collection methods (curbside/drop-off) and separation methods (source-/post-separation). In the Netherlands, the collection routes of plastic waste are the same as those of other waste, although plastic is different than other waste in terms of volume to weight ratio. This paper aims for redesigning the collection routes and compares the collection options of plastic waste using eco-efficiency as performance indicator. Eco-efficiency concerns the trade-off between environmental impacts, social issues and costs. The collection problem is modeled as a vehicle routing problem. A tabu search heuristic is used to improve the routes. Collection alternatives are compared by a scenario study approach. Real distances between locations are calculated with MapPoint. The scenario study is conducted based on real case data of the Dutch municipality Wageningen. Scenarios are designed according to the collection alternatives with different assumptions in collection method, vehicle type, collection frequency and collection points, etc. Results show that the current collection routes can be improved in terms of eco-efficiency performance by using our method. The source-separation drop-off collection scenario has the best performance for plastic collection assuming householders take the waste to the drop-off points in a sustainable manner. The model also shows to be an efficient decision support tool to investigate the impacts of future changes such as alternative vehicle type and different response rates. PMID:24559654

  1. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient and volatility of important BVOC oxidation products using the Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) coupled to a PTR-ToF-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G.; Hohaus, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schmitt, S. H.; Yu, Z.; Schlag, P.; Wegener, R.; Kaminski, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol can alter the Earth's radiative budget and global climate but can also affect human health. A dominant contributor to the submicrometer particulate matter (PM) is organic aerosol (OA). OA can be either directly emitted through e.g. combustion processes (primary OA) or formed through the oxidation of organic gases (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). A detailed understanding of SOA formation is of importance as it constitutes a major contribution to the total OA. The partitioning between the gas and particle phase as well as the volatility of individual components of SOA is yet poorly understood adding uncertainties and thus complicating climate modelling. In this work, a new experimental methodology was used for compound-specific analysis of organic aerosol. The Aerosol Collection Module (ACM) is a newly developed instrument that deploys an aerodynamic lens to separate the gas and particle phase of an aerosol. The particle phase is directed to a cooled sampling surface. After collection particles are thermally desorbed and transferred to a detector for further analysis. In the present work, the ACM was coupled to a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to detect and quantify organic compounds partitioning between the gas and particle phase. This experimental approach was used in a set of experiments at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR to investigate SOA formation. Ozone oxidation with subsequent photochemical aging of β-pinene, limonene and real plant emissions from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were studied. Simultaneous measurement of the gas and particle phase using the ACM-PTR-ToF-MS allows to report partitioning coefficients of important BVOC oxidation products. Additionally, volatility trends and changes of the SOA with photochemical aging are investigated and compared for all systems studied.

  2. Culturability of Bacillus spores on aerosol collection filters exposed to airborne combustion products of Al, Mg, and B·Ti.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Atin; Yermakov, Michael; Indugula, Reshmi; Reponen, Tiina; Driks, Adam; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of bioweapon facilities due to explosion or fire could aerosolize highly pathogenic microorganisms. The post-event air quality assessment is conducted through air sampling. A bioaerosol sample (often collected on a filter for further culture-based analysis) also contains combustion products, which may influence the microbial culturability and, thus, impact the outcome. We have examined the interaction between spores deposited on collection filters using two simulants of Bacillus anthracis [B. thuringiensis (Bt) and B. atrophaeus (referred to as BG)] and incoming combustion products of Al as well as Mg and B·Ti (common ingredient of metalized explosives). Spores extracted from Teflon, polycarbonate, mixed cellulose ester (MCE), and gelatin filters (most common filter media for bioaerosol sampling), which were exposed to combustion products during a short-term sampling, were analyzed by cultivation. Surprisingly, we observed that aluminum combustion products enhanced the culturability of Bt (but not BG) spores on Teflon filters increasing the culturable count by more than an order of magnitude. Testing polycarbonate and MCE filter materials also revealed a moderate increase of culturability although gelatin did not. No effect was observed with either of the two species interacting on either filter media with products originated by combustion of Mg and B·Ti. Sample contamination, spore agglomeration, effect of a filter material on the spore survival, changes in the spore wall ultrastructure and germination, as well as other factors were explored to interpret the findings. The study raises a question about the reliability of certain filter materials for collecting airborne bio-threat agents in combustion environments. PMID:26914458

  3. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Pt... Description Landfill Gas Collection Efficiency A1: Area with no waste in-place Not applicable; do not use...

  4. Laser-written parabolic micro-antennas for efficient photon collection

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, Andreas W. Neumer, Tanja; Benson, Oliver; Shi, Qiang; Kaschke, Johannes; Fischer, Joachim; Wegener, Martin

    2014-12-08

    Efficient collection of photons from solid-state single-photon emitters, like quantum dots, molecules, or defect centers in diamond, is a very demanding task. Here, we introduce parabolic micro-antennas fabricated by two-photon direct laser-writing to enhance the collection efficiency by directing emitted light into a small solid angle. The antennas can be fabricated on-site at the position of a pre-selected single-photon emitter.

  5. Trace elements in daily collected aerosols in Al-Hashimya, central Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Momani, Idrees F.; Daradkeh, A. S.; Haj-Hussein, Amin T.; Yousef, Yaser A.; Jaradat, Q. M.; Momani, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Coarse (>2.2 μm) and fine (<2.2 μm) atmospheric particulate material samples were collected from an urban area (Al-Hashimya, Jordan), from August 2000 to August 2001 using a "GENT" stack filter unit (SFU). Collected samples were analyzed for 19 elements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The crustal elements exhibit atmospheric concentrations that are comparable to those in urban and industrial areas. The anthropogenic elements, on the other hand, are clearly less abundant in Al-Hashimya than in other industrial regions. Results indicated that, elements of crustal origin are associated with the coarse particles, while elements of anthropogenic origins are more associated with fine particles. Concentrations of crustal-derived elements were higher in summer and those of anthropogenic elements were higher in winter. Crustal enrichment factor calculations showed that concentrations of Pb, Zn, Cd, Sb and Ag are highly enriched and of As, Cu, Co, Ca and Ni are moderately enriched. Factor analysis calculations permitted the identification of four source groups for the fine fraction, namely oil combustion, crustal and urban dust, smelting industries and motor vehicles.

  6. Organic aerosols and inorganic species from post-harvest agricultural-waste burning emissions over northern India: impact on mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Prashant; Sarin, M M; Sharma, Deepti; Singh, Darshan

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter of ≤ 2.5 μm), collected from a source region [Patiala: 30.2 °N; 76.3 °E; 250 m above mean sea level] of emissions from post-harvest agricultural-waste (paddy-residue) burning in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP), North India, has been studied for its chemical composition and impact on regional atmospheric radiative forcing. On average, organic aerosol mass accounts for 63% of PM2.5, whereas the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) is ∼3.5%. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium contribute up to ∼85% of the total water-soluble inorganic species (WSIS), which constitutes ∼23% of PM2.5. The potassium-to-organic carbon ratio from paddy-residue burning emissions (KBB(+)/OC: 0.05 ± 0.01) is quite similar to that reported from Amazonian and Savanna forest-fires; whereas non-sea-salt-sulphate-to-OC ratio (nss-SO4(2-)/OC: 0.21) and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratio of 2.6 are significantly higher (by factor of 5 to 8). The mass absorption efficiency of EC (3.8 ± 1.3 m(2) g(-1)) shows significant decrease with a parallel increase in the concentrations of organic aerosols and scattering species (sulphate and nitrate). A cross plot of OC/EC and nss-SO4(2-)/EC ratios show distinct differences for post-harvest burning emissions from paddy-residue as compared to those from fossil-fuel combustion sources in south-east Asia. PMID:25124269

  7. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Pt. 98, Subpt. HH, Table HH-3 Table HH-3 to Subpart HH of Part 98—Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Landfill Gas Collection...

  8. Bioinspired conical copper wire with gradient wettability for continuous and efficient fog collection.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jie; Xiao, Kai; Yao, Xi; Bai, Hao; Jiang, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the efficient fog collection on cactus spines, conical copper wires with gradient wettability are fabricated through gradient electrochemical corrosion and subsequent gradient chemical modification. These dual-gradient copper wires' fog-collection ability is demonstrated to be higher than that of conical copper wires with pure hydrophobic surfaces or pure hydrophilic surfaces, and the underlying mechanism is also analyzed. PMID:24038211

  9. Efficient water collection on integrative bioinspired surfaces with star-shaped wettability patterns.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hao; Wang, Lin; Ju, Jie; Sun, Ruize; Zheng, Yongmei; Jiang, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Inspired by the water-collecting strategies of desert beetles and spider silk, a novel kind of surface with star-shaped wettablity patterns has been developed. By combining both wettability and shape gradients, the as-prepared surface has gained higher efficiency in water collection compared to circle-shaped wettability patterns and uniformly superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic surfaces. PMID:24847736

  10. Increasing the Efficiency of Data Collection with a Research Participation Night

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilb, Angela; Herzig, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Data collection can be a frustrating experience for student researchers due to difficulty in scheduling appointments with participants. To increase the efficiency of research project data collection, we organized a Research Participation Night in which volunteers were incentivized to participate in as many experiments as time allowed. By offering…

  11. 76 FR 66317 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Energy Efficient Mortgages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Energy Efficient...: Energy Efficient Mortgages. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0561. Form Numbers: None. Description of the...

  12. Size-segregated compositional analysis of aerosol particles collected in the European Arctic during the ACCACIA campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, G.; Jones, H. M.; Darbyshire, E.; Baustian, K. J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Bower, K. N.; Connolly, P. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.

    2016-03-01

    Single-particle compositional analysis of filter samples collected on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft is presented for six flights during the springtime Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign (March-April 2013). Scanning electron microscopy was utilised to derive size-segregated particle compositions and size distributions, and these were compared to corresponding data from wing-mounted optical particle counters. Reasonable agreement between the calculated number size distributions was found. Significant variability in composition was observed, with differing external and internal mixing identified, between air mass trajectory cases based on HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) analyses. Dominant particle classes were silicate-based dusts and sea salts, with particles notably rich in K and Ca detected in one case. Source regions varied from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland through to northern Russia and the European continent. Good agreement between the back trajectories was mirrored by comparable compositional trends between samples. Silicate dusts were identified in all cases, and the elemental composition of the dust was consistent for all samples except one. It is hypothesised that long-range, high-altitude transport was primarily responsible for this dust, with likely sources including the Asian arid regions.

  13. Introduction to MODIS Collection 6 'Deep Blue' aerosol products and strategy for cirrus-signal correction in AOD retrievals using 1.38 μm reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Hsu, N. C.; Sayer, A. M.; Bettenhausen, C.

    2012-12-01

    This study shows the characteristics of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 Deep Blue aerosol products (hereafter, C006 DB products) and a strategy for correcting cirrus-signal in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. The C006 DB products have several changes over the C005, including extended coverage, surface reflectance model, aerosol microphysical model, and cloud screening, etc. One of the new features is the inclusion of pixel-level uncertainty estimates on the retrieved AOD. These uncertainty estimates have been determined based on a validation against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) direct-Sun AOD measurements, and are parameterized as a function of AOD, viewing geometry, and retrieval quality flag. This will provide users with a simple way to assess the uncertainty on Deep Blue AOD data for their particular application of interest. Preliminary results show strong agreement with AERONET, suggesting that the Deep Blue algorithm performs as well as other state-of-the-art satellite AOD datasets. In addition, a strategy for cirrus-signal correction in the retrieved AOD is presented. The cirrus reflectance at each wavelength to be used in the aerosol retrieval algorithms is determined by the relationships between reflectances at 1.38 μm and the aerosol bands and subtracted from the original TOA reflectance values assuming linear relationship for the optically thin case (ρ1.38 < 0.05). Since the 1.38 μm band is located in the strong water vapor absorption band, thus representing cirrus signal only, the slope between the 1.38 μm reflectance values and minimum reflectance values at each aerosol band for the corresponding values at 1.38 μm can be used to convert the 1.38 μm reflectance to the cirrus reflectance at each wavelength. Then, the cirrus-signal-corrected AOD can be retrieved by using the corrected reflectance data as input data into the aerosol retrieval algorithms. The retrieval results show that the AOD

  14. Comparative In Vitro Toxicity Profile of Electronic and Tobacco Cigarettes, Smokeless Tobacco and Nicotine Replacement Therapy Products: E-Liquids, Extracts and Collected Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Manoj; Leverette, Robert D.; Cooper, Bethany T.; Bennett, Melanee B.; Brown, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) continues to increase worldwide in parallel with accumulating information on their potential toxicity and safety. In this study, an in vitro battery of established assays was used to examine the cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxicity and inflammatory responses of certain commercial e-cigs and compared to tobacco burning cigarettes, smokeless tobacco (SLT) products and a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) product. The toxicity evaluation was performed on e-liquids and pad-collected aerosols of e-cigs, pad-collected smoke condensates of tobacco cigarettes and extracts of SLT and NRT products. In all assays, exposures with e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, at the doses tested, showed no significant activity when compared to tobacco burning cigarettes. Results for the e-cigs, with and without nicotine in two evaluated flavor variants, were very similar in all assays, indicating that the presence of nicotine and flavors, at the levels tested, did not induce any cytotoxic, genotoxic or inflammatory effects. The present findings indicate that neither the e-cig liquids and collected aerosols, nor the extracts of the SLT and NRT products produce any meaningful toxic effects in four widely-applied in vitro test systems, in which the conventional cigarette smoke preparations, at comparable exposures, are markedly cytotoxic and genotoxic. PMID:25361047

  15. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  16. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilson, Christina A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. Onemore » isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.« less

  18. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of aerosolized bacteria collected from African dust events

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Christina A.; Brigmon, Robin L.; Yeager, Chris; Smith, Garriet W.; Polson, Shawn W.

    2013-07-31

    Twenty-one bacteria were isolated and characterized from air samples collected in Africa and the Caribbean by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Isolates were selected based on preliminary characterization as possible pathogens. Identification of the bacterial isolates was 25 achieved using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) profiling, the BIOLOG Microlog® System (carbon substrate assay), and repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR analysis. The majority of isolates (18/21) were identified as species of the genus Bacillus. Three isolates were classified within the Bacillus cereus senso lato group, which includes Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus cereus strains. One isolate was identified as a Staphylococcus sp., 30 most closely related to species (i.e Staphylococcus kloosii, Staphylococcus warneri) that are commonly associated with human or animal skin, but can also act as opportunistic pathogen. Another isolate was tentatively identified as Tsukamurella inchonensis, a known respiratory pathogen, and was resistant to the ten antibiotics tested including vancomycin.

  19. Comparison between XRF and IBA techniques in analysis of fine aerosols collected in Rijeka, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivošević, Tatjana; Mandić, Luka; Orlić, Ivica; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David D.

    2014-10-01

    The new system for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analysis has been installed at the Laboratory for Elemental Micro-Analysis (LEMA) at the University of Rijeka. Currently the key application of this new XRF system is in the field of environmental science, i.e. in the analysis of fine airborne particles. In this work, results of initial multi-elemental analysis of PM2.5 fraction is reported for the first time in the region of Rijeka, Croatia. Sampling was performed at the Rijeka City center, during a continuous 9-day period in February/March 2012. All samples were collected on stretched Teflon filters in 12 h periods. To check the reliability of the new XRF system, results of XRF analysis are compared with the results obtained by the well-established Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) laboratory at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The concentrations of H, Na, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br and Pb were determined. In addition, black carbon was determined by Laser Integrating Plate Method (LIPM). Very good agreement between XRF and IBA techniques is obtained for all elements detected by both techniques. Elemental concentrations were correlated with the traffic volume and wind speed and direction. The summary of our findings is presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Characterization of Heavy Metal Contents in the Bulk Atmospheric Aerosols Simultaneously Collected at Three Islands in Okinawa, Japan by X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, Y.; ITOH, A.; Azechi, S.; Somada, Y.; Handa, D.; Miyagi, Y.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.

    2011-12-01

    We studied heavy metal contents of atmospheric aerosols using an X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method (XRF). The XRF method enables us to analyze heavy metal contents of bulk aerosols rapidly without any chemical pretreatments. We used an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer that is compact and portable. We prepared several different amounts of standard reference materials (NIES No.28) of Japanese National Institute of Environmental Studies on quartz filters for calibration curves. Then, we evaluated quantitative responses of XRF method by comparing with the metal contents determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after acid-digestion. Good linear relationships between X-ray intensity and amount of aerosol on filter were seen in the following 10 metals; Al, K, Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Rb, Ba, Pb and As. We then used XRF method to determine heavy metal contents in authentic atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa islands, Japan. Okinawa islands, consisting of many small islands, are situated east of Asian continent, and its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants. Also, in Okinawa islands, maritime air mass prevails during summer, while Asian continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background clean air and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities such as industries and automobiles. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using identical high-volume air samplers at 3 islands; Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals

  1. Electrode configurations inside an electrostatic precipitator and their impact on collection efficiency and flow pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Cheng, Lu; Shen, Xinjun; Li, Shuran; Yan, Keping

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) units have wide application in lots industries processes as gas filtration devices. Regarding their high efficiency, further improvement is still required. Wide ESP (plate-to-plate distance greater than 400 mm) is one of a promising way to improve existing ESP due to its ability to reduce equipment investment significantly. However, its large-scale application has been limited because it may potentially lead to collection efficiency reduction. This article focuses on the study of two major effects when several different electrode configurations are applied. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow pattern inside ESP and particle collection efficiency were investigated by using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) respectively. Results suggested that the collection efficiency of wide ESP is rather complicated and highly related to inner gas flow pattern.

  2. Use of spaceborne lidar for the evaluation of thin cirrus contamination and screening in the Aqua MODIS Collection 5 aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Liu, Zhaoyan; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Hansell, Richard A.; Lee, Jaehwa

    2013-06-01

    Cloud contamination from subvisual thin cirrus clouds is still a challenging issue for operational satellite aerosol retrievals. In the A-Train constellation, concurrent high-sensitivity cirrus observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to examine the susceptibility of the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol retrievals to thin cirrus contamination and to evaluate the robustness of various cirrus screening techniques. Quantitative evaluations indicate that the current cirrus screening schemes in the MODIS Dark Target and Deep Blue Collection 5 aerosol retrievals can effectively remove most cirrus signals while some residual thin cirrus signals still exist with strong spatial and seasonal variability. Results also show significant linkage between thin cirrus occurrence frequency and the susceptibility of aerosol retrievals to thin cirrus contamination. Using the CALIPSO cirrus observations as a reference, we also examined the effectiveness and robustness of eight MODIS-derived cirrus screening parameters. These parameters include apparent reflectance at 1.38 µm (R1.38), cirrus reflectance at 0.66 µm (CR0.66), CR0.66 cirrus flag (CF), reflectance ratio between 1.38 µm and 0.66 µm (RR1.38/0.66), reflectance ratio between 1.38 µm and 1.24 µm (RR1.38/1.24), brightness temperature difference between 8.6 µm and 11 µm (BTD8.6-11), brightness temperature difference between 11 µm and 12 µm (BTD11-12), and cloud phase infrared approach (CPIR). Among these parameters, RR1.38/0.66 achieves the best overall performance, followed by the BTD11-12. Results from several test cases suggest that the cirrus screening schemes in the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithms can be further improved to reduce thin cirrus contamination.

  3. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of ambient aerosols collected from Okinawa Island in the western North Pacific Rim, an outflow region of Asian dusts and pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwar, Bhagawati; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Zhu, Chunmao

    2016-04-01

    Stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope ratios were measured for total carbon (TC) and nitrogen (TN), respectively, in aerosol (TSP) samples collected at Cape Hedo, Okinawa, an outflow region of Asian pollutants, during 2009-2010. The averaged δ13C and δ15N ratios are -22.2‰ and +12.5‰, respectively. The δ13C values are similar in both spring (-22.5‰) and winter (-22.5‰), suggesting the similar sources and/or source regions. We found that δ13C from Okinawa aerosols are ca. 2‰ higher than those reported from Chinese megacities probably due to photochemical aging of organic aerosols. A strong correlation (r = 0.81) was found between nss-Ca and TSP, suggesting that springtime aerosols are influenced from Asian dusts. However, carbonates in the Asian dusts were titrated with acidic species such as sulfuric acid and oxalic acid during atmospheric transport although two samples suggested the presence of remaining carbonate. No correlations were found between δ13C and tracer compounds (levoglucosan, elemental carbon, oxalic acid, and Na+). During winter and spring, coal burning is significant source in China. Based on isotopic mass balance, contribution of coal burning origin particles to total aerosol carbon was estimated as ca. 97% in winter, which is probably associated with the high emissions in China. Contribution of NO3- to TN was on average 45% whereas that of NH4+ was 18%. These results suggest that vehicular exhaust is an important source of TN in Okinawa aerosols. Concentration of water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) is higher in summer, suggesting that WSON is more emitted from the ocean in warmer season whereas inorganic nitrogen is more emitted in winter and spring from pollution sources in the Asian continent.

  4. Heterodyne efficiency for a coherent laser radar with diffuse or aerosol targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frehlich, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a Coherent Laser Radar is determined by the statistics of the coherent Doppler signal. The heterodyne efficiency is an excellent indication of performance because it is an absolute measure of beam alignment and is independent of the transmitter power, the target backscatter coefficient, the atmospheric attenuation, and the detector quantum efficiency and gain. The theoretical calculation of heterodyne efficiency for an optimal monostatic lidar with a circular aperture and Gaussian transmit laser is presented including beam misalignment in the far-field and near-field regimes. The statistical behavior of estimates of the heterodyne efficiency using a calibration hard target are considered. For space based applications, a biased estimate of heterodyne efficiency is proposed that removes the variability due to the random surface return but retains the sensitivity to misalignment. Physical insight is provided by simulation of the fields on the detector surface. The required detector calibration is also discussed.

  5. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Collection efficiencies were generated for three spherical particle sizes, 100, 20, and 5 micron in diameter, using the codes LEWICE3D and LEWICE2D. The free stream Mach number was 0.27, representing a velocity of approximately 86 ms. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 15-20 occurred as the flow entered the shroud of the probe.Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the effect of the protective shroud.

  6. Climatology and trends of aerosol optical depth over the Mediterranean basin during the last 12years (2002-2014) based on Collection 006 MODIS-Aqua data.

    PubMed

    Floutsi, A A; Korras-Carraca, M B; Matsoukas, C; Hatzianastassiou, N; Biskos, G

    2016-05-01

    The Mediterranean basin is a region of particular interest for studying atmospheric aerosols due to the large variety of air masses it receives, and its sensitivity to climate change. In this study we use the newest collection (C006) of aerosol optical depth from MODIS-Aqua, from which we also derived the fine-mode fraction and Ångström exponent over the last 12years (i.e., from 2002 to 2014), providing the longest analyzed dataset for this region. The long-term regional optical depth average is 0.20±0.05, with the indicated uncertainty reflecting the inter-annual variability. Overall, the aerosol optical depth exhibits a south-to-north decreasing gradient and an average decreasing trend of 0.0030 per year (19% total decrease over the study period). The correlation between the reported AOD observations with measurements from the ground AERONET stations is high (R=0.76-0.80 depending on the wavelength), with the MODIS-Aqua data being slightly overestimated. Both fine-fraction and Ångström exponent data highlight the dominance of anthropogenic aerosols over the northern, and of desert aerosols over the southern part of the region. Clear intrusions of desert dust over the Eastern Mediterranean are observed principally in spring, and in some cases in winter. Dust intrusions dominate the Western Mediterranean in the summer (and sometimes in autumn), whereas anthropogenic aerosols dominate the sub-region of the Black Sea in all seasons but especially during summer. Fine-mode optical depth is found to decrease over almost all areas of the study region during the 12-year period, marking the decreasing contribution of anthropogenic particulate matter emissions over the study area. Coarse-mode aerosol load also exhibits an overall decreasing trend. However, its decrease is smaller than that of fine aerosols and not as uniformly distributed, underlining that the overall decrease in the region arises mainly from reduced anthropogenic emissions. PMID:26878641

  7. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  8. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  9. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  10. The effects of loaded carrier mass and formulation mass on aerosolization efficiency in dry powder inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Jesslynn; Gill, Charlotte; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that particle-particle impaction may influence aerosolization properties in carrier-based dry powder inhalers, through transfer of kinetic energy from large carriers to surface-deposited active drug. The importance of particle-particle collision has yet to be compared against other mechanisms that could lead to drug liberation, such as particle-wall impaction and turbulence. In particular, particle-particle collisions are difficult to model in silico due to computational restrictions. This study investigated the effects of dry powder inhaler particle-particle collisions in vitro using an established carrier-drug model dry powder inhalation formulation. Spherical polystyrene beads of median size 82.80 μm were chosen as a model carrier as they were of uniform size, shape, surface area, density, porosity and hardness and thus eliminated potential variables that would have conflicted with the study. This model carrier was geometrically blended with micronized salbutamol sulphate (loaded blend). The correlation between the mass of loaded blend (5-40 mg) in the Rotahaler® DPI device and resulting fine particle fraction (FPF) was examined at a constant flow rate of 60 L.min(-1). In a second experiment, the mass of loaded blend was kept constant and a variable amount of blank carrier particles were added to the Rotahaler® device to ascertain if additional "blank" carrier particles affected the final FPF. The efficiency of aerosolization remained constant with varying amounts of blank carrier particles as determined by the fine particle fraction of the emitted dose (FPFED) and fine particle fraction of the loaded dose (FPFLD). No statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD values were observed for increasing masses of blank carrier. In addition, no statistical difference in FPFED and FPFLD between the two experiments was obtained. These observations suggest that particle-particle collisions are not a driving mechanism responsible for

  11. Evaluation of Ag nanoparticle coated air filter against aerosolized virus: Anti-viral efficiency with dust loading.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yun Haeng; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the effect of dust loading on the anti-viral ability of an anti-viral air filter was investigated. Silver nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in diameter were synthesized via a spark discharge generation system and were used as anti-viral agents coated onto a medium air filter. The pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and anti-viral ability of the filter against aerosolized bacteriophage MS2 virus particles were tested with dust loading. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop increased with dust loading, while the anti-viral ability decreased. Theoretical analysis of anti-viral ability with dust loading was carried out using a mathematical model based on that presented by Joe et al. (J. Hazard. Mater.; 280: 356-363, 2014). Our model can be used to compare anti-viral abilities of various anti-viral agents, determine appropriate coating areal density of anti-viral agent on a filter, and predict the life cycle of an anti-viral filter. PMID:26434534

  12. Prediction of gas collection efficiency and particle collection artifact for atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds in multicapillary denuders.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Mark D; Perlinger, Judith A

    2010-01-15

    A modeling approach is presented to predict the sorptive sampling collection efficiency of gaseous semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) and the artifact caused by collection of particle-associated SOCs in multicapillary diffusion denuders containing polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stationary phase. Approaches are presented to estimate the equilibrium PDMS-gas partition coefficient (K(pdms)) from a solvation parameter model for any compound, and, for nonpolar compounds, from the octanol-air partition coefficient (K(oa)) if measured K(pdms) values are not available. These estimated K(pdms) values are compared with K(pdms) measured by gas chromatography. Breakthrough fraction was measured for SOCs collected from ambient air using high-flow (300 L min(-1)) and low-flow (13 L min(-1)) denuders under a range of sampling conditions (-10 to 25 degrees C; 11-100% relative humidity). Measured breakthrough fraction agreed with predictions based on frontal chromatography theory using K(pdms) and equations of Golay, Lövkvist and Jönsson within measurement precision. Analytes included hexachlorobenzene, 144 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers 47 and 99. Atmospheric particle transmission efficiency was measured for the high-flow denuder (0.037-6.3 microm diameter), and low-flow denuder (0.015-3.1 microm diameter). Particle transmission predicted using equations of Gormley and Kennedy, Pich, and a modified filter model, agreed within measurement precision (high-flow denuder) or were slightly greater than (low-flow denuder) measured particle transmission. As an example application of the model, breakthrough volume and particle collection artifact for the two denuder designs were predicted as a function of K(oa) for nonpolar SOCs. The modeling approach is a necessary tool for the design and use of denuders for sorptive sampling with PDMS stationary phase. PMID:19959174

  13. Large Plate Lysimeter Efficiency for Collecting Water Transported from Soil to Ground Water

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T

    2004-04-14

    A large, zero-tension, plate lysimeter (3.05 x 2.13 m) was installed to intercept percolating soil water at Bikini Atoll (11 35'N, 165 25'E), a former nuclear test-site. In two experiments controlled amounts of irrigation water were applied over the lysimeter and leachate water was collected. Evapotranspiration (ET) calculations were made using the Penman-Monteith equation and climate data collected at the atoll. The efficiency of the lysimeter was essentially 100% in contrast to low efficiencies reported for smaller plate lysimeters. Lysimeter design, installation, and water balance results are discussed.

  14. Stray-light suppression with high-collection efficiency in laser light-scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deilamian, K.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Kelleher, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An optical system is described for collecting a large fraction of fluorescent light emitted isotropically from a cylindrical interaction region. While maintaining an overall detection efficiency of 9 percent, the system rejects, by more than 12 orders of magnitude, incident laser light along a single axis that intersects the interaction region. Such a system is useful for a wide variety of light-scattering experiments in which high-collection efficiency is desirable, but in which light from an incident laser beam must be rejected without resorting to spectral filters.

