Science.gov

Sample records for aerosol direct effects

  1. Aerosol direct radiative effect over China estimated with visibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, K.; Lin, J.

    2012-12-01

    As a short-lived climate forcer, aerosols exhibit strong radiative effects that vary significantly across the space and time. Current understanding of the long-term variability of aerosol climate forcings is however very poor due to lack of relevant atmospheric measurements. Historic records for visibility measurements from thousands of ground meteorological stations offer a plausible tool to study the decadal and multi-decadal variability of aerosol radiative effects. As a first step, this study presents a method to estimate aerosol direct radiative effect over China based on visibility data for 2006. Visibility data from about 400 ground stations are converted to near-surface aerosol extinction coefficients, which are converted then to aerosol optical depth (AOD) based on spatially and temporally varying vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties simulated by the widely used chemical transport model GEOS-Chem. The resulting AOD data are consistent with direct measurements from the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) in regions where visibility and AOD measurement sites are close in distance. Next, the visibility-derived AOD data are combined with other aerosol optical properties adopted from GEOS-Chem, cloud data from ground stations and surface albedo data from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) to derive the direct radiative effect, by employing the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (SBDART). Spatial and monthly variations of aerosol radiative effects are examined.

  2. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  3. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of Southern African biomass burning aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

    2011-06-21

    The direct and semi-direct radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from Southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. The aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from MODIS and for aerosol layers above clouds from CALIPSO. Over the ocean, where the absorbing biomass burning aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semi-direct radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semi-direct radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by aerosol absorptive warming in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The ocean cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land where cloud cover changes are minimal, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative requiring a reduction in precipitation. This is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rainforest and the ITCZ in the southern Sahel. The changes are consistent with the low-level aerosol forced cooling pattern. The results highlight the

  4. Modeling the Relationships Between Aerosol Properties and the Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols on Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols may affect climate directly by scattering and absorbing visible and infrared energy, They may also affect climate indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds through microphysical processes, and by altering abundances of radiatively important gases through heterogeneous chemistry. Researchers understand which aerosol properties control the direct effect of aerosols on the radiation budget. Unfortunately, despite an abundance of data on certain types of aerosols, much work remains to be done to determine the values of these properties. For instance we have little idea about the global distribution, seasonal variation, or interannual variability of the aerosol optical depth. Also we do not know the visible light absorption properties of tropical aerosols which may contain much debris from slash and burn agriculture. A positive correlation between aerosol concentrations and albedos of marine stratus clouds is observed, and the causative microphysics is understood. However, models suggest that it is difficult to produce new particles in the marine boundary layer. Some modelers have suggested that the particles in the marine boundary layer may originate in the free troposphere and be transported into the boundary layer. Others argue that the aerosols are created in the marine boundary layer. There are no data linking aerosol concentration and cirrus cloud albedo, and models suggest cirrus properties may not be very sensitive to aerosol abundance. There is clear evidence of a radiatively significant change in the global lower stratospheric ozone abundance during the past few decades. These changes are caused by heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring on the surfaces of particles. The rates of these reactions depend upon the chemical composition of the particles. Although rapid advances in understanding heterogeneous chemistry have been made, much remains to be done.

  5. Direct and semidirect aerosol effects of southern African biomass burning aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaeda, Naoko; Wood, Robert; Rasch, Philip J.

    2011-06-01

    Direct and semidirect radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols from southern African fires during July-October are investigated using 20 year runs of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) coupled to a slab ocean model. Aerosol optical depth is constrained using observations in clear skies from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and for aerosol layers above clouds from Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO). Over the ocean, where the aerosol layers are primarily located above cloud, negative top of atmosphere (TOA) semidirect radiative effects associated with increased low cloud cover dominate over a weaker positive all-sky direct radiative effect (DRE). In contrast, over the land where the aerosols are often below or within cloud layers, reductions in cloud liquid water path (LWP) lead to a positive semidirect radiative effect that dominates over a near-zero DRE. Over the ocean, the cloud response can be understood as a response to increased lower tropospheric stability (LTS) which is caused both by radiative heating in overlying layers and surface cooling in response to direct aerosol forcing. The marine cloud changes are robust to changes in the cloud parameterization (removal of the hard-wired dependence of clouds on LTS), suggesting that they are physically realistic. Over land, decreased LWP is consistent with weaker convection driven by increased static stability. Over the entire region the overall TOA radiative effect from the biomass burning aerosols is almost zero due to opposing effects over the land and ocean. However, the surface forcing is strongly negative, which leads to a reduction in precipitation and also a reduction in sensible heat flux. The former is primarily realized through reductions in convective precipitation on both the southern and northern flanks of the convective precipitation region spanning the equatorial rain forest and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the

  6. Impact of Cloud-Borne Aerosol Representation on Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.

    2006-09-21

    Aerosol particles attached to cloud droplets are much more likely to be removed from the atmosphere and are much less efficient at scattering sunlight than if unattached. Models used to estimate direct and indirect effects of aerosols employ a variety of representations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol model with a relatively complete treatment of cloud-borne particles to estimate the sensitivity of simulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representation of cloud-borne particles. We find that neglecting transport of cloud-borne particles introduces little error, but that diagnosing cloud-borne particles produces global mean biases of 20% and local errors of up to 40% for many variables of interest. A treatment that predicts the total mass concentration of cloud-borne particles for each mode yields smaller errors and runs 20% faster than the complete treatment.

  7. Global profiles of the direct aerosol effect using vertically resolved aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korras Carraca, Marios Bruno; Pappas, Vasilios; Matsoukas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, both natural and anthropogenic, can cause climate change through their direct, indirect, and semi-direct effects on the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. In general, aerosols cause cooling of the surface and the planet, while they warm the atmosphere due to scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. The importance of vertically resolved direct radiative effect (DRE) and heating/cooling effects of aerosols is strong, while large uncertainties still lie with their magnitudes. In order to be able to quantify them throughout the atmosphere, a detailed vertical profile of the aerosol effect is required. Such data were made available recently by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite. CALIOP is the first polarization lidar to fly in space and has been acquiring unique data on aerosols and clouds since June 2006. The aim of this study is to investigate both the vertically resolved geographic and seasonal variation of the DRE due to aerosols. The vertical profile of DRE under all-sky and clear-sky conditions is computed using the deterministic spectral radiative transfer model FORTH. From the DRE, the effect on atmospheric heating/cooling rate profiles due to aerosols can also be derived. We use CALIOP Level 2-Version 3 Layer aerosol optical depth data as input to our radiation transfer model, for a period of 3 complete years (2007-2009). These data are provided on a 5 km horizontal resolution and in up to 8 vertical layers and have been regridded on our model horizontal and vertical resolutions. We use cloud data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), while the aerosol asymmetry factor and single scattering albedo are taken from the Global Aerosol Data Set (GADS). The model computations are performed on a monthly, 2.5°× 2.5° resolution on global scale, at 40

  8. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  9. Influence of Observed Diurnal Cycles of Aerosol Optical Depth on Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arola, A.; Eck, T. F.; Huttunen, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lindfors, A. V.; Myhre, G.; Smirinov, A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE). The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally.We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast) does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on 24 h ADRE was

  10. Effect of Increasing Temperature on Carbonaceous Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect over Southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielonen, Tero; Kokkola, Harri; Hienola, Anca; Kühn, Thomas; Merikanto, Joonas; Korhonen, Hannele; Arola, Antti; Kolmonen, Pekka; Sogacheva, Larisa; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are an important regulator of the Earth's climate. They scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation and thus cool the climate by reducing the amount of energy reaching the atmospheric layers and the surface below (direct effect). A certain subset of the particles can also act as initial formation sites for cloud droplets and thereby modify the microphysics, dynamics, radiative properties and lifetime of clouds (indirect effects). The magnitude of aerosol radiative effects remains the single largest uncertainty in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing. One of the key quantities needed for accurate estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing is an accurate estimate of the radiative effects from natural unperturbed aerosol. The dominant source of natural aerosols over Earth's vast forested regions are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) which, following oxidation in the atmosphere, can condense onto aerosol particles to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and significantly modify the particles' properties. In accordance with the expected positive temperature dependence of BVOC emissions, several previous studies have shown that some aerosol properties, such as mass concentration and ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), also correlate positively with temperature at many forested sites. There is conflicting evidence as to whether the aerosol direct effects have a temperature dependence due to increased BVOC emissions. The main objective of this study is to investigate the causes of the observed effect of increasing temperatures on the aerosol direct radiative effect, and to provide a quantitative estimate of this effect and of the resulting negative feedback in a warming climate. More specifically, we will investigate the causes of the positive correlation between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and land surface temperature (LST) over southeastern US where biogenic emissions are a significant source of atmospheric particles. In

  11. Retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect over clouds from spaceborne spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Wang, P.; Stammes, P.

    2012-04-01

    The solar radiative absorption by an aerosol layer above clouds is quantified using passive satellite spectrometry from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV-absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements, even when above clouds. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for biomass burning aerosols, the properties of the clouds below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol extinction optical thickness is sufficiently small. Using radiative transfer computations, the contribution of the clouds to the reflected radiation can be modeled for the entire solar spectrum. In this way, cloud and aerosol effects can be separated for a scene with aerosols above clouds. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the pure (aerosol-free) cloud spectra. An algorithm was developed using the spaceborne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds over the South Atlantic Ocean west of Africa, averaged through August 2006 was found to be 23 ± 8 Wm-2 with a mean variation over the region in this month of 22 Wm-2. The largest aerosol DRE over clouds found in that month was 132 ± 8 Wm-2. The algorithm can be applied to any instrument, or a combination of instruments, that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) simultaneously.

  12. CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects: Bias estimates using ground-based Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, Tyler J.; Fu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Observational constraints on the change in the radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e., the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study, uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE are estimated using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars at midlatitude and tropical sites. We find that CALIPSO is unable to detect all radiatively significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE by 30-50% at the two ARM sites. The undetected aerosol is likely the consequence of random noise in CALIPSO measurements and therefore will affect global observations as well. This suggests that the global aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO observations are likely too weak. Also examined is the impact of the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e., the lidar ratio) whose value CALIPSO retrievals must assume to obtain the aerosol extinction profile. It is shown that if CALIPSO can reproduce the climatological value of the lidar ratio at a given location, then the aerosol DRE there can be accurately calculated (within about 3%).

  13. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing) derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Chalmers, N.; Harris, B.; Grainger, R. G.; Highwood, E. J.

    2013-01-01

    Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region were derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which were combined to produce annual, global mean values of (-6.7 ± 3.9) W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and (-12 ± 6) W m-2 at the surface. These results were then used to give estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for the year 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  14. Regional and monthly and clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect (and forcing) derived from the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR satellite aerosol product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G. E.; Chalmers, N.; Harris, B.; Grainger, R. G.; Highwood, E. J.

    2012-07-01

    Using the GlobAEROSOL-AATSR dataset, estimates of the instantaneous, clear-sky, direct aerosol radiative effect and radiative forcing have been produced for the year 2006. Aerosol Robotic Network sun-photometer measurements have been used to characterise the random and systematic error in the GlobAEROSOL product for 22 regions covering the globe. Representative aerosol properties for each region have been derived from the results of a wide range of literature sources and, along with the de-biased GlobAEROSOL AODs, were used to drive an offline version of the Met Office unified model radiation scheme. In addition to the mean AOD, best-estimate run of the radiation scheme, a range of additional calculations were done to propagate uncertainty estimates in the AOD, optical properties, surface albedo and errors due to the temporal and spatial averaging of the AOD fields. This analysis produced monthly, regional estimates of the clear-sky aerosol radiative effect and its uncertainty, which produce annual, global mean values of (-6.7 ± 3.9) W m-2 at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and (-12 ± 6) W m-2 at the surface. These results were then used to produce estimates of regional, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative forcing, using modelled pre-industrial AOD fields for 1750 calculated for the AEROCOM PRE experiment. However, as it was not possible to quantify the uncertainty in the pre-industrial aerosol loading, these figures can only be taken as indicative and their uncertainties as lower bounds on the likely errors. Although the uncertainty on aerosol radiative effect presented here is considerably larger than most previous estimates, the explicit inclusion of the major sources of error in the calculations suggest that they are closer to the true constraint on this figure from similar methodologies, and point to the need for more, improved estimates of both global aerosol loading and aerosol optical properties.

  15. CALIPSO-inferred aerosol direct radiative effects: Bias estimates using ground-based Raman lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Observational constraints on the change in radiative energy budget caused by the presence of aerosols, i.e. the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE), have recently been made using observations from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO). CALIPSO observations have the potential to provide improved global estimates of aerosol DRE compared to passive sensor-derived estimates due to CALIPSO's ability to perform vertically-resolved aerosol retrievals over all surface types and over cloud. In this study we estimate the uncertainties in CALIPSO-inferred aerosol DRE using multiple years of observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Raman lidars (RL) at midlatitude and tropical sites. Examined are assumptions about the ratio of extinction-to-backscatter (i.e. the lidar ratio) made by the CALIPSO retrievals, which are needed to retrieve the aerosol extinction profile. The lidar ratio is shown to introduce minimal error in the mean aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere and surface. It is also shown that CALIPSO is unable to detection all radiatively-significant aerosol, resulting in an underestimate in the magnitude of the aerosol DRE. Therefore, global estimates of the aerosol DRE inferred from CALIPSO are likely too weak.

  16. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo exploration of charge effects on aerosol evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsmeier, John F.

    Aerosols are potentially generated both during normal operations in a gas cooled Generation IV nuclear reactor and in all nuclear reactors during accident scenarios. These aerosols can become charged due to aerosol generation processes, radioactive decay of associated fission products, and ionizing atmospheres. Thus the role of charge on aerosol evolution, and hence on the nuclear source term, has been an issue of interest. There is a need for both measurements and modeling to quantify this role as these effects are not currently accounted for in nuclear reactor modeling and simulation codes. In this study the role of charge effects on the evolution of a spatially homogenous aerosol was explored via the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The primary mechanisms explored were those of coagulation and electrostatic dispersion. This technique was first benchmarked by comparing the results obtained from both monodisperse and polydisperse DSMC evolution of charged aerosols with the results obtained by respectively deterministic and sectional techniques. This was followed by simulation of several polydisperse charged aerosols. Additional comparisons were made between the evolutions of charged and uncharged aerosols. The results obtained using DSMC in simple cases were comparable to those obtained from other techniques, without the limitations associated with more complex cases. Multicomponent aerosols of different component densities were also evaluated to determine the charge effects on their evolution. Charge effects can be significant and further explorations are warranted.

  17. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  18. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.

    2015-09-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (all anthropogenic, biomass burning and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. On the global scale, our results show that land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ~ 9 %. At the regional scale, plant productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols, in regions where complex canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Europe, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +8-12 % on an annual average, with a stronger increase during the growing season (> 12 %). In the Amazon basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the Amazon basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). In Europe and China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on the annual average. Anthropogenic aerosols affect land carbon fluxes via different mechanisms and we suggest that the dominant mechanism varies across regions: (1) light scattering dominates in the eastern US; (2) cooling in the Amazon basin; and (3) reduction in direct radiation in Europe and China.

  19. Sensitivity studies for incorporating the direct effect of sulfate aerosols into climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mary Rawlings Lamberton

    2000-09-01

    Aerosols have been identified as a major element of the climate system known to scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation, but the development of procedures for representing them is still rudimentary. This study addresses the need to improve the treatment of sulfate aerosols in climate models by investigating how sensitive radiative particles are to varying specific sulfate aerosol properties. The degree to which sulfate particles absorb or scatter radiation, termed the direct effect, varies with the size distribution of particles, the aerosol mass density, the aerosol refractive indices, the relative humidity and the concentration of the aerosol. This study develops 504 case studies of altering sulfate aerosol chemistry, size distributions, refractive indices and densities at various ambient relative humidity conditions. Ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols are studied with seven distinct size distributions at a given mode radius with three corresponding standard deviations implemented from field measurements. These test cases are evaluated for increasing relative humidity. As the relative humidity increases, the complex index of refraction and the mode radius for each distribution correspondingly change. Mie theory is employed to obtain the radiative properties for each case study. The case studies are then incorporated into a box model, the National Center of Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) column radiation model (CRM), and NCAR's community climate model version 3 (CCM3) to determine how sensitive the radiative properties and potential climatic effects are to altering sulfate properties. This study found the spatial variability of the sulfate aerosol leads to regional areas of intense aerosol forcing (W/m2). These areas are particularly sensitive to altering sulfate properties. Changes in the sulfate lognormal distribution standard deviation can lead to substantial regional differences in the annual aerosol forcing greater than 2 W/m 2. Changes in the

  20. Uncertainties in aerosol direct and indirect effects attributed to uncertainties in convective transport parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelvmo, T.

    2012-11-01

    Deep convection is an important transport mechanism for aerosol particles, allowing them to be lifted to levels where they are subject to long-range transport from source regions to remote regions. The sensitivity of regional aerosol effects to the rate of entrainment in deep moist convection has been explored in a global modeling framework, and found to be crucial for the radiative balance both at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere. The fact that regions where deep convection is frequent often coincide with regions of particularly high black carbon emissions is found to be an important factor in understanding this sensitivity to entrainment. More entrainment leads to shallower convective plumes and less aerosol transport from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere in source regions. As a result, boundary layer aerosol concentrations are increased in source regions, while upper tropospheric aerosol concentrations are reduced globally. This generally leads to stronger aerosol effects in polluted regions and weaker aerosol effects in remote regions. Because black carbon particles have the ability to absorb solar radiation, reducing their concentration leads to more solar radiation reflected back to space, especially over bright surfaces. Conversely, at the surface more entrainment means more downwelling shortwave radiation everywhere but in source regions. Regions that experience increased aerosol concentrations in the boundary layer in response to increased entrainment observed a stronger aerosol indirect effect, while the opposite was true everywhere else. This study highlights that the relative strengths of the aerosol direct and indirect effects in clean versus polluted regions depend crucially on the rate of entrainment in deep convective clouds, a process that is presently not well understood and quantified.

  1. Quantifying the Aerosol Semi-Direct Effect in the NASA GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randles, Cynthia A.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, Arlindo

    2011-01-01

    Aerosols such as black carbon, dust, and some organic carbon species both scatter and absorb incoming solar radiation. This direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) redistributes solar energy both by cooling the surface and warming the atmosphere. As a result, these aerosols affect atmospheric stability and cloud cover (the semi-direct effect, or SDE). Furthermore, in regions with persistent high loadings of absorbing aerosols (e.g. Asia), regional circulation patterns may be altered, potentially resulting in changes in precipitation patterns. Here we investigate aerosol-climate coupling using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), in which we have implemented an online version of the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. GOCART includes representations of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of externally mixed dust, sea salt, sulfate, and carbonaceous aerosols. We examine a series of free-running ensemble climate simulations of the present-day period (2000-2009) forced by observed sea surface temperatures to determine the impact of aerosols on the model climate. The SDE and response of each simulation is determined by differencing with respect to the control simulation (no aerosol forcing). In a free-running model, any estimate of the SDE includes changes in clouds due both to atmospheric heating from aerosols and changes in circulation. To try and quantify the SDE without these circulation changes we then examine the DARF and SDE in GEOS-5 with prescribed meteorological analyses introduced by the MERRA analysis. By doing so, we are able to examine changes in model clouds that occur on shorter scales (six hours). In the GEOS-5 data assimilation system (DAS), the analysis is defined as the best estimate of the atmospheric state at any given time, and it is determined by optimally combining a first-guess short-term GCM forecast with all available

  2. Modeling the direct and indirect climatic effects of tropospheric sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen J.

    2000-10-01

    Modeling studies of the climatic effects of tropospheric sulfate aerosols are presented. Both the direct scattering by the aerosols and the indirect effect of enhanced cloud albedo from increased aerosol numbers are addressed, in separate studies. The direct effect study uses aerosol mass concentrations from the MOGUNTIA chemical transport model. A parameterization is developed to model the radiative forcing due to direct shortwave scattering by the aerosols in the NCAR Community Climate Model, an atmospheric general circulation model. Aerosol layer optical properties are folded into the direct and diffuse surface albedo. The aerosol forcing is similar in magnitude, but opposite in sign, to the longwave forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases such as CO 2, CH4, N2O, CF2CL2, and CFCL3. CCM1 is run for thirty-five years with equal and opposite global annual mean aerosol and greenhouse forcings, and the results compared to a control run with no forcing. It is determined that the global mean temperate responds to the forcings equally, with a global sensitivity of 1.25 K/(W m -2), but the regional temperature response shows marked variation, which could not be predicted simply from the forcing pattern. The aerosol forcing is concentrated in the industrial continental areas of the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes, yet a strong cooling response is noted in regions thousands of kilometers away (for instance, western Canada) from centers of aerosol concentration. The indirect effect is studied with more recent sulfate estimates, from the Oslo Chemical Transport Model. Field studies are used to relate sulfate mass concentration to cloud droplet number concentration, and subsequently to cloud droplet effective radius. The indirect parameterization is incorporated into NCAR CCM3, along with a new shortwave parameterization which allows the full vertical distribution of the aerosols to be accounted for. The indirect radiative forcing is found to be a cooling of 0.47 W m-2

  3. Direct radiative effect modeled for regional aerosols in central Europe including the effect of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorga, G.; Hitzenberger, R.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Puxbaum, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In view of both the climatic relevance of aerosols and the fact that aerosol burdens in central Europe are heavily impacted by anthropogenic sources, this study is focused on estimating the regional-scale direct radiative effect of aerosols in Austria. The aerosol data (over 80 samples in total) were collected during measurement campaigns at five sampling sites: the urban areas of Vienna, Linz, and Graz and on Mt. Rax (1644 m, regional background aerosol) and Mt. Sonnblick (3106 m, background aerosol). Aerosol mass size distributions were obtained with eight-stage (size range: 0.06-16 μm diameter) and six-stage (size range 0.1-10 μm) low-pressure cascade impactors. The size-segregated samples were analyzed for total carbon (TC), black carbon (BC), and inorganic ions. The aerosol at these five locations is compared in terms of size distributions, optical properties, and direct forcing. Mie calculations are performed for the dry aerosol at 60 wavelengths in the range 0.3-40 μm. Using mass growth factors determined earlier, the optical properties are also estimated for higher relative humidities (60%, 70%, 80%, and 90%). A box model was used to estimate direct radiative forcing (DRF). The presence of absorbing species (BC) was found to reduce the cooling effect of the aerosols. The water-soluble substances dominate radiative forcing at the urban sites, while on Rax and Sonnblick BC plays the most important role. This result can be explained by the effect of the surface albedo, which is much lower in the urban regions (0.16) than at the ice and snow-covered mountain sites. Shortwave (below 4 μm) and longwave surface albedo values for ice were 0.35 and 0.5, while for snow surface albedo, values of 0.8 (shortwave) and 0.5 (longwave) were used. In the case of dry aerosol, especially for urban sites, the unidentified material may contribute a large part to the forcing. Depending on the sampling site the estimated forcing gets more negative with increasing humidity

  4. Evaluating Direct Radiative Effects of Absorbing Aerosols on Atmospheric Dynamics with Aquaplanet and Regional Model Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, Ö.; Tegen, I.; Quaas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics are usually investigated with help of general circulation models or also regional models that represent the atmospheric system as realistic as possible. Reducing the complexity of models used to study the effects of absorbing aerosol on atmospheric dynamics helps to understand underlying mechanisms. In this study, by using ECHAM6 General Circulation Model (GCM) in an Aquaplanet setting and using simplified aerosol climatology, an initial idealization step has been taken. The analysis only considers direct radiative effects, furthering the reduction of complex model results. The simulations include cases including aerosol radiative forcing, no aerosol forcing, coarse mode aerosol forcing only (as approximation for mineral dust forcing) and forcing with increased aerosol absorption. The results showed that increased absorption affects cloud cover mainly in subtropics. Hadley circulation is found to be weakened in the increased absorption case. To compare the results of the idealized model with a more realistic model setting, the results of the regional model COSMO-MUSCAT that includes interactive mineral dust aerosol and considers the effects of dust radiative forcing are also analyzed. The regional model computes the atmospheric circulation for the year 2007 twice, including the feedback of dust and excluding the dust aerosol forcing. It is investigated to which extent the atmospheric response to the dust forcing agrees with the simplified Aquaplanet results. As expected, in the regional model mineral dust causes an increase in the temperature right above the dust layer while reducing the temperature close to the surface. In both models the presence of aerosol forcing leads to increased specific humidity, close to ITCZ. Notwithstanding the difference magnitudes, comparisons of the global aquaplanet and the regional model showed similar patterns. Further detailed comparisons will be presented.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the direct effect of aerosols over decadal scale by using ECHAM6-standalone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, K.; Bott, A.; Hense, A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on climate is an important but still highly uncertain aspect in climate research. By using atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6 our objective is to quantify the direct effect of aerosols over decadal time scale in comparison to the variability induced by the varying sea surface temperatures (SST) and sea ice concentrations (SIC) taken by the AMIP-II data base and the inevitable internal and unpredictable climate noise. We integrated the model with prescribed SST/SIC along with observed green house gases and aerosols concentrations for ten year period 1995-2004. Two ensembles with sample size ten, each have been created by starting the integrations on January 1st, 1995 with ten different initial conditions derived from two control runs over 15-years. These ensembles differ for tropospheric aerosols (TA): the non-aerosol case (NAC) is without any TA and aerosol case (AC) is utilizing a time variable data set of aerosols optical properties for input into the solar part of the ECHAM6 radiation code (Kinne et al, 2006). This set-up allows for a quantitative estimation and separation of the stationary and transient aerosol effects, the SST/SIC induced variability and the internal variability due to large scale atmospheric instabilities and non-linearities with the help of a two-way analysis of variance. We analyzed ensemble data for top of atmosphere (TOA) energy balance and temperature at 850 hPa. In the NAC, the ensemble exhibits a global and annual mean 3 W/m2 imbalance of the TOA radiation balance whereas the AC shows only 0.6 W/m2 being much closer in radiative balance over ten year period. The aerosols increase global planetary albedo from 0.29 (non-aerosol) to 0.30 for aerosol case. Extending the analysis to regional values of annual mean TOA radiation balance components, we find that the changes in TOA solar radiation budget are highly significant for static direct aerosol effect with local contributions to the total variability

  6. Potential sensitivity of photosynthesis and isoprene emission to direct radiative effects of atmospheric aerosol pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, Susanna; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    A global Earth system model is applied to quantify the impacts of direct anthropogenic aerosol effective radiative forcing on gross primary productivity (GPP) and isoprene emission. The impacts of different pollution aerosol sources (anthropogenic, biomass burning, and non-biomass burning) are investigated by performing sensitivity experiments. The model framework includes all known light and meteorological responses of photosynthesis, but uses fixed canopy structures and phenology. On a global scale, our results show that global land carbon fluxes (GPP and isoprene emission) are not sensitive to pollution aerosols, even under a global decline in surface solar radiation (direct + diffuse) by ˜ 9 %. At a regional scale, GPP and isoprene emission show a robust but opposite sensitivity to pollution aerosols in regions where forested canopies dominate. In eastern North America and Eurasia, anthropogenic pollution aerosols (mainly from non-biomass burning sources) enhance GPP by +5-8 % on an annual average. In the northwestern Amazon Basin and central Africa, biomass burning aerosols increase GPP by +2-5 % on an annual average, with a peak in the northwestern Amazon Basin during the dry-fire season (+5-8 %). The prevailing mechanism varies across regions: light scattering dominates in eastern North America, while a reduction in direct radiation dominates in Europe and China. Aerosol-induced GPP productivity increases in the Amazon and central Africa include an additional positive feedback from reduced canopy temperatures in response to increases in canopy conductance. In Eurasia and northeastern China, anthropogenic pollution aerosols drive a decrease in isoprene emission of -2 to -12 % on an annual average. Future research needs to incorporate the indirect effects of aerosols and possible feedbacks from dynamic carbon allocation and phenology.

  7. Direct and indirect methods for correcting the aerosol effect on remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier

    1994-01-01

    Aspects of aerosol studies and remote sensing are reviewed. Aerosol scatters solar radiation before it reaches the surface and scatters and absorbs it again after it is reflected from the surface and before it reaches the satellite sensor. The effect is spectrally and spatially dependent. Therefore atmospheric aerosol (dust, smoke and air pollution particles) has a significant effect on remote sensing. Correction for the aerosol effect was never achieved on an operational basis though several case studies were demonstrated. Correction can be done in a direct way by deriving the aerosol loading from the image itself and correcting for it using the appropriate radiative transfer model or by an indirect way, by defining remote sensing functions that are less dependent on the aerosol loading. To some degree this was already achieved in global remote sensing of vegetation where a composite of several days of NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) measurements, choosing the maximal value, was used instead of a single cloud screened value. The Atmospheric Resistant Vegetation Index (ARVI) introduced recently for the NASA Earth Observing System EOS-MODIS is the most appropriate example of indirect correction, where the index is defined in such a way that the atmospheric effect in the blue spectral channel cancels to a large degree the atmospheric in the red channel in computations of a vegetation index. Atmospheric corrections can also use aerosol climatology and ground based instrumentation.

  8. Impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol direct radiative effect and heating rate in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, Vasileios; Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Matsoukas, Christos; Koras Carracca, Mario; Kinne, Stefan; Vardavas, Ilias

    2015-04-01

    been presented and its validity has been tested against satellite-based retrievals. A detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM), already used in a number of planetary and regional studies, has been used in the present study to calculate the vertically distributed aerosol direct radiative effects (DREs) and the associated aerosol heating/cooling profiles within the troposphere. Specific emphasis is given to assessment of the crucial issue of the differences between modeling the aerosol DREs using either columnar aerosol optical properties, as usually done, or vertically layered information on those properties, which is the state of the art and ideal practice. To address this problem, the following experiment has been performed: the same RTM has been used twice with the same meteorological conditions but in the first run (set1) columnar values for aerosol optical depth (AOD) have been used while using vertically distributed AOD in the second run (set2). In the second run vertically layered information for AOD is considered for 20 layers extending from the surface to 20 km a.m.s.l.. The vertical profile of AOD has been mainly based on ECHAM model. The aerosol DREs are computed at the Earth's surface, at TOA and at various levels in the atmosphere. Apart from AOD, the model also requires single-scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (ASY) in 18 different wavelengths, which are obtained by linear interpolation from the available wavelengths in HAC. The comparison between the obtained two sets of DRE (set1 and set2) reveal small, but notable differences which vary from one place to another. Within the atmosphere, the difference -averaged over the four seasons - ranges from -0.3 to 1.7 Wm-2 with a mean value of 0.32 Wm-2. Given the fact that the average column-integrated DREAtm values for the entire Mediterranean region based on columnar aerosol optical properties is 11.44 Wm-2, there is an average variance of 3.7 %, which locally could get to 14

  9. Measurement-based estimates of direct radiative effects of absorbing aerosols above clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nan; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2015-07-01

    The elevated layers of absorbing smoke aerosols from western African (e.g., Gabon and Congo) biomass burning activities have been frequently observed above low-level stratocumulus clouds off the African coast, which presents an excellent natural laboratory for studying the effects of aerosols above clouds (AAC) on regional energy balance in tropical and subtropical environments. Using spatially and temporally collocated Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System data sets, the top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol direct shortwave radiative effects (ARE) of absorbing aerosols above low-level water clouds in the southeast Atlantic Ocean was examined in this study. The regional averaged instantaneous ARE has been estimated to be 36.7 ± 20.5 Wm-2 (regional mean ± standard deviation) along with a mean positive OMI Aerosol Index at 1.3 in August 2006 based on multisensors measurements. The highest magnitude of instantaneous ARE can even reach 138.2 Wm-2. We assess that the 660 nm cloud optical depth (COD) values of 8-12 is the critical value above (below) which aerosol absorption (scattering) effect dominates and further produces positive (negative) ARE values. The results further show that ARE values are more sensitive to aerosols above lower COD values than cases for higher COD values. This is among the first studies to provide quantitative estimates of shortwave ARE due to AAC events from an observational perspective.

  10. Direct and Indirect Effects of Aerosols in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Chen, H.; Tsay, S.; Huang, J.; Zhang, W.

    2009-12-01

    By modulating atmospheric heating profile, surface energy balance and cloud microphysics, the heavy loading of aerosols in China have been hypothesized to interact with the Asian monsoon system and play a significant role in observed changes in precipitation, temperature and atmospheric circulation. Testing the hypotheses requires extensive and reliable measurements concerning their properties, radiative fluxes, cloud microphysics, precipitation, and other atmospheric variables, which is the primary goal of two major ongoing field campaigns conducted before, during and after the Beijing Olympic Games under the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) and the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in China (AMF-China). In my talk, I will review the status of the two observation campaigns; present some preliminary findings; elaborate the potential usage of the data in dealing with the aforementioned issues.

  11. Ground-based remote sensing of aerosol climatology in China: Aerosol optical properties, direct radiative effect and its parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.; Che, H.; Zhu, J.; Chen, H.; Cong, Z.; Deng, X.; Fan, X.; Fu, Y.; Goloub, P.; Jiang, H.; Liu, Q.; Mai, B.; Wang, P.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Spatio-temporal variation of aerosol optical properties and aerosol direct radiative effects (ADRE) are studied based on high quality aerosol data at 21 sunphotometer stations with at least 4-months worth of measurements in China mainland and Hong Kong. A parameterization is proposed to describe the relationship of ADREs to aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD) and single scattering albedo at 550 nm (SSA). In the middle-east and south China, the maximum AOD is always observed in the burning season, indicating a significant contribution of biomass burning to AOD. Dust aerosols contribute to AOD significantly in spring and their influence decreases from the source regions to the downwind regions. The occurrence frequencies of background level AOD (AOD < 0.10) in the middle-east, south and northwest China are very limited (0.4%, 1.3% and 2.8%, respectively). However, it is 15.7% in north China. Atmosphere is pristine in the Tibetan Plateau where 92.0% of AODs are <0.10. Regional mean SSAs at 550 nm are 0.89-0.90, although SSAs show substantial site and season dependence. ADREs at the top and bottom of the atmosphere for solar zenith angle of 60 ± 5° are -16--37 W m-2 and -66--111 W m-2, respectively. ADRE efficiency shows slight regional dependence. AOD and SSA together account for more than 94 and 87% of ADRE variability at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The overall picture of ADRE in China is that aerosols cool the climate system, reduce surface solar radiation and heat the atmosphere.

