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Sample records for aerosol cooling effect

  1. Unexpected Benefits of Reducing Aerosol Cooling Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of aerosol cooling are not limited to changes in surface temperature since modulation of atmospheric dynamics resulting from the increased stability can deteriorate local air quality and impact human health. Health impacts from two manifestations of the aerosol direct eff...

  2. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of tropospheric aerosols on atmospheric infrared cooling rates is investigated by the use of recent models of infrared gaseous absorption. A radiative model of the atmosphere that incorporates dust as an absorber and scatterer of infrared radiation is constructed by employing the exponential kernel approximation to the radiative transfer equation. Scattering effects are represented in terms of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetry factor. The model is applied to estimate the effect of an aerosol layer made of spherical quartz particles on the infrared cooling rate. Calculations performed for a reference wavelength of 0.55 microns show an increased greenhouse effect, where the net upward flux at the surface is reduced by 10% owing to the strongly enhanced downward emission. There is a substantial increase in the cooling rate near the surface, but the mean cooling rate throughout the lower troposphere was only 10%.

  3. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  4. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the impact of wind-blown dust particles upon local climate of arid regions. The case of Northwest India is specifically considered, where a dense layer of dust persists for several months during the summer. In order to examine the effect of this dust layer on the infrared radiative flux and cooling rates, a method is presented for calculating the IR flux within a dusty atmosphere which allows the use of gaseous band models and is applicable in the limit of small single scattering albedo and pronounced forward scattering. The participating components of the atmosphere are assumed to be water vapor and spherical quartz particles only. The atmospheric window is partially filled by including the water vapor continuum bands for which empirically obtained transmission functions have been used. It is shown that radically different conclusions may be drawn on dust effects if the continuum absorption is not considered. The radiative transfer model, when applied to a dusty atmosphere, indicates that there is a moderate enhancement in the atmospheric greenhouse and a 10% increase in the mean IR radiative cooling rate, relative to the dust free case, within the lower troposphere. These results have been compared with previous work by other authors in the context of the possibility of dust layers inhibiting local precipitation.

  5. Data sets for manuscript titled Unexpected benefits of reducing aerosol cooling effects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data sets were created using extensive model simulation results from the WRF-CMAQ model, population distributions, and through the use of an health impact assessment model - see manuscript for details.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Xing, J., J. Wang, R. Mathur , J. Pleim , S. Wang, C. Hogrefe , C. Gan, D. Wong , and J. Hao. Unexpected Benefits of Reducing Aerosol Cooling Effects. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, USA, 50(14): 7527–7534, (2016).

  6. Simultaneous reductions in emissions of black carbon and co-emitted species will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in the short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate atmosphere-only model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero with prescribed sea surface temperature and sea ice cover, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with recent past year 2000 levels if the emissions of only BC are reduced to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial~for the mitigation of global warming. However, both aerosol negative direct and indirect radiative effects are weakened when BC and its co-emitted species (sulfur dioxide and organic carbon) are simultaneously reduced. Relative to year 2000 levels, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 if the emissions of all these aerosols are decreased to the levels projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  7. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  8. Quantifying greenhouse warming, aerosol cooling and the transient climate sensitivity - A novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, T.; Leirvik, T.; Phillips, P.; Turrini, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present an interdisciplinary study combining climate observations and modeling with econometric methodology to identify the relative contributions to recent climate change from greenhouse warming and aerosol cooling. The cooling effect of aerosols has likely masked some of the warming due to increasing GHG concentrations to date. Several publications have recently pointed out the intimate relationship between the aerosol cooling effect and climate sensitivity. Generally, a GCM that has a large aerosol cooling effect will typically have a high climate sensitivity, and vice versa. Given this connection between the aerosol effect and the GCMs climate sensitivity, it is problematic that the aerosol effect is still very poorly constrained, even after decades of dedicated research on aerosol effects on climate. It is time to seek out other complimentary and parallel approaches to the traditional ones, and this is at the heart of the presented study. We apply econometric methods to determine the parameters of an energy balance model, using observed time series of surface air temperature, radiation and CO2 concentrations. This framework allows us to decompose of the observed temperature trend into a GHG component and an aerosol component for the time period 1960 to 2000. We find that aerosols have likely masked about 50% of the warming due to increasing GHG concentrations during this time period. This is compared to a much weaker aerosol masking simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Earth System Model (CESM). The framework also allows for an estimate of the transient climate sensitivity, with the caveat that the estimate is only valid for the parts of the globe which have sufficient data coverage to be included in our analysis. This is the case for most land areas, for which our framework yields a transient climate sensitivity of 6.1K, with a 95% confidence interval of [3.6, 8.7]K.

  9. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  10. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  11. Aerosol exposure versus aerosol cooling of climate: what is the optimal emission reduction strategy for human health?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löndahl, J.; Swietlicki, E.; Lindgren, E.; Loft, S.

    2010-10-01

    Particles, climate change, and health have thought-provoking interactions. Air pollution is one of the largest environmental problems concerning human health. On the other hand, aerosol particles can have a cooling effect on climate and a reduction of those emissions may result in an increased temperature globally, which in turn may have negative health effects. The objective of this work was to investigate the "total health effects" of aerosol emissions, which include both exposure to particles and consequences for climate change initiated by particles. As a case study the "total health effect" from ship emissions was derived by subtracting the number of deaths caused by exposure with the estimated number of lives saved from the cooling effect of the emissions. The analysis showed that, with current level of scientific understanding, it could not be determined whether ship emissions are negative or positive for human health on a short time scale. This first attempt to approximate the combined effect of particle emissions on health shows that reductions of particulate air pollution will in some cases (black carbon) have win-win effects on health and climate, but sometimes also cause a shift from particle exposure-related health effects towards an increasing risk of health consequences from climate change. Thus, measures to reduce aerosol emissions have to be coupled with climate change mitigation actions to achieve a full health benefit on a global level.

  12. Aerosol effects on deep convective clouds: impact of changes in aerosol size distribution and aerosol activation parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekman, A. M. L.; Engström, A.; Söderberg, A.

    2010-03-01

    A cloud-resolving model including explicit aerosol physics and chemistry is used to study the impact of aerosols on deep convective strength. More specifically, by conducting six sensitivity series we examine how the complexity of the aerosol model, the size of the aerosols and the aerosol activation parameterization influence the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity. Only aerosol effects on liquid droplet formation are considered. We find that an increased aerosol concentration generally results in stronger convection, which for the simulated case is in agreement with the conceptual model presented by Rosenfeld et al. (2008). However, there are two sensitivity series that do not display a monotonic increase in updraft velocity with increasing aerosol concentration. These exceptions illustrate the need to: 1) account for changes in evaporation processes and subsequent cooling when assessing aerosol effects on deep convective strength, 2) better understand graupel impaction scavenging of aerosols which may limit the number of CCN at a critical stage of cloud development and thereby dampen the convection, 3) increase our knowledge of aerosol recycling due to evaporation of cloud droplets. Furthermore, we find a significant difference in the aerosol-induced deep convective cloud sensitivity when using different complexities of the aerosol model and different aerosol activation parameterizations. For the simulated case, a 100% increase in aerosol concentration results in a difference in average updraft between the various sensitivity series which is as large as the average updraft increase itself. The model simulations also show that the change in graupel and rain formation is not necessarily directly proportional to the change in updraft velocity. For example, several of the sensitivity series display a decrease of the rain amount at the lowest model level with increasing updraft velocity. Finally, an increased number of aerosols in the Aitken mode (here

  13. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

  14. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  15. Ice nucleation in the upper troposphere: Sensitivity to aerosol number density, temperature, and cooling rate

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have investigated the processes that control ice crystal nucleation in the upper troposphere using a numerical model. Nucleation of ice resulting from cooling was simulated for a range of aerosol number densities, initial temperatures, and cooling rates. In contrast to observations of stratus clouds, we find that the number of ice crystals that nucleate in cirrus is relatively insensitive to the number of aerosols present. The ice crystal size distribution at the end of the nucleation process is unaffected by the assumed initial aerosol number density. Essentially, nucleation continues until enough ice crystals are present such that their deposition growth rapidly depletes the vapor and shuts off any further nucleation. However, the number of ice crystals nucleated increases rapidly with decreasing initial temperature and increasing cooling rate. This temperature dependence alone could explain the large ice crystal number density observed in very cold tropical cirrus.

  16. Observed Holiday Aerosol Reduction and Temperature Cooling over East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Daoyi; Wang, Wenshan; Qian, Yun; Bai, Wenbing; Guo, Yuanxi; Mao, Rui

    2014-06-16

    The Spring Festival air pollution in China was investigated using the long-term observations from 2001-2012 over 323 stations. During the Spring Festival with nearly half of urban population leaving the cities for holidays, the particulate matter (PM10) concentration is about 24.5μgm-3 (23%) lower than normal days. Associated with the national-wide burning of firework, the PM10 concentration sharply increases to 123.8μgm-3 at Chinese New Year Day (increment of 35%). Similar to PM10, the SO2 and NO2 decrease from high values in normal days to a holiday minimum with reduction of 23.3% and 30.6%, respectively. The NO2 has no peak in New Year Day because of the different emission source. The night mean and minimum temperature co-vary with PM10. Both nighttime mean and minimum temperature decrease by about 2.1°C during the holidays. And in association with the pollution jump at New Year Day the night temperature simultaneously increase by about 0.89°C. The in-phase co-variations between PM10 and night temperature suggest an overall warming effect of holiday aerosol during winter in China.

  17. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

    2011-06-21

    The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the

  18. Combustion effects on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of: (1) a reactive environment on film cooling effectiveness, and (2) film cooling on rocket engine performance were determined experimentally in a rocket thrust chamber assembly operating with hydrogen and oxygen propellants at 300 psi chamber pressure. Tests were conducted using hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen film coolants in an instrumented, thin walled, steel thrust chamber. The film cooling, performance loss, and heat transfer coefficient data were correlated with the ALRC entrainment film cooling model which relates film coolant effectiveness and mixture ratio at the wall to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. In addition, a comprehensive thermal analysis computer program, HOCOOL, was prepared from previously existing ALRC computer programs and analytical techniques.

  19. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  20. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; McIntosh, Dawn

    2000-01-01

    Ames researchers have combined measurements from satellite, aircraft, and the surface to estimate the effect of airborne particles (aerosols) on the solar radiation over the North Atlantic region. These aerosols (which come from both natural and pollution sources) can reflect solar radiation, causing a cooling effect that opposes the warming caused by carbon dioxide. Recently, increased attention has been paid to aerosol effects to better understand the Earth climate system.

  1. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  2. Global fine-mode aerosol radiative effect, as constrained by comprehensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul E.; Chu, Jung-Eun; Lee, Yunha; van Noije, Twan; Jeoung, Hwayoung; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Marks, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Aerosols directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. Although the contributions of absorption (heating) and scattering (cooling) of sunlight have proved difficult to quantify, the consensus is that anthropogenic aerosols cool the climate, partially offsetting the warming by rising greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent estimates of global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (i.e., global radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions) are -0.35 ± 0.5 W m-2, and these estimates depend heavily on aerosol simulation. Here, we integrate a comprehensive suite of satellite and ground-based observations to constrain total aerosol optical depth (AOD), its fine-mode fraction, the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and the collocation of clouds and overlying aerosols. We find that the direct fine-mode aerosol radiative effect is -0.46 W m-2 (-0.54 to -0.39 W m-2). Fine-mode aerosols include sea salt and dust aerosols, and we find that these natural aerosols result in a very large cooling (-0.44 to -0.26 W m-2) when constrained by observations. When the contribution of these natural aerosols is subtracted from the fine-mode radiative effect, the net becomes -0.11 (-0.28 to +0.05) W m-2. This net arises from total (natural + anthropogenic) carbonaceous, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, which suggests that global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is less negative than -0.35 W m-2.

  3. Indirect aerosol effect increases CMIP5 models projected Arctic warming

    SciTech Connect

    Chylek, Petr; Vogelsang, Timothy J.; Klett, James D.; Hengartner, Nicholas; Higdon, Dave; Lesins, Glen; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2016-02-20

    Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate models’ projections of the 2014–2100 Arctic warming under radiative forcing from representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) vary from 0.9° to 6.7°C. Climate models with or without a full indirect aerosol effect are both equally successful in reproducing the observed (1900–2014) Arctic warming and its trends. However, the 2014–2100 Arctic warming and the warming trends projected by models that include a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as AA models) are significantly higher (mean projected Arctic warming is about 1.5°C higher) than those projected by models without a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as NAA models). The suggestion is that, within models including full indirect aerosol effects, those projecting stronger future changes are not necessarily distinguishable historically because any stronger past warming may have been partially offset by stronger historical aerosol cooling. In conclusion, the CMIP5 models that include a full indirect aerosol effect follow an inverse radiative forcing to equilibrium climate sensitivity relationship, while models without it do not.

  4. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-11-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average of 2% precipitation decrease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that, even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  5. The impact of aerosol optical depth assimilation on aerosol forecasts and radiative effects during a wild fire event over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Liu, Z.; Schwartz, C. S.; Lin, H.-C.; Cetola, J. D.; Gu, Y.; Xue, L.

    2014-06-01

    The Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation three-dimensional variational data assimilation (DA) system coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model was utilized to improve aerosol forecasts and study aerosol direct and semi-direct radiative feedbacks during a US wild fire event. Assimilation of MODIS total 550 nm aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals clearly improved WRF/Chem forecasts of surface PM2.5 and organic carbon (OC) compared to the corresponding forecasts without aerosol data assimilation. The scattering aerosols in the fire downwind region typically cooled layers both above and below the aerosol layer and suppressed convection and clouds, which led to an average 2% precipitation decease during the fire week. This study demonstrated that even with no input of fire emissions, AOD DA improved the aerosol forecasts and allowed a more realistic model simulation of aerosol radiative effects.

  6. Aerosol effects on the anvil characteristics of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleeby, S. M.; Heever, S. C.; Marinescu, P. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; DeMott, P. J.

    2016-09-01

    Simulations of two mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that occurred during the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment were performed to examine the impact of aerosol number concentration on the vertical distributions of liquid and ice condensate and the macrophysical, microphysical, and radiative properties of the cirrus-anvil cloud shield. Analyses indicate that for an increase in aerosol concentration from a clean continental to a highly polluted state, there was an increase in the rime collection rate of cloud water, which led to less lofted cloud water. Aerosol-induced trends in the cloud mixing ratio profiles were, however, nonmonotonic in the mixed phase region, such that a moderate increase in aerosol concentration produced the greatest reduction in cloud water. Generally, less lofted cloud water led to less anvil ice mixing ratio but more numerous, small ice crystals within the anvil. In spite of reduced anvil ice mixing ratio, the anvil clouds exhibited greater areal coverage, increased albedo, reduced cloud top cooling, and reduced net radiative flux, which led to an aerosol-induced warming (reduced cooling) effect in these squall lines.

  7. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes During Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, K. M.; Chin, Mian

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  8. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes during Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Chin, Mian; Kim, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and.black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  9. Indirect aerosol effect increases CMIP5 models projected Arctic warming

    DOE PAGES

    Chylek, Petr; Vogelsang, Timothy J.; Klett, James D.; ...

    2016-02-20

    Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate models’ projections of the 2014–2100 Arctic warming under radiative forcing from representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) vary from 0.9° to 6.7°C. Climate models with or without a full indirect aerosol effect are both equally successful in reproducing the observed (1900–2014) Arctic warming and its trends. However, the 2014–2100 Arctic warming and the warming trends projected by models that include a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as AA models) are significantly higher (mean projected Arctic warming is about 1.5°C higher) than those projected by models without a full indirect aerosolmore » effect (denoted here as NAA models). The suggestion is that, within models including full indirect aerosol effects, those projecting stronger future changes are not necessarily distinguishable historically because any stronger past warming may have been partially offset by stronger historical aerosol cooling. In conclusion, the CMIP5 models that include a full indirect aerosol effect follow an inverse radiative forcing to equilibrium climate sensitivity relationship, while models without it do not.« less

  10. Oxygen isotopes in western Australian coral reveal Pinatubo aerosol-induced cooling in the Western Pacific Warm Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Gagan, M.K.; Chivas, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    The authors report a 12 year record study of oxygen 18 isotope signals in a coral (Ningaloo Reef), which is situated so as to give an ideal measure of the sea-surface temperature variation of the local Leeuwin Current. This record consists of nearly weekly readings from 1981 to 1993, and brackets the period following the June 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Extended study shows a strong correlation of sea-surface temperature on this coral with changes in the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), with a lag of 2.5 years. A distinct cooling signal was seen in the inferred sea-surface temperatures from coral measurements, in 1992 and 1993, which suggests the WPWP was cooled roughly 0.5{degrees}C by aerosol induced effects.

  11. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kotaro Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2015-12-31

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  12. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kotaro; Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO2 fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO2 and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  13. Evidence for a Glaciation Aerosol Indirect Effect from Ship Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, M.; Suzuki, K.; Stephens, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Ship tracks are a prominent manifestation of the aerosol indirect effect that provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol interactions in both warm and mixed-phase clouds. While ample evidence supports that an increase in aerosol concentration generally suppresses warm phase precipitation leading to longer cloud lifetime and more reflected sunlight (Albrecht, 1989) there is less understood about these effects in mixed-phase clouds. Lohmann, (2002) propose that an increase in IN (Ice Nuclei) may cause a glaciation indirect effect which results in more frequent glaciation of super-cooled droplets via the Bergeron process thereby increasing the amount of precipitation, which could decrease cloud cover, cloud longevity, and reflected sunlight. In this study, over 200 ship tracks are identified in mixed phase clouds using MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) imagery. Retrievals of the ice phase are obtained using CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations). These measurements provide evidence that glaciation is more frequent in polluted clouds compared to the unpolluted clouds that lie adjacent to ship tracks. Larger ice fractions may result from the increased IN emitted from the ship or by other processes (e.g., immersion/contact freezing) that lead to faster ice multiplication in polluted clouds with smaller and more numerous supercooled droplets. Observations from the profiling radar on CloudSat show that aerosol suppresses warm phase precipitation but enhances the cold phase precipitation. For mixed-phase clouds, these differences roughly cancel resulting in small changes in precipitation between polluted and unpolluted clouds. When cloud tops are warm, aerosol decreases precipitation rates and cloud water paths due to the entrainment effect but the differences in cloud water amount are considerably smaller than those found in cold phase clouds. These results provide the first glance of ship tracks in mixed

  14. Effect of aerosol subgrid variability on aerosol optical depth and cloud condensation nuclei: implications for global aerosol modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigum, Natalie; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2016-11-01

    A fundamental limitation of grid-based models is their inability to resolve variability on scales smaller than a grid box. Past research has shown that significant aerosol variability exists on scales smaller than these grid boxes, which can lead to discrepancies in simulated aerosol climate effects between high- and low-resolution models. This study investigates the impact of neglecting subgrid variability in present-day global microphysical aerosol models on aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We introduce a novel technique to isolate the effect of aerosol variability from other sources of model variability by varying the resolution of aerosol and trace gas fields while maintaining a constant resolution in the rest of the model. We compare WRF-Chem (Weather and Research Forecast model) runs in which aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km and again at 10 km resolutions; in both simulations the other model components, such as meteorology and dynamics, are kept at the 10 km baseline resolution. We find that AOD is underestimated by 13 % and CCN is overestimated by 27 % when aerosol and gases are simulated at 80 km resolution compared to 10 km. The processes most affected by neglecting aerosol subgrid variability are gas-phase chemistry and aerosol uptake of water through aerosol-gas equilibrium reactions. The inherent non-linearities in these processes result in large changes in aerosol properties when aerosol and gaseous species are artificially mixed over large spatial scales. These changes in aerosol and gas concentrations are exaggerated by convective transport, which transports these altered concentrations to altitudes where their effect is more pronounced. These results demonstrate that aerosol variability can have a large impact on simulating aerosol climate effects, even when meteorology and dynamics are held constant. Future aerosol model development should focus on accounting for the effect of subgrid variability on these

  15. Opposing forces of aerosol cooling and El Nino drive coral bleaching on Caribbean reefs.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jennifer A; Watkinson, Andrew R; McWilliams, John P; Côté, Isabelle M

    2006-12-05

    Bleaching of corals as a result of elevated sea surface temperatures (SST) is rapidly becoming a primary source of stress for reefs globally; the scale and extent of this threat will depend on how the drivers of SST interact to influence bleaching patterns. We demonstrate how the opposing forces of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and levels of atmospheric aerosols drive regional-scale patterns of coral bleaching across the Caribbean. When aerosol levels are low, bleaching is largely determined by El Niño strength, but high aerosol levels mitigate the effects of a severe El Niño. High aerosol levels, resulting principally from recent volcanic activity, have thus protected Caribbean reefs from more frequent widespread bleaching events but cannot be relied on to provide similar protection in the future.

  16. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    1987-01-01

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  17. Climate effects of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia based on modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Makiko

    The increasing emission of anthropogenic aerosols causes serious air pollution episodes and various effects on the climate by the aerosols interacting with the radiation budget by directly absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, and by them indirectly modifying the optical properties and lifetimes of clouds. In East Asia anthropogenic aerosol concentrations are rapidly increasing. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of anthropogenic aerosols upon the radiative forcing in this region. For this purpose we utilize an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with an aerosol transport and radiation model and an ocean mixed-layer model. The model in this study was a three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model (SPRINTARS), driven by the AGCM developed by CCSR (Center for Climate System Research), NIES (National Institute for Environmental Studies), and FRCGC (Frontier Research Center for Global Change). This model incorporates sulfate, carbonaceous, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols, the first three of which are assumed to acts as cloud condensation nuclei that generate cloud droplets whose number increases with the number of nuclei. We assumed sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol from fuel burning for anthropogenic aerosol. And the model simulations of equilibrium experiments were performed to investigate the impact of anthropogenic aerosols based on present-day emission data and the preindustrial-era emission data. Our simulation results showed that copious anthropogenic aerosol loading causes significant decrease in the surface downward shortwave radiation flux (SDSWRF), which indicates that a direct effect of aerosols has the greatest influence on the surface radiation. It is found from our model simulations that low-level clouds increase but convective clouds decrease due to reduced convective activity caused by surface cooling when anthropogenic aerosol increases. It was also found that the contributions of aerosols to the radiation

  18. Radiative effects of aerosols on the environment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    Anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of aerosol precursors and aerosols over China are among the highest in major countries of the world. Due to large emissions of soot and dust, aerosol absorption is high. Based on the observed direct and diffuse irradiance, a single scattering albedo of about 0.8 is derived for two large agri/eco/industrial areas. Aerosol direct effect can exert various environmental impacts in China. Photochemical activities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are significantly reduced because of reductions in photolysis rates and in emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons. Crop yields under optimal conditions can be reduced due to the reduction in surface solar irradiance. The most significant aerosol radiative perturbation is in changing the air-surface interaction and diurnal evolution of ABL. Reductions in various surface heat fluxes due to aerosols depend on soil moisture. Over a relatively dry surface, the evaporation has a small change, leading to the largest decrease of surface skin temperature at noon. Over a relatively wet surface, a substantial reduction in evaporation results in the largest surface cooling in the early morning. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) can be reduced by an amount comparable to the observed decrease of DTR. The longwave absorption of aerosols can lead to an increase of the daily minimum temperature and contributes to about 20% of the decrease in the DTR. The near-surface air temperature has the largest cooling in the early morning because the ABL is shallow and the temperature is sensitive to the radiative perturbation. As a result of the reduced sensible heat flux, the surface layer becomes more stable. Moreover, the aerosol heating enhances the stabilization of surface layer and in turn further reduces the sensible heat flux. As a result the ABL height can be reduced substantially. This will have many important ramifications, including trapping/accumulation of air pollutants, and perturbing the water

  19. Quantifying the Indirect Effect of Sulfate Aerosol on Climate Change Through the Carbon Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadule, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Bopp, L.; Piao, S.; Ciais, P.

    2008-12-01

    Elevated atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases will continue to warm the Earth's climate in the coming century. Coupled climate-carbon models have demonstrated a significant climate-induced reduction of natural carbon sinks, which acts as a positive feedback on the atmospheric CO2 concentration (between +20 and +220 ppm in 2100, for the SRES A2 emission scenario). Sulfate aerosols are known to affect climate through a radiative direct effect and a series of indirect effects involving the atmospheric water cycle. However, the effects of sulfate aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases were neglected in these coupled climate-carbon cycle models. Here we performed new coupled climate-carbon simulations wherein the evolution of sulfate aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases were explicitly represented. We show a hitherto undocumented indirect effect of aerosols on climate, via the carbon cycle. While sulfate aerosols cool the climate by 0.79°C globally, this cooling reduces land carbon sinks, leaving additional CO2 in the atmosphere. At mid-to-high northern latitudes, the aerosol-induced cooling is responsible for a decline in photosynthesis and land carbon uptake (-63 PgC by 2100). On the other hand, a variety of processes yields increased tropical carbon uptake (+28 PgC) in response to aerosol induced cooling, which is insufficient to balance the decline in the northern hemisphere. Overall, including non- CO2 greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols, in coupled simulations, doubles the additional quantity of CO2 accumulating in the atmosphere due to climate change. Our results demonstrate that any climate mitigation policy that aims to reduce warming via sulfate aerosols must also account for their indirect warming effect, which arises from interactions between climate and the carbon cycle.

  20. Regional simulation of aerosol radiative effects and their influence on rainfall over India using WRFChem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Sumita; Cherian, Ribu; Islam, Sahidul; Das, Subrata Kumar; Kaginalkar, Akshara

    2016-12-01

    A regional climate model, WRFChem has been utilized to simulate aerosol and rainfall distribution over India during July 2010 which was a normal monsoon year. Two identical simulations, one includes aerosol feedback via their direct and indirect effects and other one without any aerosol effect, are structured to understand the impact of aerosol net (direct + indirect) effect on rainfall pattern over India. Model results are accompanied by satellite and ground based observations to examine the robustness of the model simulations. It is shown that the model can reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of meteorological parameters, rainfall distribution, aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo reasonably well. Model simulated spatial distribution and magnitude of aerosol optical depth over India are realistic, particularly over northwest India, where mineral dust is a major contributor to the total aerosol loading and over Indo-Gangetic Plain region (IGP) where AOD remains high throughout the year. Net (shortwave + longwave) atmospheric heating rate is the highest (> 0.27 K day - 1) over east IGP due to abundant dust and anthropogenic aerosols while it is the lowest over peninsular India and over the Thar desert (< 0.03 K day - 1) which can be attributed to less aerosol concentration and longwave cooling, respectively. It is shown that, inclusion of aerosol direct and indirect effects have strong influence ( ± 20%) on rainfall magnitude and its distribution over Indian subcontinent during monsoon.

  1. Background on health effects of acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1989-02-01

    This introduction to the 1987 NIEHS-EPA Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols reviews the state of our knowledge on this topic as of the close of the 1984 NIEHS Conference on the Health Effects of Acid Precipitation and the results of some key studies completed since that time. These studies, together with the results of the studies presented in the papers that follow, provide a substantial increment in our knowledge of the health effects of acid aerosols.

  2. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-25

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Finally and overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  3. Effects of aerosol organics on cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) concentration and first indirect aerosol effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Lee, Y.- N.; Daum, Peter H.; Jayne, John T.; Alexander, M. L.

    2008-11-03

    Abstract. Aerosol microphysics, chemical composition, and CCN properties were measured on the Department of Energy Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus/ Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosols measured during MASE included free tropospheric aerosols, marine boundary layer aerosols, and aerosols with high organic concentration within a thin layer above the cloud. Closure analysis was carried out for all three types of aerosols by comparing the measured CCN concentrations at 0.2% supersaturation to those predicted based on size distribution and chemical composition using K¨ohler theory. The effect of aerosol organic species on predicted CCN concentration was examined using a single hygroscopicity parameterization.

  4. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  5. The radiative effect of aerosols in the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, W.-C.; Domoto, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    A modified two-flux approximation is employed to compute the transfer of radiation in a finite, inhomogeneous, turbid atmosphere. A perturbation technique is developed to allow the treatment of nongray gaseous absorption with multiple scattering. The perturbation method, which employs a backscatter factor as a parameter, can be used with anisotropic particle scattering as well as Rayleigh scattering. This method is used to study the effect of aerosols on radiative solar heating and infrared cooling as well as the radiative-convective temperature distribution in the earth's atmosphere. It is found that the effect of aerosols in the infrared cannot be neglected; while in the visible, the effect can be of the same order as that due to absorption by water vapor. For a high surface albedo (greater than 0.30) heating of the earth-atmosphere system results due to the presence of aerosols. The aerosols also reduce the amount of convection needed to maintain a stable atmosphere. For the case of a dense haze a temperature inversion is found to exist close to the ground.

  6. A Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Effects on an Idealized Supercell Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, A.; Storelvmo, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the largest uncertainties in future climate projections lies in the climatic effects of aerosols. It has been shown that the cooling effect of aerosols could partially offset the current global warming induced by increased greenhouse gas concentration. Among the effects of aerosols, the interaction between aerosols and deep convective clouds is especially difficult to quantify, due to the complex interaction and limited measurements available. Although the radiative effect of deep convective clouds on climate is small, they could affect the local, regional, and global climate by altering precipitation and the large-scale circulations. Thus, it is of importance to understand how deep convection changes its development and evolution with aerosol loading. This study aims to understand the effects of varying aerosol number concentrations on deep convective clouds, using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. A quarter-circular shear supercell is simulated with three different microphysics schemes in an idealized setting, while mimicking the changes in aerosol concentration by changing either cloud droplet concentration or activated cloud condensation nuclei concentration. We find that the simulated amount of precipitation has quite different sensitivities to aerosol concentration, depending on the microphysics scheme used; one of the simulations shows a drastic decrease in precipitation with increased aerosol loading, whereas simulations with the other two schemes show relatively low sensitivities to aerosol concentration. This fact highlights uncertainties in the complex microphysical interactions in convective clouds. In addition, changes in ice nuclei concentration are mimicked by changing the ice nucleation rate in each scheme. Sensitivity to this variation is also dependent on the microphysics scheme used. Furthermore, radiation is added in the simulations so that both radiative and microphysical effects of aerosol on the supercell storm are

  7. Potential Climate Effects of Dust Aerosols' over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, Z.; Wang, G.; Pal, J. S.; Yu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate in West Africa is under the influence of the West African monsoon circulation and mineral dust emitted from the Sahara desert (which is the world's largest source of mineral dust emission). Dust aerosols alter the atmospheric radiative fluxes and act as cloud condensation nuclei in the process of emission, transportation and deposition. However, our understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence the present-day and future climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5 is used to investigate the potential climatic effects of dust aerosols both in present (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) periods over WA. First, the model performance and dust climatic effects are evaluated. The contribution of dust climatic effects under RCP8.5 scenario and their confounding effects with land use change are assessed. Our results indicate that the model can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the spatial and temporal distribution of climatology, aerosol optical depth and surface concentration over WA. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative in the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in JJA and MAM compared to those in SON and DJF. Over most of West Africa, cooling is the dominant effect on temperature. Their impact on precipitation features a dipole pattern, with decrease in the north and increase in the south of West Africa. Despite the dust-induced decrease of precipitation amount, dusts cause extreme precipitation to increase. To evaluate the uncertainties surrounding our modeling results, sensitivity experiments driven by ICBC from MIROC-ESM and CESM and their dynamic downscaling results are used for comparisons. Results from these sensitivity experiments indicate that the impact of dust aerosols on present and future climate is robust.

  8. Measurements of Semi-volatile Aerosol and Its Effect on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2013-12-01

    Semi-volatile compounds, including particle-bound water, comprise a large part of aerosol mass and have a significant influence on aerosol lifecycle and its optical properties. Understanding the properties of semi-volatile compounds, especially those pertaining to gas/aerosol partitioning, is of critical importance for our ability to predict concentrations and properties of ambient aerosol. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of temperature and relative humidity on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder and a variable residence time constant temperature thermodenuder in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. It was found that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. The variable residence time thermodenuder data suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s, in contrast to other ambient observations. Preliminary analysis show that approximately 50% and 90% of total aerosol mass evaporated at temperatures of 100 C and 180C, respectively. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology. During course of this study, T50 (temperatures at which 50% aerosol mass evaporates) varied from 60 C to more than 120 C.

  9. Investigation of multiple scattering effects in aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of investigations on the various aspects of multiple scattering effects on visible and infrared laser beams transversing dense fog oil aerosols contained in a chamber (4' x 4' x 9'). The report briefly describes: (1) the experimental details and measurements; (2) analytical representation of the aerosol size distribution data by two analytical models (the regularized power law distribution and the inverse modified gamma distribution); (3) retrieval of aerosol size distributions from multispectral optical depth measurements by two methods (the two and three parameter fast table search methods and the nonlinear least squares method); (4) modeling of the effects of aerosol microphysical (coagulation and evaporation) and dynamical processes (gravitational settling) on the temporal behavior of aerosol size distribution, and hence on the extinction of four laser beams with wavelengths 0.44, 0.6328, 1.15, and 3.39 micrometers; and (5) the exact and approximate formulations for four methods for computing the effects of multiple scattering on the transmittance of laser beams in dense aerosols, all of which are based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation under the small angle approximation.

  10. The direct radiative forcing effects of aerosols on the climate in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Hui

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is used to explore the influence of aerosol direct radiative effects on regional climate of California. Aerosol data is provided by the MOZART global chemistry transport model and includes sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust and sea salt. To investigate the sensitivity of aerosol radiative effects to different aerosol species and to the quantity of sulfate and dust, tests are conducted by using different combinations of aerosols and by resetting the quantity of sulfate and dust. The model results show that all the considered aerosols could have a cooling effect of one half to one degree in terms of temperature and that dust and sulfate are the most important aerosols. However, large uncertainties exist. The results suggest that the dust from MOZART is greatly overestimated over the simulation domain. The single scattering albedo (SSA) values of dust used in some global climate models are likely underestimated compared to recent studies on dust optical properties and could result in overestimating the corresponding cooling effects by approximately 0.1 degree. Large uncertainties exist in estimating the roles of different forcing factors which are causing the observed temperature change in the past century in California.

  11. Aerosol indirect effect dictated by liquid clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Matthew W.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols have been shown to enhance the solar reflection from warm liquid clouds and mask part of the warming due to the buildup of greenhouse gases. However, very little is known about the effects of aerosol on mixed-phase stratiform clouds as well as other cloud regimes including cumulus, altocumulus, nimbostratus, deep convection, and anvil cirrus. These additional cloud categories are ubiquitous and typically overlooked in satellite-based assessments of the global aerosol indirect forcing. Here we provide their contribution to the aerosol indirect forcing estimate using satellite data collected from several colocated sensors in the A-train for the period 2006-2010. Cloud type is determined according to the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR CloudSat product, and the observations are matched to the radiative flux measurements from CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and aerosol retrievals from MODIS (MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). The oceanic mean aerosol indirect forcing is estimated to be -0.20 ± 0.31 W m-2 with warm low-level cloud largely dictating the strength of the response (-0.36 ± 0.21 W m-2) due to their abundance and strong cloud albedo effect. Contributions from mixed-phase low-level cloud (0.01 ± 0.06 W m-2) and convective cloud (0.15 ± 0.23 W m-2) are positive and buffer the system due to strong aerosol-cloud feedbacks that reduce the cloud albedo effect and/or lead to convective invigoration causing a countering positive longwave warming response. By combining all major cloud categories together, aerosol indirect forcing decreases and now contains positive values in the uncertainty estimate.

  12. Attribution of the United States "warming hole": aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-11-06

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20(th) century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. "warming hole"). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the "warming hole". We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed "warming hole" can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin.

  13. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect and precipitable water vapor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shaocai; Alapaty, Kiran; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Zhang, Yuanhang; Nolte, Chris; Eder, Brian; Foley, Kristen; Nagashima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and/or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. In contrast to the widespread global warming, the central and south central United States display a noteworthy overall cooling trend during the 20th century, with an especially striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) (termed the U.S. “warming hole”). Here we used observations of temperature, shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF), longwave cloud forcing (LWCF), aerosol optical depth and precipitable water vapor as well as global coupled climate models to explore the attribution of the “warming hole”. We find that the observed cooling trend in summer Tmax can be attributed mainly to SWCF due to aerosols with offset from the greenhouse effect of precipitable water vapor. A global coupled climate model reveals that the observed “warming hole” can be produced only when the aerosol fields are simulated with a reasonable degree of accuracy as this is necessary for accurate simulation of SWCF over the region. These results provide compelling evidence of the role of the aerosol indirect effect in cooling regional climate on the Earth. Our results reaffirm that LWCF can warm both winter Tmax and Tmin. PMID:25373416

  14. Climatic Effects of Marine Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Y.; Gantt, B.; Ghan, S. J.; Nenes, A.; Liu, X.; Easter, R. C.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that the emissions of primary organic matter (POM) of marine biogenic origin and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from phytoplankton-produced volatile organic compounds can lead to changes of chemical composition and size distribution of marine aerosol, thus modifying the cloud droplet activation potential and affecting climate. In this study, the effects of marine organic aerosol emissions and the dissolved marine organic aerosol components as surfactant are explored using the National Center of Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model, coupled with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Modal Aerosol Model (CAM-MAM). Primary marine organic aerosol emissions are separated into sub- and super-micron modes, and calculated based on wind speed-dependent sea-spray mass flux and remotely-sensed surface chlorophyll-a concentration. Two distinct sea spray emission functions used in this study yield different amounts and spatial distributions of sub-micron marine POM mass flux. The super-micron sea-spray flux is determined based on simulated sea-spray number flux. Both sub and super-micron marine POM are assumed to be mostly water-insoluble and added in the accumulation mode and coarse sea-salt mode, respectively. A prescribed soluble mass fraction of 50% is assumed for marine SOA, formed from phytoplankton-emitted isoprene and allowed to be condensed on existing aerosols in different modes. Surfactant effects from the soluble part of sub-micron marine POM are included in the cloud droplet activation parameterization by some modifications based on the mass fraction of dissolved marine POM. 10 year model simulations are conducted to examine the effects of marine organic aerosols on cloud microphysical and optical properties. Analyses of model results show that different marine aerosol emissions and cloud droplet activation mechanisms can yield 9% to 16% increase in global maritime mean cloud droplet number concentration. Changes

  15. Smoke and Pollution Aerosol Effect on Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  16. Effect of Increasing Temperature on Carbonaceous Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect over Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Kokkola, Harri; Hienola, Anca; Kühn, Thomas; Merikanto, Joonas; Korhonen, Hannele; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are an important regulator of the Earth's climate. They scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation and thus cool the climate by reducing the amount of energy reaching the atmospheric layers and the surface below (direct effect). A certain subset of the particles can also act as initial formation sites for cloud droplets and thereby modify the microphysics, dynamics, radiative properties and lifetime of clouds (indirect effects). The magnitude of aerosol radiative effects remains the single largest uncertainty in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing. One of the key quantities needed for accurate estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing is an accurate estimate of the radiative effects from natural unperturbed aerosol. The dominant source of natural aerosols over Earth's vast forested regions are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) which, following oxidation in the atmosphere, can condense onto aerosol particles to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and significantly modify the particles' properties. In accordance with the expected positive temperature dependence of BVOC emissions, several previous studies have shown that some aerosol properties, such as mass concentration and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), also correlate positively with temperature at many forested sites. There is conflicting evidence as to whether the aerosol direct effects have a temperature dependence due to increased BVOC emissions. The main objective of this study is to investigate the causes of the observed effect of increasing temperatures on the aerosol direct radiative effect, and to provide a quantitative estimate of this effect and of the resulting negative feedback in a warming climate. More specifically, we will investigate the causes of the positive correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and land surface temperature (LST) over southeastern US where biogenic emissions are a significant source of atmospheric particles. In

  17. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  18. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  19. Modelling the direct effect of aerosols in the solar near-infrared on a planetary scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Fotiadi, A.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Koepke, P.; Pavlakis, K. G.; Vardavas, I.

    2007-06-01

    We used a spectral radiative transfer model to compute the direct radiative effect (DRE) of natural plus anthropogenic aerosols in the solar near-infrared (IR), between 0.85-10 μm, namely, their effect on the outgoing near-IR radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA, ΔFTOA), on the atmospheric absorption of near-IR radiation (ΔFatmab) and on the surface downward and absorbed near-IR radiation (ΔFsurf, and ΔFsurfnet, respectively). The computations were performed on a global scale (over land and ocean) under all-sky conditions, using detailed spectral aerosol optical properties taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS) supplemented by realistic data for the rest of surface and atmospheric parameters. The computed aerosol DRE, averaged over the 12-year period 1984-1995 for January and July, shows that on a global mean basis aerosols produce a planetary cooling by increasing the scattered near-IR radiation back to space by 0.48 W m-2, they warm the atmosphere by 0.37 W m-2 and cool the surface by decreasing the downward and absorbed near-IR radiation at surface by 1.03 and 0.85 W m-2, respectively. The magnitude of the near-IR aerosol DRE is smaller than that of the combined ultraviolet (UV) and visible DRE, but it is still energetically important, since it contributes to the total shortwave (SW) DRE by 22-31%. The aerosol-produced near-IR surface cooling combined with the atmospheric warming, may affect the thermal dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system, by increasing the atmospheric stability, decreasing thus cloud formation, and precipitation, especially over desertification threatened regions such as the Mediterranean basin. This, together with the fact that the sign of near-IR aerosol DRE is sometimes opposite to that of UV-visible DRE, demonstrates the importance of performing detailed spectral computations to provide estimates of the climatic role of aerosols for the Earth-atmosphere system. This was demonstrated by sensitivity tests revealing very

  20. Indirect Radiative Warming Effect in the Winter and Spring Arctic Associated with Aerosol Pollution from Mid-latitude Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Garrett, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Different from global cooling effects of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions, anthropogenic aerosols from mid-latitude are found to play an increased warming effect in the Arctic in later winter and early spring. Using four-year (2000-2003) observation of aerosol, cloud and radiation at North Slope of Alaska, it is found that the aerosols can increase cloud droplet effective radius 3 um for fixed liquid water path, and increase cloud thermal emissivity about 0.05-0.08. In other words, aerosols are associated with a warming of 1-1.6 degrees (3-5 W/m2) in the Arctic during late winter and early spring solely due to their first indirect effect. Further analysis indicates that total aerosol climate effects are even more significant (8-10 W/m2), with about 50% contribution from aerosol first indirect effect and another 50% contribution from complicated feedbacks. It also shows strong seasonal distribution of the aerosol indirect radiative effects, with warming effects in seasons other than in summer. However, only the significant warming effect in winter and spring passes through the significance test. The strong warming effect due to aerosol indirect effect could be further strengthened through following feedbacks involving the surface albedo (early ice melting).

  1. Sensitivity of Aerosol Indirect Effects to Representation of Autoconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, W.; Adams, P. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Nenes, A.