  15. Estimation of Collection Efficiency Change of Moving Granular Bed Filter by Dust Load

    SciTech Connect

    Furuuchi, M.; Hata, M.; Kanaoka, C.; Kawaminami, Y.

    2002-09-18

    Final goal of this study is to theoretically describe effects of influencing factors on the performance of the coke bed filter as a material classifier and to predict its optimal operating condition. In this paper, the author focuses on the basic investigation on collection mechanism of a fixed coke bed filter on the basis of the depth filtration theory, in which an influence of dust load on the dust collection efficiency.

  16. Thermal characteristics and mass absorption efficiency of carbonaceous aerosol measured during a post-harvest burning period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batmunkh, T.; Kim, Y. J.; Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to better understand the characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol time-resolved OC, EC, and BC were measured by a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and an Aethalometer, respectively, during a post-harvest burning period from November 22 to December 20, 2011 at a sub-urban site in Gwangju, Korea. OC and EC were analyzed by the thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method with NIOSH temperature protocol. The spectral light absorption coefficient (babs) was determined based on the Aethalometer data. Overall average OC and EC concentrations were found to be 5.0±2.4 ugC/ m3 and 1.5±0.9 ugC/ m3, respectively for the sampling period. On average, babs at seven Aethalometer wavelengths was found to be 38.4±27.8 Mm-1, 24.3±17.8 Mm-1, 20.8±15.4 Mm-1, 17.9±13.3 Mm-1, 14.9±11.1 Mm-1, 9.9±7.4 Mm-1, and 8.8±6.6 Mm-1 at 370 nm, 470 nm, 520 nm, 590 nm, 660 nm, 880 nm, and 950 nm, respectively. Clear diurnal variations with morning (7:00 AM~9:00 AM) and evening (7:00 PM~11:00 PM) peaks were observed for OC, EC, and babs mostly due to local burning activities. Based on the 4-day back-trajectory analyses conducted using the HYSPLIT model. Event cases were classified into four categories, based on the 4-day air mass back trajectories, as Clean(C), Stagnant(ST), Continental(CC), and Local Burning(LB) events. In order to better investigate the characteristics of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol, thermal evolution patterns of carbonaceous aerosol measured by the Sunset analyzer were characterized as OC1, OC2, and EC, which were detected in temperature steps of 600 C, 840 C in an non-oxidizing atmosphere, and 870 C in an oxidizing atmosphere, respectively. High ratio of OC2/OC1; 1.39~1.41 was observed in the evening 9:00~11:00 PM due to local burning event. Concentration of OC2 was higher up to 1.4 times than that of OC1 for the LB cases, showing that higher molecular weight fraction of organic aerosol was dominant for the time. As expected, higher correlation was found between EC and

  17. NUMERICAL CALCULATION: ASPIRATION EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS INTO THIN-WALLED SAMPLING INLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aspiration efficiency of particles from a flowing airstream into a thin-walled sampling inlet is accurately predicted using a numerical model. he model combines the Boundary Integral Equation Method for predicting the velocity field into the inlet with an analytical solution to t...

  18. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY EVALUATION OF MERCURY-TRAPPING MEDIA FOR THE SASS TRAIN IMPINGER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an investigation of the collection efficiencies of the popularly used media in the SASS train impinger assembly. A simple mercury-vapor generator system, based on saturation of air with mercury vapor at a fixed temperature, was assembled. Performance e...

  19. Hybrid engineered materials with high water-collecting efficiency inspired by Namib Desert beetles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-05-21

    Inspired by Namib Desert beetles, a hybrid superhydrophobic surface was fabricated, showing highly efficient fog harvesting with a water collection rate (WCR) of 1309.9 mg h(-1) cm(-2). And, the surface possessed an excellent robustness and self-cleaning property. PMID:27125658

  20. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF THE HIGH VOLUME SMALL SURFACE SAMPLER ON WORN CARPETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collection Efficiency of the High Volume Small Surface Sampler on Worn Carpets

    Erik R. Svendsen*?, Peter S. Thorne*, Stephen J. Reynolds*?, Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy*, Alba Quinones*, Dale Zimmerman*, and Nervana Metwali*

    *University of Iowa College of Public Health<...

  1. EFFECT OF IMPACTION, BOUNCE AND REAEROSOLIZATION ON THE COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF IMPINGERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The collection efficiency of liquid impingers was studied experimentally as a function of the sampling flow rate with test particles in the bacterial size range. Three impingers were tested: two All-Glass Impingers(AGI-4 and AGI-30),widely used for bioaerosol sampling, and a newl...

  2. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters JJ Table JJ-6 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management Pt. 98, Subpt....

  3. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters JJ Table JJ-6 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management Pt. 98, Subpt....

  4. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters JJ Table JJ-6 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management Pt. 98, Subpt....

  5. 40 CFR Table Jj-6 to Subpart Jj of... - Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Collection Efficiencies of Anaerobic Digesters JJ Table JJ-6 to Subpart JJ of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management Pt. 98, Subpt....

  6. Simulation of Fluid Flow and Collection Efficiency for an SEA Multi-element Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.; Struk, Peter M.; Bidwell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of fluid flow and collection efficiency for a Science Engineering Associates (SEA) multi-element probe are presented. Simulation of the flow field was produced using the Glenn-HT Navier-Stokes solver. Three-dimensional unsteady results were produced and then time averaged for the heat transfer and collection efficiency results. Three grid densities were investigated to enable an assessment of grid dependence. Simulations were completed for free stream velocities ranging from 85-135 meters per second, and free stream total pressure of 44.8 and 93.1 kilopascals (6.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch absolute). In addition, the effect of angle of attack and yaw were investigated by including 5 degree deviations from straight for one of the flow conditions. All but one of the cases simulated a probe in isolation (i.e. in a very large domain without any support strut). One case is included which represents a probe mounted on a support strut within a finite sized wind tunnel. Collection efficiencies were generated, using the LEWICE3D code, for four spherical particle sizes, 100, 50, 20, and 5 micron in diameter. It was observed that a reduction in velocity of about 20% occurred, for all cases, as the flow entered the shroud of the probe. The reduction in velocity within the shroud is not indicative of any error in the probe measurement accuracy. Heat transfer results are presented which agree quite well with a correlation for the circular cross section heated elements. Collection efficiency results indicate a reduction in collection efficiency as particle size is reduced. The reduction with particle size is expected, however, the results tended to be lower than the previous results generated for isolated two-dimensional elements. The deviation from the two-dimensional results is more pronounced for the smaller particles and is likely due to the reduced flow within the protective shroud. As particle size increases differences between the two

  7. Full cost accounting in the analysis of separated waste collection efficiency: A methodological proposal.

    PubMed

    D'Onza, Giuseppe; Greco, Giulio; Allegrini, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Recycling implies additional costs for separated municipal solid waste (MSW) collection. The aim of the present study is to propose and implement a management tool - the full cost accounting (FCA) method - to calculate the full collection costs of different types of waste. Our analysis aims for a better understanding of the difficulties of putting FCA into practice in the MSW sector. We propose a FCA methodology that uses standard cost and actual quantities to calculate the collection costs of separate and undifferentiated waste. Our methodology allows cost efficiency analysis and benchmarking, overcoming problems related to firm-specific accounting choices, earnings management policies and purchase policies. Our methodology allows benchmarking and variance analysis that can be used to identify the causes of off-standards performance and guide managers to deploy resources more efficiently. Our methodology can be implemented by companies lacking a sophisticated management accounting system. PMID:26613351

  8. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Calculations for a Boeing 737-300 Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.

    1997-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a Boeing 737-300 inlet using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, the NASA Lewis LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. Flow solutions for the inlet were generated using the VSAERO panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the newly developed adaptive grid code ICEGRID3D. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Power Challenge computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes looked reasonable and appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  9. Experimental Evaluation of Stagnation Point Collection Efficiency of the NACA 0012 Swept Wing Tip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental work of a number of icing tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center to develop a test method for measuring the local collection efficiency of an impinging cloud at the leading edge of a NACA 0012 swept wing and with the data obtained to further calibrate a proposed correlation for such impingement efficiency calculation as a function of the modified inertia parameter and the sweep angle. The preliminary results showed that there could be some limitation of the test method due to the ice erosion problem when encountered, and also found that, for conditions free of such problem, the stagnation point collection efficiency measurement for sweep angles up to 45 could be well approximated by the proposed correlation. Further evaluation of this correlation is recommended in order to assess its applicability for swept-wing icing scaling analysis.

  10. The western Mediterranean basin as an aged aerosols reservoir. Insights from an old-fashioned but efficient radiotracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brattich, E.; Hernández-Ceballos, M. A.; Orza, J. A. G.; Bolívar, J. P.; Tositti, L.

    2016-09-01

    The long-term contemporary 210Pb time series acquired during the period 2004-2011 at two distant sites of different altitude in the Mediterranean basin, El Arenosillo (40 m a.s.l. in southwestern Spain) and Mt. Cimone (2165 m a.s.l. in northern Italy), are analyzed and compared. Besides being considered a tracer of continental air masses, 210Pb radionuclide is also a proxy of fine stable aerosol. For this reason, the measurements of PM10 mass concentrations collected at the same time and the corresponding 210Pb/PM10 ratio at the two sites are considered to gain better insights into the origin and size of the particles. Three statistical trajectory methods are applied to identify and characterize the 210Pb source regions at the two sites. The three methods yield similar outcomes in the source identification, which strengthens the robustness of our results. In addition to the importance of the transport from areas of continental Europe, this study highlights the relevant role of the Mediterranean Sea as a major 210Pb reservoir layer associated to the aged air masses that accumulate in the western Mediterranean basin. The analysis of the sources points out the significant influence of northern Africa to 210Pb increases at both sites as well, even though the most intensive episodes are not of Saharan origin.

  11. Meteorological and Aerosol Sensing with small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, J.; Möhler, O.; Haunold, W.; Schrod, J.; Brooks, I.; Norris, S.; Brooks, B.; Hill, M.; Leisner, T.

    2012-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) facilitate the monitoring of several meteorological and aerosol parameters with high resolution in space and time. They are small, easy to operate, cost efficient and allow for flexible application during field campaigns. We present two experimental payloads for measurement of relative humidity, temperature, aerosol size distribution and the collection of aerosol samples on board the small UAS SIRIUS II. The payload modules are light weight (<1kg) and can be easily switched between two flights. All sensors can be controlled from the ground and the measured data is recorded by the autopilot together with the position data. The first module contains a sensor package for measurement of relative humidity and temperature and the Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Prope (CLASP) for acquisition of aerosol size distributions. CLASP measures aerosol particles with diameters from 0.12μm to 9.25μm in up to 32 channels at a frequency of 10 Hz. The second module also contains a humidity and temperature sensor package and the aerosol sample collection device. The aerosol sampler collects air samples at 2 l/min onto a sample holder. After the flight the ice nuclei on the sample holder are activated in the lab and counted. In August 2012 the complete setup will be used during a measurement campaign at mount "Kleiner Feldberg" close to Frankfurt. Until then we will perform test flights and additional laboratory tests.

  12. Modeling the Efficiency of a Magnetic Needle for Collecting Magnetic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Kimberly S; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Bryant, H C; Lovato, Debbie M; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in 1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and 2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100 % of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency vs. time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium. PMID:24874577

  13. Modeling the efficiency of a magnetic needle for collecting magnetic cells.

    PubMed

    Butler, Kimberly S; Adolphi, Natalie L; Bryant, H C; Lovato, Debbie M; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2014-07-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in (1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and (2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100% of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency versus time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium. PMID:24874577

  14. Modeling the efficiency of a magnetic needle for collecting magnetic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Kimberly S.; Adolphi, Natalie L.; Bryant, H. C.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2014-07-01

    As new magnetic nanoparticle-based technologies are developed and new target cells are identified, there is a critical need to understand the features important for magnetic isolation of specific cells in fluids, an increasingly important tool in disease research and diagnosis. To investigate magnetic cell collection, cell-sized spherical microparticles, coated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles, were suspended in (1) glycerine-water solutions, chosen to approximate the range of viscosities of bone marrow, and (2) water in which 3, 5, 10 and 100% of the total suspended microspheres are coated with magnetic nanoparticles, to model collection of rare magnetic nanoparticle-coated cells from a mixture of cells in a fluid. The magnetic microspheres were collected on a magnetic needle, and we demonstrate that the collection efficiency versus time can be modeled using a simple, heuristically-derived function, with three physically-significant parameters. The function enables experimentally-obtained collection efficiencies to be scaled to extract the effective drag of the suspending medium. The results of this analysis demonstrate that the effective drag scales linearly with fluid viscosity, as expected. Surprisingly, increasing the number of non-magnetic microspheres in the suspending fluid results increases the collection of magnetic microspheres, corresponding to a decrease in the effective drag of the medium.

  15. Determinants of efficiency in the provision of municipal street-cleaning and refuse collection services

    SciTech Connect

    Benito-Lopez, Bernardino; Rocio Moreno-Enguix, Maria del; Solana-Ibanez, Jose

    2011-06-15

    Effective waste management systems can make critical contributions to public health, environmental sustainability and economic development. The challenge affects every person and institution in society, and measures cannot be undertaken without data collection and a quantitative analysis approach. In this paper, the two-stage double bootstrap procedure of is used to estimate the efficiency determinants of Spanish local entities in the provision of public street-cleaning and refuse collection services. The purpose is to identify factors that influence efficiency. The final sample comprised 1072 municipalities. In the first stage, robust efficiency estimates are obtained with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). We apply the second stage, based on a truncated-regression, to estimate the effect of a group of environmental factors on DEA estimates. The results show the existence of a significant relation between efficiency and all the variables analysed (per capita income, urban population density, the comparative index of the importance of tourism and that of the whole economic activity). We have also considered the influence of a dummy categorical variable - the political sign of the governing party - on the efficient provision of the services under study. The results from the methodology proposed show that municipalities governed by progressive parties are more efficient.

  16. Efficiency of Different Sampling Tools for Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Collections in Malaysian Streams

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Wan Mohd Hafezul Wan Abdul; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Hamid, Suhaila Abd; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the sampling performance of three benthic sampling tools commonly used to collect freshwater macroinvertebrates. Efficiency of qualitative D-frame and square aquatic nets were compared to a quantitative Surber sampler in tropical Malaysian streams. The abundance and diversity of macroinvertebrates collected using each tool evaluated along with their relative variations (RVs). Each tool was used to sample macroinvertebrates from three streams draining different areas: a vegetable farm, a tea plantation and a forest reserve. High macroinvertebrate diversities were recorded using the square net and Surber sampler at the forested stream site; however, very low species abundance was recorded by the Surber sampler. Relatively large variations in the Surber sampler collections (RVs of 36% and 28%) were observed for the vegetable farm and tea plantation streams, respectively. Of the three sampling methods, the square net was the most efficient, collecting a greater diversity of macroinvertebrate taxa and a greater number of specimens (i.e., abundance) overall, particularly from the vegetable farm and the tea plantation streams (RV<25%). Fewer square net sample passes (<8 samples) were sufficient to perform a biological assessment of water quality, but each sample required a slightly longer processing time (±20 min) compared with those gathered via the other samplers. In conclusion, all three apparatuses were suitable for macroinvertebrate collection in Malaysian streams and gathered assemblages that resulted in the determination of similar biological water quality classes using the Family Biotic Index (FBI) and the Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP). However, despite a slightly longer processing time, the square net was more efficient (lowest RV) at collecting samples and more suitable for the collection of macroinvertebrates from deep, fast flowing, wadeable streams with coarse substrates. PMID:27019685

  17. Efficiency of Different Sampling Tools for Aquatic Macroinvertebrate Collections in Malaysian Streams.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Wan Mohd Hafezul Wan Abdul; Rawi, Che Salmah Md; Hamid, Suhaila Abd; Al-Shami, Salman Abdo

    2016-02-01

    This study analyses the sampling performance of three benthic sampling tools commonly used to collect freshwater macroinvertebrates. Efficiency of qualitative D-frame and square aquatic nets were compared to a quantitative Surber sampler in tropical Malaysian streams. The abundance and diversity of macroinvertebrates collected using each tool evaluated along with their relative variations (RVs). Each tool was used to sample macroinvertebrates from three streams draining different areas: a vegetable farm, a tea plantation and a forest reserve. High macroinvertebrate diversities were recorded using the square net and Surber sampler at the forested stream site; however, very low species abundance was recorded by the Surber sampler. Relatively large variations in the Surber sampler collections (RVs of 36% and 28%) were observed for the vegetable farm and tea plantation streams, respectively. Of the three sampling methods, the square net was the most efficient, collecting a greater diversity of macroinvertebrate taxa and a greater number of specimens (i.e., abundance) overall, particularly from the vegetable farm and the tea plantation streams (RV<25%). Fewer square net sample passes (<8 samples) were sufficient to perform a biological assessment of water quality, but each sample required a slightly longer processing time (±20 min) compared with those gathered via the other samplers. In conclusion, all three apparatuses were suitable for macroinvertebrate collection in Malaysian streams and gathered assemblages that resulted in the determination of similar biological water quality classes using the Family Biotic Index (FBI) and the Biological Monitoring Working Party (BMWP). However, despite a slightly longer processing time, the square net was more efficient (lowest RV) at collecting samples and more suitable for the collection of macroinvertebrates from deep, fast flowing, wadeable streams with coarse substrates. PMID:27019685

  18. Study of anomalous charge collection efficiency in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuž, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous charge collection efficiency observed in heavily irradiated silicon strip detectors operated at high bias voltages has been studied in terms of a simple model and experimentally using 25 ns shaping electronics and transient current technique (TCT) with edge-on laser injection. The model confirmed qualitatively the explanation by electron impact ionization in the high electric field close to the strips, but failed in the quantitative description of the collected charge. First results on a Hamamatsu strip detector irradiated to 5×1015 neq/cm2 and operated at bias voltages in excess of 1000 V exhibit charge collection similar to what obtained on Micron devices. TCT tests with local charge injection by a laser confirm the validity of a linear extrapolation of trapping to very high fluences and reveal significant charge collection from the non-depleted volume of the detector.

  19. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  20. Numerical simulation of aerosol scavenging by ice-bearing convective clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Molenkamp, C.R.

    1990-04-01

    Precipitation is the most effective mechanism for cleansing the atmosphere of small aerosol particles. Although there are many process paths by which precipitation can ultimately deposit aerosol on the ground, each path begins with the initial capture, or scavenging, of an aerosol particle. One of the most effective of these processes, at least in the absence of strong electric fields, is condensation nucleation scavenging, in which an aerosol particle serves as a cloud condensation nucleus. Although scavenging is a necessary precursor to aerosol removal by precipitation, scavenging does not guarantee that an aerosol particle will be removed from the atmosphere. For example, the particle will be resuspended if its host cloud droplet evaporates or if the droplet is collected by a raindrop which subsequently evaporates. The removal process becomes further complicated if ice is present in the cloud. The purpose of this research is to study the effects of various ice processes on the net aerosol removal efficiency of convective clouds. 8 refs.

  1. The effect of nocturnal sampling on semen quality and the efficiency of collection in bovine species.

    PubMed

    Yates, Jennifer H; Chandler, John E; Canal, Anita L; Braden Paul, J

    2003-12-01

    This study evaluated night and day semen collection regimes in Holstein and Brahman bulls (four bulls of each breed) that were collected weekly, each during a morning and a night collection. Ejaculates (n=64) were obtained via artificial vagina over 4 weeks. The first collection of each week alternated between night and day. Two collection teams were employed. Bull behavior parameters included reaction time to first mount, time to ejaculation, a refractory period test, and a thrust intensity test. The numbers of interruptions were counted as a managerial parameter. Pre-freeze semen parameters included total volume, initial motility and concentration. Post-freeze semen parameters measured were: 0- and 3-h post-thaw motility; percent intact acrosomes; and percent sperm abnormalities. Data were analyzed by least squares methods. The bull within breed effect differed (P<0.05) for behavior parameters. The bull within breed effect for total motile sperm harvested was not significant. The bull within breed response was mixed for post-freeze semen viability parameters. Bull within breed was not significant for sperm abnormalities. The night versus day treatment was significant for the managerial parameter (P=0.002). Although a different collection schedule for Bos indicus cattle was not warranted, the efficiency of the collection process was affected by extraneous environmental conditions. PMID:14580649

  2. Large fog collectors: New strategies for collection efficiency and structural response to wind pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Robert; Rivera, Juan de Dios; de la Jara, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Most studies of large fog collectors (LFC) have focused on the collection efficiency, the amount of water collected, or economic and social aspects, but have not addressed the effects of strong winds on the system. Wind pressure is directly related to fog water collection efficiency but on the other hand may cause serious damage on the structure of LFCs. This study focuses in the effects of wind pressure on the components of the LFC as an integral system, and the ways to face strong winds with no significant damage. For this purpose we analysed cases of mechanical failure of LFCs both in our experimental station at Peña Blanca in Chile and elsewhere. The effects of wind pressure can be described as a sequence of physical processes, starting with the mesh deformation as a way of adapting to the induced stresses. For a big enough pressure, local stress concentrations generate a progressive rupture of the mesh. In cases where the mesh is sufficiently strong the wind force causes the partial or total collapse of the structure. Usually the weakest part is the mesh, especially close to where it is attached to the structure. The way the mesh is attached to the frame or cable of the structure is particularly important since it can induce significant stress concentrations. Mesh failure before the structure failure may be considered as a mechanical fuse, since it is cheaper to repair. However, more practical mechanical fuses can be conceived. In relation to structural performance and water collection efficiency, we propose a new design strategy that considers a three-dimensional spatial display of the collection screen, oblique incidence angle of wind on mesh and small mesh area between the supporting frame. The proposed design strategies consider both the wind pressure on mesh and structure and the collection efficiency as an integral solution for the LFC. These new design strategies are the final output of this research. Applying these strategies a multi-funnel LFC is

  3. Comparison of collection and land use efficiency for various solar concentrating field geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Kyle; Angel, J. Roger P.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we analyze the effects of neighbor shadowing of tracking solar photovoltaic arrays when they are set out in solar farms for large scale generation. Closer tracker spacing yields more power per unit area of land, but less power per tracking unit because of shadowing. A model has been developed to quantify and compare efficiencies for different tracker aspect ratios and field layouts, on an hourly, daily and annual basis. The model accounts for atmospheric absorption as well as neighbor shadowing at low solar altitude angles. We have focused on the case of CPV arrays which are oriented normal to the rays from the sun. The field layout is best characterized by the ratio of total array area to land area (the ground cover ratio or GCR). We explore as a function of GCR both the fraction of all the direct sunlight energy that is intercepted by the arrays (the irradiance collection efficiency) and the energy lost by each array because of shadowing. Examples are worked out for rectangular arrays on dual axis trackers at 33° latitude. We find that for a ground cover ratio of 30% the annual irradiance collection efficiency is 50%, almost independent of the layout pattern or the array aspect ratio. For a ground cover ratio of 40%, the irradiance collection efficiency rises to 65%. The corresponding shadowing losses do depend on aspect ratio, thus for 30% GCR the annual average of shadowing loss is 7.2% for 3:1 aspect ratio, rising to 7.8% for 2:1 aspect ratio. High GCR is not realizable for higher aspect ratios, which lead to large swing radius, but for 2:1 aspect ratio 40% GCR results in shadowing loss of 11.5%. One conclusion is that a solar farm with arrays of 2:1 aspect ratio set out with 40% GCR is good compromise when land is scarce: 64% of all the direct sunlight energy incident on the land is harvested by the arrays, with only 11.5% shadowing loss. We have compared these efficiencies with those for trough CSP systems, which also harvest direct sunlight

  4. Assessing the impact of anthropogenic pollution on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation in PM2.5 collected from the Birmingham, Alabama, ground site during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Chu, Kevin; Hapsari Budisulistiorini, Sri; Riva, Matthieu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Edgerton, Eric S.; Baumann, Karsten; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Guo, Hongyu; King, Laura; Weber, Rodney J.; Neff, Miranda E.; Stone, Elizabeth A.; Offenberg, John H.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    In the southeastern US, substantial emissions of isoprene from deciduous trees undergo atmospheric oxidation to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that contributes to fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Laboratory studies have revealed that anthropogenic pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and aerosol acidity, can enhance SOA formation from the hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of isoprene; however, the mechanisms by which specific pollutants enhance isoprene SOA in ambient PM2.5 remain unclear. As one aspect of an investigation to examine how anthropogenic pollutants influence isoprene-derived SOA formation, high-volume PM2.5 filter samples were collected at the Birmingham, Alabama (BHM), ground site during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Sample extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) with prior trimethylsilylation and ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) to identify known isoprene SOA tracers. Tracers quantified using both surrogate and authentic standards were compared with collocated gas- and particle-phase data as well as meteorological data provided by the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network to assess the impact of anthropogenic pollution on isoprene-derived SOA formation. Results of this study reveal that isoprene-derived SOA tracers contribute a substantial mass fraction of organic matter (OM) ( ˜ 7 to ˜ 20 %). Isoprene-derived SOA tracers correlated with sulfate (SO42-) (r2 = 0.34, n = 117) but not with NOx. Moderate correlations between methacrylic acid epoxide and hydroxymethyl-methyl-α-lactone (together abbreviated MAE/HMML)-derived SOA tracers with nitrate radical production (P[NO3]) (r2 = 0.57, n = 40) were observed during nighttime, suggesting a potential role of the NO3 radical in

  5. Bacterial communities in urban aerosols collected with wetted-wall cyclonic samplers and seasonal fluctuations of live and culturable airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Hernlem, Bradley J; Sarreal, Chester Z; Mandrell, Robert E

    2012-02-01

    Airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens from point sources (e.g., ranches, dairy waste treatment facilities) to areas of food production (farms) has been suspected. Determining the incidence, transport and viability of extremely low levels of pathogens require collection of high volumes of air and characterization of live bacteria from aerosols. We monitored the numbers of culturable bacteria in urban aerosols on 21 separate days during a 9 month period using high volume cyclonic samplers at an elevation of 6 m above ground level. Culturable bacteria in aerosols fluctuated from 3 CFU to 6 million CFU/L of air per hour and correlated significantly with changes in seasonal temperatures, but not with humidity or wind speed. Concentrations of viable bacteria determined by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry correlated significantly with culturable bacteria. Members of the phylum Proteobacteria constituted 98% of the bacterial community, which was characterized using 16S rRNA gene sequencing using DNA from aerosols. Aquabacterium sp., previously characterized from aquatic environments, represented 63% of all clones and the second most common were Burkholderia sp; these are ubiquitous in nature and some are potential human pathogens. Whole genome amplification prior to sequencing resulted in a substantial decrease in species diversity compared to characterizing culturable bacteria sorted by flow cytometry based on scatter signals. Although 27 isolated colonies were characterized, we were able to culture 38% of bacteria characterized by sequencing. The whole genome amplification method amplified DNA preferentially from Phyllobacterium myrsinacearum, a minor member of the bacterial communities, whereas Variovorax paradoxus dominated the cultured organisms. PMID:22193549

  6. Turbulent flow model for vapor collection efficiency of a high-purity silicon reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R.; Gould, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model and a computer code based on this model was developed to allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors for converting gaseous silicon compounds to condensed-phase silicon. Specifically, the model formulated describes the silicon vapor separation/collection from the developing turbulent flow stream within reactors of the Westinghouse type. Migration of the silicon vapor to the reactor walls was described by the parametric solutions presented here, in order to reduce the experimentation necessary in the design of such reactors. Calculations relating to the collection efficiencies of such reactors are presented as a function of the reactor throughflow and distance along its length.

  7. Building America Case Study: Apartment Compartmentalization with an Aerosol-Based Sealing Process - Queens, NY; Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    Air sealing of building enclosures is a difficult and time-consuming process. Current methods in new construction require laborers to physically locate small and sometimes large holes in multiple assemblies and then manually seal each of them. The innovation demonstrated under this research study was the automated air sealing and compartmentalization of buildings through the use of an aerosolized sealant, developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at University of California Davis.
    CARB sought to demonstrate this new technology application in a multifamily building in Queens, NY. The effectiveness of the sealing process was evaluated by three methods: air leakage testing of overall apartment before and after sealing, point-source testing of individual leaks, and pressure measurements in the walls of the target apartment during sealing. Aerosolized sealing was successful by several measures in this study. Many individual leaks that are labor-intensive to address separately were well sealed by the aerosol particles. In addition, many diffuse leaks that are difficult to identify and treat were also sealed. The aerosol-based sealing process resulted in an average reduction of 71% in air leakage across three apartments and an average apartment airtightness of 0.08 CFM50/SF of enclosure area.

  8. Aerosol Optical Properties Measured Onboard the Ronald H. Brown During ACE Asia as a Function of Aerosol Chemical Composition and Source Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Bates, T. S.; Welton, E. J.; Covert, D. S.; Miller, T. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Maria, S.; Russell, L.; Arimoto, R.