  12. Aerosol direct effect retrieval over clouds from space-borne passive hyperspectral measurements (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel approach for the retrieval of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds will be presented, which is independent of aerosol parameters estimates. The direct effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) of aerosols over clouds can be estimated using hyperspectral reflectance measurements from space-borne spectrometers, when the equivalent aerosol-unpolluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum is known. For smoke over clouds the cloud parameters can be estimated from the shortwave infrared (SWIR), where the absorption of the small smoke particles becomes sufficiently small. Using precomputed tables of cloud reflectance spectra, the unpolluted cloud scene spectrum can then be simulated and compared to the real measured polluted cloud scene reflectance spectrum. The UV-radiation absorption by the smoke will lead to a difference between the measured and simulated spectra, which is proportional to the aerosol DRE at TOA. Aerosol microphysical assumptions and retrievals are avoided by modeling only the aerosol-free scene spectra, all the aerosol effects are in the reflectance measurements. The method works especially well for cloud scenes, which can be simulated relatively accurately. An algorithm was developed to derive the aerosol DRE over marine clouds, using the space-borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which produced shortwave reflectance spectra (from 240 to 1700 nm contiguously) from 2002 till 2012. These are ideally suited to study the effect of aerosols on the shortwave spectrum. However, since aerosols in general do not have high resolution spectral features, the algorithm can be adapted to suit data from any combination of instruments that measures UV, visible and SWIR reflectances simultaneously. Examples include OMI and MODIS, flying in the A-Train constellation, and TROPOMI, on the future Sentinel 5 precursor mission, combined with NOAA's NPP VIIRS. This would produce aerosol DRE estimates with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution. The

  13. Direct and semi-direct aerosol radiative effect on the Mediterranean climate variability using a coupled regional climate system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Sevault, Florence; Chiacchio, Marc; Wild, Martin

    2015-02-01

    A fully coupled regional climate system model (CNRM-RCSM4) has been used over the Mediterranean region to investigate the direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols, but also their role in the radiation-atmosphere-ocean interactions through multi-annual ensemble simulations (2003-2009) with and without aerosols and ocean-atmosphere coupling. Aerosols have been taken into account in CNRM-RCSM4 through realistic interannual monthly AOD climatologies. An evaluation of the model has been achieved, against various observations for meteorological parameters, and has shown the ability of CNRM-RCSM4 to reproduce the main patterns of the Mediterranean climate despite some biases in sea surface temperature (SST), radiation and cloud cover. The results concerning the aerosol radiative effects show a negative surface forcing on average because of the absorption and scattering of the incident radiation. The SW surface direct effect is on average -20.9 Wm-2 over the Mediterranean Sea, -14.7 Wm-2 over Europe and -19.7 Wm-2 over northern Africa. The LW surface direct effect is weaker as only dust aerosols contribute (+4.8 Wm-2 over northern Africa). This direct effect is partly counterbalanced by a positive semi-direct radiative effect over the Mediterranean Sea (+5.7 Wm-2 on average) and Europe (+5.0 Wm-2) due to changes in cloud cover and atmospheric circulation. The total aerosol effect is consequently negative at the surface and responsible for a decrease in land (on average -0.4 °C over Europe, and -0.5 °C over northern Africa) and sea surface temperature (on average -0.5 °C for the Mediterranean SST). In addition, the latent heat loss is shown to be weaker (-11.0 Wm-2) in the presence of aerosols, resulting in a decrease in specific humidity in the lower troposphere, and a reduction in cloud cover and precipitation. Simulations also indicate that dust aerosols warm the troposphere by absorbing solar radiation, and prevent radiation from reaching the surface, thus

  14. A satellite view of the direct effect of aerosols on solar radiation at global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Matsoukas, Christos; Fotiadi, Aggeliki; Benas, Nikolaos; Vardavas, Ilias

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for better understanding and predicting current and future climate change. They are determining, apart from clouds, patterns of solar radiation through scattering and absorption processes. Especially, under cloud-free skies, aerosols are the major modulator of the solar radiation budget of the Earth-atmosphere system. Although significant improvement has been made as to better understanding the direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, there is still a need for further improvement in our knowledge of the DRE spatial and temporal patterns, in particular with respect to extended spatial and temporal coverage of relevant information. In an ongoing rapidly evolving era of great satellite-based achievements, concerning the knowledge of solar radiation budget and its modulators, and with the great progress in obtaining significant information on key aerosol optical properties needed for modeling DRE, it is a great challenge to use all this new aerosol information and to see what is the new acquired scientific knowledge. The objective of this study is to obtain an improved view of global aerosol DRE effects using contemporary accurate data for the important atmospheric and surface parameters determining the solar radiation budget, with emphasis to state of the art aerosol data. Thus, a synergy is made of different datasets providing the necessary input data and of a detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) to compute spectral globally distributed aerosol DREs. Emphasis is given on using highly accurate and well-tested aerosol optical properties. Spectral information on aerosol optical depth (AOD) is taken from retrieved products of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, while similar information is taken from MODIS for the aerosol asymmetry parameter (AP) over ocean. Information from MODIS is also taken for the aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA). All this information comes from the latest Collection

  15. FY 2011 4th Quarter Metric: Estimate of Future Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, D

    2011-09-21

    The global and annual mean aerosol direct and indirect effects, relative to 1850 conditions, estimated from CESM simulations are 0.02 W m-2 and -0.39 W m-2, respectively, for emissions in year 2100 under the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. The indirect effect is much smaller than that for 2000 emissions because of much smaller SO2 emissions in 2100; the direct effects are small due to compensation between warming by black carbon and cooling by sulfate.

  16. Satellite-based estimate of aerosol direct radiative effect over the South-East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, L.; Bréon, F.-M.

    2013-09-01

    The net effect of aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (DRF) is the balance between the scattering effect that reflects solar radiation back to space (cooling), and the absorption that decreases the reflected sunlight (warming). The amplitude of these two effects and their balance depends on the aerosol load, its absorptivity, the cloud fraction and the respective position of aerosol and cloud layers. In this study, we use the information provided by CALIOP (CALIPSO satellite) and MODIS (AQUA satellite) instruments as input data to a Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) and quantify the shortwave (SW) aerosol direct atmospheric forcing, over the South-East Atlantic. The combination of the passive and active measurements allows estimates of the horizontal and vertical distributions of the aerosol and cloud parameters. We use a parametrization of the Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) based on the satellite-derived Angstrom coefficient. The South East Atlantic is a particular region, where bright stratocumulus clouds are often topped by absorbing smoke particles. Results from radiative transfer simulations confirm the similar amplitude of the cooling effect, due to light scattering by the aerosols, and the warming effect, due to the absorption by the same particles. Over six years of satellite retrievals, from 2005 to 2010, the South-East Atlantic all-sky SW DRF is -0.03 W m-2, with a spatial standard deviation of 8.03 W m-2. In good agreement with previous estimates, statistics show that a cloud fraction larger than 0.5 is generally associated with positive all-sky DRF. In case of cloudy-sky and aerosol located only above the cloud top, a SSA larger than 0.91 and cloud optical thickness larger than 4 can be considered as threshold values, beyond which the resulting radiative forcing becomes positive.

  17. Implications of the Temporal Resolution of Fire Emissions on Direct and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmenov, A.; Barahona, D.; Kim, K. M.; da Silva, A.; Colarco, P. R.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of particulates and trace gases and a major element of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Well constrained emissions from open vegetation fires in both time and space are needed to model direct and indirect effect of biomass burning aerosols, homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere and perform credible integrated earth system analysis, climate and air pollution studies. However representing fires in regional and global numerical models is challenging because of the subgrid scales at which fire processes operate. An example of apparent discrepancy in scales is the use of monthly- or seasonal-mean fire emissions which given the stochastic nature of fires means that at certain spatial scales the temporal behavior of emissions becomes influenced by individual fire events and becomes more variable. The present study aims at investigating the impact of monthly-mean fire emissions on direct and indirect aerosol effects. Key element of our work is the use of fire radiative power (FRP) based emissions and a global fully interactive cloud-aerosol-radiation modeling system. We used the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) with two moment cloud microphysics and explicit cloud droplet activation and ice nucleation. GEOS-5 is coupled with an online version of the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model. Biomass burning emissions used in this study are from the Quick Fire Emission Dataset (QFED) available daily at up to 0.1 degrees horizontal resolution. We performed experiments with daily-mean and monthly-mean QFED emissions at two degree horizontal resolutions and report differences in aerosol burden and radiative forcing, for example we found that regional differences of clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere in MAM and JJA can be as high as 4 Wm-2 and 3 Wm-2, respectively.

  18. Direct radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Indian summer monsoon circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sushant; Dey, Sagnik; Dash, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The direct radiative impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the dynamics of Indian summer monsoon circulation are examined using the regional climate model version 4.1 (RegCM4.1). High anthropogenic aerosol optical depth (AAOD >0.1) and surface shortwave cooling (<-6 W m-2) are simulated over the Indo-Gangetic Basin (IGB), northeast India, east coast of India, and its outflow to the Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the monsoon season (June to September) in the period 2001 to 2010. The analysis reveals a decrease in near surface air temperature at 2 m over the IGB and east coast of India by >0.2 °C due to the dimming effect of anthropogenic aerosols. The aerosol-induced cooling leads to an increase in surface pressure over the local hotspots in the Indian landmass, which reduces the land-sea pressure contrast resulting in weakening of summer monsoon circulation. The simulated surface pressure anomaly also inhibits moisture transport from the BoB towards Indian landmass thereby enhancing precipitation over the BoB and parts of the east coast of India. The impacts are interpreted as conservative estimates because of the underestimation of AAOD by the model due to uncertainties in emission inventory and biases in simulated meteorology. Our results demonstrate the direct radiative impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Indian monsoon circulation and call for future studies combining the dynamical and microphysical impacts, which are not considered in this study.

  19. Impact of aerosol direct effect on East Asian air quality during the EAST-AIRE campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Allen, Dale J.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Li, Zhanqing; He, Hao

    2016-06-01

    WRF-Chem simulations were performed for the March 2005 East Asian Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) Intensive Observation Campaign (IOC) to investigate the direct effects of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality. Domain-wide, WRF-Chem showed a decrease of 20 W/m2 in surface shortwave (SW) radiation due to the aerosol direct effect (ADE), consistent with observational studies. The ADE caused 24 h surface PM2.5 (particulate matter with diameter < 2.5 µm) concentrations to increase in eastern China (4.4%), southern China (10%), western China (2.3%), and the Sichuan Basin (9.6%), due to different aerosol compositions in these four regions. Conversely, surface 1 h maximum ozone was reduced by 2.3% domain-wide and up to 12% in eastern China because less radiation reached the surface. We also investigated the impact of reducing SO2 and black carbon (BC) emissions by 80% on aerosol amounts via two sensitivity simulations. Reducing SO2 decreased surface PM2.5 concentrations in the Sichuan Basin and southern China by 5.4% and decreased ozone by up to 6 ppbv in the Sichuan Basin and Southern China. Reducing BC emissions decreased PM2.5 by 3% in eastern China and the Sichuan Basin but increased surface ozone by up to 3.6 ppbv in eastern China and the Sichuan Basin. This study indicates that the benefits of reducing PM2.5 associated with reducing absorbing aerosols may be partially offset by increases in ozone at least for a scenario when NOx and VOC emissions are unchanged.

  20. Radiative Forcing of the Direct Aerosol Effect from AeroCom Phase II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; vanNoije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m(sup-2), with a mean of -0.27 W m(sup-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 W m(sup-2). Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study.We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results

  1. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  2. Global Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect From CALIOP and C3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winker, Dave; Kato, Seiji; Tackett, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols are responsible for the largest uncertainties in current estimates of climate forcing. These uncertainties are due in part to the limited abilities of passive sensors to retrieve aerosols in cloudy skies. We use a dataset which merges CALIOP observations together with other A-train observations to estimate aerosol radiative effects in cloudy skies as well as in cloud-free skies. The results can be used to quantify the reduction of aerosol radiative effects in cloudy skies relative to clear skies and to reduce current uncertainties in aerosol radiative effects.

  3. "Investigation of Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America Using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model"

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radi...

  4. “Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model”

    EPA Science Inventory

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challengi...

  5. Direct effect of aerosol optical properties on global dimming and brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, R.; Uchiyama, A.

    2011-12-01

    Surface solar radiation observed at numerous locations has decreased from the 1960s to the 1980s (Global dimming), thereafter increased (Global brightening). The dimming and brightening is considered to be due to the changes in both clouds and aerosols. Aerosols have a direct impact on the surface solar radiation by scattering and absorption. The impact is determined by three parameters: optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry factor, but the effect of asymmetry factor is rather smaller than the others. Therefore, the long-term changes in AOD and SSA are necessary to evaluate the aerosol impact on the global dimming and brightening. We have developed the method to estimate AOD and SSA from the hourly accumulated direct and diffuse irradiances measured by the ground-based broadband radiometers. In the estimation, the real part of the refractive index is fixed, and the size distribution is defined by the Junge distribution with a fixed shaping constant. Using the developed method, the measurements from 1975 to 2008 at 14 sites in Japan were analyzed. Consequently, a decrease of AOD by 0.02 and an increase of SSA by 0.2 during the period were seen. The surface solar radiation under the clear sky conditions, which was calculated from the estimated aerosol optical properties, was increased by 5% due to the changes in AOD and SSA; the influence of SSA was dominant. We also investigate the cloud impact on the surface solar radiation which was simply defined as the difference between the surface solar radiation under the cloudy sky conditions and under the clear sky conditions; the cloud impact had no statistically significant trends. The brightening in Japan may be due to the changes in aerosol optical properties, especially SSA. Our developed method can be applied to measurements at other sites around the world and would be helpful to understand the causes of the global dimming and brightening.

  6. Impact of Aerosol Direct Effect on East Asian Air Quality During the EAST-AIRE Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Allen, D. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Three WRF-Chem simulations were conducted for East Asia region during March 2005 East Asian Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) Intensive Observation Campaign (IOC) period to investigate the direct effects of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality. WRF-Chem captured the temporal and spatial variations of meteorological fields, trace gases, and aerosol loadings. Surface shortwave radiation changes due to the aerosol direct effect (ADE) were calculated and compared with data from six World Radiation Data Center (WRDC) stations. The comparison indicated that WRF-Chem can simulate the surface short wave radiation moderately well, with temporal correlations between 0.4 and 0.7, and high biases between 9 to 120 W/m2. Domain-wide, WRF-Chem showed a decrease of 22 W/m2 in surface SW radiation due to the aerosol direct effect, consistent with observational studies. The ADE demonstrates diverse influences on air quality in East Asian. For example, the surface concentration of PM2.5 increases in eastern China (~11.1%) due to ADE, but decreases in central China (-7.3%), western China (-8.8%), and Sichuan Basin (-4%). Surface 1-hour maximum ozone is reduced by 2.3%, owing to less radiation reaching the surface due to the ADE. Since PM2.5 pollution raises serious public concern in China, regulations that control the emissions of PM2.5 and its precursors have been implemented. We investigate the impact of reducing two different types of aerosols, sulfate (scattering) and black carbon (absorbing), by cutting 80% of SO2 and black carbon (BC) emissions in two sensitivity simulations. We found that reducing SO2 emissions results in the decline of PM2.5 as much as 16mg/m3 in eastern China, and 20mg/m3 in the Sichuan Basin. Reducing the BC emissions by the same percentage causes the PM2.5 to decrease as much as 40mg/m3 in eastern China, and 25mg/m3 in the Sichuan Basin. The monthly averaged surface 1-hour maximum ozone increases 3

  7. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  8. Quantification of the aerosol direct radiative effect from smoke over clouds using passive space-borne spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.; Tilstra, L. G.

    2013-05-01

    The solar radiative absorption by smoke layers above clouds is quantified, using the unique broad spectral range of the space-borne spectrometer Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). Aerosol radiative effects in the UV are separated from cloud radiative effects in the shortwave infrared (SWIR). In the UV, aerosol absorption from smoke is strong, creating a strong signal in the measured reflectance. In the SWIR, absorbing and scattering effects from smoke are negligible, allowing the retrieval of cloud parameters from the measured spectrum using existing retrieval techniques. The spectral signature of the cloud can be modelled using a radiative transfer model (RTM) and the cloud parameters retrieved in the SWIR. In this way, the aerosol effects can be determined from the measured aerosol-polluted cloud shortwave spectrum and the modelled aerosol-unpolluted cloud shortwave spectrum. This can be used to derive the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over marine clouds, independent of aerosol parameter retrievals, significantly improving the current accuracy of aerosol DRE estimates. Only cloud parameters are needed to model the aerosolunpolluted cloud reflectance, while the effects of the aerosol absorption are in the aerosol-polluted cloud reflectance measurements. In this paper we present a case study of the above method using SCIAMACHY data over the South Atlantic Ocean west of Africa on 13 August 2006, when a huge plume of smoke was present over persistent cloud fields. The aerosol DRE over clouds was as high as 128 ± 8 Wm-2 for this case, while the aerosol DRE over clouds averaged through August 2006 was found to be 23 ± 8 Wm-2 with a mean variation over the region in this month of 22 Wm-2.

  9. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; McIntosh, Dawn

    2000-01-01

    Ames researchers have combined measurements from satellite, aircraft, and the surface to estimate the effect of airborne particles (aerosols) on the solar radiation over the North Atlantic region. These aerosols (which come from both natural and pollution sources) can reflect solar radiation, causing a cooling effect that opposes the warming caused by carbon dioxide. Recently, increased attention has been paid to aerosol effects to better understand the Earth climate system.

  10. Corrigendum to "Impact of cloud-borne aerosol representation on aerosol direct and indirect effects" published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 4163-4174, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J; Easter, Richard C

    2007-01-19

    Ghan and Easter (2006) (hereafter referred to as GE2006) used a global aerosol model to estimate the sensitivity of aerosol direct and indirect effects to a variety of simplified treatments of the cloud-borne aerosol. They found that neglecting transport of cloud-borne particles introduces little error, but that diagnosing cloud-borne particles produces global mean biases of 20% and local errors of up to 40% for aerosol, droplet number, and direct and indirect radiative forcing However, we have recently found that in those experiments we had inadvertently turned off the first aerosol indirect effect. In the radiation module, the droplet effective radius was prescribed at 10 microns rather than related to the droplet number concentration. The second indirect effect, in which droplet number influences droplet collision and coalescence, was treated, so that the simulations produced an aerosol indirect effect, albeit one that is much smaller (about -0.2Wm-2 for anthropogenic sulfate) than other previous estimates.

  11. QUantifying the Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effect over Eastern Mediterranean from Satellites (QUADIEEMS): Overview and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulias, Aristeidis K.; Zanis, Prodromos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kourtidis, Konstantinos A.; Alexandri, Georgia; Ntogras, Christos; Marinou, Eleni; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2013-04-01

    An overview and preliminary results from the research implemented within the framework of QUADIEEMS project are presented. For the scopes of the project, satellite data from five sensors (MODIS aboard EOS TERRA, MODIS aboard EOS AQUA, TOMS aboard Earth Probe, OMI aboard EOS AURA and CALIOP aboard CALIPSO) are used in conjunction with meteorological data from ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis and data from a global chemical-aerosol-transport model as well as simulation results from a regional climate model (RegCM4) coupled with a simplified aerosol scheme. QUADIEEMS focuses on Eastern Mediterranean [30oN-45No, 17.5oE-37.5oE], a region situated at the crossroad of different aerosol types and thus ideal for the investigation of the direct and indirect effects of various aerosol types at a high spatial resolution. The project consists of five components. First, raw data from various databases are acquired, analyzed and spatially homogenized with the outcome being a high resolution (0.1x0.1 degree) and a moderate resolution (1.0x1.0 degree) gridded dataset of aerosol and cloud optical properties. The marine, dust and anthropogenic fraction of aerosols over the region is quantified making use of the homogenized dataset. Regional climate model simulations with REGCM4/aerosol are also implemented for the greater European region for the period 2000-2010 at a resolution of 50 km. REGCM4's ability to simulate AOD550 over Europe is evaluated. The aerosol-cloud relationships, for sub-regions of Eastern Mediterranean characterized by the presence of predominant aerosol types, are examined. The aerosol-cloud relationships are also examined taking into account the relative position of aerosol and cloud layers as defined by CALIPSO observations. Within the final component of the project, results and data that emerged from all the previous components are used in satellite-based parameterizations in order to quantify the direct and indirect (first) radiative effect of the different

  12. SILAM and MACC reanalysis aerosol data used for simulating the aerosol direct radiative effect with the NWP model HARMONIE for summer 2010 wildfire case in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, V.; Reis, K.; Ots, R.; Kaasik, M.; Männik, A.; Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.

    2015-11-01

    Persistent high pressure conditions over the European part of Russia during summer 2010 were responsible for an extended period of hot and dry weather, creating favourable conditions for severe wildfires. The chemical transport model SILAM is used to simulate the dispersion of smoke aerosol for this case. Aerosol fields from SILAM are compared to the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis. Moreover, the model output is compared to in situ and remote sensing measurements, paying particular attention to the most intense fire period of August 7 to 9, when the plume reached the Baltic countries and Finland. The maximum observed aerosol optical depth was more than 4 at 550 nm during this time. The aerosol distributions from the SILAM run and the MACC reanalysis are subsequently used in meteorological simulations using the Hirlam Aladin Research for Mesoscale Operational Numerical Weather Prediction in Euromed (HARMONIE) model. The modelling results show a significant reduction of the daily average shortwave radiation fluxes at the surface (up to 125 W/m2) and daily average near-surface temperature (up to 4 °C) through the aerosol direct radiative effect. The simulated near-surface temperature and vertical temperature profile agree better with the observations, when the aerosol direct radiative effect is considered in the meteorological simulation. The boundary layer is more stably stratified, creating poorer dispersion conditions for the smoke.

  13. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.; Condon, Estelle (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate in potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative Forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting, future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects. TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites, as illustrated in Figure 1. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux chances, or radiative forcing, from the satellite-measured radiances or 'etrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key Initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle and high latitudes.

  14. North Atlantic Aerosol Properties and Direct Radiative Effects: Key Results from TARFOX and ACE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, Robert A.; Hignett, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Durkee, P. A.

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol effects on atmospheric radiative fluxes provide a forcing function that can change the climate In potentially significant ways. This aerosol radiative forcing is a major source of uncertainty in understanding the observed climate change of the past century and in predicting future climate. To help reduce this uncertainty, the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry Project (IGAC) has endorsed a series of multiplatform aerosol field campaigns. The Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) were the first IGAC campaigns to address the impact of anthropogenic aerosols, Both TARFOX and ACE-2 gathered extensive data sets on aerosol properties and radiative effects, TARFOX focused on the urban-industrial haze plume flowing from the eastern United States over the western Atlantic Ocean, whereas ACE-2 studied aerosols carried over the eastern Atlantic from both European urban/industrial and African mineral sources. These aerosols often have a marked influence on the top-of-atmosphere radiances measured by satellites. Shown there are contours of aerosol optical depth derived from radiances measured by the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA-11 satellite. The contours readily show that aerosols originating in North America, Europe, and Africa impact the radiative properties of air over the North Atlantic. However, the accurate derivation of flux changes, or radiative forcing, from the satellite measured radiances or retrieved optical depths remains a difficult challenge. In this paper we summarize key initial results from TARFOX and, to a lesser extent, ACE-2, with a focus on those results that allow an improved assessment of the flux changes caused by North Atlantic aerosols at middle latitudes.

  15. Combined multispectral/hyperspectral remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols for quantification of their direct radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarragh, Gregory R.

    Scattering and absorption of solar radiation by aerosols in the atmosphere has a direct radiative effect on the climate of the Earth. Unfortunately, according to the IPCC the uncertainties in aerosol properties and their effect on the climate system represent one of the largest uncertainties in climate change research. Related to aerosols, one of the largest uncertainties is the fraction of the incident radiation that is scattered rather than absorbed, or their single scattering albedo. In fact, differences in single scattering albedo have a significant impact on the magnitude of the cooling effect of aerosols (opposite to that of greenhouse gasses) which can even have a warming effect for strongly absorbing aerosols. Satellites provide a unique opportunity to measure aerosol properties on a global scale. Traditional approaches use multispectral measurements of intensity at a single view angle to retrieve at most two aerosol parameters over land but it is being realized that more detail is required for accurate quantification of the direct effect of aerosols, in particular its anthropogenic component, and therefore more measurement information is required. One approach to more advanced measurements is to use not only intensity measurements but also polarimetric measurements and to use multiple view angles. In this work we explore another alternative: the use of hyperspectral measurements in molecular absorption bands. Our study can be divided into three stages the first of which is the development of a fast radiative transfer model for rapid simulation of measurements. Our approach is matrix operator based and uses the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential to evaluate the homogeneous solution. It is shown that the method is two to four times faster than the standard and efficient discrete ordinate technique and is accurate to the 6th decimal place. The second part of our study forms the core and is divided into two chapters the first of which is a rigorous

  16. Combined multispectral/hyperspectral remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols for quantification of their direct radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarragh, Gregory R.

    Scattering and absorption of solar radiation by aerosols in the atmosphere has a direct radiative effect on the climate of the Earth. Unfortunately, according to the IPCC the uncertainties in aerosol properties and their effect on the climate system represent one of the largest uncertainties in climate change research. Related to aerosols, one of the largest uncertainties is the fraction of the incident radiation that is scattered rather than absorbed, or their single scattering albedo. In fact, differences in single scattering albedo have a significant impact on the magnitude of the cooling effect of aerosols (opposite to that of greenhouse gasses) which can even have a warming effect for strongly absorbing aerosols. Satellites provide a unique opportunity to measure aerosol properties on a global scale. Traditional approaches use multispectral measurements of intensity at a single view angle to retrieve at most two aerosol parameters over land but it is being realized that more detail is required for accurate quantification of the direct effect of aerosols, in particular its anthropogenic component, and therefore more measurement information is required. One approach to more advanced measurements is to use not only intensity measurements but also polarimetric measurements and to use multiple view angles. In this work we explore another alternative: the use of hyperspectral measurements in molecular absorption bands. Our study can be divided into three stages the first of which is the development of a fast radiative transfer model for rapid simulation of measurements. Our approach is matrix operator based and uses the Pade approximation for the matrix exponential to evaluate the homogeneous solution. It is shown that the method is two to four times faster than the standard and efficient discrete ordinate technique and is accurate to the 6th decimal place. The second part of our study forms the core and is divided into two chapters the first of which is a rigorous

  17. Modeling Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over the Northern Hemisphere using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Hogrefe, C.; Xing, J.; Wei, C.; Gan, M.

    2013-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. A detailed investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. Anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosol and gaseous precursors have witnessed dramatic changes over the past two decades across the northern hemisphere. During the period 1990-2010, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA). In contrast, anthropogenic emissions have increased dramatically in many developing regions during this period. We conduct a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosols and gaseous precursors over the past two decades, their impacts on trends and spatial heterogeneity in anthropogenic aerosol loading across the northern hemisphere troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model is applied for selected time periods spanning the period 1990-2010 over a domain covering the northern hemisphere and a nested finer resolution continental U.S. domain. The model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation. Additionally, treatment of aerosol indirect effects on clouds has also recently been implemented. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate U.S. emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as

  18. Simulation of bulk aerosol direct radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa using RegCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfaye, M.; Botai, J.; Sivakumar, V.; Mengistu Tsidu, G.; Rautenbach, C. J. deW.; Moja, Shadung J.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, 12 year runs of the Regional Climate Model (RegCM4) have been used to analyze the bulk aerosol radiative effects and its climatic feedbacks in South Africa. Due to the geographical locations where the aerosol potential source regions are situated and the regional dynamics, the South African aerosol spatial-distribution has a unique feature. Across the west and southwest areas, desert dust particles are dominant. However, sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are primarily distributed over the east and northern regions of the country. Analysis of the Radiative Effects (RE) shows that in South Africa the bulk aerosols play a role in reducing the net radiation absorbed by the surface via enhancing the net radiative heating in the atmosphere. Hence, across all seasons, the bulk aerosol-radiation-climate interaction induced statistically significant positive feedback on the net atmospheric heating rate. Over the western and central parts of South Africa, the overall radiative feedbacks of bulk aerosol predominantly induces statistically significant Cloud Cover (CC) enhancements. Whereas, over the east and southeast coastal areas, it induces minimum reductions in CC. The CC enhancement and RE of aerosols jointly induce radiative cooling at the surface which in turn results in the reduction of Surface Temperature (ST: up to -1 K) and Surface Sensible Heat Flux (SSHF: up to -24 W/m2). The ST and SSHF decreases cause a weakening of the convectively driven turbulences and surface buoyancy fluxes which lead to the reduction of the boundary layer height, surface pressure enhancement and dynamical changes. Throughout the year, the maximum values of direct and semi-direct effects of bulk aerosol were found in areas of South Africa which are dominated by desert dust particles. This signals the need for a strategic regional plan on how to reduce the dust production and monitoring of the dust dispersion as well as it initiate the need of further research on different

  19. The interplay between assumed morphology and the direct radiative effect of light-absorbing organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Rawad; Adams, Peter J.; Donahue, Neil M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-08-01

    Mie theory is widely employed in aerosol top-of-the-atmosphere direct radiative effect (DRE) calculations and to retrieve the absorptivity of light-absorbing organic aerosol (OA) from measurements. However, when OA is internally mixed with black carbon, it may exhibit complex morphologies whose optical behavior is imperfectly predicted by Mie theory, introducing bias in the retrieved absorptivities. We performed numerical experiments and global radiative transfer modeling (RTM) to investigate the effect of this bias on the calculated absorption and thus the DRE. We show that using true OA absorptivity, retrieved with a realistic representation of the complex morphology, leads to significant errors in DRE when the RTM employs the simplified Mie theory. On the other hand, when Mie theory is consistently applied in both OA absorptivity retrieval and the RTM, the errors largely cancel out, yielding accurate DRE. As long as global RTMs use Mie theory, they should implement parametrizations of light-absorbing OA derived from retrievals based on Mie theory.

  20. Atmospheric aerosol and molecular backscatter imaging effects on direct detection LADAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youmans, Douglas G.

    2015-05-01

    Backscatter from atmospheric aerosols and molecular nitrogen and oxygen causes "clutter" noise in direct detection ladar applications operating within the atmosphere. The backscatter clutter is more pronounced in multiple pulse, high PRF ladars where pulse-averaging is used to increase operating range. As more and more pulses are added to the wavetrain the backscatter increases. We analyze the imaging of a transmitted Gaussian laser-mode multi-pulse wave-train scatteried off of aerosols and molecules at the focal plane including angular-slew rate resulting from optical tracking, angular lead-angle, and bistatic-optics spatial separation. The defocused backscatter images, from those pulses closest to the receiver, are analyzed using a simple geometrical optics approximation. Methods for estimating the aerosol number density versus altitude and the volume backscatter coefficient of the aerosols are also discussed.

  1. Parameterization of clear-sky surface irradiance and its implications for estimation of aerosol direct radiative effect and aerosol optical depth

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiangao

    2015-01-01

    Aerosols impact clear-sky surface irradiance () through the effects of scattering and absorption. Linear or nonlinear relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and have been established to describe the aerosol direct radiative effect on (ADRE). However, considerable uncertainties remain associated with ADRE due to the incorrect estimation of (τa in the absence of aerosols). Based on data from the Aerosol Robotic Network, the effects of τa, water vapor content (w) and the cosine of the solar zenith angle (μ) on are thoroughly considered, leading to an effective parameterization of as a nonlinear function of these three quantities. The parameterization is proven able to estimate with a mean bias error of 0.32 W m−2, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that derived using earlier linear or nonlinear functions. Applications of this new parameterization to estimate τa from , or vice versa, show that the root-mean-square errors were 0.08 and 10.0 Wm−2, respectively. Therefore, this study establishes a straightforward method to derive from τa or estimate τa from measurements if water vapor measurements are available. PMID:26395310

  2. Parameterization of clear-sky surface irradiance and its implications for estimation of aerosol direct radiative effect and aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao

    2015-09-01

    Aerosols impact clear-sky surface irradiance () through the effects of scattering and absorption. Linear or nonlinear relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and have been established to describe the aerosol direct radiative effect on (ADRE). However, considerable uncertainties remain associated with ADRE due to the incorrect estimation of (τa in the absence of aerosols). Based on data from the Aerosol Robotic Network, the effects of τa, water vapor content (w) and the cosine of the solar zenith angle (μ) on are thoroughly considered, leading to an effective parameterization of as a nonlinear function of these three quantities. The parameterization is proven able to estimate with a mean bias error of 0.32 W m-2, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that derived using earlier linear or nonlinear functions. Applications of this new parameterization to estimate τa from , or vice versa, show that the root-mean-square errors were 0.08 and 10.0 Wm-2, respectively. Therefore, this study establishes a straightforward method to derive from τa or estimate τa from measurements if water vapor measurements are available.

  3. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  4. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol properties and clear-sky direct radiative effect over the global ocean from MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Yun Gon

    2014-08-01

    A unified satellite algorithm is presented to simultaneously retrieve aerosol properties (aerosol optical depth; AOD and aerosol type) and clear-sky shortwave direct radiative effect (hereafter, DREA) over ocean. The algorithm is applied to Moderate Resolution Imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations for a period from 2003 to 2010 to assess the DREA over the global ocean. The simultaneous retrieval utilizes lookup table (LUT) containing both spectral reflectances and solar irradiances calculated using a single radiative transfer model with the same aerosol input data. This study finds that aerosols cool the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and bottom-of-atmosphere (BOA) by 5.2 ± 0.5 W/m2 and 8.3 W/m2, respectively, and correspondingly warm the atmosphere (hereafter, ATM) by 3.1 W/m2. These quantities, solely based on the MODIS observations, are consistent with those of previous studies incorporating chemical transport model simulations and satellite observations. However, the DREAs at BOA and ATM are expected to be less accurate compared to that of TOA due to low sensitivity in retrieving aerosol type information, which is related with the atmospheric heating by aerosols, particularly in low AOD conditions; consequently, the uncertainties could not be quantified. Despite the issue in the aerosol type information, the present method allows us to confine the DREA attributed only to fine-mode dominant aerosols, which are expected to be mostly anthropogenic origin, in the range from -1.1 W/m2 to -1.3 W/m2 at TOA. Improvements in size-resolved AOD and SSA retrievals from current and upcoming satellite instruments are suggested to better assess the DREA, particularly at BOA and ATM, where aerosol absorptivity induces substantial uncertainty.