    2008-12-01

    We study the sensitivity of aerosol indirect effects to the approach used for computing autoconversion of cloudwater into rain. The NASA GISS II-prime GCM, with online simulation of aerosol and cloud droplet number (using the activation parameterization of Fountoukis and Nenes, 2005) are used for simulating the sensitivity of climate and aerosol indirect effects to autoconversion schemes. Simulations are done using the autoconversion parameterizations of Liu and Daum (2004) [P6], Khairoutdinov and Kogan, (2000) [KK], Manton and Cotton, (1977) [MC] and direct integration of the kinetic collection equation (KCE) using a gravitational (GRV) collection kernel with and without enhancement from turbulence (TUR). Given the uncertainty associated with the importance of turbulence on droplet collection, we carry out simulations using two published kernels with substantially different sensitivity to turbulence. Simulations show that increased aerosol associated with anthropogenic activity increase annual mean LWP from changes in autoconversion; strongest effects are seen in highly polluted areas. The spatial distribution of indirect forcing strongly correlates with simulated changes in LWP between pre-industrial and present day simulations; strongest cooling is seen in SE Asia, Western Europe, and eastern US. The combined first and second indirect effect is quite sensitive to the autoconversion scheme used, being -1.30 W m-2 using P6, - 2.05 W m-2 for KK, and, -1.53 W m-2 MC. Using KCE, a smaller indirect effect is simulated, being -0.89 W m- 2 when gravitational collection is only considered, and, equal to -1.03 W m-2 when also enhanced by turbulence. The spatial and temporal distribution of cloud droplet number, effective radius and liquid water content and their sensitivity to the approach used for autoconversion is also assessed.

  2. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    It is now well-established that aerosols cause an overall cooling effect at the surface and a warming effect within the atmosphere. At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), both positive and negative forcing can be found, depending on a number of other factors, such as surface albedo and relative position of clouds and aerosols. Whilst aerosol surface cooling is important due to its relation with surface temperature and other bio-environmental reasons, atmospheric heating is of special interest as well having significant impacts on atmospheric dynamics, such as formation of clouds and subsequent precipitation. The actual position of aerosols and their altitude relative to clouds is of major importance as certain types of aerosol, such as black carbon (BC) above clouds can have a significant impact on planetary albedo. The vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds has recently drawn the attention of the aerosol community, because partially can account for the differences between simulated aerosol radiative forcing with various models, and therefore decrease the level of our uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing, which is one of our priorities set by IPCC. The vertical profiles of aerosol optical and physical properties have been studied by various research groups around the world, following different methodologies and using various indices in order to present the impact of aerosols on radiation on different altitudes above the surface. However, there is still variability between the published results as to the actual effect of aerosols on shortwave radiation and on heating rate within the atmosphere. This study uses vertical information on aerosols from the Max Planck Aerosol Climatology (MAC-v1) global dataset, which is a combination of model output with quality ground-based measurements, in order to provide useful insight into the vertical profile of atmospheric heating for the Mediterranean region. MAC-v1 and the science behind this aerosol dataset have already

  3. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    , and 4.0 K/d, respectively. Outside these extreme events, the distributions of the radiative forcing values at BOA and TOA are Gaussian with means and standard deviations of - 58(± 27), and - 19(± 11)W/m 2, respectively. These two negative values indicate a cooling effect at the 2 atmospheric levels but the largest absolute value at BOA corresponds to a trapping of solar radiation inside the atmosphere. The averages of the instantaneous forcing efficiencies (FE) derived from measurements performed at solar zenith angles between 50 and 76° are - 195(± 42) and - 62(± 17)W/m 2.AOD 550 for BOA and TOA, respectively. The value at TOA is larger than in other urban environments, which could be due to the desert dust component backscattering more solar radiation to space than absorbing urban aerosols. The lower absorption of solar light by desert dust also explains qualitatively the lower than usual value of FE BOA. A more precise study of the effects of the desert dust and biomass burning aerosols shows that fluctuations of their monthly-averaged concentrations explain the departures of the TOA and BOA radiative forcings from the background situation. In April, the contributions of DD to the month averages of the instantaneous radiative forcing are as high as 53% at BOA, and 66% at TOA. In October, the biomass burning mode contributes 33 and 27% of these forcings, respectively. Noteworthy is that the contribution of DD to RF is never less than 17% (at BOA) and 27% (at TOA), emphasizing the importance of the mineral dust component on the transfer of solar radiation above Cairo, and this even in months when no major dust storm is observed.

  4. Aerosol Effects on Radiation and Climate: Column Closure Experiments with Towers, Aircraft, and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Many theoretical studies have shown that anthropogenic aerosol particles can change the radiation balance in an atmospheric column and might thereby exert a significant effect on the Earth's climate. In particular, recent calculations have shown that sulfate particles from anthropogenic combustion may already exert a cooling influence on the Earth that partially offsets the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the same combustion. Despite the potential climatic importance of anthropogenic aerosols, simultaneous measurements of anthropogenic aerosol properties and their effect on atmospheric radiation have been very rare. Successful comparisons of measured radiation fields with those calculated from aerosol measurements - now referred to as column closure comparisons - are required to improve the accuracy and credibility of climate predictions. This paper reviews the column closure experiment performed at the Mt. Sutro Tower in San Francisco in 1975, in which elevated radiometers measured the change in Earth-plus-atmosphere albedo caused by an aerosol layer, while a lidar, sunphotometer, nephelometer, and other radiometers measured properties of the responsible aerosol. The time-dependent albedo calculated from the measured aerosol properties agreed with that measured by the tower radiometers. Also presented are designs for future column closure studies using radiometers and aerosol instruments on the ground, aircraft, and satellites. These designs draw upon algorithms and experience developed in the Sutro Tower study, as well as more recent experience with current measurement and analysis capabilities.

  5. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  6. Transient effects in laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Padua, S.; Xie, C.; Gupta, R.; Batelaan, H.; Bergeman, T.; Metcalf, H.

    1993-05-01

    Transient laser cooling (TLC) can produce cooling and heating, but often with the opposite detuning from that found in steady state. In TLC the time scale is set by the optical pumping (OP) rate to a state not coupled by the laser field. The combination of such OP processes and the conservative light shift potential U{sub o}sin{sup 2}kz leads to TLC. The average PE of atoms entering a standing wave is U{sub o}/2. They experience the optical force until undergoing OP to an uncoupled state, which is more likely to happen at high light intensity, near an antinode. For {delta} > 0 this means higher PE and thus lower KE, and conversely for {delta} < 0. In TLC there is no final {open_quotes}temperature{close_quotes} resulting from competition between a damping force and diffusive heating. Instead the changes in KE are bounded by U{sub o} so that the signal widths decrease with intensity. This can result in sub-Doppler widths. We have made two independent theoretical studies of these experiments. In a semiclassical calculation we evolve the motion for a calculated OP time and calculate the velocity distribution. We have also performed fully quantum mechanical calculations of the motion of atoms in the standing wave whose basis set consists of product states of internal and external atomic coordinates.

  7. ASME 1986 International Gas Turbine Conference - Transpiration cooling: Contribution of film cooling to the overall cooling effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, G. E.; Asere, A. A.; Mkpadi, M. C.; Tirmahi, A.

    1986-06-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is made of the state-of-the-art and prospective development trends in the field of film cooling techniques for gas turbine combustion chambers and blades. The full coverage discrete hole film or effusion cooling techniques encompassed by the presently assessed researches have as their goal the achievement of performance levels comparable to those of transpiration cooling. It is recommended that attempts to improve on the current cooling effectiveness of full coverage discrete hole designs should concentrate on increasing the degree of internal wall cooling, while retaining good film-cooling characteristics.

  8. [Effectiveness of scalp cooling in chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Poder, Thomas G; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2011-10-01

    The main objectives of this literature review are to determine if scalp cooling is efficient and safe, if there are side effects and if the patients' quality of life improves. In terms of effectiveness, scalp cooling seems to get good performance in its aim to prevent hair loss in patients receiving chemotherapy. The weighted average results of all identified studies indicate that this technology allows for 63.5% of patients to have a good preservation of their hair. In studies with a group of control, the weighted rates of good preservation of the hair are 50.6% with scalp cooling and 16.3% without. From the standpoint of safety technology, the main risk is that of scalp metastases. However, no study has successfully demonstrated a statistically significant difference between groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with or without scalp cooling.

  9. Direct radiative effects of aerosols over South Asia from observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Babu, S. Suresh; Manoj, M. R.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Chin, Mian

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative assessment of the seasonal variations in the direct radiative effect (DRE) of composite aerosols as well as the constituent species over the Indian sub continent has been carried out using a synergy of observations from a dense network of ground based aerosol observatories and modeling based on chemical transport model simulations. Seasonal variation of aerosol constituents depict significant influence of anthropogenic aerosol sources in winter and the dominance of natural sources in spring, even though the aerosol optical depth doesn't change significantly between these two seasons. A significant increase in the surface cooling and atmospheric warming has been observed as season changes from winter (DRESUR = -28 ± 12 W m-2 and DREATM = +19.6 ± 9 W m-2) to spring (DRESUR = -33.7 ± 12 W m-2 and DREATM = +27 ± 9 W m-2). Interestingly, springtime aerosols are more absorptive in nature compared to winter and consequently the aerosol induced diabatic heating of the atmosphere goes as high as 1 K day-1 during spring, especially over eastern India. The atmospheric DRE due to dust aerosols (+14 ± 7 W m-2) during spring overwhelms that of black carbon DRE (+11.8 ± 6 W m-2) during winter. The DRE at the top of the atmosphere is mostly governed by the anthropogenic aerosols during all the seasons. The columnar aerosol loading, its anthropogenic fraction and radiative effects shows a steady increase with latitude across Indian mainland leading to a larger aerosol-induced atmospheric warming during spring than in winter.

  10. Black carbon mixing state impacts on cloud microphysical properties: effects of aerosol plume and environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, Ping Pui; Riemer, Nicole; West, Matthew

    2016-05-27

    Black carbon (BC) is usually mixed with other aerosol species within individual aerosol particles. This mixture, along with the particles' size and morphology, determines the particles' optical and cloud condensation nuclei properties, and hence black carbon's climate impacts. In this study the particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC was used to quantify the importance of black carbon mixing state for predicting cloud microphysical quantities. Based on a set of about 100 cloud parcel simulations a process level analysis framework was developed to attribute the response in cloud microphysical properties to changes in the underlying aerosol population ("plume effect") and the cloud parcel cooling rate ("parcel effect"). It shows that the response of cloud droplet number concentration to changes in BC emissions depends on the BC mixing state. When the aerosol population contains mainly aged BC particles an increase in BC emission results in increasing cloud droplet number concentrations ("additive effect"). In contrast, when the aerosol population contains mainly fresh BC particles they act as sinks for condensable gaseous species, resulting in a decrease in cloud droplet number concentration as BC emissions are increased ("competition effect"). Additionally, we quantified the error in cloud microphysical quantities when neglecting the information on BC mixing state, which is often done in aerosol models. The errors ranged from -12% to +45% for the cloud droplet number fraction, from 0% to +1022% for the nucleation-scavenged black carbon (BC) mass fraction, from -12% to +4% for the effective radius, and from -30% to +60% for the relative dispersion.

  11. Size distribution of heavy metal aerosols in cooling and spray dryer system

    SciTech Connect

    Wey, M.Y.; Yang, J.T.; Peng, C.Y.; Chiang, B.C.

    1999-11-01

    The cooling process prior to treating flue gas and the spray dryer process that removes acid components in flue gas are believed to influence the mass and elemental size distributions of heavy metal in fly ash. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of operating parameters on the mass and elemental size distributions of heavy metals in fly ash produced from a fluidized bed incineration and a water cooling or spray dryer flue gas treatment system. The operating parameters investigated included (1) the controlling temperature in the gas cooling system; (2) the controlling temperature in the spray dryer system; (3) the addition of organic chlorides; and (4) the addition of inorganic chloride. The experimental results indicated that the water cooling process and spray dryer process increase the amount of coarse fly ash and increase the total concentration of metal in fly ash. The amounts of fine fly ash and the total concentration of metal in fine fly ash increase with decreasing temperature during the water cooling process. However, the amounts of fine fly ash and the total concentration of metal in fine fly ash decrease with decreasing temperature during the spray dryer process.

  12. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.

    2015-09-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (all anthropogenic, biomass burning and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. On the global scale, our results show that land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ~ 9 %. At the regional scale, plant productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols, in regions where complex canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Europe, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +8-12 % on an annual average, with a stronger increase during the growing season (> 12 %). In the Amazon basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the Amazon basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). In Europe and China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on the annual average. Anthropogenic aerosols affect land carbon fluxes via different mechanisms and we suggest that the dominant mechanism varies across regions: (1) light scattering dominates in the eastern US; (2) cooling in the Amazon basin; and (3) reduction in direct radiation in Europe and China.

  13. Water absorption by secondary organic aerosol and its effect on inorganic aerosol behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A.S.; Pandis, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The hygroscopic nature of atmospheric aerosol has generally been associated with its inorganic fraction. In this study, a group contribution method is used to predict the water absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Compared against growth measurements of mixed inorganic-organic particles, this method appears to provide a first-order approximation in predicting SOA water absorption. The growth of common SOA species is predicted to be significantly less than common atmospheric inorganic salts such as (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl. Using this group contribution method as a tool in predicting SOA water absorption, an integrated modeling approach is developed combining available SOA and inorganic aerosol models to predict overall aerosol behavior. The effect of SOA on water absorption and nitrate partitioning between the gas and aerosol phases is determined. On average, it appears that SOA accounts for approximately 7% of total aerosol water and increases aerosol nitrate concentrations by approximately 10%. At high relative humidity and low SOA mass fractions, the role of SOA in nitrate partitioning and its contribution to total aerosol water is negligible. However, the water absorption of SOA appears to be less sensitive to changes in relative humidity than that of inorganic species, and thus at low relative humidity and high SOA mass fraction concentrations, SOA is predicted to account for approximately 20% of total aerosol water and a 50% increase in aerosol nitrate concentrations. These findings could improve the results of modeling studies where aerosol nitrate has often been underpredicted.

  14. Model simulations of the first aerosol indirect effect and comparison of cloud susceptibility fo satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C; Penner, J E; Kawamoto, K

    2002-03-08

    Present-day global anthropogenic emissions contribute more than half of the mass in submicron particles primarily due to sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol components derived from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning. These anthropogenic aerosols modify the microphysics of clouds by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and enhance the reflectivity of low-level water clouds, leading to a cooling effect on climate (the Twomey effect or first indirect effect). The magnitude of the first aerosol indirect effect is associated with cloud frequency as well as a quantity representing the sensitivity of cloud albedo to changes in cloud drop number concentration. This quantity is referred to as cloud susceptibility [Twomey, 1991]. Analysis of satellite measurements demonstrates that marine stratus clouds are likely to be of higher susceptibility than continental clouds because of their lower number concentrations of cloud drops [Platnick and Twomey, 1994]. Here, we use an improved version of the fully coupled climate/chemistry model [Chuang et al., 1997] to calculate the global concentrations Of sulfate, dust, sea salt, and carbonaceous aerosols (biomass smoke and fossil fuel organic matter and black carbon). We investigated the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on cloud susceptibility and calculated the associated changes of shortwave radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere. We also examined the correspondence between the model simulation of cloud susceptibility and that inferred from satellite measurements to test whether our simulated aerosol concentrations and aerosol/cloud interactions give a faithful representation of these features.

  15. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  16. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-02-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  17. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  18. Effectiveness-weighted control method for a cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simons, Robert E.

    2015-12-15

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  19. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    DOEpatents

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  20. Disentangling Greenhouse Warming and Aerosol Cooling to Reveal Earth's Transient Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, T.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's climate sensitivity has been the subject of heated debate for decades, and recently spurred renewed interest after the latest IPCC assessment report suggested a downward adjustment of the most likely range of climate sensitivities. Here, we present an observation-based study based on the time period 1964 to 2010, which is unique in that it does not rely on global climate models (GCMs) in any way. The study uses surface observations of temperature and incoming solar radiation from approximately 1300 surface sites, along with observations of the equivalent CO2 concentration (CO2,eq) in the atmosphere, to produce a new best estimate for the transient climate sensitivity of 1.9K (95% confidence interval 1.2K - 2.7K). This is higher than other recent observation-based estimates, and is better aligned with the estimate of 1.8K and range (1.1K - 2.5K) derived from the latest generation of GCMs. The new estimate is produced by incorporating the observations in an energy balance framework, and by applying statistical methods that are standard in the field of Econometrics, but less common in climate studies. The study further suggests that about a third of the continental warming due to increasing CO2,eq was masked by aerosol cooling during the time period studied.

  1. Disentangling Aerosol Cooling and Greenhouse Warming to Reveal Earth's Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, Trude; Leirvik, Thomas; Phillips, Petter; Lohmann, Ulrike; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Earth's climate sensitivity has been the subject of heated debate for decades, and recently spurred renewed interest after the latest IPCC assessment report suggested a downward adjustment of the most likely range of climate sensitivities. Here, we present a study based on the time period 1964 to 2010, which is unique in that it does not rely on global climate models (GCMs) in any way. The study uses surface observations of temperature and incoming solar radiation from approximately 1300 surface sites, along with observations of the equivalent CO2 concentration (CO2,eq) in the atmosphere, to produce a new best estimate for the transient climate sensitivity of 1.9K (95% confidence interval 1.2K - 2.7K). This is higher than other recent observation-based estimates, and is better aligned with the estimate of 1.8K and range (1.1K - 2.5K) derived from the latest generation of GCMs. The new estimate is produced by incorporating the observations in an energy balance framework, and by applying statistical methods that are standard in the field of Econometrics, but less common in climate studies. The study further suggests that about a third of the continental warming due to increasing CO2,eq was masked by aerosol cooling during the time period studied.

  2. Disentangling greenhouse warming and aerosol cooling to reveal Earth’s climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, T.; Leirvik, T.; Lohmann, U.; Phillips, P. C. B.; Wild, M.

    2016-04-01

    Earth’s climate sensitivity has long been subject to heated debate and has spurred renewed interest after the latest IPCC assessment report suggested a downward adjustment of its most likely range. Recent observational studies have produced estimates of transient climate sensitivity, that is, the global mean surface temperature increase at the time of CO2 doubling, as low as 1.3 K (refs ,), well below the best estimate produced by global climate models (1.8 K). Here, we present an observation-based study of the time period 1964 to 2010, which does not rely on climate models. The method incorporates observations of greenhouse gas concentrations, temperature and radiation from approximately 1,300 surface sites into an energy balance framework. Statistical methods commonly applied to economic time series are then used to decompose observed temperature trends into components attributable to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations and surface radiation. We find that surface radiation trends, which have been largely explained by changes in atmospheric aerosol loading, caused a cooling that masked approximately one-third of the continental warming due to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations over the past half-century. In consequence, the method yields a higher transient climate sensitivity (2.0 +/- 0.8 K) than other observational studies.

  3. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  4. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  5. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  6. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  7. The effect of pre-cooling intensity on cooling efficiency and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Nina; Perret, Claudio; Bogerd, Cornelis P; Rossi, René M; Daanen, Hein A M

    2010-05-01

    Although pre-cooling is known to enhance exercise performance, the optimal cooling intensity is unknown. We hypothesized that mild cooling opposed to strong cooling circumvents skin vasoconstriction and thermogenesis, and thus improves cooling efficiency reflected in improved time to exhaustion. Eight males undertook three randomized trials, consisting of a pre-cooling and an exercise session. During the pre-cooling, performed in a room of 24.6 +/- 0.4 degrees C and 24 +/- 6% relative humidity, participants received either 45 min of mild cooling using an evaporative cooling shirt or strong cooling using an ice-vest. A no-cooling condition was added as a control. Subsequent cycling exercise was performed at 65%[Vdot]O(2peak) in a climatic chamber of 29.3 +/- 0.2 degrees C and 80 +/- 3% relative humidity. During the pre-cooling session, mild and strong cooling decreased the skin blood flow compared with the control. However, no differences were observed between mild and strong cooling. No thermogenesis was observed in any conditions investigated. The reduction of body heat content after pre-cooling was two times larger with strong cooling (39.5 +/- 8.4 W . m(-2)) than mild cooling (21.2 +/- 5.1 W . m(-2)). This resulted in the greatest improvement in time to exhaustion with strong cooling. We conclude that the cooling intensities investigated had a similar effect on cooling efficiency (vasoconstriction and thermogenesis) and that the improved performance after strong cooling is attributable to the greater decrease in body heat content.

  8. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  9. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  10. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  11. Effects of seed aerosols on the growth of secondary organic aerosols from the photooxidation of toluene.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-qing; Wang, Zhen-ya; Huang, Ming-qiang; Fang, Li; Zhang, Wei-jun

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (.OH)-initiated photooxidation reaction of toluene was carried out in a self-made smog chamber. Four individual seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium silicate and calcium chloride, were introduced into the chamber to assess their influence on the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). It was found that the low concentration of seed aerosols might lead to high concentration of SOA particles. Seed aerosols would promote rates of SOA formation at the start of the reaction and inhibit its formation rate with prolonging the reaction time. In the case of ca. 9000 pt/cm3 seed aerosol load, the addition of sodium silicate induced a same effect on the SOA formation as ammonium nitrate. The influence of the four individual seed aerosols on the generation of SOA decreased in the order of calcium chloride>sodium silicate and ammonium nitrate>ammonium sulfate.

  12. Deciphering the Climatic Effects of Volcanic Aerosols: What Lies Ahead and Why Should We Care?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, S.

    2011-12-01

    The twentieth century was perhaps unusually free of explosive eruptions that affected highly populated Northern Hemisphere regions (where ~ 90 % of global residents live), thus our historic perspective on aspects of widespread volcanic-aerosol-induced climatic changes is limited. Highly explosive eruptions up to VEI 6 [Krakatau-size (bigger than Pinatubo), mean frequency ~ 2 per century] cause ash and aerosol clouds that affect global climate, weather, and communications; aerosol-induced cooling is small (< 1 degree C). Perhaps VEI 7 explosive eruptions (bigger than Tambora 1815) should concern us more? They are under-reported in the record, with a > 10 % chance of one occurring in the next century but the radiative effects of aerosols derived from Tambora's ~ 60 Mt release of sulphur dioxide may be limited by rapid droplet growth and sedimentation [Timmreck et al., 2009]. Basaltic fissure eruptions such as Laki 1783 can also cause long-lasting aerosol clouds, with severe local and possibly widespread health effects; some far-field health impacts ascribed to Laki's gas or aerosols may have another explanation. The > 100 Mt of sulphur dioxide released from Laki over several months may have caused ~ 200 Mt of aerosols but the cold 1783-4 winter has been claimed to be within the range of climatic variability [D'Arrigo et al., 2011]. In order to assess what lies in our future, further modelling is required to attempt to isolate the effects of volcanic stratospheric aerosols from the influences of other forcings that lead to climatic variability. Positive effects of future eruptions include possible offset of global warming via radiatively effective stratospheric aerosols and ash-fall onto oceans, which may help decrease atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  13. A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

    2013-05-01

    The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosol’s direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

  14. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  15. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  16. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  17. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    suppression, however, only occurs during the first hour of simulation. This result suggests that microphysical processes dominate the impact of aerosols on precipitation in the early stage of precipitation development. • During the mature stage of the simulations, the effect of increasing aerosol concentration ranges from rain suppression in the PRESTORM case to little effect on surface rainfall in the CRYSTAL-FACE case to rain enhancement in the TOGA COARE case. • The model results suggest that evaporative cooling is a key process in determining whether higher CCN reduces or enhances precipitation. Cold pool strength can be enhanced by stronger evaporation. When cold pool interacts with the near surface wind shear, the low-level convergence can be stronger, facilitating secondary cloud formation and more vigorous precipitation processes. Evaporative cooling is more than two times stronger at low levels with higher CCN for the TOGA COARE case during the early stages of precipitation development. However, evaporative cooling is slightly stronger at lower levels with lower CCN for the PRESTORM case. The early formation of rain in the clean environment could allow for the formation of an earlier and stronger cold pool compared to a dirty environment. PRESTORM has a very dry environment and both large and small rain droplets can evaporate. Consequently, the cold pool is relatively weaker, and the system is relatively less intense with higher CCN. • Sensitivity tests are conducted to determine the impact of ice processes on aerosol-precipitation interaction. The results suggested that ice processes are crucial for suppressing precipitation due to high CCN for the PRESTORM case. More and smaller ice particles are generated in the dirty case and transported to the trailing stratiform region. This reduces the heavy convective rain and contributes to the weakening of the cold pool. Warm rain processes dominate the TOGA COARE case. Therefore, ice processes only play a secondary

  18. Modelling the direct effect of aerosols in the solar near-infrared on a planetary scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Fotiadi, A.; Drakakis, E.; Stackhouse, P. W., Jr.; Koepke, P.; Pavlakis, K. G.; Hatzidimitriou, D.; Vardavas, I.

    2006-09-01

    We used a spectral radiative transfer model to compute the direct radiative effect (DRE) of natural plus anthropogenic aerosols in the solar near-infrared (IR), between 0.85-10 µm, namely, their effect on the outgoing near-IR radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA, ΔFTOA), on the atmospheric absorption of near-IR radiation (ΔFatmab) and on the surface downward and absorbed near-IR radiation (ΔFsurf, and ΔFsurfnet, respectively). The computations were performed on a global scale (over land and ocean) under all-sky conditions, using spectral aerosol optical properties taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS) supplemented by realistic data for the rest of surface and atmospheric parameters. The computed aerosol DRE, averaged over the 12-year period 1984-1995 for January and July, shows that aerosols produce a planetary cooling by increasing the scattered near-IR radiation back to space (by up to 6 Wm-2), they warm the atmosphere (by up to 7 Wm-2) and cool the surface (by up to 12 Wm-2). However, they can also slightly warm the Earth-atmosphere system or cool the atmosphere (by less than 1 Wm-2) over limited areas. The magnitude of the near-IR aerosol DRE is smaller than that of the combined ultraviolet (UV) and visible DRE, but it is still energetically important, since it contributes to the total shortwave (SW) DRE by 22-31%. On a global mean basis, the DREs ΔFTOA, ΔFatmab, ΔFsurf, and ΔFsurfnet are equal to about 0.48, 0.37, -1.03 and -0.85 Wm-2, i.e. their magnitude is similar to that of climate forcing associated with increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. The aerosol induced near-IR surface cooling combined with the atmospheric warming, affects the thermal dynamics of the Earth-atmosphere system, by increasing the atmospheric stability, decreasing thus cloud formation, and precipitation, especially over desertification threatened regions such as the Mediterranean basin. This, together with the fact that the sign of near-IR aerosol DRE is

  19. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  20. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol's thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ~27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3-5 W m(-2)) and a surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m(-2)). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments.

  1. Anthropogenic Aerosol Effects on Sea Surface Temperatures: Mixed-Layer Ocean Experiments with Explicit Aerosol Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols affect the Earth's radiative balance both through direct and indirect effects. These effects can lead to a reduction of the incoming solar radiation at the surface, i.e. dimming, which may lead to a change in sea surface temperatures (SST) or SST pattern. This, in turn, may affect precipitation patterns. The goal of the present work is to achieve an estimate of the equilibrium SST changes under anthropogenic aerosol forcing since industrialisation. We show preliminary results from mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with explicit aerosol representation performed with ECHAM6-HAM. The (fixed) MLO heat flux into the deep ocean was derived from atmosphere only runs with fixed climatological SSTs (1961-1990 average) and present day (year 2000) aerosols and GHG burdens. Some experiments we repeated with an alternative MLO deep ocean heat flux (based on pre-industrial conditions) to test the robustness of our results with regard to this boundary condition. The maximum surface temperature responses towards anthropogenic aerosol and GHG forcing (separately and combined) were derived on a global and regional scale. The same set of experiments was performed with aerosol and GHG forcings representative of different decades over the past one and a half centuries. This allows to assess how SST patterns at equilibrium changed with changing aerosol (and GHG) forcing. Correlating SST responses with the change in downward clear-sky and all-sky shortwave radiation provides a first estimate of the response to anthropogenic aerosols. Our results show a clear contrast in hemispheric surface temperature response, as expected from the inter-hemispheric asymmetry of aerosol forcing The presented work is part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on SSTs and the consequences for global precipitation patterns. Results from this study will serve as a starting point for further experiments involving a dynamic ocean model, which

  2. Aerosols and lightning activity: The effect of vertical profile and aerosol type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Price, C.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite has been utilized for the first time in a study regarding lightning activity modulation due to aerosols. Lightning activity observations, obtained by the ZEUS long range Lightning Detection Network, European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) data and Cloud Fraction (CF) retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite have been combined with CALIPSO CALIOP data over the Mediterranean basin and for the period March to November, from 2007 to 2014. The results indicate that lightning activity is enhanced during days characterized by higher Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values, compared to days with no lightning. This study contributes to existing studies on the link between lightning activity and aerosols, which have been based just on columnar AOD satellite retrievals, by performing a deeper analysis into the effect of aerosol profiles and aerosol types. Correlation coefficients of R = 0.73 between the CALIPSO AOD and the number of lightning strikes detected by ZEUS and of R = 0.93 between ECMWF CAPE and lightning activity are obtained. The analysis of extinction coefficient values at 532 nm indicates that at an altitudinal range exists, between 1.1 km and 2.9 km, where the values for extinction coefficient of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases are statistically significantly different. Finally, based on the CALIPSO aerosol subtype classification, we have investigated the aerosol conditions of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases. According to the results polluted dust aerosols are more frequently observed during non-lightning-active days, while dust and smoke aerosols are more abundant in the atmosphere during the lightning-active days.

  3. Quantifying the Aerosol Semi-Direct Effect in the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randles, Cynthia A.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols such as black carbon, dust, and some organic carbon species both scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation. This direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) redistributes solar energy both by cooling the surface and warming the atmosphere. As a result, these aerosols affect atmospheric stability and cloud cover (the semi-direct effect, or SDE). Furthermore, in regions with persistent high loadings of absorbing aerosols (e.g. Asia), regional circulation patterns may be altered, potentially resulting in changes in precipitation patterns. Here we investigate aerosol-climate coupling using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), in which we have implemented an online version of the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GOCART includes representations of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of externally mixed dust, sea salt, sulfate, and carbonaceous aerosols. We examine a series of free-running ensemble climate simulations of the present-day period (2000-2009) forced by observed sea surface temperatures to determine the impact of aerosols on the model climate. The SDE and response of each simulation is determined by differencing with respect to the control simulation (no aerosol forcing). In a free-running model, any estimate of the SDE includes changes in clouds due both to atmospheric heating from aerosols and changes in circulation. To try and quantify the SDE without these circulation changes we then examine the DARF and SDE in GEOS-5 with prescribed meteorological analyses introduced by the MERRA analysis. By doing so, we are able to examine changes in model clouds that occur on shorter scales (six hours). In the GEOS-5 data assimilation system (DAS), the analysis is defined as the best estimate of the atmospheric state at any given time, and it is determined by optimally combining a first-guess short-term GCM forecast with all available

  4. Effect of Carbonaceous Aerosols on Clouds and Precipitation in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v, V.; Wang, H.; Ganguly, D.; Minghuai, W.; Rasch, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation (i.e., direct radiative effect) in the atmosphere and also affect clouds and precipitation through indirect effects, thus heating the atmosphere but reducing the amount of solar radiation that reaches the earth’s surface. These effects through dynamic feedbacks can also have remote impact over regions far away from their emission sources and hence demand special scientific attention. Previous modeling studies have revealed that large amount of anthropogenic carbonaceous aerosols over the Asian region can alter monsoon circulation and precipitation patterns and thereby influence its strength by varying degrees spatially. Most of the studies focused on the direct radiative effect of aerosols and their subsequent effect on monsoon precipitation. We evaluate the changes in clouds and precipitation in Asia due to carbonaceous aerosols using the community atmospheric model (CAM5) which accounts for not only aerosol direct effects, but also aerosol indirect effects on warm, mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. This study focuses on the precipitation efficiency with emphasis on aerosol indirect effects. In addition to carbonaceous aerosol emissions over Asia, the effect of emissions from other regions like North America, North Africa and Europe are also investigated for their influence on precipitation in the Asian region. In addition to the focus on the aerosol effect on monsoon, we also study the seasonality in aerosol induced changes to precipitation efficiency. We present the quantitative estimates of changes in precipitation efficiency related to changes in aerosol loading and compare them with those estimated from satellite observations, and further explore the potential role of aerosol indirect effects to changes in precipitation efficiency.

  5. The aerosol radiative effects of uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, John K.; Cucinotta, Rachel; Ridley, David A.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Open, uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste is a potentially significant source of aerosol; however, this aerosol source is not generally included in many global emissions inventories. To provide a first estimate of the aerosol radiative impacts from domestic-waste combustion, we incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al. (2014) emissions inventory into GEOS-Chem-TOMAS, a global chemical-transport model with online aerosol microphysics. We find domestic-waste combustion increases global-mean black carbon and organic aerosol concentrations by 8 and 6 %, respectively, and by greater than 40 % in some regions. Due to uncertainties regarding aerosol optical properties, we estimate the globally averaged aerosol direct radiative effect to range from -5 to -20 mW m-2; however, this range increases from -40 to +4 mW m-2 when we consider uncertainties in emission mass and size distribution. In some regions with significant waste combustion, such as India and China, the aerosol direct radiative effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2. Similarly, we estimate a cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of -13 mW m-2, with a range of -4 to -49 mW m-2 due to emission uncertainties. In the regions with significant waste combustion, the cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2.

  6. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  7. Quantifying the temperature-independent effect of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on global-mean precipitation in a multi-model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Angus J.; Griffiths, Hannah G.

    2016-03-01

    The reduction in global-mean precipitation when stratospheric aerosol geoengineering is used to counterbalance global warming from increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations has been mainly attributed to the temperature-independent effect of CO2 on atmospheric radiative cooling. We demonstrate here that stratospheric sulphate aerosol itself also acts to reduce global-mean precipitation independent of its effects on temperature. The temperature-independent effect of stratospheric aerosol geoenginering on global-mean precipitation is calculated by removing temperature-dependent effects from climate model simulations of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). When sulphate aerosol is injected into the stratosphere at a rate of 5 Tg SO2 per year the aerosol reduces global-mean precipitation by approximately 0.2 %, though multiple ensemble members are required to separate this effect from internal variability. For comparison, the precipitation reduction from the temperature-independent effect of increasing CO2 concentrations under the RCP4.5 scenario of the future is approximately 0.5 %. The temperature-independent effect of stratospheric sulphate aerosol arises from the aerosol’s effect on tropospheric radiative cooling. Radiative transfer calculations show this is mainly due to increasing downward emission of infrared radiation by the aerosol, but there is also a contribution from the stratospheric warming the aerosol causes. Our results suggest climate model simulations of solar dimming can capture the main features of the global-mean precipitation response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering.

  8. A six year satellite-based assessment of the regional variations in aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. A.; Christopher, S. A.; Quaas, J.

    2008-12-01

    Since aerosols act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) for cloud water droplets, changes in aerosol concentrations having significant impacts on the corresponding cloud properties. An increase in aerosol concentration leads to an increase in CCN, with an associated decrease in cloud droplet size for a given cloud liquid water content. Smaller droplet sizes may then lead to a reduction in precipitation efficiency and an increase in cloud lifetimes, which induces more reflection of solar radiation back into space, cooling the atmosphere below the cloud layer. In reality, this relationship is much more complex and is interrelated between aerosol, cloud, and atmospheric conditions present at any one time. MODIS aerosol and cloud properties are combined with NCEP Reanalysis data for eight different regions around the globe between March 2000 and December 2005 to study the effects of different aerosol, cloud, and atmospheric conditions on the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). The first AIE for both anthropogenic and dust aerosols is calculated so that the importance of each can be compared. The unique aspect of this research is that it combines multiple satellite data sets over a six year period to provide a comprehensive analysis of indirect effects for different aerosol regimes around the globe. Results show that in most regions, AIE has a distinct seasonal cycle, though the cycle varies in significance and period from region to region. In the Arabian Sea, the six-year mean anthropogenic + dust AIE is -0.4 Wm-2 and is greatest during the summer months (<-2.0 Wm-2) during which dust aerosol concentration is greatest, significant concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols are present, and upward vertical motion is also present providing a favorable environment for cloud formation. In the Bay of Bengal, AIE was negligible owing to less favorable atmospheric conditions and a lower concentration of aerosols. In the eastern North Atlantic, AIE was also small (<0.1 Wm-2) and in

  9. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  10. The effect of volcanic aerosols on ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitas, Steven R.; Yung, Yuk L.

    Volcanic eruptions can inject large amounts of aerosol into the atmosphere, and, at large solar zenith angles, scattering by these aerosols can actually increase the flux of UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation reaching the surface. This is surprising since aerosols increase the reflection of sunlight to space. As previous explanations of this phenomenon are heuristic and incomplete, we first provide a rigorous and complete explanation of how this surprising effect occurs. This phenomenon makes Antarctica during spring the most susceptible place on Earth to the scattering effect of volcanic aerosols, due to the combined effect of the spring ozone hole and the large solar zenith angles characteristic of this time of year. We show that an aerosol layer lying above Antarctica during spring will decrease the integrated daily dose of biologically weighted irradiance, weighted by the erythema action spectrum, by only up to 5%. Hence the effects of any significant destruction of ozone induced by volcanic aerosols will not be offset by aerosol scattering. Thus after a volcanic eruption, life in Antarctica during spring will suffer the combined effects of the spring ozone hole and ozone destruction induced by volcanic aerosols, with the latter effect only slightly offset by aerosol scattering.

  11. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  12. Southeast Atlantic Ocean aerosol direct radiative effects over clouds: Comparison of observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Haywood, J.; Bellouin, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2017-02-01

    Absorbing aerosols exert a warming or a cooling effect on the Earth's system, depending on the circumstances. The direct radiative effect (DRE) of absorbing aerosols is negative (cooling) at the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) over a dark surface like the ocean, as the aerosols increase the planetary albedo, but it is positive (warming) over bright backgrounds like clouds. Furthermore, radiation absorption by aerosols heat the atmosphere locally, and, through rapid adjustments of the atmospheric column and cloud dynamics, the net effect can be amplified considerably. We developed a technique to study the absorption of radiation of smoke over low lying clouds using satellite spectrometry. The TOA DRE of smoke over clouds is large and positive over the southeast Atlantic Ocean off the west coast of Africa, which can be explained by the large decrease of reflected radiation by a polluted cloud, especially in the UV. However, general circulation models (GCMs) fail to reproduce these strong positive DRE, and in general GCMs disagree on the magnitude and even sign of the aerosol DRE in the southeast Atlantic region. Our satellite-derived DRE measurements show clear seasonal and inter-annual variations, consistent with other satellite measurements, which are not reproduced by GCMs. A comparison with model results showed discrepancies with the Ångström exponent of the smoke aerosols, which is larger than assumed in simulations, and a sensitivity to emission scenarios. However, this was not enough to explain the discrepancies, and we suspect that the modeling of cloud distributions and microphysics will have the necessary larger impact on DRE that will explain the differences between observations and modeling.

  13. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Daniels, John; Drayson, S. Roland; Park, Jae H.

    1995-01-01

    The eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 increased stratospheric aerosol loading by a factor of 30, affecting chemistry, radiative transfer, and remote measurements of the stratosphere. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument on board Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) makes measurements globally for inferring profiles of NO2, H2O, O3, HF, HCl, CH4, NO, and temperature in addition to aerosol extinction at five wavelengths. Understanding and removing the aerosol extinction is essential for obtaining accurate retrievals from the radiometer channels of NO2, H2O and O3 in the lower stratosphere since these measurements are severely affected by contaminant aerosol absorption. If ignored, aerosol absorption in the radiometer measurements is interpreted as additional absorption by the target gas, resulting in anomalously large mixing ratios. To correct the radiometer measurements for aerosol effects, a retrieved aerosol extinction profile is extrapolated to the radiometer wavelengths and then included as continuum attenuation. The sensitivity of the extrapolation to size distribution and composition is small for certain wavelength combinations, reducing the correction uncertainty. The aerosol corrections extend the usable range of profiles retrieved from the radiometer channels to the tropopause with results that agree well with correlative measurements. In situations of heavy aerosol loading, errors due to aerosol in the retrieved mixing ratios are reduced to values of about 15, 25, and 60% in H2O, O3, and NO2, respectively, levels that are much less than the correction magnitude.

  14. Direct Radiative Forcing and Regional Climatic Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols Over East Asia: A Regional Coupled Climate-Chemistry/Aerosol Model Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Filippo; Bi, Xunqiang; Qian, Yun )

    2002-09-01

    We present a series of regional climate model simulations aimed at assessing the radiative forcing and surface climatic effects of anthropogenic sulfate and fossil fuel soot over east Asia. The simulations are carried out with a coupled regional climate-chemistry/aerosol model for the 5-year period of 1993-1997 using published estimates of sulfur emissions for the period. Anthropogenic sulfate induces a negative radiative forcing spatially varying from -1 to -8 W/m2 in the winter to -1 to -15 W/m2 in the summer, with maxima over the Sichan Basin of southwest China and over some areas of east and northeast China. This forcing induces a surface cooling in the range of -0.1 to -0.7 K. Fossil fuel soot exerts a positive atmospheric radiative forcing of 0.5 to 2 W/m2 and enhances the surface cooling by a few tenths of K due to increased surface shielding from solar radiation. Doubling of sulfur emissions induces a substantial increase in radiative forcing (up to -7 to -8 W/m2) and associated surface cooling. With doubled sulfur emissions, the surface cooling exceeds -1 K and is statistically significant at the 90% confidence level over various areas of China. The aerosol forcing and surface cooling tend to inhibit precipitation over the region, although this effect is relatively small in the simulations. Some features of the simulated aerosol-induced cooling are consistent with temperature trends observed in recent decades over different regions of China.

  15. The Effects of Transpacific Transported Aerosol on Clouds in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K.; Creamean, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Cazorla, A.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; White, A. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cahill, J.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Chand, D.; Schmid, B.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are frequently lofted high into the atmosphere and can travel large distances within several days. Long-range transported aerosols can have large impacts on radiative and microphysical cloud properties and can affect precipitation on both regional and global scales. Research flights were conducted out of Sacramento, California onboard the DOE G-1 aircraft during the CalWater 2011 flight campaign, which aimed to understand the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation in California. To investigate aerosol effects on clouds, measurements of cloud microphysical properties were coupled with an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS), which characterized the chemical composition of aerosols and cloud residues. California Central Valley pollution aerosols were hypothesized to have a large impact on orographic clouds in the California Sierra Nevada Mountains; however transpacific transported aerosols were observed in cloud residues on several flights. Our observations indicate that dust from Asia, Africa, and the Middle East initiated ice formation in upper level clouds, while Asian soot from biomass burning served as cloud condensation nuclei in clouds with large concentrations of small liquid droplets. Previous work has linked large concentrations of small droplets to suppression of orographic precipitation, while ice formation has been shown to enhance precipitation. Therefore, the overall impact of these competing effects on precipitation in the Sierra Nevada is highly uncertain. The varying impacts of long-range transported aerosols on clouds and precipitation in California are presented.