    2004-01-01

    During the ACE Asia intensive field campaign conducted in the spring of 2001 aerosol properties were measured onboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown to study the effects of the Asian aerosol on atmospheric chemistry and climate in downwind regions. Aerosol properties measured in the marine boundary layer included chemical composition; number size distribution; and light scattering, hemispheric backscattering, and absorption coefficients. In addition, optical depth and vertical profiles of aerosol 180 deg backscatter were measured. Aerosol within the ACE Asia study region was found to be a complex mixture resulting from marine, pollution, volcanic, and dust sources. Presented here as a function of air mass source region are the mass fractions of the dominant aerosol chemical components, the fraction of the scattering measured at the surface due to each component, mass scattering efficiencies of the individual components, aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients, single scattering albedo, Angstrom exponents, optical depth, and vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. All results except aerosol optical depth and the vertical profiles of aerosol extinction are reported at a relative humidity of 55 +/- 5%. An over-determined data set was collected so that measured and calculated aerosol properties could be compared, internal consistency in the data set could be assessed, and sources of uncertainty could be identified. By taking into account non-sphericity of the dust aerosol, calculated and measured aerosol mass and scattering coefficients agreed within overall experimental uncertainties. Differences between measured and calculated aerosol absorption coefficients were not within reasonable uncertainty limits, however, and may indicate the inability of Mie theory and the assumption of internally mixed homogeneous spheres to predict absorption by the ACE Asia aerosol. Mass scattering efficiencies of non-sea salt sulfate aerosol, sea salt, submicron particulate organic

  9. A standardized technique for efficient platelet and leukocyte collection using the Model 30 Blood Processor.

    PubMed

    Aisner, J; Schiffer, C A; Wolff, J H; Wiernik, P H

    1976-01-01

    The Model 30 Blood Processor is a safe and simple means of harvesting blood cell components. Presently cell collection depends on a visual assessment by the operator of the indistinct boundaries of cell fractions. To determine when each cell component could best be harvested, serial samples were taken from the output port at fixed intervals anf the results of counts and differentials were graphed and tabulated. Studies in normal donors were done using acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD), 2 per cent sodium citrate in 6 per cent hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or heparin as anticoagulants. There was considerable overlap between the latter part of the platelet band, the leukocyte band and the rising hematocrit with all three anticoagulants. Normally functional lymphocytes could be harvested efficiently (approximately 80%) using ACD or heparin. Platelets could be harvested from ACD very efficiently (approximately 90%). Granulocytes could not be harvested from ACD (less than 10%) since they were dispersed in the red blood cell (RBC) layer. Using HES, granulocytes could be harvested efficiently (approximately 70%) by extending collection into the RBC layer. Based on these data, a standard technique for cell collection has been devised. The flow rate is slowed to 20 ml/min and collection is carried 30 ml (90 seconds at a rate of 20 ml/min) for platelets. The RBC loss is approximately 6 to 8 and 2 to 3 ml/pass respectively. These studies indicate that the Model 30 is a highly efficient apparatus for blood cell separation, but the volume of blood processed is limited by the intermittent blood flow. PMID:62425

  10. Collection efficiency of various airborne spray flux samplers used in aerial application research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low air speed, spray dispersion tunnel was constructed and used to evaluate the collection efficiency of passive spray flux collectors. The dispersion tunnel utilizes an air-assisted nozzle to generate a spray cloud with a DV0.5 of 18.5 (±0.4) µm at air speeds ranging from 0.45-4.0 m/sec. A samp...

  11. 3D imaging of radiation damage in silicon sensor and spatial mapping of charge collection efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, M.; Jakubek, J.; Zemlicka, J.; Platkevic, M.; Havranek, V.; Semian, V.

    2013-03-01

    Radiation damage in semiconductor sensors alters the response and degrades the performance of many devices ultimately limiting their stability and lifetime. In semiconductor radiation detectors the homogeneity of charge collection becomes distorted while decreasing the overall detection efficiency. Moreover the damage can significantly increase the detector noise and degrade other electrical properties such as leakage current. In this work we present a novel method for 3D mapping of the semiconductor radiation sensor volume allowing displaying the three dimensional distribution of detector properties such as charge collection efficiency and charge diffusion rate. This technique can visualize the spatially localized changes of local detector performance after radiation damage. Sensors used were 300 μm and 1000 μm thick silicon bump-bonded to a Timepix readout chip which serves as an imaging multichannel microprobe (256 × 256 square pixels with pitch of 55 μm, i.e. all together 65 thousand channels). Per pixel energy sensitivity of the Timepix chip allows to evaluate the local charge collection efficiency and also the charge diffusion rate. In this work we implement an X-ray line scanning technique for systematic evaluation of changes in the performance of a silicon sensor intentionally damaged by energetic protons.

  12. Light collection optimization for composite photoanode in dye-sensitized solar cells: Towards higher efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X. Z.; Shen, W. Z.

    2015-06-14

    Composite photoanode comprising nanoparticles and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure is a promising alternative to conventional photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Besides fast electron transport channels, the 1D nanostructure also plays as light scattering centers. Here, we theoretically investigate the light scattering properties of capsule-shaped 1D nanostructure and their influence on the light collection of DSCs. It is found that the far-field light scattering of a single capsule depends on its volume, shape, and orientation: capsules with bigger equivalent spherical diameter, smaller aspect ratio, and horizontal orientation demonstrate stronger light scattering especially at large scattering angle. Using Monte Carlo approach, we simulated and optimized the light harvesting efficiency of the cell. Two multilayer composite photoanodes containing orderly or randomly oriented capsules are proposed. DSCs composed of these two photoanodes are promising for higher efficiencies because of their efficient light collection and superior electron collection. These results will provide practical guidance to the design and optimization of the photoanodes for DSCs.

  13. Efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms collected on polymer organic film in vapor-cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atutov, S. N.; Chubakov, V. P.; Chubakov, P. A.; Plekhanov, A. I.

    2011-04-01

    The efficiency of photodesorption of Rb atoms previously collected on polymer organic film has been studied in detail. This study was carried out in a Pyrex glass cell of which the inner surface was covered with (poly)dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film and illuminated by a powerful flash lamp. The desorption dynamic of the Rb atoms density in the cell caused by the illumination and percentage of desorbed atoms was studied by using of Rb resonance lamp and free running diode laser as sources of probing light. It was determined that 85 percent collected chemical active Rb atoms and stored during 16 s in the closed cell, 75 percent in the pumped cell can be desorbed by single flash of the lamp. The number of stored atoms decays with a characteristic time of 60 min in isolated cell and with a time 12.4 min in a pumped cell. We believe that this efficient method of collection and fast realization of atoms or molecules could be used for enhancement of sensitivity of existed sensors for the trace detection of various elements (including toxic or radioactive ones) which is important to environmental applications, medicine or in geology. The effect might help to construct an efficient light-driven atomic source for a magneto-optical trap in a case of extremely low vapor density or very weak flux of atoms, such as artificial radioactive alkali atoms.

  14. Measurement of the ambient organic aerosol volatility distribution: application during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment (FAME-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Kostenidou, E.; Hildebrandt, L.; Riipinen, I.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Decarlo, P. F.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-12-01

    A variable residence time thermodenuder (TD) was combined with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to measure the volatility distribution of aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment in May of 2008 (FAME-2008). A new method for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility distribution was developed combining measurements of all three instruments together with an aerosol dynamics model. Challenges in the interpretation of ambient thermodenuder-AMS measurements include the potential resistances to mass transfer during particle evaporation, the effects of particle size on the evaporated mass fraction, the changes in the AMS collection efficiency and particle density as the particles evaporate partially in the TD, and finally potential losses inside the TD. Our proposed measurement and data analysis method accounts for all of these problems combining the AMS and SMPS measurements. The AMS collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the TD was found to be approximately 10% lower than the collection efficiency of the aerosol that passed through the bypass. The organic aerosol measured at Finokalia is approximately 2 or more orders of magnitude less volatile than fresh laboratory-generated monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene under low NOx conditions) secondary organic aerosol. This low volatility is consistent with its highly oxygenated AMS mass spectrum. The results are found to be highly sensitive to the mass accommodation coefficient of the evaporating species. This analysis is based on the assumption that there were no significant reactions taking place inside the thermodenuder.

  15. An Efficient Quantum Private Comparison of Equality over Collective-Noise Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Hung; Hwang, Tzonelih; Gope, Prosanta

    2016-04-01

    This article proposes a collective-noise resistant QPC protocol with the help of an almostdishonest third party (TP) who may try to perform any sort of attacks to derive participants' private secrets except colluding with any participant. The proposed scheme has some considerable advantages over the state-of-the-art QPC protocols over collective-noise channels, where it does not require any pre-shared key between the participants (Alice and Bob). Nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist Trojan horse attacks without consuming half of the transmitted qubits and any additional equipment (wavelength filter and PNS) support. As a consequence, the proposed QPC protocol can guarantee higher qubit efficiency as compared to the others over collective noise channels.

  16. Optical Design Considerations for Efficient Light Collection from Liquid Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L.; Fuller, Erin S.; Keillor, Martin E.; Morley, Shannon M.; Mullen, Crystal A.; Orrell, John L.; Panisko, Mark E.; Warren, Glen A.; Wright, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation light produced as a result of the dissolved material under study interacting with the scintillation cocktail. For reliable operation the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low background liquid scintillation counters additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in the laboratory and within the instruments construction materials. Low background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting in a low background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high sensitivity liquid scintillation counting system.

  17. Optical design considerations for efficient light collection from liquid scintillation counters.

    PubMed

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Douglas, Matthew; Erchinger, Jennifer L; Fuller, Erin S; Keillor, Martin E; Morley, Shannon M; Mullen, Crystal A; Orrell, John L; Panisko, Mark E; Warren, Glen A; Wright, Michael E

    2015-03-20

    Liquid scintillation counters measure charged particle-emitting radioactive isotopes and are used for environmental studies, nuclear chemistry, and life science. Alpha and beta emissions arising from the material under study interact with the scintillation cocktail to produce light. The prototypical liquid scintillation counter employs low-level photon-counting detectors to measure the arrival of the scintillation. For reliable operation, the counting instrument must convey the scintillation light to the detectors efficiently and predictably. Current best practices employ the use of two or more detectors for coincidence processing to discriminate true scintillation events from background events due to instrumental effects such as photomultiplier tube dark rates, tube flashing, or other light emission not generated in the scintillation cocktail vial. In low-background liquid scintillation counters, additional attention is paid to shielding the scintillation cocktail from naturally occurring radioactive material present in the laboratory and within the instrument's construction materials. Low-background design is generally at odds with optimal light collection. This study presents the evolution of a light collection design for liquid scintillation counting (LSC) in a low-background shield. The basic approach to achieve both good light collection and a low-background measurement is described. The baseline signals arising from the scintillation vial are modeled and methods to efficiently collect scintillation light are presented as part of the development of a customized low-background, high-sensitivity LSC system. PMID:25968530

  18. Collection efficiency for millimeter and submillimeter wave antenna-coupled detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuancheng; Lail, Brian A.

    2015-05-01

    The goal in the design of an efficient and low-noise antenna coupled receiver is to achieve a maximal capture cross section for the incident electromagnetic radiation compared to the dimensions of the sub-wavelength sized sensor loading the antenna. Collection efficiency captures this concept of power output/input and is made up of several subefficiencies. In the ideal case all of the available, incident power is collected and transferred to the load. However, many of the fundamental limits of antennas are based on theory describing the transmitting mode, whereas certain questions remain open for receiving antennas. Textbook antenna theory predicts that only 50% of available incident power can be absorbed by an antenna, yet under specific conditions this limitation can be surpassed. Two considerations are presented; (1) fundamental limits on antenna absorption, and (2) practical participation of dissipative media in achieving impedance matching between antenna and load, and the associated performance compromise. Specifically we seek to determine whether antenna-coupled detectors can approach unity absorption efficiency under matched conditions. Further, we identify practical conditions that must be met in order to overcome fundamental limitations that inhibit total absorption. Then antenna loss is split into radiative and dissipative terms in order to identify trade-offs between impedance matching and radiation efficiency.

  19. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-01-01

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into the Blu-Ice/DCSS experimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. Crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. PMID:26894529

  20. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-01-01

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. Crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  1. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Elizabeth L; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O; Bonagura, Christopher A; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F; Fraser, James S; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Kruse, Andrew C; Larsson, Karl M; Lemke, Heinrik T; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S; Soltis, S M; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I; Woldeyes, Rahel A; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E

    2016-01-01

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into the Blu-Ice/DCSS experimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. Crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. PMID:26894529

  2. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; et al

    2015-11-03

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassettemore » or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. As a result, crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.« less

  3. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2015-11-03

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. As a result, crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  4. CPAC: Energy-Efficient Data Collection through Adaptive Selection of Compression Algorithms for Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, HyungJune; Kim, HyunSeok; Chang, Ik Joon

    2014-01-01

    We propose a technique to optimize the energy efficiency of data collection in sensor networks by exploiting a selective data compression. To achieve such an aim, we need to make optimal decisions regarding two aspects: (1) which sensor nodes should execute compression; and (2) which compression algorithm should be used by the selected sensor nodes. We formulate this problem into binary integer programs, which provide an energy-optimal solution under the given latency constraint. Our simulation results show that the optimization algorithm significantly reduces the overall network-wide energy consumption for data collection. In the environment having a stationary sink from stationary sensor nodes, the optimized data collection shows 47% energy savings compared to the state-of-the-art collection protocol (CTP). More importantly, we demonstrate that our optimized data collection provides the best performance in an intermittent network under high interference. In such networks, we found that the selective compression for frequent packet retransmissions saves up to 55% energy compared to the best known protocol. PMID:24721763

  5. Laser-based directed release of array elements for efficient collection into targeted microwells.

    PubMed

    Dobes, Nicholas C; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Henley, W Hampton; Ramsey, J Michael; Sims, Christopher E; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-02-21

    A cell separation strategy capable of the systematic isolation and collection of moderate to large numbers (25-400) of single cells into a targeted microwell is demonstrated. An array of microfabricated, releasable, transparent micron-scale pedestals termed pallets and an array of microwells in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were mated to enable selective release and retrieval of individual cells. Cells cultured on a pallet array mounted on a custom designed stage permitted the array to be positioned independently of the microwell locations. Individual pallets containing cells were detached in a targeted fashion using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The location of the laser focal point was optimized to transfer individual pallets to designated microwells. In a large-scale sort (n = 401), the accuracy, defined as placing a pallet in the intended well, was 94% and the collection efficiency was 100%. Multiple pallets were observed in only 4% of the targeted wells. In cell sorting experiments, the technique provided a yield and purity of target cells identified by their fluorescence signature of 91% and 93%, respectively. Cell viability based on single-cell cloning efficiency at 72 h post collection was 77%. PMID:23223411

  6. Laser-Based Directed Release of Array Elements for Efficient Collection into Targeted Microwells

    PubMed Central

    Dobes, Nicholas C.; Dhopeshwarkar, Rahul; Henley, W. Hampton; Ramsey, J. Michael; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    A cell separation strategy capable of the systematic isolation and collection of moderate to large numbers (25–400) of single cells into a targeted microwell is demonstrated. An array of microfabricated, releasable, transparent micron-scale pedestals termed pallets and an array of microwells in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were mated to enable selective release and retrieval of individual cells. Cells cultured on a pallet array mounted on a custom designed stage permitted the array to be positioned independently of the microwell locations. Individual pallets containing cells were detached in a targeted fashion using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The location of the laser focal point was optimized to transfer individual pallets to designated microwells. In a large-scale sort (n = 401), the accuracy, defined as placing a pallet in the intended well, was 94% and the collection efficiency was 100%. Multiple pallets were observed in only 4% of the targeted wells. In cell sorting experiments, the technique provided a yield and purity of target cells identified by their fluorescence signature of 91% and 93%, respectively. Cell viability based on single-cell cloning efficiency at 72 h post collection was 77%. PMID:23223411

  7. Collection efficiency model based on boundary-layer characteristics for cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, W.S.; Lee, J.W.

    1997-10-01

    In cyclones, the boundary layer formed on the collecting-wall surface acts as a barrier for particle migration toward the wall due to a decreased centrifugal force on particles inside the boundary layer. A new theory for high-efficiency cyclones based on the boundary-layer characteristics is presented. The cyclone was divided into two regions: the turbulent-core region where the centrifugal force is large, and the near-wall region where the centrifugal force is small. Particle trajectories in the turbulent-core region are calculated from the mean fluid motion based on the quasi-steady drag assumption, and the collection probability of particles in the near-wall region is calculated by the deposition velocity that results from both turbulent diffusion and centrifugal force. The deposition velocity by centrifugal force was assumed equal to the equilibrium migration velocity at a certain point inside the boundary layer, and the distance to that point from the wall is assumed to be linearly proportional to the dimensionless-particle relaxation time. When the proportional constant was determined by fitting the theoretical results to experimental data, the theory showed an excellent enhancement in predicting the variation of collection efficiency with the inlet flow velocity and particle size.

  8. Bioaerosol sampling for the detection of aerosolized influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Blachere, Francoise M.; Lindsley, William G.; Slaven, James E.; Green, Brett J.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Chen, Bean T.; Beezhold, Don H.

    2007-01-01

    Background Influenza virus was used to characterize the efficacy of a cyclone‐based, two‐stage personal bioaerosol sampler for the collection and size fractionation of aerosolized viral particles. Methods A Collison single‐jet nebulizer was used to aerosolize the attenuated FluMist® vaccine into a calm‐air settling chamber. Viral particles were captured with bioaerosol samplers that utilize 2 microcentrifuge tubes to collect airborne particulates. The first tube (T1) collects particles greater than 1.8 μm in diameter, while the second tube (T2) collects particles between 1.0 and 1.8 μm, and the back‐up filter (F) collects submicron particles. Following aerosolization, quantitative PCR was used to detect and quantify H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains. Results Based on qPCR results, we demonstrate that aerosolized viral particles were efficiently collected and separated according to aerodynamic size using the two‐stage bioaerosol sampler. Most viral particles were collected in T2 (1‐1.8 μm) and on the back‐up filter (< 1 μm) of the bioaerosol sampler. Furthermore, we found that the detection of viral particles with the two‐stage sampler was directly proportional to the collection time. Consequently, viral particle counts were significantly greater at 40 minutes in comparison to 5, 10 and 20 minute aerosol collection points. Conclusions Due to a lack of empirical data, aerosol transmission of influenza is often questioned. Using FluMist®, we demonstrated that a newly developed bioaerosol sampler is able to recover and size fractionate aerosolized viral particles. This sampler should be an important tool for studying viral transmission in clinical settings and may significantly contribute towards understanding the modes of influenza virus transmission. PMID:19453416

  9. Hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter extracted from biomass burning aerosols collected at a rural site in Tanzania, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Mkoma, Stelyus; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we present the hygroscopic behavior of water-soluble matter (WSM) extracted from biomass burning derived particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) aerosols collected at a rural background site in Tanzania during June-August 2011. Hygroscopic growth factors, g(RH), of WSM were measured by hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA) with an initial dry particle diameter of 100 nm. We observed that the g(RH) of WSM at 90% relative humidity (RH), g(90%)WSM, ranged from 1.10 to 1.47 with an average of 1.25 ± 0.12. The H-TDMA retrieved hygroscopicity parameter of WSM, κWSM, ranged from 0.04 to 0.24 with a mean of 0.11 ± 0.07. We found that the observed g(90%)WSM is positively correlated with PM2.5 mass fractions of K+ (R2 = 0.61), Cl- (0.54), and organic carbon (0.58). Moreover, it well correlates with levoglucosan (0.67) and total diacids (0.76), implying that although the inorganic fraction may be the most important factor to control the hygroscopicity; biomass burning organics play a significant role in the hygroscopicity of Tanzanian aerosols. The lower growth factors obtained over the sampling site are probably due to the formation of less water-soluble potassium oxalate (K2C2O4) or less hygroscopic K2SO4 particles during atmospheric aging. We observed a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.33) between PM2.5 mass fraction of WSOC and g(90%)WSM. The retrieved g(90%)WSOM values ranged from 1.0 to 1.25 with a mean of 1.16 ± 0.05. This study demonstrates that the hygroscopicity of Tanzanian aerosols is largely controlled by the emission of biomass burning products and the subsequent chemical aging during atmospheric transport.

  10. Vegetation collection efficiency of ultrafine particles: From single fiber to porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Yeng; Khlystov, Andrey; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2014-01-01

    A number of parameterization schemes are available to determine the collection efficiency of ultrafine particles (UFP) onto vegetated surfaces. One approach represents the vegetated elements as a fibrous filter with a characteristic fiber size that is difficult to a priori determine, while the other, a more conventional approach, represents vegetation as a porous medium. To date, no attempts have been made to compare the performance of these two distinct approaches or bridge them so as to show the necessary conditions leading to their potential equivalence. In a wind tunnel study, the UFP collection efficiencies of pine branches at five different wind speeds, two branch orientations, and two packing densities were measured and analyzed using these two vegetation representations. This vegetation type was selected because pines are a dominant species in the Southeastern United States and pine needles geometrically resemble fibrous material with a well-defined foliage diameter. The porous media and the fibrous filter representations described well observed UFP deposition at the branch scale. Conditions promoting their equivalence are thus explored. The difficult to determine effective fiber diameter was recovered from conventional canopy attributes such as the leaf area index by matching the collection efficiencies of UFP for the two vegetation representations. These results provide a working "aerodynamic" definition of the effective single-fiber diameter thereby rendering the simplified single-fiber formulation usable in large-scale atmospheric deposition models. Furthermore, the aerodynamic correction factor allows upscaling of pine needles to an effective leaf area index and provides some quantification of the effect of needle spatial clustering on UFP deposition. The applicability of the results to other vegetation species remains to be verified.

  11. Measurement of the Charge Collection Efficiency After Heavy Non-Uniform Irradiation in BABAR Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Calderini, G.; Forti, F.; Marchiori, G.; Rizzo, G.; Giorgi, M.A.; Bosisio, L.; Dittongo, S.; Campagnari, C.; /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-03-01

    We have investigated the depletion voltage changes, leakage current increase and charge collection efficiency of a silicon microstrip detector identical to those used in the inner layers of the BABAR Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) after heavy nonuniform irradiation. A full SVT module with the front-end electronics connected has been irradiated with a 0.9 GeV electron beam up to a peak fluence of 3.5 x 10{sup 14} e{sup -}/cm{sup 2}, well beyond the level causing substrate type inversion. We have irradiated the silicon with a nonuniform profile having {sigma} = 1.4 mm that simulates the conditions encountered in the BABAR experiment by the modules intersecting the horizontal machine plane. The position dependence of the charge collection properties and the depletion voltage have been investigated in detail using a 1060 nm LED and an innovative measuring technique based only on the digital output of the chip.

  12. Three-dimensional diamond detectors: Charge collection efficiency of graphitic electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S. Parrini, G.; Sciortino, S.; Bellini, M.; Gorelli, F.; Santoro, M.; Corsi, C.

    2013-12-02

    Implementation of 3D-architectures in diamond detectors promises to achieve unreached performances in the radiation-harsh environment of future high-energy physics experiments. This work reports on the collection efficiency under β-irradiation of graphitic 3D-electrodes, created by laser pulses in the domains of nanoseconds (ns-made-sensors) and femtoseconds (fs-made-sensors). Full collection is achieved with the fs-made-sensors, while a loss of 25%–30% is found for the ns-made-sensors. The peculiar behaviour of ns-made sensors has been explained by the presence of a nano-structured sp{sup 3}-carbon layer around the graphitic electrodes, evidenced by micro-Raman imaging, by means of a numerical model of the charge transport near the electrodes.

  13. Lensed fiber-optic probe design for efficient photon collection in scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Youngjae; Shin, Younghoon; Lee, Dasol; Altarejos, Judith Y.; Chung, Euiheon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Measurement of bioluminescent or fluorescent optical reporters with an implanted fiber-optic probe is a promising approach to allow real-time monitoring of molecular and cellular processes in conscious behaving animals. Technically, this approach relies on sensitive light detection due to the relatively limited light signal and inherent light attenuation in scattering tissue. In this paper, we show that specific geometries of lensed fiber probes improve photon collection in turbid tissue such as brain. By employing Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurement, we demonstrate that hemispherical- and axicon-shaped lensed fibers increase collection efficiency by up to 2-fold when compared with conventional bare fiber. Additionally we provide theoretical evidence that axicon lenses with specific angles improve photon collection over a wider axial range while conserving lateral collection when compared to hemispherical lensed fiber. These findings could guide the development of a minimally-invasive highly sensitive fiber optic-based light signal monitoring technique and may have broad implications such as fiber-based detection used in diffuse optical spectroscopy. PMID:25657886

  14. Collecting efficiency of a cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer with preretarding lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1974-01-01

    The electron collecting efficiency of a cylindrical mirror energy analyzer incorporating retardation of the electrons prior to analysis has been determined over the range 0 to 30 eV by two methods. The first method requires the use of a vacuum ultraviolet monochromator to produce monoenergetic electrons of different energies; the second method involves measuring the energy-brightness relationship of the retarding optics and should be applicable to any deflection analyzer with pre-retarding optics. The results of the two methods are compared and the limitations of the latter method are discussed.

  15. Collecting efficiency of a cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer with pre-retarding lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, J. L.; Samson, J. A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The electron collecting efficiency of a cylindrical mirror energy analyzer incorporating retardation of the electrons prior to analysis has been determined over the range 0 to 30 eV by two methods. The first method requires the use of a vacuum ultraviolet monochromator to produce monoenergetic electrons of different energies; the second method involves measuring the energy-brightness relationship of the retarding optics and should be applicable to any deflection analyzer with pre-retarding optics. The results of the two methods are compared and the limitations of the latter method are discussed.

  16. Competition-Driven Network Dynamics: Emergence of a Scale-Free Leadership Structure and Collective Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, M.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Bassler, Kevin E.; Korniss, G.

    2004-02-01

    Using the minority game as a model for competition dynamics, we investigate the effects of interagent communications across a network on the global evolution of the game. Agent communication across this network leads to the formation of an influence network, which is dynamically coupled to the evolution of the game, and it is responsible for the information flow driving the agents' actions. We show that the influence network spontaneously develops hubs with a broad distribution of in-degrees, defining a scale-free robust leadership structure. Furthermore, in realistic parameter ranges, facilitated by information exchange on the network, agents can generate a high degree of cooperation making the collective almost maximally efficient.

  17. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  18. Single-particle detection efficiencies of aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry during the North Atlantic marine boundary layer experiment.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M; Beddows, David C S; Freney, Evelyn J; Heal, Mathew R; Donovan, Robert J

    2006-08-15

    During the North Atlantic marine boundary layer experiment (NAMBLEX) sampling campaign at Mace Head, Ireland, both continental and maritime air masses were sampled. Aerosol was characterized both with a TSI 3800 time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and a MOUDI microorifice impactor, and particle number counts were measured independently with an aerodynamic particle sizer. The data have been analyzed in order to elucidate factors determining the particle detection efficiencies of the ATOFMS. These are broken down according to the efficiency of the inlet system, the hit efficiency on particles which enter the sensing zone of the instrument and the sensitivity of the measured ion signal to the chemical species. A substantial matrix effect depending on the chemical composition of the aerosol sampled at the time was found, which is reflected in variations in the hit efficiency of particles entering the sensing zone of the instrument with the main desorption-ionization laser. This is in addition to the strong inverse power-law dependence of inlet transmission efficiency on particle diameter. The variation in hit efficiency with particle type is likely attributable to differences in the energetics of laser energy absorption, ablation, and ion formation. However, once variations in both inlet transmission and hit efficiencies are taken into account, no additional matrix dependence of ATOFMS response is required to obtain a linear relationship between the ion signal and the concentration of a particular chemical species. The observations show that a constant mass of material is ionized from each particle, irrespective of size. Consequently the integrated ion signal for a given chemical component and particle size class needs to be increased by a factor related to the cube of particle diameter in order to correlate with the airborne mass of that component. PMID:16955903

  19. A COMPUTATIONALLY EFFICIENT HYBRID APPROACH FOR DYNAMIC GAS/AEROSOL TRANSFER IN AIR QUALITY MODELS. (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dynamic mass transfer methods have been developed to better describe the interaction of the aerosol population with semi-volatile species such as nitrate, ammonia, and chloride. Unfortunately, these dynamic methods are computationally expensive. Assumptions are often made to r...

  20. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  1. Analysis of factors affecting the light collection efficiency in CT detector: CWO+PIN diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sung W.; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ho K.; Cho, Gyuseong; Ahn, Seong Kyu; Goh, Sung Min; Lee, Yoon; Park, Jung Byung

    2002-05-01

    The solid-state detector(SSD) for X-CT consists of photodiode coupled to CdWO4$(CWO. It is important to maximize the light collection in respect of a patient's dose, radiation effect and X-ray efficiency. The factors affecting the light collection efficiency are analyzed and optimized by using experimental data and appropriate simulation code. Quantum nomogram is used to investigate the signal propagation characteristics of optimally designed solid-state detector and to ensure at which stage quantum sink occurs. This paper shows that the part of SSD, the CWO of treatment with ground top/ground side yields higher quanta than that of ground top/polish side, which is different from the result of previous studies. We also shows that optimum thickness of SiN passivation and p-layer is 0.12mm and 0.1mm, respectively. From the quantum nomogram calculated for optimal design, it is predicted that the most serious signal degradation occurs at the photodiode.