  5. Shortwave Direct Radiative Effects of Above Cloud Aerosols Over Global Oceans Derived From Eight Years of CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Meyer, K.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Colarco, P. R.; Liu, Z.; Oreopoulos, L.

    2015-12-01

    Although aerosols are usually found in boundary layer beneath clouds, they can be elevated during long-range transport and rise above low-level clouds. In fact, above-cloud aerosols (ACA) are persistently observed in several regions of the globe during certain time of the year (Devasthale and Thomas, 2011; Winker et al., 2013). For example, marine-boundary layer clouds in SE Atlantic region are persistently covered by light-absorbing smoke aerosols originating from biomass burning acativities in African Savanna during austral winter (July ~ September). ACA is an important and interesting component of the climate system for a number of reasons, above all because its shortwave direct radiative effect (DRE) can differ significantly from that of clear-sky aerosols. The DRE of aerosols at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is strongly dependent on the underlying surface. Over dark surfaces (e.g. ocean surface), the scattering effect of aerosols is generally dominant, leading to negative DRE (i.e., cooling) at TOA. In contrast, when aerosols reside above clouds, their absorption effect can be significantly enhanced by cloud reflection, and offset or even exceed the scattering effect of the aerosol leading to a less negative or even positive (i.e., warming) DRE at TOA. In this study, we used 8 years of CALIOP and MODIS observations to derive the shortwave Direct of ACA over global oceans. We found in regions where ACAs are dominated by light absorbing aerosols (e.g., SE Atlantic and North Pacific), the cloudy-sky DRE at TOA due to ACA is generally positive, while in regions dominated by dust aerosols (e.g., North Atlantic and Arabian Sea) the DRE at TOA is generally negative (see Figure 7). The strongest positive TOA DRE is found in the SE Atlantic region during summer and fall with a seasonal mean over 0.4 W/m2. To our best knowledge, this is the first study to provide a global perspective on the DRE of ACA on global scale. Our results would be very useful for evaluating

  6. Direct observations of atmospheric aerosol nucleation.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, Markku; Kontkanen, Jenni; Junninen, Heikki; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Manninen, Hanna E; Nieminen, Tuomo; Petäjä, Tuukka; Sipilä, Mikko; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Rantala, Pekka; Franchin, Alessandro; Jokinen, Tuija; Järvinen, Emma; Äijälä, Mikko; Kangasluoma, Juha; Hakala, Jani; Aalto, Pasi P; Paasonen, Pauli; Mikkilä, Jyri; Vanhanen, Joonas; Aalto, Juho; Hakola, Hannele; Makkonen, Ulla; Ruuskanen, Taina; Mauldin, Roy L; Duplissy, Jonathan; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Bäck, Jaana; Kortelainen, Aki; Riipinen, Ilona; Kurtén, Theo; Johnston, Murray V; Smith, James N; Ehn, Mikael; Mentel, Thomas F; Lehtinen, Kari E J; Laaksonen, Ari; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2013-02-22

    Atmospheric nucleation is the dominant source of aerosol particles in the global atmosphere and an important player in aerosol climatic effects. The key steps of this process occur in the sub-2-nanometer (nm) size range, in which direct size-segregated observations have not been possible until very recently. Here, we present detailed observations of atmospheric nanoparticles and clusters down to 1-nm mobility diameter. We identified three separate size regimes below 2-nm diameter that build up a physically, chemically, and dynamically consistent framework on atmospheric nucleation--more specifically, aerosol formation via neutral pathways. Our findings emphasize the important role of organic compounds in atmospheric aerosol formation, subsequent aerosol growth, radiative forcing and associated feedbacks between biogenic emissions, clouds, and climate.

  7. Aerosol direct radiative effect of smoke over clouds over the southeast Atlantic Ocean from 2006 to 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graaf, M.; Bellouin, N.; Tilstra, L. G.; Haywood, J.; Stammes, P.

    2014-11-01

    The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) of African smoke was analyzed in cloud scenes over the southeast Atlantic Ocean, using Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite observations and Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2 (HadGEM2) climate model simulations. The observed mean DRE was about 30-35 W m-2 in August and September 2006-2009. In some years, short episodes of high-aerosol DRE can be observed, due to high-aerosol loadings, while in other years the loadings are lower but more prolonged. Climate models that use evenly distributed monthly averaged emission fields will not reproduce these high-aerosol loadings. Furthermore, the simulated monthly mean aerosol DRE in HadGEM2 is only about 6 W m-2 in August. The difference with SCIAMACHY mean observations can be partly explained by an underestimation of the aerosol absorption Ångström exponent in the ultraviolet. However, the subsequent increase of aerosol DRE simulation by about 20% is not enough to explain the observed discrepancy between simulations and observations.

  8. Direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols as simulated by SP-CAM global climate model with superparameterization of clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairoutdinov, M.; Grabowski, W.; Morrison, H.

    2010-12-01

    Direct and indirect effects of aerosols on radiative forcing are among major uncertainties of the climate change simulated by global climate models (GCMs). Traditional GCMs have grid spacing that is too coarse to resolve individual clouds; instead, clouds are represented using cloud parameterizations. Accordingly, the interactions between parameterized clouds and aerosols need also to be parameterized. Recently, it became practical to apply a new kind of GCM, a Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) to the aerosol-cloud-radiation problem. In SP-CAM MMF, the cloud and convection parameterizations are replaced with a small-domain coarse-resolution cloud-system-resolving model (CRM), often called in this context a "superparameterization". The CRM subcycles within the GCM's time step, explicitly simulating evolution of clouds in each GCM's grid cell in response to large-scale (GCM) dynamics. The CRM computes the precipitation rates, cloud statistics, large-scale tendencies due to cloud processes, and radiative heating rates. Recently, the single-moment bulk microphysics scheme used by the CRM in SP-CAM has been upgraded to a more sophisticated two-moment bulk microphysics scheme. The new bulk scheme's prognostic variables include not only water content, but also number concentration for all liquid and solid water species such as cloud liquid and ice water, rain, snow and graupel. The effect of aerosols on simulated clouds can be modeled through specified globally and monthly varying fields of cloud-condensation nuclei (CCN) derived from several species of prescribed aerosol climatology. The cloud drop concentration is modeled using the local CCN count and updraft vertical velocity at cloud bases. In this study, the results of global climate simulations using current and pre-industrial aerosol distributions are contrasted. The presence of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols tends to increase the strength of the meridional circulation such as the Hadley cell, redistributing

  9. Diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties in the North China Plain and their influences on the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Ye; Zhao, Chunsheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the diurnal variations of aerosol optical properties and their influences on the estimation of daily average direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) in the North China Plain (NCP) are investigated based on in situ measurements from Haze in China campaign. For ambient aerosol, the diurnal patterns of single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (g) in the NCP are both highest at dawn and lowest in the late afternoon, and quite different from those of dry-state aerosol. The relative humidity is the dominant factor which determines the diurnal patterns of SSA and g for ambient aerosol. Basing on the calculated SSA and g, several cases are designed to investigate the impacts of the diurnal changes of aerosol optical properties on DARE. The results demonstrate that the diurnal changes of SSA and g in the NCP have significant influences on the estimation of DARE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). If the full temporal coverage of aerosol optical depth (AOD), SSA and g are available, an accurate estimation of daily average DARE can be achieved by using the daily averages of AOD, SSA and g. However, due to the lack of full temporal coverage datasets of SSA and g, their daily averages are usually not available. Basing on the results of designed cases, if the RH plays a dominant role in the diurnal variations of SSA and g, we suggest that using both SSA and g averaged over early morning and late afternoon as inputs for radiative transfer model to improve the accurate estimation of DARE. If the temporal samplings of SSA or g are too few to adopt this method, either averaged over early morning or late afternoon of both SSA and g can be used to improve the estimation of DARF at TOA.

  10. A Novel Method for Estimating Shortwave Direct Radiative Effect of Above-Cloud Aerosols Using CALIOP and MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Z.; Meyer, K.; Platnick, S.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.; Yu, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient and unique method for computing the shortwave direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosol residing above low-level liquid-phase clouds using CALIOP and MODIS data. It accounts for the overlapping of aerosol and cloud rigorously by utilizing the joint histogram of cloud optical depth and cloud top pressure. Effects of sub-grid scale cloud and aerosol variations on DRE are accounted for. It is computationally efficient through using grid-level cloud and aerosol statistics, instead of pixel-level products, and a pre-computed look-up table in radiative transfer calculations. We verified that for smoke over the southeast Atlantic Ocean the method yields a seasonal mean instantaneous shortwave DRE that generally agrees with more rigorous pixel-level computation within 4. We have also computed the annual mean instantaneous shortwave DRE of light-absorbing aerosols (i.e., smoke and polluted dust) over global ocean based on 4 yr of CALIOP and MODIS data. We found that the variability of the annual mean shortwave DRE of above-cloud light-absorbing aerosol is mainly driven by the optical depth of the underlying clouds.

  11. Air pollution and climate response to aerosol direct radiative effects: A modeling study of decadal trends across the northern hemisphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decadal hemispheric Weather Research and Forecast-Community Multiscale Air Quality simulations from 1990 to 2010 were conducted to examine the meteorology and air quality responses to the aerosol direct radiative effects. The model's performance for the simulation of hourly surfa...

  12. Assesment of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol-Effect During ISDAC Through Integrated Observational and Modeling Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Boybeyi, Zafer

    2014-09-29

    The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded George Mason University (GMU) with a research project. This project started on June, 2009 and ended July 2014. Main objectives of this research project are; a) to assess the indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects on microphysical structure and radiative properties of Arctic clouds, b) to assess the impact of feedback between the aerosol-cloud interactions and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) processes on the surface energy balance, c) to better understand and characterize the important unresolved microphysical processes, aerosol effects, and ABL processes and feedbacks, over meso-γ spatial (~1-2 km) and temporal scales (a few minutes to days), and d) to investigate the scale dependency of microphysical parameterizations and its effect on simulations.

  13. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, A.-I.; Dunne, E. M.; Bergman, T.; Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Sogacheva, L.; Baisnée, D.; Sciare, J.; Manders, A.; O'Dowd, C.; de Leeuw, G.; Korhonen, H.

    2014-11-01

    Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global sea salt emission of 805 Tg yr-1 (uncertainty range 378-1233 Tg yr-1) was much lower than typically found in previous studies. Modelled sea salt and sodium ion concentrations agreed relatively well with measurements in the smaller size ranges at Mace Head (annual normalized mean model bias -13% for particles with vacuum aerodynamic diameter Dva < 1 μm), Point Reyes (-29% for particles with aerodynamic diameter Da < 2.5 μm) and Amsterdam Island (-52% for particles with Da < 1 μm) but the larger sizes were overestimated (899% for particles with 2.5 μm < Da < 10 μm) at Amsterdam Island. This suggests that at least the high end of the previous estimates of sea spray mass emissions is unrealistic. On the other hand, the model clearly underestimated the observed concentrations of organic or total carbonaceous aerosol at Mace Head (-82%) and Amsterdam Island (-68%). The large overestimation (212%) of organic matter at Point Reyes was due to the contribution of continental sources. At the remote Amsterdam Island site, the organic concentration was underestimated especially in the biologically active months, suggesting a need to improve the parameterization of the organic sea spray fraction. Globally, the satellite-retrieved AOD over the oceans, using PARASOL data, was underestimated by the model (means over ocean 0.16 and 0.10, respectively); however, in the pristine region around Amsterdam Island the measured AOD fell well within the simulated uncertainty range. The simulated sea spray aerosol contribution to the indirect radiative effect was positive (0.3 W m-2), in contrast to previous studies. This positive effect was ascribed to the tendency of sea salt aerosol to

  14. Global modelling of direct and indirect effects of sea spray aerosol using a source function encapsulating wave state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, A.-I.; Dunne, E. M.; Bergman, T.; Laakso, A.; Kokkola, H.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Sogacheva, L.; Baisnée, D.; Sciare, J.; Manders, A.; O'Dowd, C.; de Leeuw, G.; Korhonen, H.

    2014-02-01

    Recently developed parameterizations for the sea spray aerosol source flux, encapsulating wave state, and its organic fraction were incorporated into the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to investigate the direct and indirect radiative effects of sea spray aerosol particles. Our simulated global sea salt emission of 805 Tg yr-1 (uncertainty range 378-1233 Tg yr-1) was much lower than typically found in previous studies. Modelled sea salt and sodium ion concentrations agreed relatively well with measurements in the smaller size ranges at Mace Head (annual normalized mean model bias -13% for particles with vacuum aerodynamic diameter Dva < 1 μm), Point Reyes (-29% for particles with aerodynamic diameter Da < 2.5 μm) and Amsterdam Island (-52% for particles with Da < 1 μm) but the larger sizes were overestimated (899% for particles with 2.5 μm aerosol at Mace Head (-82%) and Amsterdam Island (-68%). The large overestimation (212%) of organic matter at Point Reyes was due to the contribution of continental sources. At the remote Amsterdam Island site, the organic concentration was underestimated especially in the biologically active months, suggesting a need to improve the parameterization of the organic sea spray fraction. Globally, the satellite-retrieved AOD over the oceans, using PARASOL data, was underestimated by the model (means over ocean 0.16 and 0.10, respectively); however, in the pristine region around Amsterdam Island the measured AOD fell well within the simulated uncertainty range. The simulated sea spray aerosol contribution to the indirect radiative effect was positive (0.3 W m-2), in contrast to previous studies. This positive effect was ascribed to the tendency of sea salt aerosol to

  15. Impacts of the direct radiative effect of aerosols in numerical weather prediction over Europe using the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toll, V.; Gleeson, E.; Nielsen, K. P.; Männik, A.; Mašek, J.; Rontu, L.; Post, P.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol feedbacks are becoming more accepted as physical mechanisms that should be included in numerical weather prediction models in order to improve the accuracy of the weather forecasts. The default set-up in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement INternational (ALADIN) - High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction system includes monthly aerosol climatologies to account for the average direct radiative effect of aerosols. This effect was studied using the default aerosol climatology in the system and compared to experiments run using the more up-to-date Max-Planck-Institute Aerosol Climatology version 1 (MACv1), and time-varying aerosol data from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis aerosol dataset. Accounting for the direct radiative effect using monthly aerosol climatologies or near real-time aerosol distributions improved the accuracy of the simulated radiative fluxes and temperature and humidity forecasts in the lower troposphere. However, the dependency of forecast meteorological conditions on the aerosol dataset itself was found to be weak.

  16. A Novel Method for Estimating Shortwave Direct Radiative Effect of Above-Cloud Aerosols Using CALIOP and MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Meyer, Kerry G.; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin; Yu, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient and unique method for computing the shortwave direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosol residing above low-level liquid-phase clouds using CALIOP and MODIS data. It addresses the overlap of aerosol and cloud rigorously by utilizing the joint histogram of cloud optical depth and cloud top pressure while also accounting for subgrid-scale variations of aerosols. The method is computationally efficient because of its use of grid-level cloud and aerosol statistics, instead of pixel-level products, and a pre-computed look-up table based on radiative transfer calculations. We verify that for smoke over the southeast Atlantic Ocean the method yields a seasonal mean instantaneous (approximately 1:30PM local time) shortwave DRE of above cloud aerosol (ACA) that generally agrees with more rigorous pixel-level computation within 4 percent. We also estimate the impact of potential CALIOP aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval bias of ACA on DRE. We find that the regional and seasonal mean instantaneous DRE of ACA over southeast Atlantic Ocean would increase, from the original value of 6.4 W m(-2) based on operational CALIOP AOD to 9.6 W m(-2) if CALIOP AOD retrieval are biased low by a factor of 1.5 (Meyer et al., 2013) and further to 30.9 W m(-2) if CALIOP AOD retrieval are biased low by a factor of 5 as suggested in (Jethva et al., 2014). In contrast, the instantaneous ACA radiative forcing efficiency (RFE) remains relatively invariant in all cases at about 53 W m(-2) AOD(-1), suggesting a near linear relation between the instantaneous RFE and AOD. We also compute the annual mean instantaneous shortwave DRE of light-absorbing aerosols (i.e., smoke and polluted dust) over global oceans based on 4 years of CALIOP and MODIS data. We find that the variability of the annual mean shortwave DRE of above-cloud light-absorbing aerosol is mainly driven by the optical depth of the underlying clouds. While we demonstrate our method using CALIOP and MODIS

  17. Can a coupled meteorology-chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, J.; Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Hogrefe, C.; Gan, C.-M.; Wong, D. C.; Wei, C.

    2015-09-01

    The ability of a coupled meteorology-chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere has been evaluated through a comparison of 21-year simulated results with observation-derived records from 1990 to 2010. Six satellite-retrieved AOD products including AVHRR, TOMS, SeaWiFS, MISR, MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua as well as long-term historical records from 11 AERONET sites were used for the comparison of AOD trends. Clear-sky SWR products derived by CERES at both the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface as well as surface SWR data derived from seven SURFRAD sites were used for the comparison of trends in SWR. The model successfully captured increasing AOD trends along with the corresponding increased TOA SWR (upwelling) and decreased surface SWR (downwelling) in both eastern China and the northern Pacific. The model also captured declining AOD trends along with the corresponding decreased TOA SWR (upwelling) and increased surface SWR (downwelling) in the eastern US, Europe and the northern Atlantic for the period of 2000-2010. However, the model underestimated the AOD over regions with substantial natural dust aerosol contributions, such as the Sahara Desert, Arabian Desert, central Atlantic and northern Indian Ocean. Estimates of the aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) at TOA are comparable with those derived by measurements. Compared to global climate models (GCMs), the model exhibits better estimates of surface-aerosol direct radiative efficiency (Eτ). However, surface-DRE tends to be underestimated due to the underestimated AOD in land and dust regions. Further investigation of TOA-Eτ estimations as well as the dust module used for estimates of windblown-dust emissions is needed.

  18. Satellite-Based Assessment of Possible Dust Aerosols Semi-Direct Effect on Cloud Water Path over East Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Lin, Bing; Minnis, Patrick; Wang, Tainhe; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yongxiang; Yi, Yuhong; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The semi-direct effects of dust aerosols are analyzed over eastern Asia using 2 years (June 2002 to June 2004) of data from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) scanning radiometer and MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Aqua satellite, and 18 years (1984 to 2001) of International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. The results show that the water path of dust-contaminated clouds is considerably smaller than that of dust-free clouds. The mean ice water path (IWP) and liquid water path (LWP) of dusty clouds are less than their dust-free counterparts by 23.7% and 49.8%, respectively. The long-term statistical relationship derived from ISCCP also confirms that there is significant negative correlation between dust storm index and ISCCP cloud water path. These results suggest that dust aerosols warm clouds, increase the evaporation of cloud droplets and further reduce cloud water path, the so-called semi-direct effect. The semi-direct effect may play a role in cloud development over arid and semi-arid areas of East Asia and contribute to the reduction of precipitation.

  19. Investigation of Multi-decadal Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Pleim, J.; Wong, D.; Wei, C.; Xing, J.; Gan, M.; Yu, S.; Binkowski, F.

    2012-12-01

    While aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, there has been little effort devoted to verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing. A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects and verification of their simulated effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in order to build confidence in the estimates of the projected impacts arising from changes in both anthropogenic forcing and climate change. This study aims at addressing this issue through a systematic investigation of changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past two decades in the United States, their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading in the North American troposphere, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. A newly developed 2-way coupled meteorology and air pollution model composed of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is being run for 20 years (1990 - 2010) on a 12 km resolution grid that covers most of North America including the entire conterminous US. During this period US emissions of SO2 and NOx have been reduced by about 66% and 50%, respectively, mainly due to Title IV of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments (CAA) that aimed to reduce emissions that contribute to acid deposition. A methodology is developed to consistently estimate emission inventories for the 20-year period accounting for air quality regulations as well as population trends, economic conditions, and technology changes in motor vehicles and electric power generation. The coupled WRF-CMAQ model includes detailed treatment of direct effects of aerosols on photolysis rates as well as on shortwave radiation and the direct effects of tropospheric ozone on the long

  20. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Aerosols: Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation and Direct Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-01-01

    reducing the bias against observed values. We calculate the direct radiative effect (DRE) of BrC using GEOS-Chem coupled with the radiative transfer model RRTMG (GC-RT). Treating organic aerosol as containing more strongly absorbing BrC changes the global annual mean all-sky top of atmosphere (TOA) DRE by +0.03Wm(exp -2) and all-sky surface DRE by -0.08Wm(exp -2). Regional changes of up to +0.3Wm(exp -2) at TOA and down to -1.5Wm(exp -2) at the surface are found over major biomass burning regions.

  1. Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Satellite Instrument (CERES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nine months of CERES/TRMM broadband fluxes combined with VIRS high-resolution imager measurements are used to estimate the daily average direct radiative effect of aerosols for clear-sky conditions over the tropical oceans. On average, aerosols have a cooling effect over the tropics of 4.6 +/- 1 W/sq m. The magnitude is approx.2 W/sq m smaller over the southern tropical oceans than it is over northern tropical oceans. The direct effect derived from CERES is highly correlated with coincident aerosol optical depth retrievals inferred from 0.63 microns VIRS radiances (correlation coefficient of 0.96). The slope of the regression line is approx. -32 W/sq m/t over the equatorial Pacific Ocean, but changes both regionally and seasonally, depending on the aerosol characteristics. Near sources of biomass burning and desert dust, the aerosol direct effect reaches -25 W sq m to -30 W/sq m. The direct effect from CERES also shows a dependence on wind speed. The reason for this dependence is unclear-it may be due to increased aerosol (e.g. sea-salt or aerosol transport) or increased surface reflection (e.g. due to whitecaps). The uncertainty in the tropical average direct effect from CERES is approx. 1 W/sq m (approx. 20%) due mainly to cloud contamination, the radiance-to-flux conversion, and instrument calibration. By comparison, uncertainties in the direct effect from the ERBE and CERES "ERBE-Like" products are a factor of 3 to 5 larger.

  2. Investigation of Trends in Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects over North America Using a Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive investigation of the processes regulating tropospheric aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and their radiative effects in conjunction with verification of their simulated radiative effects for past conditions relative to measurements is needed in orde...

  3. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  4. Direct Radiative Effect and Heating Rate of black carbon aerosol: high time resolution measurements and source-identified forcing effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Mocnik, Grisa; Cogliati, Sergio; Comi, Alberto; Degni, Francesca; Di Mauro, Biagio; Colombo, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) absorbs sunlight in the atmosphere heating it. However, up to now, heating rate (HR) calculations from the divergence of the net radiative flux with altitude or from the modelling activity are too sparse. This work fills the aforementioned gap presenting a new methodology based on a full set of physical equations to experimentally determine both the radiative power density absorbed into a ground-based atmospheric layer (ADRE), and the consequent HR induced by the absorptive component of aerosol. In urban context, it is essentially related to the BC. The methodology is also applicable to natural components (i.e. dust) and is obtained solving the first derivative of the main radiative transfer equations. The ADRE and the consequent HR can be determined coupling spectral aerosol absorption measurements with the spectrally resolved measurements of the direct, diffuse downward radiation and the surface reflected radiance components. Moreover, the spectral absorption of BC aerosol allows its source apportionment (traffic and biomass burning (BB)) allowing the same apportionment on HR. This work reports one year of high-time resolution measurements (5 min) of sunlight absorption and HR induced by BC aerosol over Milan. A unique sampling site was set up from March 2015 with: 1) Aethalometer (AE-31, Magee Scientific, 7-λ), 2) the Multiplexer-Radiometer-Irradiometer which detects downward and reflected radiance (350-1000 nm in 3648 spectral bands) coupled with a rotating shadow-band to measure spectrally-resolved global and diffuse radiation (thus direct), 3) a meteorological station (LSI-Lastem) equipped with 3 pyranometers (global, diffuse and refrected radiation; 300-3000 nm), a thermohygrometer, a barometer, an anemometer, 4) condensation and optical particle counters (TSI 3775 and Grimm 1.107), 5) low volume sampler (FAI Hydra dual sampler, PM2.5 and PM10) for sample collection and chemistry determination. Results concerning the radiative power

  5. Impacts of Aerosol Direct Effects on the South Asian Climate: Assessment of Radiative Feedback Processes Using Model Simulations and Satellite/Surface Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Gautam, Ritesh; Lau, William K. M.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Sun, Wen-Yih; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Hsu, Christina; Lin, Neng-Huei

    2011-01-01

    Current assessment of aerosol radiative effect is hindered by our incomplete knowledge of aerosol optical properties, especially absorption, and our current inability to quantify physical and microphysical processes. In this research, we investigate direct aerosol radiative effect over heavy aerosol loading areas (e.g., Indo-Gangetic Plains, South/East Asia) and its feedbacks on the South Asian climate during the pre-monsoon season (March-June) using the Purdue Regional Climate Model (PRCM) with prescribed aerosol data derived by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Model (GEOS-5). Our modeling domain covers South and East Asia (60-140E and 0-50N) with spatial resolutions of 45 km in horizontal and 28 layers in vertical. The model is integrated from 15 February to 30 June 2008 continuously without nudging (i.e., only forced by initial/boundary conditions). Two numerical experiments are conducted with and without the aerosol-radiation effects. Both simulations are successful in reproducing the synoptic patterns on seasonal-to-interannual time scales and capturing a pre-monsoon feature of the northward rainfall propagation over Indian region in early June which shown in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) observation. Preliminary result suggests aerosol-radiation interactions mainly alter surface-atmosphere energetics and further result in an adjustment of the vertical temperature distribution in lower atmosphere (below 700 hPa). The modifications of temperature and associated rainfall and circulation feedbacks on the regional climate will be discussed in the presentation.

  6. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  7. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Focusing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  8. Effect of spectrally varying albedo of vegetation surfaces on shortwave radiation fluxes and direct aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-06-01

    This study develops an algorithm for the representation of large spectral variations of albedo over vegetation surfaces based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels centered at 0.47, 0.55, 0.67, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.11 μm. The MODIS 7-channel observations miss several major features of vegetation albedo including the vegetation red edge near 0.7 μm and vegetation absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 μm. We characterize these features by investigating aerosol forcing in different spectral ranges. We show that the correction at 0.7 μm is the most sensitive and important due to the presence of the red edge and strong solar radiation; the other two corrections are less sensitive due to the weaker solar radiation and strong atmospheric water absorption. Four traditional approaches for estimating the reflectance spectrum and the MODIS enhanced vegetation albedo (MEVA) are tested against various vegetation types: dry grass, green grass, conifer, and deciduous from the John Hopkins University (JHU) spectral library; aspens from the US Geological Survey (USGS) digital spectral library; and Amazon vegetation types. Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA improves the accuracy of the outgoing flux at the top of the atmosphere by over 60 W m-2 and aerosol forcing by over 10 W m-2. Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol forcing at equator at equinox by 3.7 W m-2 (about 70% of the aerosol forcing calculated with high spectral resolution surface reflectance). These improvements indicate that MEVA can contribute to vegetation covered regional climate studies, and help to improve understanding of climate processes and climate change.

  9. Estimation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects Over the Mid-Latitude North Atlantic from Satellite and In Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    We estimate solar radiative flux changes due to aerosols over the mid-latitude North Atlantic by combining optical depths from AVHRR measurements with aerosol properties from the recent TARFOX program. Results show that, over the ocean the aerosol decreases the net radiative flux at the tropopause and therefore has a cooling effect. Cloud-free, 24-hour average flux changes range from -9 W/sq m near the eastern US coast in summer to -1 W/sq m in the mid-Atlantic during winter. Cloud-free North Atlantic regional averages range from -5.1 W/sq m in summer to -1.7 W/sq m in winter, with an annual average of -3.5 W/sq m. Cloud effects estimated from ISCCP data, reduce the regional annual average to -0.8 W/sq m. All values are for the moderately absorbing TARFOX aerosol (omega(0.55 microns) = 0.9); values for a nonabsorbing aerosol are approx. 30% more negative. We compare our results to a variety of other calculations of aerosol radiative effects.

  10. Interaction between the aerosol direct effect in the lower troposphere and the planetary boundary layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Virginia Ruth

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) limits the vertical mixing of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere. The PBL depth and its change over time affect weather, surface air quality and radiative forcing. While model simulations have suggested that the column optical properties of aerosol are associated with changes in the PBL depth in turn, there are few long-term measurements of PBL depth with which to validate the theory. Of the existing methods to detect the PBL depth from atmospheric profiles, many require supporting information from multiple instruments or cannot adapt to changing atmospheric conditions. This study combines two common methods for PBL depth detection (wavelet covariance and iterative curve-fitting) in order to produce more reliable PBL depths for micropulse lidar backscatter (MPL). The combined algorithm is also flexible enough to use with radiosonde and atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) data. PBL depth retrievals from these three instruments collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared to one another to show the robustness of the algorithm. The comparisons were made for different times of day, four seasons, and variable sky conditions. While considerable uncertainties exist in PBL detection using all three types of measurements, the agreement among the PBL products is promising, and the different measurements have complementary advantages. The best agreement in the seasonal cycle occurs in winter, and the best agreement in the diurnal cycle when the boundary-layer regime is mature and changes slowly. PBL depths from instruments with higher temporal resolution (MPL and AERI) are of comparable accuracy to radiosonde-derived PBL depths. The new PBL depth measurements for SGP are compared to MPL-derived PBL depths from a multiyear lidar deployment at the Hefei Radiation Observatory (HeRO), and the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) for each site is considered. A one

  11. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    DOEpatents

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  12. Advancing Solar Irradiance Measurement for Climate-Related Studies: Accurate Constraint on Direct Aerosol Radiative Effect (DARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Earth's climate is driven primarily by solar radiation. As summarized in various IPCC reports, the global average of radiative forcing for different agents and mechanisms, such as aerosols or CO2 doubling, is in the range of a few W/sq m. However, when solar irradiance is measured by broadband radiometers, such as the fleet of Eppley Precision Solar Pyranometers (PSP) and equivalent instrumentation employed worldwide, the measurement uncertainty is larger than 2% (e.g., WMO specification of pyranometer, 2008). Thus, out of the approx. 184 W/sq m (approx.263 W/sq m if cloud-free) surface solar insolation (Trenberth et al. 2009), the measurement uncertainty is greater than +/-3.6 W/sq m, overwhelming the climate change signals. To discern these signals, less than a 1 % measurement uncertainty is required and is currently achievable only by means of a newly developed methodology employing a modified PSP-like pyranometer and an updated calibration equation to account for its thermal effects (li and Tsay, 2010). In this talk, we will show that some auxiliary measurements, such as those from a collocated pyrgeometer or air temperature sensors, can help correct historical datasets. Additionally, we will also demonstrate that a pyrheliometer is not free of the thermal effect; therefore, comparing to a high cost yet still not thermal-effect-free "direct + diffuse" approach in measuring surface solar irradiance, our new method is more economical, and more likely to be suitable for correcting a wide variety of historical datasets. Modeling simulations will be presented that a corrected solar irradiance measurement has a significant impact on aerosol forcing, and thus plays an important role in climate studies.

  13. Describing the direct and indirect radiative effects of atmospheric aerosols over Europe by using coupled meteorology-chemistry simulations: a contribution from the AQMEII-Phase II exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocío; Curci, Gabriele; Forkel, Renate; Hirtl, Marcus; Honzak, Luka; Langer, Matthias; Pérez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San José, Roberto; Tuccella, Paolo; Werhahn, Johannes; Zabkar, Rahela

    2014-05-01

    The study of the response of the aerosol levels in the atmosphere to a changing climate and how this affects the radiative budget of the Earth (direct, semi-direct and indirect effects) is an essential topic to build confidence on climate science, since these feedbacks involve the largest uncertainties nowadays. Air quality-climate interactions (AQCI) are, therefore, a key, but uncertain contributor to the anthropogenic forcing that remains poorly understood. To build confidence in the AQCI studies, regional-scale integrated meteorology-atmospheric chemistry models (i.e., models with on-line chemistry) that include detailed treatment of aerosol life cycle and aerosol impacts on radiation (direct effects) and clouds (indirect effects) are in demand. In this context, the main objective of this contribution is the study and definition of the uncertainties in the climate-chemistry-aerosol-cloud-radiation system associated to the direct radiative forcing and the indirect effect caused by aerosols over Europe, using an ensemble of fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry model simulations with the WRF-Chem model run under the umbrella of AQMEII-Phase 2 international initiative. Simulations were performed for Europe for the entire year 2010. According to the common simulation strategy, the year was simulated as a sequence of 2-day time slices. For better comparability, the seven groups applied the same grid spacing of 23 km and shared common processing of initial and boundary conditions as well as anthropogenic and fire emissions. With exception of a simulation with different cloud microphysics, identical physics options were chosen while the chemistry options were varied. Two model set-ups will be considered here: one sub-ensemble of simulations not taking into account any aerosol feedbacks (the baseline case) and another sub-ensemble of simulations which differs from the former by the inclusion of aerosol-radiation feedback. The existing differences for meteorological

  14. A Novel Method for Estimating Shortwave Direct Radiative Effect of Above-cloud Aerosols over Ocean Using CALIOP and MODIS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Z.; Meyer, K.; Platnick, S.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.; Yu, H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an efficient and unique method for computing the shortwave direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosol residing above low-level liquid-phase clouds using CALIOP and MODIS data. It accounts for the overlapping of aerosol and cloud rigorously by utilizing the joint histogram of cloud optical depth and cloud top pressure. Effects of sub-grid scale cloud and aerosol variations on DRE are accounted for. It is computationally efficient through using grid-level cloud and aerosol statistics, instead of pixel-level products, and a pre-computed look-up table in radiative transfer calculations. We verified that for smoke over the southeast Atlantic Ocean the method yields a seasonal mean instantaneous shortwave DRE that generally agrees with more rigorous pixel-level computation within 4%. We have also computed the annual mean instantaneous shortwave DRE of light-absorbing aerosols (i.e., smoke and polluted dust) over global ocean based on 4 yr of CALIOP and MODIS data. We found that the variability of the annual mean shortwave DRE of above-cloud light-absorbing aerosol is mainly driven by the optical depth of the underlying clouds.