  16. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  17. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  18. Effect of Chord Size on Weight and Cooling Characteristics of Air-Cooled Turbine Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esgar, Jack B; Schum, Eugene F; Curren, Arthur N

    1958-01-01

    An analysis has been made to determine the effect of chord size on the weight and cooling characteristics of shell-supported, air-cooled gas-turbine blades. In uncooled turbines with solid blades, the general practice has been to design turbines with high aspect ratio (small blade chord) to achieve substantial turbine weight reduction. With air-cooled blades, this study shows that turbine blade weight is affected to a much smaller degree by the size of the blade chord.

  19. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  20. Modeling Trends in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden & Its Radiative Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large changes in emissions of aerosol precursors have occurred across the southeast U.S., North America, as well as the northern hemisphere. The spatial heterogeneity and contrasting trends in the aerosol burden is resulting in differing effects on regional radiative balance. Mul...

  1. The effect of subtropical aerosol loading on equatorial precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, G.; Chemke, R.

    2016-10-01

    Cloud-aerosol interactions are considered as one of the largest sources of uncertainties in the study of climate change. Here another possible cloud-aerosol effect on climate is proposed. A series of large eddy simulations (LES) with bin microphysics reveal a sensitivity of the total atmospheric water vapor amount to aerosol concentration. Under polluted conditions the rain is suppressed and the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere increases with time compared to clean precipitating conditions. Theoretical examination of this aerosol effect on water vapor transport from the subtropics to the tropics, and hence on the equatorial rain and Hadley circulation, is conducted using an idealized general circulation model (GCM). It is shown that a reduction in the subtropical rain amount results in increased water vapor advection to the tropics and enhanced equatorial rain and Hadley circulation. This joins previously proposed mechanisms on the radiative aerosol effect on the general circulation.

  2. Effects of biomass burning aerosols on CO2 fluxes on Amazon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Moreira, Demerval; Freitas, Saulo; Longo, Karla; Rosario, Nilton

    2015-04-01

    During the dry season in Central Brazil and Southern Amazon, there is an usually high concentration of aerosol particles associated with intense human activities, with extensive biomass burning. It has been observed through remote sensing that the smoke clouds in these areas often cover an area of about 4 to 5 million km2. Thus, the average aerosol optical depth of these regions at 500 ηm, is usually below 0.1 during the rainy season and can exceed 0.9 in the fire season. Aerosol particles act as condensation nuclei and also increase scattering and absorption of the incident radiation. Therefore, the layer of the aerosol alters the precipitation rate; reduces the amount of solar energy that reaches the surface, producing a cooling; and causes an increase of diffuse radiation. These factors directly and indirectly affect the CO2 fluxes at the surface. In this work, the chemical-atmospheric model CCATT-BRAMS (Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) coupled to the surface model JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) was used to simulate the effects of biomass burning aerosols in CO2 fluxes in the Amazon region. Both the total effect of the aerosols and the contribution related only to the increase of the diffuse fraction caused by the their presence were analyzed. The results show that the effect of the scattered fraction is dominant over all other effects. It was also noted that the presence of aerosols from fires can substantially change biophysiological processes of the carbon cycle. In some situations, it can lead to a sign change in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE), turning it from a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, when the aerosol is not considered in the simulations, to a sink, when it is considered. Thus, this work demonstrates the importance of considering the presence of aerosols in numerical simulations of weather and climate, since carbon dioxide is a major

  3. Effects of Biomass Burning Aerosols on CO2 Fluxes in the Amazon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. S.; Freitas, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    During the dry season in Central Brazil and Southern Amazon, there is an usually high concentration of aerosol particles associated with intense human activities, with extensive biomass burning. It has been observed through remote sensing that the smoke clouds in these areas often cover an area of about 4 to 5 million km2. Thus, the average aerosol optical depth of these regions at 500 ηm, is usually below 0.1 during the rainy season and can exceed 0.9 in the fire season. Aerosol particles act as condensation nuclei and also increase scattering and absorption of the incident radiation. Therefore, the layer of the aerosol alters the precipitation rate; reduces the amount of solar energy that reaches the surface, producing a cooling; and causes an increase of diffuse radiation. These factors directly and indirectly affect the CO2 fluxes at the surface. In this work, the chemical-atmospheric model CCATT-BRAMS (Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) coupled to the surface model JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) was used to simulate the effects of biomass burning aerosols in CO2 fluxes in the Amazon region. Both the total effect of the aerosols and the contribution related only to the increase of the diffuse fraction caused by the their presence were analyzed. The results show that the effect of the scattered fraction is dominant over all other effects. It was also noted that the presence of aerosols from fires can substantially change biophysiological processes of the carbon cycle. In some situations, it can lead to a sign change in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE), turning it from a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, when the aerosol is not considered in the simulations, to a sink, when it is considered. Thus, this work demonstrates the importance of considering the presence of aerosols in numerical simulations of weather and climate, since carbon dioxide is a major

  4. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  5. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China, to investigate the role of fireworks (FW) and secondary aerosol in particulate pollution during the Chinese Spring Festival of 2013. Three FW events, exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5), were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW were shown to have a large impact on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in submicron aerosol (PM1), of which FW organics appeared to be emitted mainly in secondary, with its mass spectrum resembling that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated the total PM1 mass on average, accounting for 63-82% during nine PEs in this study. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. Primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction being in cooking organic aerosol (OA; 69%), in nitrogen monoxide (54%), and in coal combustion OA (28%). Secondary sulfate, however, remained only slightly changed, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. Our results have significant implications for controlling local primary source emissions during PEs, e.g., cooking and traffic activities. Controlling these factors might have a limited effect on improving air quality in the megacity of Beijing, due to the dominance of SPM from regional transport in aerosol particle composition.

  6. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  7. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation, composition, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, S N

    2016-12-15

    Chemical characterization of ambient non-refractory submicron aerosols (NR-PM1) was carried out in real time at Kanpur, India. The measurements were performed during the winter (December 2014 to February 2015), and comprised of two very distinct high and low aerosol loading periods coupled with prevalent foggy conditions. The average non-refractory submicron aerosol loading varied significantly from high (HL, ~240μg/m(3)) to low loading (LL, ~100μg/m(3)) period and was dominated by organic aerosols (OA) which contributed more than half (~60%) of the measured aerosol mass. OA source apportionment via positive matrix factorization (PMF) showed drastic changes in the composition of OA from HL to LL period. Overall, O/C (oxygen to carbon) ratios also varied significantly from HL (=0.59) to LL (=0.69) period. Fog episodes (n=17) studied here seem to be reducing the magnitude of the negative impact of OA loading on O/C ratio (OA loading and O/C ratio are anti-correlated, as higher OA loading allows gas to particle partitioning of relatively less oxidized organics) by 60% via aqueous processing. This study provided new insights into the combined effects of OA loading and fog aqueous processing on the evolution of ambient organic aerosols (OA) for the first time.

  8. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  9. Estimating the direct aerosol radiative effect over China using multi-sensor satellite remote sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Anu-Maija; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2013-04-01

    The quantification of aerosol radiative effects is complex and large uncertainties still exist, mainly due to the high spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol concentration and mass as well as their relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere. In this work a multi-sensor satellite based approach is studied for defining the direct short wave aerosol radiative effect (ADRE) over China. ADRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is defined as the difference between the net solar flux with (F) and without (F0) aerosols. The negative values of ADRE correspond to increased outgoing radiation and planetary cooling, whereas positive values correspond to decreased outgoing radiation at TOA and increased atmospheric warming. To derive instantaneous ADRE from the satellite observations, the challenge is to estimate the value for F0. In this work F0 is derived using the colocated observations of CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radian Energy System) short wave broad band TOA-flux and MODIS (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Assuming that aerosol type does not change systematically within a 0.5 deg. grid cell over a month, a linear relationship is established between the TOA-flux and AOD when AOD < 2.0. Using the linear fit an estimate for F0 can be obtained and F is the monthly mean of CERES observations. However, there are several other parameters affecting the observed TOA flux than the aerosol loading and aerosol type, such as solar zenith angle, water vapour, land surface albedo and Earth-Sun distance. Changes in these parameters within a grid cell over a month inflect the correlation. To minimize the effect of zenith angle, water vapour, and Earth-Sun distance the CERES fluxes are normalized before the linear fitting using reference fluxes calculated with a radiative transfer code (Libradtran). The normalization, especially to a fixed zenith angle increases the correlation between TOA flux and AOD significantly. For a comparison theF0 is

  10. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  11. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-01-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability. PMID:27929097

  12. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H.

    2016-12-01

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field’s thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  13. Aerosol effect on the evolution of the thermodynamic properties of warm convective cloud fields.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Guy; Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Heiblum, Reuven H

    2016-12-08

    Convective cloud formation and evolution strongly depend on environmental temperature and humidity profiles. The forming clouds change the profiles that created them by redistributing heat and moisture. Here we show that the evolution of the field's thermodynamic properties depends heavily on the concentration of aerosol, liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Under polluted conditions, rain formation is suppressed and the non-precipitating clouds act to warm the lower part of the cloudy layer (where there is net condensation) and cool and moisten the upper part of the cloudy layer (where there is net evaporation), thereby destabilizing the layer. Under clean conditions, precipitation causes net warming of the cloudy layer and net cooling of the sub-cloud layer (driven by rain evaporation), which together act to stabilize the atmosphere with time. Previous studies have examined different aspects of the effects of clouds on their environment. Here, we offer a complete analysis of the cloudy atmosphere, spanning the aerosol effect from instability-consumption to enhancement, below, inside and above warm clouds, showing the temporal evolution of the effects. We propose a direct measure for the magnitude and sign of the aerosol effect on thermodynamic instability.

  14. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2013-08-01

    In atmospheric modelling applications the aerosol particle size distribution is commonly represented by modal approach, in which particles in different size ranges are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. Such method includes numerical reallocation of particles from a mode to another for example during particle growth, leading to potentially artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how this reallocation affects climatologically relevant parameters: cloud droplet number concentration, aerosol-cloud interaction coefficient and light extinction coefficient. We compared these parameters between a modal model with and without reallocation routines, and a high resolution sectional model that was considered as a reference model. We analysed the relative differences of the parameters in different experiments that were designed to cover a wide range of dynamic aerosol processes occurring in the atmosphere. According to our results, limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes and the following numerical remapping of the distribution by reallocation, leads on average to underestimation of cloud droplet number concentration (up to 100%) and overestimation of light extinction (up to 20%). The analysis of aerosol first indirect effect is more complicated as the ACI parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. However, for example in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause around average 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  15. Effect of relative humidity on mixed aerosols in atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lee, W M; Huang, W M; Chen, Y Y

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the effects of relative humidity on the deliquescent point and size of internally mixed aerosols diameter, NH4NO3 and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated using a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) with a relative humidity conditioner. The growth of mixed aerosols appears to have two deliquescent steps. The first one was at about 61.2-61.3%, but the second one was at around 77-78%. At the first deliquescence point, growth ratio at phase change was 7.5%, which agrees with the growth ratio of ammonium nitrate aerosol. Growth ratio of phase change at the second deliquescence point was about 20%, lower than the growth ratio of ammonium sulfate aerosol. In the relative humidity range of 80-85%, the growth ratio of the mixed aerosols reached 60%. In other words, it appears that growth ratio increases with the size of aerosol. Furthermore, a theoretical growth model of mixed aerosols was developed and applied to estimate the amount of composition of the mixed aerosols dissolved at each deliquescence point. The results also show that some of ammonium sulfate already dissolved at the first deliquescence point according to the theoretical growth model.

  16. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  17. A satellite view of aerosols in the climate system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Boucher, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are intricately linked to the climate system and to the hydrologic cycle. The net effect of aerosols is to cool the climate system by reflecting sunlight. Depending on their composition, aerosols can also absorb sunlight in the atmosphere, further cooling the surface but warming the atmosphere in the process. These effects of aerosols on the temperature profile, along with the role of aerosols as cloud condensation nuclei, impact the hydrologic cycle, through changes in cloud cover, cloud properties and precipitation. Unravelling these feedbacks is particularly difficult because aerosols take a multitude of shapes and forms, ranging from desert dust to urban pollution, and because aerosol concentrations vary strongly over time and space. To accurately study aerosol distribution and composition therefore requires continuous observations from satellites, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Increases in aerosol concentration and changes in their composition, driven by industrialization and an expanding population, may adversely affect the Earth's climate and water supply.

  18. A satellite view of aerosols in the climate system.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Tanré, Didier; Boucher, Olivier

    2002-09-12

    Anthropogenic aerosols are intricately linked to the climate system and to the hydrologic cycle. The net effect of aerosols is to cool the climate system by reflecting sunlight. Depending on their composition, aerosols can also absorb sunlight in the atmosphere, further cooling the surface but warming the atmosphere in the process. These effects of aerosols on the temperature profile, along with the role of aerosols as cloud condensation nuclei, impact the hydrologic cycle, through changes in cloud cover, cloud properties and precipitation. Unravelling these feedbacks is particularly difficult because aerosols take a multitude of shapes and forms, ranging from desert dust to urban pollution, and because aerosol concentrations vary strongly over time and space. To accurately study aerosol distribution and composition therefore requires continuous observations from satellites, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Increases in aerosol concentration and changes in their composition, driven by industrialization and an expanding population, may adversely affect the Earth's climate and water supply.

  19. Cyclosporin a aerosol improves the anticancer effect of Paclitaxel aerosol in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Vernon; Koshkina, N. V.; Golunski, E.; Roberts, L. E.; Gilbert, B. E.

    2004-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a lipophilic agent with broad anticancer activity. In the present study we examined the antitumor effect and toxicity of co-administration of cyclosporine A (CsA) and PTX in liposomal aerosol using the Renca lung metastases mouse model. The untreated and PTX-only groups exhibited cancer growth while CsA aerosol plus PTX had more favorable effects on tumor growth. Weight loss was seen in mice treated with CsA/PTX+CsA by day 9 to 22. Histopathological examination showed no toxicity following treatment. The findings offer evidence that a combination of CsA and PTX may be suitable for aerosol treatment of lung cancer if it is possible to control toxicity of the therapy. Images Fig. 1 PMID:17060982

  20. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  1. Effect of aerosolization on subsequent bacterial survival.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, M V; Marthi, B; Fieland, V P; Ganio, L M

    1990-01-01

    To determine whether aerosolization could impair bacterial survival, Pseudomonas syringae and Erwinia herbicola were aerosolized in a greenhouse, the aerosol was sampled at various distances from the site of release by using all-glass impingers, and bacterial survival was followed in the impingers for 6 h. Bacterial survival subsequent to aerosolization of P. syringae and E. herbicola was not impaired 1 m from the site of release. P. syringae aerosolized at 3 to 15 m from the site of release at a temperature of 12 degrees C and a relative humidity of 80% survived 35- to 65-fold better than P. syringae released at 27 degrees C and a relative humidity of 40%. No difference was observed in the survival of P. syringae and E. herbicola following aerosolization at the same temperature and relative humidity. Bacteria sprayed directly onto bean and oat plants established stable populations at comparable numbers on both plants over an 8-day period following inoculation. Bacteria that inoculated adjacent plants by drifting downwind up to 5 m were detectable at an initial population of 10(2) CFU/g on oats and 10(5) CFU/g on beans 2 h after the spray. However, bacterial populations on both plants were undetectable within 48 h. PMID:2268157

  2. Airborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on climate and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Pósfai, Mihály

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the troposphere and exert an important influence on global climate and the environment. They affect climate through scattering, transmission, and absorption of radiation as well as by acting as nuclei for cloud formation. A significant fraction of the aerosol particle burden consists of minerals, and most of the remainder— whether natural or anthropogenic—consists of materials that can be studied by the same methods as are used for fine-grained minerals. Our emphasis is on the study and character of the individual particles. Sulfate particles are the main cooling agents among aerosols; we found that in the remote oceanic atmosphere a significant fraction is aggregated with soot, a material that can diminish the cooling effect of sulfate. Our results suggest oxidization of SO2 may have occurred on soot surfaces, implying that even in the remote marine troposphere soot provided nuclei for heterogeneous sulfate formation. Sea salt is the dominant aerosol species (by mass) above the oceans. In addition to being important light scatterers and contributors to cloud condensation nuclei, sea-salt particles also provide large surface areas for heterogeneous atmospheric reactions. Minerals comprise the dominant mass fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden. As all geologists know, they are a highly heterogeneous mixture. However, among atmospheric scientists they are commonly treated as a fairly uniform group, and one whose interaction with radiation is widely assumed to be unpredictable. Given their abundances, large total surface areas, and reactivities, their role in influencing climate will require increased attention as climate models are refined. PMID:10097046

  3. Local cooling, plasma reheating and thermal pinching induced by single aerosol droplets injected into an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-07-01

    The injection of a single micrometer-sized droplet into an analytical inductively coupled plasma (ICP) perturbs the plasma and involves three sequential effects: local cooling, thermal pinching and plasma reheating. Time-resolved two-dimensional monochromatic imaging of the load-coil region of an ICP was used to monitor this sequence of plasma perturbations. When a microdroplet enters the plasma, it acts as a local heat sink and cools the nearby plasma region. The cooling effect is considered local, although the cooling volume can be large and extends 6 mm from the physical location of the vaporizing droplet. The liberated hydrogen, from decomposition of water, causes a thermal pinch effect by increasing the thermal conductivity of the bulk plasma and accelerating heat loss at the plasma periphery. As a response to the heat loss, the plasma shrinks in size, which increases its power density. Plasma shrinkage starts around the same time when the microdroplet enters the plasma and lasts at least 2 ms after the droplet leaves the load-coil region. Once the vaporizing droplet passes through a particular plasma volume, that volume is reheated to an even higher temperature than under steady-state conditions. Because of the opposing effects of plasma cooling and reheating, the plasma conditions are different upstream (downward) and downstream (upward) from a vaporizing droplet - cooling dominates the downstream region whereas reheating controls in the upstream domain. The boundary between the local cooling and reheating zones is sharp and is only ~ 1 mm thick. The reheating effect persists a relatively long time in the plasma, at least up to 4 ms after the droplet moves out of the load-coil region. The restoration of plasma equilibrium after the perturbation induced by microdroplet injection is slow. Microdroplet injection also induces a momentary change in plasma impedance, and the impedance change was found to correlate qualitatively with the different stages of plasma

  4. Aerosol effects on climate in China: a consistent picture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Population growth and industrialization in China in recent decades were accompanied by a substantial increase in aerosol emissions. Corresponding inventory data as well as consequences of increasing aerosol emissions are debated on the quantitative level, e.g. urbanization effects in observed data. We use transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM (aerosol emission data from NIES, the National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan; prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center) to investigate the effect of different aerosol emissions on surface solar radiation (SSR), surface air temperature (SAT), and precipitation. Observed and modeled SSR show a decrease of around -7 W/m2 in eastern parts of China, before increasing again in the late 1990s. Modeled SAT reflects the decrease in SSR in recent decades but carries also a substantial SST signature, in particular in the first half of the 20th century. Modeled precipitation decreases under the influence of increasing aerosol emissions, the 'northern drought, southern flood' pattern gets lost. We discuss how modeled changes due to increasing aerosol emissions compare with observations and what this may imply for the prescribed aerosol emissions, the model results, and the observed data.

  5. Laser Propagation Experiments - Aerosol and Stagnation Zone Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    Phys. 46, 402 (1975). 5. D. E. Lencioni and H. Kleiman. Effects of Aerosol Particle Heating on Laser Beam Propagation, Project Report LTP -27 on...1977. 18. J. Herrmann and L. C. Bradley. Numerical Calculations of Light Propagat , MIT/Lincln Laboratory Laser Technology Program Report LTP -10...R77-922578-13 ,/ Laser Propagation Experimets Aerosol and Stagnation "Zone Effects Final Technical Report "June 19, 1977 M.C. Fowe; J.R. Dunphy 3.3 0

  6. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and clear-sky direct radiative effect over the global ocean from MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Yun Gon

    2014-08-01

    A unified satellite algorithm is presented to simultaneously retrieve aerosol properties (aerosol optical depth; AOD and aerosol type) and clear-sky shortwave direct radiative effect (hereafter, DREA) over ocean. The algorithm is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations for a period from 2003 to 2010 to assess the DREA over the global ocean. The simultaneous retrieval utilizes lookup table (LUT) containing both spectral reflectances and solar irradiances calculated using a single radiative transfer model with the same aerosol input data. This study finds that aerosols cool the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and bottom-of-atmosphere (BOA) by 5.2 ± 0.5 W/m2 and 8.3 W/m2, respectively, and correspondingly warm the atmosphere (hereafter, ATM) by 3.1 W/m2. These quantities, solely based on the MODIS observations, are consistent with those of previous studies incorporating chemical transport model simulations and satellite observations. However, the DREAs at BOA and ATM are expected to be less accurate compared to that of TOA due to low sensitivity in retrieving aerosol type information, which is related with the atmospheric heating by aerosols, particularly in low AOD conditions; consequently, the uncertainties could not be quantified. Despite the issue in the aerosol type information, the present method allows us to confine the DREA attributed only to fine-mode dominant aerosols, which are expected to be mostly anthropogenic origin, in the range from -1.1 W/m2 to -1.3 W/m2 at TOA. Improvements in size-resolved AOD and SSA retrievals from current and upcoming satellite instruments are suggested to better assess the DREA, particularly at BOA and ATM, where aerosol absorptivity induces substantial uncertainty.

  7. Effects of meteoric debris on stratospheric aerosols and gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.

    1981-01-01

    Characterizations of meteoric dust height and size distributions are obtained using Hunten's calculations of meteor ablation and recondensation rates. The contribution of meteor residues to aerosol composition, the role of meteoric dust as condensation nuclei, and the effects of meteor debris on aerosol size distributions are quantified, and particle surface areas are estimated. The potential importance of heterogeneous chemistry for stratospheric trace gases is discussed. The interaction between H2SO4 vapor and meteor metal vapors is investigated. It is concluded that meteoric particles may dominate the natural stratospheric aerosols at small (less than .01 micron radius) and large (greater than 1 micron radius) sizes under normal conditions.

  8. The direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation over the broader Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimas, C. D.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Matsoukas, C.; Kanakidou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Vardavas, I.

    2011-11-01

    For the first time, the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols on solar radiation is computed over the entire Mediterranean basin, one of the most climatically sensitive world regions, by using a deterministic spectral radiation transfer model (RTM). The DRE effects on the outgoing shortwave radiation at the top of atmosphere (TOA), DRETOA, on the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column, DREatm, and on the downward and absorbed surface solar radiation (SSR), DREsurf and DREnetsurf, respectively, are computed separately. The model uses input data for the period 2000-2007 for various surface and atmospheric parameters, taken from satellite (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, ISCCP-D2), Global Reanalysis projects (National Centers for Environmental Prediction - National Center for Atmospheric Research, NCEP/NCAR), and other global databases. The spectral aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth, AOD, asymmetry parameter, gaer and single scattering albedo, ωaer), are taken from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) of NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) and they are Supplemented by the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model SSR fluxes have been successfully validated against measurements from 80 surface stations of the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) covering the period 2000-2007. A planetary cooling is found above the Mediterranean on an annual basis (regional mean DRETOA = -2.4 Wm-2). Though planetary cooling is found over most of the region, up to -7 Wm-2, large positive DRETOA values (up to +25 Wm-2) are found over North Africa, indicating a strong planetary warming, as well as over the Alps (+0.5 Wm-2). Aerosols are found to increase the absorption of solar radiation in the atmospheric column over the region (DREatm = +11.1 Wm-2) and to decrease SSR (DREsurf = -16.5 Wm-2 and DREnetsurf -13.5 Wm-2) inducing thus significant atmospheric warming and surface radiative cooling

  9. Nonlinear effects of anthropogenic aerosol and urban land surface forcing on spring climate in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiechun; Xu, Haiming; Zhang, Leying

    2016-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols and urban land cover change induce opposite thermal effects on the atmosphere near surface as well as in the troposphere. One can think of these anthropogenic effects as composed of two parts: the individual effect due to an individual anthropogenic forcing and the nonlinear effects resulting from the coexistence of two forcing factors. In this study, we explored the role of such nonlinear effects in affecting East Asian climate, as well as individual forcing effects, using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 coupled with the Community Land Model version 4. Atmospheric responses were simulated by including anthropogenic aerosol emission only, urban cover only, or the combination of the two, over eastern China. Results showed that nonlinear responses were different from any effects by an individual forcing or the linear combination of individual responses. The nonlinear interaction could generate cold horizontal temperature advection to cool the troposphere, which induced anomalous subsidence along the Yangtze River Valley (YRV). This anomalous vertical motion, together with a weakened low-level southwesterly, favored below-normal (above-normal) rainfall over the YRV (southern China), shifting the spring rain belt southward. The resultant diabatic cooling, in turn, amplified the anomalous descent and further decreased tropospheric temperature over the YRV, forming a positive feedback loop to maintain the nonlinear effects. Consequently, the nonlinear effects acted to reduce the climate anomalies from a simple linear combination of two individual effects and played an important role in regional responses to one anthropogenic forcing when the other is prescribed.

  10. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  11. Effects of sulfate aerosol forcing on East Asian summer monsoon for 1985-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjoong J.; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-02-01

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1. One control and two sensitivity model experiments were conducted in order to diagnose the separate roles played by sea surface temperature (SST) variations and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcing changes in East Asia. We find that the SST variation has been a major driver for the observed weakening of the EASM, whereas the effect of the anthropogenic aerosol forcing has been opposite and has slightly intensified the EASM over the recent decades. The reinforcement of the EASM results from radiative cooling by the sulfate aerosol forcing, which decelerates the jet stream around the jet's exit region. Subsequently, the secondary circulation induced by such a change in the jet stream leads to the increase in precipitation around 18-23°N. This result indicates that the increase in anthropogenic emissions over East Asia may play a role in compensating for the weakening of the EASM caused by the SST forcing.

  12. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  13. Aerosol indirect effect on tropospheric ozone via lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Bian, H.; Ziemke, J. R.; Albrecht, R. I.; Pickering, K. E.; Oreopoulos, L.; Goodman, S. J.; Yu, H.; Allen, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a pollutant and major greenhouse gas and its radiative forcing is still uncertain. The unresolved difference between modeled and observed natural background O3 concentrations is a key source of the uncertainty. Here we demonstrate remarkable sensitivity of lightning activity to aerosol loading with lightning activity increasing more than 30 times per unit of aerosol optical depth over our study area. We provide observational evidence that indicates the observed increase in lightning activity is caused by the influx of aerosols from a volcano. Satellite data analyses suggest O3 is increased as a result of aerosol-induced increase in lightning and lightning produced NOx. Model simulations with prescribed lightning change corroborate the satellite data analysis. This aerosol-O3 connection is achieved via aerosol increasing lightning and thus lightning produced nitrogen oxides. This aerosol-lightning-ozone link provides a potential physical mechanism that may account for a part of the model-observation difference in background O3 concentration. More importantly, O3 production increase from this link is concentrated in the upper troposphere, where O3 is most efficient as a greenhouse gas. Both of these implications suggest a stronger O3 historical radiative forcing. This introduces a new pathway, through which increasing in aerosols from pre-industrial time to present day enhances tropospheric O3 production. Aerosol forcing thus has a warming component via its effect on O3 production. Sensitivity simulations suggest that 4-8% increase of tropospheric ozone, mainly in the tropics, is expected if aerosol-lighting-ozone link is parameterized, depending on the background emission scenario. We note, however, substantial uncertainties remain on the exact magnitude of aerosol effect on tropospheric O3 via lightning. The challenges for obtaining a quantitative global estimate of this effect are also discussed. Our results have significant implications

  14. Effects of aerosol from biomass burning on the global radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Dickinson, Robert E.; O'Neill, Christine A.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the likely contribution of smoke particles from biomass burning to the global radiation balance. These particles act to reflect solar radiation directly; they also can act as cloud condensation nuclei, increasing the reflectivity of clouds. Together these effects, although uncertain, may add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 watts per square meter, comparable to the estimated contribution to sulfate aerosols. Anthropogenic increases of smoke emission thus may have helped weaken the net greenhouse warming from anthropogenic trace gases.

  15. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  16. Simulation of bulk aerosol direct radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa using RegCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, M.; Botai, J.; Sivakumar, V.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW.; Moja, Shadung J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, 12 year runs of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) have been used to analyze the bulk aerosol radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa. Due to the geographical locations where the aerosol potential source regions are situated and the regional dynamics, the South African aerosol spatial-distribution has a unique feature. Across the west and southwest areas, desert dust particles are dominant. However, sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are primarily distributed over the east and northern regions of the country. Analysis of the Radiative Effects (RE) shows that in South Africa the bulk aerosols play a role in reducing the net radiation absorbed by the surface via enhancing the net radiative heating in the atmosphere. Hence, across all seasons, the bulk aerosol-radiation-climate interaction induced statistically significant positive feedback on the net atmospheric heating rate. Over the western and central parts of South Africa, the overall radiative feedbacks of bulk aerosol predominantly induces statistically significant Cloud Cover (CC) enhancements. Whereas, over the east and southeast coastal areas, it induces minimum reductions in CC. The CC enhancement and RE of aerosols jointly induce radiative cooling at the surface which in turn results in the reduction of Surface Temperature (ST: up to -1 K) and Surface Sensible Heat Flux (SSHF: up to -24 W/m2). The ST and SSHF decreases cause a weakening of the convectively driven turbulences and surface buoyancy fluxes which lead to the reduction of the boundary layer height, surface pressure enhancement and dynamical changes. Throughout the year, the maximum values of direct and semi-direct effects of bulk aerosol were found in areas of South Africa which are dominated by desert dust particles. This signals the need for a strategic regional plan on how to reduce the dust production and monitoring of the dust dispersion as well as it initiate the need of further research on different

  17. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  18. Effects of aerosols on tropospheric oxidants: A global model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Brasseur, Guy; Emmons, Louisa; Horowitz, Larry; Kinnison, Douglas

    2001-10-01

    The global distributions of sulfate and soot particles in the atmosphere are calculated, and the effect of aerosol particles on tropospheric oxidants is studied using a global chemical/transport/aerosol model. The model is developed in the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) global three-dimensional chemical/transport model (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART)). In addition to the gas-phase photochemistry implemented in the MOZART model, the present study also accounts for the formation of sulfate and black carbon aerosols as well as for heterogeneous reactions on particles. The simulated global sulfate aerosol distributions and seasonal variation are compared with observations. The seasonal variation of sulfate aerosols is in agreement with measurements, except in the Arctic region. The calculated vertical profiles of sulfate aerosol agree well with the observations over North America. In the case of black carbon the calculated surface distribution is in fair agreement with observations. The effects of aerosol formation and heterogeneous reactions on the surface of sulfate aerosols are studied. The model calculations show the following: (1) The concentration of H2O2 is reduced when sulfate aerosols are formed due to the reaction of SO2 + H2O2 in cloud droplets. The gas-phase reaction SO2 + OH converts OH to HO2, but the reduction of OH and enhancement of HO2 are insignificant (<3%). (2) The heterogeneous reaction of HO2 on the surface of sulfate aerosols produces up to 10% reduction of hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) with an uptake coefficient of 0.2. However, this uptake coefficient could be overestimated, and the results should be regard as an upper limit estimation. (3) The N2O5 reaction on the surface of sulfate aerosols leads to an 80% reduction of NOx at middle to high latitudes during winter. Because ozone production efficiency is low in winter, ozone decreases by only 10% as a result of this reaction. However

  19. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China to investigate the aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival, 2013. Three fireworks (FW) events exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5) were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW showed major impacts on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in PM1, of which the FW organics appeared to be mainly secondary with its mass spectrum resembling to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated PM1 accounting for 63-82% during the nine PEs observed. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than that during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. The primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction for cooking OA (69%), nitrogen monoxide (54%), and coal combustion OA (28%). The secondary sulfate, however, remained minor change, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. These results have significant implications that controlling local primary source emissions, e.g., cooking and traffic activities, might have limited effects on improving air quality during PEs when SPM that is formed over regional scales dominates aerosol particle composition.

  20. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L.

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  1. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, S.; Lowe, D.; Schultz, D. M.; McFiggans, G.

    2015-10-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 km and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average reduction of downwelling shortwave radiation at the surface of -24.7 W m-2 over the three case studies. However, around 21.7 W m-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively interacting aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase net shortwave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that largely counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was difficult to quantify, being extremely sensitive to the model resolution and use of convective parameterisation. The 1 km domain simulated clouds less horizontally spread, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Not having a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain reduced total cloud cover, but also total precipitation. BB aerosol particles acted as CCN, increasing the droplet number concentration of clouds. However, the changes to cloud properties had negligible impact on net radiative balance on either domain, with or without convective parameterisation. Sensitivity to the uncertainties relating to the semi

  2. Selective Brain Cooling after Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects of Three Different Cooling Methods-Case Report.

    PubMed

    Westermaier, Thomas; Nickl, Robert; Koehler, Stefan; Fricke, Patrick; Stetter, Christian; Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-12-30

    Background In experimental models of neuronal damage, therapeutic hypothermia proved to be a powerful neuroprotective method. In clinical studies of traumatic brain injury (TBI), this very distinct effect was not reproducible. Several meta-analyses draw different conclusions about whether therapeutic hypothermia can improve outcome after TBI. Adverse side effects of systemic hypothermia, such as severe pneumonia, have been held responsible by some authors to counteract the neuroprotective effect. Selective brain cooling (SBC) attempts to take advantage of the protective effects of therapeutic hypothermia without the adverse side effects of systemic hypothermia. Methods Three different methods of SBC were applied in a patient who had severe TBI with recurrent increases of intracranial pressure (ICP) refractory to conventional forms of treatment: (1) external cooling of the scalp and neck using ice packs prior to hemicraniectomy, (2) external cooling of the craniectomy defect using ice packs after hemicraniectomy, and (3) cooling by epidural irrigation with cold Ringer solution after hemicraniectomy. Results External scalp cooling before hemicraniectomy, external cooling of the craniectomy defect, and epidural irrigation with cold fluid resulted in temperature differences (brain temperature to body temperature) of - 0.2°, - 0.7°, and - 3.6°C, respectively. ICP declined with decreasing brain temperature. Conclusion Previous external cooling attempts for SBC faced the problem that brain temperature could not be lowered without a simultaneous decrease of systemic temperature. After hemicraniectomy, epidural irrigation with cold fluid may be a simple and effective way to lower ICP and apply one of the most powerful methods of cerebroprotection after severe TBI.

  3. Microphysical effects determine macrophysical response for aerosol impacts on deep convective clouds

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-01-01

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation, energy, and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Aerosol particles can influence DCCs by altering cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Previous studies reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but few were concerned with the whole life cycle of DCC. By conducting multiple monthlong cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macrophysical and microphysical properties of summer convective clouds and precipitation in the tropics and midlatitudes, this study provides a comprehensive view of how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height, and radiative forcing. We found that although the widely accepted theory of DCC invigoration due to aerosol’s thermodynamic effect (additional latent heat release from freezing of greater amount of cloud water) may work during the growing stage, it is microphysical effect influenced by aerosols that drives the dramatic increase in cloud cover, cloud top height, and cloud thickness at the mature and dissipation stages by inducing larger amounts of smaller but longer-lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs, even when thermodynamic invigoration of convection is absent. The thermodynamic invigoration effect contributes up to ∼27% of total increase in cloud cover. The overall aerosol indirect effect is an atmospheric radiative warming (3–5 W⋅m−2) and a surface cooling (−5 to −8 W⋅m−2). The modeling findings are confirmed by the analyses of ample measurements made at three sites of distinctly different environments. PMID:24218569

  4. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  5. Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols over Global Oceans from Merged CERES and MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Smith, N. M.

    2004-01-01

    The direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA) is defined as the difference between radiative fluxes in the absence and presence of aerosols. In this study, the direct radiative effect of aerosols is estimated for 46 months (March, 2000 to December, 2003) of merged CERES and MODIS Terra global measurements over ocean. This analysis includes the contribution from clear regions in both clear and partly cloudy CERES footprints. MODIS-CERES narrow-to-broadband regressions are developed to convert clear-sky MODIS narrowband radiances to broadband SW radiances, and CERES clear-sky Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) are used to estimate the corresponding TOA radiative fluxes needed to determine the DREA. Clear-sky MODIS pixels are identified using two independent cloud masks: (i) the NOAA-NESDIS algorithm used for inferring aerosol properties from MODIS on the CERES Single Scanner Footprint TOA/Surface Fluxes and Clouds (SSF) product (NOAA-SSF); and (ii) the standard algorithm used by the MODIS aerosol group to produce the MODO4 product (MODO4). Over global oceans, direct radiative cooling by aerosols for clear scenes identified from MODO4 is estimated to be 5.5 W m-2, compared to 3.8 W m-2 for clear scenes from NOAA-SSF. Regionally, differences are largest in areas affected by dust aerosol, such as oceanic regions adjacent to the Saharan and Saudi Arabian deserts, and in northern Pacific Ocean regions influenced by dust transported from Asia. The net total-sky (clear and cloudy) DREA is negative (cooling) and is estimated to be -2.0 W m-2 from MOD04, and -1.6 W m-2 from NOAA-SSF. The DREA is shown to have pronounced seasonal cycles in the Northern Hemisphere and large year-to-year fluctuations near deserts. However, no systematic trend in deseasonalized anomalies of the DREA is observed over the 46-month time series considered.

  6. Optical characterization of continental and biomass-burning aerosols over Bozeman, Montana: A case study of the aerosol direct effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Reagan, John A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2011-11-01

    shown to compare favorably with regional-scale forcing calculations using MODIS-Terra and AERONET data in an effort to assess the accuracy of estimating the regional-scale aerosol direct radiative forcing effect using aerosol optical properties measured from a single rural site such as Bozeman, Montana.

  7. Linking Aerosol Source Activities to Present and Future Climate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Streets, D.; Menon, S.; Unger, N.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol source sectors (transport, power, industry, residential, biomass burning) generate distinct mixtures of aerosol species. These mixtures in turn have different effects on climate. As sectoral emissions change in coming decades, whether by regulation or not, it is helpful to link pollution from source types to climate consequences. We do so, using our global (GISS GCM) aerosol model for present and future IPCC SRES scenarios. According to our model, residential and transport sectors have net positive 1995 aerosol forcings (0.04 and 0.03 W m-2) due to their large black carbon contents. However, the sulfate-dominated power and industry sectors have net negative 1995 forcings (-0.10 and -0.09 W m-2). Due to the near-balance of absorbing and scattering components, biomass burning forcing is small. For the 2050 SRES A1B scenario, the net (negative) aerosol forcing is double 1995 due primarily to increased sulfur emissions in the industry and power sectors. For 2050 B1 the net (negative) forcing decreases relative to 1995, as sulfur emissions are reduced. Both future scenarios project decreasing residential emissions. Yet transport emissions are expected to remain significant and thus become the dominant source of warming aerosols in the future. Aerosol pollution is projected to shift southward relative to the present, as the current industrialized regions generally reduce emissions and tropical and southern hemispheric regions continue to develop. Similar to these SRES scenarios, IIASA scenarios project a decline in residential emissions; however IIASA is more optimistic about transport sector emissions reductions. We will conduct present-day climate experiments, including aerosol direct and indirect effects, to study impacts of power and transport sectors on climate features such as air temperature and hydrologic cycle.

  8. Effects of anthropogenic aerosols on temperature changes in China during the twentieth century based on CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunxiang; Zhao, Tianbao; Ying, Kairan

    2016-08-01

    Using three models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), we compare the direct and other effects of anthropogenic aerosols on observed and simulated annual, winter, and summer temperature changes. Three regions, namely, arid-semiarid area, humid-semiarid area, and the whole of China, are studied. The temperature changes caused by other effects of anthropogenic aerosol (OE) are calculated from the difference between the anthropogenic aerosol forcing run (AA) and the anthropogenic aerosol direct effect forcing run (DE). When the combined effects are considered, a significant area-averaged cooling rate varies in the range of -0.86 to -0.76 °C per century throughout China. Meanwhile, the isolated direct and other effects lower the temperature nationwide by -0.66 to -0.55 °C per century, and -0.31 to -0.11 °C per century, respectively. From a nonlinear perspective, the aerosol-induced temperature experiences a cooling trend, with AA having the largest cooling trend changes both annually and in the summer, while DE has the greatest reduction in the winter. Additionally, the influence of OE cannot be detected in observed annual changes over the arid-semiarid area and the whole of China, while the others are clearly detectable in all cases. AA (DE, OE) reduces the observational temperature mainly over the humid-semihumid region, where the contribution to the observed warming ranges from -515.2 % (-298.7 %, -198.9 %) to -173.6 % (-130.3 %, -66.4 %).

  9. Influence of internal flow on film cooling effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Wilfert, G.; Wolff, S.

    2000-04-01

    Film cooling experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of internal flow conditions and plenum geometry on the film cooling effectiveness. The film cooling measurements show a strong influence of the coolant inlet conditions on film cooling performance. The present experiments were carried out on a flat plate with a row of cylindrical holes oriented at 30 degrees with respect to a constant-velocity external flow, systematically varying the plenum geometry and blowing rates (0.5 {le} M {le} 1.25). Adiabatic film cooling measurements using the multiple narrow-banded thermochromic liquid crystal technique (TLC) were carried out, simulating a flow parallel to the mainstream flow with and without crossflow at the coolant hole entry compared with a standard plenum configuration. An impingement in front of the cooling hole entry with and without crossflow was also investigated. For all parallel flow configurations, ribs were installed at the top and bottom coolant channel wall. As the hole length-to-diameter ratio has an influence on the film cooling effectiveness, the wall thickness has also been varied. In order to optimize the benefit of the geometry effects with ribs, a vortex generator was designed and tested. Results from these experiments show in a region 5 {le} X/D {le} 80 downstream of the coolant injection location differences in adiabatic film cooling effectiveness between +5% and +65% compared with a standard plenum configuration.

  10. A numerical study of aerosol effects on electrification of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. B.; Shi, Z.; Chen, Z. L.; Peng, L.; Yang, Y.; Guo, X. F.; Chen, H. R.

    2017-02-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effect of aerosol on microphysical and electrification in thunderstorm clouds. A two-dimensional (2-D) cumulus model with electrification scheme including non-inductive and inductive charge separation is used. The concentration of aerosol particles with distribution fitted by superimposing three log-normal distributions rises from 50 to 10,000 cm-3. The results show that the response of charge separation rate to the increase of aerosol concentration is nonmonotonic. When aerosol concentration is changed from 50 to 1000 cm-3, a stronger formation of cloud droplet, graupel and ice crystal results in increasing charge separation via non-inductive and inductive mechanism. However, in the range of 1000-3000 cm-3, vapor competition arises in the decrease of ice crystal mixing ratio and the reduction of ice crystals size leads to a slightly decrease in non-inductive charge rate, while inductive charging rate has no significant change in magnitude. Above aerosol concentration of 3000 cm-3, the magnitude of charging rate which keeps steady is insensitive to the increase in aerosol concentration. The results also suggest that non-inductive charge separation between ice crystal and graupel contributes to the main upper positive charge region and the middle negative charge region. Inductive graupel-cloud droplet charge separation, on the other hand, is found to play an important role in the development of lower charge region.