  2. In Situ Aerosol Optical Thickness Collected by the SIMBIOS Program (1997-2000): Protocols, and and Data QC and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fargion, Giulietta S.; Barnes, Robert; McClain, Charles

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technical report is to provide current documentation of the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project Office activities on in situ aerosol optical thickness (i.e., protocols, and data QC and analysis). This documentation is necessary to ensure that critical information is related to the scientific community and NASA management. This critical information includes the technical difficulties and challenges of validating and combining ocean color data from an array of independent satellite systems to form consistent and accurate global bio-optical time series products. This technical report is not meant as a substitute for scientific literature. Instead, it will provide a ready and responsive vehicle for the multitude of technical reports issued by an operational project.

  3. Efficient collection and cryopreservation of embryos in F344 strain inbred rats.

    PubMed

    Taketsuru, Hiroaki; Kaneko, Takehito

    2013-10-01

    In rats, it is now possible to produce genetically engineered strains, not only as transgenic animals but also using gene knockout techniques. Reproductive technologies have been used as indispensable tools to produce and maintain these novel valuable strains. Although studies for collecting and cryopreserving embryos have been reported using outbred rats, efficient methods have not been established in inbred strains. The F344 inbred strain is important in rat breeding and has been used for the production of transgenic/knockout strains and for genome sequencing. Here we studied the optimal conditions for oocyte collection by induction of superovulation, and the development of embryos after cryopreservation in F344 rats. The response to pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was examined by injection of 150 IU/kg PMSG + 75 IU/kg hCG or 300 IU/kg PMSG + 300 IU/kg hCG. Superovulation was achieved at high efficiency by an injection of 150 IU/kg PMSG + 75 IU/kg hCG. Furthermore, superovulation in this strain showed similar high response as Wistar rats. Of 2-cell embryos cryopreserved by vitrification in a solution containing 10% propylene glycol, 30% ethylene glycol, 20% Percoll and 0.3 M sucrose, more than 90% survived after warming and 32% developed to offspring. However, the freezability of pronuclear stage embryos was extremely low. This study demonstrated that sufficient unfertilized oocytes and embryos can be collected from F344 rats by the induction of superovulation with 150 IU/kg PMSG + 75 IU/kg hCG. Furthermore, cryopreservation of 2-cell embryos using this vitrification protocol can now be applied to maintaining valuable rat strains derived from the F344 inbred strain as genetic resources. PMID:23928269

  4. Dielectric Interface Effects on Surface Charge Accumulation and Collection towards High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yu-Che; Zang, Huidong; Ivanov, Ilia; Xu, Tao; Lu, Luyao; Yu, Luping; Hu, Bin

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports the experimental studies on the effects of dielectric thin-film on surface-charge accumulation and collection by using capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements under photoexcitation. The dielectric thin-films with different surface polarizations are used with inverted device architecture based on the common photovoltaic PTB7:PC71BM film. In the C-V measurements, the peak-voltage shift with light intensity, namely, Vpeak shift, is particularly used to determine the surface-charge accumulation. We find that the Vpeak shows a smaller shift with light intensity when a higher surface polarization of dielectric thin-film is used. This means that a higher surface polarization of dielectric thin-film can decrease the surface-charge accumulation at electrode interface. However, a lower surface polarization of dielectric thin-film leads to a larger shift with light intensity. This implies that a lower surface polarization of dielectric thin-film corresponds to a larger surface-charge accumulation. This experimental finding indicates that dielectric thin-film plays an important role in the surface-charge accumulation and collection in the generation of photocurrent in organic solar cells. We demonstrate that the device performance can reach the power conversion efficiency of 8.7% when a higher dielectric PFN is used to enhance the surface-charge collection based on the inverted design of ITO/PFN/PTB7:PC71BM/MoO3/Ag.

  5. High Efficiency Inverted Organic Solar Cells with a Neutral Fulleropyrrolidine Electron-Collecting Interlayer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; Yan, Congfei; Kan, Zhipeng; Wang, Yang; Lai, Wen-Yong; Huang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    A novel fulleropyrrolidine derivative, named FPNOH, was designed, synthesized, and utilized as an efficient electron-collecting (EC) layer for inverted organic solar cells (i-OSCs). The grafted diethanolamino-polar moieties can not only trigger its function as an EC interlayer, but also induce orthogonal solubility that guarantees subsequent multilayer processing without interfacial mixing. A higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 8.34% was achieved for i-OSC devices with ITO/FPNOH EC electrode, compared to that of the sol-gel ZnO based reference devices with an optimized PCE value of 7.92%. High efficiency exceeding 7.7% was still achieved even for the devices with a relatively thick FPNOH film (16.9 nm). It is worthwhile to mention that this kind of material exhibits less thickness dependent performance, in contrast to widely utilized p-type conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) as well as the nonconjugated polyelectrolytes (NCPEs). Further investigation on illuminating intensity dependent parameters revealed the role of FPNOH in reducing interfacial trap-induced recombination at the ITO/active layer interface. PMID:27197741

  6. Characterization of individual submicrometer aerosol particles collected in Incheon, Korea, by quantitative transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Hong; Kang, Sujin; Jung, Hae-Jin; ChoëL, Marie; Kim, Hyekyeong; Ro, Chul-Un

    2010-08-01

    For the last decade the Monte Carlo calculation method has been proven to be an excellent tool for accurately simulating electron-solid interactions in atmospheric individual particles of micrometer size. Although it was designed for application to scanning electron microscopy, in the present study it is demonstrated that the Monte Carlo calculation can also be applied in a quantitative single particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an ultrathin window energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometer with a high accelerating voltage (200 kV). By utilizing an iterative reverse Monte Carlo simulation combined with successive approximation, atomic elemental concentrations (including low-Z elements) of submicrometer standard particles were determined with high accuracy for electron beam refractory particles such as NaCl, KCl, SiO2, Fe2O3, Na2SO4, K2SO4, CaCO3, and CaSO4. On the basis of quantitative X-ray analysis together with morphological information from TEM images, overall 1638 submicrometer individual particles from 10 sets of aerosol samples collected in Incheon, Korea, were identified. The most frequently encountered particle types are carbonaceous and (NH4)2SO4/NH4HSO4-containing particles, followed by mineral (e.g., aluminosilicate, SiO2, CaCO3), sea salt, K-rich (e.g., K2SO4 and KCl), Fe-rich, fly ash, and transition or heavy-metal-containing (e.g., ZnSO4, ZnCl2, PbSO4) particles. The relative abundances of the submicrometer particle types vary among samples collected in different seasons and also depend on different air mass transport routes. This study demonstrates that the quantitative TEM-EDX individual particle analysis is a useful and reliable technique in characterizing urban submicrometer aerosol particles.

  7. Contact freezing efficiency of mineral dust aerosols studied in an electrodynamic balance: quantitative size and temperature dependence for illite particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Contact freezing has long been discussed as a candidate for cloud ice formation at temperatures warmer than about -25 degrees C, but until now the molecular mechanism underlying this process has remained obscure and little quantitative information about the size and temperature dependent contact freezing properties of the various aerosol species is available. In this contribution, we present the first quantitative measurements of the freezing probability of a supercooled droplet upon a single contact with a size selected illite mineral particle. It is found that this probability is a strong function of temperature and aerosol particle size. For the particles investigated and on the minute time scale of the experiment, contact freezing indeed dominates immersion freezing for all temperatures. PMID:24601013

  8. Efficient isolation of multiphoton processes and detection of collective resonances in dilute samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Lukas; Binz, Marcel; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A phase modulation technique to sensitively and selectively isolate multiple-quantum coherences in a femtosecond pump-probe setup is presented. By detecting incoherent observables and incorporating lock-in amplification, even weak signals of highly dilute samples can be acquired. Applying this method, efficient isolation of one- and two-photon quantum beats in a rubidium-doped helium droplet beam experiment is demonstrated and collective resonances are observed in a potassium vapor for the first time up to fourth order. Our approach provides promising perspectives for coherent time-resolved experiments in the deep UV and multidimensional spectroscopy schemes, in particular when mass-selective detection of particles in dilute gas-phase targets is possible.

  9. Plasmon-mediated emergence of collective emission and enhanced quantum efficiency in quantum dot films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, M.; Mukherjee, Arnab; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Basu, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results on monolayer colloidal cadmium selenide quantum dot films embedded with tiny gold nanoparticles. By varying the density of the embedded gold nanoparticles, we were able to engineer a plasmon-mediated crossover from emission quenching to enhancement regime at interparticle distances for which only quenching of emission is expected. This crossover and a nonmonotonic variation of photoluminescence intensity and decay rate, in experiments, is explained in terms of a model for plasmon-mediated collective emission of quantum emitters which points to the emergence of a new regime in plasmon-exciton interactions. The presented methodology to achieve enhancement in optical quantum efficiency for optimal doping of gold nanoparticles in such ultrathin high-density quantum dot films can be beneficial for new-generation displays and photodetectors.

  10. AEROSOL PARTICLE COLLECTOR DESIGN STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-09-27

    A computational evaluation of a particle collector design was performed to evaluate the behavior of aerosol particles in a fast flowing gas stream. The objective of the work was to improve the collection efficiency of the device while maintaining a minimum specified air throughput, nominal collector size, and minimal power requirements. The impact of a range of parameters was considered subject to constraints on gas flow rate, overall collector dimensions, and power limitations. Potential improvements were identified, some of which have already been implemented. Other more complex changes were identified and are described here for further consideration. In addition, fruitful areas for further study are proposed.

  11. Five task clusters that enable efficient and effective digitization of biological collections

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gil; Paul, Deborah; Riccardi, Gregory; Mast, Austin R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes and illustrates five major clusters of related tasks (herein referred to as task clusters) that are common to efficient and effective practices in the digitization of biological specimen data and media. Examples of these clusters come from the observation of diverse digitization processes. The staff of iDigBio (The U.S. National Science Foundation’s National Resource for Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections) visited active biological and paleontological collections digitization programs for the purpose of documenting and assessing current digitization practices and tools. These observations identified five task clusters that comprise the digitization process leading up to data publication: (1) pre-digitization curation and staging, (2) specimen image capture, (3) specimen image processing, (4) electronic data capture, and (5) georeferencing locality descriptions. While not all institutions are completing each of these task clusters for each specimen, these clusters describe a composite picture of digitization of biological and paleontological specimens across the programs that were observed. We describe these clusters, three workflow patterns that dominate the implemention of these clusters, and offer a set of workflow recommendations for digitization programs. PMID:22859876

  12. Five task clusters that enable efficient and effective digitization of biological collections.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Gil; Paul, Deborah; Riccardi, Gregory; Mast, Austin R

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes and illustrates five major clusters of related tasks (herein referred to as task clusters) that are common to efficient and effective practices in the digitization of biological specimen data and media. Examples of these clusters come from the observation of diverse digitization processes. The staff of iDigBio (The U.S. National Science Foundation's National Resource for Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections) visited active biological and paleontological collections digitization programs for the purpose of documenting and assessing current digitization practices and tools. These observations identified five task clusters that comprise the digitization process leading up to data publication: (1) pre-digitization curation and staging, (2) specimen image capture, (3) specimen image processing, (4) electronic data capture, and (5) georeferencing locality descriptions. While not all institutions are completing each of these task clusters for each specimen, these clusters describe a composite picture of digitization of biological and paleontological specimens across the programs that were observed. We describe these clusters, three workflow patterns that dominate the implemention of these clusters, and offer a set of workflow recommendations for digitization programs. PMID:22859876

  13. Solution-processed nickel compound as hole collection layer for efficient polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shaojian; Li, Shusheng; Tan, Zhan'ao; Zheng, Hua; Lin, Jun; Hu, Siqian; Liu, Jiyan; Li, Yongfang

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrated efficient bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells (PSCs) by inserting a solution-processable hole collection layer (HCL) between the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and photoactive layer. The HCL was prepared by spin-coating nickel acetylacetonate (Ni(acac)2) isopropanol solution on ITO, and then baking in air at 180 °C for 10 min followed by UV ozone treatment, which was marked as a-Ni(acac)2. The a-Ni(acac)2 HCL shows suitable energy levels, high hole mobility of 4.09  ×  10-3 cm2 V-1·s-1, and high transparency with light transmittance better than poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) in the wavelength range 550-800 nm. The PSCs with a-Ni(acac)2 HCL showed improved performance compared with the PSCs without or with traditional PEDOT:PSS HCL. The power conversion efficiency of the PSC based on PBDTTT-C-T:PC70BM with a-Ni(acac)2 HCL reached 7.84% under the illumination of AM 1.5 G, 100 mW cm-2.

  14. High antipredatory efficiency of insular lizards: a warning signal of excessive specimen collection?

    PubMed

    Delibes, Miguel; Blázquez, María del Carmen; Soriano, Laura; Revilla, Eloy; Godoy, José Antonio

    2011-01-01

    We live-captured lizards on islands in the Gulf of California and the Baja California peninsula mainland, and compared their ability to escape predation. Contrary to expectations, endemic lizard species from uninhabited islands fled from humans earlier and more efficiently than those from peninsular mainland areas. In fact, 58.2% (n=146) of the lizards we tried to capture on the various islands escaped successfully, while this percentage was only 14.4% (n=160) on the peninsular mainland. Separate evidence (e.g., proportion of regenerated tails, low human population at the collection areas, etc.) challenges several potential explanations for the higher antipredatory efficiency of insular lizards (e.g., more predation pressure on islands, habituation to humans on the peninsula, etc.). Instead, we suggest that the ability of insular lizards to avoid predators may be related to harvesting by humans, perhaps due to the value of endemic species as rare taxonomic entities. If this hypothesis is correct, predation-related behavioral changes in rare species could provide early warning signals of their over-exploitation, thus encouraging the adoption of conservation measures. PMID:22216244

  15. Dithiapyrannylidenes as efficient hole collection interfacial layers in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Berny, Stéphane; Tortech, Ludovic; Véber, Michelle; Fichou, Denis

    2010-11-01

    One inherent limitation to the efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells based on polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) is the accumulation of positive charges at the anodic interface. The unsymmetrical charge collection of holes and electrons dramatically decreases the short-circuit current. Interfacial layers (IFLs) such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) have no effect on the unbalanced electron/hole transport across the BHJ. We report here on the use of dithiapyrannylidenes (DITPY), a new class of planar quinoid compounds, as efficient hole-transporting/electron-blocking layers in organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)/[6,6]-phenyl-C(61)-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) BHJs. Inserting a 15-nm-thick IFL of 4,4'-bis(diphenyl-2,6-thiapyrannylidene) (DITPY-Ph(4)) between the indium-tin oxide electrode and the P3HT:PCBM BHJ prevents detrimental space-charge effects and favors recombination-limited currents. Current-sensing atomic force microscopy reveals a drastic increase of the hole-carrying pathways in DITPY-Ph(4) compared to PEDOT:PSS. In ambient conditions, photovoltaic cells using DITPY-Ph(4) exhibit an 8% increase in the current density, although the conversion efficiency remains slightly lower compared to PEDOT:PSS-based devices. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the photocurrent generation, showing that DITPY-Ph(4) IFLs induce a transition from unproductive space-charge-limited currents to recombination-limited currents. PMID:21028838

  16. Fog-basking behaviour and water collection efficiency in Namib Desert Darkling beetles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the Namib Desert fog represents an alternative water source. This is utilised by Darkling beetles (Tenebrionidae) that employ different strategies for obtaining the fog water. Some dig trenches in the sand, while others use their own bodies as fog collectors assuming a characteristic fog-basking stance. Two beetle species from the genus Onymacris have been observed to fog-bask on the ridges of the sand dunes. These beetles all have smooth elytra surfaces, while another species with elytra covered in bumps is reported to have specialised adaptations facilitating water capture by fog-basking. To resolve if these other beetles also fog-bask, and if an elytra covered in bumps is a more efficient fog water collector than a smooth one, we examined four Namib Desert beetles; the smooth Onymacris unguicularis and O. laeviceps and the bumpy Stenocara gracilipes and Physasterna cribripes. Here we describe the beetles' fog-basking behaviour, the details of their elytra structures, and determine how efficient their dorsal surface areas are at harvesting water from fog. Results The beetles differ greatly in size. The largest P. cribripes has a dorsal surface area that is 1.39, 1.56, and 2.52 times larger than O. unguicularis, O. laeviceps, and S. gracilipes, respectively. In accordance with earlier reports, we found that the second largest O. unguicularis is the only one of the four beetles that assumes the head standing fog-basking behaviour, and that fog is necessary to trigger this behaviour. No differences were seen in the absolute amounts of fog water collected on the dorsal surface areas of the different beetles. However, data corrected according to the sizes of the beetles revealed differences. The better fog water harvesters were S. gracilipes and O. unguicularis while the large P. cribripes was the poorest. Examination of the elytra microstructures showed clear structural differences, but the elytra of all beetles were found to be completely hydrophobic

  17. Direct gravimetric measurements of the mass of the antarctic aerosol collected by high volume sampler: PM10 summer seasonal variation at Terra Nova Bay.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Lambertucci, Luca; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    An on-site procedure was set up for direct gravimetric measurement of the mass of aerosol collected using high volume impactors (aerodynamic size cut point of 10 microm, PM10); this knowledge has hitherto been unavailable. Using a computerized microbalance in a clean chemistry laboratory, under controlled temperature (+/-0.5 degrees C) and relative humidity (+/-1%), continuous, long time filter mass measurements (hours) were carried out before and after exposure, after a 48 h minimun equilibration at the laboratory conditions. The effect of the electrostatic charge was exhausted in 30-60 min, after which stable measurements were obtained. Measurements of filters exposed for 7-11 days (1.13 m3 min(-1)) in a coastal site near Terra Nova Bay (December 2000 - February 2001), gave results for aerosol mass in the order of 10-20 mg (SD approximately 2 mg), corresponding to atmospheric concentrations of 0.52-1.27 microg m(-3). Data show a seasonal behaviour in the PM10 content with an increase during December - early January, followed by a net decrease. The above results compare well with estimates obtained from proxy data for the Antarctic Peninsula (0.30 microg m(-3)), the Ronne Ice Shelf (1.49 microg m(-3)), and the South Pole (0.18 microg m(-3), summer 1974-1975, and 0.37 microg m(-3), average summer seasons 1975-1976 and 1977-1978), and from direct gravimetric measurements recently obtained from medium volume samplers at McMurdo station (downwind 3.39 microg m(-3), upwind 4.15 microg m(-3)) and at King George Island (2.5 microg m(-3), summer, particle diameter <20 microm). This finding opens the way to the direct measurement of the chemical composition of the Antarctic aerosol and, in turn, to a better knowledge of the snow/air relationships as required for the reconstruction of the chemical composition of past atmospheres from deep ice core data. PMID:16398350

  18. The impact of an efficient collection sites location on the zoning phase in municipal solid waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Ghiani, Gianpaolo Manni, Andrea Manni, Emanuele Toraldo, Massimiliano

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We study the problems of locating collection areas and zoning the service territory in a municipal waste management system. • We investigate the impact that an efficient collection sites location has on the subsequent zoning phase. • On a real-world test case, we show that the proposed approach could allow achieving significant monetary savings. - Abstract: In this paper, we study two decisional problems arising when planning the collection of solid waste, namely the location of collection sites (together with bin allocation) and the zoning of the service territory, and we assess the potential impact that an efficient location has on the subsequent zoning phase. We first propose both an exact and a heuristic approach to locate the unsorted waste collection bins in a residential town, and to decide the capacities and characteristics of the bins to be located at each collection site. A peculiar aspect we consider is that of taking into account the compatibility between the different types of bins when allocating them to collection areas. Moreover, we propose a fast and effective heuristic approach to identify homogeneous zones that can be served by a single collection vehicle. Computational results on data related to a real-life instance show that an efficient location is fundamental in achieving consistent monetary savings, as well as a reduced environmental impact. These reductions are the result of one vehicle less needed to perform the waste collection operations, and an overall traveled distance reduced by about 25% on the average.

  19. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Springer, David

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  20. PHOTOACOUSTIC DETERMINATION OF OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AEROSOL PARTICLES COLLECTED ON FILTERS: DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD TAKING INTO ACCOUNT SUBSTRATE REFLECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The absorptivity and imaginary index of refraction for carbon and methylene blue particles were inferred from the photoacoustic spectra of samples collected on Teflon filter substrates. Three models of varying complexity were developed to describe the photoacoustic signal as a fu...

  1. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  2. A simulation of a CdTe gamma ray detector based on collection efficiency profiles as determined by lateral IBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Fizzotti, F.; Lo Giudice, A.; Polesello, P.; Manfredotti, C.

    1999-06-01

    Collection efficiency profiles as determined by the ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) technique have been considered to evaluate the spectroscopic performance of a cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear radiation detector. The dependence of such profiles on the applied bias voltage and the shaping time are presented and discussed on the basis of a theoretical model, which is also used to evaluate the electron/hole collection lengths profiles. Experimental collection efficiency profiles were used as input data of the "ISIDE" Monte Carlo programme to simulate the CdTe response to gamma rays produced by 57Co. A systematic investigation of such spectra obtained under different detection conditions shows the effects of non constant collection efficiency profiles and ballistic deficit on the energy resolution of the detector.

  3. Energy Efficient IoT Data Collection in Smart Cities Exploiting D2D Communications.

    PubMed

    Orsino, Antonino; Araniti, Giuseppe; Militano, Leonardo; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Molinaro, Antonella; Iera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Fifth Generation (5G) wireless systems are expected to connect an avalanche of "smart" objects disseminated from the largest "Smart City" to the smallest "Smart Home". In this vision, Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) is deemed to play a fundamental role in the Internet of Things (IoT) arena providing a large coherent infrastructure and a wide wireless connectivity to the devices. However, since LTE-A was originally designed to support high data rates and large data size, novel solutions are required to enable an efficient use of radio resources to convey small data packets typically exchanged by IoT applications in "smart" environments. On the other hand, the typically high energy consumption required by cellular communications is a serious obstacle to large scale IoT deployments under cellular connectivity as in the case of Smart City scenarios. Network-assisted Device-to-Device (D2D) communications are considered as a viable solution to reduce the energy consumption for the devices. The particular approach presented in this paper consists in appointing one of the IoT smart devices as a collector of all data from a cluster of objects using D2D links, thus acting as an aggregator toward the eNodeB. By smartly adapting the Modulation and Coding Scheme (MCS) on the communication links, we will show it is possible to maximize the radio resource utilization as a function of the total amount of data to be sent. A further benefit that we will highlight is the possibility to reduce the transmission power when a more robust MCS is adopted. A comprehensive performance evaluation in a wide set of scenarios will testify the achievable gains in terms of energy efficiency and resource utilization in the envisaged D2D-based IoT data collection. PMID:27338385

  4. Energy Efficient IoT Data Collection in Smart Cities Exploiting D2D Communications

    PubMed Central

    Orsino, Antonino; Araniti, Giuseppe; Militano, Leonardo; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Molinaro, Antonella; Iera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Fifth Generation (5G) wireless systems are expected to connect an avalanche of “smart” objects disseminated from the largest “Smart City” to the smallest “Smart Home”. In this vision, Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) is deemed to play a fundamental role in the Internet of Things (IoT) arena providing a large coherent infrastructure and a wide wireless connectivity to the devices. However, since LTE-A was originally designed to support high data rates and large data size, novel solutions are required to enable an efficient use of radio resources to convey small data packets typically exchanged by IoT applications in “smart” environments. On the other hand, the typically high energy consumption required by cellular communications is a serious obstacle to large scale IoT deployments under cellular connectivity as in the case of Smart City scenarios. Network-assisted Device-to-Device (D2D) communications are considered as a viable solution to reduce the energy consumption for the devices. The particular approach presented in this paper consists in appointing one of the IoT smart devices as a collector of all data from a cluster of objects using D2D links, thus acting as an aggregator toward the eNodeB. By smartly adapting the Modulation and Coding Scheme (MCS) on the communication links, we will show it is possible to maximize the radio resource utilization as a function of the total amount of data to be sent. A further benefit that we will highlight is the possibility to reduce the transmission power when a more robust MCS is adopted. A comprehensive performance evaluation in a wide set of scenarios will testify the achievable gains in terms of energy efficiency and resource utilization in the envisaged D2D-based IoT data collection. PMID:27338385

  5. Virus-templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electron collection in photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xiangnan; Yi, Hyunjung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Yun, Dong Soo; Ladewski, Rebecca; Strano, Michael S.; Hammond, Paula T.; Belcher, Angela M.

    2011-06-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices could be improved by using rationally designed nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. Single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit very high electron mobility, but the incorporation of such nanotubes into nanocomposites to create efficient photovoltaic devices is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube-TiO2 nanocrystal core-shell nanocomposites using a genetically engineered M13 virus as a template. By using the nanocomposites as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, we demonstrate that even small fractions of nanotubes improve the power conversion efficiency by increasing the electron collection efficiency. We also show that both the electronic type and degree of bundling of the nanotubes in the nanotube/TiO2 complex are critical factors in determining device performance. With our approach, we achieve a power conversion efficiency in the dye-sensitized solar cells of 10.6%.

  6. Virus-templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electron collection in photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiangnan; Yi, Hyunjung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Yun, Dong Soo; Ladewski, Rebecca; Strano, Michael S; Hammond, Paula T; Belcher, Angela M

    2011-06-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices could be improved by using rationally designed nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. Single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit very high electron mobility, but the incorporation of such nanotubes into nanocomposites to create efficient photovoltaic devices is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube-TiO(2) nanocrystal core-shell nanocomposites using a genetically engineered M13 virus as a template. By using the nanocomposites as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, we demonstrate that even small fractions of nanotubes improve the power conversion efficiency by increasing the electron collection efficiency. We also show that both the electronic type and degree of bundling of the nanotubes in the nanotube/TiO(2) complex are critical factors in determining device performance. With our approach, we achieve a power conversion efficiency in the dye-sensitized solar cells of 10.6%. PMID:21516089

  7. Collection efficiencies of high flow rate personal respirable samplers when measuring Arizona road dust and analysis of quartz by x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Peter; Lee, Taekhee; Thorpe, Andrew; Roberts, Paul; Frost, Gillian; Harper, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Prolonged exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) causes silicosis and is also considered a cause of cancer. To meet emerging needs for precise measurements of RCS, from shorter sampling periods (<4 h) and lower air concentrations, collaborative work was done to assess the differences between personal respirable samplers at higher flow rates. The performance of FSP10, GK2.69, and CIP 10 R samplers were compared with that of the Safety In Mines Personal Dust Sampler (SIMPEDS) sampler as a reference, which is commonly used in the UK for the measurement of RCS. In addition, the performance of the FSP10 and GK 2.69 samplers were compared; at the nominal flow rates recommended by the manufacturers of 10 and 4.2 l · min(-1) and with flow rates proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of 11.2 and 4.4 l · min(-1). Samplers were exposed to aerosols of ultrafine and medium grades of Arizona road dust (ARD) generated in a calm air chamber. All analyses for RCS in this study were performed at the Health and Safety Laboratory. The difference in flow rates for the GK2.69 is small and does not result in a substantial difference in collection efficiency for the dusts tested, while the performance of the FSP10 at 11.2 l · min(-1) was more comparable with samples from the SIMPEDS. Conversely, the GK2.69 collected proportionately more crystalline silica in the respirable dust than other samplers, which then produced RCS results most comparable with the SIMPEDS. The CIP 10 R collected less ultrafine ARD than other samplers, as might be expected based on earlier performance evaluations. The higher flow rate for the FSP10 should be an added advantage for task-specific sampling or when measuring air concentrations less than current occupational exposure limits. PMID:24470535

  8. Collection Efficiencies of High Flow Rate Personal Respirable Samplers When Measuring Arizona Road Dust and Analysis of Quartz by X-ray Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to respirable crystalline silica (RCS) causes silicosis and is also considered a cause of cancer. To meet emerging needs for precise measurements of RCS, from shorter sampling periods (<4h) and lower air concentrations, collaborative work was done to assess the differences between personal respirable samplers at higher flow rates. The performance of FSP10, GK2.69, and CIP 10 R samplers were compared with that of the Safety In Mines Personal Dust Sampler (SIMPEDS) sampler as a reference, which is commonly used in the UK for the measurement of RCS. In addition, the performance of the FSP10 and GK 2.69 samplers were compared; at the nominal flow rates recommended by the manufacturers of 10 and 4.2 l · min−1 and with flow rates proposed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of 11.2 and 4.4 l · min−1. Samplers were exposed to aerosols of ultrafine and medium grades of Arizona road dust (ARD) generated in a calm air chamber. All analyses for RCS in this study were performed at the Health and Safety Laboratory. The difference in flow rates for the GK2.69 is small and does not result in a substantial difference in collection efficiency for the dusts tested, while the performance of the FSP10 at 11.2 l · min−1 was more comparable with samples from the SIMPEDS. Conversely, the GK2.69 collected proportionately more crystalline silica in the respirable dust than other samplers, which then produced RCS results most comparable with the SIMPEDS. The CIP 10 R collected less ultrafine ARD than other samplers, as might be expected based on earlier performance evaluations. The higher flow rate for the FSP10 should be an added advantage for task-specific sampling or when measuring air concentrations less than current occupational exposure limits. PMID:24470535

  9. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols and particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3), and the coarse particles were found to have higher concentrations of amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition in the aerosol collected at Dome C had also changed compared to the coastal site, suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V Italica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material (as microorganisms or plant material) in the sample.