  15. An assessment of the quality of aerosol retrievals over the Red Sea and evaluation of the climatological cloud-free dust direct radiative effect in the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, H.; Osipov, S.; Bantges, R.; Smirnov, A.; Banks, J.; Levy, R.; Jish Prakash, P.; Stenchikov, G.

    2015-10-01

    Ground-based and satellite observations are used in conjunction with the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) to assess climatological aerosol loading and the associated cloud-free aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over the Red Sea. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are first evaluated via comparison with ship-based observations. Correlations are typically better than 0.9 with very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of the DRE along the ship cruises using RRTM also show good agreement with colocated estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large particles. A monthly climatology of AOD over the Red Sea is then created from 5 years of SEVIRI retrievals. This shows enhanced aerosol loading and a distinct north to south gradient across the basin in the summer relative to the winter months. The climatology is used with RRTM to estimate the DRE at the top and bottom of the atmosphere and the atmospheric absorption due to dust aerosol. These climatological estimates indicate that although longwave effects can reach tens of W m-2, shortwave cooling typically dominates the net radiative effect over the Sea, being particularly pronounced in the summer, reaching 120 W m-2 at the surface. The spatial gradient in summertime AOD is reflected in the radiative effect at the surface and in associated differential heating by aerosol within the atmosphere above the Sea. This asymmetric effect is expected to exert a significant influence on the regional atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

  16. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  17. Direct Radiative Forcing and Regional Climatic Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols Over East Asia: A Regional Coupled Climate-Chemistry/Aerosol Model Study

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Filippo; Bi, Xunqiang; Qian, Yun )

    2002-09-01

    We present a series of regional climate model simulations aimed at assessing the radiative forcing and surface climatic effects of anthropogenic sulfate and fossil fuel soot over east Asia. The simulations are carried out with a coupled regional climate-chemistry/aerosol model for the 5-year period of 1993-1997 using published estimates of sulfur emissions for the period. Anthropogenic sulfate induces a negative radiative forcing spatially varying from -1 to -8 W/m2 in the winter to -1 to -15 W/m2 in the summer, with maxima over the Sichan Basin of southwest China and over some areas of east and northeast China. This forcing induces a surface cooling in the range of -0.1 to -0.7 K. Fossil fuel soot exerts a positive atmospheric radiative forcing of 0.5 to 2 W/m2 and enhances the surface cooling by a few tenths of K due to increased surface shielding from solar radiation. Doubling of sulfur emissions induces a substantial increase in radiative forcing (up to -7 to -8 W/m2) and associated surface cooling. With doubled sulfur emissions, the surface cooling exceeds -1 K and is statistically significant at the 90% confidence level over various areas of China. The aerosol forcing and surface cooling tend to inhibit precipitation over the region, although this effect is relatively small in the simulations. Some features of the simulated aerosol-induced cooling are consistent with temperature trends observed in recent decades over different regions of China.

  18. Estimating the direct radiative effect of absorbing aerosols overlying marine boundary layer clouds in the southeast Atlantic using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-05-01

    aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm-2AOD-1 to 65.1Wm-2AOD-1 when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  19. Estimating the Direct Radiative Effect of Absorbing Aerosols Overlying Marine Boundary Layer Clouds in the Southeast Atlantic Using MODIS and CALIOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Lee, Dongmin

    2013-01-01

    Absorbing aerosols such as smoke strongly absorb solar radiation, particularly at ultraviolet and visible/near-infrared (VIS/NIR) wavelengths, and their presence above clouds can have considerable implications. It has been previously shown that they have a positive (i.e., warming) direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE) when overlying bright clouds. Additionally, they can cause biased passive instrument satellite retrievals in techniques that rely on VIS/NIR wavelengths for inferring the cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (re) of underlying clouds, which can in turn yield biased above-cloud DARE estimates. Here we investigate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical property retrieval biases due to overlying absorbing aerosols observed by Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and examine the impact of these biases on above-cloud DARE estimates. The investigation focuses on a region in the southeast Atlantic Ocean during August and September (2006-2011), where smoke from biomass burning in southern Africa overlies persistent marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds. Adjusting for above-cloud aerosol attenuation yields increases in the regional mean liquid COT (averaged over all ocean-only liquid clouds) by roughly 6%; mean re increases by roughly 2.6%, almost exclusively due to the COT adjustment in the non-orthogonal retrieval space. It is found that these two biases lead to an underestimate of DARE. For liquid cloud Aqua MODIS pixels with CALIOP-observed above-cloud smoke, the regional mean above-cloud radiative forcing efficiency (DARE per unit aerosol optical depth (AOD)) at time of observation (near local noon for Aqua overpass) increases from 50.9Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup-1) to 65.1Wm(sup-2)AOD(sup -1) when using bias-adjusted instead of nonadjusted MODIS cloud retrievals.

  20. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  1. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    DOE PAGES

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; et al

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41more » stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.« less

  2. Indirect and semi-direct aerosol campaign: The impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ghan, Steven; Verlinde, Johannes; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Menqistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Dan; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. Richard; Liu, Peter; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, Ann -Marie; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, Hugh; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ronfeld, Debbie; Shupe, Matthew D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matt; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska, was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). ISDAC's primary aim was to examine the effects of aerosols, including those generated by Asian wildfires, on clouds that contain both liquid and ice. ISDAC utilized the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pro- gram's permanent observational facilities at Barrow and specially deployed instruments measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation, and radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties and collected data using an unprecedented 41 stateof- the-art cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 h on 12 different days. Aerosol compositions, including fresh and processed sea salt, biomassburning particles, organics, and sulfates mixed with organics, varied between flights. Observations in a dense arctic haze on 19 April and above, within, and below the single-layer stratocumulus on 8 and 26 April are enabling a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect arctic clouds. Inhomogeneities in reflectivity, a close coupling of upward and downward Doppler motion, and a nearly constant ice profile in the single-layer stratocumulus suggests that vertical mixing is responsible for its longevity observed during ISDAC. Data acquired in cirrus on flights between Barrow and Fairbanks, Alaska, are improving the understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Furthermore, ISDAC data will improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and determine the extent to which surface measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation, and radiative heating.

  3. Assessment of multi-decadal WRF-CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, C.-M.; Pleim, J.; Mathur, R.; Hogrefe, C.; Long, C. N.; Xing, J.; Wong, D.; Gilliam, R.; Wei, C.

    2015-07-01

    Multi-decadal simulations with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model have been conducted to systematically investigate the changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past 21 years (1990-2010) across the United States (US), their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading over North America, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. In particular, this study attempts to determine the consequences of the changes in tropospheric aerosol burden arising from substantial reductions in emissions of SO2 and NOx associated with control measures under the Clean Air Act (CAA) especially on trends in solar radiation. Extensive analyses conducted by Gan et al. (2014) utilizing observations (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) over the past 16 years (1995-2010) indicate a shortwave (SW) radiation (both all-sky and clear-sky) "brightening" in the US. The relationship of the radiation brightening trend with decreases in the aerosol burden is less apparent in the western US. One of the main reasons for this is that the emission controls under the CAA were aimed primarily at reducing pollutants in areas violating national air quality standards, most of which were located in the eastern US while the relatively less populated areas in the western US were less polluted at the beginning of this study period. Comparisons of model results with observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol concentration, and radiation demonstrate that the coupled WRF-CMAQ model is capable of replicating the trends well even through it tends to underestimate the AOD. In particular, the sulfate concentration predictions were well matched with the observations. The discrenpancies found in the clear-sky diffuse SW radiation are likely due to several factors such as potential increase of ice particles associated with increasing air traffic, the definition of "clear-sky" in the radiation retrieval methodology and aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be readily

  4. The Effect of Aerosol Hygroscopicity and Volatility on Aerosol Optical Properties During Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Grieshop, A. P.; Saha, P.; Subramanian, R.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources can influence optical properties of ambient aerosol by altering its hygroscopicity and contributing to light absorption directly via formation of brown carbon and indirectly by enhancing light absorption by black carbon ("lensing effect"). The magnitude of these effects remains highly uncertain. A set of state-of-the-art instruments was deployed at the SEARCH site near Centerville, AL during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign in summer 2013 to measure the effect of relative humidity and temperature on aerosol size distribution, composition and optical properties. Light scattering and absorption by temperature- and humidity-conditioned aerosols was measured using three photo-acoustic extinctiometers (PAX) at three wavelengths (405 nm, 532 nm, and 870 nm). The sample-conditioning system provided measurements at ambient RH, 10%RH ("dry"), 85%RH ("wet"), and 200 C ("TD"). In parallel to these measurements, a long residence time temperature-stepping thermodenuder (TD) and a variable residence time constant temperature TD in combination with three SMPS systems and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) were used to assess aerosol volatility and kinetics of aerosol evaporation. We will present results of the on-going analysis of the collected data set. We will show that both temperature and relative humidity have a strong effect on aerosol optical properties. SOA appears to increase aerosol light absorption by about 10%. TD measurements suggest that aerosol equilibrated fairly quickly, within 2 s. Evaporation varied substantially with ambient aerosol loading and composition and meteorology.

  5. Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: The Impact of Arctic Aerosols on Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Ghan, Steven J.; Verlinde, J.; Korolev, Alexei; Strapp, J. Walter; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Wolde, Mengistu; Brooks, Sarah D.; Cziczo, Daniel J.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fan, Jiwen; Flynn, Connor J.; Gultepe, Ismail; Hubbe, John M.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander; Lawson, Paul; Leaitch, W. R.; Liu, Peter S.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lubin, Dan; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Macdonald, A. M.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shupe, Matthew D.; Turner, David D.; Xie, Shaocheng; Zelenyuk, Alla; Bae, Kenny; Freer, Matthew; Glen, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive dataset of microphysical and radiative properties of aerosols and clouds in the arctic boundary layer in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska was collected in April 2008 during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) sponsored by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) and Atmospheric Science Programs. The primary aim of ISDAC was to examine indirect effects of aerosols on clouds that contain both liquid and ice water. The experiment utilized the ARM permanent observational facilities at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) in Barrow. These include a cloud radar, a polarized micropulse lidar, and an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer as well as instruments specially deployed for ISDAC measuring aerosol, ice fog, precipitation and spectral shortwave radiation. The National Research Council of Canada Convair-580 flew 27 sorties during ISDAC, collecting data using an unprecedented 42 cloud and aerosol instruments for more than 100 hours on 12 different days. Data were obtained above, below and within single-layer stratus on 8 April and 26 April 2008. These data enable a process-oriented understanding of how aerosols affect the microphysical and radiative properties of arctic clouds influenced by different surface conditions. Observations acquired on a heavily polluted day, 19 April 2008, are enhancing this understanding. Data acquired in cirrus on transit flights between Fairbanks and Barrow are improving our understanding of the performance of cloud probes in ice. Ultimately the ISDAC data will be used to improve the representation of cloud and aerosol processes in models covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales, and to determine the extent to which long-term surface-based measurements can provide retrievals of aerosols, clouds, precipitation and radiative heating in the Arctic.

  6. Shortwave direct radiative effects of above-cloud aerosols over global oceans derived from 8 years of CALIOP and MODIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Meyer, Kerry; Yu, Hongbin; Platnick, Steven; Colarco, Peter; Liu, Zhaoyan; Oreopoulos, Lazaros

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we studied the frequency of occurrence and shortwave direct radiative effects (DREs) of above-cloud aerosols (ACAs) over global oceans using 8 years (2007-2014) of collocated CALIOP and MODIS observations. Similar to previous work, we found high ACA occurrence in four regions: southeastern (SE) Atlantic region, where ACAs are mostly light-absorbing aerosols, i.e., smoke and polluted dust according to CALIOP classification, originating from biomass burning over the African Savanna; tropical northeastern (TNE) Atlantic and the Arabian Sea, where ACAs are predominantly windblown dust from the Sahara and Arabian deserts, respectively; and the northwestern (NW) Pacific, where ACAs are mostly transported smoke and polluted dusts from Asian. From radiative transfer simulations based on CALIOP-MODIS observations and a set of the preselected aerosol optical models, we found the DREs of ACAs at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to be positive (i.e., warming) in the SE Atlantic and NW Pacific regions, but negative (i.e., cooling) in the TNE Atlantic Ocean and the Arabian Sea. The cancellation of positive and negative regional DREs results in a global ocean annual mean diurnally averaged cloudy-sky DRE of 0.015 W m-2 (range of -0.03 to 0.06 W m-2) at TOA. The DREs at surface and within the atmosphere are -0.15 W m-2 (range of -0.09 to -0.21 W m-2), and 0.17 W m-2 (range of 0.11 to 0.24 W m-2), respectively. The regional and seasonal mean DREs are much stronger. For example, in the SE Atlantic region, the JJA (July-August) seasonal mean cloudy-sky DRE is about 0.7 W m-2 (range of 0.2 to 1.2 W m-2) at TOA. All our DRE computations are publicly available1. The uncertainty in our DRE computations is mainly caused by the uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties, in particular aerosol absorption, the uncertainties in the CALIOP operational aerosol optical thickness retrieval, and the ignorance of cloud and potential aerosol diurnal cycle. In situ and remotely sensed

  7. Assessment of long-term WRF–CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, C.-M.; Pleim, J.; Mathur, R.; Hogrefe, C.; Long, C. N.; Xing, J.; Wong, D.; Gilliam, R.; Wei, C.

    2015-11-03

    methodology, and aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be readily isolated from the observed data.« less

  8. Assessment of long-term WRF-CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, C.-M.; Pleim, J.; Mathur, R.; Hogrefe, C.; Long, C. N.; Xing, J.; Wong, D.; Gilliam, R.; Wei, C.

    2015-11-01

    aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be readily isolated from the observed data.

  9. Assessment of multi-decadal WRF-CMAQ simulations for understanding direct aerosol effects on radiation "brightening" in the United States

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, C.-M.; Pleim, J.; Mathur, R.; Hogrefe, C.; Long, C. N.; Xing, J.; Wong, D.; Gilliam, R.; Wei, C.

    2015-07-01

    Multi-decadal simulations with the coupled WRF-CMAQ model have been conducted to systematically investigate the changes in anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx over the past 21 years (1990–2010) across the United States (US), their impacts on anthropogenic aerosol loading over North America, and subsequent impacts on regional radiation budgets. In particular, this study attempts to determine the consequences of the changes in tropospheric aerosol burden arising from substantial reductions in emissions of SO2 and NOx associated with control measures under the Clean Air Act (CAA) especially on trends in solar radiation. Extensive analyses conducted by Gan et al. (2014) utilizingmore » observations (e.g. SURFRAD, CASTNET, IMPROVE and ARM) over the past 16 years (1995–2010) indicate a shortwave (SW) radiation (both all-sky and clear-sky) "brightening" in the US. The relationship of the radiation brightening trend with decreases in the aerosol burden is less apparent in the western US. One of the main reasons for this is that the emission controls under the CAA were aimed primarily at reducing pollutants in areas violating national air quality standards, most of which were located in the eastern US while the relatively less populated areas in the western US were less polluted at the beginning of this study period. Comparisons of model results with observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol concentration, and radiation demonstrate that the coupled WRF-CMAQ model is capable of replicating the trends well even through it tends to underestimate the AOD. In particular, the sulfate concentration predictions were well matched with the observations. The discrenpancies found in the clear-sky diffuse SW radiation are likely due to several factors such as potential increase of ice particles associated with increasing air traffic, the definition of "clear-sky" in the radiation retrieval methodology and aerosol semi-direct and/or indirect effects which cannot be

  10. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  11. Direct and semi-direct radiative forcing of smoke aerosols over clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Observations from Earth observing satellites indicate that dark carbonaceous aerosols that absorb solar radiation are widespread in the tropics and subtropics. When these aerosols mix with clouds, there is generally a reduction of cloudiness owing to absorption of solar energy in the aerosol layer. Over the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean, where smoke from savannah burning in southern Africa resides above a persistent deck of marine stratocumulus clouds, radiative heating of the smoke layer leads to a thickening of the cloud layer. Here, satellite observations of the albedo of overcast scenes of 25 km2 size or larger are combined with additional satellite observations of clouds and aerosols to estimate the top-of-atmosphere direct radiative forcing attributable to presence of dark aerosol above bright cloud, and the negative semi-direct forcing attributable to the thickening of the cloud layer. The average positive direct radiative forcing by smoke over an overcast scene is 9.2±6.6 W m-2 for cases with an unambiguous signal of absorbing aerosol over cloud in passive ultraviolet remote sensing observations. However, cloud liquid water path is enhanced by 16.3±7.7 g m-2 across the range of values for sea surface temperature for cases of smoke over cloud. The negative radiative forcing associated with this semi-direct effect of smoke over clouds is estimated to be -5.9±3.5 W m-2. Therefore, the cooling associated with the semi-direct cloud thickening effect compensates for greater than 60 % of the direct radiative effect. Accounting for the frequency of occurrence of significant absorbing aerosol above overcast scenes leads to an estimate of the average direct forcing of 1.0±0.7 W m-2 contributed by these scenes averaged over the subtropical southeast Atlantic Ocean during austral winter. The regional average of the negative semi-direct forcing is -0.7±0.4 W m-2. Therefore, smoke aerosols overlaying the decks of overcast marine stratocumulus clouds considered

  12. Direct and semi-direct radiative forcing of smoke aerosols over clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.

    2011-07-01

    Observations from Earth observing satellites indicate that dark carbonaceous aerosols that absorb solar radiation are widespread in the tropics and subtropics. When these aerosols mix with clouds, there is generally a reduction of cloudiness owing to absorption of solar energy in the aerosol layer. Over the subtropical South Atlantic Ocean, where smoke from savannah burning in southern Africa resides above a persistent deck of marine stratocumulus clouds, radiative heating of the smoke layer leads to a thickening of the cloud layer. Here, satellite observations of the albedo of overcast scenes of 25 km2 size or larger are combined with additional satellite observations of clouds and aerosols to estimate the top-of-atmosphere direct radiative forcing attributable to presence of dark aerosol above bright cloud, and the negative semi-direct forcing attributable to the thickening of the cloud layer. The average positive direct radiative forcing by smoke over an overcast scene is 9.2±6.6 W m-2 for cases with an unambiguous signal of absorbing aerosol over cloud in passive ultraviolet remote sensing observations. However, cloud liquid water path is enhanced by 16.3±7.7 g m-2 across the range of values for sea surface temperature for cases of smoke over cloud. The negative radiative forcing associated with this semi-direct effect of smoke over clouds is estimated to be -5.9±3.5 W m-2. Therefore, the cooling associated with the semi-direct cloud thickening effect compensates for greater than 60 % of the direct radiative effect. Accounting for the frequency of occurrence of significant absorbing aerosol above overcast scenes leads to an estimate of the average direct forcing of 1.0±0.7 W m-2 contributed by these scenes averaged over the subtropical southeast Atlantic Ocean during austral winter. The regional average of the negative semi-direct forcing is -0.7±0.4 W m-2. Therefore, smoke aerosols overlaying the decks of overcast marine stratocumulus clouds considered

  13. Sensitivity of clear-sky direct radiative effect of the aerosol to micro-physical properties by using 6SV radiative transfer model: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassani, Cristiana; Tirelli, Cecilia; Manzo, Ciro; Pietrodangelo, Adriana; Curci, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The aerosol micro-physical properties are crucial to analyze their radiative impact on the Earth's radiation budget [IPCC, 2007]. The 6SV model, last generation of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer code [Kotchenova et al., 2007; Vermote et al., 1997] has been used to perform physically-based atmospheric correction of hyperspectral airborne and aircraft remote sensing data [Vermote et al., 2009; Bassani et al. 2010; Tirelli et al., 2014]. The atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data has been shown to be sensitive to the aerosol micro-physical properties, as reported in Bassani et al., 2012. The role of the aerosol micro-physical properties on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data acquired over water and land targets is investigated within the framework of CLAM-PHYM (Coasts and Lake Assessment and Monitoring by PRISMA HYperspectral Mission) and PRIMES (Synergistic use of PRISMA products with high resolution meteo-chemical simulations and their validation on ground and from satellite) projects, both funded by Italian Space Agency (ASI). In this work, the results of the radiative field of the Earth/Atmosphere coupled system simulated by using 6SV during the atmospheric correction of hyperspectral data are presented. The analysis of the clear-sky direct radiative effect is performed considering the aerosol micro-physical properties used to define the aerosol model during the atmospheric correction process. In particular, the AERONET [Holben et al., 1998] and FLEXAOD [Curci et al., 2014] micro-physical properties are used for each image to evaluate the contribution of the size distribution and refractive index of the aerosol type on the surface reflectance and on the direct radiative forcing. The results highlight the potential of the hyperspectral remote sensing data for atmospheric studies as well as for environmental studies. Currently, the future hyperspectral missions, such as the

  14. Aerosol indirect effect on biogeochemical cycles and climate.

    PubMed

    Mahowald, Natalie

    2011-11-11

    The net effect of anthropogenic aerosols on climate is usually considered the sum of the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, plus the indirect effect of these aerosols through aerosol-cloud interactions. However, an additional impact of aerosols on a longer time scale is their indirect effect on climate through biogeochemical feedbacks, largely due to changes in the atmospheric concentration of CO(2). Aerosols can affect land and ocean biogeochemical cycles by physical forcing or by adding nutrients and pollutants to ecosystems. The net biogeochemical effect of aerosols is estimated to be equivalent to a radiative forcing of -0.5 ± 0.4 watts per square meter, which suggests that reaching lower carbon targets will be even costlier than previously estimated.

  15. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  16. Can a coupled meteorology–chemistry model reproduce the historical trend in aerosol direct radiative effects over the Northern Hemisphere?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of a coupled meteorology–chemistry model, i.e., Weather Research and Forecast and Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ), to reproduce the historical trend in aerosol optical depth (AOD) and clear-sky shortwave radiation (SWR) over the Northern Hemisphere h...

  17. Inter-annual Tropospheric Aerosol Variability in Late Twentieth Century and its Impact on Tropical Atlantic and West African Climate by Direct and Semi-direct Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Katherine J; Hack, James J; Truesdale, John; Mahajan, Salil; Lamarque, J-F

    2012-01-01

    A new high-resolution (0.9$^{\\circ}$x1.25$^{\\circ}$ in the horizontal) global tropospheric aerosol dataset with monthly resolution is generated using the finite-volume configuration of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) coupled to a bulk aerosol model and forced with recent estimates of surface emissions for the latter part of twentieth century. The surface emissions dataset is constructed from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) decadal-resolution surface emissions dataset to include REanalysis of TROpospheric chemical composition (RETRO) wildfire monthly emissions dataset. Experiments forced with the new tropospheric aerosol dataset and conducted using the spectral configuration of CAM4 with a T85 truncation (1.4$^{\\circ}$x1.4$^{\\circ}$) with prescribed twentieth century observed sea surface temperature, sea-ice and greenhouse gases reveal that variations in tropospheric aerosol levels can induce significant regional climate variability on the inter-annual timescales. Regression analyses over tropical Atlantic and Africa reveal that increasing dust aerosols can cool the North African landmass and shift convection southwards from West Africa into the Gulf of Guinea in the spring season in the simulations. Further, we find that increasing carbonaceous aerosols emanating from the southwestern African savannas can cool the region significantly and increase the marine stratocumulus cloud cover over the southeast tropical Atlantic ocean by aerosol-induced diabatic heating of the free troposphere above the low clouds. Experiments conducted with CAM4 coupled to a slab ocean model suggest that present day aerosols can shift the ITCZ southwards over the tropical Atlantic and can reduce the ocean mixed layer temperature beneath the increased marine stratocumulus clouds in the southeastern tropical Atlantic.

  18. Direct Measurement of Aerosol Absorption Using Photothermal Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Efforts to bound the contribution of light absorption in aerosol radiative forcing is still very much an active area of research in large part because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering. In response to this and other technical issues, the aerosol community has actively pursued the development of new instruments to measure aerosol absorption (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP)). In this poster, we introduce the technique of photothermal interferometry (PTI), which combines the direct measurement capabilities of photothermal spectroscopy (PTS) with high-sensitivity detection of the localized heating brought about by the PT process through interferometry. At its most fundamental level, the PTI technique measures the optical pathlength change that one arm of an interferometer (referred to as the 'probe' arm) experiences relative to the other arm of the interferometer (called the 'reference' arm). When the two arms are recombined at a beamsplitter, an interference pattern is created. If the optical pathlength in one arm of the interferometer changes, a commensurate shift in the interference pattern will take place. For the specific application of measuring light absorption, the heating of air surrounding the light- absorbing aerosol following laser illumination induces the optical pathlength change. This localized heating creates a refractive index gradient causing the probe arm of the interferometer to take a slightly different optical pathlength relative to the unperturbed reference arm. This effect is analogous to solar heating of a road causing mirages. As discussed above, this altered optical pathlength results in a shift in the interference pattern that is then detected as a change in the signal intensity by a single element detector. The current optical arrangement utilizes a folded Jamin interferometer design (Sedlacek, 2006) that provides a platform that is robust with respect to sensitivity

  19. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions.

  20. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Johannes W; Thaler, Klemens M; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  1. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  2. Continental pollution in the Western Mediterranean basin: large variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo and influence on the direct shortwave radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, Claudia; Formenti, Paola; Doppler, Lionel; Gaimoz, Cécile; Grand, Noel; Ancellet, Gerard; Attié, Jean-Luc; Bucci, Silvia; Dubuisson, Philippe; Fierli, Federico; Mallet, Marc; Ravetta, François

    2016-08-01

    Pollution aerosols strongly influence the composition of the Western Mediterranean basin, but at present little is known on their optical properties. We report in this study in situ observations of the single scattering albedo (ω) of pollution aerosol plumes measured over the Western Mediterranean basin during the TRAQA (TRansport and Air QuAlity) airborne campaign in summer 2012. Cases of pollution export from different source regions around the basin and at different altitudes between ˜ 160 and 3500 m above sea level were sampled during the flights. Data from this study show a large variability of ω, with values between 0.84-0.98 at 370 nm and 0.70-0.99 at 950 nm. The single scattering albedo generally decreases with the wavelength, with some exception associated to the mixing of pollution with sea spray or dust particles over the sea surface. The lowest values of ω (0.84-0.70 between 370 and 950 nm) are measured in correspondence of a fresh plume possibly linked to ship emissions over the basin. The range of variability of ω observed in this study seems to be independent of the source region around the basin, as well as of the altitude and aging time of the plumes. The observed variability of ω reflects in a large variability for the complex refractive index of pollution aerosols, which is estimated to span in the large range 1.41-1.77 and 0.002-0.097 for the real and the imaginary parts, respectively, between 370 and 950 nm. Radiative calculations in clear-sky conditions were performed with the GAME radiative transfer model to test the sensitivity of the aerosol shortwave Direct Radiative Effect (DRE) to the variability of ω as observed in this study. Results from the calculations suggest up to a 50 and 30 % change of the forcing efficiency (FE), i.e. the DRE per unit of optical depth, at the surface (-160/-235 W m-2 τ-1 at 60° solar zenith angle) and at the Top-Of-Atmosphere (-137/-92 W m-2 τ-1) for ω varying between its maximum and minimum value

  3. Characterization of Speciated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Over California

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Easter, Richard C.; Hand, Jenny; Avise, J.

    2013-03-16

    . Aerosol radiative forcing is presented along with the contribution from individual aerosol species from the simulation with anthropogenic EC emission doubled. On statewide average over California, aerosol reduces the seasonal-average surface radiation fluxes by about 3 W m-2 with a maximum of 10 W m-2 in summer. In the atmosphere, aerosol introduces a warming effect of about 2 W m-2 with a maximum of 10 W m-2 also in summer. EC and dust contribute about 75-95% and 1-10% of the total warming through the seasons, respectively. At the top of atmosphere (TOA), the overall aerosol radiative effect is cooling with a maximum of -3.5 W m-2. EC contributes exclusively to the TOA warming of up to about 0.7 W m-2. The encouraging performance of WRF-Chem in simulating aerosols and their radiative forcing suggests that the model is suitable for further investigation of the impact of emission control on radiative forcing and regional climate over California.

  4. Global Aerosol Effect Retrieval From Passive Hyperspectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, M.; Tilstra, L. G.; Stammes, P.

    2013-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols can have a significant local direct radiative effect (DRE), while the global average aerosol DRE remains highly uncertain. Modelling studies have shown that the magnitude and sign of the aerosol DRE at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) depend on the scene, especially on the albedo of the scene under the aerosol layer. It changes with cloud fraction, from large positive for overcast conditions when aerosols are present above the cloud, to large negative for clear sky ocean scenes. Observational studies, which are necessary to constrain the model studies, have been scarce. The results of modelling studies depend strongly on the assumed aerosol properties. Observational studies also need to assume aerosol type and geophysical properties to derive aerosol optical properties from radiation measurements. This introduces large uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol DRE. Furthermore, the retrieval of aerosols over clouds from passive instruments is difficult, due to the large optical thickness of clouds. Therefore, observational studies of aerosol direct and indirect effects from passive satellite instruments are invariably restricted to aerosol studies close to the cloud edges. We have developed a method to derive the aerosol DRE for smoke over clouds directly from passive satellite hyperspectral reflectance measurements, independent of aerosol micro- physical property assumptions. This allows us to assess the local aerosol DRE from passive imagery directly on a pixel to pixel basis, even over clouds. The solar radiative absorption by smoke layers is quantified using the TOA reflectance spectrum from the ultraviolet (UV) to the shortwave infrared (SWIR). UV- absorbing aerosols have a strong signature that can be detected using UV reflectance measurements. Since the aerosol extinction optical thickness decreases rapidly with increasing wavelength for smoke, the properties of the scene below the aerosol layer can be retrieved in the SWIR, where aerosol

  5. New Directions: Emerging Satellite Observations of Above-cloud Aerosols and Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar and passive sensors with multi-wavelength and polarization capabilities onboard the A-Train provide unprecedented opportunities of observing above-cloud aerosols and direct radiative forcing. Significant progress has been made in recent years in exploring these new aerosol remote sensing capabilities and generating unique datasets. The emerging observations will advance the understanding of aerosol climate forcing.

  6. The aerosol radiative effects of uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, John K.; Cucinotta, Rachel; Ridley, David A.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Open, uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste is a potentially significant source of aerosol; however, this aerosol source is not generally included in many global emissions inventories. To provide a first estimate of the aerosol radiative impacts from domestic-waste combustion, we incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al. (2014) emissions inventory into GEOS-Chem-TOMAS, a global chemical-transport model with online aerosol microphysics. We find domestic-waste combustion increases global-mean black carbon and organic aerosol concentrations by 8 and 6 %, respectively, and by greater than 40 % in some regions. Due to uncertainties regarding aerosol optical properties, we estimate the globally averaged aerosol direct radiative effect to range from -5 to -20 mW m-2; however, this range increases from -40 to +4 mW m-2 when we consider uncertainties in emission mass and size distribution. In some regions with significant waste combustion, such as India and China, the aerosol direct radiative effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2. Similarly, we estimate a cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of -13 mW m-2, with a range of -4 to -49 mW m-2 due to emission uncertainties. In the regions with significant waste combustion, the cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2.

  7. Unexpected Benefits of Reducing Aerosol Cooling Effects.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jia; Wang, Jiandong; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wang, Shuxiao; Hogrefe, Christian; Gan, Chuen-Meei; Wong, David C; Hao, Jiming

    2016-07-19

    Impacts of aerosol cooling are not limited to changes in surface temperature since modulation of atmospheric dynamics resulting from the increased stability can deteriorate local air quality and impact human health. Health impacts from two manifestations of the aerosol direct effects (ADE) are estimated in this study: (1) the effect on surface temperature and (2) the effect on air quality through atmospheric dynamics. Average mortalities arising from the enhancement of surface PM2.5 concentration due to ADE in East Asia, North America and Europe are estimated to be 3-6 times higher than reduced mortality from decreases of temperature due to ADE. Our results suggest that mitigating aerosol pollution is beneficial in decreasing the impacts of climate change arising from these two manifestations of ADE health impacts. Thus, decreasing aerosol pollution gets direct benefits on health, and indirect benefits on health through changes in local climate and not offsetting changes associated only with temperature modulations as traditionally thought. The modulation of air pollution due to ADE also translates into an additional human health dividend in regions (e.g., U.S. Europe) with air pollution control measures but a penalty for regions (e.g., Asia) witnessing rapid deterioration in air quality. PMID:27310144

  8. Overview of ACE-Asia Spring 2001 Investigations on Aerosol Radiative Effects and Related Aerosol Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Valero, F. P. J.; Flatau, P. J.; Bergin, M.; Holben, B.; Nakajima, T.; Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A primary, ACE-Asia objective was to quantify the interactions between aerosols and radiation in the Asia-Pacific region. Toward this end, radiometric and related aerosol measurements were made from ocean, land, air and space platforms. Models that predict aerosol fields guided the measurements and are helping integrate and interpret results. Companion overview's survey these measurement and modeling components. Here we illustrate how these components were combined to determine aerosol radiative. impacts and their relation to aerosol properties. Because clouds can obscure or change aerosol direct radiative effects, aircraft and ship sorties to measure these effects depended on predicting and finding cloud-free areas and times with interesting aerosols present. Pre-experiment satellite cloud climatologies, pre-flight aerosol and cloud forecasts, and in-flight guidance from satellite imagery all helped achieve this. Assessments of aerosol regional radiative impacts benefit from the spatiotemporal coverage of satellites, provided satellite-retrieved aerosol properties are accurate. Therefore, ACE-Asia included satellite retrieval tests, as part of many comparisons to judge the consistency (closure) among, diverse measurements. Early results include: (1) Solar spectrally resolved and broadband irradiances and optical depth measurements from the C-130 aircraft and at Kosan, Korea yielded aerosol radiative forcing efficiencies, permitting comparisons between efficiencies of ACE-Asia and INDOEX aerosols, and between dust and "pollution" aerosols. Detailed results will be presented in separate papers. (2) Based on measurements of wavelength dependent aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo the estimated 24-h a average aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the surface for photosynthetically active radiation (400 - 700 nm) in Yulin, China is approx. 30 W sq m per AOD(500 nm). (3) The R/V Brown cruise from Honolulu to Sea of Japan sampled an aerosol optical

  9. How Well Will MODIS Measure Top of Atmosphere Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Levin, Zev; Ghan, Stephen; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The new generation of satellite sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) will be able to detect and characterize global aerosols with an unprecedented accuracy. The question remains whether this accuracy will be sufficient to narrow the uncertainties in our estimates of aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. Satellite remote sensing detects aerosol optical thickness with the least amount of relative error when aerosol loading is high. Satellites are less effective when aerosol loading is low. We use the monthly mean results of two global aerosol transport models to simulate the spatial distribution of smoke aerosol in the Southern Hemisphere during the tropical biomass burning season. This spatial distribution allows us to determine that 87-94% of the smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere occurs in grid squares with sufficient signal to noise ratio to be detectable from space. The uncertainty of quantifying the smoke aerosol forcing in the Southern Hemisphere depends on the uncertainty introduced by errors in estimating the background aerosol, errors resulting from uncertainties in surface properties and errors resulting from uncertainties in assumptions of aerosol properties. These three errors combine to give overall uncertainties of 1.5 to 2.2 Wm-2 (21-56%) in determining the Southern Hemisphere smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The range of values depend on which estimate of MODIS retrieval uncertainty is used, either the theoretical calculation (upper bound) or the empirical estimate (lower bound). Strategies that use the satellite data to derive flux directly or use the data in conjunction with ground-based remote sensing and aerosol transport models can reduce these uncertainties.