  11. Effects of Aerosols on the Carbon Cycle and on Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Li, H.

    2005-12-01

    This talk gives two examples of the effects of aerosols on the carbon and hydrological cycles. Stratospheric aerosols from volcanic eruptions affect the biospheric carbon sink, which may affect the record of volcanic cooling seen in tree rings, and tropospheric aerosol trends (solar dimming) may have affected observed soil moisture trends in the Ukraine. The lack of a larger cooling in proxy records of climate change following large volcanic eruptions such as those of Tambora in 1815 and Krakatau in 1883 has long been a puzzle for climatologists. These records, however, may have been biased by enhanced tree growth for several years following each eruption induced by additional diffuse radiation caused by the stratospheric volcanic aerosol clouds from the eruptions. By comparing proxy reconstructions of climate with and without tree ring data, this effect is demonstrated for the five largest eruptions for the period 1750-1980. When proxy records of Northern Hemisphere climate change are corrected for this proposed diffuse effect, there is no impact on climate change for time scales longer than 20 years. However, it now appears that there was a hemispheric cooling of about 0.6°C for a decade following the unknown volcanic eruption of 1809 and Tambora in 1815, and a cooling of 0.3°C for several years following the Krakatau eruption of 1883. Observations from the longest data set of observed soil moisture available in the world, 47 yr of gravimetrically-observed plant available soil moisture for the top 1 m of soil, observed every 10 days for April-October for 141 stations from fields with either winter or spring cereals from the Ukraine for 1958-2004, show a positive soil moisture trend for the entire period of observation, with the trend leveling off in the last two decades. Using a land surface model forced with observed meteorology and modified solar insolation, we find that an observed downward trend in insolation for the first half of the period produced a

  12. Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

    2013-10-18

    This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition

  13. Aerosol effects on clouds, convection and precipitation in the chemistry-climate model EMAC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D. Y.; Steil, B.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation using the EMAC atmospheric chemistry general circulation model. Aerosol-cloud interactions are explicitly considered in two prognostic cloud droplet nucleation schemes, i.e., applying an osmotic model and the κ method. The two schemes have rather different effects on cloud properties such as cloud droplet number and size distribution, cloud water content, and cloud optical properties. Much higher cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) are simulated with the osmotic model compared to the k method, leading to substantially different cloud radiative effects and consequently convection and precipitation, particularly over the continents. The osmotic model simulation yields an about 6.5 W/m2 stronger cooling effect over land than the κ method, with three times higher CDNC. The convective activity in terms of convective available potential energy (CAPE) is decreased by 20%, which corresponds to a decrease in convective precipitation by 23% in favor of large-scale precipitation. Note that in the current model setup only large-scale clouds are directly affected by interactions with aerosols, while in convection and associated precipitation are affected indirectly.

  14. Spray Cooling Modeling: Droplet Sub-Cooling Effect on Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Joseph E.; Selvam, R. P.; Silk, Eric A.

    2008-01-21

    Spray cooling has become increasingly popular as a thermal management solution for high-heat flux (>100 W/cm{sup 2}) applications such as laser diodes and radars. Research has shown that using sub-cooled liquid can increase the heat flux from the hot surface. The objective of this study was to use a multi-phase numerical model to simulate the effect of a sub-cooled droplet impacting a growing vapor bubble in a thin (<100 {mu}m) liquid film. The two-phase model captured the liquid-vapor interface using the level set method. The effects of surface tension, viscosity, gravity and phase change were accounted for by using a modification to the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, which were solved using the finite difference method. The computed liquid-vapor interface and temperature distributions were visualized for better understanding of the heat removal process. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms of sub-cooled droplet impact on a growing vapor bubble, various initial droplet temperatures were modeled (from 20 deg. C below saturation temperature to saturation temperature). This may provide insights into how to improve the heat transfer in future spray cooling systems.

  15. Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to pyrethrin aerosol: effects of aerosol particle size, concentration, and exposure conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted to assess effect of droplet size on efficacy of pyrethrin aerosol against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, the confused flour beetle. A vertical flow aerosol exposure chamber that generated a standardized particle size diameter was used for...

  16. Delineating the effect of El-Nino Southern Oscillations using oxygen and sulfur isotope anomalies of sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Jackson, T.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, contribute to global cooling by acting as cloud condensation nuclei in the troposphere and by directly reflecting solar radiation in the stratosphere. To understand the long-term effect of natural and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the climate cycle, it is critical to obtain a clear picture of the factors controlling the transport and transformation of sulfate aerosols. We have employed both oxygen triple isotopes and sulfur quadruple isotopes on sulfates from Antarctic ice samples to define the oxidation history, long range transport dynamics, and sources of sulfate aerosols over time. The measurements are used to deconvolve the impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol composition. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1979-2002) with a high resolution temporal (6 month) record of the winter and summer seasons covering two largest volcanic events, Pinatubo and El-chichon and three largest ENSO events of the century. All three oxygen and four sulfur isotopes were measured on the extracted sulfate (Shaheen et al., 2013). The high temperature pyrolysis (1000oC) of silver sulfate yielded O2 and SO2. The oxygen triple isotopic composition of the O2 gas was used to determine the oxidation history of sulfate aerosol and SO2 gas obtained during this reaction was utilized to measure sulfur quadruple isotopes following appropriate reaction chemistry (Farquhar et al., 2001). The data revealed that oxygen isotope anomalies in Antarctic aerosols (Δ17O = 0.8-3.7‰) from 1990 to 2001 are strongly linked to the variation in ozone levels in the upper stratosphere/lower stratosphere. The variations in ozone levels are reflective of the intensity of the ENSO events and changes in relative humidity in the atmosphere during this time period. Sulfate concentrations and sulfur quadruple isotopic composition and associated anomalies were used to elucidate the sources of

  17. Cooling effectiveness of cutting fluid in creep feed grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.B.; Kou, H.S.

    1997-10-01

    In this study, the heat transfer paths among the grinding fluid, the grains and the workpiece are investigated for the creep feed grinding. As heat enters the workpiece, the majority of heat is carried away by the fluid. Thus, the cooling effectiveness of the grinding fluid is defined and calculated through the application of the numerical method to illustrate how much the fraction of the heat is carried away by the grinding fluid. The results reveal that water has higher cooling effectiveness than oil. In addition, the cooling effect of the grinding fluid becomes more significant at lower workpiece speed, higher grinding depth and greater wheel speed.

  18. Dust aerosol radiative effect and influence on urban atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, M.; Li, L.

    2007-11-01

    An 1.5-level-closure and 3-D non-stationary atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model and a radiation transfer model with the output of Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) Model and lidar AML-1 are employed to simulate the dust aerosol radiative effect and its influence on ABL in Beijing for the period of 23-26 January 2002 when a dust storm occurred. The simulation shows that daytime dust aerosol radiative effect heats up the ABL at the mean rate of about 0.68 K/h. The horizontal wind speed from ground to 900 m layer is also overall increased, and the value changes about 0.01 m/s at 14:00 LT near the ground. At night, the dust aerosol radiative effect cools the ABL at the mean rate of -0.21 K/h and the wind speed lowers down at about -0.19 m/s at 02:00 LT near the ground.

  19. A GCM study of effects of radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol on large scale circulation and rainfall in East Asia during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2007-12-01

    The effect of sulfate aerosol radiative forcing on spring rainfall in East Asia are studied based on numerical simulations with the NASA finite-volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM) forced with monthly varying three-dimensional aerosol distribution from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Result shows that radiative forcing of sulfate aerosol leads to cooling of the land surface and reduction in rainfall over central East Asia. The maximum reduction in precipitation is shifted northward relative to the maximum aerosol loading region as a result of dynamical feedback. The anomalous thermal gradient by aerosol cooling near the land surface, reduces the baroclinicity of the atmosphere, leading to a deceleration of the upper level westerly flow. The westerly deceleration induces, through ageostrophic wind adjustment, anomalous meridional secondary circulation at the entrance region of the East Asian jetstream, with strong sinking motion and suppressed precipitation near 30°N, coupled to weak rising motion and moderately enhanced precipitation over southern China and the South China Sea. These results suggest that the radiative forcing of aerosol through induced dynamical feedback with the atmospheric water cycle, may be a causal factor in the observed spring precipitation trend over East Asia.

  20. The Effect of Changes in Polar Sea Ice on Emissions of Marine Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrai, P.; Gabric, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud radiative effects remain a major weakness in our understanding of the climate system and consequently in developing accurate climate projections. This is mainly true for Arctic low-level clouds in their key role of regulating surface energy fluxes which affect the freezing and melting of sea ice. The radiative properties of clouds are strongly dependent on the number concentration of airborne water-soluble particles, known as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In the Arctic, the aerosol-cloud-radiation relationship is more complex than elsewhere and the clouds constitute a warming factor for climate, rather than cooling, most of the year. This is due to the semi-permanent ice cover, which raises the albedo of the surface, and the clean Arctic air, which decreases the albedo of the clouds. There has been much discussion on the relative magnitude of the biogenic source of polar CCN: Primary organic marine aerosols and/or sulfate-containing aerosols, derived from marine emissions. Regional field measurements and pan- (Ant)Arctic model simulations don't necessarily agree. Arctic CCN are formed primarily by aggregates of marine organic material and may grow in mass by condensation. Southern Ocean aerosols may be dominated by sulfate particles and organic particles at lower and higher Antarctic latitudes, respectively. The interaction of polar marine microorganisms, seasonality, sea ice cover, presence or absence of sea spray, and atmospheric heterogeneous processes combine to control natural aerosol concentrations and mass, thus modulating the sensitivity of cloud properties, including their reflectivity and the resulting regional radiation budget. We discuss Arctic and Antarctic field and satellite observations and establish a strong and fundamental link between the biology at the ocean/sea ice interface, clouds and climate over polar regions.

  1. Effect of aerosol propellants and surfactants on airway resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, G. M.; Batten, J. C.

    1969-01-01

    The effects on the airways of inhalation of the vehicles used in two commercial pressurized bronchodilator aerosols were studied in 20 normal and seven asthmatic subjects. Changes in bronchial calibre due to bronchoconstriction were measured as changes in airway resistance using a constant volume whole body plethysmograph, and results were expressed as changes in the ratio Airway conductance/Thoracic gas volume (=specific airway conductance). The aerosols caused very slight bronchoconstriction in the normal subjects, with a mean decrease of 5·3% in specific airway conductance after inhalation of a spray containing sorbitol trioleate as a surface tension lowering agent, and of 9·7% after inhalation of a spray containing lecithin. This effect was prevented by prior inhalation of atropine methonitrate, and its mechanism was therefore probably a vagally mediated reflex. The bronchoconstriction was also reversed by the addition of isoprenaline to the aerosol. The asthmatic subjects showed larger mean reductions in specific airway conductance of 13% and 21% after sorbitol and lecithin respectively: the response was again prevented by atropine. We conclude that, although the aerosol vehicles cause slight bronchoconstriction, this is unlikely to be a clinical danger since it is insufficient to cause symptoms of wheezing, and is less than that caused by inhalation of a single cigarette. Moreover, the constriction is regularly converted to dilatation in both normal and asthmatic subjects by the addition of atropine or isoprenaline to the aerosol. PMID:5821624

  2. Hybrid cooling vest for cooling between exercise bouts in the heat: Effects and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Chan, Albert P C; Yang, Yang; Song, Wen-Fang; Wong, Del P

    2017-01-01

    While continuous cooling strategies may induce some ergonomic problems to occupational workers, cooling between work bouts may be an alternative for cooling them down in hot environments. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of wearing a newly designed hybrid cooling vest (HCV) between two bouts of exercise. Inside a climatic chamber set at an air temperature of 37°C and a relative humidity of 60%, twelve male participants underwent two bouts of intermittent exercise interspersed with a 30min between-bout recovery session, during which HCV or a passive rest without any cooling (PAS) was administered. The results indicated that thermoregulatory, physiological, and perceptual strains were significantly lower in HCV than those in PAS during the recovery session (p≤0.022), which were accompanied with a large effect of cooling (Cohen's d=0.84-2.11). For the second exercise bout, the exercise time following HCV (22.13±12.27min) was significantly longer than that following PAS (11.04±3.40min, p=0.005, d=1.23) During this period, core temperature Tc was significantly lower by 0.14±0.0.15°C in HCV than that in PAS. The heart rate drift over time was declined by 2±2bpmmin(-1) (p=0.001, d=1.00) and the rise in physiological strain index was reduced by 0.11±0.12unitmin(-1) (p=0.010, d=0.96) following the use of HCV. These findings suggested that using HCV could accelerate between-bout recovery and improve subsequent exercise performance by the enlarged body core temperature margin and blunted cardiovascular drift.

  3. Improved thermoelectric cooling based on the Thomson effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Khanna, Raghav; Toberer, Eric S.; Heinz, Nicholas A.; Seifert, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Traditional thermoelectric cooling relies on the Peltier effect which produces a temperature drop limited by the figure of merit, zT. This cooling limit is not required from classical thermodynamics but can be traced to problems of thermoelectric compatibility. Alternatively, if a thermoelectric cooler can be designed to achieve full thermoelectric compatibility, lower temperature can be achieved even if the zT is low. In such a device the Thomson effect plays an important role. We present the theoretical concept of a "Thomson cooler," for cryogenic cooling which is designed to maintain thermoelectric compatibility and we derive the requirements for the Seebeck coefficient.

  4. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical linkage between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption and giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics to understand their individual impacts on global-scale cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Compared to the existing activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of activation schemes increase the computation time by ~10% but leads to predicted CDNC in better agreement with satellite-derived/in situ values in many regions with high CDNC but in worse agreement for some regions with low CDNC. Large percentage changes in predicted CDNC occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reduced activation of sea spray aerosol after accounting for giant CCN activation kinetics. Comparison of CESM/CAM5 predictions against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes generally improve the low biases. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 150% and an increase (more negative) in shortwave cloud forcing of 12%. With the improvement of model-predicted CDNCs and better agreement with most satellite-derived cloud properties in many regions, the inclusion of these aerosol activation

  5. Correlation between model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and satellite-derived cloud optical depths: Indication of indirect effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Luo, C.; Saylor, R.; Streets, D.; Huang, Y.; Bergin, M.; Giorgi, F.

    2002-05-01

    is a mechanistic coupling between anthropogenic aerosol concentrations and cloud optical properties; one such mechanism is the so-called first and second indirect effect by which aerosols enhance the optical depths and albedos of clouds by increasing the number of droplets within clouds and suppressing precipitation from clouds, respectively. The regressions further suggest that the cloud optical depths increase on average by 0.16 for each 1 mg m-2 increase in the column-integrated anthropogenic aerosol burden. Simple box-model calculations suggest that this is equivalent to a cooling over the model domain from anthropogenic aerosols via the indirect effect that is a factor of about 1.5 times that from the direct effect. Accounting for a possible underestimate in model-simulated aerosol concentrations over the model domain of as much as a factor of 0.6 would lower the estimated cooling from the indirect effect to about 1 times that from the direct effect. In contrast to the results using ISSCP-derived cloud optical depths, the correlation between the model-calculated anthropogenic aerosols and average cloud amount over the model domain was relatively weak and inconsistent. This result arose perhaps because of a cancelling of the competing influences on cloud lifetime and frequency by the second indirect effect and the so-called semi direct effect (i.e., the suppression of clouds by absorbing aerosols).

  6. Direct aerosol effects during periods of solar dimming and brightening hidden in the regression residuals: Evidence from Potsdam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Tobias; Wechsung, Frank

    2015-11-01

    A recent empirical study of Stanhill et al. (2014), which was based on the Angstrom-Prescott relationship between global radiation and sunshine duration, was evaluated. The parameters of this relationship seemed to be rather stable across the dimming and brightening periods. Thus, the authors concluded that the variation in global radiation is more influenced by changes in cloud cover and sunshine duration than by the direct aerosol effects. In our study, done for the Potsdam station (one of six globally distributed stations, the source of one of the longest observational records and closely located to former hot spots of aerosol emission), we tested and rejected the hypothesis that the dimming of global radiation directly caused by aerosols is negligible. The residuals of the Angstrom-Prescott regression reveal a statistically significant positive temporal trend and a temporal level segmentation. The latter was consistent with the temporal emission patterns around Potsdam. The trend in the residuals only disappeared when the model intercept varied according to the temporal level segmentation. The magnitude of the direct aerosol effect on the level changes in global radiation derived from the modified Angstrom-Prescott relationship was in the range indicated in previous studies. Thus, from here, a specific request cannot be made for a revision of current climate models state-of-the-art representation of both the cooling effect directly caused by aerosols and the temperature sensitivity to the increase of greenhouse gases.

  7. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  8. Carbon cycle and climate effects of forcing from fire-emitted aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Damon Matthews, H.

    2017-02-01

    Aerosols emitted by landscape fires affect many climatic processes. Here, we combined an aerosol–climate model and a coupled climate–carbon model to study the carbon cycle and climate effects caused by fire-emitted aerosols (FEA) forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. This forcing (‘best guess’ present-day values of ‑0.10 and ‑1.3 W m‑2 at the top of the atmosphere and surface, respectively) had a predominant cooling influence that altered regional land carbon stocks on decadal timescales by modifying vegetation productivity and soil–litter decomposition. Changes in regional land and ocean carbon stocks became much stronger for FEA forcing acting on multi-century timescales; this occurred because carbon stocks responded to the forcing itself on such timescales and also due to gradual effects on the climate (e.g. through increased sea ice cover) that further affected the carbon cycle. Carbon increases and decreases in different regions partly offset each other, so that absolute changes in global land, atmosphere, and ocean stocks were all <2 Pg C after 30 years of FEA forcing and <6 Pg C after more than 1000 years of FEA forcing. FEA-caused changes in land carbon storage did not substantially modify the magnitude of FEA emissions, suggesting there is no consequential regional-scale positive feedback loop between these two elements. However, we found indications that the FEA-caused cooling from frequently-burning regions in Africa and Australia increased land carbon stocks in eastern South America and equatorial Asia, respectively. This suggests the potential for remote carbon cycle effects from regions emitting large amounts of fire aerosols.

  9. Implementation and initial application of new chemistry-aerosol options in WRF/Chem for simulating secondary organic aerosols and aerosol indirect effects for regional air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yang; Yahya, Khairunnisa; Wu, Shiang-Yuh; Grell, Georg

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play important roles in affecting regional meteorology and air quality through aerosol direct and indirect effects. Two new chemistry-aerosol options have been developed in WRF/Chem v3.4.1 by incorporating the 2005 Carbon Bond (CB05) mechanism and coupling it with the existing aerosol module MADE with SORGAM and VBS modules for simulating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), aqueous-phase chemistry in both large scale and convective clouds, and aerosol feedback processes (hereafter CB05-MADE/SORGAM and CB05-MADE/VBS). As part of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase II model intercomparison that focuses on online-coupled meteorology and chemistry models, WRF/Chem with the two new options is applied to an area over North America for July 2006 episode. The simulations with both options can reproduce reasonably well most of the observed meteorological variables, chemical concentrations, and aerosol/cloud properties. Compared to CB05-MADE/SORGAM, CB05-MADE/VBS greatly improves the model performance for organic carbon (OC) and PM2.5, reducing NMBs from -81.2% to -13.1% and from -26.1% to -15.6%, respectively. Sensitivity simulations show that the aerosol indirect effects (including aqueous-phase chemistry) can reduce the net surface solar radiation by up to 53 W m-2 with a domainwide mean of 12 W m-2 through affecting cloud formation and radiation scattering and reflection by increasing cloud cover, which in turn reduce the surface temperature, NO2 photolytic rate, and planetary boundary layer height by up to 0.3 °C, 3.7 min-1, and 64 m, respectively. The changes of those meteorological variables further impact the air quality through the complex chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions by reducing O3 mixing ratios by up to 5.0 ppb. The results of this work demonstrate the importance of aerosol indirect effects on the regional climate and air quality. For comparison, the impacts of aerosol direct effects on both

  10. Impact of aerosol hygroscopic growth on the direct aerosol radiative effect in summer on North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y.; Zhao, C. S.; Tao, J. C.; Bian, Y. X.; Ma, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, relative humidity (RH) profiles and their impacts on the vertical variations of aerosol optical properties and the direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) have been investigated based on surface measurements from the Haze in China campaign and sounding data from the North China Plain. Among the profiles obtained from July to September in 2008, about half have RHs greater than 80% within the mixed layer. The vertical variations in the aerosol optical properties at ambient RH, including the extinction coefficient (σext), single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g), are remarkably different from the variations in the dry aerosols and are highly dependent on the RH profiles. Increases of the aerosol optical depth and column-averaged SSA and g due to aerosol water uptake can reach up to 64%, 0.052 and 0.079, respectively. The fractional contribution to the instantaneous DARE at the top of the atmosphere due to aerosol hygroscopic growth reaches 60% in high RH profiles. DARE estimates can be significantly biased if the RH dependence of SSA or g is not considered. We suggest that if their vertical profiles or column-averaged values are absent, then the ambient values of SSA and g at the surface should be used rather than the values of SSA and g obtained from dry aerosols when estimating DAREs.

  11. [Effectiveness of individual units of aerosol therapy equipment].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, L A; Perel'mutr, A S

    1975-01-01

    Various methods of drug atomization and future prospects for their application in medical practice are considered. On the ground of a research into the influence produced by the administered doses and the density of the aerosol on the therapeutic activity the expediency of employing aerosol generators based upon pneumatic atomization by using the principle of ejecting an additional volume of air, as units yielding a substantial curative effect, is demonstrated. Data which bear proof to economic advantages of the units under review are given.

  12. Detecting Aerosol Effect on Deep Precipitation Systems: A Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Tao, W.; Khain, A.; Kummerow, C.; Simpson, J.

    2006-05-01

    Urban cities produce high concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols. These aerosols are generally hygroscopic and may serve as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). This study focuses on the aerosol indirect effect on the deep convective systems over the land. These deep convective systems contribute to the majority of the summer time rainfall and are important for local hydrological cycle and weather forecast. In a companion presentation (Tao et al.) in this session, the mechanisms of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in deep convective systems are explored using cloud-resolving model simulations. Here these model results will be analyzed to provide guidance to the detection of the impact of aerosols as CCN on summer time, deep convections using the currently available observation methods. The two-dimensional Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model with an explicit microphysical scheme has been used to simulate the aerosol effect on deep precipitation systems. This model simulates the size distributions of aerosol particles, as well as cloud, rain, ice crystals, snow, graupel, and hail explicitly. Two case studies are analyzed: a midlatitude summer time squall in Oklahoma, and a sea breeze convection in Florida. It is shown that increasing the CCN number concentration does not affect the rainfall structure and rain duration in these two cases. The total surface rainfall rate is reduced in the squall case, but remains essentially the same in the sea breeze case. For the long-lived squall system with a significant portion of the stratiform rain, the surface rainfall PDF (probability density function) distribution is more sensitive to the change of the initial CCN concentrations compared with the total surface rainfall. The possibility of detecting the aerosol indirect effect in deep precipitation systems from the space is also studied in this presentation. The hydrometeors fields from the GCE model simulations are used as inputs to a microwave radiative transfer model

  13. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  14. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  15. Effect of aerosol particles generated by ultrasonic humidifiers on the lung in mouse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic humidifiers silently generate water droplets as a cool fog and produce most of the dissolved minerals in the fog in the form of an aerosolized “white dust.” However, the health effect of these airborne particles is largely unknown. This study aimed to characterize the aerosol particles generated by ultrasonic humidifiers and to investigate their effect on the lung tissue of mice. Methods An ultrasonic humidifier was operated with tap water, high-silica water, ultrapure water, or other water types. In a chamber (0.765 m3, ventilation ratio 11.5 m3/hr), male ICR mice (10-week-old) were exposed by inhalation to an aerosol-containing vapor generated by the humidifier. After exposure for 7 or 14 days, lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were collected from each mouse and examined by microarray, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and light and electron microscopy. Results Particles generated from the humidifier operated with tap water had a mass concentration of 0.46 ± 0.03 mg/m3, number concentration of (5.0 ± 1.1) × 104/cm3, and peak size distribution of 183 nm. The particles were phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages in the lung of mice. Inhalation of particles caused dysregulation of genes related to mitosis, cell adhesion molecules, MHC molecules and endocytosis, but did not induce any signs of inflammation or tissue injury in the lung. Conclusion These results indicate that aerosol particles released from ultrasonic humidifiers operated with tap water initiated a cellular response but did not cause severe acute inflammation in pulmonary tissue. Additionally, high mineral content tap water is not recommended and de-mineralized water should be recommended in order to exclude any adverse effects. PMID:24359587

  16. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  17. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-11-01

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol-radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m-2), while fire POM induces a small effect (-0.05 and 0.04 ± 0.01 W m-2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol-cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is -0.70 ± 0.05 W m-2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (-0.59 ± 0.03 W m-2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m-2) and REaci (-1.38 ± 0.23 W m-2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and -0.82 ± 0.09 W m-2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to -15 W m-2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m-2) is small and statistically insignificant and is mainly due to the fire BC-in-snow effect (0.02 W m-2) with the maximum albedo effect

  18. Simulating Aerosol Indirect Effects with Improved Aerosol-Cloud- Precipitation Representations in a Coupled Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Leung, L. Ruby; Fan, Jiwen

    2016-04-27

    This is a collaborative project among North Carolina State University, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego to address the critical need for an accurate representation of aerosol indirect effect in climate and Earth system models. In this project, we propose to develop and improve parameterizations of aerosol-cloud-precipitation feedbacks in climate models and apply them to study the effect of aerosols and clouds on radiation and hydrologic cycle. Our overall objective is to develop, improve, and evaluate parameterizations to enable more accurate simulations of these feedbacks in high resolution regional and global climate models.

  19. Effect of Hydrophilic Organic Seed Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, Matthew K.

    2011-07-26

    Gas-particle partitioning theory is widely used in atmospheric models to predict organic aerosol loadings. This theory predicts that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of an oxidized VOC product will increase as the mass loading of preexisting organic aerosol increases. In a previous study, we showed that the presence of model hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA) had no detectable effect on the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from ozonolysis of {alpha}-pinene, suggesting that the condensing SOA compounds form a separate phase from the preexisting POA. However, non-polar, hydrophobic POA may gradually become polar and hydrophilic as it undergoes oxidative aging while POA formed from biomass burning is already somewhat polar and hydrophilic. In this study, we investigate the effects of model hydrophilic POA such as fulvic acid, adipic acid and citric acid on the gas-particle partitioning of SOA from {alpha}-pinene ozonolysis. The results show that only citric acid seed significantly enhances the absorption of {alpha}-pinene SOA into the particle-phase. The other two POA seed particles have negligible effect on the {alpha}-pinene SOA yields, suggesting that {alpha}-pinene SOA forms a well-mixed organic aerosol phase with citric acid while a separate phase with adipic acid and fulvic acid. This finding highlights the need to improve the thermodynamics treatment of organics in current aerosol models that simply lump all hydrophilic organic species into a single phase, thereby potentially introducing an erroneous sensitivity of SOA mass to emitted POA.

  20. Cooling following large volcanic eruptions corrected for the effect of diffuse radiation on tree rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2005-03-01

    The lack of a larger cooling in proxy records of climate change following large volcanic eruptions such as those of Tambora in 1815 and Krakatau in 1883 has long been a puzzle for climatologists. These records, however, may have been biased by enhanced tree growth for several years following each eruption induced by additional diffuse radiation caused by the stratospheric volcanic aerosol clouds from the eruptions. By comparing proxy reconstructions of climate with and without tree ring data, this effect is demonstrated for the five largest eruptions for the period 1750-1980. When proxy records of Northern Hemisphere climate change are corrected for this proposed diffuse effect, there is no impact on climate change for time scales longer than 20 years. However, it now appears that there was a hemispheric cooling of about 0.6°C for a decade following the unknown volcanic eruption of 1809 and Tambora in 1815, and a cooling of 0.3°C for several years following the Krakatau eruption of 1883.

  1. The impact of the direct effects of sulfate and black carbon aerosols on the subseasonal march of the East Asian subtropical summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongdong; Zhu, Bin; Jiang, Zhihong; Yang, Xiu-Qun; Zhu, Tong

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol emissions have rapidly increased in East Asia since the late 1970s. During the same period, the East Asian summer monsoon has shown a weakening trend. In this work, the direct effects (DE) of sulfate and black carbon (BC) aerosols on the subseasonal (pentad mean) march of the East Asian subtropical summer monsoon (EASSM) are investigated using an interactive global climate-chemistry model. The simulation results suggest that the DE of sulfate aerosols have a notable effect on the cooling of the low troposphere across the continent in spring and autumn, hence, changing the time of the seasonal transition of the zonal land-sea thermal contrast (ZTC). The DE of BC result in cooling of the low troposphere and heating of the middle troposphere, leading to a different impact than that caused by sulfates. The cooling of the surface and troposphere by sulfates leads to a delay in the warming of East Asian continent in spring and the EASSM onset time; it also accelerates the process of the continent turning colder and advances the retreat of the EASSM. The deeper heating in the middle-upper troposphere than the cooling in the low troposphere due to the DE of BC or the combination of both lead to an advance in the onset time of the monsoon caused by the continent turning warmer earlier in spring. In autumn, the same cooling effect by sulfates leads to the continent turning colder earlier, resulting in an advance in the retreat time.

  2. Effect of Exhaust Pressure on the Cooling Characteristics of a Liquid-Cooled Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Ronald B.; Desmon, Leland G.

    1947-01-01

    Data for a liquid-cooled engine with a displacement volume of 1710 cubic inches were analyzed to determine the effect of exhaust pressure on the engine cooling characteristics. The data covered a range of exhaust pressures from 7 to 62 inches of mercury absolute, inlet-manifold pressures from 30 to 50 inches of mercury absolute, engine speeds from 1600 to 3000 rpm, and fuel-air ratios from 0.063 to 0.100. The effect of exhaust pressure on engine cooling was satisfactorily incorporated in the NACA cooling-correlation method as a variation in effective gas temperature with exhaust pressure. Large variations of cylinder-head temperature with exhaust pressure were obtained for operation at constant charge flow. At a constant charge flow of 2 pounds per second (approximately 1000 bhp) and a fuel-air ratio of 0.085, an increase in exhaust pressure from 10 to 60 inches of mercury absolute resulted in an increase of 40 F in average cylinder-head temperature. For operation at constant engine speed and inlet-manifold pressure and variable exhaust pressure (variable charge flow), however, the effect of exhaust pressure on cylinder-head temperature is small. For example, at an inlet-manifold pressure of 40 inches of mercury absolute, an engine speed of 2400 rpm.- and a fuel-air ratio of 0.085, the average cylinder-head temperature was about the same at exhaust pressures of 10 and 60 inches of,mercury absolute; a rise and a subsequent decrease of about 70 occurred between these extremes.

  3. Effect of free-stream turbulence on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    Film-cooling experiments were conducted at four levels of free-stream turbulence to test the hypothesis that the film-cooling effectiveness is inversely related to the free-stream turbulence level. The hot-gas operating conditions were held constant at a temperature of 590 K, a pressure of 1 atmosphere, and a velocity of 62 m/sec. The film-cooling air was at ambient inlet temperature, and the film-cooling flow rates were 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 percent of the total airflow. Blockage plates with blockage areas of 0, 52, 72, and 90 percent were placed upstream of the film-cooling slot and produced axial turbulence intensities of 7, 14, 23, and 35 percent, respectively. The film-cooling effectiveness decreased as much as 50 percent as the freestream turbulence intensity was increased from 7 to 35 percent. The value of the turbulent mixing coefficient used in previous work was compared with the axial turbulence intensity. The turbulent mixing coefficient was found to be 10 to 40 percent of the axial turbulence intensity.

  4. Smoke aerosol and its radiative effects during extreme fire event over Central Russia in summer 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N.; Nezval', Ye.; Sviridenkov, I.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2012-03-01

    Different microphysical, optical and radiative properties of aerosol were analyzed during the severe fires in summer 2010 over Central Russia using ground measurements at two AERONET sites in Moscow (Meteorological Observatory of Moscow State University - MSU MO) and Zvenigorod (Moscow Region) and radiative measurements at the MSU MO. Volume aerosol size distribution in smoke conditions had a bimodal character with the significant prevalence of fine mode particles, for which effective radius was shifted to higher values (reff-fine = 0.24 μm against approximately 0.15 μm in typical conditions). For smoke aerosol, the imaginary part of refractive index (REFI) in the visible spectral region was lower than that for typical aerosol (REFIλ =675 nm = 0.006 against REFIλ =675 nm = 0.01), while single scattering albedo (SSA) was significantly higher (SSAλ =675 nm = 0.95 against SSAλ =675 nm ~ 0.9). Extremely high aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (AOT500) was observed on 6-8 August reaching the absolute maximum on 7 August in Moscow (AOT500 = 6.4) and at Zvenigorod (AOT500 = 5.9). A dramatic attenuation of solar irradiance at ground was also recorded. Maximum irradiance loss had reached 64% for global shortwave irradiance, 91% for UV radiation 300-380 nm, and 97% for erythemally-weighted UV irradiance at relatively high solar elevation 47°. Significant spectral dependence in attenuation of solar irradiance in smoky conditions was mainly explained by higher AOT and smaller SSA in UV (0.8-0.9) compared with SSA in the visible region of spectrum. The assessments of radiative forcing effect (RFE) at the TOA indicated a significant cooling of the smoky atmosphere. Instant RFE reached -167 Wm-2 at AOT500 = 6.4, climatological RFE calculated with August 2010 monthly mean AOT was about -65 Wm-2, compared with -20 Wm-2 for typical aerosol according to the 10 yr period of measurements in Moscow.

  5. In situ observations of aerosol and chlorine monoxide after the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo - Effect of reactions on sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Poole, L. R.; Woods, D. C.; Decoursey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Highly resolved aerosol size distributions measured from high-altitude aircraft can be used to describe the effect of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the stratospheric aerosol. In some air masses, aerosol mass mixing ratios increased by factors exceeding 100 and aerosol surface area concentrations increased by factors of 30 or more. Increases in aerosol surface area concentration were accompanied by increases in chlorine monoxide at mid-latitudes when confounding factors were controlled. This observation supports the assertion that reactions occurring on the aerosol can increase the fraction of stratospheric chlorine that occurs in ozone-destroying forms.

  6. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  7. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Lawson, M. B.; Lithgow, R. A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and was used to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The variables considered include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicates that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  8. Spatial distributions and seasonal cycles of aerosol climate effects in India seen in a global climate-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, S. V.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Räisänen, P.; Kupiainen, K.; Tonttila, J.; Hooda, R.; Lihavainen, H.; O'Donnell, D.; Backman, L.; Klimont, Z.; Laaksonen, A.

    2014-09-01

    Climate-aerosol interactions in India are studied by employing the global climate-aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM and the GAINS inventory for anthropogenic aerosol emissions. Model validation is done for black carbon surface concentrations in Mukteshwar and for features of the monsoon circulation. Seasonal cycles and spatial distributions of radiative forcing and the temperature and rainfall responses are presented for different model setups. While total aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in the summer, anthropogenic forcing is considerably stronger in winter than in summer. Local seasonal temperature anomalies caused by aerosols are mostly negative with some exceptions, e.g., parts of northern India in March-May. Rainfall increases due to the elevated heat pump (EHP) mechanism and decreases due to solar dimming mechanisms (SDMs) and the relative strengths of these effects during different seasons and for different model setups are studied. Aerosol light absorption does increase rainfall in northern India, but effects due to solar dimming and circulation work to cancel the increase. The total aerosol effect on rainfall is negative for northern India in the months of June-August, but during March-May the effect is positive for most model setups. These differences between responses in different seasons might help converge the ongoing debate on the EHPs and SDMs. Due to the complexity of the problem and known or potential sources for error and bias, the results should be interpreted cautiously as they are completely dependent on how realistic the model is. Aerosol-rainfall correlations and anticorrelations are shown not to be a reliable sole argument for deducing causality.

  9. Effects of orientation angles on film cooling over a flat plate: Boundary layer temperature distributions and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, I.S.; Lee, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Presented are experimental results describing the effects of orientation angle of film cooling holes on boundary layer temperature distributions and film cooling effectiveness. Film flow data were obtained from a row of five film cooling holes on a flat test plate. The inclination angle of the hole was fixed at 35 deg and four orientation angles of 0, 30, 60, and 90 deg were investigated. The velocity ratios surveyed were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. The boundary layer temperature distributions were measured at three downstream locations using 1 {micro}m platinum wire. Detailed adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions were measured using thermochromic liquid crystal. Results show that the increased lateral momentum in the case of large orientation angle injection strongly affects boundary layer temperature distributions. Temperature distribution characteristics are, in general, explained in the context of the interactions between injectant and free-stream fluid and between injectants issuing from adjacent holes. The adiabatic film cooling effectiveness distributions are discussed in connection with the boundary layer temperature distributions. Spanwise-averaged effectiveness distributions and space-averaged effectiveness distributions are also presented with respect to the velocity ratios and the orientation angles.

  10. Observation of spin-wave cooling effect in magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Toshu; Uchida, Ken-Ichi; Harii, Kazuya; Kajiwara, Yosuke; Yamagichi, Kazuya; Jungfleisch, M. B.; Chumak, A. V.; Vasyuchka, V. I.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Saitoh, Eiji

    2012-02-01

    We focused on utilizing a surface spin wave (Damon-Eshbach mode); traveling on top and bottom surfaces in a non reciprocal manner, as a good carrier of heat. As a sample, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) was chosen because the spin waves excited in the YIG is known to have a long coherence length propagating distances even a few millimeters. By exciting the surface spin wave of only one side, heat transportation was successfully observed by measuring sample temperature with an infrared thermocamera. More interestingly, the temperature where the spin wave is initially excited shows cooling effect to drop its temperature just after the excitation of the surface spin wave. Here we call this effect as microwave cooling effect which is introducing a new cooling principle.

  11. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-28

    In this study, aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ε, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ε increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitional regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ε further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.

  12. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; ...

    2016-02-28

    In this study, aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ε, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ε increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitionalmore » regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ε further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.« less

  13. Global Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect From CALIOP and C3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Kato, Seiji; Tackett, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols are responsible for the largest uncertainties in current estimates of climate forcing. These uncertainties are due in part to the limited abilities of passive sensors to retrieve aerosols in cloudy skies. We use a dataset which merges CALIOP observations together with other A-train observations to estimate aerosol radiative effects in cloudy skies as well as in cloud-free skies. The results can be used to quantify the reduction of aerosol radiative effects in cloudy skies relative to clear skies and to reduce current uncertainties in aerosol radiative effects.

  14. Effects of e-beam parameters on coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) requires detailed control of the phase between the hadron an the FEL-amplified wave packet. This phase depends on local electron beam parameters such as the energy spread and the peak current. In this paper, we examine the effects of local density variations on the cooling rates for CeC. Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) [1] is a new concept in intense, high energy hadron beamcooling, in which the Debye screened charge perturbation calculated in [2] is used to seed a high-gain free electron laser (FEL). Using delays to give the perturbing hadron an energy-dependent longitudinal displacement relative to its frequencymodulated charge perturbation, the hadron receives an energy-dependent kick which reduces its energy variation from the design energy. The equations of motion in [1] assume that the electron bunch is the same physical size as the hadron bunch, and has a homogeneous charge density across the entire bunch. In practice, the electron bunches will be much shorter than the hadron bunch, and this local spacial inhomogeneity in the charge distribution will alter the gain length of the FEL, resulting in both a change in the amplification of the initial signal and a phase shift. In this paper we consider these inhomogeneity effects, determining cooling equations for bunched beam CeC consistent with these effects and determining thresholds for the cooling parameters.

  15. Light Absorption in the Stratosphere: Trend, Soot Aerosol Concentration and Contribution by...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Verma, S.; Strwwa, A. W.; Ferry, G. V.; Hamill, P.; Vay, S.; Gore, Warren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The light absorption coefficient, Beta(a) of the stratospheric aerosol is an important quantity that determines its radiative effects. When combined with the aerosol scattering coefficient, Beta(a) it becomes possible to evaluate the aerosol single scatter albedo, omega = Beta(s)/(Beta(s) + Beta(a)) which is essential for modeling the overall radiative effects of the stratospheric aerosol. Pollack1 determined that omega = 0.98 is a critical value that separates stratospheric cooling from warming.

  16. From nuclear power to coal power: Aerosol-induced health and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Laakso, Anton; Karhunen, Anni; Kokkola, Harri; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated what would be the climate and PM-induced air quality consequences if all nuclear reactors worldwide were closed down and replaced by coal combustion. In a way, this presents a "worst-case scenario" since less polluting energy sources are available. We studied simultaneously the radiative and health effects of coal power emissions using a global 3-D aerosol-climate model (ECHAM-HAMMOZ). This approach allowed us to estimate the effects of a major global energy production change from low carbon source to a high carbon one using detailed spatially resolved population density information. We included the radiative effects of both CO2 and PM2.5 but limited the study of health effects to PM2.5 only. Our results show that the replacement of nuclear power with coal power would have globally caused an average of 150,000 premature deaths per year during the period 2005-2009 with two thirds of them in Europe. For 37 years the aerosol emissions from the additional coal power plants would cool the climate but after that the accumulating CO2 emissions would accelerate the warming of the climate.

  17. Effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated cooling waters on estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Liden, L.H.; Burton, D.T.; Bongers, L.H.; Holland, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Research report:Continuous-flow bioassays were conducted during August 1976 to compare the effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated condenser cooling effluents on several selected estuarine food-chain organisms. Two fish species, two bivalve species, a copepod, and naturally occurring phytoplankton communities were studied. Toxic effects of chlorobrominated and chlorinated power plant cooling waters on estuarine organisms appear to be similar with respect to the lethal and sublethal response indicators used in the study. However, more comparative tests must be conducted to define any differences in toxicities of bromine chloride or chlorine residual oxidants. (50 references, 5 tables)

  18. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, Curt; Ghan, Steven J.; Walton, John J.; Weissman, Paul R.

    1989-01-01

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of nuclear winter; GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of asteroid/comet winter, however, are more severe than in nuclear winter because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a patchy sense.

  19. Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

    2011-02-08

    Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

  20. Simulation of jet cooling effects on Czochralski crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, R. K.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Dudukovic, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of cooling the crystal side surface by blowing a jet of an inert gas are examined in detail for Czochralski crystal growth. A combined model of the crystal + melt, which incorporates the detailed radiation calculations, the shape of the melt-gas meniscus, predicts the growth rate and the crystal-melt interface shape, is used for this study. The convective heat transfer coefficient for the jet is estimated from the correlation available in the literature. The effect of the jet cooling on the interface shape and the pulling rate is significant. The crystal diameter as well as the interface shape tend to be more stable in the environment of the rapid cooling of the crystal by the jet. The crystal diameter or the interface shape can be easily controlled by adjusting the gas flow rate through the jet. This gives the Czochralski pulling an additional degree of freedom facilitating the control of crystal diameter and interface shape.