  10. Sampling strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of organic aerosol measurements requiring long sample-collection times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, Rob L.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The composition and properties of atmospheric organic aerosols (OAs) change on timescales of minutes to hours. However, some important OA characterization techniques typically require greater than a few hours of sample-collection time (e.g., Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy). In this study we have performed numerical modeling to investigate and compare sample-collection strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of OA measurements requiring long sample-collection times. Specifically, we modeled the measurement of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) concentrations at a polluted urban site in Mexico City, and investigated how to construct hourly resolved time series from samples collected for 4, 6, and 8 h. We modeled two sampling strategies - sequential and staggered sampling - and a range of post-processing methods including interpolation and deconvolution. The results indicated that relative to the more sophisticated and costly staggered sampling methods, linear interpolation between sequential measurements is a surprisingly effective method for increasing time resolution. Additional error can be added to a time series constructed in this manner if a suboptimal sequential sampling schedule is chosen. Staggering measurements is one way to avoid this effect. There is little to be gained from deconvolving staggered measurements, except at very low values of random measurement error (< 5 %). Assuming 20 % random measurement error, one can expect average recovery errors of 1.33-2.81 µg m-3 when using 4-8 h-long sequential and staggered samples to measure time series of concentration values ranging from 0.13-29.16 µg m-3. For 4 h samples, 19-47 % of this total error can be attributed to the process of increasing time resolution alone, depending on the method used, meaning that measurement precision would only be improved by 0.30-0.75 µg m-3 if samples could be collected over 1 h instead of 4 h. Devising a

  11. Artifact free denuder method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuška, P.; Vecera, Z.; Broškovicová, A.

    2003-04-01

    Over the past decade, a growing attention has been focused on the carbonaceous aerosols. Although they may account for 30--60% of the total fine aerosol mass, their concentration and formation mechanisms are not well understood, particularly in comparison with major fine particle inorganic species. The deficiency in knowledge of carbonaceous aerosols results from their complexity and because of problems associated with their collection. Conventional sampling techniques of the carbonaceous aerosols, which utilize filters/backup adsorbents suffer from sampling artefacts. Positive artifacts are mainly due to adsorption of gas-phase organic compounds by the filter material or by the already collected particles, whereas negative artifacts arise from the volatilisation of already collected organic compounds from the filter. Furthermore, in the course of the sampling, the composition of the collected organic compounds may be modified by oxidants (O_3, NO_2, PAN, peroxides) that are present in the air passing through the sampler. It is clear that new, artifact free, method for sampling of carbonaceous aerosols is needed. A combination of a diffusion denuder and a filter in series is very promising in this respect. The denuder is expected to collect gaseous oxidants and gas-phase organic compounds from sample air stream prior to collection of aerosol particles on filters, and eliminate thus both positive and negative sampling artifacts for carbonaceous aerosols. This combination is subject of the presentation. Several designs of diffusion denuders (cylindrical, annular, parallel plate, multi-channel) in combination with various types of wall coatings (dry, liquid) were examined. Special attention was given to preservation of the long-term collection efficiency. Different adsorbents (activated charcoal, molecular sieve, porous polymers) and sorbents coated with various chemical reagents (KI, Na_2SO_3, MnO_2, ascorbic acid) or chromatographic stationary phases (silicon oils

  12. Determination of Water Soluble Organic Carbon Collected ~1 km above the Earth's Surface during a Mid-Atlantic Air Quality Episode and Comparison to Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Arkinson, H. L.; Stehr, J. W.; Ring, A.; Marufu, L.; Reiner, J.; Sander, L. C.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2014-12-01

    Routine, light aircraft air-monitoring conducted in MD provides insight into atmospheric photochemical processing as a function of altitude in the boundary layer and lower free troposphere. We present correlations between the optical properties and chemical composition of aerosols at ~1 km altitude over Maryland. Data were collected during the peak smog day and a dissipation day during an air quality episode studied in DISCOVER-AQ, July 2011. Post flight filter sample analysis shows a positive trend between measurable carboxylate concentrations and particle size with a recirculating, aged, urban air mass influenced with southeasterly marine winds (peak day). A westerly influx of air from the Ohio River Valley on the dissipation day was depleted in carboxylates compared with samples collected over the same location two days prior. These samples contained quantifiable concentrations of cis-pinonic acid, a reaction product of pinene after ozonation and photochemical oxidation. New techniques were developed to improve airborne data collection and analysis of water soluble organic acids (WSOA), a frequently dominant fraction of particulate matter (PM). An ion chromatographic mass spectrometric method was developed using NIST Standard Referencing Material 1649b, Urban Dust, as a surrogate material to achieve separation and resolution of at least 34 organic acids. Analysis of aircraft filter samples resulted in detection of 16 organic acids of which 12 were quantified. Eight inorganic species were also quantified. Aged, re-circulated metropolitan air showed a greater number of dicarboxylic acids than new transport air from the west and may provide a useful test of SOA formation theory.

  13. Risk in the mist? Deriving data to quantify microbial health risks associated with aerosol generation by water-efficient devices during typical domestic water-using activities.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, J; Keywood, M; Sinclair, M; Leder, K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address existing data gaps and to determine the size distribution of aerosols associated with water-efficient devices during typical domestic activities. This information is important to assist in understanding infection spread during water-using activities and in designing water regulations. Three water-using scenarios were evaluated: i) showering using a water-efficient showerhead; ii) use of a high pressure spray unit for cleaning cars and iii) toilet flushing using a dual flush low volume flush device. For each scenario a control condition (conventional lower efficiency device) was selected for benchmarking purposes. Shower module results highlighted the complexity of particle generation and removal processes and showed that more than 90% of total particle mass in the breathing zone was attributed to particle diameters greater than 6 mum. Conversely, results for car washing experiments showed that particle diameters up to 6 mum constituted the major part of the total mass generated by both water-efficient and conventional devices. Even under worse case scenario conditions for toilet flushing, particle measurements were at or below the level of detection of the measuring instrumentation. The data provide information that assists in health risk assessment and in determining future research directions, including methodological aspects. PMID:19934513

  14. Efficiency of evanescent excitation and collection of spontaneous Raman scattering near high index contrast channel waveguides.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Ashim; Raza, Ali; Peyskens, Frédéric; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Clemmen, Stéphane; Le Thomas, Nicolas; Baets, Roel

    2015-10-19

    We develop and experimentally verify a theoretical model for the total efficiency η0 of evanescent excitation and subsequent collection of spontaneous Raman signals by the fundamental quasi-TE and quasi-TM modes of a generic photonic channel waveguide. Single-mode silicon nitride (Si3N4) slot and strip waveguides of different dimensions are used in the experimental study. Our theoretical model is validated by the correspondence between the experimental and theoretical absolute values within the experimental errors. We extend our theoretical model to silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) channel waveguides and study η0 as a function of index contrast, polarization of the mode and the geometry of the waveguides. We report nearly 2.5 (4 and 5) times larger η0 for the fundamental quasi-TM mode when compared to η0 for the fundamental quasi-TE mode of a typical Si3N4 (TiO2 and SOI) strip waveguide. η0 for the fundamental quasi-TE mode of a typical Si3N4, (TiO2 and SOI) slot waveguide is about 7 (22 and 90) times larger when compared to η0 for the fundamental quasi-TE mode of a strip waveguide of the similar dimensions. We attribute the observed enhancement to the higher electric field discontinuity present in high index contrast waveguides. PMID:26480401

  15. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Pastuovic, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.; Garcia Lopez, J.; Jaksic, M.; Raisanen, J.; Siegele, R.; Simon, A.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  16. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vittone, Ettore; Pastuovic, Zeljko; Breese, Mark B. H.; Lopez, Javier Garicia; Jaksic, Milko; Raisanen, Jyrki; Siegele, Rainer; Simon, Aliz; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy

    2016-02-08

    This study investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and themore » charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.« less

  17. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material.

  18. Joint aperture detection for speckle reduction and increased collection efficiency in ophthalmic MHz OCT

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Thomas; André, Raphael; Wieser, Wolfgang; Pfeiffer, Tom; Huber, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Joint-aperture optical coherence tomography (JA-OCT) is an angle-resolved OCT method, in which illumination from an active channel is simultaneously probed by several passive channels. JA-OCT increases the collection efficiency and effective sensitivity of the OCT system without increasing the power on the sample. Additionally, JA-OCT provides angular scattering information about the sample in a single acquisition, so the OCT imaging speed is not reduced. Thus, JA-OCT is especially suitable for ultra high speed in-vivo imaging. JA-OCT is compared to other angle-resolved techniques, and the relation between joint aperture imaging, adaptive optics, coherent and incoherent compounding is discussed. We present angle-resolved imaging of the human retina at an axial scan rate of 1.68 MHz, and demonstrate the benefits of JA-OCT: Speckle reduction, signal increase and suppression of specular and parasitic reflections. Moreover, in the future JA-OCT may allow for the reconstruction of the full Doppler vector and tissue discrimination by analysis of the angular scattering dependence. PMID:23577296

  19. Evaluation of the efficiency of streamflow data collection strategies for alluvial rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kitanidis, P.K.; Lara, O.G.; Lane, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Streamflow discharge is usually determined indirectly from measurements of the river stage at gaging stations and through the use of stage-discharge relationships (rating curves). However, in alluvial streams, stage-discharge relationships change continually and, sometimes, quite markedly. Such changes may be caused by major floods, seasonal variations, or long-term secular trends associated with changes in the river channel. Consequently, reliable estimates of discharge using rating curves are not possible unless frequent direct measurements of discharge are made. Such measurements involve appreciable costs, and it is important to evaluate their contribution in increasing the accuracy of estimation of quantities of interest such as mean daily, monthly or annual flow. A methodology for the evaluation of the efficiency of data-collection strategies for alluvial rivers is developed and applied to stations on the Missouri River, U.S.A. A flexible and expedient model describing the variability of discharges and shifts in the stage-discharge relationship is developed. Procedures for the estimation of parameters and the validation of the model using actual data are presented. The calibrated and validated model is then employed in simulations to evaluate the effect of sampling strategies (such as frequency and accuracy of discharge measurements) on the accuracy of estimated mean daily, monthly and annual flow. Curves relating the cost of sampling to the achieved accuracy can be generated, and the optimization of sampling strategies given accuracy or budget objectives or constraints can be achieved. ?? 1984.

  20. Simulations for Light Collection Efficiency (Jlab Hall C 12 GeV Kaon Aerogel Detector)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothgeb, Laura

    2011-10-01

    Studying the additional flavor degree of freedom in charged kaon production allows for an unexampled insight into the transition from hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom in exclusive processes and specifically the reaction mechanism underlying strangeness production. This unique opportunity has gone greatly unexplored, however, because of the challenges posed by the experimental factors. One of these challenges is determining a method of separation for kaons from pion and proton backgrounds at high momenta. The simplest and most cost-effective solution is the implementation of a kaon aerogel Cherenkov detector. At the Catholic University of America, we are building such a detector for use in the 12GeV Hall C Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab. The detector will use photo multiplier tubes to collect the Cherenkov radiation given off by the aerogel and convert that signal into analyzable data that will be used to determine the form factor of the kaon, which will yield a greater understanding of the internal structure of the proton. In this presentation I will present the results from the simulations carried out to optimize the aerogel coverage and study the effect of light guides on the efficiency of the detector. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY 1019521 and 1039446.

  1. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Collection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Fred J.; Palmquist, Debra E.

    2014-01-01

    Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after “lights on”) and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h). Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils. PMID:26462948

  2. Photoacoustic determination of optical properties of aerosol particles collected on filters: development of a method taking into account substrate reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Röhl, R; McClenny, W A; Palmer, R A

    1982-02-01

    The absorptivity of soot and methylene blue particles collected on Teflon filters is derived from photoacoustic measurements by least squares fitting a simple expression based on Beer's law to the experimental data. Refinements of the expression take into account the diffuse reflection of light by the filter substrate, yielding a base 10 absorptivity at 600 nm for soot of 3.00 +/- 0.37 m(2)/g. This value is in close agreement with the result of transmission measurements performed on the same samples (3.08 +/- 0.05 m(2)/g). PMID:20372465

  3. Refining the Parameterisation of Sea Salt Aerosol Production from Blowing Snow on Sea Ice Based on Data Collected in the Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Frey, M. M.; Levine, J. G.; Brooks, I. M.; Anderson, P. A.; Jones, A. E.; Wolff, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of blowing snow lifted snow particles, via a subsequent sublimation process, as a significant sea salt aerosol (SSA) source over sea ice has recently been strongly supported by a winter cruise through the Weddell Sea during June-August 2013. The newly collected data, including both physical and chemical components, provide a unique way to test and validate the parameterisation used to date. The observed salinity of surface and blowing snow is very low; on average more than an order in magnitude smaller than column mean value. Here we apply a low salinity of 0.27 PSU (representing an average of the top 10cm of snow plus blowing snow samples) in the p-TOMCAT model to test its effect on sea salt concentrations reaching the Antarctic. The comparison with previous model output (using column mean salinity) shows that SSA concentration in central Antarctica is insensitive to change in snow salinity, due to the compensating effect of increasing fine SSA partitioning upon reducing the salinity. We also investigate the impact of changing the number of SSA particles formed from each snow particle on SSA concentration and size distribution. Applying a ratio of 10 SSA particles per blowing snow particle, rather than one as assumed to date, greatly increases the amount of sub-micrometer SSA reaching central Antarctica. Without applying blowing snow related SSA production in the p-TOMCAT model, the observed elevated SSA in the Weddell Sea could not be reproduced.

  4. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  5. Efficient Collection of Methane from Extremely Large Volumes of Water for Natural Radiocarbon Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, K. J.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Collecting sufficient amounts of natural methane sample for a high precision radiocarbon (14C-CH4) analysis was previously unfeasible when sampling from low methane concentration waters like the open ocean. A new method incorporating dissolved gas extraction technology (Liqui-Cel® membrane contactors) has been developed to circumvent the challenges that natural 14C-CH4 sampling presents. With this method, adequate amounts of methane-carbon for a traditional 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis can be cleanly and efficiently extracted from 1000s L water in a few hours. This technique is currently being improved to enable sampling from > 11,000 L water in less than 1 hr. For transport from the field to the laboratory, each extracted gas sample is compressed into a small (1.68 L) high-pressure aluminum cylinder using an oil-free compressor pump. Due to the small size and portability of the sample cylinders, high resolution sampling plans composed of 30+ samples are possible even in remote locations. The laboratory preparation of these methane samples for 14C-AMS analyses is carried out on a new flow-through vacuum line. While the bulk water vapor and carbon dioxide (CO2) are removed before the sample is compressed in the field, the residual trace amounts of these constituents are cryogenically removed from the sample in the initial phase of the vacuum line. Carbon monoxide in the sample is quantitatively oxidized at 290°C to CO2 and cryogenically removed. Finally, the sample methane is quantitatively oxidized at 950°C to products CO2 and water and then cryogenically isolated. The new vacuum line technique achieves low blanks and purifies and oxidizes the methane contained in the extracted gas sample with high efficiency. At an AMS facility, an aliquot of the methane-produced CO2 is graphitized and analyzed for radiocarbon content using traditional 14C-AMS. Supporting dual-inlet isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements are conducted to determine both

  6. Design of an efficient Fresnel-type lens utilizing double total internal reflection for solar energy collection.

    PubMed

    Wallhead, Ian; Jiménez, Teresa Molina; Ortiz, Jose Vicente García; Toledo, Ignacio Gonzalez; Toledo, Cristóbal Gonzalez

    2012-11-01

    A novel of Fresnel-type lens for use as a solar collector has been designed which utilizes double total internal reflection (D-TIR) to optimize collection efficiency for high numerical aperture lenses (in the region of 0.3 to 0.6 NA). Results show that, depending on the numerical aperture and the size of the receiver, a collection efficiency theoretical improvement on the order of 20% can be expected with this new design compared with that of a conventional Fresnel lens. PMID:23326849

  7. Probing photo-carrier collection efficiencies of individual silicon nanowire diodes on a wafer substrate.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, S W; Brönstrup, G; Shalev, G; Srivastava, S K; Bashouti, M Y; Döhler, G H; Christiansen, S H

    2014-07-21

    Vertically aligned silicon nanowire (SiNW) diodes are promising candidates for the integration into various opto-electronic device concepts for e.g. sensing or solar energy conversion. Individual SiNW p-n diodes have intensively been studied, but to date an assessment of their device performance once integrated on a silicon substrate has not been made. We show that using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a nano-manipulator and an optical fiber feed-through for tunable (wavelength, power using a tunable laser source) sample illumination, the dark and illuminated current-voltage (I-V) curve of individual SiNW diodes on the substrate wafer can be measured. Surprisingly, the I-V-curve of the serially coupled system composed of SiNW/wafers is accurately described by an equivalent circuit model of a single diode and diode parameters like series and shunting resistivity, diode ideality factor and photocurrent can be retrieved from a fit. We show that the photo-carrier collection efficiency (PCE) of the integrated diode illuminated with variable wavelength and intensity light directly gives insight into the quality of the device design at the nanoscale. We find that the PCE decreases for high light intensities and photocurrent densities, due to the fact that considerable amounts of photo-excited carriers generated within the substrate lead to a decrease in shunting resistivity of the SiNW diode and deteriorate its rectification. The PCE decreases systematically for smaller wavelengths of visible light, showing the possibility of monitoring the effectiveness of the SiNW device surface passivation using the shown measurement technique. The integrated device was pre-characterized using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), TCAD simulations and electron beam induced current (EBIC) measurements to validate the properties of the characterized material at the single SiNW diode level. PMID:24830733

  8. Collection-efficient, axisymmetric vacuum sublimation module for the purification of solid materials.

    PubMed

    May, Michael; Paul, Elizabeth; Katovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    A vacuum sublimation module of axisymmetric geometry was developed and employed to purify solid-phase materials. The module provides certain practical advantages and it comprises: a metering valve, glass collector, glass lower body, main seal, threaded bushing, and glass internal cartridge (the latter to contain starting material). A complementary process was developed to de-solvate, sublime, weigh, and collect solid chemical materials exemplified by oxalic acid, ferrocene, pentachlorobenzene, chrysene, and urea. The oxalic acid sublimate was analyzed by titration, melting range, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and its (aqueous phase) electrolytically generated gas. The analytical data were consistent with a high-purity, anhydrous oxalic acid sublimate. Cyclic voltammograms of 0.11 mol. % oxalic acid in water displayed a 2.1 V window on glassy carbon electrode beyond which electrolytic decomposition occurs. During module testing, fifteen relatively pure materials were sublimed with (energy efficient) passive cooling and the solid-phase recovery averaged 95 mass %. Key module design features include: compact vertical geometry, low-angle conical collector, uniformly compressed main seal, modest power consumption, transparency, glovebox compatibility, cooling options, and preferential conductive heat transfer. To help evaluate the structural (module) heat transfer, vertical temperature profiles along the dynamically evacuated lower body were measured versus electric heater power: for example, an input of 18.6 W generated a temperature 443-K at the bottom. Experimental results and engineering calculations indicate that during sublimation, solid conduction is the primary mode of heat transfer to the starting material. PMID:26628150

  9. 77 FR 8273 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Capture Energy Efficiency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... is soliciting public comments on the subject proposal. HUD is creating the Capture Energy Efficiency...: Title of Proposal: Capture Energy Efficiency Measures for PIH (CEEMP). OMB Approval Number: 2577-New... the Capture Energy Efficiency Measures for PIH (CEEMP) data system to track the amount and types...

  10. Neutralization of calcite in mineral aerosols by acidic sullur species collected in China and Japan studied by ca K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshio; Miyoshi, Takuro; Higashi, Masayuki; Kamioka, Hikari; Kanai, Yutaka

    2009-09-01

    Calcium species in mineral aerosols collected simultaneously in Aksu (near the Taklimakan Desert), Qingdao (eastern China), and Tsukuba (Japan) during dust and nondust periods were determined using Ca K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). From the fitting of XANES spectra, it was found that (i) calcite and gypsum were the main Ca species in the aerosol samples, and (ii) the gypsum fraction versus total Ca minerals [Gyp]/[Ca2+]t increased progressively in the order Aksu < Qingdao < Tsukuba. Surface-sensitive XANES in the conversion electron yield mode (CEY) showed that the gypsum is formed selectively at the surface of mineral aerosols for all the samples except for that taken in Aksu during the dust period. The decrease of the [Gyp]/[Ca2+]t ratio with an increase in particle size showed that the neutralization effect proceeds from the particle surface. For the Aksu sample in the dust period, however, (i) the [Gyp]/[Ca2+]t ratios obtained by XANES measured in the fluorescence (FL; regarded as bulk analysis) and CEY modes were similar and (ii) size dependence was not found, showing that neutralization is not important for the sample because of the large supply of mineral aerosol with little neutralization effect in Aksu. It was also found that the pH of the aerosol and the ratio of (NH4)2SO4 to gypsum were positively and negatively correlated with the Ca (or calcite) content, respectively. The speciation of Ca by XANES revealed the neutralization processes of acidic sulfur species by calcite during the long-range transport of mineral aerosols. PMID:19764213

  11. 42 CFR 420.410 - Establishment of a program to collect suggestions for improving Medicare program efficiency and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Establishment of a program to collect suggestions for improving Medicare program efficiency and to reward suggesters for monetary savings. 420.410 Section 420.410 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM...

  12. 76 FR 6488 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Conversion of Efficiency Units to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Conversion of... and forms to permit the conversion of efficiencies to one-bedrooms provided it can be demonstrated that the conversion is warranted by local demands and results in the long- term financial and...

  13. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  15. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  16. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  17. Collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles in micro-orifice-based cascade impactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Awasthi, Amit; Hung, Yi-Hung; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two micro-orifice-based cascade impactors, including the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI, MSP Model 110) and the NCTU micro-orifice cascade impactor (NMCI), were tested for the collection efficiency and interstage loss of nanoparticles. In the NMCI, new nozzle plates with smooth nozzle shape made by the LIGA (Lithography, Electroplating, and Molding) process were used to replace the 7th-10th stages in one of the MOUDI. Test results show that after adjusting proper S/W ratios (S: jet to plate distance, W: nozzle diameter) to 2.52, 3.01, 13.44, and 24.75 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the NMCI, respectively, and 5.56, 11.18, 9.3, and 10.9 for the 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th stage of the MOUDI, respectively, the cutoff aerodynamic diameters (dpa50) are close to the nominal values given in Marple et al. (1991). Different S/W ratios are needed due to differences in the nozzle shape and nozzle diameter between two cascade impactors. Total interstage loss of nanoparticles from the inlet to the 6th-10th stage of the MOUDI exists due to the convection-diffusion mechanism, which increases with decreasing dpa. For the MOUDI, total loss is 2.9-15.3 % (dpa: 105.8 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 6th stage and it increases to 20.1-26.1 % (dpa: 23 to 15.4 nm) for the inlet to the 10th stage, respectively. Similar but slightly lower loss also exists in the NMCI. Field comparison tests in the ambient air show that mass size distributions measured by the MOUDI agree well with those of the NMCI. Finally, nozzle clogging tests using high concentration incense smokes indicate that the NMCI has a much less tendency for particles to clog in the nozzles than the MODUI.

  18. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Area with daily soil cover and active gas collection CE3: 60%. A4: Area with an intermediate soil cover, or a final soil cover not meeting the criteria for A5 below, and active gas collection CE4: 75%. A5: Area with a final soil cover of 3 feet or thicker of clay and/or geomembrane cover system and...

  19. 40 CFR Table Hh-3 to Subpart Hh of... - Landfill Gas Collection Efficiencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Area with daily soil cover and active gas collection CE3: 60%. A4: Area with an intermediate soil cover, or a final soil cover not meeting the criteria for A5 below, and active gas collection CE4: 75%. A5: Area with a final soil cover of 3 feet or thicker of clay and/or geomembrane cover system and...

  20. 76 FR 70831 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees (Quality and Efficiency of VA Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ...The Veterans Health Administration (VHA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, Federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed......

  1. Speciated local aerosol characteristics and radiative forcing at a rural midwestern site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillner, Ann Marie

    2000-11-01

    In this research, physical and chemical properties of ambient aerosols were measured at a rural perturbed mid- latitude site (Bondville, IL) and used to calculate the aerosol optical properties and the resulting direct radiative forcing. Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected during the summer of 1997 using three parallel MOUDIs operating at ambient relative humidity. Two sample sets were used to obtain sulfate, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), carbonate and total aerosol mass. The third sample set was used to obtain the size-specific and wavelength-dependent extinction efficiency of EC. The measured submicrometer mass concentration was 11.4 +/- 4.0 μg m-3. Ammonium sulfate comprised nearly half of the submicrometer aerosol and OC plus EC comprised 25%. Water content for ammonium sulfate and OC was estimated using both Köhler theory and parameterized water uptake curves from the literature. Water content for internally mixed aerosols was determined using a ZSR method. Aerosol optical properties (extinction efficiency, asymmetry parameter, single scatter albedo) were calculated from measured size distributions and wavelength dependent refractive indexes for each species and for internal and external mixtures using Mie theory. A technique, utilizing transmission measurements through extracts of size segregated ambient aerosol samples, was developed to obtain the extinction efficiency of EC. Measured EC extinction efficiencies ranged from 7.3 to 1.7 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, depending on particle diameter. Normalized direct aerosol radiative forcing (W g-1 ) was calculated using the Column Radiation Module (CRM) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3). Aerosol optical properties, used in the model, were assumed to be uniform throughout the lowest one kilometer of the atmosphere. The normalized forcing due to ammonium sulfate was -340 +/- 10 W g-1. OC was 1/3 larger and residue was 1/3 smaller. EC within an

  2. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  3. COLLECTION EFFICIENCY OF FIELD SAMPLING CASSETTES: INTERAGENCY ENERGY/ENVIRONMENT R AND D PROGRAM REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial hygiene particulate samples are often collected under anisokinetic sampling conditions and in crosswinds. Experiments were conducted to quantitate errors associated with sampling under these non-ideal conditions. Three types of field sampling cassetts were tested to de...

  4. Assessing the Performance of Computationally Simple and Complex Representations of Aerosol Processes using a Testbed Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Ma, P.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Zaveri, R. A.; Rasch, P.

    2012-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing in climate models still contain large uncertainties, resulting from a poor understanding of certain aerosol processes, the level of complexity of aerosol processes represented in models, and the ability of models to account for sub-grid scale variability of aerosols and processes affecting them. In addition, comparing the performance and computational efficiency of new aerosol process modules used in various studies is problematic because different studies often employ different grid configurations, meteorology, trace gas chemistry, and emissions that affect the temporal and spatial evolution of aerosols. To address this issue, we have developed an Aerosol Modeling Testbed (AMT) to systematically and objectively evaluate aerosol process modules. The AMT consists of the modular Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a series of testbed cases for which extensive in situ and remote sensing measurements of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties are available, and a suite of tools to evaluate the performance of meteorological, chemical, aerosol process modules. WRF contains various parameterizations of meteorological, chemical, and aerosol processes and includes interactive aerosol-cloud-radiation treatments similar to those employed by climate models. In addition, the physics suite from a global climate model, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), has also been ported to WRF so that these parameterizations can be tested at various spatial scales and compared directly with field campaign data and other parameterizations commonly used by the mesoscale modeling community. In this study, we evaluate simple and complex treatments of the aerosol size distribution and secondary organic aerosols using the AMT and measurements collected during three field campaigns: the Megacities Initiative Local and Global Observations (MILAGRO) campaign conducted in the vicinity of Mexico City during March 2006, the

  5. On the Quality of Collective Decisions in Sociotechnical Systems: Transparency, Fairness, and Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porello, Daniele

    The aim of this paper is to propose a methodology for evaluating the quality of collective decisions in sociotechnical systems (STS). We propose using a foundational ontology for conceptualizing the complex hierarchy of information involved in decisions in STS (e.g., normative, conceptual, factual, perceptual). Moreover, we introduce the concept of transparency of decisions as a necessary condition in order to assess the quality of decision-making in STS. We further view transparency as an entitlement of the agent affected by the decision: i.e., the collective decision should be justified.

  6. Efficient Collection of {sup 221}Fr into a Vapor Cell Magneto-optical Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Corwin, K.L.; Vogel, K.R.; Wieman, C.E. |; Dinneen, T.P.; Maddi, J.; Gould, H.