  10. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

  11. Revisiting Aerosol Effects in Global Climate Models Using an Aerosol Lidar Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, P. L.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D. M.; Ghan, S.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol effects are considered a major source of uncertainty in global climate models and the direct and indirect radiative forcings have strong model dependency. These forcings are routinely evaluated (and calibrated) against observations, among them satellite retrievals are greatly used for their near-global coverage. However, the forcings calculated from model output are not directly comparable with those computed from satellite retrievals since sampling and algorithmic differences (such as cloud screening, noise reduction, and retrieval) between models and observations are not accounted for. It is our hypothesis that the conventional model validation procedures for comparing satellite observations and model simulations can mislead model development and introduce biases. Hence, we have developed an aerosol lidar simulator for global climate models that simulates the CALIOP lidar signal at 532nm. The simulator uses the same algorithms as those used to produce the "GCM-oriented CALIPSO Aerosol Product" to (1) objectively sample lidar signal profiles; and (2) derive aerosol fields (e.g., extinction profile, aerosol type, etc) from lidar signals. This allows us to sample and derive aerosol fields in the model and real atmosphere in identical ways. Using the Department of Energy's ACME model simulations, we found that the simulator-retrieved aerosol distribution and aerosol-cloud interactions are significantly different from those computed from conventional approaches, and that the model is much closer to satellite estimates than previously believed.

  12. Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    SJ Ghan; B Schmid; JM Hubbe; CJ Flynn; A Laskin; AA Zelenyuk; DJ Czizco; CN Long; G McFarquhar; J Verlinde; J Harrington; JW Strapp; P Liu; A Korolev; A McDonald; M Wolde; A Fridlind; T Garrett; G Mace; G Kok; S Brooks; D Collins; D Lubin; P Lawson; M Dubey; C Mazzoleni; M Shupe; S Xie; DD Turner; Q Min; EJ Mlawer; D Mitchell

    2007-11-01

    The ARM Climate Research Facility’s (ACRF) Aerial Vehicle Program (AVP) will deploy an intensive cloud and aerosol observing system to the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale for a five week Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) during period 29 March through 30 April 2008. The deployment period is within the International Polar Year, thus contributing to and benefiting from the many ancillary observing systems collecting data synergistically. We will deploy the Canadian National Research Council Convair 580 aircraft to measure temperature, humidity, total particle number, aerosol size distribution, single particle composition, concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei, optical scattering and absorption, updraft velocity, cloud liquid water and ice contents, cloud droplet and crystal size distributions, cloud particle shape, and cloud extinction. In addition to these aircraft measurements, ISDAC will deploy two instruments at the ARM site in Barrow: a spectroradiometer to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius, and a tandem differential mobility analyzer to measure the aerosol size distribution and hygroscopicity. By using many of the same instruments used during Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), conducted in October 2004, we will be able to contrast the arctic aerosol and cloud properties during the fall and spring transitions. The aerosol measurements can be used in cloud models driven by objectively analyzed boundary conditions to test whether the cloud models can simulate the aerosol influence on the clouds. The influence of aerosol and boundary conditions on the simulated clouds can be separated by running the cloud models with all four combinations of M-PACE and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions: M-PACE aerosol and boundary conditions, M-PACE aerosol and ISDAC boundary conditions, ISDAC aerosol and M-PACE boundary conditions, and ISDAC aerosol and boundary conditions. ISDAC and M-PACE boundary

  13. Evaluation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in MIRAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Easter, Richard C.; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, Seth; Chapman, Elaine G.; Zhang, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2001-04-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). The treatment of water uptake in MIRAGE agrees with laboratory measurements for the aerosol components that have been measured. The simulated frequency of relative humidity near 100% is about twice that of European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analyzed relative humidity. When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated aerosol optical depth agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for. Simulated optical depths are low over sites in Brazil during the biomass burning season and over sites in central Canada during the wildfire season, which can be attributed to limitations in the organic and black car bon emissions data used by MIRAGE. The simulated aerosol optical depths are mostly within a factor of two of satellite estimates, but MIRAGE simulates excessively high aerosol optical depths off the east coast of the US and China, and too little dust off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea. The simulated distribution of single-scatter albedo is consistent with the available in situ surface measurements. The simulated sensitivity of radiative forcing to aerosol optical depth is consistent with estimates from measurements where available. The simulated spatial distribution of aerosol radiance is broadly consistent with estimates from satellite measurements, but with the same errors as the aerosol optical depth. The simulated direct forcing is within the uncertainty of estimates from measurements in the North Atlantic.

  14. Evaluating aerosol indirect effect through marine stratocumulus clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, Z.N.; Kogan, Y.L.; Lilly, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. and Penner et al. have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate (-1 to -2 W/m{sup 2}) which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth`s radiative budget either directly by scattering and absorption of solar radiation by themselves or indirectly by altering the cloud radiative properties through changes in cloud microstructure. Marine stratocumulus cloud layers and their possible cooling influence on the atmosphere as a result of pollution are of special interest because of their high reflectivity, durability, and large global cover. We present an estimate of thet aerosol indirect effect, or, forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate aerosols.

  15. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  16. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs.

  17. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs. PMID:27200479

  18. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Han, X.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W/m2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W/m2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan.

  19. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiwei; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Xiaohong

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W m -2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W m -2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan

  20. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiewi; Xin, Jin-Yuan; Liu, Xiaohong

    2011-11-14

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W m-2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W m-2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan

  1. Characteristics of Carbonaceous and Ionic Species and Direct Aerosol Forcing of the Aerosols over Gosan, Jeju, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, N.; Kim, Y.; Kang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols, consisting of elemental carbon (EC) are emitted into the atmosphere through incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel. It directly warms the air by absorbing solar radiation. Another major pollutant emitted by fossil fuel combustion is SO2, which result in the formation of particulate sulfate (SO42-) compounds, contribute substantially to cool the air by scattering solar radiation. Therefore, carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols play an important role in regulating the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the earth atmosphere. (Charlson et al. 1992; Jacobson, 2004; Khan et al., 2010) Carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols are both temporally and spatially variable. Northeast Asia is characterized by high energy consumption. China, Japan, and South Korea have consumed 16.8%, 4.7%, and 2.1% of the world total primary energy, respectively in 2007 (BP, 2008). Consequently, there are resultant huge emissions of anthropogenic air pollutants. Therefore, the effect on climate forcing by carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols are even more important in this region. In this study, PM2.5 intensive measurement data for 18 separate periods at Gosan, Jeju, Korea from 1994 to 2006 were analyzed. Gosan is one of the cleanest areas in Korea and an excellent location to study the ambient aerosols in Northeast Asia (Kim et al., 2009). The characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols and anthropogenic ions such as SO42-, NO3-, NH4+ were analyzed. Also, direct aerosol forcing due to EC and SO42- were calculated. The net aerosol forcing were about -0.5 W m-2 to -0.1 W m-2 at Gosan. References BP, www.bp.com/statisticalreview, 2008. Charlson, R.J., Schwartz, S.E., Hales, J.M., Cess, R.D., Coakley, J.A.Jr., Hansen, J.E., and Hofmann, D.J. (1992) Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols, Science, 255, 423-430. Jacobson, M.Z. (2004) Climate response of fossil fuel and biofuel soot, accounting for soot's feedback to snow and sea ice albedo and emissivity, Journal of

  2. The contribution of aerosol hygroscopic growth to the modeled aerosol radiative effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkola, Harri; Kühn, Thomas; Kirkevåg, Alf; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Arola, Antti

    2016-04-01

    The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant effect on the direct radiative effect of atmospheric aerosol. However, there are significant uncertainties concerning how much of the radiative forcing is due to different chemical compounds, especially water. For example, modeled optical depth of water in global aerosol-climate models varies by more than a factor of two. These differences can be attributed to differences in modeled 1) hygroscopicity, 2) ambient relative humidity, and/or 3) aerosol size distribution. In this study, we investigate which of these above-mentioned factors cause the largest variability in the modeled optical depth of water. In order to do this, we have developed a tool that calculates aerosol extinction using interchangeable global 3D data of aerosol composition, relative humidity, and aerosol size distribution fields. This data is obtained from models that have taken part in the open international initiative AeroCom (Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models). In addition, we use global 3D data for relative humidity from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) flying on board NASA's Aqua satellite and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data. These observations are used to evaluate the modeled relative humidity fields. In the first stage of the study, we made a detailed investigation using the aerosol-chemistry-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ in which most of the aerosol optical depth is caused by water. Our results show that the model significantly overestimates the relative humidity over the oceans while over land, the overestimation is lower or it is underestimated. Since this overestimation occurs over the oceans, the water optical depth is amplified as the hygroscopic growth is very sensitive to changes in high relative humidities. Over land, error in modeled relative humidity is unlikely to cause significant errors in water optical depth as relative humidities are generally

  3. Direct measurements of mass-specific optical cross sections of single-component aerosol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Ma, Xiaofei; Gillis, Keith A; Zachariah, Michael R; Hodges, Joseph T; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2013-09-01

    The optical properties of atmospheric aerosols vary widely, being dependent upon particle composition, morphology, and mixing state. This diversity and complexity of aerosols motivates measurement techniques that can discriminate and quantify a variety of single- and multicomponent aerosols that are both internally and externally mixed. Here, we present a new combination of techniques to directly measure the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections of laboratory-generated aerosols that are relevant to atmospheric studies. Our approach employs a tandem differential mobility analyzer, an aerosol particle mass analyzer, cavity ring-down and photoacoustic spectrometers, and a condensation particle counter. This suite of instruments enables measurement of aerosol particle size, mass, extinction and absorption coefficients, and aerosol number density, respectively. Taken together, these observables yield the mass-specific extinction and absorption cross sections without the need to model particle morphology or account for sample collection artifacts. Here we demonstrate the technique in a set of case studies which involve complete separation of aerosol by charge, separation of an external mixture by mass, and discrimination between particle types by effective density and single-scattering albedo. PMID:23875772

  4. Aerosol radiative effects over BIMSTEC regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumit; Kar, S. C.; Mupparthy, Raghavendra S.

    Aerosols can have variety of shapes, composition, sizes and other properties that influence their optical characteristics and thus the radiative impact. The visible impact of aerosol is the formation of haze, a layer of particles from vehicular, industrial emissions and biomass burning. The characterization of these fine particles is important for regulators and researchers because of their potential impact on human health, their ability to travel thousands of kilometers crossing international borders, and their influence on climate forcing and global warming. The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) with Member Countries Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Thailand has emerged as an important regional group for technical and economic Cooperation. Continuing the quest for a deeper understanding of BIMSTEC countries weather and climate, in this paper we focused on aerosols and their direct radiative effects. Because of various contrasts like geophysical, agricultural practices, heterogeneous land/ocean surface, population etc these regions present an excellent natural laboratory for studying aerosol-meteorology interactions in tropical to sub-tropical environments. We exploited data available on multiple platforms (such as MISR, MODIS etc) and models (OPAC, SBDART etc) to compute the results. Ten regions were selected with different surface characteristics, also having considerable differences in the long-term trends and seasonal distribution of aerosols. In a preliminary analysis pertaining to pre-monsoon (March-April-May) of 2013, AOD _{555nm} is found to be maximum over Bangladesh (>0.52) and minimum over Bhutan (0.22), whereas other regions have intermediate values. Concurrent to these variability of AOD we found a strong reduction in incoming flux at surface of all the regions (> -25 Wm (-2) ), except Bhutan and Sri Lanka (< -18Wm (-2) ). The top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing values are

  5. Unexpected Benefits of Reducing Aerosol Cooling Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Impacts of aerosol cooling are not limited to changes in surface temperature since modulation of atmospheric dynamics resulting from the increased stability can deteriorate local air quality and impact human health. Health impacts from two manifestations of the aerosol direct eff...

  6. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, H.; Asmi, E.; Aaltonen, V.; Makkonen, U.; Kerminen, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) originating from the emissions of volatile organic compounds from terrestrial vegetation constitutes an important part of the natural aerosol system. According to large-scale model simulations, the direct and indirect radiative effects of the BSOA are potentially large, yet poorly quantified. We used more than 5 years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97±66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63±40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the "dry" aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of this direct radiative feedback is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  7. A Strategy to Assess Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Satellite Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a complex internal chemical composition and optical properties. Therefore it is difficult to model their impact on redistribution and absorption of solar radiation, and the consequent impact on atmospheric dynamics and climate. The use in climate models of isolated aerosol parameters retrieved from satellite data (e.g. optical thickness) may result in inconsistent calculations, if the model assumptions differ from these of the satellite retrieval schemes. Here we suggest a strategy to assess the direct impact of aerosol on the radiation budget at the top and bottom of the atmosphere using satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral solar radiation scattered by the aerosol. This method ensures consistent use of the satellite data and increases its accuracy. For Kaufman and Tanre: Strategy for aerosol direct forcing anthropogenic aerosol in the fine mode (e.g. biomass burning smoke and urban pollution) consistent use of satellite derived optical thickness can yield the aerosol impact on the spectral solar flux with accuracy an order of magnitude better than the optical thickness itself. For example, a simulated monthly average smoke optical thickness of 0.5 at 0.55 microns (forcing of 40-50 W/sq m) derived with an error of 20%, while the forcing can be measured directly with an error of only 0-2 W/sq m. Another example, the effect of large dust particles on reflection of solar flux can be derived three times better than retrievals of optical thickness. Since aerosol impacts not only the top of the atmosphere but also the surface irradiation, a combination of satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral flux, can be the most direct mechanism to evaluate the aerosol effect on climate and assimilate it in climate models. The strategy is applied to measurements from SCAR-B and the Tarfox experiments. In SCAR-B aircraft spectral data are used to derive the 24 hour radiative forcing of smoke at the top of the atmosphere of

  8. Direct radiative forcing of aerosols in cloudy condition using CALIPSO satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, E.; Nakajima, T.; Winker, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The aerosol direct effect occurs by direct scattering and absorption of solar and thermal radiation. Shortwave direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) under clear-sky condition is estimated about 5 Wm-2 from satellite retrievals and model simulations [Yu et al., 2006ACP]. Simultaneous observations of aerosols and clouds are very limited, thus it is difficult to validate the estimation of DARF under cloudy-sky condition. In 2006, the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite was launched with the space-borne lidar, CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization). This enabled us to get data of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds all over the world. Oikawa et al. [2013JGR] estimated DARF under clear-sky, cloudy-sky, and all-sky conditions using CALIPSO and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectrometer) data. Over Atlantic Ocean off southwest Africa, biomass burning aerosols are transported above low-level clouds and cause large positive DARF [Oikawa et al., 2013JGR; Chand et al., 2009Nat. Geosci.; De Graaf et al., 2012JGR; Takemura et al., 2005JGR]. We calculate DARF using CALIOP Level 2 Cloud and Aerosol Layer Products Version 3 and the method of Oikawa et al. [2013]. In this study, we focus on the case that aerosols exist above clouds (above-cloud case) in 2007. Over Atlantic Ocean off southwest Africa, DARF caused by smoke aerosols is +7.1 Wm-2 in September. On the other hand, aerosol optical thickness (AOT) of smoke is small as close to 0 Wm-2 in spring season. Over North Pacific, yellow sand and industrial smoke are transported from Asia and DARF is +5.2 Wm-2 in May. Dust AOT at 532 nm is 0.014 and polluted dust AOT at 532 nm is 0.052; in other words, a large part of dust emitted from Taklamakan and Gobi deserts are mixed with the industrial smoke and transported to the Pacific Ocean according to the CALIPSO algorithms.

  9. Global aerosol effects on convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Till; Stier, Philip

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect cloud properties, and thereby the radiation balance of the planet and the water cycle. The influence of aerosols on clouds is dominated by increase of cloud droplet and ice crystal numbers (CDNC/ICNC) due to enhanced aerosols acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. In deep convective clouds this increase in CDNC/ICNC is hypothesised to increase precipitation because of cloud invigoration through enhanced freezing and associated increased latent heat release caused by delayed warm rain formation. Satellite studies robustly show an increase of cloud top height (CTH) and precipitation with increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD, as proxy for aerosol amount). To represent aerosol effects and study their influence on convective clouds in the global climate aerosol model ECHAM-HAM, we substitute the standard convection parameterisation, which uses one mean convective cloud for each grid column, with the convective cloud field model (CCFM), which simulates a spectrum of convective clouds, each with distinct values of radius, mixing ratios, vertical velocity, height and en/detrainment. Aerosol activation and droplet nucleation in convective updrafts at cloud base is the primary driver for microphysical aerosol effects. To produce realistic estimates for vertical velocity at cloud base we use an entraining dry parcel sub cloud model which is triggered by perturbations of sensible and latent heat at the surface. Aerosol activation at cloud base is modelled with a mechanistic, Köhler theory based, scheme, which couples the aerosols to the convective microphysics. Comparison of relationships between CTH and AOD, and precipitation and AOD produced by this novel model and satellite based estimates show general agreement. Through model experiments and analysis of the model cloud processes we are able to investigate the main drivers for the relationship between CTH / precipitation and AOD.

  10. Aerosol effects on global land surface energy fluxes during 2003-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoqing; Chen, Min; Zhuang, Qianlai

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols affect downward solar radiation, impacting the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics and energy budget. Here we apply a coupled modeling framework of a terrestrial ecosystem model and an atmospheric radiative transfer model to evaluate aerosol direct radiative effects on the surface heat fluxes of global terrestrial ecosystems during 2003-2010. We find that aerosol loadings decrease the mean latent heat flux by 2.4 Wm-2 (or evapotranspiration by 28 mm) and sensible heat flux by 16 Wm-2. As a result, global mean soil moisture and water evaporative fraction have increased by 0.5% and 4%, respectively. Spatially, aerosol effects are significant in tropical forests and temperate broadleaf evergreen forests. This study is among the first quantifications of aerosols' effects on the heat fluxes of the global terrestrial ecosystems. The study further suggests that both direct and indirect aerosol radiative effects through aerosol-cloud interactions should be considered to quantify the energy budget of the global terrestrial ecosystems.

  11. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station.

  12. Direct gravimetric determination of aerosol mass concentration in central antarctica.

    PubMed

    Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In Antarctica, experimental difficulties due to extreme conditions have meant that aerosol mass has rarely been measured directly by gravimetry, and only in coastal areas where concentrations were in the range of 1-7 μg m(-3). The present work reports on a careful differential weighing methodology carried out for the first time on the plateau of central Antarctica (Dome C, East Antarctica). To solve problems of accurate aerosol mass measurements, a climatic room was used for conditioning and weighing filters. Measurements were carried out in long stages of several hours of readings with automatic recording of temperature/humidity and mass. This experimental scheme allowed us to sample from all the measurements (up to 2000) carried out before and after exposure, those which were recorded under the most stable humidity conditions and, even more importantly, as close to each other as possible. The automatic reading of the mass allowed us in any case to obtain hundreds of measurements from which to calculate average values with uncertainties sufficiently low to meet the requirements of the differential weighing procedure (±0.2 mg in filter weighing, between ±7% and ±16% both in aerosol mass and concentration measurements). The results show that the average summer aerosol mass concentration (aerodynamic size ≤10 μm) in central Antarctica is about 0.1 μg m(-3), i.e., about 1/10 of that of coastal Antarctic areas. The concentration increases by about 4-5 times at a site very close to the station. PMID:21141836

  13. Global fine-mode aerosol radiative effect, as constrained by comprehensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul E.; Chu, Jung-Eun; Lee, Yunha; van Noije, Twan; Jeoung, Hwayoung; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Marks, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Aerosols directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. Although the contributions of absorption (heating) and scattering (cooling) of sunlight have proved difficult to quantify, the consensus is that anthropogenic aerosols cool the climate, partially offsetting the warming by rising greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent estimates of global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (i.e., global radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions) are -0.35 ± 0.5 W m-2, and these estimates depend heavily on aerosol simulation. Here, we integrate a comprehensive suite of satellite and ground-based observations to constrain total aerosol optical depth (AOD), its fine-mode fraction, the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and the collocation of clouds and overlying aerosols. We find that the direct fine-mode aerosol radiative effect is -0.46 W m-2 (-0.54 to -0.39 W m-2). Fine-mode aerosols include sea salt and dust aerosols, and we find that these natural aerosols result in a very large cooling (-0.44 to -0.26 W m-2) when constrained by observations. When the contribution of these natural aerosols is subtracted from the fine-mode radiative effect, the net becomes -0.11 (-0.28 to +0.05) W m-2. This net arises from total (natural + anthropogenic) carbonaceous, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, which suggests that global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is less negative than -0.35 W m-2.

  14. Manifestation of Aerosol Indirect Effects in Arctic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, D.; Vogelmann, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The first aerosol indirect effect has traditionally been conceived as an enhancement of shortwave cloud reflectance in response to decreased effective droplet size at fixed liquid water path, as cloud nucleating aerosol becomes entrained in the cloud. The high Arctic, with its pervasive low-level stratiform cloud cover and frequent episodes of anthropogenic aerosol (Artic "haze"), has in recent years served as a natural laboratory for research on actual manifestations of aerosol indirect effects. This paper will review the surprising set of developments: (1) the detection of the indirect effect as a source of surface warming, rather than cooling, throughout early spring, (2) a transition to a cooling effect in late spring, corresponding to the beginning of the sea ice melt season, and (3) detection of an indirect effect during summer, outside of the "Arctic haze" season. This paper will also discuss measurements of spectral shortwave irradiance (350-2200 nm) made at Barrow, Alaska, during the U.S. Department of Energy's Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), which reveal complications in our conception of the indirect effect related to the ice phase in Arctic stratiform clouds.

  15. Assessing the direct occupational and public health impacts of solar radiation management with stratospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Effiong, Utibe; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-19

    Geoengineering is the deliberate large-scale manipulation of environmental processes that affects the Earth's climate, in an attempt to counteract the effects of climate change. Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors and designed nanoparticles into the stratosphere to (i.e., solar radiation management [SRM]), has been suggested as one approach to geoengineering. Although much is being done to unravel the scientific and technical challenges around geoengineering, there have been few efforts to characterize the potential human health impacts of geoengineering, particularly with regards to SRM approaches involving stratospheric aerosols. This paper explores this information gap. Using available evidence, we describe the potential direct occupational and public health impacts of exposures to aerosols likely to be used for SRM, including environmental sulfates, black carbon, metallic aluminum, and aluminum oxide aerosols. We speculate on possible health impacts of exposure to one promising SRM material, barium titanate, using knowledge of similar nanomaterials. We also explore current regulatory efforts to minimize exposure to these toxicants. Our analysis suggests that adverse public health impacts may reasonably be expected from SRM via deployment of stratospheric aerosols. Little is known about the toxicity of some likely candidate aerosols, and there is no consensus regarding acceptable levels for public exposure to these materials. There is also little infrastructure in place to evaluate potential public health impacts in the event that stratospheric aerosols are deployed for solar radiation management. We offer several recommendations intended to help characterize the potential occupation and public health impacts of SRM, and suggest that a comprehensive risk assessment effort is needed before this approach to geoengineering receives further consideration.

  16. Assessing the direct occupational and public health impacts of solar radiation management with stratospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Effiong, Utibe; Neitzel, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Geoengineering is the deliberate large-scale manipulation of environmental processes that affects the Earth's climate, in an attempt to counteract the effects of climate change. Injecting sulfate aerosol precursors and designed nanoparticles into the stratosphere to (i.e., solar radiation management [SRM]), has been suggested as one approach to geoengineering. Although much is being done to unravel the scientific and technical challenges around geoengineering, there have been few efforts to characterize the potential human health impacts of geoengineering, particularly with regards to SRM approaches involving stratospheric aerosols. This paper explores this information gap. Using available evidence, we describe the potential direct occupational and public health impacts of exposures to aerosols likely to be used for SRM, including environmental sulfates, black carbon, metallic aluminum, and aluminum oxide aerosols. We speculate on possible health impacts of exposure to one promising SRM material, barium titanate, using knowledge of similar nanomaterials. We also explore current regulatory efforts to minimize exposure to these toxicants. Our analysis suggests that adverse public health impacts may reasonably be expected from SRM via deployment of stratospheric aerosols. Little is known about the toxicity of some likely candidate aerosols, and there is no consensus regarding acceptable levels for public exposure to these materials. There is also little infrastructure in place to evaluate potential public health impacts in the event that stratospheric aerosols are deployed for solar radiation management. We offer several recommendations intended to help characterize the potential occupation and public health impacts of SRM, and suggest that a comprehensive risk assessment effort is needed before this approach to geoengineering receives further consideration. PMID:26786592

  17. Past and future direct radiative forcing of nitrate aerosol in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiandong; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Liao, Hong; Chang, Wenyuan

    2015-08-01

    Nitrate as a rapidly increasing aerosol species in recent years affects the present climate and potentially has large implications on the future climate. In this study, the long-term direct radiative forcing (DRF) of nitrate aerosol is investigated using State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and the aerosol dataset simulated by a chemical transport model with focus on East Asia. The DRF due to other aerosols, especially sulfate, is also evaluated for comparisons. Although the chemical transport model underestimates the magnitudes of nitrate and sulfate aerosols when compared with Chinese site observations, some insights into the significances of nitrate climate effects still emerge. The present-day global annual mean all-sky DRF of nitrate is calculated to be -0.025 W m-2 relative to the preindustrial era, which is much weaker than -0.37 W m-2 for sulfate. However, nitrate DRF may become increasingly important in the future especially over East Asia, given the expectation that decreasing trend in global sulfate continues while the projected nitrate maintains at the present level for a mid-range forcing scenario and even be a factor of two larger by the end of the 21st century for high emission scenarios. For example, the anthropogenic nitrate DRF of -2.0 W m-2 over eastern China could persist until the 2050s, and nitrate is projected to account for over 60 % of total anthropogenic aerosol DRF over East Asia by 2100. In addition, we illustrate that the regional nitrate DRF and its seasonal variation are sensitive to meteorological parameters, in particular the relative humidity and cloud amount. It thus remains a need for climate models to include more realistically nitrate aerosol in projecting future climate changes.

  18. Aerosol-cloud interactions: effect on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takle, Jasmine; Maheskumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols are tiny suspended particle in the atmosphere with high variability in time and space, play a major role in modulating the cloud properties and thereby precipitation. To understand the aerosol induced Invigoration effect predictors like aerosol optical depth, cloud optical depth, cloud top temperature, cloud effective radii, ice water path, retrieved from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 aqua satellite data were analysed for pre monsoon April-May and post monsoon October-November months over the Indian subcontinent 8 ° N to 33° N, 65 °E to 100 °E during the period 2003-2013. Apart from the above data, mesoscale dynamical parameters such as vertical wind shear of horizontal wind, relative humidity, were also considered to understand their role in invigoration. Case studies have been carried out for the regions having heavy rainfall events & minimal rainfall events during high Aerosol optical depths occasions respectively. Analysis revealed that the heavy rainfall which occurred in this region with higher optical depths might be due to invigoration effect of aerosols wherein the dynamical as well as thermodynamical parameters were also found favourable. Minimal rainfall events were also observed most probably due to the suppression of rain formation/delay in precipitation due to high amount of aerosol concentration in these regions. Prominent 36 such cases were studied all over India during Pre & Post monsoon months.

  19. Investigation of multiple scattering effects in aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of investigations on the various aspects of multiple scattering effects on visible and infrared laser beams transversing dense fog oil aerosols contained in a chamber (4' x 4' x 9'). The report briefly describes: (1) the experimental details and measurements; (2) analytical representation of the aerosol size distribution data by two analytical models (the regularized power law distribution and the inverse modified gamma distribution); (3) retrieval of aerosol size distributions from multispectral optical depth measurements by two methods (the two and three parameter fast table search methods and the nonlinear least squares method); (4) modeling of the effects of aerosol microphysical (coagulation and evaporation) and dynamical processes (gravitational settling) on the temporal behavior of aerosol size distribution, and hence on the extinction of four laser beams with wavelengths 0.44, 0.6328, 1.15, and 3.39 micrometers; and (5) the exact and approximate formulations for four methods for computing the effects of multiple scattering on the transmittance of laser beams in dense aerosols, all of which are based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation under the small angle approximation.

  20. Climate effects of anthropogenic aerosols over East Asia based on modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Makiko

    The increasing emission of anthropogenic aerosols causes serious air pollution episodes and various effects on the climate by the aerosols interacting with the radiation budget by directly absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, and by them indirectly modifying the optical properties and lifetimes of clouds. In East Asia anthropogenic aerosol concentrations are rapidly increasing. It is therefore necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of anthropogenic aerosols upon the radiative forcing in this region. For this purpose we utilize an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with an aerosol transport and radiation model and an ocean mixed-layer model. The model in this study was a three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model (SPRINTARS), driven by the AGCM developed by CCSR (Center for Climate System Research), NIES (National Institute for Environmental Studies), and FRCGC (Frontier Research Center for Global Change). This model incorporates sulfate, carbonaceous, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols, the first three of which are assumed to acts as cloud condensation nuclei that generate cloud droplets whose number increases with the number of nuclei. We assumed sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol from fuel burning for anthropogenic aerosol. And the model simulations of equilibrium experiments were performed to investigate the impact of anthropogenic aerosols based on present-day emission data and the preindustrial-era emission data. Our simulation results showed that copious anthropogenic aerosol loading causes significant decrease in the surface downward shortwave radiation flux (SDSWRF), which indicates that a direct effect of aerosols has the greatest influence on the surface radiation. It is found from our model simulations that low-level clouds increase but convective clouds decrease due to reduced convective activity caused by surface cooling when anthropogenic aerosol increases. It was also found that the contributions of aerosols to the radiation

  1. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical linkage between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5) which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption and giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics to understand their individual impacts on global-scale cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC). Compared to the existing activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of activation schemes increase the computation time by ~10% but leads to predicted CDNC in better agreement with satellite-derived/in situ values in many regions with high CDNC but in worse agreement for some regions with low CDNC. Large percentage changes in predicted CDNC occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reduced activation of sea spray aerosol after accounting for giant CCN activation kinetics. Comparison of CESM/CAM5 predictions against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes generally improve the low biases. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNC of 150% and an increase (more negative) in shortwave cloud forcing of 12%. With the improvement of model-predicted CDNCs and better agreement with most satellite-derived cloud properties in many regions, the inclusion of these aerosol activation

  2. Long-term AOD timeseries by Precision Filter Radiometer and assessment of radiative forcing due to the aerosol direct effect at four sites in Switzerland over the last two decades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Giovanni; Vuilleumier, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In association with the WMO GAW Precision Filter Radiometer network, MeteoSwiss operates four automatic stations measuring the direct solar irradiance in 16 narrow spectral bands within the range 305-1024 nm since 1998. The four sites are (i) Payerne (timeseries 2002-2016), characterized by rural environment (Swiss plateau), (ii) Davos (timeseries 1998-2016), characterized by alpine environment, (iii) Jungfraujoch (timeseries 1999-2016), characterized by alpine environment and partial free tropospheric conditions (mainly in winter, Hermann et al, 2015), and (iv) Locarno-Monti (timeseries 2001-2016), characterized by semi-alpine and urban environment (southern side of the Swiss-Italian Alps). WE present the long-term, almost uninterrupted, timeseries of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in the spectral range 368-1024 nm that has been calculated for each of the four sites along the last two decades. Additionally, we present a study of the trends over almost twenty years of the AOD at different wavelengths. Based on the simulations of the LibRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations (Meyer and Kylling, 2005) and on the PFR-based timeseries of AOD it has been possible to assess the radiative forcing due to the direct effect of aerosols over Switzerland since 1998.

  3. Smoke and pollution aerosol effect on cloud cover.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan

    2006-08-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  4. Smoke and Pollution Aerosol Effect on Cloud Cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Pollution and smoke aerosols can increase or decrease the cloud cover. This duality in the effects of aerosols forms one of the largest uncertainties in climate research. Using solar measurements from Aerosol Robotic Network sites around the globe, we show an increase in cloud cover with an increase in the aerosol column concentration and an inverse dependence on the aerosol absorption of sunlight. The emerging rule appears to be independent of geographical location or aerosol type, thus increasing our confidence in the understanding of these aerosol effects on the clouds and climate. Preliminary estimates suggest an increase of 5% in cloud cover.