  1. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  2. Effect of input power on cooling property of a thermoacoustic cooling system with diameter-expanded prime movers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, So; Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Orino, Yuichiro; Wada, Takahiro; Inui, Yoshitaka; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-01

    We studied a thermoacoustic cooling system driven at low temperatures to make practical use of the system. Aiming to reduce the driving temperature of the thermoacoustic system, we developed a loop-tube-type thermoacoustic system with diameter-expanded two-stage prime movers, i.e., a heat-to-sound transducer. The system drove at 67 °C. Additionally, we developed a prototype for a thermoacoustic cooling system with a diameter-expanded two-stage prime mover. In the experiment, the cooling point temperature was decreased by 4.4 °C from room temperature, i.e., 20 °C. To improve the cooling performance of the prototype thermoacoustic cooling system, we experimentally investigated the effect of increasing the input power on the cooling performance.

  3. War Induced Aerosol Optical, Microphysical and Radiative Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, Pavel; Tiwari, Shubhansh

    2017-01-01

    The effect of war on air pollution and climate is assessed in this communication. War today in respect of civil wars and armed conflict in the Middle East area is taken into consideration. Impacts of war are not only in loss of human life and property, but also in the environment. It is well known that war effects air pollution and in the long run contribute to anthropogenic climate change, but general studies on this subject are few because of the difficulties of observations involved. In the current scenario of the ongoing conflict in the Middle East regions, deductions in parameters of atmosphere are discussed. Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol loads, Black Carbon, Ozone,Dust, regional haze and many more are analyzed using various satellite data. Multi-model analysis is also studied to verify the analysis. Type segregation of aerosols, in-depth constraints to atmospheric chemistry, biological effects and particularly atmospheric physics in terms of radiative forcing, etc. are discussed. Undergraduate in Earth Sciences.

  4. Can Coolness Predict Technology Adoption? Effects of Perceived Coolness on User Acceptance of Smartphones with Curved Screens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Shin, Dong-Hee; Park, Eunil

    2015-09-01

    This study proposes an acceptance model for curved-screen smartphones, and explores how the sense of coolness induced by attractiveness, originality, subcultural appeal, and the utility of the curved screen promotes smartphone adoption. The results of structural equation modeling analyses (N = 246) show that these components of coolness (except utility) increase the acceptance of the technology by enhancing the smartphones' affectively driven qualities rather than their utilitarian ones. The proposed coolness model is then compared with the original technology acceptance model to validate that the coolness factors are indeed equally effective determinants of usage intention, as are the extensively studied usability factors such as perceived ease of use and usefulness.

  5. Keep it cool: temperature priming effect on cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Halali, Eliran; Meiran, Nachshon; Shalev, Idit

    2017-03-01

    The effect of physical temperature on cognition and behavior has been the focus of extensive research in recent years, demonstrating that embodied concepts are grounded in, and shaped by, sensorimotor physical experiences. Nevertheless, less is known about how experienced and perceived temperatures affect cognitive control, one of humans core executive functions. In the present work, we primed participants with cool versus warm temperature using a between participants manipulation of physical touch experience (Experiment 1), and a within participants manipulation of seeing landscape views associated with cool vs. warm temperatures (Experiment 2). In both experiments, cool compared to warm temperatures lead to improved performance on an anti-saccade task, an established cognitive control measure. Implications are discussed.

  6. ACUTE CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF FIREFIGHTING AND ACTIVE COOLING DURING REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jefferey L.; Duncan, Michael D.; Hu, Chengcheng; Littau, Sally R.; Caseman, Delayne; Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; Davis-Gorman, Grace; McDonagh, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the cardiovascular and hemostatic effects of fire suppression and post-exposure active cooling. Methods Forty-four firefighters were evaluated prior to and after a 12 minute live-fire drill. Next, 50 firefighters undergoing the same drill were randomized to post-fire forearm immersion in 10°C water or standard rehabilitation. Results In the first study, heart rate and core body temperature increased and serum C-reactive protein decreased but there were no significant changes in fibrinogen, sE-selectin or sL-selectin. The second study demonstrated an increase in blood coagulability, leukocyte count, factors VIII and X, cortisol and glucose, and a decrease in plasminogen and sP-selectin. Active cooling reduced mean core temperature, heart rate and leukocyte count. Conclusions Live-fire exposure increased core temperature, heart rate, coagulability and leukocyte count; all except coagulability were reduced by active cooling. PMID:23090161

  7. Potential climate effect of mineral aerosols over West Africa. Part I: model validation and contemporary climate evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhenming; Wang, Guiling; Pal, Jeremy S.; Yu, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Mineral dusts present in the atmosphere can play an important role in climate over West Africa and surrounding regions. However, current understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model is used to investigate the potential climatic impacts of dust aerosols. Two sets of simulations driven by reanalysis and Earth System Model boundary conditions are performed with and without the representation of dust processes. The model, regardless of the boundary forcing, captures the spatial and temporal variability of the aerosol optical depth and surface concentration. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative at the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in the spring and summer. The presence of mineral dusts causes surface cooling and lower troposphere heating, resulting in a stabilization effect and reduction in precipitation in the northern portion of the monsoon close to the dust emissions region. This results in an enhancement of precipitation to the south. While dusts cause the lower troposphere to stabilize, upper tropospheric cooling makes the region more prone to intense deep convection as is evident by a simulated increase in extreme precipitation. In a companion paper, the impacts of dust emissions on future West African climate are investigated.

  8. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  9. Observed aerosol effects on marine cloud nucleation and supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Sorooshian, Armin; Seinfeld, John H.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Nenes, Athanasios; Leaitch, W. Richard; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Ahlm, Lars; Chen, Yi-Chun; Coggon, Matthew; Corrigan, Ashley; Craven, Jill S.; Flagan, Richard C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hawkins, Lelia N.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Jung, Eunsil; Lin, Jack J.; Metcalf, Andrew R.; Modini, Robin; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; Roberts, Greg C.; Shingler, Taylor; Song, Siwon; Wang, Zhen; Wonaschütz, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer include primary organic and salt particles from sea spray and combustion-derived particles from ships and coastal cities. These particle types serve as nuclei for marine cloud droplet activation, although the particles that activate depend on the particle size and composition as well as the supersaturation that results from cloud updraft velocities. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) 2011 was a targeted aircraft campaign to assess how different particle types nucleate cloud droplets. As part of E-PEACE 2011, we studied the role of marine particles as cloud droplet nuclei and used emitted particle sources to separate particle-induced feedbacks from dynamical variability. The emitted particle sources included shipboard smoke-generated particles with 0.05-1 μm diameters (which produced tracks measured by satellite and had drop composition characteristic of organic smoke) and combustion particles from container ships with 0.05-0.2 μm diameters (which were measured in a variety of conditions with droplets containing both organic and sulfate components) [1]. Three central aspects of the collaborative E-PEACE results are: (1) the size and chemical composition of the emitted smoke particles compared to ship-track-forming cargo ship emissions as well as background marine particles, with particular attention to the role of organic particles, (2) the characteristics of cloud track formation for smoke and cargo ships, as well as the role of multi-layered low clouds, and (3) the implications of these findings for quantifying aerosol indirect effects. For comparison with the E-PEACE results, the preliminary results of the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) 2012 provided evidence of the cloud-nucleating roles of both marine organic particles and coastal urban pollution, with simultaneous measurements of the effective supersaturations of the clouds in the

  10. Analysis of Measurement Requirements for the Aerosol Indirect Effect: A Synthesis of Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, G.; Previdi, M.; Veron, D. E.

    2003-12-01

    The aerosol indirect effect has been measured for some time now by satellite remote sensors, and more recently by surface-based remote sensors. The indirect effect is often expressed in terms of a relative change in drop size for a relative change in aerosol optical depth or extinction. Here we present some recent results of surface based remote sensing of the indirect effect and assess whether aerosol optical depth or extinction is a suitable proxy for the aerosol affecting drop formation. To do so, we use multiple realizations of a cloud model to investigate the sensitivity of cloud drop effective radius re to aerosol parameters (size distribution and composition) and dynamical parameters (updraft and liquid water content). A breakdown of the individual aerosol terms contributing to drop size change shows that use of aerosol extinction as a proxy for size distribution and composition tends to underestimate the magnitude of the first indirect effect. The use of the aerosol index alleviates this problem somewhat. We show that re is most sensitive to cloud liquid water, a parameter often ignored in indirect effect analyses. The relative importance of the other parameters varies for different conditions but aerosol concentration Na is consistently important. Updraft plays an increasingly important role under high aerosol loadings. Requirements for measuring the indirect effect over polluted continents are shown to be more stringent than those over cleaner, remote oceans. This may influence interpretation of current satellite and surface remote measurements of the indirect effect.

  11. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat

    2005-01-01

    The Bay Area Environmental Research Institute (BAER) scientists have worked with the NASA Ames Research Center sunphotometer group led by Dr. Philip Russell for many years researching the climatic effects of aerosol particles in the stratosphere and troposphere. We have continued to work with the NASA Ames sunphotometer group in research activities representing funded, peer-reviewed proposals to NASA, NOAA and DOE. The activities are described in those proposals and also in the documents provided to the Grants Office earlier. This is the final report from January 1,2002 - June 30, 2005. The report consists of a compilation of 41 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 43 first-authored conference presentations. To save paper, reprints are not included but will, of course, be provided upon request.

  12. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  13. Effect of aerosol number concentration on cloud droplet dispersion: An LES study and implications for aerosol indirect forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2005-12-01

    Through three-dimensional LES simulations of marine stratocumulus we explore the factors that control the cloud spectral relative dispersion (ratio of cloud droplet spectral width to the mean radius of the distribution) as a function of aerosol number concentration and the extent to which the relative dispersion either enhances or mitigates the Twomey effect. We find that relative dispersion decreases with increasing aerosol number concentration (for aerosol number concentrations less than about 1000 cm- 3) because smaller droplets resulting from higher aerosol number concentrations inhibit precipitation and lead to: (1) less spectral broadening by suppressed collision and coalescence processes; and (2) more spectral narrowing by droplet condensational growth at higher updraft velocity, because reduced drizzle latent heating at cloud top results in increased boundary layer turbulent kinetic energy production by buoyancy and thereby stronger turbulence. Increased spectral broadening owing to increased cloud-top entrainment mixing, also as a result of increased boundary layer turbulence, is relatively insignificant compared with (1) and (2). The coefficient k, an important parameter that relates cloud droplet effective radius and volume mean radius in large-scale models, is a function of skewness and relative dispersion of the distribution and is negatively correlated with relative dispersion. Increasing k with increasing aerosol number concentration leads to maximum enhancement of the cloud susceptibility (the change of cloud optical depth due to change of cloud droplet number concentration) over that attributable to the Twomey effect alone by about 4.2% and 39% for simulated FIRE and ASTEX cases, respectively.

  14. Effects of aerosol on evaporation, freezing and precipitation in a multiple cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Kim, Byung-Gon; Yum, Seong Soo; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Um, Jun Shik; Li, Zhanqing; Hong, JinKyu; Chang, Ki-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yim

    2017-02-01

    Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation account for a large portion of uncertainties in the prediction of the future course of global hydrologic circulations and climate. As a process of a better understanding of interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation, simulations are performed for a mixed-phase convective multiple-cloud system over the tropics. Studies on single-cloud systems have shown that aerosol-induced increases in freezing, associated increases in parcel buoyancy and thus the intensity of clouds (or updrafts) are a main mechanism which controls aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in convective clouds. However, in the multiple-cloud system that plays much more important roles in global hydrologic circulations and thus climate than single-cloud systems, aerosol effects on condensation play the most important role in aerosol-induced changes in the intensity of clouds and the effects on freezing play a negligible role in those changes. Aerosol-induced enhancement in evaporation intensifies gust fronts and increases the number of subsequently developing clouds, which leads to the substantial increases in condensation and associated intensity of convection. Although aerosol-induced enhancement in freezing takes part in the increases in condensation by inducing stronger convergence around cloud bottom, the increases in condensation are one order of magnitude larger than those in freezing. It is found that while aerosol-induced increases in freezing create intermittent extremely heavy precipitation, aerosol-induced increases in evaporation enhance light and medium precipitation in the multiple-cloud system here. This increase in light and medium precipitation makes it possible that cumulative precipitation increases with increasing aerosol concentration, although the increase is small. It is interesting that the altitude of the maximum of the time- and domain-averaged hydrometeor mass densities is quite robust to increases in aerosol

  15. Aerosol Indirect Effect on Warm Clouds over Eastern China Using Combined CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol, one of key components of the climate system, is highly variable, both temporally and spatially. It often exerts great influences on the cloud-precipitation chain processes by serving as CCN/IN, altering cloud microphysics and its life cycle. Yet, the aerosol indirect effect on clouds remains largely unknown, because the initial changes in clouds due to aerosols may be enhanced or dampened by such feedback processes as modified cloud dynamics, or evaporation of the smaller droplets due to the competition for water vapor. In this study, we attempted to quantify the aerosol effects on warm cloud over eastern China, based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO and CPR/CLOUDSAT during the period 2006 to 2010. The seasonality of aerosol from ground-based PM10 is quite different from that estimated from MODIS AOD. This result is corroborated by lower level profile of aerosol occurrence frequency from CALIOP, indicating the significant role CALIOP could play in aerosol-cloud interaction. The combined use of CALIOP and CPR facilitate the process to exactly determine the (vertical) position of warm cloud relative to aerosol, out of six scenarios in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status, which shows as follows: AO (Aerosol only), CO (Cloud only), SASC (Single aerosol-single cloud), SADC (single aerosol-double cloud), DASC (double aerosol-single cloud), and others. Results shows that about 54% of all the cases belong to mixed status, among all the collocated aerosol-cloud cases. Under mixed condition, a boomerang shape is observed, i.e., reduced cloud droplet radius (CDR) is associated with increasing aerosol at moderate aerosol pollution (AOD<0.4), becoming saturated at AOD of 0.5, followed by an increase in CDR with aerosol. In contrast, there is no such boomerang shape found for (aerosol-cloud) separated cases. We categorize dataset into warm-season and cold-season subsets to figure out how the

  16. Latent cooling and microphysics effects in deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-González, S.; Wang, P. K.; Gascón, E.; Valero, F.; Sánchez, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Water phase changes within a storm are responsible for the enhancement of convection and therefore the elongation of its lifespan. Specifically, latent cooling absorbed during evaporation, melting and sublimation is considered the main cause of the intensification of downdrafts. In order to know more accurately the consequences of latent cooling caused by each of these processes (together with microphysical effects that they induce), four simulations were developed with the Wisconsin Dynamical and Microphysical Model (WISCDYMM): one with all the microphysical processes; other without sublimation; melting was suppressed in the third simulation; and evaporation was disabled in the fourth. The results show that sublimation cooling is not essential to maintain the vertical currents of the storm. This is demonstrated by the fact that in the simulation without sublimation, maximum updrafts are in the same range as in the control simulation, and the storm lifespan is similar or even longer. However, melting was of vital importance. The storm in the simulation without melting dissipated prematurely, demonstrating that melting is indispensable to the enhancement of downdrafts below the freezing level and for avoiding the collapse of low level updrafts. Perhaps the most important finding is the crucial influence of evaporative cooling above the freezing level that maintains and enhances mid-level downdrafts in the storm. It is believed that this latent cooling comes from the evaporation of supercooled liquid water connected with the Bergeron-Findeisen process. Therefore, besides its influence at low levels (which was already well known), this evaporative cooling is essential to strengthen mid-level downdrafts and ultimately achieve a quasi-steady state.

  17. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Tripathi, Sachchida; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs throughout the world, it contains substantial quantity of liquid water and generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but it also has the potential to form highly oxidized secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient aerosols. On the other hand higher organic aerosols (OA) loading tend to decrease the overall oxidation level (O/C) of the particle phase organics, due to enhanced partitioning of less oxidized organics from gas to particle phase. However, combined impact of these two parameters; aqueous oxidation and OA loading, on the overall oxidation ratio (O/C) of ambient OA has never been studied. To assess this, real time ambient sampling using HR-ToF-AMS was carried out at Kanpur, India from 15 December 2014 - 10 February 2015. In first 3 weeks of this campaign, very high OA loading is (134 ± 42 μg/m3) observed (termed as high loading or HL period) while loading is substantially reduced from 2nd January, 2016 (56 ± 20 μg/m3, termed as low loading or LL period) . However, both the loading period was affected by several fog episodes (10 in HL and 7 in LL), thus providing the opportunity of studying the combined effects of fog and OA loading on OA oxidation. It is found that O/C ratio is very strongly anti-correlated with OA loading in both the loading period, however, slope of this ant-correlation is much steep during HL period than in LL period. Source apportionment of OA revealed that there is drastic change in the types of OA from HL to LL period, clearly indicating difference in OA composition from HL to LL period. During foggy night continuous oxidation of OA is observed from early evening to early morning with 15-20% enhancement in O/C ratio, while the same is absent during non-foggy period, clearly indicating the efficient fog processing of ambient OA. It is also found that night time fog aqueous oxidation can be as effective as daytime photo chemistry in oxidation of OA. Fog

  18. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  19. Attribution of the United States “warming hole”: Aerosol indirect effect andprecipitable water vapor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosols can influence the climate indirectly by acting as cloud condensation nuclei and /or ice nuclei, thereby modifying cloud optical properties. Observations show a striking cooling trend in summertime daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in the central and...

  20. Effectiveness of bromicide against Legionella pneumophila in a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Harvey, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling towers are considered to be man-made amplifiers of Legionella. Thus the proper maintenance and choice of biocides is important. The only biocide that has thus far been shown to be effective in field tests is the judicious use of chlorination. Perturbation studies were conducted on an industrial cooling tower shown to contain Legionella, using 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (Bromicide, Great Lakes Chemical Corp.). At the manufacturer's recommended concentrations neither the density nor the activity of Legionella was affected. At concentrations greater than 2.0 ppM free residual, the Bromicide was not effective in reducing Legionella to source water concentrations, nor was it effective in reducing the INT activity of the bacterium in situ. The data indicate that at concentrations up to 2.0 ppM, Bromicide is not effective in these tower studies. 23 references, 3 tables.

  1. Aerosol radiative effects over global arid and semi-arid regions based on MODIS Deep Blue satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    effect of aerosols at the top of atmosphere (TOA) fluxes (DRETOA), the atmospheric absorption of solar radiation (DREatmab) and the incoming and absorbed surface solar radiative fluxes (DREsurf and (DREnetsurf, respectively). The results are obtained for the period from January 2003 till December 2009, i.e. seven (7) years, on a monthly mean basis. The RTM results indicate that aerosols significantly enhance the absorbed solar radiation in the atmosphere, especially over the major deserts of Africa and Asia, by amounts ranging from 15 to 55 W/m2 (maximum values in Bodele, Sahara). On the other hand, through scattering and absorption, they decrease the surface absorption of solar radiation, by 10-45 W/m2 over the same areas, thus producing a significant surface radiative cooling. As a result of significant solar atmospheric absorption over the highly reflecting desert surface, aerosols decrease the reflected solar radiation to space, by up to 17 W m-2, producing a decrease of planetary albedo and an important planetary warming. Even larger values are obtained on a seasonal basis, while the average values of DREatmab and DREnetsurf over global land arid and semi-arid regions are equal to 8.9 and -11.3 W/m2, respectively. Significant intra- and inter-annual variations and changes of DREs are also identified.

  2. Global-mean temperature change from shipping toward 2050: improved representation of the indirect aerosol effect in simple climate models.

    PubMed

    Lund, Marianne Tronstad; Eyring, Veronika; Fuglestvedt, Jan; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Lee, David; Righi, Mattia

    2012-08-21

    We utilize a range of emission scenarios for shipping to determine the induced global-mean radiative forcing and temperature change. Ship emission scenarios consistent with the new regulations on nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) from the International Maritime Organization and two of the Representative Concentration Pathways are used as input to a simple climate model (SCM). Based on a complex aerosol-climate model we develop and test new parametrizations of the indirect aerosol effect (IAE) in the SCM that account for nonlinearities in radiative forcing of ship-induced IAE. We find that shipping causes a net global cooling impact throughout the period 1900-2050 across all parametrizations and scenarios. However, calculated total net global-mean temperature change in 2050 ranges from -0.03[-0.07,-0.002]°C to -0.3[-0.6,-0.2]°C in the A1B scenario. This wide range across parametrizations emphasizes the importance of properly representing the IAE in SCMs and to reflect the uncertainties from complex global models. Furthermore, our calculations show that the future ship-induced temperature response is likely a continued cooling if SO(2) and NO(x) emissions continue to increase due to a strong increase in activity, despite current emission regulations. However, such cooling does not negate the need for continued efforts to reduce CO(2) emissions, since residual warming from CO(2) is long-lived.

  3. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  4. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p < 0.05). Maximum inversion range of motion was 28.4 ± 1.8° for all subjects. No overall condition by time difference was detected (p > 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p < 0.05). Joint cooling does not result in deficiencies in reaction time or immediate muscle activation following inversion perturbation compared to a control. Key PointsJoint cooling is used as a treatment intervention prior to activity. Whether ankle cooling

  5. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at mid-latitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30â€"50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  6. CALIPSO-Inferred Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects: Bias Estimates Using Ground-Based Raman Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorsen, Tyler; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50%. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak.

  7. Climatic Effects of 1950-2050 Changes in US Anthropogenic Aerosols. Part 1; Aerosol Trends and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibensperger, E. M.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Chen, W.-T.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Nenes, A.; Adams, P. J.; Streets, D. G.; Kumar, N.; Rind, D.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate decadal aerosol direct and indirect (warm cloud) radiative forcings from US anthropogenic sources over the 1950-2050 period. Past and future aerosol distributions are constructed using GEOS-Chem and historical emission inventories and future projections from the IPCC A1B scenario. Aerosol simulations are evaluated with observed spatial distributions and 1980-2010 trends of aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in the contiguous US. Direct and indirect radiative forcing is calculated using the GISS general circulation model and monthly mean aerosol distributions from GEOS-Chem. The radiative forcing from US anthropogenic aerosols is strongly localized over the eastern US. We find that its magnitude peaked in 1970-1990, with values over the eastern US (east of 100 deg W) of -2.0Wm(exp-2 for direct forcing including contributions from sulfate (-2.0Wm-2), nitrate (-0.2Wm(exp-2), organic carbon (-0.2Wm(exp-2), and black carbon (+0.4Wm(exp-2). The uncertainties in radiative forcing due to aerosol radiative properties are estimated to be about 50 %. The aerosol indirect effect is estimated to be of comparable magnitude to the direct forcing. We find that the magnitude of the forcing declined sharply from 1990 to 2010 (by 0.8Wm(exp-2) direct and 1.0Wm(exp-2 indirect), mainly reflecting decreases in SO2 emissions, and project that it will continue declining post-2010 but at a much slower rate since US SO2 emissions have already declined by almost 60% from their peak. This suggests that much of the warming effect of reducing US anthropogenic aerosol sources has already been realized. The small positive radiative forcing from US BC emissions (+0.3Wm(exp-2 over the eastern US in 2010; 5% of the global forcing from anthropogenic BC emissions worldwide) suggests that a US emission control strategy focused on BC would have only limited climate benefit.

  8. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  9. Absorbing aerosols over Asia: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-11-01

    Forcing by absorbing atmospheric black carbon (BC) tends to heat the atmosphere, cool the surface, and reduce the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates and the hydrologic cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the increases in (1) the total amount of all aerosol species and (2) the amount of aerosol absorption that may have occurred over the 1950-1990 period. Focusing on south and east Asia, the sensitivity of a general circulation model's climate response (with prescribed sea surface temperatures and aerosol distributions) to such changes is investigated by considering a range of both aerosol absorption and aerosol extinction optical depth increases. We include direct and semidirect aerosol effects only. Precipitation changes are less sensitive to changes in aerosol absorption optical depth at lower aerosol loadings. At higher-extinction optical depths, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of absorbing aerosols and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation in northwestern India. In contrast, the presence of increases in only scattering aerosols weakens the monsoonal circulation and inhibits precipitation here. Cloud amount changes can enhance or counteract surface solar flux reduction depending on the aerosol loading and absorption, with the changes also influencing the surface temperature and the surface energy balance. The results have implications for aerosol reduction strategies in the future that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone has a reduced effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in BC aerosols should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosols.

  10. Effect of injector configuration in rocket nozzle film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A. Lakshya; Pisharady, J. C.; Shine, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations are carried out to analyze the effect of coolant injector configuration on overall film cooling performance in a divergent section of a rocket nozzle. Two different injector orientations are investigated: (1) shaped slots with a divergence angle of 15° (semi-divergent injector) (2) fully divergent slot (fully divergent injector). A 2-dimensional, axis-symmetric, multispecies computational model using finite volume formulation has been developed and validated against the experimental data. The experiments provided a consistent set of measurements for cooling effectiveness for different blowing ratios ranging from 3.7 to 6. Results show that the semi divergent configuration leads to higher effectiveness compared to fully divergent slot at all blowing ratios. The spatially averaged effectiveness results show that the difference between the two configurations is significant at higher blowing ratios. The increase in effectiveness was around 2 % at BR = 3.7 whereas it was around 12 % in the case of BR = 6. Numerical results show the presence of secondary flow recirculation zones near the jet exit for both the injectors. An additional recirculation zone present in the case of fully divergent injector caused an increase in mixing of the coolant and mainstream, and a reduction in film cooling performance.

  11. The effect of organic aerosol material on aerosol reactivity towards ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batenburg, Anneke; Gaston, Cassandra; Thornton, Joel; Virtanen, Annele

    2015-04-01

    After aerosol particles are formed or emitted into the atmosphere, heterogeneous reactions with gaseous oxidants cause them to 'age'. Aging can change aerosol properties, such as the hygroscopicity, which is an important parameter in how the particles scatter radiation and form clouds. Conversely, heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles play a significant role in the cycles of various atmospheric trace gases. Organic compounds, a large part of the total global aerosol matter, can exist in liquid or amorphous (semi)solid physical phases. Different groups have shown that reactions with ozone (O3) can be limited by bulk diffusion in organic aerosol, particularly in viscous, (semi)solid materials, and that organic coatings alter the surface interactions between gas and aerosol particles. We aim to better understand and quantify how the viscosity and phase of organic aerosol matter affect gas-particle interactions. We have chosen the reaction of O3 with particles composed of a potassium iodide (KI) core and a variable organic coating as a model system. The reaction is studied in an aerosol flow reactor that consists of a laminar flow tube and a movable, axial injector for the injection of O3. The aerosol-containing air is inserted at the tube's top. The interaction length (and therefore time), between the particles and the O3 can be varied by moving the injector. Alternatively, the production of aerosol particles can be modulated. The remaining O3 concentration is monitored from the bottom of the tube and particle concentrations are measured simultaneously, which allows us to calculate the reactive uptake coefficient γ. We performed exploratory experiments with internally mixed KI and polyethylene glycol (PEG) particles at the University of Washington (UW) in a setup with a residence time around 50 s. Aerosol particles were generated in an atomizer from solutions with varying concentrations of KI and PEG and inserted into the flow tube after they were diluted and

  12. Biological aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. Gannet; Huffman, J. Alex; Fridlind, Ann

    2012-12-01

    Bioaerosol Effects on Clouds Workshop;Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 5-6August 2012 Bioaerosols such as bacteria have been proposed as significant contributors to cloud ice nucleation, but too little is known about the properties and impacts of bioaerosol and other ice nuclei to make reliable conclusions about their wide-scale impact on clouds and precipitation. During late summer an international group of 40 participants met at a Steamboat Springs ski resort to share perspectives on bioaerosol sources, activity, and influence on clouds. Participants who were invited collectively spanned a broad range of expertise, including atmospheric chemistry, microbiology, micrometeorology, and cloud physics, as well as a broad range of research approaches, including laboratory measurement, field measurement, and modeling. Tours of Storm Peak Laboratory (http://www.stormpeak.dri.edu) were offered before and after the workshop.

  13. Internally Consistent MODIS Estimate of Aerosol Clear-Sky Radiative Effect Over the Global Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2004-01-01

    Modern satellite remote sensing, and in particular the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), offers a measurement-based pathway to estimate global aerosol radiative effects and aerosol radiative forcing. Over the Oceans, MODIS retrieves the total aerosol optical thickness, but also reports which combination of the 9 different aerosol models was used to obtain the retrieval. Each of the 9 models is characterized by a size distribution and complex refractive index, which through Mie calculations correspond to a unique set of single scattering albedo, assymetry parameter and spectral extinction for each model. The combination of these sets of optical parameters weighted by the optical thickness attributed to each model in the retrieval produces the best fit to the observed radiances at the top of the atmosphere. Thus the MODIS Ocean aerosol retrieval provides us with (1) An observed distribution of global aerosol loading, and (2) An internally-consistent, observed, distribution of aerosol optical models that when used in combination will best represent the radiances at the top of the atmosphere. We use these two observed global distributions to initialize the column climate model by Chou and Suarez to calculate the aerosol radiative effect at top of the atmosphere and the radiative efficiency of the aerosols over the global oceans. We apply the analysis to 3 years of MODIS retrievals from the Terra satellite and produce global and regional, seasonally varying, estimates of aerosol radiative effect over the clear-sky oceans.

  14. Combined multispectral/hyperspectral remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols for quantification of their direct radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarragh, Gregory R.

    Scattering and absorption of solar radiation by aerosols in the atmosphere has a direct radiative effect on the climate of the Earth. Unfortunately, according to the IPCC the uncertainties in aerosol properties and their effect on the climate system represent one of the largest uncertainties in climate change research. Related to aerosols, one of the largest uncertainties is the fraction of the incident radiation that is scattered rather than absorbed, or their single scattering albedo. In fact, differences in single scattering albedo have a significant impact on the magnitude of the cooling effect of aerosols (opposite to that of greenhouse gasses) which can even have a warming effect for strongly absorbing aerosols. Satellites provide a unique opportunity to measure aerosol properties on a global scale. Traditional approaches use multispectral measurements of intensity at a single view angle to retrieve at most two aerosol parameters over land but it is being realized that more detail is required for accurate quantification of the direct effect of aerosols, in particular its anthropogenic component, and therefore more measurement information is required. One approach to more advanced measurements is to use not only intensity measurements but also polarimetric measurements and to use multiple view angles. In this work we explore another alternative: the use of hyperspectral measurements in molecular absorption bands. Our study can be divided into three stages the first of which is the development of a fast radiative transfer model for rapid simulation of measurements. Our approach is matrix operator based and uses the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential to evaluate the homogeneous solution. It is shown that the method is two to four times faster than the standard and efficient discrete ordinate technique and is accurate to the 6th decimal place. The second part of our study forms the core and is divided into two chapters the first of which is a rigorous

  15. Effect of Aerosol and Ocean Representation on Simulated Climate Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated to what extent anthropogenic aerosols shaped 20th century surface temperatures, especially sea surface temperatures (SSTs), through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). SSTs, in turn, are crucial in the context of atmospheric circulation and ocean heat uptake. Uncertainty considering anthropogenic aerosol forcing thus translates into uncertainty regarding ocean heat uptake and, ultimately, climate responses towards anthropogenic influences. We use the global climate model ECHAM to analyse the 20th century climate response towards either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases or both with different representations of ocean and aerosols: atmosphere-only with prescribed SSTs and interactive aerosols; mixed-layer ocean and interactive or prescribed aerosols; fully coupled with prescribed aerosols. For interactive aerosols we use the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM). Our results suggest that up to 15% of global ocean surfaces undergo an SSR reduction of at least -4W/m² in the year 2000, due to anthropogenic aerosols. The area affected depends on how aerosols are represented and whether clear sky or all sky SSR is considered. In MLO equilibria with interactive aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols clearly shape surface temperature response patterns. This is to a lesser degree the case for the transient fully coupled case. Additivity of global mean temperature responses towards single forcings - an assumption often made in the literature - is not fulfilled for the MLO experiments, but for the fully coupled experiments. While some of these differences can be attributed to the differing ocean representation, it is implied that differing aerosol representation may play an even more relevant role. Thus, our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature responses, but also highlight the relevance of choice of aerosol representation.

  16. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  17. Effect of Propeller on Engine Cooling System Drag and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Barlow, Philip R.

    1982-01-01

    The pressure recovery of incoming cooling air and the drag associated with engine cooling of a typical general aviation twin-engine aircraft was Investigated experimentally. The semispan model was mounted vertically in the 40 x 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at Ames Research Center. The propeller was driven by an electric motor to provide thrust with low vibration levels for the cold-now configuration. It was found that the propeller slip-stream reduces the frontal air spillage around the blunt nacelle shape. Consequently, this slip-stream effect promotes flow reattachment at the rear section of the engine nacelle and improves inlet pressure recovery. These effects are most pronounced at high angles of attack; that is, climb condition. For the cruise condition those improvements were more moderate.

  18. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  19. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  20. Combined Effects of Wakes and Jet Pulsing on Film Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    water as a refer- ence. Constant current cold- wire and constant temperature hot - wire anemometry were used to measure flow temperature and velocity...Temperature measurements were made using an infrared camera, thermocouples, and constant current (cold wire ) anemometry . The local film cooling effectiveness...and heat transfer coefficient were de- termined from the measured temperatures. Phase locked flow temperature fields were determined from cold- wire

  1. Effect of Cooling Water on Stability of NLC Linac Components

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pimpec, Frederic

    2002-11-01

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  2. Effect of cooling water on stability of NLC linac components

    SciTech Connect

    F. Le Pimpec et al.

    2003-02-11

    Vertical vibration of linac components (accelerating structures, girders and quadrupoles) in the NLC has been studied experimentally and analytically. Effects such as structural resonances and vibration caused by cooling water both in accelerating structures and quadrupoles have been considered. Experimental data has been compared with analytical predictions and simulations using ANSYS. A design, incorporating the proper decoupling of structure vibrations from the linac quadrupoles, is being pursued.

  3. Impact of aerosol radiative effects on 2000-2010 surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gettelman, A.; Shindell, D. T.; Lamarque, J. F.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing from direct and indirect effects of aerosols is examined over the recent past (last 10-15 years) using updated sulfate aerosol emissions in two Earth System Models with very different surface temperature responses to aerosol forcing. The hypothesis is that aerosol forcing and in particular, the impact of indirect effects of aerosols on clouds (Aerosol-Cloud Interactions, or ACI), explains the recent `hiatus' in global mean surface temperature increases. Sulfate aerosol emissions increase globally from 2000 to 2005, and then decrease slightly to 2010. Thus the change in anthropogenic sulfate induced net global radiative forcing is small over the period. Regionally, there are statistically significant forcings that are similar in both models, and consistent with changes in simulated emissions and aerosol optical depth. Coupled model simulations are performed to look at impacts of the forcing on recent surface temperatures. Temperature response patterns in the models are similar, and reflect the regional radiative forcing. Pattern correlations indicate significant correlations between observed decadal surface temperature changes and simulated surface temperature changes from recent sulfate aerosol forcing in an equilibrium framework. Sulfate ACI might be a contributor to the spatial patterns of recent temperature forcing, but not to the global mean `hiatus' itself.

  4. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  5. Stellar cooling bounds on new light particles: plasma mixing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edward; Lasenby, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Strong constraints on the coupling of new light particles to the Standard Model (SM) arise from their production in the hot cores of stars, and the effects of this on stellar cooling. For new light particles which have an effective in-medium mixing with the photon, plasma effects can result in parametrically different production rates to those obtained from a naive calculation. Taking these previously-neglected contributions into account, we make updated estimates for the stellar cooling bounds on light scalars and vectors with a variety of SM couplings. In particular, we improve the bounds on light ( m ≲ keV) scalars coupling to electrons or nucleons by up to 3 orders of magnitude in the coupling squared, significantly revise the supernova cooling bounds on dark photon couplings, and qualitatively change the mass dependence of stellar bounds on new vectors. Scalars with mass ≲ 2 keV that couple through the Higgs portal are constrained to mixing angle sin θ ≲ 3 × 10-10, which gives the dominant bound for scalar masses above ˜ 0 .2eV.

  6. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-09

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30 degrees S-20 degrees S), smoke (20 degrees S-5 degrees N), mineral dust (5 degrees N-25 degrees N), and pollution aerosols (30 degrees N- 60 degrees N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 +/- 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect.

  7. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-01-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30°S–20°S), smoke (20°S–5°N), mineral dust (5°N–25°N), and pollution aerosols (30°N– 60°N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2–0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is –11 ± 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect. PMID:16076949

  8. Radiative effects of black carbon aerosols on Indian monsoon: a study using WRF-Chem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Pramod; Tripathi, Sachchida Nand; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is utilized to examine the radiative effects of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the Indian monsoon, for the year 2010. Five ensemble simulations with different initial conditions (1st to 5th December, 2009) were performed and simulation results between 1st January, 2010 to 31st December, 2010 were used for analysis. Most of the BC which stays near the surface during the pre-monsoon season gets transported to higher altitudes with the northward migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during the monsoon season. In both the seasons, strong negative SW anomalies are present at the surface along with positive anomalies in the atmosphere, which results in the surface cooling and lower tropospheric heating, respectively. During the pre-monsoon season, lower troposphere heating causes increased convection and enhanced meridional wind circulation, bringing moist air from Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal to the North-East India, leading to increased rainfall there. However, during the monsoon season, along with cooling over the land regions, a warming over the Bay of Bengal is simulated. This differential heating results in an increased westerly moisture flux anomaly over central India, leading to increased rainfall over northern parts of India but decreased rainfall over southern parts. Decreased rainfall over southern India is also substantiated by the presence of increased evaporation over Bay of Bengal and decrease over land regions.

  9. Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Satellite Instrument (CERES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nine months of CERES/TRMM broadband fluxes combined with VIRS high-resolution imager measurements are used to estimate the daily average direct radiative effect of aerosols for clear-sky conditions over the tropical oceans. On average, aerosols have a cooling effect over the tropics of 4.6 +/- 1 W/sq m. The magnitude is approx.2 W/sq m smaller over the southern tropical oceans than it is over northern tropical oceans. The direct effect derived from CERES is highly correlated with coincident aerosol optical depth retrievals inferred from 0.63 microns VIRS radiances (correlation coefficient of 0.96). The slope of the regression line is approx. -32 W/sq m/t over the equatorial Pacific Ocean, but changes both regionally and seasonally, depending on the aerosol characteristics. Near sources of biomass burning and desert dust, the aerosol direct effect reaches -25 W sq m to -30 W/sq m. The direct effect from CERES also shows a dependence on wind speed. The reason for this dependence is unclear-it may be due to increased aerosol (e.g. sea-salt or aerosol transport) or increased surface reflection (e.g. due to whitecaps). The uncertainty in the tropical average direct effect from CERES is approx. 1 W/sq m (approx. 20%) due mainly to cloud contamination, the radiance-to-flux conversion, and instrument calibration. By comparison, uncertainties in the direct effect from the ERBE and CERES "ERBE-Like" products are a factor of 3 to 5 larger.

  10. SEAC4RS Aerosol Radiative Effects and Heating Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Redemann, J.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; LeBlanc, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present (a) aerosol optical properties, (b) aerosol radiative forcing, (c) aerosol and gas absorption and heating rates, and (d) spectral surface albedo for cases from August 19th and 26th of the SEAC4RS mission. This analysis is based on irradiance data from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), spectral aerosol optical depth from the Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), and extinction profiles from the DIAL/High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). We derive spectrally resolved values of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo from the data, and determine profiles of absorption and heating rate segregated by absorber (aerosol and gas).

  11. [Effect of ammonium sulfate aerosol on the photochemical reaction of toluene/ NO(x)/air mixture].

    PubMed

    Wu, Shan; Hao, Ji-Ming; Lü, Zi-Feng; Zhao, Zhe; Li, Jun-Hua

    2007-06-01

    The effect of ammonium sulfate aerosol on the photochemical reaction of toluene/NO(x)/air mixture was evaluated with Tsinghua Smog Chamber facility. The results indicate that the presence of concentrated preexisting ammonium sulfate aerosol shortens the time to reach maximum PM (particle matter) concentration and increases the aerosol yield of toluene. And under the presence of high concentrated ammonium sulfate aerosol seed, the concentration of aerosol does not have significant effects on NO(x), NO and O3 variation, but affects the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The SOA yield increases with the increasing initial ammonium sulfate seed concentration (< 160 microg x m(-3)). From the minimum 7.2% to the maximum 11.7%, the percentage increase of SOA yield is more than 60%.

  12. Meteorological and Aerosol effects on Marine Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Roberts, G.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Wang, Z.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Lin, J.; Nenes, A.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K.; Jonsson, H.; Albrecht, B. A.; Desiree, T. S.; Macdonald, A. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation and consequently their droplet distributions and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies provide detailed measurements in 6 case studies of both cloud thermodynamic properties and initial particle number distribution and composition, as well as the resulting cloud drop distribution and composition. This study uses simulations of a detailed chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce the observed cloud droplet distribution and composition. Four of the cases examined had a sub-adiabatic lapse rate, which was shown to have fewer droplets due to decreased maximum supersaturation, lower LWC and higher cloud base height, consistent with previous findings. These detailed case studies provided measured thermodynamics and microphysics that constrained the simulated droplet size distribution sufficiently to match the droplet number within 6% and the size within 19% for 4 of the 6 cases, demonstrating "closure" or consistency of the measured composition with the measured CCN spectra and the inferred and modeled supersaturation. The contribution of organic components to droplet formation shows small effects on the droplet number and size in the 4 marine cases that had background aerosol conditions with varying amounts of coastal, ship or other non-biogenic sources. In contrast, the organic fraction and hygroscopicity increased the droplet number and size in the cases with generated smoke and cargo ship plumes that were freshly emitted and not yet internally mixed with the background particles. The simulation results show organic hygroscopicity causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (<0.7%) with the exception of the cargo ship plume and smoke plume which increased absolute cloud reflectivity fraction by 0

  13. Landauer's blowtorch effect as a thermodynamic cross process: Brownian cooling.

    PubMed

    Das, Moupriya; Das, Debojyoti; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    The local heating of a selected region in a double-well potential alters the relative stability of the two wells and gives rise to an enhancement of population transfer to the cold well. We show that this Landauer's blowtorch effect may be considered in the spirit of a thermodynamic cross process linearly connecting the flux of particles and the thermodynamic force associated with the temperature difference and consequently ensuring the existence of a reverse cross effect. This reverse effect is realized by directing the thermalized particles in a double-well potential by application of an external bias from one well to the other, which suffers cooling.

  14. Landauer's blowtorch effect as a thermodynamic cross process: Brownian cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Moupriya; Das, Debojyoti; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2015-11-01

    The local heating of a selected region in a double-well potential alters the relative stability of the two wells and gives rise to an enhancement of population transfer to the cold well. We show that this Landauer's blowtorch effect may be considered in the spirit of a thermodynamic cross process linearly connecting the flux of particles and the thermodynamic force associated with the temperature difference and consequently ensuring the existence of a reverse cross effect. This reverse effect is realized by directing the thermalized particles in a double-well potential by application of an external bias from one well to the other, which suffers cooling.