    1997-08-01

    We have efficiently loaded a vapor cell magneto-optical trap from an orthotropic source of {sup 221}Fr with a trapping efficiency of 56(10){percent}. A novel detection scheme allowed us to measure 900 trapped atoms with a signal to noise ratio of {approximately}60 in 1sec. We have measured the energies and the hyperfine constants of the 7 {sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 7 {sup 2}P{sub 3/2} states. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Medical Registry Data Collection Efficiency: A Crossover Study Comparing Web-Based Electronic Data Capture and a Standard Spreadsheet

    PubMed Central

    Staziaki, Pedro Vinícius; Kim, Phillip; Vadvala, Harshna V

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic medical records and electronic data capture (EDC) have changed data collection in clinical and translational research. However, spreadsheet programs, such as Microsoft Excel, are still used as data repository to record and organize patient data for research. Objective The objective of this study is to assess the efficiency of EDC as against a standard spreadsheet in regards to time to collect data and data accuracy, measured in number of errors after adjudication. Methods This was a crossover study comparing the time to collect data in minutes between EDC and a spreadsheet. The EDC tool used was Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap), whereas the spreadsheet was Microsoft Excel. The data collected was part of a registry of patients who underwent coronary computed tomography angiography in the emergency setting. Two data collectors with the same experience went over the same patients and collected relevant data on a case report form identical to the one used in our Emergency Department (ED) registry. Data collection tool was switched after the patient that represented half the cohort. For this, the patient cohort was exactly 30 days of our ED coronary Computed Tomography Angiography registry and the point of crossover was determined beforehand to be 15 days. We measured the number of patients admitted, and time to collect data. Accuracy was defined as absence of blank fields and errors, and was assessed by comparing data between data collectors and counting every time the data differed. Statistical analysis was made using paired t -test. Results The study included 61 patients (122 observations) and 55 variables. The crossover occurred after the 30th patient. Mean time to collect data using EDC in minutes was 6.2±2.3, whereas using Excel was 8.0±2.0 (P <.001), a difference of 1.8 minutes between both means (22%). The cohort was evenly distributed with 3 admissions in the first half of the crossover and 4 in the second half. We saw 2 (<0

  8. Development of a system for determining collection efficiency of spray samplers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low speed spray dispersion tunnel was constructed and evaluated for use in passive spray collector efficiency studies. The dispersion tunnel utilizes an air-assisted nozzle to generate a spray cloud with a volume median diameter of about 20 um. The air velocities in the testing section of the di...

  9. 77 FR 3841 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Veteran Enrollees (Quality and Efficiency of VA Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Care)) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans... VA Health Care), VA Form 10-21088. OMB Control Number: 2900-0725. Type of Review: Extension of a... promote quality and efficient delivery of health care through the use of health information...

  10. Spatially resolved imaging of charge collection efficiency in polycrystalline CVD diamond by the use of ion beam induced current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, D. R.; Saint, A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Kalish, R.

    1997-07-01

    Diamond based detectors have potential applications in high energy physics experiments. These detectors can be fabricated from synthetic Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films. Previously it has been shown by the Turin group and their coworkers in Zagreb that it is possible to investigate the electrical characteristics of high quality polycrystalline CVD diamond films by Ion Beam Induced Current (IBIC). The present work describes IBIC images obtained using 2 MeV He + irradiation of 250 μm thick polycrystalline diamond films through a thin gold surface contact layer biased positively relative to the grounded rear surface of the film. In contrast to previous experiments the present spectra of collected charge display a clearly defined peak from the induced charge. Images obtained by separating these spectra into different regions of interest allow the identification of regions in the sample of different charge collection efficiency. In particular the presence of some grains in which no charge collection appears possible and the reduction in charge collection efficiency at the grain boundaries is evident.

  11. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2011-08-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99 %, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8 %. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20 % of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40 % and as high as +70 % were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are upto a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  12. Partial Derivative Fitted Taylor Expansion: an efficient method for calculating gas/liquid equilibria in atmospheric aerosol particles - Part 2: Organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topping, D.; Lowe, D.; McFiggans, G.

    2012-01-01

    A flexible mixing rule is presented which allows the calculation of activity coefficients of organic compounds in a multi-component aqueous solution. Based on the same fitting methodology as a previously published inorganic model (Partial Differential Fitted Taylor series Expansion; PD-FiTE), organic PD-FiTE treats interactions between binary pairs of solutes with polynomials of varying order. The numerical framework of organic PD-FiTE is not based on empirical observations of activity coefficient variation, rather a simple application of a Taylor Series expansion. Using 13 example compounds extracted from a recent sensitivity study, the framework is benchmarked against the UNIFAC model. For 1000 randomly derived concentration ranges and 10 relative humidities between 10 and 99%, the average deviation in predicted activity coefficients was calculated to be 3.8%. Whilst compound specific deviations are present, the median and inter-quartile values across all relative humidity range always fell within ±20% of the UNIFAC value. Comparisons were made with the UNIFAC model by assuming interactions between solutes can be set to zero within PD-FiTE. In this case, deviations in activity coefficients as low as -40% and as high as +70% were found. Both the fully coupled and uncoupled organic PD-FiTE are up to a factor of ≈12 and ≈66 times more efficient than calling the UNIFAC model using the same water content, and ≈310 and ≈1800 times more efficient than an iterative model using UNIFAC. The use of PD-FiTE within a dynamical framework is presented, demonstrating the potential inaccuracy of prescribing fixed negative or positive deviations from ideality when modelling the evolving chemical composition of aerosol particles.

  13. Stratospheric aerosols - Observation and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.; Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    Important chemical and physical roles of aerosols are discussed, and properties of stratospheric aerosols as revealed by experimental data are described. In situ measurements obtained by mechanical collection and scattered-light detection yield the overall size distribution of the aerosols, and analyses of preserved aerosol precursor gases by wet chemical, cryogenic and spectroscopic techniques indicate the photochemical sources of particle mass. Aerosol chemical reactions including those of gaseous precursors, those in aqueous solution, and those on particle surfaces are discussed, in addition to aerosol microphysical processes such as nucleation, condensation/evaporation, coagulation and sedimentation. Models of aerosols incorporating such chemical and physical processes are presented, and simulations are shown to agree with measurements. Estimates are presented for the potential aerosol changes due to emission of particles and gases by aerospace operations and industrial consumption of fossil fuels, and it is demonstrated that although the climatic effects of existing levels of stratospheric aerosol pollution are negligible, potential increases in those levels might pose a future threat.

  14. Chemical composition and characteristics of ambient aerosols and rainwater residues during Indian summer monsoon: Insight from aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-07-01

    Real time composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) is measured via Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) for the first time during Indian summer monsoon at Kanpur, a polluted urban location located at the heart of Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP). Submicron aerosols are found to be dominated by organics followed by nitrate. Source apportionment of organic aerosols (OA) via positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed several types of secondary/oxidized and primary organic aerosols. On average, OA are completely dominated by oxidized OA with a very little contribution from biomass burning OA. During rain events, PM1 concentration is decreased almost by 60%, but its composition remains nearly the same. Oxidized OA showed slightly more decrease than primary OAs, probably due to their higher hygroscopicity. The presence of organo nitrates (ON) is also detected in ambient aerosols. Apart from real-time sampling, collected fog and rainwater samples were also analyzed via AMS in offline mode and in the ICP-OES (Inductively coupled plasma - Optical emission spectrometry) for elements. The presence of sea salt, organo nitrates and sulfates has been observed. Rainwater residues are also dominated by organics but their O/C ratios are 15-20% lower than the observed values for ambient OA. Alkali metals such as Ca, Na, K are found to be most abundant in the rainwater followed by Zn. Rainwater residues are also found to be much less oxidized than the aerosols present inside the fog water, indicating presence of less oxidized organics. These findings indicate that rain can act as an effective scavenger of different types of pollutants even for submicron particle range. Rainwater residues also contain organo sulfates which indicate that some portion of the dissolved aerosols has undergone aqueous processing, possibly inside the cloud. Highly oxidized and possibly hygroscopic OA during monsoon period compared to other seasons (winter, post monsoon), indicates that they can act

  15. Toward new techniques to measure heterogeneous oxidation of aerosol: Electrodynamic Balance-Mass Spectrometry (EDB-MS) and Aerosol X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, M. I.; Heine, N.; Xu, B.; Davies, J. F.; Kirk, B. B.; Kostko, O.; Alayoglu, S.; Wilson, K. R.; Ahmed, M.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical composition and physical properties of aerosol can be changed via heterogeneous oxidation with the OH radical. However, the physical state of the aerosol influences the kinetics of this reaction; liquid particles with a high diffusion coefficient are expected to be well mixed and homogenously oxidized, while oxidation of solid, diffusion-limited aerosol is expected to occur primarily on the surface, creating steep chemical gradients within the particle. We are working to develop several new techniques to study the heterogeneous oxidation of different types of aerosol. We are developing a "modular" electrodynamic balance (EDB) that will enable us to study heterogeneous oxidation at aqueous interfaces using a mass-spectrometer (and potentially other detection techniques). Using a direct analysis in real time (DART) interface, preliminary droplet train measurements have demonstrated single-droplet mass spectrometry to be possible. With long reaction times in our EDB, we will be able to study heterogeneous oxidation of a wide variety of organic species in aqueous droplets. Additionally, we are working to use aerosol photoemission and velocity map imaging (VMI) to study the surface of aerosol particles as they undergo heterogeneous oxidation. With VMI, we're able to collect electrons with a 4π collection efficiency over conventional electron energy analyzers. Preliminary results looking at the ozonolysis of squalene using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) show that heterogeneous oxidation kinetic data can be extracted from photoelectron spectra. By moving to X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), we will determine elemental and chemical composition of the aerosol surface. Thus, aerosol XPS will provide information on the steep chemical gradients that form as diffusion-limited aerosol undergo heterogeneous oxidation.

  16. Free amino acids in Antarctic aerosol: potential markers for the evolution and fate of marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Zangrando, R.; Vecchiato, M.; Piazza, R.; Cairns, W. R. L.; Capodaglio, G.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the impact of marine aerosols on global climate change it is important to study their chemical composition and size distribution. Amino acids are a component of the organic nitrogen in aerosols, particles containing amino acids have been found to be efficient ice nuclei. The main aim of this study was to investigate the L- and D-free amino acid composition as possible tracers of primary biological production in Antarctic aerosols from three different areas: two continental bases, Mario Zucchelli Station (MZS) on the coast of the Ross Sea, Concordia Station at Dome C on the Antarctic Plateau, and the Southern Ocean near the Antarctic continent. Studying the size distribution of amino acids in aerosols allowed us to characterize this component of the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in marine aerosols near their source and after long-range transport. The presence of only free L-amino acids in our samples is indicative of the prevalence of phytoplanktonic material. Sampling at these three points allowed us to study the reactivity of these compounds during long-range transport. The mean total amino acid concentration detected at MZS was 11 pmol m-3, a higher percentage of amino acids were found in the fine fraction. The aerosol samples collected at Dome C had the lowest amino acid values (0.7 and 0.8 pmol m-3) and the coarse particles were found to be enriched with amino acids compared to the coastal site. The amino acid composition had also changed suggesting that physical and chemical transformations had occurred during long range transport. During the sampling cruise on the R/V talica on the Southern Ocean, high concentrations of amino acids were found in the total suspended particles, this we attribute to the presence of intact biological material in the sample.

  17. Highly efficient photocatalytic TiO2 coatings deposited by open air atmospheric pressure plasma jet with aerosolized TTIP precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhouri, H.; Ben Salem, D.; Carton, O.; Pulpytel, J.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2014-07-01

    A simple method to deposit photocatalytic TiO2 coatings, at a high rate (20-40 µm s-1), and with a high porosity, is reported in this paper. This method, which allows the treatment of membranes (with an 800 nm pore size), is based on the introduction of a liquid precursor sprayed into an open-air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 thin films prepared by APPJ have been compared with our best N-doped TiO2 thin films, deposited by reactive radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, previously reported in the literature. The morphology, chemical composition, photoelectrochemical, and photocatalytic properties of the coatings have been studied in this paper. Significant control of the porosity and crystallinity was achieved by varying the deposition parameters and the annealing temperature. Under optimized conditions, the TiO2 coatings deposited by APPJ are characterized by a higher photocatalytic activity as compared to the optimized thin films deposited by RF sputtering. This difference can be explained by the higher specific surface of the APPJ coatings. Finally, the most interesting characteristic of this APPJ-liquid spray process is its capacity to treat membranes without blocking the pores, and to produce photocatalytic membranes which can efficiently combine filtration and photocatalysis for water treatment.

  18. Low power acoustic harvesting of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, G.; Sinha, D. N.

    2001-01-01

    A new acoustic device for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and sniall liquid/solid samples (up to several millimeters in diameter) in air has been developed. The device is inexpensive, low-power, and, in its simplest embodiment, does not require accurate alignmen1 of a resonant cavity. It is constructed from a cylindrical PZT tube of outside diameter D = 19.0 mm and thickness-to-radius ratio h/a - 0.03. The lowest-order breathing mode of the tube is tuned to match a resonant mode of the interior air-filled cylindrical cavity. A high Q cavity results that can be driven efficiently. An acoustic standing wave is created in the inteirior cavity of the cylindrical shell where particle concrmtration takes place at the nodal planes of the field. It is shown that drops of water in excess of 1 mm in diameter may be levitated against the force of gravity for approxirnately 100 mW of input electrical power. The main objective of the research is to implement this lowpower device to concentrate and harvest aerosols in a flowing system. Several different cavity geonietries iwe presented for efficient collection of 1 he conaartratetl aerosols. Concentraiion factors greater than 40 iue demonstrated for particles of size 0.7 1.1 in a flow volume of 50 L/minute.

  19. Bacterial communities in urban aerosols collected with wetted-wall cyclonic samplers and seasonal fluctuations of live and culturable airborne bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens from point sources (e.g. ranches, waste treatment facilities) to areas of food production (farms) has been suspected. However, there have been few studies monitoring the incidence, transport and viability of bacteria in aerosols. We monitored the numb...

  20. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.; Orsini, Douglas

    2006-04-18

    An apparatus for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution is provided. The apparatus includes an enhanced particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and an enhanced collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical means. Methods for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles are also provided, the method including exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; and flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  1. Apparatus for rapid measurement of aerosol bulk chemical composition

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Yin-Nan E.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles with a fast time resolution are provided. The apparatus includes a modified particle size magnifier for producing activated aerosol particles and a collection device which collects the activated aerosol particles into a liquid stream for quantitative analysis by analytical methods. The method provided for on-line measurement of chemical composition of aerosol particles includes exposing aerosol carrying sample air to hot saturated steam thereby forming activated aerosol particles; collecting the activated aerosol particles by a collection device for delivery as a jet stream onto an impaction surface; flushing off the activated aerosol particles from the impaction surface into a liquid stream for delivery of the collected liquid stream to an analytical instrument for quantitative measurement.

  2. Evaluating the efficiency of municipalities in collecting and processing municipal solid waste: A shared input DEA-model

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, Nicky; De Jaeger, Simon

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity in local waste management calls for more in depth efficiency analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shared-input Data Envelopment Analysis can provide solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable room for the Flemish municipalities to improve their cost efficiency. - Abstract: This paper proposed an adjusted 'shared-input' version of the popular efficiency measurement technique Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) that enables evaluating municipality waste collection and processing performances in settings in which one input (waste costs) is shared among treatment efforts of multiple municipal solid waste fractions. The main advantage of this version of DEA is that it not only provides an estimate of the municipalities overall cost efficiency but also estimates of the municipalities' cost efficiency in the treatment of the different fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW). To illustrate the practical usefulness of the shared input DEA-model, we apply the model to data on 293 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, for the year 2008.

  3. Efficient collective data distribution in all-port wormhole-routed hypercubes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.F.; Judd, D.; McKinley, P.K.; Cheng, B.H.C.

    1993-12-31

    This paper addresses the problem of collective data distribution, specifically multicast, in wormhole-routed hypercubes. The system model allows a processor to send and receive data in all dimensions simultaneously. New theoretical results that characterize contention among messages in wormhole-routed hypercubes are developed and used to design new multicast routing algorithms. The algorithms are compared in terms of the number of steps required in each, their measured execution times when implemented on a relatively small-scale nCUBE-2, and their simulated execution times on larger hypercubes. The results indicate that significant performance improvement is possible when the multicast algorithm actively identifies and uses multiple ports in parallel.

  4. Efficient Stem Cell Collection after Modified Cisplatin-Based Mobilization Chemotherapy in Patients with Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lisenko, Katharina; Cremer, Martin; Schwarzbich, Mark-Alexander; Kriegsmann, Mark; Ho, Anthony D; Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Wuchter, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    In patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), R-DHAP (rituximab, dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin) is a commonly used regimen for salvage therapy and for mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs). At our center, a modified R-DHAP regimen with administration of 25 mg/m(2) cisplatin as a 3-hour infusion over 4 consecutive days, instead of a single infusion of 100 mg/m(2) over 24 hours, has been established. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficiency of this modified R-DHAP regimen plus G-CSF as a mobilization strategy. We retrospectively analyzed clinical characteristics, PBSC collection and autologous stem cell transplantation parameters, and hematologic reconstitution data for 65 patients with relapsed or refractory DLBCL who underwent PBSC collection after mobilization with the modified R-DHAP protocol at our institution between 2002 and 2013. Data were evaluated for the overall cohort and with regard to the number of R-DHAP cycles received before PBSC collection. PBSC collection was performed after the first R-DHAP course in 32 patients (49%), after the second course in 30 patients (46%), and after the third course in 3 patients (5%). Sixty-three patients (97%) achieved the collection goal of ≥2.0 × 10(6) CD34(+) cells/kg body weight. A significantly higher median CD34(+) cell collection yield was achieved when cells were collected after the first R-DHAP course compared with after the second course (P < .01). A peripheral blood leukocyte increase of ≥1.0 × 10(9)/L and a platelet increase of ≥20 × 10(9)/L were observed by 11 days after ASCT. In our cohort, the modified R-DHAP regimen proved safe and feasible, showed an overall response rate (complete response, complete response unconfirmed, and partial response) of 66%, and allowed efficient mobilization of CD34(+) cells for PBSC collection. PMID:27060439

  5. Efficient Genome-Wide Sequencing and Low-Coverage Pedigree Analysis from Noninvasively Collected Samples.

    PubMed

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Majoros, William H; Yuan, Michael L; Shaver, Amanda O; Gordon, Jacob B; Kopp, Gisela H; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Alberts, Susan C; Mukherjee, Sayan; Zhou, Xiang; Tung, Jenny

    2016-06-01

    Research on the genetics of natural populations was revolutionized in the 1990s by methods for genotyping noninvasively collected samples. However, these methods have remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years and lag far behind the genomics era. To close this gap, here we report an optimized laboratory protocol for genome-wide capture of endogenous DNA from noninvasively collected samples, coupled with a novel computational approach to reconstruct pedigree links from the resulting low-coverage data. We validated both methods using fecal samples from 62 wild baboons, including 48 from an independently constructed extended pedigree. We enriched fecal-derived DNA samples up to 40-fold for endogenous baboon DNA and reconstructed near-perfect pedigree relationships even with extremely low-coverage sequencing. We anticipate that these methods will be broadly applicable to the many research systems for which only noninvasive samples are available. The lab protocol and software ("WHODAD") are freely available at www.tung-lab.org/protocols-and-software.html and www.xzlab.org/software.html, respectively. PMID:27098910

  6. Efficient Genome-Wide Sequencing and Low-Coverage Pedigree Analysis from Noninvasively Collected Samples

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Majoros, William H.; Yuan, Michael L.; Shaver, Amanda O.; Gordon, Jacob B.; Kopp, Gisela H.; Schlebusch, Stephen A.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Alberts, Susan C.; Mukherjee, Sayan; Zhou, Xiang; Tung, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Research on the genetics of natural populations was revolutionized in the 1990s by methods for genotyping noninvasively collected samples. However, these methods have remained largely unchanged for the past 20 years and lag far behind the genomics era. To close this gap, here we report an optimized laboratory protocol for genome-wide capture of endogenous DNA from noninvasively collected samples, coupled with a novel computational approach to reconstruct pedigree links from the resulting low-coverage data. We validated both methods using fecal samples from 62 wild baboons, including 48 from an independently constructed extended pedigree. We enriched fecal-derived DNA samples up to 40-fold for endogenous baboon DNA and reconstructed near-perfect pedigree relationships even with extremely low-coverage sequencing. We anticipate that these methods will be broadly applicable to the many research systems for which only noninvasive samples are available. The lab protocol and software (“WHODAD”) are freely available at www.tung-lab.org/protocols-and-software.html and www.xzlab.org/software.html, respectively. PMID:27098910

  7. Multiscale transparent electrode architecture for efficient light management and carrier collection in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Mathieu; Battaglia, Corsin; Hänni, Simon; Söderström, Karin; Escarré, Jordi; Nicolay, Sylvain; Meillaud, Fanny; Despeisse, Matthieu; Ballif, Christophe

    2012-03-14

    The challenge for all photovoltaic technologies is to maximize light absorption, to convert photons with minimal losses into electric charges, and to efficiently extract them to the electrical circuit. For thin-film solar cells, all these tasks rely heavily on the transparent front electrode. Here we present a multiscale electrode architecture that allows us to achieve efficiencies as high as 14.1% with a thin-film silicon tandem solar cell employing only 3 μm of silicon. Our approach combines the versatility of nanoimprint lithography, the unusually high carrier mobility of hydrogenated indium oxide (over 100 cm(2)/V/s), and the unequaled light-scattering properties of self-textured zinc oxide. A multiscale texture provides light trapping over a broad wavelength range while ensuring an optimum morphology for the growth of high-quality silicon layers. A conductive bilayer stack guarantees carrier extraction while minimizing parasitic absorption losses. The tunability accessible through such multiscale electrode architecture offers unprecedented possibilities to address the trade-off between cell optical and electrical performance. PMID:22332666

  8. A simple and high collection efficiency sampling method for monitoring of carbonyl compounds in a workplace environment.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Thavarungkul, Panote; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2012-01-01

    A simple and high collection efficiency sampling method was developed for the monitoring of carbonyl compounds, i.e., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, acetone and butanone. The determination is based on the reaction of these compounds in a sensitive absorbing solution of 2,4-DNPH. After the completion of the reaction the derivatives were analyzed by the HPLC system without any post sample preparation. The operation conditions of the proposed method were optimized to obtain the highest sampling efficiency within a short analysis time. The collection efficiency for all compounds was in the range of 95 ± 3 % to 99 ± 4 % and the relative standard deviations (n = 15) were less than 10 %. This method was validated and applied to monitor carbonyl compounds in air samples from an occupational environment, the adhesive industry. Formaldehyde was found to be the most abundant carbonyl compound (64 ± 8 to 250 ± 20 ppbv), followed by acetaldehyde (ND to 24 ± 6 ppbv), acetone (ND to 21 ± 5 ppbv) and benzaldehyde (ND to 27 ± 7 ppbv). The sampling of air directly into the absorbing solution was compared with the conventional method of using an adsorbent cartridge, and the results were in good agreement (P > 0.05). PMID:22242868

  9. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Characteristics of Two Full Scale and One 1/4 Scale Business Jet Horizontal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Papadakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a series of business jet horizontal tail configurations using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, and the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. The horizontal tail models included two full scale wing tips and a 25 percent scale model. Flow solutions for the horizontal tails were generated using the PMARC panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the adaptive grid code ICEGRID. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Octane computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  10. Aerosol Microtops II sunphotometer observations over Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovchaliuk, V.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Milinevsky, G.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Goloub, Ph.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their impact on climate study are based on measurements by networks of ground-based instruments, satellite sensors, and measurements on portable sunphotometers. This paper presents the preliminary aerosol characteristics obtained during 2009-2012 using portable multi-wavelength Microtops II sunphotometer. Measurements were collected at different Ukraine sites in Kyiv, Odesa, Lugansk, Rivne, Chornobyl regions. The main aerosol characteristics, namely aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and Angstroem exponent, have been retrieved and analyzed. Aerosol data processing, filtering and calibration techniques are discussed in the paper.

  11. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  12. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  13. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  14. Mass absorption efficiency of light absorbing organic aerosols from source region of paddy-residue burning emissions in the Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, B.; Rastogi, N.; Sarin, M. M.; Singh, A.; Singh, D.

    2016-01-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of light absorbing water-soluble organics, representing a significant fraction of brown carbon (BrC), has been studied in fine mode aerosols (PM2.5) from a source region (Patiala: 30.2 °N, 76.3 °E) of biomass burning emissions (BBEs) in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The mass absorption coefficient of BrC at 365 nm (babs-365), assessed from absorption spectra of aqueous extracts, exhibits significant linear relationship with water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) for day (R2 = 0.37) and night time (R2 = 0.77) samples; and slope of regression lines provides a measure of MAE of BrC (daytime: ˜0.75 m2 g-1 and night time: 1.13 m2 g-1). A close similarity in the temporal variability of babs-365 (for BrC) and K+ in all samples suggests their common source from BBEs. The babs-365 of BrC follows a power law (babs-λ ≈ λ-α; where α = angstrom exponent) and averages around 5.2 ± 2.0 M m-1 (where M = 10-6). A significant decrease in the MAE of BrC from the source region (this study) to the downwind oceanic region (over Bay of Bengal, Srinivas and Sarin, 2013) could be attributed to relative increase in the contribution of non-absorbing WSOC and/or photo-bleaching of BrC during long-range atmospheric transport. The atmospheric radiative forcing due to BrC over the study site accounts for ˜40% of that from elemental carbon (EC).

  15. Data collection framework for energy efficient privacy preservation in wireless sensor networks having many-to-many structures.

    PubMed

    Bahşi, Hayretdin; Levi, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) generally have a many-to-one structure so that event information flows from sensors to a unique sink. In recent WSN applications, many-to-many structures evolved due to the need for conveying collected event information to multiple sinks. Privacy preserved data collection models in the literature do not solve the problems of WSN applications in which network has multiple un-trusted sinks with different level of privacy requirements. This study proposes a data collection framework bases on k-anonymity for preventing record disclosure of collected event information in WSNs. Proposed method takes the anonymity requirements of multiple sinks into consideration by providing different levels of privacy for each destination sink. Attributes, which may identify an event owner, are generalized or encrypted in order to meet the different anonymity requirements of sinks at the same anonymized output. If the same output is formed, it can be multicasted to all sinks. The other trivial solution is to produce different anonymized outputs for each sink and send them to related sinks. Multicasting is an energy efficient data sending alternative for some sensor nodes. Since minimization of energy consumption is an important design criteria for WSNs, multicasting the same event information to multiple sinks reduces the energy consumption of overall network. PMID:22163660

  16. Data Collection Framework for Energy Efficient Privacy Preservation in Wireless Sensor Networks Having Many-to-Many Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bahşi, Hayretdin; Levi, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) generally have a many-to-one structure so that event information flows from sensors to a unique sink. In recent WSN applications, many-to-many structures evolved due to the need for conveying collected event information to multiple sinks. Privacy preserved data collection models in the literature do not solve the problems of WSN applications in which network has multiple un-trusted sinks with different level of privacy requirements. This study proposes a data collection framework bases on k-anonymity for preventing record disclosure of collected event information in WSNs. Proposed method takes the anonymity requirements of multiple sinks into consideration by providing different levels of privacy for each destination sink. Attributes, which may identify an event owner, are generalized or encrypted in order to meet the different anonymity requirements of sinks at the same anonymized output. If the same output is formed, it can be multicasted to all sinks. The other trivial solution is to produce different anonymized outputs for each sink and send them to related sinks. Multicasting is an energy efficient data sending alternative for some sensor nodes. Since minimization of energy consumption is an important design criteria for WSNs, multicasting the same event information to multiple sinks reduces the energy consumption of overall network. PMID:22163660

  17. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  18. Novel Photoanode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Enhanced Light-Harvesting and Electron-Collection Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, Weixing; Gong, Yudong; Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong; Zhao, Huabo; Sun, Chunwen

    2016-06-01

    A novel photoanode structure modified by porous flowerlike CeO2 microspheres as a scattering layer with a thin TiO2 film deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is prepared to achieve a significantly enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The light scattering capability of the photoanode with the porous CeO2 microsphere layer is considerably improved. The interconnection of particles and electrical contact between bilayer and conducting substrate is further enhanced by an ALD-deposited TiO2 film, which effectively reduces the electron recombination and facilitates electron transport and thus enhances the charge collection efficiency of DSSCs. As a result, the overall efficiency of the obtained TiO2-CeO2-based cells reaches 9.86%, which is 31% higher than that of the DSSCs with a conventional TiO2 photoanode. PMID:27169327

  19. FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROMETRY OF AMBIENT AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry has been evaluated as a method for determining the concentration of selected species present in ambient aerosols collected on Teflon filters. The filters are analyzed by transmission measurements after collection of the fine fraction...

  20. Efficient and Robust Data Collection Using Compact Micro Hardware, Distributed Bus Architectures and Optimizing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Vatan, Farrokh; Randolph, Vincent; Baroth, Edmund C.