  5. Future Climate Impacts of Direct Radiative Forcing Anthropogenic Aerosols, Tropospheric Ozone, and Long-lived Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Long-lived greenhouse gases (GHGs) are the most important driver of climate change over the next century. Aerosols and tropospheric ozone (O3) are expected to induce significant perturbations to the GHG-forced climate. To distinguish the equilibrium climate responses to changes in direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols, tropospheric ozone, and GHG between present day and year 2100, four 80-year equilibrium climates are simulated using a unified tropospheric chemistry-aerosol model within the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) 110. Concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, primary organic (POA) carbon, secondary organic (SOA) carbon, black carbon (BC) aerosols, and tropospheric ozone for present day and year 2100 are obtained a priori by coupled chemistry-aerosol GCM simulations, with emissions of aerosols, ozone, and precursors based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenario (SRES) A2. Changing anthropogenic aerosols, tropospheric ozone, and GHG from present day to year 2100 is predicted to perturb the global annual mean radiative forcing by +0.18 (considering aerosol direct effects only), +0.65, and +6.54 W m(sup -2) at the tropopause, and to induce an equilibrium global annual mean surface temperature change of +0.14, +0.32, and +5.31 K, respectively, with the largest temperature response occurring at northern high latitudes. Anthropogenic aerosols, through their direct effect, are predicted to alter the Hadley circulation owing to an increasing interhemispheric temperature gradient, leading to changes in tropical precipitation. When changes in both aerosols and tropospheric ozone are considered, the predicted patterns of change in global circulation and the hydrological cycle are similar to those induced by aerosols alone. GHG-induced climate changes, such as amplified warming over high latitudes, weakened Hadley circulation, and increasing precipitation over the

  6. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free direct radiative forcing of aerosol over the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, Helen; Osipov, Serega; Bantges, Richard; Smirnov, Alexander; Banks, Jamie; Levy, Robert; Prakash, P.-Jish; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-04-01

    A combination of ground-based and satellite observations are used, in conjunction with column radiative transfer modelling, to assess the climatological aerosol loading and quantify its corresponding cloud-free direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Red Sea. While there have been campaigns designed to probe aerosol-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to this region. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements which can be used to evaluate retrievals are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based sun-photometer micro-tops observations gathered from a series of cruises which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Initially two aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms developed for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are evaluated via comparison with the co-located cruise observations. These show excellent agreement, with correlations typically better than 0.9 and very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of radiative fluxes and DRF along one of the cruises using the observed aerosol and meteorological conditions also show good agreement with co-located estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large

  7. Background on health effects of acid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M

    1989-02-01

    This introduction to the 1987 NIEHS-EPA Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols reviews the state of our knowledge on this topic as of the close of the 1984 NIEHS Conference on the Health Effects of Acid Precipitation (Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 63) and the results of some key studies completed since that time. These studies, together with the results of the studies presented in the papers that follow, provide a substantial increment in our knowledge of the health effects of acid aerosols.

  8. Background on health effects of acid aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, M

    1989-01-01

    This introduction to the 1987 NIEHS-EPA Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols reviews the state of our knowledge on this topic as of the close of the 1984 NIEHS Conference on the Health Effects of Acid Precipitation (Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 63) and the results of some key studies completed since that time. These studies, together with the results of the studies presented in the papers that follow, provide a substantial increment in our knowledge of the health effects of acid aerosols. PMID:2707208

  9. Stronger constraints on the anthropogenic indirect aerosol effect.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Lesins, Glen

    2002-11-01

    The anthropogenic indirect aerosol effects of modifying cloud albedo and cloud lifetime cannot be deduced from observations alone but require a modeling component. Here we validate a climate model, with and without indirect aerosol effects, by using satellite observations. The model agrees better with observations when both indirect aerosol effects are included. However, the simulated clouds are more susceptible to aerosols than the observed clouds from the POLDER satellite, thus overestimating the indirect aerosol effect. By taking the difference in susceptibilities into account, the global mean total anthropogenic aerosol effect is reduced from -1.4 to -0.85 watts per square meter.

  10. Aerosol polarization effects on atmospheric correction and aerosol retrievals in ocean color remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Menghua

    2006-12-10

    The current ocean color data processing system for the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) uses the Rayleigh lookup tables that were generated using the vector radiative transfer theory with inclusion of the polarization effects. The polarization effects, however, are not accounted for in the aerosol lookup tables for the ocean color data processing. I describe a study of the aerosol polarization effects on the atmospheric correction and aerosol retrieval algorithms in the ocean color remote sensing. Using an efficient method for the multiple vector radiative transfer computations, aerosol lookup tables that include polarization effects are generated. Simulations have been carried out to evaluate the aerosol polarization effects on the derived ocean color and aerosol products for all possible solar-sensor geometries and the various aerosol optical properties. Furthermore, the new aerosol lookup tables have been implemented in the SeaWiFS data processing system and extensively tested and evaluated with SeaWiFS regional and global measurements. Results show that in open oceans (maritime environment), the aerosol polarization effects on the ocean color and aerosol products are usually negligible, while there are some noticeable effects on the derived products in the coastal regions with nonmaritime aerosols.

  11. The importance of aerosol water for air pollution effects on weather and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, S.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-12-01

    We apply a new concept to study air pollution effects on weather and climate, which is based on thermodynamic principles that explain hydration and osmosis - including the required transformation of laboratory based concepts to atmospheric conditions. Under ambient conditions the equilibrium relative humidity (ERH) determines the saturation molality, solute and solvent activities (and activity coefficients), and the aerosol associated water mass, sine the water content is fixed by ERH for a given aerosol concentration and type. As a consequence, aerosol water drives the gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning, ambient aerosol size-distributions and directly links aerosol hygroscopic growth into fog, haze and clouds. Various modeling results indicate that a) our new concept is not limited to dilute binary solutions, b) sensitive aerosol properties such as the pH of binary and mixed inorganic/organic salt solutions up to saturation can be computed accurately, and c) that anthropogenic emissions can be directly linked to visibility reduction, cloud formation and climate forcing, if we explicitly account for the aerosol water mass. Our new concept is more explicit than the traditional CCN concept as it abandons the use of ambiguous terms such as "marine" and "continental" aerosols, and refines lumped categories such as mineral dust, biomass burning, sea salt, organic or sulfate aerosols currently used in atmospheric modeling. Despite, our concept is computationally very efficient as it allows solving the whole gas/liquid/solid aerosol partitioning analytically without numerical iterations. It is therefore especially suited for regional high resolution, or global climate applications.

  12. Aerosol optical properties and radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao; Li, Zhanqing; Holben, Brent; Wang, Pucai; Eck, Tom; Chen, Hongbin; Cribb, Maureen; Zhao, Yanxia

    2007-11-01

    One year's worth of aerosol and surface irradiance data from September 2005 to August 2006 were obtained at Taihu, the second supersite for the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE). Aerosol optical properties derived from measurements by a Sun photometer were analyzed. The aerosol data were used together with surface irradiance data to quantitatively estimate aerosol effects on surface shortwave radiation (SWR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The annual mean aerosol optical depth at 500 nm is 0.77, and mean Ångstrom wavelength exponent is 1.17. The annual mean aerosol single scattering albedo and mean aerosol asymmetry factor at 440 nm are 0.90 and 0.72, respectively. Both parameters show a weak seasonal variation, with small values occurring during the winter and larger values during the summer. Clear positive relationships between relative humidity and aerosol properties suggest aerosol hygroscopic growth greatly modifies aerosol properties. The annual mean aerosol direct radiative forcing at the surface (ADRF) is -38.4 W m-2 and -17.8 W m-2 for SWR and PAR, respectively. Because of moderate absorption, the instantaneous ADRF at the top of the atmosphere derived from CERES SSF data is close to zero. Heavy aerosol loading in this region leads to -112.6 W m-2 and -45.5 W m-2 reduction in direct and global SWR, but 67.1 W m-2 more diffuse SWR reaching the surface. With regard to PAR, the annual mean differences in global, direct and diffuse irradiance are -23.1 W m-2, -65.2 W m-2 and 42.1 W m-2 with and without the presence of aerosol, respectively.

  13. Aerosol effects on deep convection in a multi-scale aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Ghan, S. J.; Morrison, H.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols have been demonstrated to affect convective clouds and precipitation in observations, process models, and regional climate models. However, examining aerosol effects on convective clouds and precipitation in global climate models has been extremely challenging, as until recently the treatments in the few global climate models that include aerosol effects on convective clouds have used conventional cumulus parameterizations and hence have been quite crude. We have recently built a multi-scale aerosol-climate model, PNNL-MMF, which is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) model. The extended model explicitly treats aerosol effects on deep convection using a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme in the cloud-resolving model component of the MMF. In this presentation, we examine aerosol effects on convective clouds at the global scale using the PNNL-MMF model. Our results show that the frequency of precipitation occurrence at a given liquid water path increases with increasing aerosol loading for deep clouds with surface precipitation rate larger than 10 mm/day. This relationship is particularly evident during the summer time, when convection activity is strong, and may indicate invigoration of deep convection by aerosols. The modeled relationship of aerosols, clouds and precipitation is further compared with observations from the ARM long-term sites (e.g., SGP). The causes of the modeled relationship of aerosols, clouds and precipitations are examined by using a pair of 5-year MMF simulations with and without anthropogenic aerosols.

  14. Estimation of aerosol direct forcing by Asian dust using sun/sky radiometer and lidar measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, J. G.; Yoon, S. C.; Holben, B.

    2002-12-01

    Appropriate optical parameters of aerosols are critical part for estimating aerosol direct forcing. We suggest a method of determining aerosol parameters for the radiative transfer model, CRM released by NCAR, from AERONET inversion data set. AERONET inversion provides size distribution and complex refractive indices at 4 wavelengths, 440, 670, 870 and 1020nm. Mie calculation can produce the aerosol optical parameters, such as aerosol optical thickness (AOT), single scattering albedo (SSA), asymmetry factor(g) and by using regression fitting method on log-log plane, the parameters at 19 channels of short wavelength region can be retrieved. With this method, it becomes possible to use ground-base solar radiance measurement data for calculating aerosol direct forcing without assuming the specific aerosol type in advance. We investigated the differences of aerosol forcing by dust and non-dust aerosols. Out of AERONET data collected in Apr. 2001, the properties of Asian dust aerosols were examined, which have the characteristics of bigger AOT, bigger SSA (bigger solar radiance reflection) and less wavelength dependence of SSA and g. This difference makes larger aerosol direct forcing at TOA and less atmospheric absorption. The aerosol profiles measured by lidar are also applied for radiative transfer calculation. The profiles of short wave radiation flux and heating rate by dust were investigated for two Asian dust events, one was elevated dust event and the other was dust event settling into the PBL. Instantaneous heating rate larger than 2K/day was estimated within dust aerosol layer and several differences of radiation flux profiles due to the aerosol profiles were investigated.

  15. BAECC Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Petäjä, Tuukka; Moisseev, Dmitri; Sinclair, Victoria; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Manninen, Antti J.; Levula, Janne; Väänänen, Riikka; Heikkinen, Liine; Äijälä, Mikko; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana

    2015-11-01

    “Biogenic Aerosols - Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC)”, featured the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s 2nd Mobile Facility (AMF2) in Hyytiälä, Finland. It operated for an 8-month intensive measurement campaign from February to September 2014. The main research goal was to understand the role of biogenic aerosols in cloud formation. One of the reasons to perform BAECC study in Hyytiälä was the fact that it hosts SMEAR-II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations), which is one of the world’s most comprehensive surface in-situ observation sites in a boreal forest environment. The station has been measuring atmospheric aerosols, biogenic emissions and an extensive suite of parameters relevant to atmosphere-biosphere interactions continuously since 1996. The BAECC enables combining vertical profiles from AMF2 with surface-based in-situ SMEAR-II observations and allows the processes at the surface to be directly related to processes occurring throughout the entire tropospheric column. With the inclusion of extensive surface precipitation measurements, and intensive observation periods involving aircraft flights and novel radiosonde launches, the complementary observations of AMF2 and SMEAR-II provide a unique opportunity for investigating aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud-to-precipitation processes. The BAECC dataset will initiate new opportunities for evaluating and improving models of aerosol sources and transport, cloud microphysical processes, and boundary-layer structures.

  16. Radiative effects of aerosols on the environment in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    Anthropogenic emissions and concentrations of aerosol precursors and aerosols over China are among the highest in major countries of the world. Due to large emissions of soot and dust, aerosol absorption is high. Based on the observed direct and diffuse irradiance, a single scattering albedo of about 0.8 is derived for two large agri/eco/industrial areas. Aerosol direct effect can exert various environmental impacts in China. Photochemical activities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are significantly reduced because of reductions in photolysis rates and in emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons. Crop yields under optimal conditions can be reduced due to the reduction in surface solar irradiance. The most significant aerosol radiative perturbation is in changing the air-surface interaction and diurnal evolution of ABL. Reductions in various surface heat fluxes due to aerosols depend on soil moisture. Over a relatively dry surface, the evaporation has a small change, leading to the largest decrease of surface skin temperature at noon. Over a relatively wet surface, a substantial reduction in evaporation results in the largest surface cooling in the early morning. The diurnal temperature range (DTR) can be reduced by an amount comparable to the observed decrease of DTR. The longwave absorption of aerosols can lead to an increase of the daily minimum temperature and contributes to about 20% of the decrease in the DTR. The near-surface air temperature has the largest cooling in the early morning because the ABL is shallow and the temperature is sensitive to the radiative perturbation. As a result of the reduced sensible heat flux, the surface layer becomes more stable. Moreover, the aerosol heating enhances the stabilization of surface layer and in turn further reduces the sensible heat flux. As a result the ABL height can be reduced substantially. This will have many important ramifications, including trapping/accumulation of air pollutants, and perturbing the water

  17. Comprehensive tool for calculation of radiative fluxes: illustration of shortwave aerosol radiative effect sensitivities to the details in aerosol and underlying surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derimian, Yevgeny; Dubovik, Oleg; Huang, Xin; Lapyonok, Tatyana; Litvinov, Pavel; Kostinski, Alex B.; Dubuisson, Philippe; Ducos, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    The evaluation of aerosol radiative effect on broadband hemispherical solar flux is often performed using simplified spectral and directional scattering characteristics of atmospheric aerosol and underlying surface reflectance. In this study we present a rigorous yet fast computational tool that accurately accounts for detailed variability of both spectral and angular scattering properties of aerosol and surface reflectance in calculation of direct aerosol radiative effect. The tool is developed as part of the GRASP (Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties) project. We use the tool to evaluate instantaneous and daily average radiative efficiencies (radiative effect per unit aerosol optical thickness) of several key atmospheric aerosol models over different surface types. We then examine the differences due to neglect of surface reflectance anisotropy, nonsphericity of aerosol particle shape and accounting only for aerosol angular scattering asymmetry instead of using full phase function. For example, it is shown that neglecting aerosol particle nonsphericity causes mainly overestimation of the aerosol cooling effect and that magnitude of this overestimate changes significantly as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA) if the asymmetry parameter is used instead of detailed phase function. It was also found that the nonspherical-spherical differences in the calculated aerosol radiative effect are not modified significantly if detailed BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) is used instead of Lambertian approximation of surface reflectance. Additionally, calculations show that usage of only angular scattering asymmetry, even for the case of spherical aerosols, modifies the dependence of instantaneous aerosol radiative effect on SZA. This effect can be canceled for daily average values, but only if sun reaches the zenith; otherwise a systematic bias remains. Since the daily average radiative effect is obtained by integration over a range

  18. Volcanic aerosols: Chemistry, evolution, and effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols have been the subject of scientific speculation since the 1880s, when the powerful eruption of Krakatoa attracted worldwide attention to the upper atmosphere through spectacular optical displays. The presence of a permanent tenuous dust layer in the lower stratosphere was postulated in the 1920s following studies of the twilight glow. Junge collected the first samples of these 'dust' particles and demonstrated that they were actually composed of sulfates, most likely concentrated sulfuric acid (Junge and Manson, 1961; Junge, 1963). Subsequent research has been spurred by the realization that stratospheric particles can influence the surface climate of earth through their effects on atmospheric radiation. Such aerosols can also influence, through chemical and physical effects, the trace composition of the atmosphere, ozone concentrations, and atmospheric electrical properties. The properties of stratospheric aerosols (both the background particles and those enhanced by volcanic eruptions) were measured in situ by balloon ascents and high altitude aircraft sorties. The aerosols were also observed remotely from the ground and from satellites using both active (lidar) and passive (solar occultation) techniques (remote sensing instruments were carried on aircraft and balloon platforms as well). In connection with the experimental work, models were developed to test theories of particle formation and evolution, to guide measurement strategies, to provide a means of connecting laboratory and field data, and to apply the knowledge gained to answer practical questions about global changes in climate, depletion of the ozone layer, and related environmental problems.

  19. Radiative Effects of Aerosol in the Marine Environment: Tales from the Two-Column Aerosol Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; Barnard, J.; Chand, D.; Chapman, E. G.; Comstock, J. M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Flynn, C. J.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hubbe, J.; Johnson, R.; Kassianov, E.; Kluzek, C.; Laskin, A.; Lee, Y.; Mei, F.; Michalsky, J. J.; Redemann, J.; Rogers, R. R.; Russell, P. B.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Schmid, B.; Shilling, J. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Springston, S. R.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Berkowitz, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    There is still uncertainty associated with the direct radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosol and its representation in atmospheric models. This is particularly true in marine environments near the coast where the aerosol loading is a function of both naturally occurring and anthropogenic aerosol. These regions are also subject to variable synoptic and thermally driven flows (land-sea breezes) that transport aerosol between the continental and marine environments. The situation is made more complicated due to seasonal changes in aerosol emissions. Given these differences in emissions, we expect significant differences in the aerosol intensive and extensive properties between summer and winter and data is needed to evaluate models over the wide range of conditions. To address this issue, the recently completed Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) was designed to measure the key aerosol parameters in two atmospheric columns, one located over Cape Cod, Massachusetts and another approximately 200 km from the coast over the Atlantic Ocean. Measurements included aerosol size distribution, chemical composition, optical properties and vertical distribution. Several aspects make TCAP unique, including the year-long deployment of a suite of surface-based instruments by the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and two aircraft intensive operations periods supported by the ARM Airborne Facility, one conducted in July 2012 and a second in February 2013. The presentation will include a discussion of the impact of the aerosol optical properties and their uncertainty on simulations of the radiation budget within the TCAP domain in the context of both single column and regional scale models. Data from TCAP will be used to highlight a number of important factors, including diurnal variation in aerosol optical depth measured at the surface site, systematic changes in aerosol optical properties (including scattering, absorption, and

  20. Reducing the Uncertainties in Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne particles, which include desert and soil dust, wildfire smoke, sea salt, volcanic ash, black carbon, natural and anthropogenic sulfate, nitrate, and organic aerosol, affect Earth's climate, in part by reflecting and absorbing sunlight. This paper reviews current status, and evaluates future prospects for reducing the uncertainty aerosols contribute to the energy budget of Earth, which at present represents a leading factor limiting the quality of climate predictions. Information from satellites is critical for this work, because they provide frequent, global coverage of the diverse and variable atmospheric aerosol load. Both aerosol amount and type must be determined. Satellites are very close to measuring aerosol amount at the level-of-accuracy needed, but aerosol type, especially how bright the airborne particles are, cannot be constrained adequately by current techniques. However, satellite instruments can map out aerosol air mass type, which is a qualitative classification rather than a quantitative measurement, and targeted suborbital measurements can provide the required particle property detail. So combining satellite and suborbital measurements, and then using this combination to constrain climate models, will produce a major advance in climate prediction.

  1. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Measured properties of atmospheric aerosol particles are presented. These include aerosol size frequency distribution and complex retractive index. The optical properties of aerosols are computed based on the presuppositions of thermodynamic equilibrium and of Mie-theory.

  2. Secondary inorganic aerosol formation and its shortwave direct radiative forcing in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA), including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium, is an important part of fine particle. SIA plays a significant role in shortwave radiation transfer. Numerical simulation is usually used to study SIA formation and its climate effect. In this work, we used the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) to study SIA formation and its direct radiative forcing (DRF) over China. SO2 oxidation pathways related to mineral aerosol, including transition metal-catalyzed oxidation in aqueous phase and heterogeneous reactions, play an important role in sulfate production, but they are not well treated in current atmospheric models. In this work, we improved the WRF-Chem model by simulating the enhancement role of mineral aerosol in sulfate production. Firstly, we estimated mineral cations based on local measurements in order to well represent aqueous phase acidity. Secondly, we scaled the transition metal concentration to the mineral aerosol levels according to the existing observations and improved transition metal-catalyzed oxidation calculation. Lastly, heterogeneous reactions of acid gases on the surface of mineral aerosol were included in this simulation. Accuracy in the prediction of sulfate by the model was significantly improved and we concluded that mineral aerosol can facilitate SO2 oxidation and subsequent sulfate formation. It was demonstrated that, over China, mineral aerosol was responsible for 21.8% of annual mean sulfate concentration. The enhanced aqueous oxidation was more significant compared to the heterogeneous reactions. In winter, mineral aerosol was responsible for 39.6% of sulfate production. In summer, gaseous oxidation and aqueous oxidation of SO2 by hydrogen peroxide and ozone were the dominant pathways of sulfate formation. Mineral aerosol only contributed 11.9% to the total sulfate production. The increase in annual mean sulfate concentration due to mineral aerosol could reach up to over 6

  3. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30 degrees S-20 degrees S), smoke (20 degrees S-5 degrees N), mineral dust (5 degrees N-25 degrees N), and pollution aerosols (30 degrees N- 60 degrees N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 +/- 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect.

  4. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Yoram J; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30 degrees S-20 degrees S), smoke (20 degrees S-5 degrees N), mineral dust (5 degrees N-25 degrees N), and pollution aerosols (30 degrees N- 60 degrees N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 +/- 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect. PMID:16076949

  5. Climatic Effects of 1950-2050 Changes in US Anthropogenic Aerosols. Part 1; Aerosol Trends and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibensperger, E. M.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Chen, W.-T.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Nenes, A.; Adams, P. J.; Streets, D. G.; Kumar, N.; Rind, D.

    2012-01-01

    We calculate decadal aerosol direct and indirect (warm cloud) radiative forcings from US anthropogenic sources over the 1950-2050 period. Past and future aerosol distributions are constructed using GEOS-Chem and historical emission inventories and future projections from the IPCC A1B scenario. Aerosol simulations are evaluated with observed spatial distributions and 1980-2010 trends of aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in the contiguous US. Direct and indirect radiative forcing is calculated using the GISS general circulation model and monthly mean aerosol distributions from GEOS-Chem. The radiative forcing from US anthropogenic aerosols is strongly localized over the eastern US. We find that its magnitude peaked in 1970-1990, with values over the eastern US (east of 100 deg W) of -2.0Wm(exp-2 for direct forcing including contributions from sulfate (-2.0Wm-2), nitrate (-0.2Wm(exp-2), organic carbon (-0.2Wm(exp-2), and black carbon (+0.4Wm(exp-2). The uncertainties in radiative forcing due to aerosol radiative properties are estimated to be about 50 %. The aerosol indirect effect is estimated to be of comparable magnitude to the direct forcing. We find that the magnitude of the forcing declined sharply from 1990 to 2010 (by 0.8Wm(exp-2) direct and 1.0Wm(exp-2 indirect), mainly reflecting decreases in SO2 emissions, and project that it will continue declining post-2010 but at a much slower rate since US SO2 emissions have already declined by almost 60% from their peak. This suggests that much of the warming effect of reducing US anthropogenic aerosol sources has already been realized. The small positive radiative forcing from US BC emissions (+0.3Wm(exp-2 over the eastern US in 2010; 5% of the global forcing from anthropogenic BC emissions worldwide) suggests that a US emission control strategy focused on BC would have only limited climate benefit.

  6. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W m(exp -2) in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  7. GCM Simulations of the Aerosol Indirect Effect: Sensitivity to Cloud Parameterization and Aerosol Burden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Koch, Dorothy; Tselioudis, George; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the coupling of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM) to an online sulfur chemistry model and source models for organic matter and sea-salt that is used to estimate the aerosol indirect effect. The cloud droplet number concentration is diagnosed empirically from field experiment datasets over land and ocean that observe droplet number and all three aerosol types simultaneously; corrections are made for implied variations in cloud turbulence levels. The resulting cloud droplet number is used to calculate variations in droplet effective radius, which in turn allows us to predict aerosol effects on cloud optical thickness and microphysical process rates. We calculate the aerosol indirect effect by differencing the top-of-the-atmosphere net cloud radiative forcing for simulations with present-day vs. pre-industrial emissions. Both the first (radiative) and second (microphysical) indirect effects are explored. We test the sensitivity of our results to cloud parameterization assumptions that control the vertical distribution of cloud occurrence, the autoconversion rate, and the aerosol scavenging rate, each of which feeds back significantly on the model aerosol burden. The global mean aerosol indirect effect for all three aerosol types ranges from -1.55 to -4.36 W/sq m in our simulations. The results are quite sensitive to the pre-industrial background aerosol burden, with low pre-industrial burdens giving strong indirect effects, and to a lesser extent to the anthropogenic aerosol burden, with large burdens giving somewhat larger indirect effects. Because of this dependence on the background aerosol, model diagnostics such as albedo-particle size correlations and column cloud susceptibility, for which satellite validation products are available, are not good predictors of the resulting indirect effect.

  8. Uncertainties in global aerosols and climate effects due to biofuel emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodros, J. K.; Scott, C. E.; Farina, S. C.; Lee, Y. H.; L'Orange, C.; Volckens, J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-08-01

    Aerosol emissions from biofuel combustion impact both health and climate; however, while reducing emissions through improvements to combustion technologies will improve health, the net effect on climate is largely unconstrained. In this study, we examine sensitivities in global aerosol concentration, direct radiative climate effect, and cloud-albedo aerosol indirect climate effect to uncertainties in biofuel emission factors, optical mixing state, and model nucleation and background secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We use the Goddard Earth Observing System global chemical-transport model (GEOS-Chem) with TwO Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics. The emission factors include amount, composition, size, and hygroscopicity, as well as optical mixing-state properties. We also evaluate emissions from domestic coal use, which is not biofuel but is also frequently emitted from homes. We estimate the direct radiative effect assuming different mixing states (homogeneous, core-shell, and external) with and without absorptive organic aerosol (brown carbon). We find the global-mean direct radiative effect of biofuel emissions ranges from -0.02 to +0.06 W m-2 across all simulation/mixing-state combinations with regional effects in source regions ranging from -0.2 to +0.8 W m-2. The global-mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect (AIE) ranges from +0.01 to -0.02 W m-2 with regional effects in source regions ranging from -1.0 to -0.05 W m-2. The direct radiative effect is strongly dependent on uncertainties in emissions mass, composition, emissions aerosol size distributions, and assumed optical mixing state, while the indirect effect is dependent on the emissions mass, emissions aerosol size distribution, and the choice of model nucleation and secondary organic aerosol schemes. The sign and magnitude of these effects have a strong regional dependence. We conclude that the climate effects of biofuel aerosols are largely unconstrained, and the overall sign of the aerosol

  9. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  10. Effects of aerosols on clear-sky solar radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleeson, Emily; Toll, Velle; Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Rontu, Laura; Masek, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols under clear-sky conditions in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement InterNational - High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN-HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments: the Integrated Forecast System (IFS), acraneb2 and the hlradia radiation schemes. The multi-band IFS scheme was formerly used operationally by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) whereas hlradia and acraneb2 are broadband schemes. The former is a new version of the HIRLAM radiation scheme while acraneb2 is the radiation scheme in the ALARO-1 physics package. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical weather prediction (NWP) system regarding aerosols and to prepare it for use of real-time aerosol information. The experiments were run with particular focus on the August 2010 Russian wildfire case. Each of the three radiation schemes accurately (within ±4 % at midday) simulates the direct shortwave aerosol effect when observed aerosol optical properties are used. When the aerosols were excluded from the simulations, errors of more than +15 % in global shortwave irradiance were found at midday, with the error reduced to +10 % when standard climatological aerosols were used. An error of -11 % was seen at midday if only observed aerosol optical depths at 550 nm, and not observation-based spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors, were included in the simulations. This demonstrates the importance of using the correct aerosol optical properties. The dependency of the direct radiative effect of aerosols on relative humidity was tested and shown to be within ±6 % in this case. By modifying the assumptions about the shape of the IFS climatological vertical aerosol profile, the inherent uncertainties associated with assuming fixed vertical

  11. Effect of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol-radiation interaction: A theoretical prospect.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Koren, Ilan; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical investigation of the effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Four aerosol composition models (dust, polluted dust, pollution and pure scattering aerosols) with varying aerosol vertical profiles are incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The simulations show interesting spectral dependence of the ARE on the aerosol layer height. ARE increases with the aerosol layer height in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.25-0.42 μm) and thermal-infrared (TH-IR: 4.0-20.0 μm) regions, whereas it decreases in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR: 0.42-4.0 μm) region. Changes in the ARE with aerosol layer height are associated with different dominant processes for each spectral region. The combination of molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and aerosol absorption is the key process in the UV region, whereas aerosol (Mie) scattering and atmospheric gaseous absorption are key players in the VIS-NIR region. The longwave emission fluxes are controlled by the environmental temperature at the aerosol layer level. ARE shows maximum sensitivity to the aerosol layer height in the TH-IR region, followed by the UV and VIS-NIR regions. These changes are significant even in relatively low aerosol loading cases (aerosol optical depth ∼0.2-0.3). Dust aerosols are the most sensitive to altitude followed by polluted dust and pollution in all three different wavelength regions. Differences in the sensitivity of the aerosol type are explained by the relative strength of their spectral absorption/scattering properties. The role of surface reflectivity on the overall altitude dependency is shown to be important in the VIS-NIR and UV regions, whereas it is insensitive in the TH-IR region. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of water vapor with respect to the aerosol layer is an important factor in the ARE estimations. Therefore, improved estimations of the water vapor profiles are needed for the further reduction in

  12. Effect of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol-radiation interaction: A theoretical prospect.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit Kumar; Koren, Ilan; Rudich, Yinon

    2015-10-01

    This study presents a theoretical investigation of the effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the aerosol radiative effect (ARE). Four aerosol composition models (dust, polluted dust, pollution and pure scattering aerosols) with varying aerosol vertical profiles are incorporated into a radiative transfer model. The simulations show interesting spectral dependence of the ARE on the aerosol layer height. ARE increases with the aerosol layer height in the ultraviolet (UV: 0.25-0.42 μm) and thermal-infrared (TH-IR: 4.0-20.0 μm) regions, whereas it decreases in the visible-near infrared (VIS-NIR: 0.42-4.0 μm) region. Changes in the ARE with aerosol layer height are associated with different dominant processes for each spectral region. The combination of molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and aerosol absorption is the key process in the UV region, whereas aerosol (Mie) scattering and atmospheric gaseous absorption are key players in the VIS-NIR region. The longwave emission fluxes are controlled by the environmental temperature at the aerosol layer level. ARE shows maximum sensitivity to the aerosol layer height in the TH-IR region, followed by the UV and VIS-NIR regions. These changes are significant even in relatively low aerosol loading cases (aerosol optical depth ∼0.2-0.3). Dust aerosols are the most sensitive to altitude followed by polluted dust and pollution in all three different wavelength regions. Differences in the sensitivity of the aerosol type are explained by the relative strength of their spectral absorption/scattering properties. The role of surface reflectivity on the overall altitude dependency is shown to be important in the VIS-NIR and UV regions, whereas it is insensitive in the TH-IR region. Our results indicate that the vertical distribution of water vapor with respect to the aerosol layer is an important factor in the ARE estimations. Therefore, improved estimations of the water vapor profiles are needed for the further reduction in

  13. Incorporation of advanced aerosol activation treatments into CESM/CAM5: model evaluation and impacts on aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantt, B.; He, J.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Nenes, A.

    2013-12-01

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in the science of anthropogenic climate change is from aerosol-cloud interactions. The activation of aerosols into cloud droplets is a direct microphysical link between aerosols and clouds; parameterizations of this process realistically link aerosol with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and the resulting indirect effects. Small differences between parameterizations can have a large impact on the spatiotemporal distributions of activated aerosols and the resulting cloud properties. In this work, we incorporate a series of aerosol activation schemes into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1.1 within the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM/CAM5), which include factors such as insoluble aerosol adsorption, giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation kinetics, and entrainment to understand their individual impacts on global scale cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNCs). Compared to the existing simple activation scheme in CESM/CAM5, this series of schemes predict CDNCs that are typically in better agreement with satellite-derived and observed values. The largest changes in predicted CDNCs occur over desert and oceanic regions, owing to the enhanced activation of dust from insoluble aerosol adsorption and reductions in cloud supersaturation from the intense absorption of water vapor in regions of strong giant CCN emissions (e.g., sea-salt). Comparison of CESM/CAM5 against satellite-derived cloud optical thickness and liquid water path shows that the updated activation schemes improve the low biases in their predictions. Globally, the incorporation of all updated schemes leads to an average increase in column CDNCs of 155%, an increase in shortwave cloud forcing of 13%, and a decrease in surface shortwave radiation of 4%. In terms of meteorological impacts, these updated aerosol activation schemes result in a slight decrease in near-surface temperature of 0.9 °C and precipitation of 0.04 mm day-1

  14. Stratospheric aerosol properties and their effects on infrared radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents a stratospheric aerosol model and infers its effects on terrestrial radiation. Composition of the aerosol is assumed to be concentrated sulfuric acid. An appropriate size distribution has been determined from available size distribution measurements of other investigators. Aerosols composed of concentrated sulfuric acid emit energy in the atmospheric window region of the infrared spectrum, 8-13 microns. Laboratory measurements of optical constant data obtained at room temperature are presented for 75 and 90% aqueous sulfuric acid. Calculations of an aerosol extinction coefficient are then performed by using the above data. Effects of changes in aerosol phase and temperature are discussed but not resolved.

  15. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  16. simplified aerosol representations in global modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, Stefan; Peters, Karsten; Stevens, Bjorn; Rast, Sebastian; Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    The detailed treatment of aerosol in global modeling is complex and time-consuming. Thus simplified approaches are investigated, which prescribe 4D (space and time) distributions of aerosol optical properties and of aerosol microphysical properties. Aerosol optical properties are required to assess aerosol direct radiative effects and aerosol microphysical properties (in terms of their ability as aerosol nuclei to modify cloud droplet concentrations) are needed to address the indirect aerosol impact on cloud properties. Following the simplifying concept of the monthly gridded (1x1 lat/lon) aerosol climatology (MAC), new approaches are presented and evaluated against more detailed methods, including comparisons to detailed simulations with complex aerosol component modules.