  15. Is prolonged and excessive cooling of a scalded wound effective?

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Urushidate, S; Yotsuyanagi, T; Ishita, K

    1997-02-01

    An experimental study was carried out using rats to evaluate the effectiveness of prolonged and excessive cooling on the burned wound just immediately after injury. The wound was produced by applying a lint immersed in boiled water at 99 degrees C. The wound produced by applying a lint for 3 s, and then immediately soaking with tap water for 1 min, resulted in little damage. However, the wound produced by applying a lint for 10 s, and immediately after an ice cube applied for 10 min, resulted in the most severe damage. The wound produced by applying a lint for 10 s, and no treatment applied thereafter, and the wound produced by applying a lint for 10 s and immediately after soaked with tap water for 1 min, resulted in moderate damage. From this experiment, it is suggested excessive and prolonged cooling of the burn wound, such as using an ice cube immediately after injury, is harmful in some instances.

  16. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-13

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for low aerosol concentration; here, [Formula: see text] is the phase-relaxation time and [Formula: see text] is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as [Formula: see text], and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  17. A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Vogelmann, Andrew M.

    2006-01-01

    The warming of Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice thickness and extent observed over recent decades are believed to result from increased direct greenhouse gas forcing, changes in atmospheric dynamics having anthropogenic origin, and important positive reinforcements including ice-albedo and cloud-radiation feedbacks. The importance of cloud-radiation interactions is being investigated through advanced instrumentation deployed in the high Arctic since 1997 (refs 7, 8). These studies have established that clouds, via the dominance of longwave radiation, exert a net warming on the Arctic climate system throughout most of the year, except briefly during the summer. The Arctic region also experiences significant periodic influxes of anthropogenic aerosols, which originate from the industrial regions in lower latitudes. Here we use multisensor radiometric data to show that enhanced aerosol concentrations alter the microphysical properties of Arctic clouds, in a process known as the `first indirect' effect. Under frequently occurring cloud types we find that this leads to an increase of an average 3.4watts per square metre in the surface longwave fluxes. This is comparable to a warming effect from established greenhouse gases and implies that the observed longwave enhancement is climatologically significant.

  18. Large-Eddy Simulations of Trade Wind Cumuli: Investigation of Aerosol Indirect Effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Huiwen; Feingold, Graham

    2006-06-01

    The effects of aerosol on warm trade cumulus clouds are investigated using a large-eddy simulation with size-resolved cloud microphysics. It is shown that, as expected, increases in aerosols cause a reduction in precipitation and an increase in the cloud-averaged liquid water path (LWP). However, for the case under study, cloud fraction, cloud size, cloud-top height, and depth decrease in response to increasing aerosol concentration, contrary to accepted hypotheses associated with the second aerosol indirect effect. It is found that the complex responses of clouds to aerosols are determined by competing effects of precipitation and droplet evaporation associated with entrainment. As aerosol concentration increases, precipitation suppression tends to maintain the clouds and lead to higher cloud LWP, whereas cloud droplets become smaller and evaporate more readily, which tends to dissipate the clouds and leads to lower cloud fraction, cloud size, and depth. An additional set of experiments with higher surface latent heat flux, and hence higher LWP and drizzle rate, was also performed. Changes in cloud properties due to aerosols have the same trends as in the base runs, although the magnitudes of the changes are larger. Evidence for significant stabilization (or destabilization) of the subcloud layer due to drizzle is not found, mainly because drizzling clouds cover only a small fraction of the domain. It is suggested that cloud fraction may only increase with increasing aerosol loading for larger clouds that are less susceptible to entrainment and evaporation. Finally, it is noted that at any given aerosol concentration the dynamical variability in bulk cloud parameters such as LWP tends to be larger than the aerosol-induced changes in these parameters, indicating that the second aerosol indirect effect may be hard to measure in this cloud type. The variability in cloud optical depth is, however, dominated by changes in aerosol, rather than dynamics.


  19. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  20. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H; Molina, Mario J

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by -2.5 and +1.3 W m(-2), respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale.

  1. Regional climate effects of aerosols on precipitation and snowpack in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Su, H.; Jiang, J. H.; Zhao, C.; Qian, Y.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Water sources in California are derived predominantly from precipitation (mostly during the winter time) and storage in the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. With California facing one of the most severe droughts on record, it is important to understand the factors influencing precipitation and snowpack for water management and hydropower operation. Recent observational and numerical modeling studies have shown that aerosol pollutants can substantially change precipitation and snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. However, previous studies focused only on one of the aerosol effects or just focus on a single event. A complete view on regional climate effects of aerosol on precipitation and snowpack in California is not delivered yet. In this study, we use a fully coupled aerosol-meteorology-snowpack model (WRF-Chem-SNICAR) to investigate aerosol impacts on regional climate in California, with a focus on precipitation and snowpack. We will evaluate the performance of the WRF-Chem-SNICAR model on simulating regional climate in California. Sensitivity experiments will be conducted to disentangle the relative roles of each aerosol effect, such as aerosol radiation interaction vs. aerosol cloud interaction and aerosol snowpack interaction, local emission vs. long-range transport etc.

  2. Time-Dependent SSC Cooling Effects on Blazar Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Michael; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Blazars are among the most violent sources in the cosmos exhibiting flaring states with remarkably different variability time scales. Especially rapid flares with flux doubling time scales of the order of minutes have been puzzling for quite some time. Many modeling attempts use the well known linear and steady-state scenario for the cooling and emission processes in the jet, albeit the obvious strongly time-dependent nature of flares. Due to the feedback of the self-produced synchrotron radiation with additional scattering by the relativistic electrons, the synchrotron-self Compton (SSC) effect is inherently time-dependent. Recently, an analytical analysis on the effects of this nonlinear behavior has been presented. Here, we summarize these results concerning the effect of the time-dependent SSC cooling on the spectral energy distribution (SED), and the synchrotron lightcurves of blazars. For that, we calculated analytically the synchrotron, SSC and external Compton (EC) component of the SED, giving remarkably different spectral features compared to the standard linear approach. The resulting fluxes strongly depend on the parameters, and SSC might have a strong effect even in sources with strong external photon fields (such as FSRQs). For the synchrotron lightcurve we considered the effects of retardation, including the geometry of the source. The retardation might smear out some effects of the time-dependent cooling, but since lightcurves and SEDs have to be fitted simultaneously with the same set of parameters, the results give nonetheless important clues about the source. Thus, we argue for a wide utilization of the time-dependent treatment in modeling (especially rapid) blazar flares, since it accounts for features in the SED and the lightcurves that are usually accounted for by introducing several breaks in the electron distribution without any physical justification.

  3. An assessment of the quality of aerosol retrievals over the Red Sea and evaluation of the climatological cloud-free dust direct radiative effect in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, H.; Osipov, S.; Bantges, R.; Smirnov, A.; Banks, J.; Levy, R.; Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.

    2015-10-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations are used in conjunction with the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) to assess climatological aerosol loading and the associated cloud-free aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over the Red Sea. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are first evaluated via comparison with ship-based observations. Correlations are typically better than 0.9 with very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of the DRE along the ship cruises using RRTM also show good agreement with colocated estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large particles. A monthly climatology of AOD over the Red Sea is then created from 5 years of SEVIRI retrievals. This shows enhanced aerosol loading and a distinct north to south gradient across the basin in the summer relative to the winter months. The climatology is used with RRTM to estimate the DRE at the top and bottom of the atmosphere and the atmospheric absorption due to dust aerosol. These climatological estimates indicate that although longwave effects can reach tens of W m-2, shortwave cooling typically dominates the net radiative effect over the Sea, being particularly pronounced in the summer, reaching 120 W m-2 at the surface. The spatial gradient in summertime AOD is reflected in the radiative effect at the surface and in associated differential heating by aerosol within the atmosphere above the Sea. This asymmetric effect is expected to exert a significant influence on the regional atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

  4. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies. PMID:27350423

  5. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies.

  6. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Jathar, Shantanu H; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L

    2016-06-28

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies.

  7. Exploring the Longwave Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, Richard A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Dust aerosols not only affect air quality and visibility where they pose a significant health and safety risk, but they can also play a role in modulating the energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by directly interacting with local radiative fields. Consequently, dust aerosols can impact regional climate patterns such as changes in precipitation and the evolution of the hydrological cycle. Assessing the direct effect of dust aerosols at the solar wavelengths is fairly straightforward due in part to the relatively large signal-to-noise ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impacts, on the other hand, are rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (10 Wm-2) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Moreover, compared to the shortwave (SW), limited experimental data on the LW optical properties of dust makes it a difficult challenge for constraining the LW impacts. Owing to the strong absorption features found in many terrestrial minerals (e.g., silicates and clays), the LW effects, although much smaller in magnitude compared to the SW, can still have a sizeable impact on the energetics of the Earth-atmosphere system, which can potentially trigger changes in the heat and moisture surface budgets, and dynamics of the atmosphere. The current endeavor is an integral part of an on-going research study to perform detailed assessments of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) using comprehensive global datasets from NASA Goddards mobile ground-based facility (cf. http://smartlabs.gsfc.nasa.gov/) during previous field experiments near key dust source regions. Here we examine and compare the results from two of these studies: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal Island (16.73N, 22.93W), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye China (39

  8. Detailed Aerosol Characterization using Polarimetric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasekamp, Otto; di Noia, Antonio; Stap, Arjen; Rietjens, Jeroen; Smit, Martijn; van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are believed to cause the second most important anthropogenic forcing of climate change after greenhouse gases. In contrast to the climate effect of greenhouse gases, which is understood relatively well, the negative forcing (cooling effect) caused by aerosols represents the largest reported uncertainty in the most recent assessment of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To reduce the large uncertainty on the aerosol effects on cloud formation and climate, accurate satellite measurements of aerosol optical properties (optical thickness, single scattering albedo, phase function) and microphysical properties (size distribution, refractive index, shape) are essential. There is growing consensus in the aerosol remote sensing community that multi-angle measurements of intensity and polarization are essential to unambiguously determine all relevant aerosol properties. This presentations adresses the different aspects of polarimetric remote sensing of atmospheric aerosols, including retrieval algorithm development, validation, and data needs for climate and air quality applications. During past years, at SRON-Netherlands Instite for Space Research retrieval algorithms have been developed that make full use of the capabilities of polarimetric measurements. We will show results of detailed aerosol properties from ground-based- (groundSPEX), airborne- (NASA Research Scanning Polarimeter), and satellite (POLDER) measurements. Also we will discuss observational needs for future instrumentation in order to improve our understanding of the role of aerosols in climate change and air quality.

  9. Have tropospheric aerosol emissions contributed to the recent climate hiatus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Thomas; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Laakso, Anton; Lu, Zifeng; Bergman, Tommi; Mikkonen, Santtu; Kokkola, Harri; Korhonen, Hannele; Räisänen, Petri; Streets, David G.; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Laaksonen, Ari

    2014-05-01

    During the last 15 years global warming has slowed considerably, with the resulting plateau in global temperature records being dubbed the climate hiatus. Apart from variations in solar irradiance and ocean temperature, increased anthropogenic aerosol emissions in South and East Asia have been suggested as possible causes for this hiatus. While European and and North American aerosol emissions have constantly decreased since the 1980's, emissions in China and India have started increasing at the same time and, although total global aerosol emissions have decreased, aerosol effects on the global energy budget are expected to enhance towards the equator due to stronger irradiance there. In this study we used the aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM2 to assess the effect that this re-distribution of anthropogenic aerosol emissions towards the equator may have on climate. To this end, we computed radiative forcing and equilibrium temperature response due to the change in global aerosol emissions (black carbon (BC), organic carbon and sulphur dioxide) between 1996 and 2010, keeping all other anthropogenic influences fixed. Surprisingly we found that the cooling due the increased aerosol emissions in China and India is almost negligible compared to the warming caused by the decreasing aerosol emissions in Europe and North America. The radiative flux perturbation (RFP; includes aerosol indirect effects) was 0.42 W/m2 and the change in global equilibrium 2 m temperature increased by 0.25 °C. The lack of cooling in China and India stems from a cancellation of sulfate cooling and BC warming, especially over China. There, the strong cloud cover leads to both attenuation of sulphate aerosol light scattering and saturation tendency of indirect aerosol effects on clouds. BC levels on the other hand increase also above the clouds (relative increase of BC levels is almost uniform with height), leading to warming through light absorption.

  10. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effect of Rapid Thermal Cooling on Mechanical Rock Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Kemeny, John; Nickerson, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Laboratory tests have been conducted to investigate the effects of rapid thermal cooling on various rock specimens including igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. At first, various types of thermal loading were conducted: heating up to 100, 200, and 300 °C, followed by rapid cooling with a fan. In addition, multiple cyclic thermal cooling (10, 15 and 20 cycles) with a maximum temperature of only 100 °C was conducted. Experiments included edge notched disc (END) tests to determine the Mode I fracture toughness, Brazilian disc tests to determine tensile strength, seismic tests to determine P-wave velocity, and porosity tests leading to meaningful results. Even though only small changes of temperature (rapid cooling from 100 °C to room temperature) were applied, the results showed that crack growth occurred in some rock types (granite, diabase with ore veins, and KVS) while crack healing occurred in other rock types (diabase without ore veins, quartzite, and skarn). To better understand the results, 3D transient thermo-mechanical analysis was conducted using the ANSYS program. The results indicated that there was a thin region near the outside of the specimen where large tensile stresses occur and microcracking would be expected, and that there was a large area in the middle of the specimen where lower magnitude compressive stresses occur and crack closure would be expected. It was found that the more heterogeneous and more coarse-grained rock types are more likely to exhibit crack growth, while less heterogeneous and more fine-grained rocks are more likely to exhibit crack healing.

  12. Radiative impact of aerosols generated from biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1995-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles play a vital role in the Earth's radiative energy budget. They exert a net cooling influence on climate by directly reflecting the solar radiation to space and by modifying the shortwave reflective properties of clouds. Each year, increasing amounts of aerosol particles are released into the atmosphere due to biomass burning, dust storms, forest fires, and volcanic activity. These particles significantly perturb the radiative balance on local, regional, and global scales. While the detection of aerosols over water is a well established procedure, the detection of aerosols over land is often difficult due to the poor contrast between the aerosols and the underlying terrain. In this study, we use textural measures in order to detect aerosols generated from biomass burning over South America, using AVHRR data. The regional radiative effects are then examined using ERBE data. Preliminary results show that the net radiative forcing of aerosols is about -36 W/sq m.

  13. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  14. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  15. Leading edge film cooling effects on turbine blade heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Vijay K.; Gaugler, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    An existing three dimensional Navier-Stokes code, modified to include film cooling considerations, has been used to study the effect of spanwise pitch of shower-head holes and coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio on the adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient on a film-cooled turbine vane. The mainstream is akin to that under real engine conditions with stagnation temperature = 1900 K and stagnation pressure = 3 MPa. It is found that with the coolant to mainstream mass flow ratio fixed, reducing P, the spanwise pitch for shower-head holes, from 7.5 d to 3.0 d, where d is the hole diameter, increases the average effectiveness considerably over the blade surface. However, when P/d= 7.5, increasing the coolant mass flow increases the effectiveness on the pressure surface but reduces it on the suction surface due to coolant jet lift-off. For P/d = 4.5 or 3.0, such an anomaly does not occur within the range of coolant to mainstream mass flow ratios analyzed. In all cases, adiabatic effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are highly three-dimensional.

  16. Effects of aerosols on clear-sky solar radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Emily; Toll, Velle; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Rontu, Laura; Masek, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols under clear-sky conditions in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement InterNational - High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN-HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments: the Integrated Forecast System (IFS), acraneb2 and the hlradia radiation schemes. The multi-band IFS scheme was formerly used operationally by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) whereas hlradia and acraneb2 are broadband schemes. The former is a new version of the HIRLAM radiation scheme while acraneb2 is the radiation scheme in the ALARO-1 physics package. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) system regarding aerosols and to prepare it for use of real-time aerosol information. The experiments were run with particular focus on the August 2010 Russian wildfire case. Each of the three radiation schemes accurately (within ±4 % at midday) simulates the direct shortwave aerosol effect when observed aerosol optical properties are used. When the aerosols were excluded from the simulations, errors of more than +15 % in global shortwave irradiance were found at midday, with the error reduced to +10 % when standard climatological aerosols were used. An error of -11 % was seen at midday if only observed aerosol optical depths at 550 nm, and not observation-based spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors, were included in the simulations. This demonstrates the importance of using the correct aerosol optical properties. The dependency of the direct radiative effect of aerosols on relative humidity was tested and shown to be within ±6 % in this case. By modifying the assumptions about the shape of the IFS climatological vertical aerosol profile, the inherent uncertainties associated with assuming fixed vertical

  17. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g., formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low and high NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after 4 days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to 8 days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields, i.e., ~15 % (low NOx) to ~45 % (high NOx) for α-pinene, ~15 % for toluene, ~25 % for C12 n-alkane, and ~10 % for C16 n-alkane. The small effect of gas-phase photolysis on low-volatility n-alkanes such as C16 n-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase, where they are protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass is increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an empirically estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA

  18. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g. formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low- and high-NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after four days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to eight days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields i.e ~15% (low-NOx) to ~45% (high-NOx) for α-pinene, ~15% for toluene, ~25% for C12-alkane, and ~10% for C16-alkane. The small effect on low volatility n-alkanes such as C16-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase where they are assumed to be protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass seems increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas-phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA=4 x 10-4JNO2. Modeling

  19. The effect of aerosols on the earth-atmosphere albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B. M.; Browning, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents calculations of the change in reflected flux by the earth-atmosphere system in response to increases in the atmospheric aerosol loading for a range of complex indices of refraction, solar elevation angle and ground albedo. Results show that, for small values of ground albedo, the reflected solar flux may either increase or decrease with increasing aerosol loadings, depending upon the complex part of the index of refraction of the aerosols. For high ground albedos, an increase in aerosol levels always results in a decrease of reflected flux (i.e., a warming of the earth-atmosphere system).

  20. The Invigoration of Deep Convective Clouds Over the Atlantic: Aerosol Effect, Meteorology or Retrieval Artifact?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    Associations between cloud properties and aerosol loading are frequently observed in products derived from satellite measurements. These observed trends between clouds and aerosol optical depth suggest aerosol modification of cloud dynamics, yet there are uncertainties involved in satellite retrievals that have the potential to lead to incorrect conclusions. Two of the most challenging problems are addressed here: the potential for retrieved aerosol optical depth to be cloud-contaminated, and as a result, artificially correlated with cloud parameters; and the potential for correlations between aerosol and cloud parameters to be erroneously considered to be causal. Here these issues are tackled directly by studying the effects of the aerosol on convective clouds in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite remote sensing, a chemical transport model, and a reanalysis of meteorological fields. Results show that there is a robust positive correlation between cloud fraction or cloud top height and the aerosol optical depth, regardless of whether a stringent filtering of aerosol measurements in the vicinity of clouds is applied, or not. These same positive correlations emerge when replacing the observed aerosol field with that derived from a chemical transport model. Model-reanalysis data is used to address the causality question by providing meteorological context for the satellite observations. A correlation exercise between the full suite of meteorological fields derived from model reanalysis and satellite-derived cloud fields shows that observed cloud top height and cloud fraction correlate best with model pressure updraft velocity and relative humidity. Observed aerosol optical depth does correlate with meteorological parameters but usually different parameters from those that correlate with observed cloud fields. The result is a near-orthogonal influence of aerosol and meteorological fields on cloud top height and cloud fraction. The results strengthen the case

  1. Effect of environmental factors on aerosol-induced Lassa virus infection.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, E H; Larson, E W; Dominik, J W

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that the most frequent means of transmission of Lassa virus was by either direct or indirect contact with infectious material. Aerosol stability and respiratory infectivity of the Josiah strain of Lassa virus were assessed to determine the effect of environmental factors on aerosol-induced infection. The stability of the virus in aerosol, particularly at low relative humidity (30% RH), plus the ability of the virus to infect guinea pigs and monkeys via the respiratory route emphasize the potential for aerosol transmission of Lassa virus. Biological half-lives at both 24 and 32 degrees C ranged from 10.1 to 54.6 min, and were sufficient for aerosol dispersion of virus to considerable distances in natural situations. Infectivity of Lassa virus in small particle aerosol was demonstrated in outbred guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys using dynamic aerosol equipment. Monkeys exposed to inhaled doses to 465 PFU were infected and died. The median infectious dose (ID50) for guinea pigs was 15 PFU, yet a definitive median lethal aerosol dose (LD50) could not be established. Organ tropism of aerosol-induced Lassa virus infections in outbred guinea pigs was similar to that previously reported for inbred guinea pigs infected by subcutaneous inoculation.

  2. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  3. Cryogenetically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  4. A chip scale electrocaloric effect based cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Haiming; Qian, Xiaoshi; Li, Xinyu; Craven, Brent; Zhu, Wenyi; Cheng, Ailan; Yao, S. C.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2013-03-01

    The recent finding of large electrocaloric effect in several ferroelectric polymers creates unique opportunity for developing compact size solid state cooling cycles beyond the traditional mechanical vapor compression cycles. Here, we show that, by employing regeneration process with solid state regenerators, a chip scale Electrocaloric Oscillatory Refrigeration (ECOR) can be realized. A prototype ECOR is fabricated and characterized. More than 6 K temperature span is obtained near room temperature between the hot and cold sides of a 2 cm long device. Finite volume simulation validates the test results and shows the potential high performance of the ECOR.

  5. Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), g1-aircraft, sedlacek sp2

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sedlacek, Art

    2011-08-30

    The primary objective of the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume.

  6. A modeling study of the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Xiaoning; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Changhai; Gettelman, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (version 3.5) coupled with the Morrison-Gettelman two-moment cloud microphysics scheme is employed to simulate the aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation in two numerical experiments, one representing present-day conditions (year 2000) and the other the pre-industrial conditions (year 1750) over East Asia by considering both direct and indirect aerosol effects. To isolate the aerosol effects, we used the same set of boundary conditions and only altered the aerosol emissions in both experiments. The simulated results show that the cloud microphysical properties are markedly affected by the increase in aerosols, especially for the column cloud droplet number concentration (DNC), liquid water path (LWP), and the cloud droplet effective radius (DER). With increased aerosols, DNC and LWP have been increased by 137% and 28%, respectively, while DER is reduced by 20%. Precipitation rates in East Asia and East China are reduced by 5.8% and 13%, respectively, by both the aerosol's second indirect effect and the radiative forcing that enhanced atmospheric stability associated with the aerosol direct and first indirect effects. The significant reduction in summer precipitation in East Asia is also consistent with the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon, resulting from the decreasing thermodynamic contrast between the Asian landmass and the surrounding oceans induced by the aerosol's radiative effects. The increase in aerosols reduces the surface net shortwave radiative flux over the East Asia landmass, which leads to the reduction of the land surface temperature. With minimal changes in the sea surface temperature, hence, the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon further enhances the reduction of summer precipitation over East Asia.

  7. Electrically heated tube investigation of cooling channel geometry effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation on the combined effects of cooling channel aspect ratio and curvature for rocket engines are presented. Symmetrically heated tubes with average heat fluxes up to 1.7 MW/m(exp 2) were used. The coolant was gaseous nitrogen at an inlet temperature of 280 K (500 R) and inlet pressures up to 1.0 x 10(exp 7) N/m(exp 2) (1500 psia). Two different tube geometries were tested: a straight, circular cross-section tube, and an aspect-ratio 10 cross-section tube with a 45 deg bend. The circular tube results are compared to classical models from the literature as validation of the system. The curvature effect data from the curved aspect-ratio 10 tube compare favorably to the empirical equations available in the literature for low aspect ratio tubes. This latter results suggest that thermal stratification of the coolant due to diminished curvature effect mixing may not be an issue for high aspect-ratio cooling channels.

  8. Icehouse Effect: A Polar Autumn and Winter Cooling Trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetzel, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    The icehouse effect is a hypothesized polar climate trend toward cooling (or lack of warming) in response to greenhouse warming of adjacent lower latitudes. When greenhouse warmed air from lower latitudes moves over ice and snow, it generates a stronger, more stable, cappino, inversion than in a parallel case without greenhouse warming. Because the degree of decoupling between vertically adjacent air masses is directly dependent on the strength of the inversion, the capping inversion acts somewhat analogously to the walls and roof of the icehouse of generations past. What is inside the icehouse, namely the cold polar atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) air, is preserved by the "insulation" or decoupling, provided by the warm air aloft. Observations over the Arctic Ocean have shown an unexpected lack of any detectable surface warming trend over the past 40 years. This finding strongly contradicts climate model predictions that polar regions should show the strongest effect of greenhouse warming. It also stands in contrast to the consensus reached by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), that human caused greenhouse warming is now detectable globally. One might ask: Are these Arctic observations wrong? Or, if right, is there a plausible physical explanation for them? The published observations mentioned above used about 50,000 soundings over the Arctic Ocean. Here I present a novel analysis of ALL available Arctic rawinsonde data north of 65N--a total of more than 1.1 million soundings. The analysis confirms the previously published result: There is indeed a slight climate-cooling trend in the vast majority of the data. Importantly, there are also select conditions (very strong and very weak stability of the ABL) which show a consistent, strong Arctic warming trend. It is the juxtaposition of these warming and cooling trends which defines a unique "icehouse signature" for which an explanation can be sought.

  9. A new approach to modeling aerosol effects on East Asian climate: Parametric uncertainties associated with emissions, cloud microphysics, and their interactions: AEROSOL EFFECTS ON EAST ASIAN CLIMATE

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiping; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Minghuai; Yang, Ben; Liu, Xiaohong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-09

    In this study, we adopt a parametric sensitivity analysis framework that integrates the quasi-Monte Carlo parameter sampling approach and a surrogate model to examine aerosol effects on the East Asian Monsoon climate simulated in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5). A total number of 256 CAM5 simulations are conducted to quantify the model responses to the uncertain parameters associated with cloud microphysics parameterizations and aerosol (e.g., sulfate, black carbon (BC), and dust) emission factors and their interactions. Results show that the interaction terms among parameters are important for quantifying the sensitivity of fields of interest, especially precipitation, to the parameters. The relative importance of cloud-microphysics parameters and emission factors (strength) depends on evaluation metrics or the model fields we focused on, and the presence of uncertainty in cloud microphysics imposes an additional challenge in quantifying the impact of aerosols on cloud and climate. Due to their different optical and microphysical properties and spatial distributions, sulfate, BC, and dust aerosols have very different impacts on East Asian Monsoon through aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions. The climatic effects of aerosol do not always have a monotonic response to the change of emission factors. The spatial patterns of both sign and magnitude of aerosol-induced changes in radiative fluxes, cloud, and precipitation could be different, depending on the aerosol types, when parameters are sampled in different ranges of values. We also identify the different cloud microphysical parameters that show the most significant impact on climatic effect induced by sulfate, BC and dust, respectively, in East Asia.

  10. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol–climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by −2.5 and +1.3 W m−2, respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors’ knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale. PMID:24733923

  11. Bio-aerosols in indoor environment: composition, health effects and analysis.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Padma; Sudharsanam, Suchithra; Steinberg, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Bio-aerosols are airborne particles that are living (bacteria, viruses and fungi) or originate from living organisms. Their presence in air is the result of dispersal from a site of colonization or growth. The health effects of bio-aerosols including infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, allergies and cancer coupled with the threat of bioterrorism and SARS have led to increased awareness on the importance of bio-aerosols. The evaluation of bio-aerosols includes use of variety of methods for sampling depending on the concentration of microorganisms expected. There have been problems in developing standard sampling methods, in proving a causal relationship and in establishing threshold limit values for exposures due to the complexity of composition of bio-aerosols, variations in human response to their exposure and difficulties in recovering microorganisms. Currently bio-aerosol monitoring in hospitals is carried out for epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infectious diseases, research into airborne microorganism spread and control, monitoring biohazardous procedures and use as a quality control measure. In India there is little awareness regarding the quality of indoor air, mould contamination in indoor environments, potential source for transmission of nosocomial infections in health care facilities. There is an urgent need to undertake study of indoor air, to generate baseline data and explore the link to nosocomial infections. This article is a review on composition, sources, modes of transmission, health effects and sampling methods used for evaluation of bio-aerosols, and also suggests control measures to reduce the loads of bio-aerosols.

  12. The effect of wake passing on turbine blade film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidmann, James David

    The effect of upstream blade row wake passing on the showerhead film cooling performance of a downstream turbine blade has been investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies. The experiments were performed in a steady-flow annular turbine cascade facility equipped with an upstream rotating row of cylindrical rods to produce a periodic wake field similar to that found in an actual turbine. Spanwise, chordwise, and temporal resolution of the blade surface temperature were achieved through the use of an array of nickel thin-film surface gauges covering one unit cell of showerhead film hole pattern. Film effectiveness and Nusselt number values were determined for a test matrix of various injectants, injectant blowing ratios, and wake Strouhal numbers. Results indicated a demonstrable reduction in film effectiveness with increasing Strouhal number, as well as the expected increase in film effectiveness with blowing ratio. An equation was developed to correlate the span-average film effectiveness data. The primary effect of wake unsteadiness was found to be correlated well by a chordwise-constant decrement of 0.094*St. Measurable spanwise film effectiveness variations were found near the showerhead region, but meaningful unsteady variations and downstream spanwise variations were not found. Nusselt numbers were less sensitive to wake and injection changes. Computations were performed using a three-dimensional turbulent Navier-Stokes code which was modified to model wake passing and film cooling. Unsteady computations were found to agree well with steady computations provided the proper time-average blowing ratio and pressure/suction surface flow split are matched. The remaining differences were isolated to be due to the enhanced mixing in the unsteady solution caused by the wake sweeping normally on the pressure surface. Steady computations were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental Nusselt numbers, but to overpredict

  13. The Effect of Wake Passing on Turbine Blade Film Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James David

    1996-01-01

    The effect of upstream blade row wake passing on the showerhead film cooling performance of a downstream turbine blade has been investigated through a combination of experimental and computational studies. The experiments were performed in a steady-flow annular turbine cascade facility equipped with an upstream rotating row of cylindrical rods to produce a periodic wake field similar to that found in an actual turbine. Spanwise, chordwise, and temporal resolution of the blade surface temperature were achieved through the use of an array of nickel thin-film surface gauges covering one unit cell of showerhead film hole pattern. Film effectiveness and Nusselt number values were determined for a test matrix of various injectants, injectant blowing ratios, and wake Strouhal numbers. Results indicated a demonstratable reduction in film effectiveness with increasing Strouhal number, as well as the expected increase in film effectiveness with blowing ratio. An equation was developed to correlate the span-average film effectiveness data. The primary effect of wake unsteadiness was found to be correlated well by a chordwise-constant decrement of 0.094-St. Measurable spanwise film effectiveness variations were found near the showerhead region, but meaningful unsteady variations and downstream spanwise variations were not found. Nusselt numbers were less sensitive to wake and injection changes. Computations were performed using a three-dimensional turbulent Navier-Stokes code which was modified to model wake passing and film cooling. Unsteady computations were found to agree well with steady computations provided the proper time-average blowing ratio and pressure/suction surface flow split are matched. The remaining differences were isolated to be due to the enhanced mixing in the unsteady solution caused by the wake sweeping normally on the pressure surface. Steady computations were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental Nusselt numbers, but to overpredict

  14. On the use of satellite remote sensing to determine aerosol direct radiative effect over land: A case study over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, Anu-Maija; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of aerosol radiative effects is complex and large uncertainties still exist, mainly due to the high spatial and temporal variation of the aerosol concentration and mass as well as their relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere. In this work a multi-sensor satellite based approach is studied for defining the direct short wave aerosol radiative effect (ADRE) over China. ADRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is defined as the difference between the net solar flux with (F ) and without (F0) aerosols. The negative values of ADRE correspond to increased outgoing radiation and planetary cooling, whereas positive values correspond to decreased outgoing radiation at TOA and increased atmospheric warming. To derive instantaneous ADRE from the satellite observations, the challenge is to estimate the value for F0. In this work F0 is derived using the colocated observations of CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radian Energy System) short wave broad band TOA-flux for cloud free sky and MODIS (Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Assuming that aerosol type does not change systematically within a 0.5 deg. grid cell over a month, a linear relationship is established between the clear-sky TOA-fluxes and AODs. Using the linear regression an estimate for instantaneous monthly F0 can be obtained by extrapolating the line to AOD=0, while F is the monthly mean of cloud free CERES observations. However, there are several other parameters affecting the observed TOA flux than the aerosol loading and aerosol type, such as solar zenith angle, water vapour, land surface albedo and Earth-Sun distance. Changes in these parameters within a grid cell over a month inflect the correlation between AOD and TOA fluxes. To minimize the effect of zenith angle, water vapour, and Earth-Sun distance the CERES fluxes are normalized before the linear fitting using reference fluxes calculated with a radiative transfer code (Libradtran). The normalization

  15. Climate Engineering with Stratospheric Aerosols and Associated Engineering Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    2013-02-12

    Climate engineering with stratospheric aerosols, an idea inspired by large volcaniceruptions, could cool the Earth’s surface and thus alleviate some of the predicted dangerous impacts of anthropogenic climate change. However, the effectiveness of climate engineering to achieve a particular climate goal, and any associated side effects, depend on certain aerosol parameters and how the aerosols are deployed in the stratosphere. Through the examples of sulfate and black carbon aerosols, this paper examines "engineering" parameters-aerosol composition, aerosol size, and spatial and temporal variations in deployment-for stratospheric climate engineering. The effects of climate engineering are sensitive to these parameters, suggesting that a particle could be found ordesigned to achieve specific desired climate outcomes. This prospect opens the possibility for discussion of societal goals for climate engineering.

  16. The effect of ozone and aerosols on the surface erythemal UV radiation estimated from OMI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Deok Rae; Kim, Seung-Yeon; Song, Chang-Keun; Hong, Jun Suk; Hong, Youdeog; Lee, Sukjo

    2013-05-01

    Surface erythemal UV radiation is mainly affected by total column ozone, aerosols, clouds, and solar zenith angle. The effect of ozone on the surface UV radiation has been explored many times in the previous studies due to the decrease of ozone layer. In this study, we calculated the effect of aerosols on the surface UV radiation as well as that of ozone using data acquired from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). First, ozone, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and surface erythemal UVB radiation measured from satellite are compared with those from ground measurements. The results showed that the comparison for ozone was good with r 2 of 0.92. For aerosol, there was difference between satellite measurements and surface measurements due to the insufficient information on aerosol in the retrieval algorithm. The r 2 for surface erythemal UV radiation was high (˜0.94) but satellite measurements showed about 30% larger values than surface measurements on average by not considering the effect of absorbing aerosols in the retrieval process from satellite measurements. Radiative amplification factor (RAF) is used to access the effect of ozone and aerosol quantitatively. RAF for ozone was 0.97˜1.49 with solar zenith angle. To evaluate the effect of aerosol on the surface UV radiation, only clear-sky pixel data were used and solar zenith angle and total column amount of ozone were fixed. Also, RAF for aerosol was assessed according to the single scattering albedo (SSA) of aerosols. The results showed that RAF for aerosol with smaller SSA (< 0.90) was larger than that for with larger SSA (> 0.90). The RAF for aerosol was 0.09˜0.22 for the given conditions which was relatively small compared to that for ozone. However, considering the fact that aerosol optical depth can change largely in time and space while the total column amount of ozone does not change very much, it needs to include the effect of aerosol to predict the variations of surface UV radiation more correctly.

  17. Effects of ozone and aerosol on surface UV radiation variability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jhoon; Cho, Hi-Ku; Mok, Jungbin; Yoo, Hee Dong; Cho, Nayeong

    2013-02-05

    Global (direct+diffuse) spectral ultraviolet (UV, 290-363nm) and total ozone measurements made on the roof of the Main Science Building, Yonsei University at Seoul (37.57°, 128.98°E) were analyzed to quantify the effects of ozone and aerosol on the variability of surface erythemal UV (EUV) irradiance. The measurements have been made with a Brewer Spectrophotometer MKIV (SCI-TEC#148) and a Dobson Ozone Spectrophotometer (Beck#123), respectively, during 2004-2008. The overall mean radiation amplification factor, RAF(AOD, SZA) [23,24] due to total ozone (O(3)) (hereafter O(3) RAF) shows that 1% decrease in total ozone results in an increase of 1.18±0.02% in the EUV irradiance with the range of 0.67-1.74% depending on solar zenith angles (SZAs) (40-70°) and on aerosol optical depths (AODs) (<4.0), under both clear (cloud cover<25%) and all sky conditions. For the mean AOD, the O(3) RAFs(SZA) for both sky conditions increased as SZA increased from 40° to 60°, and then decreased for higher SZA 70°, where the patterns are consistent with results of the previous studies [2,10]. A similar analysis of the RAF(O(3), SZA) due to AOD (hereafter AOD RAF) under clear and all-sky conditions shows that on average, a 1% increase in AOD forces a decrease of 0.29±0.06% in the EUV irradiance with the maximum range 0.18-0.63% depending on SZAs and O(3). Thus, overall sensitivity of UV to ozone (O(3), RAF) was estimated to be about four times higher than to the aerosol (AOD RAF). At the mean O(3), the AOD RAFs(SZA) for both skies appears to be almost independent of SZAs. It is shown that the O(3) RAFs are nearly independent of the sky conditions, whereas the AOD RAFs depend distinctly on the sky conditions with the larger values for all skies. Under cloud free conditions, the overall mean ratio for measured-to-modeled O(3), RAF(AOD, SZA) is 1.13, whereas the ratio for AOD RAF(O(3), SZA) shows 0.82 in the EUV irradiance. Overall, the RAF measurements are corroborated by radiative

  18. A case study of the radiative effect of aerosols over Europe: EUCAARI-LONGREX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Anna R.; Highwood, Eleanor J.; Ryder, Claire L.

    2016-06-01

    The radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols over Europe during the 2008 European Integrated Project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions Long Range Experiment (EUCAARI-LONGREX) campaign has been calculated using measurements collected by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft and radiative transfer modelling. The aircraft sampled anthropogenically perturbed air masses across north-western Europe under anticyclonic conditions with aerosol optical depths ranging from 0.047 to 0.357. For one specially designed "radiative closure" flight, simulated irradiances have been compared to radiation measurements for a case of aged European aerosol in order to explore the validity of model assumptions and the degree of radiative closure that can be attained given the spatial and temporal variability of the observations and their measurement uncertainties. Secondly, the diurnally averaged aerosol radiative effect throughout EUCAARI-LONGREX has been calculated. The surface radiative effect ranged between -3.9 and -22.8 W m-2 (mean -11 ± 5 W m-2), whilst top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) values were between -2.1 and -12.0 W m-2 (mean -5 ± 3 W m-2). We have quantified the uncertainties in our calculations due to the way in which aerosols and other parameters are represented in a radiative transfer model. The largest uncertainty in the aerosol radiative effect at both the surface and the TOA comes from the spectral resolution of the information used in the radiative transfer model (˜ 17 %) and the aerosol description (composition and size distribution) used in the Mie calculations of the aerosol optical properties included in the radiative transfer model (˜ 7 %). The aerosol radiative effect at the TOA is also highly sensitive to the surface albedo (˜ 12 %).

  19. A six year satellite-based assessment of the regional variations in aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T. A.; Christopher, S. A.; Quaas, J.

    2009-06-01

    Aerosols act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) for cloud water droplets, and changes in aerosol concentrations have significant microphysical impacts on the corresponding cloud properties. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol and cloud properties are combined with NCEP Reanalysis data for six different regions around the globe between March 2000 and December 2005 to study the effects of different aerosol, cloud, and atmospheric conditions on the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). Emphasis is placed in examining the relative importance of aerosol concentration, type, and atmospheric conditions (mainly vertical motion) to AIE from region to region. Results show that in most regions, AIE has a distinct seasonal cycle, though the cycle varies in significance and period from region to region. In the Arabian Sea (AS), the six-year mean anthropogenic + dust AIE is -0.27 Wm-2 and is greatest during the summer months (<-2.0 Wm-2) during which aerosol concentrations (from both dust and anthropogenic sources) are greatest. Comparing AIE as a function of thin (LWP<20 gm-2) vs. thick (LWP≥20 gm-2) clouds under conditions of large scale ascent or decent at 850 hPa showed that AIE is greatest for thick clouds during periods of upward vertical motion. In the Bay of Bengal, AIE is negligible owing to less favorable atmospheric conditions, a lower concentration of aerosols, and a non-alignment of aerosol and cloud layers. In the eastern North Atlantic, AIE is weakly positive (+0.1 Wm-2) with dust aerosol concentration being much greater than the anthropogenic or sea salt components. However, elevated dust in this region exists above the maritime cloud layers and does not have a hygroscopic coating, which occurs in AS, preventing the dust from acting as CCN and limiting AIE. The Western Atlantic has a large anthropogenic aerosol concentration transported from the eastern United States producing a modest anthropogenic AIE (-0.46 Wm-2). Anthropogenic AIE is also

  20. The Effect of Asian Dust Aerosols on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing from MODIS and CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Wang, Tianhe; Yi, Yuhong; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust storms on cloud properties and radiative forcing are analyzed over northwestern China from April 2001 to June 2004 using data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites. On average, ice cloud effective particle diameter, optical depth and ice water path of the cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions are 11%, 32.8%, and 42% less, respectively, than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments. The humidity differences are larger in the dusty region than in the dust-free region, and may be caused by removal of moisture by wet dust precipitation. Due to changes in cloud microphysics, the instantaneous net radiative forcing is reduced from -71.2 W/m2 for dust contaminated clouds to -182.7 W/m2 for dust-free clouds. The reduced cooling effects of dusts may lead to a net warming of 1 W/m2, which, if confirmed, would be the strongest aerosol forcing during later winter and early spring dust storm seasons over the studied region.

  1. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  2. Study of aerosol effect on accelerated snow melting over the Tibetan Plateau during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo-Seop; Bhawar, Rohini L.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Sang, Jeong

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, a coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate model (CSIRO-Mk3.6) is used to investigate the role of aerosol forcing agents as drivers of snow melting trends in the Tibetan Plateau (TP) region. Anthropogenic aerosol-induced snow cover changes in a warming climate are calculated from the difference between historical run (HIST) and all forcing except anthropogenic aerosol (NoAA). Absorbing aerosols can influence snow cover by warming the atmosphere, reducing snow reflectance after deposition. The warming the rate of snow melt, exposing darker surfaces below to short-wave radiation sooner, and allowing them to heat up even faster in the Himalayas and TP. The results show a strong spring snow cover decrease over TP when absorbing anthropogenic aerosol forcing is considered, whereas snow cover fraction (SCF) trends in NoAA are weakly negative (but insignificant) during 1951-2005. The enhanced spring snow cover trends in HIST are due to overall effects of different forcing agents: When aerosol forcing (AERO) is considered, a significant reduction of SCF than average can be found over the western TP and Himalayas. The large decreasing trends in SCF over the TP, with the maximum reduction of SCF around 12-15% over the western TP and Himalayas slope. Also accelerated snow melting during spring is due to effects of aerosol on snow albedo, where aerosol deposition cause decreases snow albedo. However, the SCF change in the “NoAA” simulations was observed to be less.