    2006-01-01

    Future In-Space propulsion systems for exploration programs will invariably require data collection from a large number of sensors. Consider the sensors needed for monitoring several vehicle systems states of health, including the collection of structural health data, over a large area. This would include the fuel tanks, habitat structure, and science containment of systems required for Lunar, Mars, or deep space exploration. Such a system would consist of several hundred or even thousands of sensors. Conventional avionics system design will require these sensors to be connected to a few Remote Health Units (RHU), which are connected to robust, micro flight computers through a serial bus. This results in a large mass of cabling and unacceptable weight. This paper first gives a survey of several techniques that may reduce the cabling mass for sensors. These techniques can be categorized into four classes: power line communication, serial sensor buses, compound serial buses, and wireless network. The power line communication approach uses the power line to carry both power and data, so that the conventional data lines can be eliminated. The serial sensor bus approach reduces most of the cabling by connecting all the sensors with a single (or redundant) serial bus. Many standard buses for industrial control and sensor buses can support several hundreds of nodes, however, have not been space qualified. Conventional avionics serial buses such as the Mil-Std-1553B bus and IEEE 1394a are space qualified but can support only a limited number of nodes. The third approach is to combine avionics buses to increase their addressability. The reliability, EMI/EMC, and flight qualification issues of wireless networks have to be addressed. Several wireless networks such as the IEEE 802.11 and Ultra Wide Band are surveyed in this paper. The placement of sensors can also affect cable mass. Excessive sensors increase the number of cables unnecessarily. Insufficient number of sensors

  1. Efficient Algorithms for the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree Problems with Interval Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Miranda, E.; Candia, A.; Chen, X.; Hu, X.; Li, B.

    Given a graph G = (V,E) with a cost on each edge in E and a prize at each vertex in V, and a target set V' ⊆ V, the Prize Collecting Steiner Tree (PCST) problem is to find a tree T interconnecting vertices in V' that has minimum total costs on edges and maximum total prizes at vertices in T. This problem is NP-hard in general, and it is polynomial-time solvable when graphs G are restricted to 2-trees. In this paper, we study how to deal with PCST problem with uncertain costs and prizes. We assume that edge e could be included in T by paying cost x_ein[c_e^-,c_e^+] while taking risk c_e^+-x_e/ c_e^+-c_e^- of losing e, and vertex v could be awarded prize p_vin [p_v^-,p_v^+] while taking risk y_v-p_v^-/p_v^+-p_v^- of losing the prize. We establish two risk models for the PCST problem, one minimizing the maximum risk over edges and vertices in T and the other minimizing the sum of risks. Both models are subject to upper bounds on the budget for constructing a tree. We propose two polynomial-time algorithms for these problems on 2-trees, respectively. Our study shows that the risk models have advantages over the tradional robust optimization model, which yields NP-hard problems even if the original optimization problems are polynomial-time solvable.

  2. Nanotechnology and pharmaceutical inhalation aerosols.

    PubMed

    Patel, A R; Vavia, P R

    2007-02-01

    Pharmaceutical inhalation aerosols have been playing a crucial role in the health and well being of millions of people throughout the world for many years. The technology's continual advancement, the ease of use and the more desirable pulmonary-rather-than-needle delivery for systemic drugs has increased the attraction for the pharmaceutical aerosol in recent years. But administration of drugs by the pulmonary route is technically challenging because oral deposition can be high, and variations in inhalation technique can affect the quantity of drug delivered to the lungs. Recent advances in nanotechnology, particularly drug delivery field have encouraged formulation scientists to expand their reach in solving tricky problems related to drug delivery. Moreover, application of nanotechnology to aerosol science has opened up a new category of pharmaceutical aerosols (collectively known as nanoenabled-aerosols) with added advantages and effectiveness. In this review, some of the latest approaches of nano-enabled aerosol drug delivery system (including nano-suspension, trojan particles, bioadhesive nanoparticles and smart particle aerosols) that can be employed successfully to overcome problems of conventional aerosol systems have been introduced. PMID:17375556

  3. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  4. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate ofmore » heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.« less

  5. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D; Anderson, Erik H; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-04-21

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier's law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  6. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.

  7. Estimation and discrimination of aerosols using multiple wavelength LWIR lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ahl, Jeffrey L.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent work by the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) in algorithm development for parameter estimation and classification of localized atmospheric aerosols using data from rapidly tuned multiple-wavelength range-resolved LWIR lidar. The motivation for this work is the need to detect, locate, and discriminate biological threat aerosols in the atmosphere from interferent materials such as dust and smoke at safe standoff ranges using time-series data collected at a discrete set of CO2 laser wavelengths. The goals of the processing are to provide real-time aerosol detection, localization, and discrimination. Earlier work by the authors has produced an efficient Kalman filter-based algorithm for estimating the range-dependent aerosol concentration and wavelength-dependent backscatter signatures. The latter estimates are used as feature vectors for training support vector machines classifiers for performing the discrimination. Several years of field testing under the Joint Biological Standoff Detection System program at Dugway Proving Ground, UT, Eglin Air Force Base, FL, and other locations have produced data and backscatter estimates from a broad range of biological and interferent aerosol materials for the classifier development. The results of this work are summarized in our presentation.

  8. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  9. Breaking waves and near-surface sea spray aerosol dependence on changing winds: Wave breaking efficiency and bubble-related air-sea interaction processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, P. A.; Savelyev, I. B.; Anguelova, M. D.

    2016-05-01

    Simultaneous measurements of sea spray aerosol (SSA), wind, wave, and microwave brightness temperature are obtained in the open ocean on-board Floating Instrument Platform (FLIP). These data are analysed to clarify the ocean surface processes important to SSA production. Parameters are formulated to represent surface processes with characteristic length scales spanning a broad range. The investigation reveals distinct differences of the SSA properties in rising winds and falling winds, with higher SSA volume in falling winds. Also, in closely related measurements of whitecap coverage, higher whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed is found in falling winds than in rising winds or in older seas than in younger seas. Similar trend is found in the short scale roughness reflected in the microwave brightness temperature data. In the research of length and velocity scales of breaking waves, it has been observed that the length scale of wave breaking is shorter in mixed seas than in wind seas. For example, source function analysis of short surface waves shows that the characteristic length scale of the dissipation function shifts toward higher wavenumber (shorter wavelength) in mixed seas than in wind seas. Similarly, results from feature tracking or Doppler analysis of microwave radar sea spikes, which are closely associated with breaking waves, show that the magnitude of the average breaking wave velocity is smaller in mixed seas than in wind seas. Furthermore, breaking waves are observed to possess geometric similarity. Applying the results of breaking wave analyses to the SSA and whitecap observations described above, it is suggestive that larger air cavities resulting from the longer breakers are entrained in rising high winds. The larger air cavities escape rapidly due to buoyancy before they can be fully broken down into small bubbles for the subsequent SSA production or whitecap manifestation. In contrast, in falling winds (with mixed seas more likely), the

  10. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

    1984-04-11

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

  11. CMAQ AEROSOL MODULE DEVELOPMENT RECENT ENHANCEMENTS & FUTURE PLANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent enhancements to the CMAQ aerosol module will be reviewed briefly. These include revision of the secondary organic aerosol subroutine to improve numerical efficiency and control the growth of the accumulation mode standard deviation, revision of the nucleation subroutine t...

  12. Determination of aromatic tracer compounds for environmental tobacco smoke aerosol by two step laser mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrical, Brad D.; Zenobi, Renato

    Cigarette smoking is a major cause of indoor aerosol pollution. Determination of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) aerosol is critical to understanding health effects. Sizing studies have shown that ETS has a size distribution that is efficiently deposited into the lungs and can therefore provide effective delivery of carcinogenic compounds into the human body. Two-step laser mass spectrometry is used to analyze aromatic compounds on aerosols collected from a smoking lobby. The determination and suitability of ETS tracers on aerosols is examined. Additionally, the transport of aerosol from the smoking lobby is examined to determine what effect deposition and dilution have on the mass spectrum observed. Results from the analysis of ETS, both from lobby samples and direct cigarette sampling, show that several unique peaks are present in the mass spectrum when compared to other combustion sources, such as automobiles and diesel trucks. In particular, ions at m/ z 118, 132, 146, and 160 are consistently present and are not found in other combustion sources. For the indoor environment, where chemical transformation is much less rapid than in the outdoor environment, these ions were found to be present as soon as the first smokers appeared and persisted over the course of the day. Aerosol samples taken in the morning prior to the presence of smokers in the lobby reveal the presence of skeletal PAHs, indicative of outdoor urban traffic aerosol penetration into the building.

  13. Aerosol growth in Titan's ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Lavvas, Panayotis; Yelle, Roger V; Koskinen, Tommi; Bazin, Axel; Vuitton, Véronique; Vigren, Erik; Galand, Marina; Wellbrock, Anne; Coates, Andrew J; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Crary, Frank J; Snowden, Darci

    2013-02-19

    Photochemically produced aerosols are common among the atmospheres of our solar system and beyond. Observations and models have shown that photochemical aerosols have direct consequences on atmospheric properties as well as important astrobiological ramifications, but the mechanisms involved in their formation remain unclear. Here we show that the formation of aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere is directly related to ion processes, and we provide a complete interpretation of observed mass spectra by the Cassini instruments from small to large masses. Because all planetary atmospheres possess ionospheres, we anticipate that the mechanisms identified here will be efficient in other environments as well, modulated by the chemical complexity of each atmosphere. PMID:23382231

  14. Towards increased recycling of household waste: Documenting cascading effects and material efficiency of commingled recyclables and biowaste collection.

    PubMed

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Rothmann, Marianne; Hamelin, Lorie; Wenzel, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management remains a challenge, even in Europe where several countries now possess capacity to treat all arising MSW, while others still rely on unsustainable disposal pathways. In the former, strategies to reach higher recycling levels are affecting existing waste-to-energy (WtE) treatment infrastructure, by inducing additional overcapacity and this in turn rebounds as pressure on the waste and recyclable materials markets. This study addresses such situations by documenting the effects, in terms of resource recovery, global warming potential (GWP) and cumulative energy demand (CED), of a transition from a self-sufficient waste management system based on minimal separate collection and efficient WtE, towards a system with extended separate collection of recyclable materials and biowaste. In doing so, it tackles key questions: (1) whether recycling and biological treatment are environmentally better compared to highly efficient WtE, and (2) what are the implications of overcapacity-related cascading effects, namely waste import, when included in the comparison of alternative waste management systems. System changes, such as the implementation of kerbside separate collection of recyclable materials were found to significantly increase material recovery, besides leading to substantial GWP and CED savings in comparison to the WtE-based system. Bio-waste separate collection contributed with additional savings when co-digested with manure, and even more significantly when considering future renewable energy background systems reflecting the benefits induced by the flexible use of biogas. Given the current liberalization of trade in combustible waste in Europe, waste landfilling was identified as a short-to-medium-term European-wide waste management marginal reacting to overcapacity effects induced by the implementation of increased recycling strategies. When waste import and, consequently, avoided landfilling were included in the system

  15. The Versatility of SpAM: A Fast, Efficient, Spatial Method of Data Collection for Multidimensional Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Hout, Michael C.; Goldinger, Stephen D.; Ferguson, Ryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Although traditional methods to collect similarity data (for multidimensional scaling, MDS) are robust, they share a key shortcoming. Specifically, the possible pairwise comparisons in any set of objects grow rapidly as a function of set size. This leads to lengthy experimental protocols, or procedures that involve scaling stimulus subsets. We review existing methods of collecting similarity data, and critically examine a spatial arrangement method (SpAM) proposed by Goldstone (1994a), in which similarity ratings are obtained by presenting many stimuli at once. The participant moves stimuli around the computer screen, placing them at distances from one another that are proportional to subjective similarity. This provides a fast, efficient, and user-friendly method for obtaining MDS spaces. Participants gave similarity ratings to artificially constructed visual stimuli (comprising 2–3 perceptual dimensions), and non-visual stimuli (animal names) with less-defined underlying dimensions. Ratings were obtained using four methods: pairwise comparisons, spatial arrangement, and two novel hybrid methods. We compared solutions from alternative methods to the pairwise method, finding that the SpAM produces high-quality MDS solutions. Monte Carlo simulations on degraded data suggest that the method is also robust to reductions in sample sizes and granularity. Moreover, coordinates derived from SpAM solutions accurately predicted discrimination among objects in “same/different” classification. In the General Discussion, we address the benefits of using a spatial medium to collect similarity measures. PMID:22746700

  16. The versatility of SpAM: a fast, efficient, spatial method of data collection for multidimensional scaling.

    PubMed

    Hout, Michael C; Goldinger, Stephen D; Ferguson, Ryan W

    2013-02-01

    Although traditional methods to collect similarity data (for multidimensional scaling [MDS]) are robust, they share a key shortcoming. Specifically, the possible pairwise comparisons in any set of objects grow rapidly as a function of set size. This leads to lengthy experimental protocols, or procedures that involve scaling stimulus subsets. We review existing methods of collecting similarity data, and critically examine the spatial arrangement method (SpAM) proposed by Goldstone (1994a), in which similarity ratings are obtained by presenting many stimuli at once. The participant moves stimuli around the computer screen, placing them at distances from one another that are proportional to subjective similarity. This provides a fast, efficient, and user-friendly method for obtaining MDS spaces. Participants gave similarity ratings to artificially constructed visual stimuli (comprising 2-3 perceptual dimensions) and nonvisual stimuli (animal names) with less-defined underlying dimensions. Ratings were obtained with 4 methods: pairwise comparisons, spatial arrangement, and 2 novel hybrid methods. We compared solutions from alternative methods to the pairwise method, finding that the SpAM produces high-quality MDS solutions. Monte Carlo simulations on degraded data suggest that the method is also robust to reductions in sample sizes and granularity. Moreover, coordinates derived from SpAM solutions accurately predicted discrimination among objects in same-different classification. We address the benefits of using a spatial medium to collect similarity measures. PMID:22746700

  17. Ice Formation Potential of Field-Collected Marine Biogenic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrion-Matta, A.; Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Marine biogenic particles composed mainly of sea salt and organic material aerosolized from a mesocosm in laboratory experiments have recently been found to act as ice nuclei. How these particles relate to those collected from sea spray under ambient conditions in the field is unknown. This study reports on the heterogeneous ice nucleation potential of particles collected during the marine aerosol characterization experiment (MACE) on the south shore of Long Island, New York. Ambient aerosol size distributions were measured and particles were collected on hydrophobically coated substrates and subsequently used for ice nucleation experiments using an ice nucleation cell coupled to an optical microscope. This technique allows detection of ice formation for temperatures between 200 and 273 K and for relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) from 100% up to water saturation. Individual ice nucleating particles were identified for subsequent chemical and physical characterization using both X-ray and electron micro-spectroscopic techniques. Concentrations of bacteria, viruses, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in the bulk seawater, sea-surface microlayer (SML), and in sea spray were determined using established methods and related to airborne sea spray particles and their ice nucleation potential. Onshore aerosol size distribution measurements taken at 5 m height and 10 m away from the breaking waves, revealed a peak maximum at 100 nm and Ntot = 6.8 x 10^2 cm^-3. Bacterial, viral, and TEP were found to be enriched in the SML. Ambient particles collected during MACE were found to nucleate ice efficiently, e. g. at 215 K, ice nucleation occurred on average at 125% RHice. Results of aerosol size distributions and ice nucleation efficiencies are compared to laboratory bubble bursting experiments in which natural seawater was used. The goal of this study is to understand the connection between sea spray aerosolization and atmospheric ice cloud formation and to

  18. Variability in Nose-to-Lung Aerosol Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Walenga, Ross L; Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Yelverton, Joshua; Dodson, Kelley; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Nasal delivery of lung targeted pharmaceutical aerosols is ideal for drugs that need to be administered during high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) gas delivery, but based on previous studies losses and variability through both the delivery system and nasal cavity are expected to be high. The objective of this study was to assess the variability in aerosol delivery through the nose to the lungs with a nasal cannula interface for conventional and excipient enhanced growth (EEG) delivery techniques. A database of nasal cavity computed tomography (CT) scans was collected and analyzed, from which four models were selected to represent a wide range of adult anatomies, quantified based on the nasal surface area-to-volume ratio (SA/V). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods were validated with existing in vitro data and used to predict aerosol delivery through a streamlined nasal cannula and the four nasal models at a steady state flow rate of 30 L/min. Aerosols considered were solid particles for EEG delivery (initial 0.9 μm and 1.5 μm aerodynamic diameters) and conventional droplets (5 μm) for a control case. Use of the EEG approach was found to reduce depositional losses in the nasal cavity by an order of magnitude and substantially reduce variability. Specifically, for aerosol deposition efficiency in the four geometries, the 95% confidence intervals (CI) for 0.9 and 5 μm aerosols were 2.3-3.1 and 15.5-66.3%, respectively. Simulations showed that the use of EEG as opposed to conventional methods improved delivered dose of aerosols through the nasopharynx, expressed as penetration fraction (PF), by approximately a factor of four. Variability of PF, expressed by the coefficient of variation (CV), was reduced by a factor of four with EEG delivery compared with the control case. Penetration fraction correlated well with SA/V for larger aerosols, but smaller aerosols showed some dependence on nasopharyngeal exit hydraulic diameter. In conclusion, results indicated that

  19. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, Matthew E.; Pratt, Kerri A.; Kulkarni, Gourihar; Hallar, A. Gannet; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  20. Importance of aerosol composition, mixing state, and morphology for heterogeneous ice nucleation: A combined field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Baustian, Kelly J.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Wise, M. A.; Pratt, Kerri; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hallar, Anna G.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2012-03-30

    In this study chemical compositions of background aerosol and ice nuclei were examined through laboratory investigations using Raman spectroscopy and field measurements by single-particle mass spectrometry. Aerosol sampling took place at Storm Peak Laboratory in Steamboat Springs, Colorado (elevation of 3210 m). A cascade impactor was used to collect coarse-mode aerosol particles for laboratory analysis by Raman spectroscopy; the composition, mixing state, and heterogeneous ice nucleation activity of individual particles were examined. For in situ analysis of fine-mode aerosol, ice nucleation on ambient particles was observed using a compact ice nucleation chamber. Ice crystals were separated from unactivated aerosol using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor, and ice nuclei were analyzed using particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry. For both fine and coarse modes, the ice nucleating particle fractions were enriched in minerals and depleted in sulfates and nitrates, compared to the background aerosol sampled. The vast majority of particles in both the ambient and ice active aerosol fractions contained a detectable amount of organic material. Raman spectroscopy showed that organic material is sometimes present in the form of a coating on the surface of inorganic particles. We find that some organic-containing particles serve as efficient ice nuclei while others do not. For coarse-mode aerosol, organic particles were only observed to initiate ice formation when oxygen signatures were also present in their spectra.

  1. Ejaculate collection efficiency and post-thaw semen quality in wild-caught Griffon vultures from the Sardinian population

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Manuela; Berlinguer, Fiammetta; Ledda, Massimo; Leoni, Giovanni G; Satta, Valentina; Succu, Sara; Rotta, Andrea; Pasciu, Valeria; Zinellu, Angelo; Muzzeddu, Marco; Carru, Ciriaco; Naitana, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to test the feasibility of a programme of semen collection and cryopreservation in Griffon vultures. Four wild-caught individuals kept in captivity because of unrecoverable traumas were used. Semen collection attempts were made twice a week during three consecutive reproductive seasons (December – March) using the abdominal massage method. Ejaculation was successfully induced between late January and late February. Semen collection efficiency was rather low (27.9%) and it did not vary among individuals (p > 0.05). No differences were found in ejaculate volumes (12.5 +/- 9.1 μl), spermatozoa concentration (28.4 +/- 30.9 million cells/ml) and viability (61.3 +/- 13.9%) among the 4 vultures. ATP values differed among the four vultures (p < 0.001); B showed higher nucleotide concentration than both C and D, while it did not differ form A, whose values were higher compared with D. After freezing and thawing, semen in vitro viability, DNA integrity and ATP intracellular concentration were determined. Spermatozoa viability after thawing did not differ among the four individuals (52.6 +/- 5.8 in A, 53.4 +/- 4.6 in B, 50.4 +/- 3.2 in C, 42.5 +/- 2.7 in D), but it decreased significantly compared to fresh semen (p < 0.05). During 4 hrs in vitro culture, spermatozoa collected from B maintained over time a higher viability in vitro when compared to A, C and D. As evaluated by the comet assay method, DNA fragmentation after freezing and thawing did not differ in the 4 vultures. ATP concentration in frozen/thawed semen was significantly lower than in fresh semen (p < 0.0001). This study indicates that semen cryopreservation can be considered as a useful tool in the conservation of Griffon vulture genetic resources, but further studies are needed to optimize this technique. PMID:19228408

  2. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Shao, L. Y.; Zhou, S. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2011-11-01

    The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on the regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l.) from 19 to 28 April, 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19-21 April), from the south (phase-II: 22-25 April), and from the northwest (phase-III: 26-28 April). Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), new particle formation (NPF) and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a high percentage of particles were sulfur-rich (47-49%). In phase-III, the haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were dominant (43%). NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced on hazy than on clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10-22 nm in the morning to 56-96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. However, the presence of fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash) embedded within S-rich particles indicates that they could weaken NPF and enhance particle growth through condensation and coagulation. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because they supplied sufficient area on which acidic gases or acids condensed.

  3. A comparison between PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of metals in aerosol particulate collected in urban and marine sites in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversi, R.; Becagli, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Rugi, F.; Severi, M.; Udisti, R.

    2014-01-01

    PIXE and ICP-AES techniques are largely used in atmospheric aerosol studies. Since PIXE is able to provide the total elemental concentrations, while ICP-AES results depend on the extraction conditions, parallel PIXE and ICP-AES measurements of Fe, Al, Cu, Pb, Mn, Cr, Ni, V, As on PM10 and PM2.5 samples were compared. Two extraction procedures were applied to samples from 5 sites at different anthropization level in Italy: a "weak" extraction (HNO3 at pH = 1.5) and a "strong" extraction (micro-wave oven in HNO3 and H2O2 - following EU rules).

  4. Estimating Marine Aerosol Particle Volume and Number from Maritime Aerosol Network Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Munchak, L. A.; Holben, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    As well as spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol composition and concentration (number, volume, or mass) are of interest for a variety of applications. However, remote sensing of these quantities is more difficult than for AOD, as it is more sensitive to assumptions relating to aerosol composition. This study uses spectral AOD measured on Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) cruises, with the additional constraint of a microphysical model for unpolluted maritime aerosol based on analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) inversions, to estimate these quantities over open ocean. When the MAN data are subset to those likely to be comprised of maritime aerosol, number and volume concentrations obtained are physically reasonable. Attempts to estimate surface concentration from columnar abundance, however, are shown to be limited by uncertainties in vertical distribution. Columnar AOD at 550 nm and aerosol number for unpolluted maritime cases are also compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, for both the present Collection 5.1 and forthcoming Collection 6. MODIS provides a best-fitting retrieval solution, as well as the average for several different solutions, with different aerosol microphysical models. The average solution MODIS dataset agrees more closely with MAN than the best solution dataset. Terra tends to retrieve lower aerosol number than MAN, and Aqua higher, linked with differences in the aerosol models commonly chosen. Collection 6 AOD is likely to agree more closely with MAN over open ocean than Collection 5.1. In situations where spectral AOD is measured accurately, and aerosol microphysical properties are reasonably well-constrained, estimates of aerosol number and volume using MAN or similar data would provide for a greater variety of potential comparisons with aerosol properties derived from satellite or chemistry transport model data.

  5. Acid aerosol transport episodes in Toronto, Ontario

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, G.D. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Waldman, J. )

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the authors examine the pollution data collected during a 1986 field study in order to assess the nature and sources of acidic aerosols in the Toronto metropolitan area during this period. Through the examination of the continuous and filter aerosol data, isobaric back-trajectories of air masses, weather maps, and available trace element data, assessment are made of the character and possible sources of acid aerosols in this Southern Ontario city.

  6. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  7. Highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells with a solution-processable dendrimer as the electron-collection interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugesan, Vajjiravel; Sun, Kuan; Ouyang, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM, generation 2), a solution-processable dendrimer, is used as the electron-collection interlayer on indium tin oxide (ITO) for inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester as the active materials. The inverted PSCs exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 3.53% under AM1.5G illumination, which is significantly higher than that of the control inverted PSCs with blank ITO and comparable to that of the control PSCs with normal architecture. The high-performance of the inverted PSCs is attributed to the reduction of the work function of ITO by 0.75 eV by PAMAM.

  8. Hump-shaped internal collection efficiency of degraded a-Si:H {ital p-i-n} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smole, F.; Topic, M.; Furlan, J.; Kusian, W.

    1997-07-01

    Measured internal collection efficiency (ICE) characteristics of annealed and degraded a-Si:H p-i-n solar cells were used for an analysis of their internal behavior. Using the numerical simulator ASPIN, simulations were performed in order to fit and explain pronounced hump-shaped voltage-dependent ICE characteristics of degraded structures under weak short-wavelength illumination. Agreement with measured ICE characteristics for a degraded cell was obtained only if in addition to the introduction of light-induced dangling bond defect states, their capture cross sections were also increased, in particular the capture cross section for the charged defect states were increased. This caused a change in the occupancy of defect states at the p-i interface and front part of the i layer under forward biases. Consequently, the electric field in the front part of the cell was sustained under higher forward biases, resulting in recovery of the ICE. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. New measurement of the Fano factor of mercuric iodide. [astronomical x-ray detector charge collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Vallerga, J. V.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Entine, G.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that mercuric iodide (HgI2) shows great promise as a high-resolution X-ray detector for use in X-ray astronomy. Development of mercuric iodide for astronomical work has required investigation of the temperature dependence of the HgI2 crystal parameters such as leakage current, resolution, and mobility of the charge carriers. The first studies in connection with these investigations have led to a new value of the Fano factor of 0.19 + or - 0.03. The best value previously reported was 0.27 measured at room temperature. The new upper limit of 0.19 for the HgI2 Fano factor was determined by cooling the HgI2 crystal and preamp to -20 C. It is concluded that room-temperature energy resolution of HgI2 is not limited by charge generation statistics but rather by collection efficiency.

  10. Endotoxin in Size-Separated Metal Working Fluid Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Lindgren, Åsa; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2016-08-01

    Patients with airway symptoms working in metal working industries are increasing, despite efforts to improve the environmental air surrounding the machines. Our aim was to analyse the amount of endotoxin in size-separated airborne particles of metal working fluid (MWF) aerosol, by using the personal sampler Sioutas cascade impactor, to compare filter types, and to compare the concentration of airborne endotoxin to that of the corresponding MWFs. In a pilot field study, aerosols were collected in two separate machine halls on totally 10 occasions, using glass fibre and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters in parallel at each station. Airborne endotoxin was distributed over all size fractions. While a major part was found in the largest size fraction (72%, 2.5-10 µm), up to 8% of the airborne endotoxin was detected in the smallest size fraction (<0.25 µm). Comparing the efficiency of the filter types, a significantly higher median endotoxin level was found with glass fibres filters collecting the largest particle-size fraction (1.2-fold) and with PTFE filters collecting the smallest ones (5-fold). The levels of endotoxin in the size-separated airborne particle fractions correlated to those of the MWFs supporting the aerosol-generating machines. Our study indicates that a significant part of inhalable aerosols of MWFs consists of endotoxin-containing particles below the size of intact bacteria, and thus small enough to readily reach the deepest part of the lung. Combined with other chemical irritants of the MWF, exposure to MWF aerosols containing endotoxin pose a risk to respiratory health problems. PMID:27268595

  11. Improvement of the electron collection efficiency in porous hematite using a thin iron oxide underlayer: towards efficient all-iron based photoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Dalle Carbonare, Nicola; Carli, Stefano; Argazzi, Roberto; Orlandi, Michele; Bazzanella, Nicola; Miotello, Antonio; Caramori, Stefano; Bignozzi, Carlo A

    2015-11-28

    Different approaches have been explored to increase the water oxidation activity of nanostructured hematite (α-Fe2O3) photoanodes, including doping with various elements, surface functionalization with both oxygen evolving catalysts (OEC) and functional overlayers and, more recently, the introduction of ultrathin oxide underlayers as tunneling back contacts. Inspired by this latter strategy, we present here a photoanode design with a nanometric spin-coated iron oxide underlayer coupled with a mesoporous hematite film deposited by electrophoresis. The electrodes equipped with the thin underlayer exhibit a four-fold improvement in photoactivity over the simple hematite porous film, reaching a stable photocurrent density of ca. 1 mA cm(-2) at 0.65 V versus the saturated calomel electrode (SCE) at pH 13.3 (NaOH 0.1 M) under air mass (AM) 1.5G illumination. A further improvement to 1.5 mA cm(-2) is observed after decoration of the hematite surface with a Fe(iii)-OEC. These results demonstrate that by combining different iron oxide morphologies, it is possible to improve the selectivity of the interfaces towards both electron collection at the back contact and hole transfer to the electrolyte, obtaining an efficient all-iron based photoelectrode entirely realized with simple wet solution scalable procedures. PMID:26477966

  12. Performance of personal inhalable aerosol samplers in very slowly moving air when facing the aerosol source.

    PubMed

    Witschger, O; Grinshpun, S A; Fauvel, S; Basso, G

    2004-06-01

    While personal aerosol samplers have been characterized primarily based on wind tunnel tests conducted at relatively high wind speeds, modern indoor occupational environments are usually represented by very slow moving air. Recent surveys suggest that elevated levels of occupational exposure to inhalable airborne particles are typically observed when the worker, operating in the vicinity of the dust source, faces the source. Thus, the first objective of this study was to design and test a new, low cost experimental protocol for measuring the sampling efficiency of personal inhalable aerosol samplers in the vicinity of the aerosol source when the samplers operate in very slowly moving air. In this system, an aerosol generator, which is located in the centre of a room-sized non-ventilated chamber, continuously rotates and omnidirectionally disperses test particles of a specific size. The test and reference samplers are equally distributed around the source at the same distance from the centre and operate in parallel (in most of our experiments, the total number of simultaneously operating samplers was 15). Radial aerosol transport is driven by turbulent diffusion and some natural convection. For each specific particle size and the sampler, the aerosol mass concentration is measured by weighing the collection filter. The second objective was to utilize the new protocol to evaluate three widely used aerosol samplers: the IOM Personal Inhalable Sampler, the Button Personal Inhalable Aerosol Sampler and the 25 mm Millipore filter holder (closed-face C25 cassette). The sampling efficiencies of each instrument were measured with six particle fractions, ranging from 6.9 to 76.9 micro m in their mass median aerodynamic diameter. The Button Sampler efficiency data demonstrated a good agreement with the standard inhalable convention and especially with the low air movement inhalabilty curve. The 25 mm filter holder was found to considerably under-sample the particles larger

  13. Optimization of the electron collection efficiency of a large area MCP-PMT for the JUNO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Tian, Jinshou; Liu, Chunliang; Wang, Yifang; Zhao, Tianchi; Liu, Hulin; Wei, Yonglin; Sai, Xiaofeng; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xing; Lu, Yu; Hui, Dandan; Guo, Lehui; Liu, Shulin; Qian, Sen; Xia, Jingkai; Yan, Baojun; Zhu, Na; Sun, Jianning; Si, Shuguang; Li, Dong; Wang, Xingchao; Huang, Guorui; Qi, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A novel large-area (20-inch) photomultiplier tube based on microchannel plate (MCP-PMTs) is proposed for the Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) experiment. Its photoelectron collection efficiency Ce is limited by the MCP open area fraction (Aopen). This efficiency is studied as a function of the angular (θ), energy (E) distributions of electrons in the input charge cloud and the potential difference (U) between the PMT photocathode and the MCP input surface, considering secondary electron emission from the MCP input electrode. In CST Studio Suite, Finite Integral Technique and Monte Carlo method are combined to investigate the dependence of Ce on θ, E and U. Results predict that Ce can exceed Aopen, and are applied to optimize the structure and operational parameters of the 20-inch MCP-PMT prototype. Ce of the optimized MCP-PMT is expected to reach 81.2%. Finally, the reduction of the penetration depth of the MCP input electrode layer and the deposition of a high secondary electron yield material on the MCP are proposed to further optimize Ce.