  17. Multidecadal solar radiation trends in the United States and Germany and direct tropospheric aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepert, Beate; Tegen, Ina

    2002-06-01

    In recent studies, anthropogenic aerosols have been recognized as important radiative forcing factors of climate because of their ability to scatter and/or absorb sunlight. At clear-sky conditions the direct aerosol forcing at ground is negative and implies less solar heating of the surface because of aerosols. In this study, an intensified direct aerosol forcing of -7 to -8 W/m2 has been detected in the United States for the interval from 1960 to 1990. In Germany a weakened aerosol forcing of +3 W/m2 was observed during the same time period. Even though the aerosol forcing is stronger in the eastern United States compared to the western United States, the positive trend is almost equal. We attained these results by scrutinizing clear-sky global solar radiation recordings for these regions and this time period. Additionally, the diurnal cycle and the direct to diffuse ratio of solar radiation were used for constraining the observed trends. Increased absorption and declined light scattering are presumably responsible for the intensified direct aerosol forcing in the United States. While at the same time in Germany, both aerosol absorption and scattering must have declined to explain the parallel weakened aerosol forcing and the increased direct/diffuse ratio. To estimate the possible anthropogenic portion of these observed changes, we compared the observational results with modeled aerosol forcing scenarios retrieved from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model (GISS GCM). Modeled surface solar radiation, aerosol optical thickness, and single-scattering albedo are derived from emission trends of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. The emission distributions are calculated from fossil fuel consumption databases. On the basis of these simulations we suspect that the declining trend of sulfate burden over Germany between 1960 and 1990 was stronger than estimated with the model. Over the United States the simulated small increase

  18. Satellite remote sensing of dust aerosol indirect effects on ice cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Steve Szu-Cheng; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Wang, Xingjuan; Hansell, Richard; Lefevre, Randy; Cocks, Stephen

    2009-01-20

    We undertook a new approach to investigate the aerosol indirect effect of the first kind on ice cloud formation by using available data products from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) and obtained physical understanding about the interaction between aerosols and ice clouds. Our analysis focused on the examination of the variability in the correlation between ice cloud parameters (optical depth, effective particle size, cloud water path, and cloud particle number concentration) and aerosol optical depth and number concentration that were inferred from available satellite cloud and aerosol data products. Correlation results for a number of selected scenes containing dust and ice clouds are presented, and dust aerosol indirect effects on ice clouds are directly demonstrated from satellite observations.

  19. A modeling study of the effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Xiaoning; Yin, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Changhai; Gettelman, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (version 3.5) coupled with the Morrison-Gettelman two-moment cloud microphysics scheme is employed to simulate the aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation in two numerical experiments, one representing present-day conditions (year 2000) and the other the pre-industrial conditions (year 1750) over East Asia by considering both direct and indirect aerosol effects. To isolate the aerosol effects, we used the same set of boundary conditions and only altered the aerosol emissions in both experiments. The simulated results show that the cloud microphysical properties are markedly affected by the increase in aerosols, especially for the column cloud droplet number concentration (DNC), liquid water path (LWP), and the cloud droplet effective radius (DER). With increased aerosols, DNC and LWP have been increased by 137% and 28%, respectively, while DER is reduced by 20%. Precipitation rates in East Asia and East China are reduced by 5.8% and 13%, respectively, by both the aerosol's second indirect effect and the radiative forcing that enhanced atmospheric stability associated with the aerosol direct and first indirect effects. The significant reduction in summer precipitation in East Asia is also consistent with the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon, resulting from the decreasing thermodynamic contrast between the Asian landmass and the surrounding oceans induced by the aerosol's radiative effects. The increase in aerosols reduces the surface net shortwave radiative flux over the East Asia landmass, which leads to the reduction of the land surface temperature. With minimal changes in the sea surface temperature, hence, the weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon further enhances the reduction of summer precipitation over East Asia.

  20. Aerosol effect on cloud droplet size monitored from satellite.

    PubMed

    Bréon, Francois-Marie; Tanré, Didier; Generoso, Sylvia

    2002-02-01

    Aerosol concentration and cloud droplet radii derived from space-borne measurements are used to explore the effect of aerosols on cloud microphysics. Cloud droplet size is found to be largest (14 micrometers) over remote tropical oceans and smallest (6 micrometers) over highly polluted continental areas. Small droplets are also present in clouds downwind of continents. By using estimates of droplet radii coupled with aerosol load, a statistical mean relationship is derived. The cloud droplet size appears to be better correlated with an aerosol index that is representative of the aerosol column number under some assumptions than with the aerosol optical thickness. This study reveals that the effect of aerosols on cloud microphysics is significant and occurs on a global scale.

  1. Satellite Estimates of the Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass Burning Aerosols Over South America and Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Kliche, Donna V.; Berendes, Todd; Welch, Ronald M.; Yang, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic are important to the earth's radiative balance. Therefore it is important to provide adequate validation information on the spatial, temporal and radiative properties of aerosols. This will enable us to predict realistic global estimates of aerosol radiative effects more confidently. The current study utilizes 66 AVHRR LAC (Local Area Coverage) and coincident Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) images to characterize the fires, smoke and radiative forcings of biomass burning aerosols over four major ecosystems of South America.

  2. What does nature tell us about aerosol effects in a trade cumulus regime?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Wang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Detecting aerosol effect on cloud amount has been elusive to both observations and modeling due to potential buffering mechanisms and convolution of meteorology. Here through a natural experiment provided by long-term degassing of a low-lying volcano and use of A-Train satellite observations, we show modifications of trade cumulus cloud fields including decreased droplet size, decreased precipitation efficiency and increased cloud amount are associated with volcanic aerosols. In addition we find significantly higher cloud tops for polluted clouds. We demonstrate that the observed microphysical and macrophysical changes cannot be explained by synoptic meteorology or the orographic effect of the Hawaiian Islands. Idealized large eddy simulations reproduce some key observed features of the cloud response to aerosol perturbations, which helps us further understand the underlying mechanisms. The "total shortwave aerosol forcing", resulting from direct and indirect forcings including both cloud albedo and cloud amount, is almost an order of magnitude higher than aerosol direct forcing alone. Furthermore, the precipitation reduction associated with enhanced aerosol leads to large changes in the energetics of air-sea exchange and trade wind boundary layer. Our results represent the first observational evidence of large-scale increase of cloud amount due to aerosols in a trade cumulus regime, which can be used to constrain the representation of aerosol-cloud interactions in climate models. The findings also have implications for volcano-climate interactions and climate mitigation research.

  3. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Forcing Efficiencies at Surface from the shortwave Irradiance Measurements in Abu Dhabi, UAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beegum S, N.; Ben Romdhane, H.; Ghedira, H.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are known to affect the radiation balance of the Earth-Atmospheric system directly by scattering and absorbing the solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly by affecting the lifetime and albedo of the clouds. Continuous and simultaneous measurements of short wave global irradiance in combination with synchronous spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements (from 340 nm to 1640 nm in 8 channels), for a period of 1 year from June 2012 to May 2013, were used for the determination of the surface direct aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies under cloud free conditions in Abu Dhabi (24.42°N, 54.61o E, 7m MSL), a coastal location in United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the Arabian Peninsula. The Rotating Shadow band Pyranometer (RSP, LI-COR) was used for the irradiance measurements (in the spectral region 400-1100 nm), whereas the AOD measurements were carried out using CIMEL Sunphotometer (CE 318-2, under AERONET program). The differential method, which is neither sensitive to calibration uncertainties nor model assumptions, has been employed for estimating forcing efficiencies from the changes in the measured fluxes. The forcing efficiency, which quantifies the net change in irradiance per unit change in AOD, is an appropriate parameter for the characterization of the aerosol radiative effects even if the microphysical and optical properties of the aerosols are not completely understood. The corresponding forcing values were estimated from the forcing efficiencies. The estimated radiative forcing and forcing efficiencies exhibited strong monthly variations. The forcing efficiencies (absolute magnitudes) were highest during March, and showed continuous decrease thereafter to reach the lowest value during September. In contrast, the forcing followed a slightly different pattern of variability, with the highest solar dimming during April ( -60 W m-2) and the minimum during February ( -20 W m-2). The results indicate that the aerosol

  4. Modeling of aerosol properties related to direct climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloutsou-Vakakis, Sotiria; Rood, Mark J.; Nenes, Athanasios; Pilinis, Christodoulos

    1998-07-01

    A long-term local experiment was designed with the purpose to accurately quantify aerosol parameters needed in order to estimate aerosol climate forcing at an anthropogenically perturbed continental site. Total light-scattering σλ,sp and backscattering σλ,bsp coefficients at wavelength λ, the hygroscopic growth factors with respect to scattering, ƒ(RH)λ,s, and the backscatter ratio bλ are the parameters considered in the paper. Reference and controlled relative humidity nephelometry measurements were taken at a ground level field sampling station, located near Bondville Illinois (40°03'12″N, W 88°22'19″W). Aerosol particle chemical composition and mass particle size distributions were also measured. The target parameters were also estimated from models. The modeling approach involved a two-step process. In the first step, aerosol properties were parameterized with an approach that made use of a modified thermodynamic equilibrium model, published laboratory measurements of single hygroscopic particle properties, and empirical mixing rules. In the second step, the parameterized aerosol properties were used as inputs into a code that calculate σλ,sp and σλ,bsp as functions of λ, RH, particle size, and composition. Comparison between the measured and the modeled results showed that depending on the assumptions, the differences between the modeled and observed results were within 5 to 28% for ƒ(RH)λ,s and within 22-35% for bλ at low RH and 0-20% for bλ at high RH. The temporal variation of the particle size distribution, the equilibrium state of the particles, and the hygroscopicity of the material characterized as residual were the major factors limiting the predictive ability of the models.

  5. The Invigoration of Deep Convective Clouds Over the Atlantic: Aerosol Effect, Meteorology or Retrieval Artifact?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koren, Ilan; Feingold, Graham; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2010-01-01

    Associations between cloud properties and aerosol loading are frequently observed in products derived from satellite measurements. These observed trends between clouds and aerosol optical depth suggest aerosol modification of cloud dynamics, yet there are uncertainties involved in satellite retrievals that have the potential to lead to incorrect conclusions. Two of the most challenging problems are addressed here: the potential for retrieved aerosol optical depth to be cloud-contaminated, and as a result, artificially correlated with cloud parameters; and the potential for correlations between aerosol and cloud parameters to be erroneously considered to be causal. Here these issues are tackled directly by studying the effects of the aerosol on convective clouds in the tropical Atlantic Ocean using satellite remote sensing, a chemical transport model, and a reanalysis of meteorological fields. Results show that there is a robust positive correlation between cloud fraction or cloud top height and the aerosol optical depth, regardless of whether a stringent filtering of aerosol measurements in the vicinity of clouds is applied, or not. These same positive correlations emerge when replacing the observed aerosol field with that derived from a chemical transport model. Model-reanalysis data is used to address the causality question by providing meteorological context for the satellite observations. A correlation exercise between the full suite of meteorological fields derived from model reanalysis and satellite-derived cloud fields shows that observed cloud top height and cloud fraction correlate best with model pressure updraft velocity and relative humidity. Observed aerosol optical depth does correlate with meteorological parameters but usually different parameters from those that correlate with observed cloud fields. The result is a near-orthogonal influence of aerosol and meteorological fields on cloud top height and cloud fraction. The results strengthen the case

  6. A new chemistry option in WRF-Chem v. 3.4 for the simulation of direct and indirect aerosol effects using VBS: evaluation against IMPACT-EUCAARI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccella, P.; Curci, G.; Grell, G. A.; Visconti, G.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    condensation nuclei (CCN) are also overestimated, but the bias is more contained with respect to that of CN. The CCN efficiency, which is a characterization of the ability of aerosol particles to nucleate cloud droplets, is underestimated by a factor of 1.5 and 3.8 in the PBL and FT, respectively. The comparison with MODIS data shows that the model overestimates the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The domain averages (for 1 day) are 0.38 ± 0.12 and 0.42 ± 0.10 for MODIS and WRF-Chem data, respectively. The droplet effective radius (Re) in liquid-phase clouds is underestimated by a factor of 1.5; the cloud liquid water path (LWP) is overestimated by a factor of 1.1-1.6. The consequence is the overestimation of average liquid cloud optical thickness (COT) from a few percent up to 42 %. The predicted cloud water path (CWP) in all phases displays a bias in the range +41-80 %, whereas the bias of COT is about 15 %. In sensitivity tests where we excluded SOA, the skills of the model in reproducing the observed patterns and average values of the microphysical and optical properties of liquid and all phase clouds decreases. Moreover, the run without SOA (NOSOA) shows convective clouds with an enhanced content of liquid and frozen hydrometers, and stronger updrafts and downdrafts. Considering that the previous version of WRF-Chem coupled with a modal aerosol module predicted very low SOA content (secondary organic aerosol model (SORGAM) mechanism) the new proposed option may lead to a better characterization of aerosol-cloud feedbacks.

  7. Scattering directionality parameters of fractal black carbon aerosols and comparison with the Henyey-Greenstein approximation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Apoorva; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-07-15

    Current radiation transfer schemes employ the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) phase function to connect three single parameter representations of aerosol scattering directionality-the hemispherical upscatter fraction (β), the backscatter fraction (b), and the asymmetry parameter (g). The HG phase function does not account for particle morphology, which could lead to significant errors. In this Letter, we compute these single parameters for fractal black carbon (BC) aerosols using the numerically exact superposition T-matrix method. The variations in β, g, and b as a function of aerosol morphology are examined. Corrected empirical relationships connecting these parameters are proposed. We find that the HG phase function could introduce up to a 35% error in β and g estimates. Interestingly, these errors are suppressed by the large mass absorption cross-sections of BC aerosols in radiative transfer calculations and contribute to ≤8% error in direct forcing efficiencies. PMID:27420533

  8. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    levels of atmospheric pollutants or intense biomass burning events in the region. However, numerous mineral dust plumes were observed during the campaign, with the main sources located in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, leading to aerosol optical depth (AOD) values ranging between 0.2 and 0.6 (at 440 nm) over the western and central Mediterranean basins. One important point of this experiment concerns the direct observations of aerosol extinction onboard the ATR-42, using the CAPS system, showing local maxima reaching up to 150 M m-1 within the dust plume. Non-negligible aerosol extinction (about 50 M m-1) has also been observed within the marine boundary layer (MBL). By combining the ATR-42 extinction coefficient observations with absorption and scattering measurements, we performed a complete optical closure revealing excellent agreement with estimated optical properties. This additional information on extinction properties has allowed calculation of the dust single scattering albedo (SSA) with a high level of confidence over the western Mediterranean. Our results show a moderate variability from 0.90 to 1.00 (at 530 nm) for all flights studied compared to that reported in the literature on this optical parameter. Our results underline also a relatively low difference in SSA with values derived near dust sources. In parallel, active remote-sensing observations from the surface and onboard the F-20 aircraft suggest a complex vertical structure of particles and distinct aerosol layers with sea spray and pollution located within the MBL, and mineral dust and/or aged North American smoke particles located above (up to 6-7 km in altitude). Aircraft and balloon-borne observations allow one to investigate the vertical structure of the aerosol size distribution showing particles characterized by a large size (> 10 µm in diameter) within dust plumes. In most of cases, a coarse mode characterized by an effective diameter ranging between 5 and 10 µm, has been detected above the

  9. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Cirrus Clouds in Global Aerosol-Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhang, K.; Wang, Y.; Neubauer, D.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Zhou, C.; Penner, J.; Barahona, D.; Shi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Cirrus clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and water vapor distribution in the upper troposphere. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei that promote ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Anthropogenic emissions from fossil fuel and biomass burning activities have substantially perturbed and enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. Global aerosol-climate models (GCMs) have now been used to quantify the radiative forcing and effects of aerosols on cirrus clouds (IPCC AR5). However, the estimate uncertainty is very large due to the different representation of ice cloud formation and evolution processes in GCMs. In addition, large discrepancies have been found between model simulations in terms of the spatial distribution of ice-nucleating aerosols, relative humidity, and temperature fluctuations, which contribute to different estimates of the aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds. In this presentation, four GCMs with the start-of-the art representations of cloud microphysics and aerosol-cloud interactions are used to estimate the aerosol indirect effects on cirrus clouds and to identify the causes of the discrepancies. The estimated global and annual mean anthropogenic aerosol indirect effect through cirrus clouds ranges from 0.1 W m-2 to 0.3 W m-2 in terms of the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation flux, and 0.5-0.6 W m-2 for the TOA longwave flux. Despite the good agreement on global mean, large discrepancies are found at the regional scale. The physics behind the aerosol indirect effect is dramatically different. Our analysis suggests that burden of ice-nucleating aerosols in the upper troposphere, ice nucleation frequency, and relative role of ice formation processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous nucleation) play key roles in determining the characteristics of the simulated aerosol indirect effects. In addition to the indirect effect estimate, we also use field campaign

  10. The role of Saharan dust in determining the first aerosol indirect effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Liu, G.

    2007-12-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei affect Earth's radiative balance indirectly by changing cloud radiative properties. This so-called first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a potentially large but poorly quantified cooling effect. In modeling the aerosol indirect forcing, because the aerosol-cloud interaction is not resolved in global climate models (GCMs), cloud droplet number concentration is typically parameterized using an empirical relationship that directly relates droplet number concentration to aerosol number concentration based on the measurements between polluted and clean clouds. It is realized that the first AIE obtained in this way can be contaminated by the coherent variation in the pertinent variables such as cloud liquid water and the degree of entrainment mixing. However, the influence from changes in aerosol properties themselves has not received a deserved attention. Using satellite observations over eastern subtropical oceans, we show that over the north-eastern Atlantic the aerosols properties are distinct from the other regions due to the dust particles originating from Sahara desert. These dust particles may significantly reduce the efficiency of aerosols to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As a result, the locally observed first AIE from this region can be significantly deviated from global mean, even resulting in positive values. Because of the large areal fraction of this region, ignoring the influence from the northern Africa dust particles will underestimate the globally averaged first AIE approximately by half.

  11. Estimation of aerosol single scattering albedo from solar direct spectral radiance and total broadband irradiances measured in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fengsheng; Li, Zhanqing

    2007-11-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo (ωo) is a primary factor dictating aerosol radiative effect. Ground-based remote sensing of ωo has been employed most widely using spectral sky radiance measurements made from a scanning Sun photometer. Reliable results can be achieved for high aerosol loadings and for solar zenith angle >50°. This study presents an alternative method using spectral direct radiance measurements or aerosol optical depths together with total sky irradiance to retrieve ωo. The method does not require sky radiance data that can only be acquired by the expensive scanning Sun photometer. The method is evaluated using extensive measurements by a suite of instruments deployed in northern China under the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) project. The sensitivities of the retrieval to various uncertain factors were first examined by means of radiative transfer simulations. It was found the retrieval is most sensitive to cloud screening, total irradiance and the Angstrom Exponent (AE), but only weakly depends on surface albedo and the fine structure of aerosol size distribution. Using 1 year of rigorously screened clear-sky measurements made at the Xianghe site, the retrieved ωo values were found to agree with those retrieved from the Cimel Sun photometer by the AERONET method to within ˜0.03 (RMS), and ˜0.003 (mean bias). As part of the differences originate from different sky views seen by the Sun photometers and pyranometer under comparison, a further test was conducted by using total sky irradiances simulated with the retrieved aerosol properties from the AERONET. The resulting estimates of ωo agree to within 0.01-0.02 (RMS differences) and 0.002-0.003 (mean bias). These values are better measure of the true retrieval uncertainties, as they are free from any data mismatch. The characteristics of ωo retrievals were discussed.

  12. A Study of Direct and Cloud-Mediated Radiative Forcing of Climate Due to Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Shao-Cai

    1999-01-01

    radiative properties to aerosol composition, size distribution, relative humidity (RH) is examined for the following aerosol systems: inorganic and organic ions (Cl-, Br-, NO3 -, SO4 2-, Na+, NH4 +, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCOO-, CH3COO-, CH3CH2COO-, CH3COCOO-, OOCCOO2-, MSA-1); water-insoluble inorganic and organic compounds (elemental carbon, n-alkanes, SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and other organic compounds). The partial molar refraction method was used to calculate the real part of the refractive index. It was found that the asymmetry factor increased by approximately 48% with the real part varying from 1.40 to 1.65, and the single scattering albedo decreased by 24% with the imaginary part varying from -0.005 to -0.1. The asymmetry factor increased by 5.4 times with the geometric standard deviation varying from 1.2 to 3.0. The radiation transmission is very sensitive to the change in size distribution; other factors are not as significant. To determine the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF), the aerosol optical depth (AOD) values at the three operational wavelengths (415, 500 and 673 nm) were determined at a regionally representative site, namely, Mt. Gibbs (35.78 deg N, 82.29 deg W, elevation 2006 m) in Mt. Mitchell State Park, NC, and a site located in an adjacent valley (Black Mountain, 35.66 deg N, 82.38 deg W, elevation 951 m) in the southeastern US. The two sites are separated horizontally by 10 km and vertically by 1 km. It was found that the representative total AOD values at 500 nm at the valley site for highly polluted (HP), marine (M) and continental (C) air masses were 0.68 +/- 0.33, 0.29 +/- 0.19 and 0.10 +/- 0.04, respectively. A search-graph method was used to retrieve the columnar size distribution (number concentration N, effective radius reff and geometric standard deviation=?g) from the optical depth observations at three operational wavelengths. The ground albedo, single scattering albedo and imaginary part of the refractive index were calculated using a

  13. The effect of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol on shallow cloud development over the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Koren, Ilan; Remer, Lorraine A.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-08-01

    Clouds developing in a polluted environment tend to have more numerous but smaller droplets. This property may lead to suppression of precipitation and longer cloud lifetime. Absorption of incoming solar radiation by aerosols, however, can reduce the cloud cover. The net aerosol effect on clouds is currently the largest uncertainty in evaluating climate forcing. Using large statistics of 1-km resolution MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data, we study the aerosol effect on shallow water clouds, separately in four regions of the Atlantic Ocean, for June through August 2002: marine aerosol (30°S-20°S), smoke (20°S-5°N), mineral dust (5°N-25°N), and pollution aerosols (30°N- 60°N). All four aerosol types affect the cloud droplet size. We also find that the coverage of shallow clouds increases in all of the cases by 0.2-0.4 from clean to polluted, smoky, or dusty conditions. Covariability analysis with meteorological parameters associates most of this change to aerosol, for each of the four regions and 3 months studied. In our opinion, there is low probability that the net aerosol effect can be explained by coincidental, unresolved, changes in meteorological conditions that also accumulate aerosol, or errors in the data, although further in situ measurements and model developments are needed to fully understand the processes. The radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere incurred by the aerosol effect on the shallow clouds and solar radiation is -11 ± 3 W/m2 for the 3 months studied; 2/3 of it is due to the aerosol-induced cloud changes, and 1/3 is due to aerosol direct radiative effect. Author contributions: Y.J.K., I.K., L.A.R., D.R., and Y.R. designed research; Y.J.K., I.K., and L.A.R. performed research; Y.J.K., I.K., and L.A.R. analyzed data; Y.J.K. wrote the paper; I.K. and L.A.R. also participated in writing the paper; D.R. provided cloud physics context for the analysis; and D.R. and Y.R. participated in data

  14. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Daniels, John; Drayson, S. Roland; Park, Jae H.

    1995-01-01

    The eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 increased stratospheric aerosol loading by a factor of 30, affecting chemistry, radiative transfer, and remote measurements of the stratosphere. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument on board Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) makes measurements globally for inferring profiles of NO2, H2O, O3, HF, HCl, CH4, NO, and temperature in addition to aerosol extinction at five wavelengths. Understanding and removing the aerosol extinction is essential for obtaining accurate retrievals from the radiometer channels of NO2, H2O and O3 in the lower stratosphere since these measurements are severely affected by contaminant aerosol absorption. If ignored, aerosol absorption in the radiometer measurements is interpreted as additional absorption by the target gas, resulting in anomalously large mixing ratios. To correct the radiometer measurements for aerosol effects, a retrieved aerosol extinction profile is extrapolated to the radiometer wavelengths and then included as continuum attenuation. The sensitivity of the extrapolation to size distribution and composition is small for certain wavelength combinations, reducing the correction uncertainty. The aerosol corrections extend the usable range of profiles retrieved from the radiometer channels to the tropopause with results that agree well with correlative measurements. In situations of heavy aerosol loading, errors due to aerosol in the retrieved mixing ratios are reduced to values of about 15, 25, and 60% in H2O, O3, and NO2, respectively, levels that are much less than the correction magnitude.

  15. Studies of the aerosol indirect effect from sulfate and black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristjánsson, Jón Egill

    2002-08-01

    The indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosols is investigated using the global climate model National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model Version 3 (NCAR CCM3). Two types of anthropogenic aerosols are considered, i.e., sulfate and black carbon aerosols. The concentrations and horizontal distributions of these aerosols were obtained from simulations with a life-cycle model incorporated into the global climate model. They are then combined with size-segregated background aerosols. The aerosol size distributions are subjected to condensation, coagulation, and humidity swelling. By making assumptions on supersaturation, we determine cloud droplet number concentrations in water clouds. Cloud droplet sizes and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are in good agreement with satellite observations. Both components of the indirect effect, i.e., the radius and lifetime effects, are computed as pure forcing terms. Using aerosol data for 2000 from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we find, globally averaged, a 5% decrease in cloud droplet radius and a 5% increase in cloud water path due to anthropogenic aerosols. The largest changes are found over SE Asia, followed by the North Atlantic, Europe, and the eastern United States. This is also the case for the radiative forcing (``indirect effect''), which has a global average of -1.8 W m-2. When the experiment is repeated using data for 2100 from the IPCC A2 scenario, an unchanged globally averaged radiative forcing is found, but the horizontal distribution has been shifted toward the tropics. Sensitivity experiments show that the radius effect is ~3 times as important as the lifetime effect and that black carbon only contributes marginally to the overall indirect effect.

  16. Regional Biases in Droplet Activation Parameterizations: Strong Influence on Aerosol Second Indirect Effect in the Community Atmosphere Model v5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate change estimates. The magnitude of these interactions as represented in climate models strongly depends on the process of aerosol activation. This process is the most direct physical link between aerosols and cloud microphysical properties. Calculation of droplet number in GCMs requires the computation of new droplet formation (i.e., droplet activation), through physically based activation parameterizations. Considerable effort has been placed in ensuring that droplet activation parameterizations have a physically consistent response to changes in aerosol number concentration. However, recent analyses using an adjoint sensitivity approach showed that parameterizations can exhibit considerable biases in their response to other aerosol properties, such as aerosol modal diameter or to the aerosol chemical composition. This is a potentially important factor in estimating aerosol indirect effects since changes in aerosol properties from pre-industrial times to present day exhibit a very strong regional signature. In this work we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) to show that the regional imprint of the changes in aerosol properties during the last century interacts with the droplet activation parameterization in a way that these biases are amplified over climatically relevant regions. Two commonly used activation routines, the CAM5 default, Abdul-Razzak and Ghan parameterization, as well as the Fountoukis and Nenes parameterization are used in this study. We further explored the impacts of Nd parameterization biases in the first and second aerosol indirect effects separately, by performing simulations were droplet number was not allowed to intervene in the precipitation initiation process. The simulations performed show that an unphysical response to changes in the diameter of accumulation mode aerosol translates into extremely high Nd concentrations over South

  17. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free shortwave direct radiative forcing of mineral dust aerosol over the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G. L.; Brindley, H. E.; Osipov, S.; Bantges, R. J.; Smirnov, A.; Prakash, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    While there have been a number of campaigns designed to probe dust-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to the Red Sea. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements, which can be used to evaluate retrievals, are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based hand-held sun-photometer (microtops) observations gathered within the framework of NASA Aerosol Maritime Network from a series of cruises, which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Here we used the microtops measurements to evaluate the performance of co-located satellite retrievals from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the MODerate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Both algorithms show good agreement with the ship-based measurements and with each other, although it appears that the MODIS cloud detection scheme in particular is rather conservative. The stand alone Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM) driven by reanalysis meteorological fields is used to estimate the cloud-free aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface and TOA along the ship tracks. The TOA effects are compared to co-located measurements from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument. Having evaluated both the quality of the retrievals and the ability of the model to capture the associated radiative effect, we will present a climatology of aerosol loading over the

  18. Aerosol speckle effects on atmospheric pulsed lidar backscattered signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    Lidar systems using atmospheric aerosols as targets exhibit return signal amplitude and power fluctuations which indicate speckle effects. The effects of refractive turbulence along the path on the aerosol speckle field propagation and on the decorrelation time are studied for coherent pulsed lidar systems.

  19. Effects of aerosols and relative humidity on cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Li, Guohui; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2007-07-01

    The influences of the aerosol type and concentration and relative humidity (RH) on cumulus clouds have been investigated using a two-dimensional spectral-bin cloud model. Three simulations are conducted to represent the polluted continental, clean continental, and marine aerosol types. Under the same initial dynamic and thermodynamic conditions, the maritime aerosol case results in more intensive radar reflectivity in both developing and mature stages than the continental aerosol cases, because of enhanced warm rain by collisions and ice processes by deposition growth due to larger droplet sizes and higher supersaturation, respectively. The considerable delay in convective development due to reduced droplet condensation is responsible for the longer cloud lifetime in the marine aerosol case. For the continental case, the most noticeable effects of increasing aerosol number concentrations (with 15 different initial values) are the increases of the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud water content but a decrease in the effective droplet radius. More latent heat release from increasing condensation results in stronger convection and more melting precipitation at the higher aerosol concentrations. Melting precipitation and secondary clouds primarily contribute to enhanced precipitation with increasing aerosols. The precipitation, however, decreases with increasing aerosol in the extremely high aerosol cases (over 5 × 104 cm-3) due to suppression of convection from depleted water vapor and inefficient coalescence. When the initial aerosol concentration exceeds a critical level, most of the cloud properties become less sensitive to aerosols, implying that the aerosol effect on deep convection is more pronounced in relatively clean air than in heavily polluted air. The aerosol effect on the cloud properties is strongly dependent on RH. As the surface RH increases from 40 to 70%, the cloud changes from shallow warm to deep convective types due to a significant

  20. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  1. Influence of the vertical absorption profile of mixed Asian dust plumes on aerosol direct radiative forcing over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Young Min; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Kwanchul; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Dong Ho

    2016-08-01

    We estimate the aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) and heating rate profiles of mixed East Asian dust plumes in the solar wavelength region ranging from 0.25 to 4.0 μm using the Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) code. Vertical profiles of aerosol extinction coefficients and single-scattering albedos (SSA) were derived from measurements with a multi-wavelength Raman lidar system. The data are used as input parameters for our radiative transfer calculations. We considered four cases of radiative forcing in SBDART: 1. dust, 2. pollution, 3. mixed dust plume and the use of vertical profiles of SSA, and 4. mixed dust plumes and the use of column-averaged values of SSA. In our sensitivity study we examined the influence of SSA and aerosol layer height on our results. The ADRF at the surface and in the atmosphere shows a small dependence on the specific shape of the aerosol extinction vertical profile and its light-absorption property for all four cases. In contrast, at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the ADRF is largely affected by the vertical distribution of the aerosols extinction. This effect increases if the light-absorption capacity (decrease of SSA) of the aerosols increases. We find different radiative effects in situations in which two layers of aerosols had different light-absorption properties. The largest difference was observed at the TOA for an absorbing aerosol layer at high altitude in which we considered in one case the vertical profile of SSA and in another case the column-averaged SSA only. The ADRF at the TOA increases when the light-absorbing aerosol layer is located above 3 km altitude. The differences between height-resolved SSA, which can be obtained from lidar data, and total layer-mean SSA indicates that the use of a layer-mean SSA can be rather misleading as it can induce a large error in the calculation of the ADRF at the TOA, which in turn may cause errors in the vertical profiles of heating rates.

  2. Aerosol, Cloud and Trace Gas Observations Derived from Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. Dunagan et al. [2013] present results establishing the performance of the instrument, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and preliminary scientific field data. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft (Shinozuka et al., 2013), and acquired a wealth of data in support of mission objectives on all SEAC4RS and TCAP research flights. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2; Segal-Rosenheimer et al., 2014), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In addition, 4STAR measured zenith radiances underneath cloud decks for retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective diameter. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new

  3. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  4. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Bergstrom, Robert W.; Redemann, Jens

    2002-01-01

    This report is the final report for "Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects". It is a bibliographic compilation of 29 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 30 first-authored conference presentations. The tasks outlined in the various proposals are listed below with a brief comment as to the research performed. Copies of title/abstract pages of peer-reviewed publications are attached.

  5. Aerosol direct radiative forcing in desert and semi-desert regions of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jinyuan; Gong, Chongshui; Wang, Shigong; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of dust aerosols were measured using narrow-band data from a portable sun photometer at four desert and semi-desert stations in northwestern China from 2004 to 2007. Ground-based and satellite observations indicated absorbing dust aerosol loading over the region surrounded by eight large-scale deserts. Radiation forcing was identified by using the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The ranges of annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angström exponents, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) were from 0.25 to 0.35, from - 0.73 to 1.18, and from 0.77 to 0.86, respectively. The ranges of annual mean aerosol direct radiative forcing values at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), mid-atmosphere, and on the surface were from 3.9 to 12.0, from 50.0 to 53.1, and from - 39.1 to - 48.1 W/m2, respectively. The aerosols' optical properties and radiative characteristics showed strong seasonal variations in both the desert and semi-desert regions. Strong winds and relatively low humidity will lead dust aerosols in the atmosphere to an increase, which played greatly affected these optical properties during spring and winter in northwestern China. Based on long-term observations and retrieved data, aerosol direct radiative forcing was confirmed to heat the atmosphere (50-53 W/m2) and cool the surface (- 39 to - 48 W/m2) above the analyzed desert. Radiative forcing in the atmosphere in spring and winter was 18 to 21 W/m2 higher than other two seasons. Based on the dust sources around the sites, the greater the AOD, the more negative the forcing. The annual averaged heating rates for aerosols close to the ground (1 km) were approximately 0.80-0.85 K/day.