  3. Modelling of experimentally created partial-thickness human skin burns and subsequent therapeutic cooling: a new measure for cooling effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Van de Sompel, Dominique; Kong, Tze Yean; Ventikos, Yiannis

    2009-07-01

    Rapid post-injury cooling of a skin burn has been shown to have both symptomatic and therapeutic benefits. However, the latter cannot be explained by temperature reduction alone, and must thus be secondary to an altered biological response. In this study, we construct a computational model to calculate the heat transfer and damage accumulation in human skin during and after a burn. This enables us to assess the effectiveness of various cooling protocols (involving both free and forced convection to air and water respectively) in terms of their reduction in Arrhenius tissue damage. In this process, we propose an extension of the Arrhenius damage model in the form of a new measure xi, which estimates the relevance of post-burn accrued damage. It was found that the reduction in Arrhenius damage integrals near the skin surface was too small to be physiologically relevant. Hence our results confirm that while the reduction in tissue temperatures is indeed quicker, the therapeutic benefit of cooling cannot be explained by thermal arguments (i.e. based on Arrhenius damage models) alone. We plan to validate this hypothesis by conducting future microarray analyses of differential gene expression in cooled and non-cooled burn lesions. Our computational model will support such experiments by calculating the necessary conditions to produce a burn of specified severity for a given experimental setup.

  4. A Case Study of Urbanization Impact on Summer Precipitation in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area. Urban Heat Island Versus Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Xiuqun

    2015-10-23

    Convection-resolving ensemble simulations using the WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model (UCM) are conducted to investigate the individual and combined impacts of land use and anthropogenic pollutant emissions from urbanization on a heavy rainfall event in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area (GBMA) in China. The simulation with the urbanization effect included generally captures the spatial pattern and temporal variation of the rainfall event. An improvement of precipitation is found in the experiment including aerosol effect on both clouds and radiation. The expanded urban land cover and increased aerosols have an opposite effect on precipitation processes, with the latter playing a more dominant role, leading to suppressed convection and rainfall over the upstream (northwest) area, and enhanced convection and more precipitation in the downstream (southeast) region of the GBMA. In addition, the influence of aerosol indirect effect is found to overwhelm that of direct effect on precipitation in this rainfall event. Increased aerosols induce more cloud droplets with smaller size, which favors evaporative cooling and reduce updrafts and suppress convection over the upstream (northwest) region in the early stage of the rainfall event. As the rainfall system propagates southeastward, more latent heat is released due to the freezing of larger number of smaller cloud drops that are lofted above the freezing level, which is responsible for the increased updraft strength and convective invigoration over the downstream (southeast) area.

  5. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  6. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  7. The Effects of Orientation and Elevated Acceleration on the Cooling Performance of a Centrifuge-Mounted Spray Cooling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    the range of 0.01 to 1.8g’s in both single phase ( Yerkes , et al. 2006) and two-phase(Michalak, et al. 2010) operation. Spray cooled arrays have been...technician support in the experimental setup and testing phases. 29 6. Bibliography Elston, L. J., K. L. Yerkes , S. K. Thomas, and J. McQuillen...Conference. 2005. Michalak, T. E., K. L. Yerkes , S. K. Thomas, and J. McQuillen. "Acceleration Effects on the Cooling Performance of a Partially Confined FC

  8. Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven; Liu, Xiaohong; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-08-01

    Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (Spop), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation (λ), as both Spop and λ strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. Spop in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of Spop and to examine Spop in high-resolution models.

  9. Cooling interventions for athletes: An overview of effectiveness, physiological mechanisms, and practical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Coen C. W. G.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Eijsvogels, Thijs M. H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exercise-induced increases in core body temperature could negative impact performance and may lead to development of heat-related illnesses. The use of cooling techniques prior (pre-cooling), during (per-cooling) or directly after (post-cooling) exercise may limit the increase in core body temperature and therefore improve exercise performance. The aim of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of current scientific knowledge in the field of pre-cooling, per-cooling and post-cooling. Based on existing studies, we will discuss 1) the effectiveness of cooling interventions, 2) the underlying physiological mechanisms and 3) practical considerations regarding the use of different cooling techniques. Furthermore, we tried to identify the optimal cooling technique and compared whether cooling-induced performance benefits are different between cool, moderate and hot ambient conditions. This article provides researchers, physicians, athletes and coaches with important information regarding the implementation of cooling techniques to maintain exercise performance and to successfully compete in thermally stressful conditions. PMID:28349095

  10. Multi-Decadal Variations of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effects on Surface Radiation Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Streets, David; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world.

  11. A multi-satellite analysis of the direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Y. Y.; Christopher, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above liquid water clouds in the southeast Atlantic as a function of fire sources are investigated using A-Train data coupled with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP). Both the VIIRS Active Fire product and the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Thermal Anomalies product (MYD14) are used to identify the biomass burning fire origin in southern Africa. The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) are used to assess the aerosol type, aerosol altitude, and cloud altitude. We use back trajectory information, wind data, and the Fire Locating and Modeling of Burning Emissions (FLAMBE) product to infer the transportation of aerosols from the fire source to the CALIOP swath in the southeast Atlantic during austral winter.

  12. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  13. Effects of cooling methods on silver-palladium castings.

    PubMed

    Jochen, D G; Caputo, A A; Matyas, J

    1988-03-01

    Cast metal specimens for three ceramic metals were subjected to two different types of cooling procedures after casting. One method involved the rapid cooling of the casting as soon as the red glow of the button disappeared. The other method allowed the castings to bench cool to room temperature. Hardness, bond strength, and microstructural determinations lead to the following conclusions. 1. Vickers hardness values for W-1 and Rx-91 alloys for each cooling regimen were not significantly different. Statistically higher hardness values were obtained for the quenched specimens of JP-5 alloys compared with the bench-cooled specimens. 2. Cooling of W-1 and JP-5 alloy specimens by quenching resulted in higher bond strengths than for specimens that were bench-cooled to room temperature. However, bench-cooling Rx-91 alloy lead to higher bond strengths than did quenching. 3. For all of the alloys examined, quenching produced a smaller grain structure than did bench-cooling. 4. From the standpoint of the parameters tested and the saving of processing time, quenching of the silver-palladium ceramic alloys examined is the cooling procedure of choice for W-1 and JP-5 alloys.

  14. Radiative effects of interannually varying vs. interannually invariant aerosol emissions from fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandey, Benjamin S.; Lee, Hsiang-He; Wang, Chien

    2016-11-01

    Open-burning fires play an important role in the earth's climate system. In addition to contributing a substantial fraction of global emissions of carbon dioxide, they are a major source of atmospheric aerosols containing organic carbon, black carbon, and sulfate. These "fire aerosols" can influence the climate via direct and indirect radiative effects. In this study, we investigate these radiative effects and the hydrological fast response using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). Emissions of fire aerosols exert a global mean net radiative effect of -1.0 W m-2, dominated by the cloud shortwave response to organic carbon aerosol. The net radiative effect is particularly strong over boreal regions. Conventionally, many climate modelling studies have used an interannually invariant monthly climatology of emissions of fire aerosols. However, by comparing simulations using interannually varying emissions vs. interannually invariant emissions, we find that ignoring the interannual variability of the emissions can lead to systematic overestimation of the strength of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols. Globally, the overestimation is +23 % (-0.2 W m-2). Regionally, the overestimation can be substantially larger. For example, over Australia and New Zealand the overestimation is +58 % (-1.2 W m-2), while over Boreal Asia the overestimation is +43 % (-1.9 W m-2). The systematic overestimation of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols is likely due to the non-linear influence of aerosols on clouds. However, ignoring interannual variability in the emissions does not appear to significantly impact the hydrological fast response. In order to improve understanding of the climate system, we need to take into account the interannual variability of aerosol emissions.

  15. Effects of geometry on slot-jet film cooling performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyams, D.G.; McGovern, K.T.; Leylek, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    The physics of the film cooling process for shaped, inclined slot-jets with realistic slot-length-to-width ratios (L/s) is studied for a range of blowing ratio (M) and density ratio (DR) parameters typical of gas turbine operations. For the first time in the open literature, the effect of inlet and exit shaping of the slot-jet on both flow and thermal field characteristics is isolated, and the dominant mechanisms responsible for differences in these characteristics are documented. A previously documented computational methodology was applied for the study of four distinct configurations: (1) slot with straight edges and sharp corners (reference case); (2) slot with shaped inlet region; (3) slot with shaped exit region; and (4) slot with both shaped inlet and exit regions. Detailed field results as well as surface phenomena involving adiabatic film effectiveness ({eta}) and heat transfer coefficient (h) are presented. It is demonstrated that both {eta} and h results are vital in the proper assessment of film cooling performance. All simulations were carried out using a multi-block, unstructured/adaptive grid, fully explicit, time-marching solver with multi-grid, local time stepping, and residual smoothing type acceleration techniques. Special attention was paid to and full documentation provided for: (1) proper modeling of the physical phenomena; (2) exact geometry and high quality grid generation techniques; (3) discretization schemes; and (4) turbulence modeling issues. The key parameters M and DR were varied from 1.0 to 2.0 and 1.5 to 2.0, respectively, to show their influence. Simulations were repeated for slot length-to-width ratio (L/s) of 3.0 and 4.5 in order to explain the effects of this important parameter. Additionally, the performance of two popular turbulence models, standard k-F, and RNG k-E, were studied to establish their ability to handle highly elliptic jet/crossflow interaction type processes.

  16. Shortwave direct radiative effects of above cloud aerosols over global oceans derived from eight years of CALIOP and MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Meyer, K.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S.; Colarco, P.; Liu, Z.; Oreopoulos, L.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we studied the frequency of occurrence and shortwave direct radiative effects (DRE) of above-cloud aerosols (ACAs) over global oceans using eight years of collocated CALIOP and MODIS observations. Similar to previous work, we found high ACA occurrence in four regions: Southeast (SE) Atlantic region where ACAs are mostly light-absorbing aerosols, i.e., smoke and polluted dust according to CALIOP classification, originating from biomass burning over African Savanna; Tropical Northeast Atlantic and Arabian Sea where ACAs are predominantly windblown dust from the Sahara and Arabian desert, respectively; and Northwest Pacific where ACAs are mostly transported smoke and polluted dusts from Asian. From radiative transfer simulations based on CALIOP-MODIS observations and a set of the preselected aerosol optical models, we found the DREs of ACAs at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to be positive (i.e., warming) in the SE Atlantic and NW Pacific regions, but negative (i.e., cooling) in TNE Atlantic and Arabian Sea. The cancellation of positive and negative regional DREs results in a global ocean annual mean diurnally averaged cloudy-sky DRE of 0.015 W m-2 (range of -0.03 to 0.06 W m-2) at TOA. The DREs at surface and within atmosphere are -0.15 W m-2 (range of -0.09 to -0.21 W m-2), and 0.17 W m-2 (range of 0.11 to 0.24 W m-2), respectively. The regional and seasonal mean DREs are much stronger. For example, in the SE Atlantic region the JJA (July ~ August) seasonal mean cloudy-sky DRE is about 0.7 W m-2 (range of 0.2 to 1.2 W m-2) at TOA. The uncertainty in our DRE computations is mainly cause by the uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties, in particular aerosol absorption, and uncertainties in the CALIOP operational aerosol optical thickness retrieval. In situ and remotely sensed measurements of ACA from future field campaigns and satellite missions, and improved lidar retrieval algorithm, in particular vertical feature masking, would help reduce the

  17. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  18. Exploring matrix effects on photochemistry of organic aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Lignell, Hanna; Hinks, Mallory L.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    This work explores the effect of the environment on the rate of photolysis of 2,4-dinitrophenol (24-DNP), an important environmental toxin. In stark contrast to the slow photolysis of 24-DNP in an aqueous solution, the photolysis rate is increased by more than an order of magnitude for 24-DNP dissolved in 1-octanol or embedded in secondary organic material (SOM) produced by ozonolysis of α-pinene. Lowering the temperature decreased the photolysis rate of 24-DNP in SOM much more significantly than that of 24-DNP in octanol, with effective activation energies of 53 kJ/mol and 12 kJ/mol, respectively. We discuss the possibility that the increasing viscosity of the SOM matrix constrains the molecular motion, thereby suppressing the hydrogen atom transfer reaction to the photo-excited 24-DNP. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a significant effect of the matrix, and possibly viscosity, on the rate of an atmospheric photochemical reaction within SOM. It suggests that rates of photochemical processes in organic aerosols will depend on both relative humidity and temperature and thus altitude. The results further suggest that photochemistry in SOM may play a key role in transformations of atmospheric organics. For example, 24-DNP and other nitro-aromatic compounds should readily photodegrade in organic particulate matter, which has important consequences for predicting their environmental fates and impacts. PMID:25201953

  19. Effect of stratospheric aerosol layers on the TOMS/SBUV ozone retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Ahmad, Zia; Pan, L.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Mcpeters, R.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of the optical effects of stratospheric aerosol layers on total ozone retrieval from space by the TOMS/SBUV type instruments is presented here. Using the Dave radiative transfer model we estimate the magnitude of the errors in the retrieved ozone when polar stratospheric clouds (PSC's) or volcanic aerosol layers interfere with the measurements. The largest errors are produced by optically thick water ice PSC's. Results of simulation experiments on the effect of the Pinatubo aerosol cloud on the Nimbus-7 and Meteor-3 TOMS products are presented.

  20. SAGE II/Umkehr ozone comparisons and aerosols effects: An empirical and theoretical study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Newchurch, M.

    1997-09-15

    The objectives of this research were to: (1) examine empirically the aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles using SAGE II aerosol and ozone data; (2) examine theoretically the aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles; (3) examine the differences between SAGE II ozone profiles and both old- and new-format Umkehr ozone profiles for ozone-trend information; (4) reexamine SAGE I-Umkehr ozone differences with the most recent version of SAGE I data; and (5) contribute to the SAGE II science team.

  1. Implementation of the Missing Aerosol Physics into LLNL IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C

    2005-02-09

    In recent assessments of climate forcing, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change lists aerosol as one o f the most important anthropogenic agents that influence climate. Atmospheric aerosols directly affect the radiative fluxes at the surface and top of the Earth's atmosphere by scattering and/or absorbing radiation. Further, aerosols indirectly change cloud microphysical properties (such as cloud drop effective radius) that also affect the radiative fluxes. However, the estimate of the magnitude of aerosol climatic effect varies widely, and aerosol/cloud interactions remain one of the most uncertain aspects of climate models today. The Atmospheric Sciences Division has formulated a plan to enhance and expand our modeling expertise in aerosol/cloud/climate interactions. Under previous LDRD support, we successfully developed a computationally efficient version of IMPACT to simulate aerosol climatology. This new version contains a compact chemical mechanism for the prediction of sulfate and also predicts the distributions of organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), dust, and sea salt. Furthermore, we implemented a radiation package into IMPACT to calculate the radiative forcing and heating/cooling rates by aerosols. This accomplishment built the foundation of our currently funded projects under the NASA Global Modeling and Analysis Program as well as the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Program. Despite the fact that our research is being recognized as an important effort to quantify the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on climate, the major shortcoming of our previous simulations on aerosol climatic effects is the over simplification of spatial and temporal variations of aerosol size distributions that are shaped by complicated nucleation, growth, transport and removal processes. Virtually all properties of atmospheric aerosols and clouds depend strongly on aerosol size distribution. Moreover, molecular processing on aerosol surfaces alters the hygroscopic

  2. Film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer with injection through holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the local film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer downstream of injection of air through discrete holes into a turbulent boundary layer of air on a flat plate is reported. Secondary air is injected through a single hole normal to the main flow and through both a single hole and a row of holes spaced at three diameter intervals with an injection angle of 35 deg to the main flow. Two values of the mainstream Reynolds number are used; the blowing rate is varied from 0.1 to 2.0. Photographs of a carbon dioxide-water fog injected into the main flow at an angle of 90 deg are also presented to show interaction between the jet and mainstream.

  3. Solid-state cooling line based on the electrocaloric effect.

    PubMed

    Khodayari, Akram; Mohammadi, Saber

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using ferroelectric materials as a cooling device or solid-state refrigerator based on the electrocaloric effect has been considered. The electrocaloric responses of two different ferroelectric capacitors (PMN-25PT, PZN-4.5PT) are studied. In this study, the dynamics of temperature variation at the edges of a layered structure comprised of an electrocaloric material with heatconducting elements on its sides to an applied periodic electric field have been studied. Electrocaloric elements can generate directed heat flux as a thermal pump by alternative switching. A temperature reduction of 6° is obtained in an electric field of 1 KV/mm at a frequency of 1 Hz for PMN-25PT material after applying 80 cycles. It is shown that the type of applied electric pulses and ferroelectric material affect the results.

  4. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  5. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  6. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Aerosols on the Viability of Escherichia coli during Biofilm Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Renu; Monnappa, Ajay K.; Hong, Seongkyeol; Mitchell, Robert J.; Jang, Jaesung

    2015-01-01

    A periodic jet of carbon dioxide (CO2) aerosols is a very quick and effective mechanical technique to remove biofilms from various substrate surfaces. However, the impact of the aerosols on the viability of bacteria during treatment has never been evaluated. In this study, the effects of high-speed CO2 aerosols, a mixture of solid and gaseous CO2, on bacteria viability was studied. It was found that when CO2 aerosols were used to disperse biofilms of Escherichia coli, they led to a significant loss of viability, with approximately 50% of the dispersed bacteria killed in the process. By comparison, 75.6% of the biofilm-associated bacteria were viable when gently dispersed using Proteinase K and DNase I. Indirect proof that the aerosols are damaging the bacteria was found using a recombinant E. coli expressing the cyan fluorescent protein, as nearly half of the fluorescence was found in the supernatant after CO2 aerosol treatment, while the rest was associated with the bacterial pellet. In comparison, the supernatant fluorescence was only 9% when the enzymes were used to disperse the biofilm. As such, these CO2 aerosols not only remove biofilm-associated bacteria effectively but also significantly impact their viability by disrupting membrane integrity. PMID:26345492

  7. Effects of Aerosol Pollution on Clouds over Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sechrist, B.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties - principally cloud fraction and cloud optical depth (COD) - is examined using satellite retrievals from the MODIS satellites over Los Angeles and Beijing. Ten Hoeve et al. (2011, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 11(7), 3021-3036) used satellite data to examine the impact of aerosols on warm clouds around Rondonia, Brazil, during the biomass burning season. They found that the COD-AOD relationship exhibits a 'boomerang' shape in which COD initially increases with increasing AOD but then decreases as AOD continues to increase beyond some critical level. This result is thought to reflect the balance between the microphysical and radiative components of a cloud's response to aerosols. The microphysical process dominates at low AOD, while the radiative process dominates at high AOD. This study is analogous to Ten Hoeve et al., but for aerosols derived primarily from fossil fuel combustion rather than biomass burning. Preliminary results will be presented.

  8. COOLING COIL EFFECTS ON BLENDING IN A PILOT SCALE TANK

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.; Steeper, T.

    2010-08-26

    Blending, or mixing, processes in 1.3 million gallon nuclear waste tanks are complicated by the fact that miles of serpentine, vertical, cooling coils are installed in the tanks. As a step toward investigating blending interference due to coils in this type of tank, a 1/10.85 scale tank and pump model were constructed for pilot scale testing. A series of tests were performed in this scaled tank by adding blue dye to visualize blending, and by adding acid or base tracers to solution to quantify the time required to effectively blend the tank contents. The acid and base tests were monitored with pH probes, which were located in the pilot scale tank to ensure that representative samples were obtained. Using the probes, the hydronium ion concentration [H{sup +}] was measured to ensure that a uniform concentration was obtained throughout the tank. As a result of pilot scale testing, a significantly improved understanding of mixing, or blending, in nuclear waste tanks has been achieved. Evaluation of test data showed that cooling coils in the waste tank model increased pilot scale blending times by 200% in the recommended operating range, compared to previous theoretical estimates of a 10-50% increase. Below the planned operating range, pilot scale blending times were increased by as much as 700% in a tank with coils installed. One pump, rather than two or more, was shown to effectively blend the tank contents, and dual pump nozzles installed parallel to the tank wall were shown to provide optimal blending. In short, experimental results varied significantly from expectations.

  9. Quantitative analysis of the direct effect of aerosols over decadal scale by using ECHAM6-standalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, K.; Bott, A.; Hense, A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on climate is an important but still highly uncertain aspect in climate research. By using atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6 our objective is to quantify the direct effect of aerosols over decadal time scale in comparison to the variability induced by the varying sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice concentrations (SIC) taken by the AMIP-II data base and the inevitable internal and unpredictable climate noise. We integrated the model with prescribed SST/SIC along with observed green house gases and aerosols concentrations for ten year period 1995-2004. Two ensembles with sample size ten, each have been created by starting the integrations on January 1st, 1995 with ten different initial conditions derived from two control runs over 15-years. These ensembles differ for tropospheric aerosols (TA): the non-aerosol case (NAC) is without any TA and aerosol case (AC) is utilizing a time variable data set of aerosols optical properties for input into the solar part of the ECHAM6 radiation code (Kinne et al, 2006). This set-up allows for a quantitative estimation and separation of the stationary and transient aerosol effects, the SST/SIC induced variability and the internal variability due to large scale atmospheric instabilities and non-linearities with the help of a two-way analysis of variance. We analyzed ensemble data for top of atmosphere (TOA) energy balance and temperature at 850 hPa. In the NAC, the ensemble exhibits a global and annual mean 3 W/m2 imbalance of the TOA radiation balance whereas the AC shows only 0.6 W/m2 being much closer in radiative balance over ten year period. The aerosols increase global planetary albedo from 0.29 (non-aerosol) to 0.30 for aerosol case. Extending the analysis to regional values of annual mean TOA radiation balance components, we find that the changes in TOA solar radiation budget are highly significant for static direct aerosol effect with local contributions to the total variability

  10. Effects of aerosol emission pathways on future warming and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    The peak global temperature is largely determined by cumulative emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases. However, anthropogenic emissions include also so-called short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), which include aerosol particles and methane. Previous studies with simple models indicate that the timing of SLCF emission reductions has only a small effect on the rate of global warming and even less of an effect on global peak temperatures. However, these simple model analyses do not capture the spatial dynamics of aerosol-climate interactions, nor do they consider the additional effects of aerosol emissions on human health. There is therefore merit in assessing how the timing of aerosol emission reductions affects global temperature and premature mortality caused by elevated aerosol concentrations, using more comprehensive climate models. Here, we used an aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to simulate the direct and indirect radiative forcing resulting from aerosol emissions. We simulated Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, and we also designed idealized low and high aerosol emission pathways based on RCP4.5 scenario (LOW and HIGH, respectively). From these simulations, we calculated the Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) from aerosol emissions between 1850 and 2100, as well as aerosol concentrations used to estimate the premature mortality caused by particulate pollution. We then use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model to simulate the spatial and temporal pattern of climate response to these aerosol-forcing scenarios, in combination with prescribed emissions of both short and long-lived greenhouse gases according to the RCP4.5 scenario. In the RCP scenarios, global mean ERF declined during the 21st century from -1.3 W m-2 to -0.4 W m-2 (RCP8.5) and -0.2 W m-2 (RCP2.6). In the sensitivity scenarios, the forcing at the end of the 21st century was -1.6 W m-2 (HIGH) and practically zero (LOW). The difference in global mean temperature

  11. Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, R. J.; Schwartz, S. E.; Hales, J. M.; Cess, R. D.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.; Hansen, J. E.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although long considered to be of marginal importance to global climate change, tropospheric aerosol contributes substantially to radiative forcing, and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol, in particular, has imposed a major perturbation to this forcing. Both the direct scattering of short-wavelength solar radiation and the modification of the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by sulfate aerosol particles increase planetary albedo, thereby exerting a cooling influence on the planet. Current climate forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate is estimated to be -1 to -2 watts per square meter, globally averaged. This perturbation is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign. Thus, the aerosol forcing has likely offset global greenhouse warming to a substantial degree. However, differences in geographical and seasonal distributions of these forcings preclude any simple compensation. Aerosol effects must be taken into account in evaluating anthropogenic influences on past, current, and projected future climate and in formulating policy regarding controls on emission of greenhouse gases and sulfur dioxide. Resolution of such policy issues requires integrated research on the magnitude and geographical distribution of aerosol climate forcing and on the controlling chemical and physical processes.

  12. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  13. Effects of Aircraft On Aerosol Abundance in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Strawa, A. W.; Howard, S. D.; Verma, S.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.; Hannan, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A significant increase in sulfuric acid aerosol concentration was detected above 10 km pressure altitude during a cross-corridor flight out of Shannon on October 23, 1997. The source of this aerosol is ascribed to commercial aircraft operations in flight corridors above 10 km, because (1) a stable atmosphere prevented vertical air mass exchanges and thus eliminated surface sources, (2) air mass back trajectories documented the absence of remote continental sources, and (3) temperature profiler data showed the tropopause at least one kilometers above flight altitude throughout the flight. Particle volatility identified 70% H2SO4, 20% (NH4)2SO4 and 10% nonvolatile aerosol in the proximity of flight corridors, and (10-30)% H2SO4, up to 50% (NH4)2SO4, and (40-60)% nonvolatile aerosols in air that was not affected by aircraft operations below 10 km. Only a very small fraction of the nonvolatile particles (determined with a condensation nucleus counter) could be morphologically identified as soot aerosol (validated by scanning electron microscopy of wire impactor samples). The newly formed H2SO4 particles did not measurably affect surface area and volume of the background aerosol due to their small size, hence did not affect radiative transfer directly.

  14. Materials with Giant Mechanocaloric Effects: Cooling by Strength.

    PubMed

    Mañosa, Lluís; Planes, Antoni

    2016-12-27

    The search for materials with large caloric effects has become a major challenge in material science due to their potential in developing near room-temperature solid-state cooling devices, which are both efficient and clean, and that can successfully replace present refrigeration technologies. There are three main families of caloric materials: magnetocaloric, electrocaloric, and mechanocaloric. While magnetocaloric and electrocaloric materials have been studied intensively in the last few decades, mechanocaloric materials are only very recently receiving a great deal of attention. The mechanocaloric effect refers to the reversible thermal response of a solid when subjected to an external mechanical field, and encompasses both the elastocaloric effect, corresponding to a uniaxial force, and the barocaloric effect, which corresponds to the response to hydrostatic pressure. Here, the state of the art in giant mechanocaloric effects is reviewed and a critical analysis of the thermodynamic quantities that characterize the major families of barocaloric and elastocaloric materials is provided. Finally perspectives for further development in this area are given.

  15. Effect of In-Plume Aerosol Processing on the Efficacy of Marine Cloud Albedo Enhancement from Controlled Sea-Spray Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, R. G.; Spracklen, D.; Korhonen, H.; Pierce, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    The intentional enhancement of cloud albedo via controlled sea-spray injection from ships has been suggested as a possible means to control anthropogenic global warming (1); however, there remains significant uncertainty in the efficacy of this method due to uncertainties in aerosol and cloud microphysics. Recent analysis showed that more sea-spray may be necessary than previously assumed to reach a desired cooling due to nonlinearities in the aerosol/cloud microphysics (2). A major assumption used in (2) is that all sea-spray was emitted uniformly into some oceanic grid boxes, and thus did not account for sub-grid aerosol microphysics within the sea-spray plumes. However, as a consequnce of the fast sea-spray injection rates which are proposed, in the order of 1x10^17 1/s (1), particle concentrations in these plumes may be quite high and particle coagulation may significantly reduce the number of emitted particles and increase their average size. Therefore, it is possible that the emissions necessary to reach a desired cooling may be even larger than currently assumed. We explore the processing of the freshly emitted sea-spray plumes in the Large-Eddy Simulation (LES)/Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) the System for Atmospheric Modelling (SAM, 3) with the online aerosol microphysics module TOMAS (4). We determine how the final number and size of particles (once well mixed with background air) depends on the emission rate and size distribution of the sea-spray plume and on the pre-existing aerosol concentrations and local atmospheric conditions. Finally, we make suggestions for effective size-resolved emissions for use in climate models. (1) Salter, S. et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A., 2008. (2) Korhonen, H. et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 4133-4143, 2010. (3) Khairoutdinov, M., and Randall, D.,. J. Atmos. Sci., 60, 607-625, 2003. (4) Pierce, J. and Adams, P., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 1339-1356, 2009.

  16. Effect of body cooling on subsequent aerobic and anaerobic exercise performance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, Gregory F; Demartini, Julianne K; Casa, Douglas J; McDermott, Brendon P; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Maresh, Carl M

    2010-12-01

    Body cooling has become common in athletics, with numerous studies looking at different cooling modalities and different types of exercise. A search of the literature revealed 14 studies that measured performance following cooling intervention and had acceptable protocols for exercise and performance measures. These studies were objectively analyzed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale, and 13 of the studies were included in this review. These studies revealed that body cooling by various modalities had consistent and greater impact on aerobic exercise performance (mean increase in performance = 4.25%) compared to anaerobic (mean increase in performance = 0.66%). Different cooling modalities, and cooling during different points during an exercise protocol, had extremely varied results. In conclusion, body cooling seems to have a positive effect on aerobic performance, although the impact on anaerobic performance may vary and often does not provide the same positive effect.

  17. Climatic impact of urbanization in Eastern China: modeling the combined urban heat island and aerosol effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y.; Yang, B.; Zhao, C.; Leung, L. R.; Yan, H.; Fan, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we investigate the climatic impact of urbanization, including both Urban Heat Island (UHI) and aerosol effects, over the Yangtze-Delta metropolitan clusters region of Eastern China, based on a series of simulations with prescribed land use/land cover and emissions of aerosols and their precursors for the 2000s and 1970s , respectively. We conduct simulations for each land use/land cover and emission scenario from 2006-2010 using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, with online chemistry/aerosol and urban canopy models, at a 3-km grid spacing. Overall the model can reasonably capture the spatial pattern of temperature and precipitation as well as the phase of precipitation diurnal cycle in summer. Simulations results show a very clear UHI effect, i.e. expanded urban surface decreases surface latent heat flux, increases sensible heat flux and PBL height, and reduces surface wind over urban areas, with a more significant change in summer. Aerosol has much less obvious impact on local surface heat flux and temperature, but shows more remote impacts downwind due to dispersion and transport of pollutants and aerosol-cloud interaction. Aerosol also has a larger impact on precipitation amount and areal coverage than UHI. While UHI increases precipitation over urban regions during daytime especially when the southeasterly monsoonal flow prevails, aerosol remarkably suppresses precipitation, especially for light to moderate rain events, and increases the frequency of dry days in the entire model region.

  18. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  19. The Effect of Aerosol Formation on Stable Isotopes Ratio in Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa G.; Sebree, Joshua; Wold, Allison; Stern, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    The formation of large amounts of aerosol in Titan atmosphere induces a significant sink for carbon and nitrogen in the atmosphere. Due to the high complexity of the chemistry leading to aerosol formation, there may be isotopic fractionation along the formation pathways of the aerosol. So far several stable isotopes have been measured in Titan atmosphere including the 13C/12C, 15N/14N and D/H ratios for different gaseous species. However, the fractionation effect of the aerosol formation and its impact on atmospheric stable isotope ratios has yet to be fully understood. Two experimental studies were recently published on the stable carbon [1] and nitrogen [1,2] isotope fractionation during aerosol formation in N2-CH4 reactant mixture. To better constrain the fractionation effect of aerosol formation on the Titan atmosphere we have measured the isotopic fractionation induced in laboratory aerosol analogues produced exploring the space of parameters that are expected to have an effect on fractionation processes. Parameters studied include pressure and temperature of aerosol formation and the reactant gas phase composition, including the standard "Titan" mixture of CH4/N2 as well as other trace species such as benzene (C6H6).[1] Sebree, J.A., Stern, J.C., Mandt, K.E., Domagal-Goldman, S.D., and Trainer, M.G.: C and N Fractionation of CH /N Mixtures during Photochemical Aerosol Formation: Relevance to Titan, (2016) Icarus 270:421-428[2] Kuga, M., Carrasco, N., Marty, B., Marrochi, Y., Bernard, S., Rigaudier, T., Fleury, B., Tissandier, L.: Nitrogen isotopic fractionation during abiotic synthesis of organic solid particles, (2014) EPSL 393:2-13

  20. Effects of sulfuric acid aerosol on cardiopulmonary function of dogs, sheep, and humans.

    PubMed

    Sackner, M A; Ford, D; Fernandez, R; Cipley, J; Perez, D; Kwoka, M; Reinhart, M; Michaelson, E D; Schreck, R; Wanner, A

    1978-09-01

    Submicronic aerosol of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) originates from the burning of fossil fuels and discharge of vapor from the automobile engine equipped with the catalytic converter. This study was conducted to determine whether brief exposure to this aerosol in high concentrations adversely affects the cardiopulmonary system. In all studies, submicronic aerosol of sodium chloride was used as a control. Anesthetized dogs that breathed H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 8 mg per m3 showed no effects on respiratory resistance, static lung compliance, and functional residual capacity. A 4-hour exposure to H2SO4 aerosol (4 mg per m3) produced no significant changes in mechanics of breathing, functional residual capacity, pulmonary and systemic arterial blood pressures, cardiac output, heart rate, and arterial blood gas tensions. Conscious sheep that breathed H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 14 mg per m3 for 20 min had no alteration of tracheal mucous velocity in an immediate 3-hour follow-up period or 5 to 10 days later. Conscious sheep that breathed H2SO4 aerosol (4 mg per m3) for 4 hours had no significant alteration of tracheal mucous velocity immediately and 2 hours thereafter. Both normal and asthmatic adults breathing H2SO4 aerosol in concentrations up to 1 mg per m3 for 10 min showed no significant alteration of lung volumes, distribution of ventilation, ear oximetry, dynamic mechanics of breathing, oscillation mechanics of the chest-lung system, pulmonary capillary blood flow, diffusing capacity, O2 consumption, and pulmonary tissue volume. No delayed effects in pulmonary function nor exacerbation of bronchial asthma were observe during a follow-up period of a few weeks. The present study indicates that single exposure to submicronic H2SO4 aerosol does not produce an immediate or a delayed adverse effect on cardiopulmonary function in anesthetized dogs, conscious sheep, and normal and asthmatic adults.

  1. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Yuhang; Yang, Xiu-Qun

    2016-11-29

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol–radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m-2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m-2), while fire POM induces a small effect (-0.05 and 0.04 ± 0.01 W m-2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol–cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is -0.70 ± 0.05 W m-2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (-0.59 ± 0.03 W m-2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m-2) and REaci (-1.38 ± 0.23 W m-2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and -0.82 ± 0.09 W m-2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to -15 Wm-2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m-2) is small

  2. Impacts of global open-fire aerosols on direct radiative, cloud and surface-albedo effects simulated with CAM5

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Yiquan; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaohong; ...

    2016-11-29

    Aerosols from open-land fires could significantly perturb the global radiation balance and induce climate change. In this study, Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with prescribed daily fire aerosol emissions is used to investigate the spatial and seasonal characteristics of radiative effects (REs, relative to the case of no fires) of open-fire aerosols including black carbon (BC) and particulate organic matter (POM) from 2003 to 2011. The global annual mean RE from aerosol–radiation interactions (REari) of all fire aerosols is 0.16 ± 0.01 W m−2 (1σ uncertainty), mainly due to the absorption of fire BC (0.25 ± 0.01 W m−2), while fire POM induces a small effect (−0.05 andmore » 0.04 ± 0.01 W m−2 based on two different methods). Strong positive REari is found in the Arctic and in the oceanic regions west of southern Africa and South America as a result of amplified absorption of fire BC above low-level clouds, in general agreement with satellite observations. The global annual mean RE due to aerosol–cloud interactions (REaci) of all fire aerosols is −0.70 ± 0.05 W m−2, resulting mainly from the fire POM effect (−0.59 ± 0.03 W m−2). REari (0.43 ± 0.03 W m−2) and REaci (−1.38 ± 0.23 W m−2) in the Arctic are stronger than in the tropics (0.17 ± 0.02 and −0.82 ± 0.09 W m−2 for REari and REaci), although the fire aerosol burden is higher in the tropics. The large cloud liquid water path over land areas and low solar zenith angle of the Arctic favor the strong fire aerosol REaci (up to −15 W m−2) during the Arctic summer. Significant surface cooling, precipitation reduction and increasing amounts of low-level cloud are also found in the Arctic summer as a result of the fire aerosol REaci based on the atmosphere-only simulations. The global annual mean RE due to surface-albedo changes (REsac) over land areas (0.03 ± 0.10 W m−2) is small

  3. A satellite view of the direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Matsoukas, Christos; Fotiadi, Aggeliki; Benas, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for better understanding and predicting current and future climate change. They are determining, apart from clouds, patterns of solar radiation through scattering and absorption processes. Especially, under cloud-free skies, aerosols are the major modulator of the solar radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. Although significant improvement has been made as to better understanding the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, there is still a need for further improvement in our knowledge of the DRE spatial and temporal patterns, in particular with respect to extended spatial and temporal coverage of relevant information. In an ongoing rapidly evolving era of great satellite-based achievements, concerning the knowledge of solar radiation budget and its modulators, and with the great progress in obtaining significant information on key aerosol optical properties needed for modeling DRE, it is a great challenge to use all this new aerosol information and to see what is the new acquired scientific knowledge. The objective of this study is to obtain an improved view of global aerosol DRE effects using contemporary accurate data for the important atmospheric and surface parameters determining the solar radiation budget, with emphasis to state of the art aerosol data. Thus, a synergy is made of different datasets providing the necessary input data and of a detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute spectral globally distributed aerosol DREs. Emphasis is given on using highly accurate and well-tested aerosol optical properties. Spectral information on aerosol optical depth (AOD) is taken from retrieved products of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, while similar information is taken from MODIS for the aerosol asymmetry parameter (AP) over ocean. Information from MODIS is also taken for the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA). All this information comes from the latest Collection

  4. Effects of skin cooling on airway reactivity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, M E; Ciufo, R; Nelson, J A; McFadden, E R

    1998-05-01

    1. Environmental contact with cold air is a common cause of respiratory distress in obstructive lung disease, and direct and reflex changes in bronchial calibre are well documented with this stimulus when it is inhaled or contacts the exposed skin respectively. It is now known that skin chilling does not amplify the effects of breathing cold air, but it is not established if this lack of interaction is unique, or applies to other forms of airway constrictors. 2. To provide data on this issue, 10 subjects with atopic asthma underwent methacholine bronchoprovocations with and without chilling of the integument of their heads and thoraces for 30 min. Chilling was accomplished with a specially designed thermal garment. Spirometry as well as core and skin temperatures were serially monitored during all experiments. 3. In the control phase (no cooling), integumental temperatures rose slightly, the forced expiratory volume in 1.0 s (FEV1.0) did not change, and the mean provocative concentration of methacholine required to reduce the FEV1.0 by 20% (PC20 meth) was 0.47 +/- 0.17 mg/ml (2.4 +/- 0.87 mmol/l). In the cold trial, the temperature of the back fell 5.1 +/- 1.7 degrees C to 28.7 +/- 1.8 degrees C (P < 0.01), core temperatures did not change, and airway obstruction developed (delta FEV1.0 = -6.7 +/- 2.1%; P < 0.05). The PC20 meth, however, was unaltered [PC20 meth = 0.45 +/- 0.13 mg/ml (2.3 +/- 0.66 mmol/l); P = 0.85]. 4. These results demonstrate that although skin cooling produces mild airway obstruction in subjects with asthma, it does not change the response to non-specific bronchoconstrictors such as methacholine.

  5. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  6. Effect of neck warming and cooling on thermal comfort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.; Chambers, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    The potential use of local neck cooling in an area superficial to the cerebral arteries was evaluated by circulating cold or hot water through two copper disks held firmly against the neck. Subjective responses indicated that neck cooling improves the thermal comfort in a hot environment.

  7. The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi-Nik, Farhad; Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid

    2008-07-08

    Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered.

  8. Effect of cooling on Clostridium perfringens in pea soup.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A E I; Rombouts, F M; Beumer, R R

    2004-02-01

    Foods associated with Clostridium perfringens outbreaks are usually abused after cooking. Because of their short generation times, C. perfringens spores and cells can grow out to high levels during improper cooling. Therefore, the potential of C. perfringens to multiply in Dutch pea soup during different cooling times was investigated. Tubes of preheated pea soup (50 degrees C) were inoculated with cocktails of cells or heat-activated spores of this pathogen. The tubes were linearly cooled to 15 degrees C in time spans of 3, 5, 7.5, and 10 h and were subsequently stored in a refrigerator at 3 or 7 degrees C for up to 84 h. Cell numbers increased by 1-log cycle during the 3-h cooling period and reached their maximum after 10 h of cooling. Subsequent refrigeration hardly reduced cell numbers. Cooling of 3.75 liters of pea soup in an open pan showed that this amount of pea soup cooled from 50 to 15 degrees C in 5 h, which will allow a more than 10-fold increase in cell numbers. These findings emphasize the need of good hygienic practices and quick cooling of heated foods after preparation.

  9. Combustion chamber struts can be effectively transpiration cooled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. H.

    1966-01-01

    Vapor-deposited sintering technique increases the feasible temperature range of transpiration-cooled structural members in combustion chambers. This technique produces a porous mass of refractory metal wires around a combustion chamber structural member. This mass acts as a transpiration-cooled surface for a thick-walled tube.

  10. Distinct effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the East Asian summer monsoon between multidecadal strong and weak monsoon stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoning; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Liu, Yangang

    2016-06-01

    Because industrial emissions of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia have greatly increased in recent decades, the interactions between atmospheric aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have attracted enormous attention. To further understand the aerosol-EASM interaction, we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the EASM during the multidecadal strong (1950-1977) and weak (1978-2000) EASM stages using the Community Atmospheric Model 5.1. Numerical experiments are conducted for the whole period, including the two different EASM stages, with present day (PD, year 2000) and preindustrial (PI, year 1850) aerosol emissions, as well as the observed time-varying aerosol emissions. A comparison of the results from PD and PI shows that, with the increase in anthropogenic aerosols, the large-scale EASM intensity is weakened to a greater degree (-9.8%) during the weak EASM stage compared with the strong EASM stage (-4.4%). The increased anthropogenic aerosols also result in a significant reduction in precipitation over North China during the weak EASM stage, as opposed to a statistically insignificant change during the strong EASM stage. Because of greater aerosol loading and the larger sensitivity of the climate system during weak EASM stages, the aerosol effects are more significant during these EASM stages. These results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols from the same aerosol emissions have distinct effects on the EASM and the associated precipitation between the multidecadal weak and strong EASM stages.

  11. Distinct effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the East Asian summer monsoon between multidecadal strong and weak monsoon stages

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoning; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Xiaodong; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhaosheng; Liu, Yangang

    2016-06-18

    Industrial emissions of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia have greatly increased in recent decades, and so the interactions between atmospheric aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have attracted enormous attention. In order to further understand the aerosol-EASM interaction, we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the EASM during the multidecadal strong (1950–1977) and weak (1978–2000) EASM stages using the Community Atmospheric Model 5.1. Numerical experiments are conducted for the whole period, including the two different EASM stages, with present day (PD, year 2000) and preindustrial (PI, year 1850) aerosol emissions, as well as the observed time-varying aerosol emissions. A comparison of the results from PD and PI shows that, with the increase in anthropogenic aerosols, the large-scale EASM intensity is weakened to a greater degree (-9.8%) during the weak EASM stage compared with the strong EASM stage (-4.4%). The increased anthropogenic aerosols also result in a significant reduction in precipitation over North China during the weak EASM stage, as opposed to a statistically insignificant change during the strong EASM stage. Because of greater aerosol loading and the larger sensitivity of the climate system during weak EASM stages, the aerosol effects are more significant during these EASM stages. Moreover, these results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols from the same aerosol emissions have distinct effects on the EASM and the associated precipitation between the multidecadal weak and strong EASM stages.