  14. Enhanced carrier collection efficiency and reduced quantum state absorption by electron doping in self-assembled quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tian E-mail: dage@ece.umd.edu; Dagenais, Mario E-mail: dage@ece.umd.edu; Lu, Haofeng; Fu, Lan; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-02-02

    Reduced quantum dot (QD) absorption due to state filling effects and enhanced electron transport in doped QDs are demonstrated to play a key role in solar energy conversion. Reduced QD state absorption with increased n-doping is observed in the self-assembled In{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}As/GaAs QDs from high resolution below-bandgap external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurement, which is a direct consequence of the Pauli exclusion principle. We also show that besides partial filling of the quantum states, electron-doping produces negatively charged QDs that exert a repulsive Coulomb force on the mobile electrons, thus altering the electron trajectory and reducing the probability of electron capture, leading to an improved collection efficiency of photo-generated carriers, as indicated by an absolute above-bandgap EQE measurement. The resulting redistribution of the mobile electron in the planar direction is further validated by the observed photoluminescence intensity dependence on doping.

  15. A 12 year observation of water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-03-01

    In order to characterize the long term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12 year observation was conducted for water-soluble inorganic ions in TSP aerosols collected from 2001-2012 in the Asian outflow region at a Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of nss-SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007-2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001-2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are increasingly more transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific.

  16. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  17. Size effect on transfection and cytotoxicity of nanoscale plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes for aerosol gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon Byeon, Jeong; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale plasmid DNA (pDNA)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes were fabricated in the aerosol state using a nebulization system consisting of a collison atomizer and a cool-walled diffusion dryer. The aerosol fabricated nanoscale complexes were collected and employed to determine fundamental properties of the complexes, such as size, structure, surface charge, and in vitro gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. The results showed that mass ratio between pDNA and PEI should be optimized to enhance gene transfection efficiency without a significant loss of cell viability. These findings may support practical advancements in the field of nonviral gene delivery.

  18. Size effect on transfection and cytotoxicity of nanoscale plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes for aerosol gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Byeon, Jeong; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-02-03

    Nanoscale plasmid DNA (pDNA)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes were fabricated in the aerosol state using a nebulization system consisting of a collison atomizer and a cool-walled diffusion dryer. The aerosol fabricated nanoscale complexes were collected and employed to determine fundamental properties of the complexes, such as size, structure, surface charge, and in vitro gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. The results showed that mass ratio between pDNA and PEI should be optimized to enhance gene transfection efficiency without a significant loss of cell viability. These findings may support practical advancements in the field of nonviral gene delivery.

  19. Individual particle analysis of aerosols collected under haze and non-haze conditions at a high-elevation mountain site in the North China plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. J.; Zhang, D. Z.; Shao, L. Y.; Zhou, S. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2011-08-01

    The North China plain is a region with megacities and huge populations. Aerosols over the highly polluted area have a significant impact on a regional and global climate. In order to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosol particles in elevated layers there, observations were carried out at the summit of Mt. Tai (1534 m a.s.l) from 19 to 28 April 2010, when the air masses were advected from the east (phase-I: 19-21 April), from the south (phase-II: 22-25 April), and from the northwest (phase-III: 26-28 April). Individual aerosol particles were identified with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), new particle formation (NPF) and growth events were monitored by a wide-range particle spectrometer, and ion concentrations in PM2.5 were analyzed. During phase-I and phase-II, haze layers caused by anthropogenic pollution were observed, and a major number of particles were sulfur-rich (47-49 %). In phase-III, haze disappeared due to the intrusion of cold air from the northwest, and mineral dust particles from deserts were predominant (43 %). NPF followed by particle growth during daytime was more pronounced at upper levels of the haze layers than clear days. Particle growth during daytime resulted in an increase of particle geometric mean diameter from 10-22 nm in the morning to 56-96 nm in the evening. TEM analysis suggests that sulfuric acid and secondary organic compounds should be important factors for particle nucleation and growth. Moreover, the presence of ultrafine and fine anthropogenic particles (e.g., soot, metal, and fly ash) embedded within S-rich particles may indicate their influences on particle nucleation through condensation and enhancement of particle growth through coagulation. Each fine refractory particle can enlarge the sulfate particles by 10-20 nm. Abundant mineral particles in phase-III likely suppressed the NPF processes because a high number of crustal mineral particles in the free troposphere supplied an important

  20. Transfer learning used to analyze the dynamic evolution of the dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Gong, Wei; Mao, Feiyue

    2015-03-01

    To keep the advantage of Support Vector Machine (SVM) in analyzing the dynamic evolution of the dust aerosol, we introduce transfer learning as a new method because transfer learning can utilize knowledge from previously collected data and add dozens of new samples, which can significantly improve dust and cloud classification results. It can also reduce the time of sample collection and make learning efficient. In this paper, we receive significant improvement effect using SVM as the basic learner in TrAdaBoost during four consecutive dust storm days, and correct one error classification in PDF. As a result, dust aerosol in high altitude can even spread to stratosphere. Moreover, in the process of dust aerosol transportation, it is highly affected by anthropogenic aerosol, for example, the color ratio (CR) changes from 0.728 to 0.460 and finally reaches 0.466, while depolarization ratio (DR) changes from 0.308 to 0.081 and finally reaches 0.156. It is indicated that the big size and non-spherical aerosol particles reduce obviously after dust aerosol deposition, but small size and spherical anthropogenic aerosol also produce a certain effect, and on March 22, 2010 had a small recovery above the ocean following the reduction of DR and CR. Due to the MODIS resolution not meeting the observation requirement and layer identification being different between CALIPSO and CloudSat, a problem such as stratocumulus cloud in low altitude still exists in aerosol and cloud classification. Lack of ground-based auxiliary data is the main problem which hinders our validation and quantitative analysis. It is pressing for a solution in future.

  1. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  2. METHODS OF CALCULATINAG LUNG DELIVERY AND DEPOSITION OF AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Lung deposition of aerosol is measured by a variety of methods. Total lung deposition can be measured by monitoring inhaled and exhaled aerosols in situ by laser photometry or by collecting the aerosols on filters. The measurements can be performed accurately for stable monod...

  3. Saharan Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing Measured from Space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Ramanathan, V.

    2004-07-01

    This study uses data collected from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments to determine Saharan dust broadband shortwave aerosol radiative forcing over the Atlantic Ocean near the African coast (15° 25°N, 45° 15°W). The clear-sky aerosol forcing is derived directly from these data, without requiring detailed information about the aerosol properties that are not routinely observed such as chemical composition, microphysical properties, and their height variations. To determine the diurnally averaged Saharan dust radiative forcing efficiency (i.e., broadband shortwave forcing per unit optical depth at 550 nm, W m-2 τ-1a), two extreme seasons are juxtaposed: the high-dust months [June August (JJA)] and the low-dust months [November January (NDJ)]. It is found that the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) diurnal mean forcing efficiency is -35 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for JJA, and -26 ± 3 W m-2 τ-1a for NDJ. These efficiencies can be fit by reducing the spectrally varying aerosol single-scattering albedo such that its value at 550 nm is reduced from 0.95 ± 0.04 for JJA to about 0.86 ± 0.04 for NDJ. The lower value for the low-dust months might be influenced by biomass-burning aerosols that were transported into the study region from equatorial Africa. Although the high-dust season has a greater (absolute value of the) TOA forcing efficiency, the low-dust season may have a greater surface forcing efficiency. Extrapolations based on model calculations suggest the surface forcing efficiencies to be about -65 W m-2 τ-1a for the high-dust season versus -81 W m-2 τ-1a for the low-dust season. These observations indicate that the aerosol character within a region can be readily modified, even immediately adjacent to a powerful source region such as the Sahara. This study provides important observational constraints for models of dust radiative forcing.


  4. Airborne influenza virus detection with four aerosol samplers using molecular and infectivity assays: considerations for a new infectious virus aerosol sampler

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, P.; McDevitt, J. J.; Houseman, E. A.; Milton, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    As a first step in conducting studies of airborne influenza transmission, we compared the collection performance of an SKC Biosampler, a compact cascade impactor (CCI), Teflon filters, and gelatin filters by collecting aerosolized influenza virus in a one-pass aerosol chamber. Influenza virus infectivity was determined using a fluorescent focus assay and influenza virus nucleic acid (originating from viable and non-viable viruses) was measured using quantitative PCR. The results showed that the SKC Biosampler recovered and preserved influenza virus infectivity much better than the other samplers – the CCI, Teflon, and gelatin filters recovered only 7–22% of infectious viruses compared with the Biosampler. Total virus collection was not significantly different among the SKC Biosampler, the gelatin, and Teflon filters, but was significantly lower in the CCI. Results from this study show that a new sampler is needed for virus aerosol sampling, as commercially available samplers do not efficiently collect and conserve virus infectivity. Applications for a new sampler include studies of airborne disease transmission and bioterrorism monitoring. Design parameters for a new sampler include high collection efficiency for fine particles and liquid sampling media to preserve infectivity. PMID:19689447

  5. A simple parameterization of aerosol emissions in RAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letcher, Theodore

    Throughout the past decade, a high degree of attention has been focused on determining the microphysical impact of anthropogenically enhanced concentrations of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) on orographic snowfall in the mountains of the western United States. This area has garnered a lot of attention due to the implications this effect may have on local water resource distribution within the Region. Recent advances in computing power and the development of highly advanced microphysical schemes within numerical models have provided an estimation of the sensitivity that orographic snowfall has to changes in atmospheric CCN concentrations. However, what is still lacking is a coupling between these advanced microphysical schemes and a real-world representation of CCN sources. Previously, an attempt to representation the heterogeneous evolution of aerosol was made by coupling three-dimensional aerosol output from the WRF Chemistry model to the Colorado State University (CSU) Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) (Ward et al. 2011). The biggest problem associated with this scheme was the computational expense. In fact, the computational expense associated with this scheme was so high, that it was prohibitive for simulations with fine enough resolution to accurately represent microphysical processes. To improve upon this method, a new parameterization for aerosol emission was developed in such a way that it was fully contained within RAMS. Several assumptions went into generating a computationally efficient aerosol emissions parameterization in RAMS. The most notable assumption was the decision to neglect the chemical processes in formed in the formation of Secondary Aerosol (SA), and instead treat SA as primary aerosol via short-term WRF-CHEM simulations. While, SA makes up a substantial portion of the total aerosol burden (much of which is made up of organic material), the representation of this process is highly complex and highly expensive within a numerical

  6. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Herceg, Joseph E.; Klocksieben, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

  7. The MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy: A Flexible Strategy for Efficient Information Collection and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bos, Peter M J; Gottardo, Stefania; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Semenzin, Elena; Fernandes, Teresa F; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Hunt, Neil; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Landsiedel, Robert; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Kesteren, Petra C E; Oomen, Agnes G

    2015-12-01

    An engineered nanomaterial (ENM) may actually consist of a population of primary particles, aggregates and agglomerates of various sizes. Furthermore, their physico-chemical characteristics may change during the various life-cycle stages. It will probably not be feasible to test all varieties of all ENMs for possible health and environmental risks. There is therefore a need to further develop the approaches for risk assessment of ENMs. Within the EU FP7 project Managing Risks of Nanoparticles (MARINA) a two-phase risk assessment strategy has been developed. In Phase 1 (Problem framing) a base set of information is considered, relevant exposure scenarios (RESs) are identified and the scope for Phase 2 (Risk assessment) is established. The relevance of an RES is indicated by information on exposure, fate/kinetics and/or hazard; these three domains are included as separate pillars that contain specific tools. Phase 2 consists of an iterative process of risk characterization, identification of data needs and integrated collection and evaluation of data on the three domains, until sufficient information is obtained to conclude on possible risks in a RES. Only data are generated that are considered to be needed for the purpose of risk assessment. A fourth pillar, risk characterization, is defined and it contains risk assessment tools. This strategy describes a flexible and efficient approach for data collection and risk assessment which is essential to ensure safety of ENMs. Further developments are needed to provide guidance and make the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy operational. Case studies will be needed to refine the strategy. PMID:26633430

  8. The MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy: A Flexible Strategy for Efficient Information Collection and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Peter M. J.; Gottardo, Stefania; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; van Tongeren, Martie; Semenzin, Elena; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Hunt, Neil; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Landsiedel, Robert; Peijnenburg, Willie J. G. M.; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Kesteren, Petra C. E.; Oomen, Agnes G.

    2015-01-01

    An engineered nanomaterial (ENM) may actually consist of a population of primary particles, aggregates and agglomerates of various sizes. Furthermore, their physico-chemical characteristics may change during the various life-cycle stages. It will probably not be feasible to test all varieties of all ENMs for possible health and environmental risks. There is therefore a need to further develop the approaches for risk assessment of ENMs. Within the EU FP7 project Managing Risks of Nanoparticles (MARINA) a two-phase risk assessment strategy has been developed. In Phase 1 (Problem framing) a base set of information is considered, relevant exposure scenarios (RESs) are identified and the scope for Phase 2 (Risk assessment) is established. The relevance of an RES is indicated by information on exposure, fate/kinetics and/or hazard; these three domains are included as separate pillars that contain specific tools. Phase 2 consists of an iterative process of risk characterization, identification of data needs and integrated collection and evaluation of data on the three domains, until sufficient information is obtained to conclude on possible risks in a RES. Only data are generated that are considered to be needed for the purpose of risk assessment. A fourth pillar, risk characterization, is defined and it contains risk assessment tools. This strategy describes a flexible and efficient approach for data collection and risk assessment which is essential to ensure safety of ENMs. Further developments are needed to provide guidance and make the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy operational. Case studies will be needed to refine the strategy. PMID:26633430

  9. Charge collection efficiency and space charge formation in CdTe gamma and X-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matz, R.; Weidner, M.

    1998-02-01

    A new extended model for the charge collection efficiency in CdTe gamma and X ray detectors is presented which allows to derive from apparent experimental gamma spectra of a quasi-monochromatic source, an 241Am source in the present case, not only the μρ products of electrons and holes individually but also the sign, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of the net space charge accumulated in the detector. Resistive CdTe and CdZnTe as well as CdTe Schottky detectors are studied. While the resistive type is stable in time and exhibits higher μτ products, the Schottky type shows space charge accumulation which approaches saturation after about 1 h at several 10 11 cm -3. This is attributed to efficient majority carrier depletion, Fermi level shift, and trap filling. Resistive detectors thus appear optimized to the needs of gamma spectroscopy even at low bias voltage, while Schottky types need higher bias to overcome the space charge. They are suited to both, gamma spectroscopy and X-ray detection in analog current mode, where they operate more stably due ρo the higher bias. From the point of view of materials characterization, gamma spectroscopy with Schottky detectors probes and reveals the trap density near the Fermi level (several 10 12 cm -3 eV -1). We find a basically homogeneous spatial distribution suggesting the trap origin being in crystal growth rather than surface processing. Capture of photogenerated charges in traps is detrimental for current-mode operation under high X-ray flux because delayed emission from traps limits the detector's ability to respond to fast signal changes.

  10. Aerosol Modeling for the Global Model Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenstein, Debra K.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an aerosol module to be used within the framework of the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The model development work will be preformed jointly by the University of Michigan and AER, using existing aerosol models at the two institutions as starting points. The GMI aerosol model will be tested, evaluated against observations, and then applied to assessment of the effects of aircraft sulfur emissions as needed by the NASA Subsonic Assessment in 2001. The work includes the following tasks: 1. Implementation of the sulfur cycle within GMI, including sources, sinks, and aqueous conversion of sulfur. Aerosol modules will be added as they are developed and the GMI schedule permits. 2. Addition of aerosol types other than sulfate particles, including dust, soot, organic carbon, and black carbon. 3. Development of new and more efficient parameterizations for treating sulfate aerosol nucleation, condensation, and coagulation among different particle sizes and types.

  11. Study on Dicarboxylic Acids in Aerosol Samples with Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α, ω-dicarboxylic acids (C2–C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50 μL. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2–C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m3. PMID:24729915

  12. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Springer, David

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology. However, this technology is capable of bringing the air leakage of a building that was built with standard construction techniques and HERS-verified sealing down to levels that would meet DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes program requirements. When a developer is striving to meet a tighter envelope leakage specification, this technology could greatly reduce the cost to achieve that goal by providing a simple and relatively low cost method for reducing the air leakage of a building envelope with little to no change in their common building practices.

  13. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  14. Feasibility study for GCOM-C/SGLI: Retrieval algorithms for carbonaceous aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Sonoyo; Sano, Itaru; Yasumoto, Masayoshi; Fujito, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Makiko; Kokhanovsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has been developing the new Earth observing system, GCOM (Global Change Observation Mission) project, which consists of two satellite series of GCOM-W1 and GCOM-C1. The 1st GCOM-C satellite will board the SGLI (second generation global imager) which also includes polarimetric sensor and be planed to launch in early of 2017. The SGLI has multi (19)-channels including near UV channel (380 nm) and two polarization channels at red and near-infrared wavelengths of 670 and 870 nm. EUMETSAT plans to collect polarization measurements with a POLDER follow on 3MI / EPS-SG in 2021. Then the efficient retrieval algorithms for aerosol and/or cloud based on the combination use of radiance and polarization are strongly expected. This work focuses on serious biomass burning episodes in East Asia. It is noted that the near UV measurements are available for detection of the carbonaceous aerosols. The biomass burning aerosols (BBA) generated by forest fire and/or agriculture biomass burning have influenced on the severe air pollutions. It is known that the forest fire increases due to global warming and a climate change, and has influences on them vice versa. It is well known that this negative cycle decreases the quality of global environment and human health. We intend to consider not only retrieval algorithms of remote sensing for severe air pollutions but also detection and/or distinction of aerosols and clouds, because mixture of aerosols and clouds are often occurred in the severe air pollutions. Then precise distinction of aerosols and clouds, namely aerosols in cloudy scenes and/or clouds in heavy aerosol episode, is desired. Aerosol retrieval in the hazy atmosphere has been achieved based on radiation simulation method of successive order of scattering 1,2. In this work, we use both radiance and polarization measurements observed by GLI and POLDER-2 on Japanese ADEOS-2 satellite in 2003 as a simulated data. As a result the

  15. Standard aerosols for particle velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepark, A.; Ozarski, R.; Thomson, J. A. L.

    1976-01-01

    System consists of laser-scattering counter (LSC) and photographic system. Photographic system provides absolute method of measuring aerosol size-distribution independently of their light scattering properties. LSC comprises 1-mW He/Ne laser, input optics, collecting optics, photodetector, and signal-processing electronics.

  16. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  17. A 12-year observation of water-soluble ions in TSP aerosols collected at a remote marine location in the western North Pacific: an outflow region of Asian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreddy, S. K. R.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-06-01

    In order to characterize the long-term trend of remote marine aerosols, a 12-year observation was conducted for water-soluble ions in TSP (total suspended particulate) aerosols collected from 2001 to 2012 in the Asian outflow region at Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific. We found a clear difference in chemical composition between the continentally affected and marine background air masses over the observation site. Asian continental air masses are delivered from late autumn to spring, whereas marine air masses were dominated in summer. Concentrations of non-sea salt (nss-) SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, nss-K+ and nss-Ca2+ are high in winter and spring and low in summer. On the other hand, MSA- (methanesulfonate) exhibits higher concentrations during spring and winter, probably due to springtime dust bloom or due to the direct continental transport of MSA- to the observation site. We could not find any clear decadal trend for Na+, Cl-, Mg2+ and nss-Ca2+ in all seasons, although there exists a clear seasonal trend. However, concentrations of nss-SO42- continuously decreased from 2007 to 2012, probably due to the decreased SO2 emissions in East Asia especially in China. In contrast, nss-K+ and MSA- concentrations continuously increased from 2001 to 2012 during winter and spring seasons, demonstrating that biomass burning and/or terrestrial biological emissions in East Asia are being increasingly transported from the Asian continent to the western North Pacific. This study also demonstrates that Asian dusts can act as an important source of nutrients for phytoplankton and thus sea-to-air emission of dimethyl sulfide over the western North Pacific.

  18. Characterization of Organic Nitrogen in the Atmosphere Using High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, X.; Sun, Y.; Chen, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Despite extensive efforts on characterizing organic nitrogen (ON) compounds in atmospheric aerosols and aqueous droplets, knowledge of ON chemistry is still limited, mainly due to its chemical complexity and lack of highly time-resolved measurements. This work is aimed at optimizing the method of using Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) to characterize ON compounds in atmospheric aerosols. Seventy-five pure nitrogen-containing organic compounds covering a variety of functional groups were analyzed with the HR-AMS. Our results show that ON compounds commonly produce NHx+, NOx+, which are usually attributed to inorganic N species such as ammonium and nitrate, and CH2N+ at m/z = 28, which is rarely quantified in ambient aerosol due to large interference from N2+ in the air signal. As a result, using the nitrogen-to-carbon (N/C) calibration factor proposed by Aiken et al. (2008) on average leads to ~ 20% underestimation of N/C in ambient organic aerosol. A new calibration factor of 0.79 is proposed for determining the average N/C in organics. The relative ionization efficiencies (RIEs) of different ON species, on average, are found to be consistent with the default RIE value (1.4) for the total organics. The AMS mass spectral features of various types of ON species (amines, amides, amino acids, etc.) are examined and used for characterizing ON composition in ambient aerosols. Our results indicate that submicron organic aerosol measured during wintertime in Fresno, CA contains significant amounts of amino-compounds whereas more diversified ON species, including N-containing aromatic heterocycle (e.g., imidazoles), are observed in fog waters collected simultaneously. Our findings have important implications for understanding atmospheric ON behaviors via the widespread HR-AMS measurements of ambient aerosols and droplets.

  19. SoFi, an IGOR-based interface for the efficient use of the generalized multilinear engine (ME-2) for the source apportionment: ME-2 application to aerosol mass spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonaco, F.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Source apportionment using the bilinear model through a multilinear engine (ME-2) was successfully applied to non-refractory organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra collected during the winter of 2011 and 2012 in Zurich, Switzerland using the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM). Five factors were identified: low-volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA), semivolatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA), hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking OA (COA) and biomass burning OA (BBOA). A graphical user interface SoFi (Source Finder) was developed at PSI in order to facilitate the testing of different rotational techniques available within the ME-2 engine by providing a priori factor profiles for some or all of the expected factors. ME-2 was used to test the positive matrix factorization (PMF) model, the fully constrained chemical mass balance (CMB) model, and partially constrained models utilizing a values and pulling equations. Within the set of model solutions determined to be environmentally reasonable, BBOA and SV-OOA factor mass spectra and time series showed the greatest variability. This variability represents the uncertainty in the model solution and indicates that analysis of model rotations provides a useful approach for assessing the uncertainty of bilinear source apportionment models.

  20. Aerosols, climate, and the hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, V; Crutzen, P J; Kiehl, J T; Rosenfeld, D

    2001-12-01

    Human activities are releasing tiny particles (aerosols) into the atmosphere. These human-made aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation. They also produce brighter clouds that are less efficient at releasing precipitation. These in turn lead to large reductions in the amount of solar irradiance reaching Earth's surface, a corresponding increase in solar heating of the atmosphere, changes in the atmospheric temperature structure, suppression of rainfall, and less efficient removal of pollutants. These aerosol effects can lead to a weaker hydrological cycle, which connects directly to availability and quality of fresh water, a major environmental issue of the 21st century. PMID:11739947

  1. Generation of a monodispersed aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenck, H.; Mikasa, M.; Devicariis, R.

    1974-01-01

    The identity and laboratory test methods for the generation of a monodispersed aerosol are reported on, and are subjected to the following constraints and parameters; (1) size distribution; (2) specific gravity; (3) scattering properties; (4) costs; (5) production. The procedure called for the collection of information from the literature, commercial available products, and experts working in the field. The following topics were investigated: (1) aerosols; (2) air pollution -- analysis; (3) atomizers; (4) dispersion; (5) particles -- optics, size analysis; (6) smoke -- generators, density measurements; (7) sprays; (8) wind tunnels -- visualization.

  2. Holistic aerosol evaluation using synthesized aerosol aircraft measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson-Parris, Duncan; Reddington, Carly; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip; Carslaw, Ken; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James; Coe, Hugh

    2016-04-01

    Despite ongoing efforts there are still large uncertainties in aerosol concentrations and loadings across many commonly used GCMs. This in turn leads to large uncertainties in the contributions of the direct and indirect aerosol forcing on climate. However, constraining these fields using earth observation data, although providing global coverage, is problematic for many reasons, including the large uncertainties in retrieving aerosol loadings. Additionally, the inability to retrieve aerosols in or around cloudy scenes leads to further sampling biases (Gryspeerdt 2015). Many in-situ studies have used regional datasets to attempt to evaluate the model uncertainties, but these are unable to provide an assessment of the models ability to represent aerosols properties on a global scale. Within the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP) we have assembled the largest collection of quality controlled, in-situ aircraft observations ever synthesized to a consistent format. This provides a global set of in-situ measurements of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Black Carbon (BC), amongst others. In particular, the large number of vertical profiles provided by this aircraft data allows us to investigate the vertical structure of aerosols across a wide range of regions and environments. These vertical distributions are particularly valuable when investigating the dominant processes above or below clouds where remote sensing data is not available. Here we present initial process-based assessments of the BC lifetimes and vertical distributions of CCN in the HadGEM-UKCA and ECHAM-HAM models using this data. We use point-by-point based comparisons to avoid the sampling issues associated with comparing spatio-temporal aggregations.

  3. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  4. Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D W

    1982-01-01

    The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

  5. PIXE Analysis of Indoor Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Christopher; Turley, Colin; Moore, Robert; Battaglia, Maria; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol samples collected in academic buildings at Union College to investigate the air quality in these buildings and the effectiveness of their air filtration systems. This is also the commissioning experiment for a new scattering chamber in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. The aerosol samples were collected on Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates particles according to their aerodynamic size. The foils were bombarded with beams of 2.2-MeV protons from the Union College 1.1-MV Pelletron Accelerator and the X-ray products were detected with an Amptek silicon drift detector. After subtracting the contribution from the Kapton foils, the X-ray energy spectra of the aerosol samples were analyzed using GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the samples. We will describe the collection of the aerosol samples, discuss the PIXE analysis, and present the results.