  12. Evaluating the aerosol indirect effect in WRF-Chem simulations of the January 2013 Beijing air pollution event.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Steven; Grell, Georg; Xie, Ying; Wu, Jian-Bin

    2015-04-01

    In January 2013, an unusual weather pattern over Northern China produced unusually cool, moist conditions for the region. Recent peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts report that during this time period, Beijing experienced a historically severe haze and smog event with observed monthly average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations exceeding 225 micrograms per cubic meter. MODIS satellite observations produced AOD values of approximately 1.5 to 2 for the same time. In addition, over eastern and northern China record-breaking hourly average PM2.5 concentrations of more than 700 μg m-3 were observed. Clearly, the severity and persistence of this air pollution episode has raised the interest of the scientific community as well as widespread public attention. Despite the significance of this and similar air pollution events, several questions regarding the ability of numerical weather prediction models to forecast such events remain. Some of these questions are: • What is the importance of including aerosols in the weather prediction models? • What is the current capability of weather prediction models to simulate aerosol impacts upon the weather? • How important is it to include the aerosol feedbacks (direct and indirect effect) in the numerical model forecasts? In an attempt to address these and other questions, a Joint Working Group of the Commission for Atmospheric Sciences and the World Climate Research Programme has been convened. This Working Group on Numerical Experimentation (WGNE), has set aside several events of interest and has asked its members to generate numerical simulations of the events and examine the results. As part of this project, weather and pollution simulations were produced at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) chemistry model. These particular simulations include the aerosol indirect effect and are being done in collaboration with a group in China that will produce

  13. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical Property Measurements Made During the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period and Their Effects on Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Hallar, A. G.; Arnott, W. P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ogren, J.; Schmid, B.; Luu, A.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult to measure aerosol properties. One of the main purposes of the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) flown in May, 2003 was to assess our ability to measure absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of aerosol optical properties made during the IOP. Measurements of aerosol absorption coefficient were made by Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter (U. Washington) and on the DOE Cessna 172 (NOAA-C,MDL). Aerosol absorption coefficient was also measured by a photoacoustic instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the IOP. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-AkC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Measurements of absorption coefficient from all of these instruments during appropriate periods are compared. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model.

  14. Retrievals of Effective Aerosol Layer Height and Single Scattering Albedo for Biomass-Burning Smoke and Mineral Dust Aerosols from A-Train Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, M.; Hsu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Launches of state-of-the-art satellite sensors dedicated to aerosol remote sensing in recent years marked the beginning of a new era in aerosol-related studies by virtue of the well-coordinated observing system consisting of an array of satellites flown in formation, so called A-Train (Afternoon satellites constellation). The capabilities of the individual sensors aboard the A-Train satellites are complementary and overlapping in terms of retrievable aerosol parameters, sensitivity, spatial resolution and coverage. Thus, there is a great potential to gain value-added information about aerosols by merging observations from the A-Train sensors. In this study, we introduce a new algorithm, which can be utilized to derive aerosol layer height (ALH) and single scattering albedo (SSA) for biomass-burning smoke and airborne mineral dust aerosols by synthesizing observations from three A-Train satellite sensors: CALIOP, MODIS, and OMI. By using this algorithm, it is presented that ALH and SSA of biomass-burning smoke aerosols over North America, Southeast Asia, and Europe can be derived successfully. We show the retrieved values of SSA bear reasonable agreements with those from AERONET. The results of this study also reveal that the algorithm has a basic skill to estimate ALH by combining only MODIS and OMI observations, allowing us to separate smoke aerosols residing within the boundary layer from those elevated in the free troposphere. Currently, another version of the algorithm to be applicable for mineral dust aerosols is under development, and earlier results will be presented. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of transport and radiative effects of biomass-burning smoke and mineral dust aerosols.

  15. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. Satellite observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation for cloud-free scenes. We do so by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation of the difference was 0.6 ± 8 %. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 68 % of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 30 % of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10 % higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30 %, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and

  16. Effect of Cooling Rate and Chemical Composition on Microstructure and Properties of Naturally Cooled Vanadium-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sahu, Pooja; Neogy, Suman; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Mitra, Rahul; Mukherjee, Subrata; Kundu, Saurabh

    2017-04-01

    Samples from two V-microalloyed steels (0.05 wt pct V) having different C and N levels, namely high-C low-N steel, HCLN (0.22 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) and low-C high-N steel, LCHN (0.06 wt pct C, 0.013 wt pct N) were naturally cooled from 1373 K (1100 °C) to room temperature over a range of cooling rates (0.07 to 3.33 K/s). Samples from a plain C-Mn steel (0.06 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) were also subjected to the same heat treatment for comparison. The effect of cooling rate and steel composition on microstructures, precipitates, and tensile properties has been investigated. Due to the presence of large fraction of harder constituents, like pearlite and bainite, HCLN steel showed higher strength and lower ductility than LCHN steel. LCHN steel, on the other hand, showed good combination of strength and ductility due to its predominantly ferrite matrix with precipitation strengthening. The V-precipitate size was more refined and the precipitate density was higher in HCLN steel than that in LCHN steel. This observation confirms the importance of C content in V-microalloyed steel in terms of precipitation strengthening. An intermediate cooling rate ( 1.4 K/s) has been found to be the optimum choice in order to maximize the precipitation strengthening in V-containing steels.

  17. Effect of Cooling Rate and Chemical Composition on Microstructure and Properties of Naturally Cooled Vanadium-Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Anish; Sahu, Pooja; Neogy, Suman; Chakrabarti, Debalay; Mitra, Rahul; Mukherjee, Subrata; Kundu, Saurabh

    2017-01-01

    Samples from two V-microalloyed steels (0.05 wt pct V) having different C and N levels, namely high-C low-N steel, HCLN (0.22 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) and low-C high-N steel, LCHN (0.06 wt pct C, 0.013 wt pct N) were naturally cooled from 1373 K (1100 °C) to room temperature over a range of cooling rates (0.07 to 3.33 K/s). Samples from a plain C-Mn steel (0.06 wt pct C, 0.007 wt pct N) were also subjected to the same heat treatment for comparison. The effect of cooling rate and steel composition on microstructures, precipitates, and tensile properties has been investigated. Due to the presence of large fraction of harder constituents, like pearlite and bainite, HCLN steel showed higher strength and lower ductility than LCHN steel. LCHN steel, on the other hand, showed good combination of strength and ductility due to its predominantly ferrite matrix with precipitation strengthening. The V-precipitate size was more refined and the precipitate density was higher in HCLN steel than that in LCHN steel. This observation confirms the importance of C content in V-microalloyed steel in terms of precipitation strengthening. An intermediate cooling rate ( 1.4 K/s) has been found to be the optimum choice in order to maximize the precipitation strengthening in V-containing steels.

  18. Physical characteristics and health effects of aerosols from collapsed buildings.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H

    2006-01-01

    Airborne pollutants can rise to extreme levels when large buildings fall down. The terrorist attack on New York's World Trade Center (WTC) towers caused the release of an enormous quantity of pulverized building materials and combustion products into the local environment. Particulate matter (PM) from crushed WTC building materials is primarily non-respirable (>96% larger than 10 microm mass median aerodynamic diameter [MMAD]) and composed of fibrous and nonfibrous components such as gypsum, calcite, silica, glass fibers, cellulose, and asbestos. Respirable fine WTC PM (PM(2.5)) may include finely crushed building materials as well as combustion products such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Rescue workers at the WTC site had exposure-related increases in the incidences of nasal congestion, bronchial hyperreactivity to aerosolized methacholine, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and persistent cough. Toxicological studies in mice indicate that WTC PM(2.5) causes airflow obstruction above a critical dose. The review of physical characteristics and health effects of major pollutants derived from the collapse of the WTC towers has assisted in risk assessment efforts related to the collapse of large buildings.

  19. Concentration Effects on the Thermophoresis of Aerosol Spheres.

    PubMed

    Keh; Ho

    1999-08-01

    The thermophoretic motion of a homogeneous suspension of identical spherical particles of arbitrary thermal conductivity and surface properties is considered under conditions of small Knudsen, Peclet, and Reynolds numbers. The effects of interaction of the individual particles are taken into explicit account by employing a unit cell model which is known to provide good predictions for the sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of spherical particles. The appropriate equations of conservation of energy and momentum are solved for each cell, in which a spherical particle is envisaged to be surrounded by a concentric shell of suspending fluid, and the thermophoretic migration velocity of the particle is calculated for various cases. Analytical expressions of this mean particle velocity are obtained in closed form as functions of the volume fraction of the particles. Comparisons between the ensemble-averaged thermophoretic velocity of a test particle in a dilute suspension and our cell-model results are made. A parallel analysis for the sedimentation of aerosol spheres is also presented. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, Susanna; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ˜ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +5-8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  1. Radiative effects of interannually varying vs. interannually invariant aerosol emissions from fires

    DOE PAGES

    Grandey, Benjamin S.; Lee, Hsiang-He; Wang, Chien

    2016-11-23

    Open-burning fires play an important role in the earth's climate system. In addition to contributing a substantial fraction of global emissions of carbon dioxide, they are a major source of atmospheric aerosols containing organic carbon, black carbon, and sulfate. These “fire aerosols” can influence the climate via direct and indirect radiative effects. In this study, we investigate these radiative effects and the hydrological fast response using the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). Emissions of fire aerosols exert a global mean net radiative effect of −1.0 W m−2, dominated by the cloud shortwave response to organic carbon aerosol. The net radiative effect ismore » particularly strong over boreal regions. Conventionally, many climate modelling studies have used an interannually invariant monthly climatology of emissions of fire aerosols. However, by comparing simulations using interannually varying emissions vs. interannually invariant emissions, we find that ignoring the interannual variability of the emissions can lead to systematic overestimation of the strength of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols. Globally, the overestimation is +23 % (−0.2 W m−2). Regionally, the overestimation can be substantially larger. For example, over Australia and New Zealand the overestimation is +58 % (−1.2 W m−2), while over Boreal Asia the overestimation is +43 % (−1.9 W m−2). The systematic overestimation of the net radiative effect of the fire aerosols is likely due to the non-linear influence of aerosols on clouds. However, ignoring interannual variability in the emissions does not appear to significantly impact the hydrological fast response. In order to improve understanding of the climate system, we need to take into account the interannual variability of aerosol emissions.« less

  2. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  3. Ground Based Remote Sensing of the First Aerosol Indirect Effect: An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previdi, M.; Feingold, G.; Veron, D. E.; Eberhard, W. L.

    2003-12-01

    The first aerosol indirect effect can be defined as an increase in the shortwave albedo of clouds due to higher concentrations of atmospheric aerosol, whereby the aerosol acts as cloud condensation nuclei to produce increased cloud droplet concentrations and smaller, more reflective droplets. The current work is one step toward achieving a more complete understanding of the indirect effect, which will consequently allow for a better determination of how changes in cloud induced by aerosol may affect the radiation budget and thus the climate. We utilize a series of continuous ground-based measurements from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program to investigate the indirect effect. Days that exhibit ice-free, single layered, nonprecipitating clouds are analyzed, with the indirect effect quantified as the relative change in cloud droplet effective radius for a relative change in aerosol extinction (under conditions of equivalent cloud liquid water path). Several cases from the first six years of our analysis (1998-2003) are described here, and probable reasons for the differences in the cloud response to aerosol among the cases are discussed.

  4. A Simple Model for the Cloud Adjacency Effect and the Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Coakley, James A., Jr.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Loeb,Norman G.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In determining aerosol-cloud interactions, the properties of aerosols must be characterized in the vicinity of clouds. Numerous studies based on satellite observations have reported that aerosol optical depths increase with increasing cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from the humidification and consequent growth of aerosol particles in the moist cloud environment, but part comes from 3D cloud-radiative transfer effects on the retrieved aerosol properties. Often, discerning whether the observed increases in aerosol optical depths are artifacts or real proves difficult. The paper provides a simple model that quantifies the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds that are used in the aerosol retrievals. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from enhanced Rayleigh scattering that results from the presence of the nearby clouds. The enhancement in Rayleigh scattering is estimated using a stochastic cloud model to obtain the radiative flux reflected by broken clouds and comparing this flux with that obtained with the molecules in the atmosphere causing extinction, but no scattering.

  5. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, Andrew; Morrison, Hugh; Lee, Yunha; Shindell, Drew T.; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Kipling, Zak; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascent (ω500 < -25 hPa day-1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day-1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  6. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, A.; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Takeamura, Toshihiko; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Shindell, D. T.; Partridge, Daniel; Stier, P.; Kipling, Z.; Fu, Congbin

    2016-03-04

    Aerosol-cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascend (ω500 < -25 hPa/d) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is as large as that in stratocumulus regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascend are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. 42" It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm/d) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64% to nearly 100%). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes than that globally, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  7. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Johnson, Jill S; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Schmidt, K Sebastian

    2016-05-24

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol-cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution to represent clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol-cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol-cloud radiation system.

  8. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; Johnson, Jill S.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol-cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution to represent clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol-cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol-cloud radiation system.

  9. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Prediction Error from Application of Kohler Theory: Importance for the Aerosol Indirect Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotiropoulou, Rafaella-Eleni P.; Nenes, Athanasios; Adams, Peter J.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2007-01-01

    In situ observations of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the GISS GCM Model II' with an online aerosol simulation and explicit aerosol-cloud interactions are used to quantify the uncertainty in radiative forcing and autoconversion rate from application of Kohler theory. Simulations suggest that application of Koehler theory introduces a 10-20% uncertainty in global average indirect forcing and 2-11% uncertainty in autoconversion. Regionally, the uncertainty in indirect forcing ranges between 10-20%, and 5-50% for autoconversion. These results are insensitive to the range of updraft velocity and water vapor uptake coefficient considered. This study suggests that Koehler theory (as implemented in climate models) is not a significant source of uncertainty for aerosol indirect forcing but can be substantial for assessments of aerosol effects on the hydrological cycle in climatically sensitive regions of the globe. This implies that improvements in the representation of GCM subgrid processes and aerosol size distribution will mostly benefit indirect forcing assessments. Predictions of autoconversion, by nature, will be subject to considerable uncertainty; its reduction may require explicit representation of size-resolved aerosol composition and mixing state.

  10. New approaches to quantifying aerosol influence on the cloud radiative effect

    DOE PAGES

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Yamaguchi, Takanobu; ...

    2016-02-01

    The topic of cloud radiative forcing associated with the atmospheric aerosol has been the focus of intense scrutiny for decades. The enormity of the problem is reflected in the need to understand aspects such as aerosol composition, optical properties, cloud condensation, and ice nucleation potential, along with the global distribution of these properties, controlled by emissions, transport, transformation, and sinks. Equally daunting is that clouds themselves are complex, turbulent, microphysical entities and, by their very nature, ephemeral and hard to predict. Atmospheric general circulation models represent aerosol-cloud interactions at ever-increasing levels of detail, but these models lack the resolution tomore » represent clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions adequately. There is a dearth of observational constraints on aerosol-cloud interactions. We develop a conceptual approach to systematically constrain the aerosol-cloud radiative effect in shallow clouds through a combination of routine process modeling and satellite and surface-based shortwave radiation measurements. We heed the call to merge Darwinian and Newtonian strategies by balancing microphysical detail with scaling and emergent properties of the aerosol-cloud radiation system.« less

  11. Real Effect or Artifact of Cloud Cover on Aerosol Optical Thickness?

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, M-J.; Li, Z.

    2005-03-18

    Aerosol measurements over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud And Radiation Test bed (CART) site under Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program characterize the temporal variability, vertical distribution, and optical properties of aerosols in the region. They were made by the Cimel sunphotometer and Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), Raman Lidar, In situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) flights, and the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). The spatial variability of aerosols relies a network of MFRSR at the Central Facility (CF) and Extended Facilities (EF), together with satellite remote sensing. The current state-of-art satellite-based estimates over land--e.g., MODerate resolution Imaging Scanner (MODIS) aerosol optical thickness--still suffer from large uncertainties. Contamination due to sub-pixel and/or thin cirrus clouds is believed to be one of the major sources of uncertainties. Retrievals near clouds are discouraged to use, which reduces considerably the amount of useful data. In this regard, cloud is considered as an artifact. However, cloud could have a real impact on AOT by changing humidity, which affects aerosol through the aerosol swelling effect. As a preliminary study, we first investigate the effects of cloud cover and humidity on the retrievals of AOT from ground-based Cimel sunphotometer measurements, in order to help us sort out the real influence and artifact. In general, it is very difficult to verify and quantify the effects of cloud on satellite retrieval of aerosol quantities. Speculation and warning of cloud contamination have been made whenever there is a correlation between the retrieved AOT and cloud fraction or their spatial variabilities, while it has also been argued that aerosol humidification effect (AHE) might be at work. The ample measurements available from ARM over the SGP region may allow us to unravel this complex issue. Our ultimate goals are to (1) evaluate various effects on the

  12. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-07-12

    The CARES field campaign is motivated by the scientific issues described in the CARES Science Plan. The primary objectives of this field campaign are to investigate the evolution and aging of carbonaceous aerosols and their climate-affecting properties in the urban plume of Sacramento, California, a mid-size, mid-latitude city that is located upwind of a biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission region. Our basic observational strategy is to make comprehensive gas, aerosol, and meteorological measurements upwind, within, and downwind of the urban area with the DOE G-1 aircraft and at strategically located ground sites so as to study the evolution of urban aerosols as they age and mix with biogenic SOA precursors. The NASA B-200 aircraft, equipped with the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), digital camera, and the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), will be flown in coordination with the G-1 to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties, and to provide the vertical context for the G-1 and ground in situ measurements.

  13. Aerosol scattering effects on water vapor retrievals over the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhao-Cheng; Zhang, Qiong; Natraj, Vijay; Margolis, Jack S.; Shia, Run-Lie; Newman, Sally; Fu, Dejian; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Wong, Kam W.; Sander, Stanley P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we propose a novel approach to describe the scattering effects of atmospheric aerosols in a complex urban environment using water vapor (H2O) slant column measurements in the near infrared. This approach is demonstrated using measurements from the California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the top of Mt. Wilson, California, and a two-stream-exact single scattering (2S-ESS) radiative transfer (RT) model. From the spectral measurements, we retrieve H2O slant column density (SCD) using 15 different absorption bands between 4000 and 8000 cm-1. Due to the wavelength dependence of aerosol scattering, large variations in H2O SCD retrievals are observed as a function of wavelength. Moreover, the variations are found to be correlated with aerosol optical depths (AODs) measured at the AERONET-Caltech station. Simulation results from the RT model reproduce this correlation and show that the aerosol scattering effect is the primary contributor to the variations in the wavelength dependence of the H2O SCD retrievals. A significant linear correlation is also found between variations in H2O SCD retrievals from different bands and corresponding AOD data; this correlation is associated with the asymmetry parameter, which is a first-order measure of the aerosol scattering phase function. The evidence from both measurements and simulations suggests that wavelength-dependent aerosol scattering effects can be derived using H2O retrievals from multiple bands. This understanding of aerosol scattering effects on H2O retrievals suggests a promising way to quantify the effect of aerosol scattering on greenhouse gas retrievals and could potentially contribute towards reducing biases in greenhouse gas retrievals from space.

  14. Aerosol effects on summer monsoon over Asia during 1980s and 1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, I.-Chun; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Lee, Wei-Liang

    2016-10-01

    The Community Earth System Model is used to study the aerosol climate effects during the 1980s and 1990s in which the anthropogenic SO2 emissions decreased in North America and Western Europe and increased in East and South Asia. From the 100 year simulations, aerosol forcing results in cooler (-0.13 K) and drier (-0.01 mm/day) atmosphere with less shortwave radiation flux at the surface (-0.37 W/m2). The clear-sky shortwave radiation flux decreased over East Asia (-0.81 W/m2) and South Asia (-1.09 W/m2), but increased over Western Europe (+1.16 W/m2) and North America (+0.39 W/m2), consistent with aerosol loading changes. While changes in spatial distributions of all-sky shortwave radiation and surface temperature are closely related to cloud changes, the changes in wind and precipitation do not correspond to aerosol loading changes, indicating the complexity of aerosol-cloud circulation interactions. The East and South Asia monsoons were generally weakened due mainly to southward shift of the 200 hPa East Asia Jet (EAJ) and decrease in 850 hPa winds; annual precipitation decreased by 2% in South Asia but increased by 2% in Yangtze-Huai River Valley over East Asia. The uncertainties associated with aerosol climate effects are addressed within the context of model variability and the global warming effect. For the latter, while the aerosol effects decrease the greenhouse warming on the global mean, the regional responses are different. Nevertheless, the characteristics of aerosol climate effects, including the southward 200 hPa EAJ and weakened South Asia monsoon, still persist when the climate becomes warmer, although the strength and the geographical distribution are slightly modulated.

  15. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd

  16. Aerosol direct effect retrieval over clouds from space-borne passive hyperspectral measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds will be presented, which is independent of aerosol parameters estimates. The direct effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) of aerosols over clouds can be estimated using hyperspectral reflectance measurements from space-borne spectrometers, when the equivalent aerosol-unpolluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum is known. For smoke over clouds the cloud parameters can be estimated from the shortwave infrared (SWIR), where the absorption of the small smoke particles becomes sufficiently small. Using precomputed tables of cloud reflectance spectra, the unpolluted cloud scene spectrum can then be simulated and compared to the real measured polluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum. The UV-radiation absorption by the smoke will lead to a difference between the measured and simulated spectra, which is proportional to the aerosol DRE at TOA. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the aerosol-free scene spectra, all the aerosol effects are in the reflectance measurements. The method works especially well for cloud scenes, which can be simulated relatively accurately. An algorithm was developed to derive the aerosol DRE over marine clouds, using the space-borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which produced shortwave reflectance spectra (from 240 to 1700 nm contiguously) from 2002 till 2012. These are ideally suited to study the effect of aerosols on the shortwave spectrum. However, since aerosols in general do not have high resolution spectral features, the algorithm can be adapted to suit data from any combination of instruments that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances simultaneously. Examples include OMI and MODIS, flying in the A-Train constellation, and TROPOMI, on the future Sentinel 5 precursor mission, combined with NOAA's NPP VIIRS. This would produce aerosol DRE estimates with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution. The

  17. Evidence for an earlier greenhouse cooling effect in the stratosphere before 1980 over the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerefos, C. S.; Tourpali, K.; Zanis, P.; Eleftheratos, K.; Repapis, C.; Goodman, A.; Wuebbles, D.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Luterbacher, J.

    2014-08-01

    processes reduce the statistical significance of these trends. Model results are in line with reanalysis and the observations, indicating a persistent cooling (-0.33 °C decade-1) in the lower stratosphere during summer before and after 1980; a feature that is also seen throughout the year. However, the lower stratosphere CESM1-WACCM modelled trends are generally lower than reanalysis and the observations. The contrasting effects of ozone depletion at polar latitudes in winter/spring and the anticipated strengthening of the Brewer-Dobson circulation from man-made global warming at polar latitudes are discussed. Our results provide additional evidence for an early greenhouse cooling signal in the lower stratosphere before 1980, which appears well in advance relative to the tropospheric greenhouse warming signal. The suitability of early warning signals in the stratosphere relative to the troposphere is supported by the fact that the stratosphere is less sensitive to changes due to cloudiness, humidity and man-made aerosols. Our analysis also indicates that the relative contribution of the lower stratosphere versus the upper troposphere low-frequency variability is important for understanding the added value of the long-term tropopause variability related to human-induced global warming.

  18. Amplification of ENSO effects on Indian summer monsoon by absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sang, Jeong; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Woo-Seop

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present observational evidence, based on satellite aerosol measurements and MERRA reanalysis data for the period 1979-2011, indicating that absorbing aerosols can have strong influence on seasonal-to-interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, including amplification of ENSO effects. We find a significant correlation between ENSO (El Nino Southern Oscillation) and aerosol loading in April-May, with La Nina (El Nino) conditions favoring increased (decreased) aerosol accumulation over northern India, with maximum aerosol optical depth over the Arabian Sea and Northwestern India, indicative of strong concentration of dust aerosols transported from West Asia and Middle East deserts. Composite analyses based on a normalized aerosol index (NAI) show that high concentration of aerosol over northern India in April-May is associated with increased moisture transport, enhanced dynamically induced warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau, and enhanced rainfall over northern India and the Himalayan foothills during May-June, followed by a subsequent suppressed monsoon rainfall over all India, consistent with the elevated heat pump (EHP) hypothesis (Lau et al. in Clim Dyn 26:855-864, 2006. doi: 10.1007/s00382-006-0114-z). Further analyses from sub-sampling of ENSO years, with normal (<1-σ), and abnormal (>1-σ) NAI over northern India respectively show that the EHP may lead to an amplification of the Indian summer monsoon response to ENSO forcing, particularly with respect to the increased rainfall over the Himalayan foothills, and the warming of the upper troposphere over the Tibetan Plateau. Our results suggest that absorbing aerosol, particular desert dusts can strongly modulate ENSO influence, and possibly play important roles as a feedback agent in climate change in Asian monsoon regions.

  19. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, C. D.; Ottaviani, Matteo; Cziczo, D. J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail Dmitrievic; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Schmid, B.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Erickson, M. H.; Fast, J. D.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Baidar, S.; Hair, J.; Hostetler, C.; Obland, M. D.; Rogers, R. R.; Floerchinger, C.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climaterelated properties in freshly polluted and "aged" urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: (a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, (b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, (c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and (d) a roadmap of planned data

  20. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Baidar, S.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, B.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Erickson, M. H.; Fast, J. D.; Floerchinger, C.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Gaffney, J. S.; Gilles, M. K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, W. I.; Gyawali, M.; Hair, J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, S.; Hiranuma, N.; Hostetler, C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, B. T.; Kassianov, E. I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, C.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, C.; Kubátová, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, A.; Laulainen, N.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mei, F.; Moffet, R. C.; Nelson, D.; Obland, M. D.; Oetjen, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Ortega, I.; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, M.; Prather, K. A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, R. R.; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, A.; Senff, C. J.; Senum, G.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J. E.; Shrivastava, M.; Song, C.; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, K.; Tomlinson, J.; Volkamer, R.; Wallace, H. W.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X.-Y.; Zelenyuk, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-08-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and "aged" urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: (a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, (b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, (c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and (d) a roadmap of planned data

  1. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, B.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Baidar, S.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, B.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Fast, J. D.; Floerchinger, C.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Gaffney, J. S.; Gilles, M. K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, W. I.; Gyawali, M.; Hair, J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, S.; Hiranuma, N.; Hostetler, C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, B. T.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, C.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, C.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, A.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mei, F.; Moffet, R. C.; Nelson, D.; Obland, M. D.; Oetjen, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Ortega, I.; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, M.; Prather, K. A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, R. R.; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, A.; Senff, C. J.; Senum, G.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J. E.; Shrivastava, M.; Song, C.; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Tomlinson, J.; Volkamer, R.; Wallace, H. W.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Yu, X.-Y.; Zelenyuk, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and "aged" urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: (a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, (b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, (c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and (d) a roadmap of planned data

  2. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, B.; Ferrare, R. A.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, M.; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D. B.; Baidar, S.; Banta, R. M.; Barnard, J. C.; Beranek, J.; Berg, L. K.; Brechtel, F.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, J. F.; Cairns, B.; Cappa, C. D.; Chand, D.; China, S.; Comstock, J. M.; Dubey, M. K.; Easter, R. C.; Erickson, M. H.; Fast, J. D.; Floerchinger, C.; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, E.; Gaffney, J. S.; Gilles, M. K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, W. I.; Gyawali, M.; Hair, J.; Hardesty, R. M.; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, S.; Hiranuma, N.; Hostetler, C.; Hubbe, J. M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, B. T.; Kassianov, E. I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, C.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, C.; Kubátová, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, A.; Laulainen, N.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, C.; Mei, F.; Moffet, R. C.; Nelson, D.; Obland, M. D.; Oetjen, H.; Onasch, T. B.; Ortega, I.; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, M.; Prather, K. A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, R. R.; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, A.; Senff, C. J.; Senum, G.; Setyan, A.; Shilling, J. E.; Shrivastava, M.; Song, C.; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, K.; Tomlinson, J.; Volkamer, R.; Wallace, H. W.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Yu, X. -Y.; Zelenyuk, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites – one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area – were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and “aged” urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial findings from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of

  3. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

    2012-08-22

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data

  4. A study of the indirect aerosol effect on subarctic marine liquid low-level clouds using MODIS cloud data and ground-based aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporre, Moa K.; Glantz, Paul; Tunved, Peter; Swietlicki, Erik; Kulmala, Markku; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2012-10-01

    Cloud microphysics is substantially affected by aerosol loading and the resulting changes in the reflective properties of the clouds can significantly affect the global radiation budget. A study of how marine low-level clouds over Barents Sea and the northern parts of the Norwegian Sea are affected by air mass origin has been performed by combining ground-based aerosol measurements with satellite cloud retrievals. Aerosol number size distributions have been obtained from measurement stations in northern Finland, and a trajectory model has been used to estimate the movement of the air masses. To identify anthropogenic influences on the clouds, the dataset has been divided according to aerosol loading. The clean air masses arrived to the investigation area from the north and the polluted air masses arrived from the south. Satellite derived microphysical and optical cloud parameters from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) have then been analyzed for days when the trajectories coincided with marine low-level clouds over the investigated area. The cloud optical thickness (τ), cloud depth (H) and droplet number concentration (Nd) were significantly higher for the polluted days compared to the clean conditions, while the opposite was found for the cloud droplet effective radius (re). The H and Nd were derived from the satellite retrievals of τ and re. Furthermore, calculations of the aerosol cloud interaction relationship (ACI), relating Nd to boundary layer aerosol concentrations, resulted in a value of 0.17, which is in line with previous remote sensing studies. The results demonstrate that ground-based aerosol measurements can be combined with satellite cloud observations to study the indirect aerosol effect, and that the microphysics of marine sub-polar clouds can be considerably affected by continental aerosols.

  5. Integration of the Equations of Classical Electrode-Effect Theory with Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A. V.; Leont'ev, N. V.; Terent'ev, A. M.; Umnikov, E. D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to an analytical study of the one-dimensional stationary system of equations for modeling of the electrode effect in the Earth's atmospheric layer with aerosols. New integrals of the system are derived. Using these integrals, the expressions for solutions of the system and estimates of the electrode layer's thickness as a function of the aerosol concentration are obtained for numerical parameters close to real.

  6. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, T. D.; Sahu, S. K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g-1 and 17.84±6.45 W g-1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67-90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV-visible spectrum.

  7. Effect of stratospheric aerosols on direct sunlight and implications for concentrating solar power.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Daniel M

    2009-04-15

    Light scattering calculations and data show that stratospheric aerosols reduce direct sunlight by about 4 W for every watt reflected to outer space. The balance becomes diffuse sunlight. One consequence of deliberate enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer would be a significant reduction in the efficiency of solar power generation systems using parabolic or other concentrating optics. There also would be a reduction in the effectiveness of passive solar design.

  8. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are input into the troposphere by biomass burning, among other sources. These aerosol palls cover large expanses of the earth's surface. Aerosols may directly scatter solar radiation back to space, thus increasing the earth's albedo and act to cool the earth's surface and atmosphere. Aerosols also contribute to the earth's energy balance indirectly. Hygroscopic aerosol act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and thus affects cloud properties. In 1977, Twomey theorized that additional available CCN would create smaller but more numerous cloud droplets in a cloud with a given amount of liquid water. This in turn would increase the cloud albedo which would scatter additional radiation back to space and create a similar cooling pattern as the direct aerosol effect. Estimates of the magnitude of the aerosol indirect effect on a global scale range from 0.0 to -4.8 W/sq m. Thus the indirect effect can be of comparable magnitude and opposite in sign to the estimates of global greenhouse gas forcing Aerosol-cloud interaction is not a one-way process. Just as aerosols have an influence on clouds through the cloud microphysics, clouds have an influence on aerosols. Cloud droplets are solutions of liquid water and CCN, now dissolved. When the cloud droplet evaporates it leaves behind an aerosol particle. This new particle does not have to have the same properties as the original CCN. In fact, studies show that aerosol particles that result from cloud processing are larger in size than the original CCN. Optical properties of aerosol particles are dependent on the size of the particles. Larger particles have a smaller backscattering fraction, and thus less incoming solar radiation will be backscattered to space if the aerosol particles are larger. Therefore, we see that aerosols and clouds modify each other to influence the radiative balance of the earth. Understanding and quantifying the spatial and seasonal patterns of the aerosol indirect forcing may have

  9. Crystal/liquid partitioning in augite - Effects of cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, R. P.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-03-01

    The partitioning of major and minor elements between augite and melt was determined as a function of cooling rate for two high-titanium basalt compositions. The results of this study of lunar rock systems 10017 and 75055 were compared with the results of other kinetic studies of augite-liquid partitioning in other rock systems. It was found that the partitioning of major elements (i.e., Ca, Fe, Mg) is essentially rate independent and is insensitive to bulk rock composition and to the nature and order of appearance of coexisting phases for cooling rates of less than 100 C/hr. The partitioning behavior of minor elements (i.e., Al, Cr, Ti) for the same range of cooling rates is complex, being dependent on cooling rate and bulk rock composition. Consideration of these factors is important when augite chemistry and/or partitioning behavior are used in modeling certain magmatic processes or in estimating the thermal history of basaltic rocks.

  10. Radiative forcing under mixed aerosol conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA, O. E.; Expósito, F. J.; DíAz, J. P.; DíAz, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mixture of mineral dust with biomass burning or urban-industrial aerosols presents significant differences in optical properties when compared to those of the individual constituents, leading to different impacts on solar radiation levels. This effect is assessed by estimating the direct radiative forcing (ΔF) of these aerosols from solar flux models using the radiative parameters derived from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). These data reveal that, in oceanic and vegetative covers (surface albedo (SA) < 0.30), the aerosol effect at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is always cooling the Earth-atmosphere system, regardless of the aerosol type. The obtained average values of ΔF range between -27 ± 15 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 μm, 0.3 ± 0.3) for mineral dust mixed with urban-industrial aerosols, registered in the East Asia region, and -34 ± 18 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4) for the mixture of the mineral dust and biomass burning particles, observed in the Central Africa region. In the intermediate SA range (0.30-0.50) the TOA radiative effect depends on the aerosol absorption properties. Thus, aerosols with single scattering albedo at 0.55 μm lower than ˜0.88 lead to a warming of the system, with ΔF of 10 ± 11 Wm-2 for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning. Cases with SA > 0.30 are not present in East Asia region. At the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) the maximum ΔF values are associated with the highest AOD levels obtained for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols (-130 ± 44 Wm-2 with AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4 for SA < 0.30).

  11. Effects of Pulsing on Film Cooling of Gas Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-09

    turbine engine . 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 70 14. SUBJECT TERMS: Turbine blade ; Film cooling ; Pulsed jet 16. PRICE CODE 17...with additional research, ultimately allowing for an increased efficiency in a gas turbine engine . 2 Keywords Turbine blade Film cooling Pulsed jet ... engine for aircraft propulsion…………………. 11 Figure 2: Thermodynamic cycle of a general turbine engine . ………………………..…… 11

  12. Effects of atmospheric dynamics and aerosols on the fraction of supercooled water clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiming; Lv, Qiaoyi; Zhang, Min; Wang, Tianhe; Kawamoto, Kazuaki; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Beidou

    2017-02-01

    Based on 8 years of (January 2008-December 2015) cloud phase information from the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Cloud Product (GOCCP), aerosol products from CALIPSO and meteorological parameters from the ERA-Interim products, the present study investigates the effects of atmospheric dynamics on the supercooled liquid cloud fraction (SCF) during nighttime under different aerosol loadings at global scale to better understand the conditions of supercooled liquid water gradually transforming to ice phase. Statistical results indicate that aerosols' effect on nucleation cannot fully explain all SCF changes, especially in those regions where aerosols' effect on nucleation is not a first-order influence (e.g., due to low ice nuclei aerosol frequency). By performing the temporal and spatial correlations between SCFs and different meteorological factors, this study presents specifically the relationship between SCF and different meteorological parameters under different aerosol loadings on a global scale. We find that the SCFs almost decrease with increasing of aerosol loading, and the SCF variation is closely related to the meteorological parameters but their temporal relationship is not stable and varies with the different regions, seasons and isotherm levels. Obviously negative temporal correlations between SCFs versus vertical velocity and relative humidity indicate that the higher vertical velocity and relative humidity the smaller SCFs. However, the patterns of temporal correlation for lower-tropospheric static stability, skin temperature and horizontal wind are relatively more complex than those of vertical velocity and humidity. For example, their close correlations are predominantly located in middle and high latitudes and vary with latitude or surface type. Although these statistical correlations have not been used to establish a certain causal relationship, our results may provide a unique point of view

  13. Aerosol effects on ozone concentrations in Beijing: a model sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Zheng, Shaoqing; He, Youjiang

    2012-01-01

    Most previous O3 simulations were based only on gaseous phase photochemistry. However, some aerosol-related processes, namely, heterogeneous reactions occurring on the aerosol surface and photolysis rate alternated by aerosol radiative influence, may affect O3 photochemistry under high aerosol loads. A three-dimensional air quality model, Models-3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality-Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution, was employed to simulate the effects of the above-mentioned processes on O3 formation under typical high O3 episodes in Beijing during summer. Five heterogeneous reactions, i.e., NO2, NO3, N2O5, HO2, and O3, were individually investigated to elucidate their effects on 03 formation. The results showed that the heterogeneous reactions significantly affected O3 formation in the urban plume. NO2 heterogeneous reaction increased O3 to 90 ppb, while HO2 heterogeneous reaction decreased O3 to 33 ppb. In addition, O3 heterogeneous loss decreased O3 to 31 ppb. The effects of NO2, NO3, and N2O5 heterogeneous reactions showed opposite O3 concentration changes between the urban and extra-urban areas because of the response of the reactions to the two types of O3 formation regimes. When the aerosol radiative influence was included, the photolysis rate decreased and O3 decreased significantly to 73 ppb O3. The two aerosol-related processes should be considered in the study of O3 formation because high aerosol concentration is a ubiquitous phenomenon that affects the urban- and regional air quality in China.

  14. Dimers in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol: effect of hydroxyl radical, ozone, relative humidity and aerosol acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, K.; Cui, T.; Zhang, H.; Gold, A.; Glasius, M.; Surratt, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from both ozonolysis and hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of α-pinene under conditions of high nitric oxide (NO) concentrations with varying relative humidity (RH) and aerosol acidity was investigated in the University of North Carolina dual outdoor smog chamber facility. SOA formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene was enhanced relative to that from OH-initiated oxidation in the presence of initially high-NO conditions. However, no effect of RH on SOA mass was evident. Ozone (O3)-initiated oxidation of α-pinene in the presence of ammonium sulfate (AS) seed coated with organic aerosol from OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene showed reduced nucleation compared to ozonolysis in the presence of pure AS seed aerosol. The chemical composition of α-pinene SOA was investigated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-Q-TOFMS), with a focus on the formation of carboxylic acids and high-molecular weight dimers. A total of eight carboxylic acids and four dimers were identified, constituting between 8 and 12% of the total α-pinene SOA mass. OH-initiated oxidation of α-pinene in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) resulted in the formation of highly oxidized carboxylic acids, such as 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA) and diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA). The formation of dimers was observed only in SOA produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene in the absence of NOx, with increased concentrations by a factor of two at higher RH (50-90%) relative to lower RH (30-50%). The increased formation of dimers correlates with an observed increase in new particle formation at higher RH due to nucleation. Increased aerosol acidity was found to have a negligible effect on the formation of the dimers. SOA mass yield did not influence the chemical composition of SOA formed from α-pinene ozonolysis with respect to

  15. Distinct effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the East Asian summer monsoon between multidecadal strong and weak monsoon stages

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Xiaoning; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Xiaodong; ...

    2016-06-18

    Industrial emissions of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia have greatly increased in recent decades, and so the interactions between atmospheric aerosols and the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) have attracted enormous attention. In order to further understand the aerosol-EASM interaction, we investigate the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the EASM during the multidecadal strong (1950–1977) and weak (1978–2000) EASM stages using the Community Atmospheric Model 5.1. Numerical experiments are conducted for the whole period, including the two different EASM stages, with present day (PD, year 2000) and preindustrial (PI, year 1850) aerosol emissions, as well as the observed time-varying aerosolmore » emissions. A comparison of the results from PD and PI shows that, with the increase in anthropogenic aerosols, the large-scale EASM intensity is weakened to a greater degree (-9.8%) during the weak EASM stage compared with the strong EASM stage (-4.4%). The increased anthropogenic aerosols also result in a significant reduction in precipitation over North China during the weak EASM stage, as opposed to a statistically insignificant change during the strong EASM stage. Because of greater aerosol loading and the larger sensitivity of the climate system during weak EASM stages, the aerosol effects are more significant during these EASM stages. Moreover, these results suggest that anthropogenic aerosols from the same aerosol emissions have distinct effects on the EASM and the associated precipitation between the multidecadal weak and strong EASM stages.« less

  16. Local cooling and warming effects of forests based on satellite observations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Maosheng; Motesharrei, Safa; Mu, Qiaozhen; Kalnay, Eugenia; Li, Shuangcheng

    2015-03-31

    The biophysical effects of forests on climate have been extensively studied with climate models. However, models cannot accurately reproduce local climate effects due to their coarse spatial resolution and uncertainties, and field observations are valuable but often insufficient due to their limited coverage. Here we present new evidence acquired from global satellite data to analyse the biophysical effects of forests on local climate. Results show that tropical forests have a strong cooling effect throughout the year; temperate forests show moderate cooling in summer and moderate warming in winter with net cooling annually; and boreal forests have strong warming in winter and moderate cooling in summer with net warming annually. The spatiotemporal cooling or warming effects are mainly driven by the two competing biophysical effects, evapotranspiration and albedo, which in turn are strongly influenced by rainfall and snow. Implications of our satellite-based study could be useful for informing local forestry policies.

  17. Measurement of the Vertical Distribution of Aerosol by Globally Distributed MP Lidar Network Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Welton, Judd; Campbell, James; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global distribution of aerosol has an important influence on climate through the scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation and through modification of cloud optical properties. Current satellite and other data already provide a great amount of information on aerosol distribution. However there are critical parameters that can only be obtained by active optical profiling. For aerosol, no passive technique can adequately resolve the height profile of aerosol. The aerosol height distribution is required for any model for aerosol transport and the height resolved radiative heating/cooling<