  6. Direct Observations of the Composition of Sub-20 Nanometer Ambient Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. F.; Smith, J. N.; Eisele, F. L.; McMurry, P. H.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding new particle formation in the atmosphere depends upon many factors including detailed knowledge of their chemical composition. The chemical composition of sub-20 nanometer ambient aerosol particles, however, is typically inferred from observations of the aerosol behavior when subjected to varying conditions during sampling. Direct observations of aerosol chemical composition are usually limited to or dominated by larger particles of higher mass. Recently a new instrument has been developed - the Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) - which can directly measure the chemical composition of sub-20 nanometer aerosol particles. Briefly, the front end of the TDCIMS functions as an electrostatic precipitator using a strong electric field to collect charged aerosol particles onto a sample wire. After volatilization by heating, the component species of the collected particles are subjected to chemical ionization prior to introduction into the mass spectrometer for analysis. Detection limits on the order of picograms permit sample collection periods as small as five minutes for ambient aerosol concentrations providing near "real-time" resolution. For selected periods from April through June 2002, we used the TDCIMS to measure the chemical composition of ambient aerosol for the first time. We investigated both the positive and negative ion spectrums produced by sub-20 nanometer ambient aerosol particles at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. Principal species identified include ammonium, sulfate and nitrate although additional peaks consistent with particle-phase origin were readily observed. Diurnal concentration profiles appear to be present and the relative proportion of sulfate and nitrate to each other can vary appreciably over several hours and between days. Validation of the TDCIMS' performance and the interpretation of its results will also be discussed.

  7. On the influence of the diurnal variations of aerosol content to estimate direct aerosol radiative forcing using MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Min, Min; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in Beijing reveal a strong diurnal cycle of aerosol load staged by seasonal patterns. Such pronounced variability is matter of importance in respect to the estimation of daily averaged direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). Polar-orbiting satellites could only offer a daily revisit, which turns in fact to be even much less in case of frequent cloudiness. Indeed, this places a severe limit to properly capture the diurnal variations of AOD and thus estimate daily DARF. Bearing this in mind, the objective of the present study is however to evaluate the impact of AOD diurnal variations for conducting quantitative assessment of DARF using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data over Beijing. We provide assessments of DARF with two different assumptions about diurnal AOD variability: taking the observed hourly-averaged AOD cycle into account and assuming constant MODIS (including Terra and Aqua) AOD value throughout the daytime. Due to the AOD diurnal variability, the absolute differences in annual daily mean DARFs, if the constant MODIS/Terra (MODIS/Aqua) AOD value is used instead of accounting for the observed hourly-averaged daily variability, is 1.2 (1.3) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 27.5 (30.6) Wm-2 at the surface, and 26.4 (29.3) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. During the summertime, the impact of the diurnal AOD variability on seasonal daily mean DARF estimates using MODIS Terra (Aqua) data can reach up to 2.2 (3.9) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 43.7 (72.7) Wm-2 at the surface, and 41.4 (68.8) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. Overall, the diurnal variation in AOD tends to cause large bias in the estimated DARF on both seasonal and annual scales. In summertime, the higher the surface albedo, the stronger impact on DARF at the top of the atmosphere caused by dust and biomass burning (continental) aerosol. This

  8. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous

  9. Effect of Aerosols on Surface Radiation and Air Quality in the Central American Region Estimated Using Satellite UV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Torres, O.; Krotkov, N. A.

    2007-05-01

    Solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface is reduced by both aerosol scattering and aerosol absorption. Over many parts of the world the latter effect can be as large or larger than the former effect, and small changes in the aerosol single scattering albedo can either cancel the former effect or enhance it. In addition, absorbing aerosols embedded in clouds can greatly reduce the amount of radiation reaching the surface by multiple scattering. Though the potential climatic effects of absorbing aerosols have received considerable attention lately, their effect on surface UV, photosynthesis, and photochemistry can be equally important for our environment and may affect human health and agricultural productivity. Absorption of all aerosols commonly found in the Earth's atmosphere becomes larger in the UV and blue wavelengths and has a relatively strong wavelength dependence. This is particularly true of mineral dust and organic aerosols. However, these effects have been very difficult to estimate on a global basis since the satellite instruments that operate in the visible are primarily sensitive to aerosol scattering. A notable exception is the UV Aerosol Index (AI), first produced using NASA's Nimbus-7 TOMS data. AI provides a direct measure of the effect of aerosol absorption on the backscattered UV radiation in both clear and cloudy conditions, as well as over snow/ice. Although many types of aerosols produce a distinct color cast in the visible images, and aerosols absorption over clouds and snow/ice could, in principle be detected from their color, so far this technique has worked well only in the UV. In this talk we will discuss what we have learned from the long-term record of AI produced from TOMS and Aura/OMI about the possible role of aerosols on surface radiation and air quality in the Central American region.

  10. Modeling Trends in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden & Its Radiative Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large changes in emissions of aerosol precursors have occurred across the southeast U.S., North America, as well as the northern hemisphere. The spatial heterogeneity and contrasting trends in the aerosol burden is resulting in differing effects on regional radiative balance. Mul...

  11. EFFECT OF ACIDITY ON SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ISOPRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of particle-phase acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene is investigated in a laboratory chamber study, in which the acidity of the inorganic seed aerosol was controlled systematically. The observed enhancement in SOA mass concentration is c...

  12. Influence of atmospheric relative humidity on ultraviolet flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Chen, Ling; Chen, Huizhong; Luo, Xuyu; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-01

    The atmospheric aerosols can absorb moisture from the environment due to their hydrophilicity and thus affect atmospheric radiation fluxes. In this article, the ultraviolet radiation and relative humidity (RH) data from ground observations and a radiative transfer model were used to examine the influence of RH on ultraviolet radiation flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing under the clear-sky conditions. The results show that RH has a significant influence on ultraviolet radiation because of aerosol hygroscopicity. The relationship between attenuation rate and RH can be fitted logarithmically and all of the R2 of the 4 sets of samples are high, i.e. 0.87, 0.96, 0.9, and 0.9, respectively. When the RH is 60%, 70%, 80% and 90%, the mean aerosol direct radiative forcing in ultraviolet is -4.22W m-2, -4.5W m-2, -4.82W m-2 and -5.4W m-2, respectively. For the selected polluted air samples the growth factor for computing aerosol direct radiative forcing in the ultraviolet for the RH of 80% varies from 1.19 to 1.53, with an average of 1.31.

  13. Simulations of aerosols and their effects on photolysis and ozone formation in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Pandis, S.; Molina, L. T.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols, formed from natural and anthropogenic sources, are believed to be associated with adverse human effects at high levels in polluted urban areas. They also play a key role in climate through direct and indirect effects. Therefore, accurate simulations of aerosol composition and distribution in the atmospheric models are important in evaluating their impact on environment and climate. In the present study, a flexible gas phase chemical module with SAPRC mechanism and the CMAQ/models3 aerosol module developed by EPA have been implemented into the WRF-CHEM model. Additionally, to further improve the aerosol, especially the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) simulations, an advanced SOA module [Tsimpidi et al., 2009] has been incorporated into the WRF-CHEM model. The new SOA module is based on the volatility basis-set approach in which both primary and secondary organic components are assumed to be semivolatile and photochemically reactive [Lane et al., 2008]. Gas phase species and aerosol simulation results are compared with the available measurements obtained during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign. When the advanced SOA mechanism is employed, the SOA simulations are significantly improved. Furthermore, the aerosol impacts on the photochemistry in Mexico City have been evaluated using the FTUV [Tie et al., 2005]. Aerosol optical properties are calculated using the Mie theory and compared with available observations in Mexico City [Paredes-Miranda et al., 2008]. Aerosols, principally black carbon, reduce the photolysis frequencies of J[O3(1D)] and J[NO2] in the planetary boundary layer and hence decrease the ground-level ozone concentration. Our study demonstrates that the impact of aerosols on photochemistry is significant in polluted urban atmosphere. References: Lane, T. E., N. M. Donahue, and S. N. Pandis (2008), Simulating secondary organic aerosol formation using the volatility basis-set approach in a chemical transport model, PMCAMx, Atmos. Environ

  14. Quantification of regional radiative impacts and climate effects of tropical fire aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, M. G.; Zender, C. S.; Randerson, J. T.

    2011-12-01

    Regionally expansive smoke clouds originating from deforestation fires in Indonesia can modify local precipitation patterns via direct aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation (Tosca et al., 2010). Here we quantify the regional climate impacts of fire aerosols for three tropical burning regions that together account for about 70% of global annual fire emissions. We use the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5) coupled to a slab ocean model (SOM) embedded within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In addition to direct aerosol radiative effects, CAM5 also quantifies indirect, semi-direct and cloud microphysical aerosol effects. Climate impacts are determined using regionally adjusted emissions data that produce realistic aerosol optical depths in CAM5. We first analyzed a single 12-year transient simulation (1996-2007) forced with unadjusted emissions estimates from the Global Fire Emissions Database, version 3 (GFEDv3) and compared the resulting aerosol optical depths (AODs) for 4 different burning regions (equatorial Asia, southern Africa, South America and boreal North America) to observed MISR and MODIS AODs for the same period. Based on this analysis we adjusted emissions for each burning region between 150 and 300% and forced a second simulation with the regionally adjusted emissions. Improved AODs from this simulation are compared to AERONET observations available at 15 stations throughout the tropics. We present here two transient simulations--one with the adjusted fire emissions and one without fires--to quantify the cumulative fire aerosol climate impact for three major tropical burning regions (equatorial Asia, southern Africa and South America). Specifically, we quantify smoke effects on radiation, precipitation, and temperature. References Tosca, M.G., J.T. Randerson, C.S. Zender, M.G. Flanner and P.J. Rasch (2010), Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Nino?, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 3515

  15. Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2014-05-19

    1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd

  16. Observations of relative humidity effects on aerosol light scattering in the Yangtze River Delta of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Sun, J. Y.; Shen, X. J.; Zhang, Y. M.; Che, H.; Ma, Q. L.; Zhang, Y. W.; Zhang, X. Y.; Ogren, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    Scattering of solar radiation by aerosol particles is highly dependent on relative humidity (RH) as hygroscopic particles take up water with increasing RH. To achieve a better understanding of the effect of aerosol hygroscopic growth on light scattering properties and radiative forcing, the aerosol scattering coefficients at RH in the range of 40 to ~ 90 % were measured using a humidified nephelometer system in the Yangtze River Delta of China in March 2013. In addition, the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition were measured. During the observation period, the mean and standard deviation (SD) of enhancement factors at RH = 85 % for the scattering coefficient (f(85 %)), backscattering coefficient (fb(85 %)), and hemispheric backscatter fraction (fβ(85 %)) were 1.58 ± 0.12, 1.25 ± 0.07, and 0.79 ± 0.04, respectively, i.e., aerosol scattering coefficient and backscattering coefficient increased by 58 and 25 % as the RH increased from 40 to 85 %. Concurrently, the aerosol hemispheric backscatter fraction decreased by 21 %. The relative amount of organic matter (OM) or inorganics in PM1 was found to be a main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH). The highest values of f(RH) corresponded to the aerosols with a small fraction of OM, and vice versa. The relative amount of NO3- in fine particles was strongly correlated with f(85 %), which suggests that NO3- played a vital role in aerosol hygroscopic growth during this study. The mass fraction of nitrate also had a close relationship to the curvature of the humidograms; higher mass fractions of nitrate were associated with humidograms that had the least curvature. Aerosol hygroscopic growth caused a 47 % increase in the calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing at 85 % RH, compared to the forcing at 40 % RH.

  17. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitor along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China, to investigate the role of fireworks (FW) and secondary aerosol in particulate pollution during the Chinese Spring Festival of 2013. Three FW events, exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5), were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW were shown to have a large impact on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in submicron aerosol (PM1), of which FW organics appeared to be emitted mainly in secondary, with its mass spectrum resembling that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated the total PM1 mass on average, accounting for 63-82% during nine PEs in this study. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. Primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction being in cooking organic aerosol (OA; 69%), in nitrogen monoxide (54%), and in coal combustion OA (28%). Secondary sulfate, however, remained only slightly changed, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. Our results have significant implications for controlling local primary source emissions during PEs, e.g., cooking and traffic activities. Controlling these factors might have a limited effect on improving air quality in the megacity of Beijing, due to the dominance of SPM from regional transport in aerosol particle composition.

  18. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  19. Assessment of aerosol optical property and radiative effect for the layer decoupling cases over the northern South China Sea during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lolli, Simone; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chantara, Somporn; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The aerosol radiative effect can be modulated by the vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols, particularly when aerosol layers are decoupled. Direct aerosol radiative effects over the northern South China Sea (SCS) were assessed by incorporating an observed data set of aerosol optical properties obtained from the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/Dongsha Experiment into a radiative transfer model. Aerosol optical properties for a two-layer structure of aerosol transport were estimated. In the radiative transfer calculations, aerosol variability (i.e., diversity of source region, aerosol type, and vertical distribution) for the complex aerosol environment was also carefully quantified. The column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm was 0.1-0.3 for near-surface aerosols and increased 1-5 times in presence of upper layer biomass-burning aerosols. A case study showed the strong aerosol absorption (single-scattering albedo (ω) ≈ 0.92 at 440 nm wavelength) exhibited by the upper layer when associated with predominantly biomass-burning aerosols, and the ω (≈0.95) of near-surface aerosols was greater than that of the upper layer aerosols because of the presence of mixed type aerosols. The presence of upper level aerosol transport could enhance the radiative efficiency at the surface (i.e., cooling) and lower atmosphere (i.e., heating) by up to -13.7 and +9.6 W m-2 per AOD, respectively. Such enhancement could potentially modify atmospheric stability, can influence atmospheric circulation, as well as the hydrological cycle over the tropical and low-latitude marginal northern SCS.

  20. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    levels of atmospheric pollutants or intense biomass burning events in the region. However, numerous mineral dust plumes were observed during the campaign, with the main sources located in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, leading to aerosol optical depth (AOD) values ranging between 0.2 and 0.6 (at 440 nm) over the western and central Mediterranean basins. One important point of this experiment concerns the direct observations of aerosol extinction onboard the ATR-42, using the CAPS system, showing local maxima reaching up to 150 M m-1 within the dust plume. Non-negligible aerosol extinction (about 50 M m-1) has also been observed within the marine boundary layer (MBL). By combining the ATR-42 extinction coefficient observations with absorption and scattering measurements, we performed a complete optical closure revealing excellent agreement with estimated optical properties. This additional information on extinction properties has allowed calculation of the dust single scattering albedo (SSA) with a high level of confidence over the western Mediterranean. Our results show a moderate variability from 0.90 to 1.00 (at 530 nm) for all flights studied compared to that reported in the literature on this optical parameter. Our results underline also a relatively low difference in SSA with values derived near dust sources. In parallel, active remote-sensing observations from the surface and onboard the F-20 aircraft suggest a complex vertical structure of particles and distinct aerosol layers with sea spray and pollution located within the MBL, and mineral dust and/or aged North American smoke particles located above (up to 6-7 km in altitude). Aircraft and balloon-borne observations allow one to investigate the vertical structure of the aerosol size distribution showing particles characterized by a large size (> 10 µm in diameter) within dust plumes. In most of cases, a coarse mode characterized by an effective diameter ranging between 5 and 10 µm, has been detected above the

  1. Aerosol chemical characterization and role of carbonaceous aerosol on radiative effect over Varanasi in central Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S.; Dumka, U. C.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Ram, Kirpa; Panicker, A. S.; Srivastava, M. K.; Tiwari, Shani; Attri, S. D.; Soni, V. K.; Pandey, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the chemical composition of PM10 aerosols at Varanasi, in the central Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) during April to July 2011, with emphasis on examining the contribution of elemental carbon (EC) to the estimates of direct aerosol radiative effect (DARE). PM10 samples are analysed for carbonaceous aerosols (Organic Carbon, OC and EC) and water-soluble ionic species (WSIS: Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, PO42- NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) and several diagnostic ratios (OC/EC, K+/EC, etc) have been also used for studying the aerosol sources at Varanasi. PM10 mass concentration varies between 53 and 310 μg m-3 (mean of 168 ± 73 μg m-3), which is much higher than the National and International air quality standards. The OC mass concentration varies from 6 μg m-3 to 24 μg m-3 (mean of 12 ± 5 μg m-3; 7% of PM10 mass), whereas EC ranges between 1.0 and 14.3 μg m-3 (4.4 ± 3.9 μg m-3; ˜3% of PM10 mass). The relative low OC/EC of 3.9 ± 2.0 and strong correlation (R2 = 0.82) between them suggest the dominance of primary carbonaceous aerosols. The contribution of WSIS to PM10 is found to be ˜12%, out of which ˜57% and 43% are anions and cations, respectively. The composite DARE estimates via SBDART model reveal significant radiative effect and atmospheric heating rates (0.9-2.3 K day-1). Although the EC contributes only ˜3% to the PM10 mass, its contribution to the surface and atmospheric forcing is significantly high (37-63% and 54-77%, respectively), thus playing a major role in climate implications over Varanasi.

  2. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  3. Direct aerosol synthesis of large-pore amorphous mesostructured aluminosilicates with superior acid-catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Pega, Stéphanie; Boissière, Cédric; Grosso, David; Azaïs, Thierry; Chaumonnot, Alexandra; Sanchez, Clément

    2009-01-01

    An old dream comes true: A direct and environmentally benign synthetic strategy was developed for the aerosol-based mass production of large-pore mesostructured aluminosilicate powders (see TEM image). Although amorphous, some powders exhibit higher activity towards m-xylene isomerization and lower coke formation than a Y-zeolite based industrial reference catalyst.

  4. Effects of aerosol emission pathways on future warming and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    The peak global temperature is largely determined by cumulative emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases. However, anthropogenic emissions include also so-called short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs), which include aerosol particles and methane. Previous studies with simple models indicate that the timing of SLCF emission reductions has only a small effect on the rate of global warming and even less of an effect on global peak temperatures. However, these simple model analyses do not capture the spatial dynamics of aerosol-climate interactions, nor do they consider the additional effects of aerosol emissions on human health. There is therefore merit in assessing how the timing of aerosol emission reductions affects global temperature and premature mortality caused by elevated aerosol concentrations, using more comprehensive climate models. Here, we used an aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to simulate the direct and indirect radiative forcing resulting from aerosol emissions. We simulated Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, and we also designed idealized low and high aerosol emission pathways based on RCP4.5 scenario (LOW and HIGH, respectively). From these simulations, we calculated the Effective Radiative Forcing (ERF) from aerosol emissions between 1850 and 2100, as well as aerosol concentrations used to estimate the premature mortality caused by particulate pollution. We then use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model to simulate the spatial and temporal pattern of climate response to these aerosol-forcing scenarios, in combination with prescribed emissions of both short and long-lived greenhouse gases according to the RCP4.5 scenario. In the RCP scenarios, global mean ERF declined during the 21st century from -1.3 W m-2 to -0.4 W m-2 (RCP8.5) and -0.2 W m-2 (RCP2.6). In the sensitivity scenarios, the forcing at the end of the 21st century was -1.6 W m-2 (HIGH) and practically zero (LOW). The difference in global mean temperature

  5. An Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaveri, R. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The primary objective of the DOE Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June 2010 was to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their optical and hygroscopic properties in central California, with a focus on the Sacramento urban plume. Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. However, significant knowledge gaps and uncertainties still exist in the process-level understanding of: 1) SOA formation, 2) BC mixing state evolution, and 3) the optical and hygroscopic properties of fresh and aged carbonaceous aerosols. The CARES 2010 field study was designed to address several specific science questions under these three topics. During summer the Sacramento-Blodgett Forest corridor effectively serves as a mesoscale daytime flow reactor in which the urban aerosols undergo significant aging as they are transported to the northeast by upslope flow. The CARES campaign observation strategy consisted of the DOE G-1 aircraft sampling upwind, within, and outside of the evolving Sacramento urban plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The G-1 payload consisted of a suite of instruments to measure trace gases, aerosol size distribution, composition, and optical properties. The NASA B-200 aircraft carrying a High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) and a Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties. The aircraft measurements were complemented by heavily-instrumented ground sites within the Sacramento urban area and at a downwind site in Cool, California, to characterize the diurnal evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol

  6. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  7. A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Lubin, Dan; Vogelmann, Andrew M

    2006-01-26

    The warming of Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice thickness and extent observed over recent decades are believed to result from increased direct greenhouse gas forcing, changes in atmospheric dynamics having anthropogenic origin, and important positive reinforcements including ice-albedo and cloud-radiation feedbacks. The importance of cloud-radiation interactions is being investigated through advanced instrumentation deployed in the high Arctic since 1997 (refs 7, 8). These studies have established that clouds, via the dominance of longwave radiation, exert a net warming on the Arctic climate system throughout most of the year, except briefly during the summer. The Arctic region also experiences significant periodic influxes of anthropogenic aerosols, which originate from the industrial regions in lower latitudes. Here we use multisensor radiometric data to show that enhanced aerosol concentrations alter the microphysical properties of Arctic clouds, in a process known as the 'first indirect' effect. Under frequently occurring cloud types we find that this leads to an increase of an average 3.4 watts per square metre in the surface longwave fluxes. This is comparable to a warming effect from established greenhouse gases and implies that the observed longwave enhancement is climatologically significant.

  8. Aerosol optical properties and their radiative effects in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Xia, Xiangao; Cribb, Maureen; Mi, Wen; Holben, Brent; Wang, Pucai; Chen, Hongbin; Tsay, Si-Chee; Eck, T. F.; Zhao, Fengsheng; Dutton, E. G.; Dickerson, R. E.

    2007-11-01

    As a fast developing country covering a large territory, China is experiencing rapid environmental changes. High concentrations of aerosols with diverse properties are emitted in the region, providing a unique opportunity for understanding the impact of environmental changes on climate. Until very recently, few observational studies were conducted in the source regions. The East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) attempts to characterize the physical, optical and chemical properties of the aerosols and their effects on climate over China. This study presents some preliminary results using continuous high-quality measurements of aerosol, cloud and radiative quantities made at the first EAST-AIRE baseline station at Xianghe, about 70 km east of Beijing over a period of one year (September 2004 to September 2005). It was found that the region is often covered by a thick layer of haze (with a yearly mean aerosol optical depth equal to 0.82 at 500 nm and maximum greater than 4) due primarily to anthropogenic emissions. An abrupt "cleanup" of the haze often took place in a matter of one day or less because of the passage of cold fronts. The mean single scattering albedo is approximately 0.9 but has strong day-to-day variations with maximum monthly averages occurring during the summer. Large aerosol loading and strong absorption lead to a very large aerosol radiative effect at the surface (the annual 24-hour mean values equals 24 W m-2), but a much smaller aerosol radiative effect at the top of the atmosphere (one tenth of the surface value). The boundary atmosphere is thus heated dramatically during the daytime, which may affect atmospheric stability and cloud formation. In comparison, the cloud radiative effect at the surface is only moderately higher (-41 W m-2) than the aerosol radiative effect at the surface.

  9. Houston urban growth and associated aerosol effects on convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrio, G. G.; Cotton, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this study we investigate the effects of the Houston Metropolitan Area on the characteristics and intensity of convection and precipitation, focusing on events triggered by the sea breeze circulation. For this purpose, we implemented the Town Energy Budget (TEB) urban model into the an improved version of RAMS that considers the explicit activation of CCN (and giant CCN), a bimodal representation of cloud droplets, a bin- emulation approach for droplet collection, ice-particle riming, and sedimentation, and direct radiative effects of aerosols. TEB is now coupled to run in parallel as to maximize the full potential of our computing resources. RAMS@CSU is configured to use four two-way interactive nested model grids with 42-vertical levels and horizontal grid spacings of 45.0, 15.0, 3.75, and 0.75 km centered over Houston. Grid 1 (50 X 50 grid points) and grid 2 (71 X 61 grid points) are used to simulate the synoptic and mesoscale environments, respectively. While Grids 3 and 4 (102 X 102 grid points and 202 X 202 grid points) are used to resolve deep convection as well and the sea breeze circulation . Numerical experiments cover the effects of perturbing both the urban land-use and the aerosol concentrations as well as variations of both. The Landsat Thematic Mapper National Land Cover Data (NLCD) for the Houston area corresponding to the years 2001 and 2006 were used as benchmarks for the experimental design of the land-use sensitivity experiments, including a run with no city and one of a future scenario. We use aerosol observations during the TexAQS/ GoMACCS field campaign for the initial CCN/GCCN sensitivity experiments. As expected, dramatic impact on the intensity of the convection and precipitation result for the selected case (for August 24, 2000). Additional numerical experiments will be performed by only perturbing the land-use input data as well as varying both aerosol concentration and land use. Sensitivity experiments with an older NCLD land

  10. Exploring the Longwave Radiative Effects of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansell, Richard A., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Dust aerosols not only affect air quality and visibility where they pose a significant health and safety risk, but they can also play a role in modulating the energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system by directly interacting with local radiative fields. Consequently, dust aerosols can impact regional climate patterns such as changes in precipitation and the evolution of the hydrological cycle. Assessing the direct effect of dust aerosols at the solar wavelengths is fairly straightforward due in part to the relatively large signal-to-noise ratio in broadband irradiance measurements. The longwave (LW) impacts, on the other hand, are rather difficult to ascertain since the measured dust signal level (10 Wm-2) is on the same order as the instrumental uncertainties. Moreover, compared to the shortwave (SW), limited experimental data on the LW optical properties of dust makes it a difficult challenge for constraining the LW impacts. Owing to the strong absorption features found in many terrestrial minerals (e.g., silicates and clays), the LW effects, although much smaller in magnitude compared to the SW, can still have a sizeable impact on the energetics of the Earth-atmosphere system, which can potentially trigger changes in the heat and moisture surface budgets, and dynamics of the atmosphere. The current endeavor is an integral part of an on-going research study to perform detailed assessments of dust direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE) using comprehensive global datasets from NASA Goddards mobile ground-based facility (cf. http://smartlabs.gsfc.nasa.gov/) during previous field experiments near key dust source regions. Here we examine and compare the results from two of these studies: the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities and the 2008 Asian Monsoon Years. The former study focused on transported Saharan dust at Sal Island (16.73N, 22.93W), Cape Verde along the west coast of Africa while the latter focused on Asian dust at Zhangye China (39

  11. Effect of CALIPSO Cloud Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Confidence Levels on Observations of Aerosol Properties near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; Varnai, Tamas; Liu, Zhaoyan

    2012-01-01

    CALIPSO aerosol backscatter enhancement in the transition zone between clouds and clear sky areas is revisited with particular attention to effects of data selection based on the confidence level of cloud-aerosol discrimination (CAD). The results show that backscatter behavior in the transition zone strongly depends on the CAD confidence level. Higher confidence level data has a flatter backscatter far away from clouds and a much sharper increase near clouds (within 4 km), thus a smaller transition zone. For high confidence level data it is shown that the overall backscatter enhancement is more pronounced for small clear-air segments and horizontally larger clouds. The results suggest that data selection based on CAD reduces the possible effects of cloud contamination when studying aerosol properties in the vicinity of clouds.

  12. Response of direct thoron progeny sensors (DTPS) to various aerosol concentrations and ventilation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rosaline; Prajith, R.; Sapra, B. K.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2010-03-01

    Direct thoron/radon progeny sensors (DTPS/DRPS) are absorber mounted LR115 type track detectors for measuring the time-averaged progeny concentrations. Through a large number of experiments, the sensitivity factor of these sensors in natural indoor environment was found to be nearly constant at a value of 0.94 Tr cm -2 d -1/EETC (Bq m -3) for DTPS and 0.09 Tr cm -2 d -1/EERC (Bq m -3) for DRPS. The constancy of the sensitivity factor in the natural environments is attributed primarily to the presence of large aerosol concentrations and relatively low ventilation rates in time-averaged measurements. However, detailed model calculations suggest that in extreme scenario i.e. at high ventilation rate and low aerosol concentrations, the sensitivity factor can be quite different. Such situations are likely to occur in occupational plant areas. Therefore systematic chamber experiments were carried out to using DTPS, to estimate the variability of the sensitivity factor in these extreme conditions. In the first set, the sensitivity factor of DTPS was measured in 6 different aerosol concentrations at zero ventilation rates. The sensitivity factor showed a steep decrease as the aerosol concentration increased to about 8554 particle cm -3, after which it remained almost constant with increase in aerosol concentration. The second set of experiments was conducted at ˜5000 particles cm -3 at three different ventilation rates. The sensitivity factor was found to increase with increase in ventilation rate. The results are further discussed.

  13. Direct radiative forcing and atmospheric absorption by boundary layer aerosols in the southeastern US: model estimates on the basis of new observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaocai; Zender, Charles S.; Saxena, V. K.

    In an effort to reduce uncertainties in the quantification of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) in the southeastern United States (US), a field column experiment was conducted to measure aerosol radiative properties and effects at Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina, and at an adjacent valley site. The experimental period was from June 1995 to mid-December 1995. The aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor) needed to compute ADRF were obtained on the basis of a procedure involving a Mie code and a radiative transfer code in conjunction with the retrieved aerosol size distribution, aerosol optical depth, and diffuse-to-direct solar irradiance ratio. The regional values of ADRF at the surface and top of atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric aerosol absorption are derived using the obtained aerosol optical properties as inputs to the column radiation model (CRM) of the community climate model (CCM3). The cloud-free instantaneous TOA ADRFs for highly polluted (HP), marine (M) and continental (C) air masses range from 20.3 to -24.8, 1.3 to -10.4, and 1.9 to -13.4 W m -2, respectively. The mean cloud-free 24-h ADRFs at the TOA (at the surface) for HP, M, and C air masses are estimated to be -8±4 (-33±16), -7±4 (-13±8), and -0.14±0.05 (-8±3) W m -2, respectively. On the assumption that the fractional coverage of clouds is 0.61, the annual mean ADRFs at the TOA and the surface are -2±1, and -7±2 W m -2, respectively. This also implies that aerosols currently heat the atmosphere over the southeastern US by 5±3 W m -2 on annual timescales due to the aerosol absorption in the troposphere.

  14. Real Effect or Artifact of Cloud Cover on Aerosol Optical Thickness?

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, M-J.; Li, Z.

    2005-03-18

    retrievals of AOT from both satellite and ground sensors; (2) separate artifact from real effect; (3) create ''clean'' aerosol products for studying their direct and indirect effect. Presented are some very preliminary findings.

  15. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, D. B.; Zhao, D. F.; Ruppel, M. J.; Laskina, O.; Grandquist, J. R.; Modini, R. L.; Stokes, M. D.; Russell, L. M.; Bertram, T. H.; Grassian, V. H.; Deane, G. B.; Prather, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA) must be underpinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Since bubble bursting is sensitive to the physicochemical properties of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into SSA composition. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an inter-comparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits"), a pulsed plunging waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8-2 μm size range. These particles, when dried, had more spherical morphologies compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles, which can be attributed to the presence of additional organic carbon. In addition to an inter-comparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method utilized in this study on SSA composition was undertaken. In organic-enriched seawater, the continuous operation of the plunging waterfall mechanism resulted in the accumulation of surface foam and an over-expression of organic matter in SSA particles compared to pulsed plunging waterfall. Throughout this set of experiments, comparative differences in the SSA number size distribution were coincident with differences in aerosol composition, indicating that the production mechanism of SSA exerts

  16. A numerical study of the effect of different aerosol types on East Asian summer clouds and precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Yiquan; Liu, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiuqun; Wang, Minghuai

    2013-05-01

    The impact of anthropogenic aerosol on the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is investigated with NCAR CAM5, a state-of-the-art climate model with aerosol’s direct and indirect effects. Results indicate that anthropogenic aerosol tends to cause a weakened EASM with a southward shift of precipitation in East Asia mostly by its radiative effect. Anthropogenic aerosol induced surface cooling stabilizes the boundary layer, suppresses the convection and latent heat release in northern China, and reduces the tropospheric temperature over land and land-sea thermal contrast, thus leading to a weakened EASM. Meanwhile, acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), anthropogenic aerosol can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration but decrease the cloud droplet effective radius over Indochina and Indian Peninsulas as well as over southwestern and northern China, inhibiting the precipitation in these regions. Thus, anthropogenic aerosol tends to reduce Southeast and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation by its indirect effect.

  17. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    . Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  18. Aerosol indirect effect on tropospheric ozone via lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tianle; Remer, Lorraine A.; Bian, Huisheng; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Albrecht, Rachel; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Goodman, Steven J.; Yu, Hongbin; Allen, Dale J.

    2012-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a pollutant and major greenhouse gas and its radiative forcing is still uncertain. Inadequate understanding of processes related to O3 production, in particular those natural ones such as lightning, contributes to this uncertainty. Here we demonstrate a new effect of aerosol particles on O3production by affecting lightning activity and lightning-generated NOx (LNOx). We find that lightning flash rate increases at a remarkable rate of 30 times or more per unit of aerosol optical depth. We provide observational evidence that indicates the observed increase in lightning activity is caused by the influx of aerosols from a volcano. Satellite data analyses show O3is increased as a result of aerosol-induced increase in lightning and LNOx, which is supported by modle simulations with prescribed lightning change. O3production increase from this aerosol-lightning-ozone link is concentrated in the upper troposphere, where O3 is most efficient as a greenhouse gas. In the face of anthropogenic aerosol increase our findings suggest that lightning activity, LNOx and O3, especially in the upper troposphere, have all increased substantially since preindustrial time due to the proposed aerosol-lightning-ozone link, which implies a stronger O3 historical radiative forcing. Aerosol forcing therefore has a warming component via its effect on O3 production and this component has mostly been ignored in previous studies of climate forcing related to O3and aerosols. Sensitivity simulations suggest that 4-8% increase of column tropospheric ozone, mainly in the tropics, is expected if aerosol-lighting-ozone link is parameterized, depending on the background emission scenario. We note, however, substantial uncertainties remain on the exact magnitude of aerosol effect on tropospheric O3 via lightning. The challenges for obtaining a quantitative global estimate of this effect are also discussed. Our results have significant implications for understanding past and

  19. Climate Effects of Black Carbon Aerosols in China and India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Surabi; Hansen, James; Nazarenko, Larissa; Luo, Yunfeng

    2002-09-01

    In recent decades, there has been a tendency toward increased summer floods in south China, increased drought in north China, and moderate cooling in China and India while most of the world has been warming. We used a global climate model to investigate possible aerosol contributions to these trends. We found precipitation and temperature changes in the model that were comparable to those observed if the aerosols included a large proportion of absorbing black carbon (``soot''), similar to observed amounts. Absorbing aerosols heat the air, alter regional atmospheric stability and vertical motions, and affect the large-scale circulation and hydrologic cycle with significant regional climate effects.

  20. Direct normal irradiance forecasting at dust sites based on aerosol data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Charlotte; Friese, Elmar; Berndt, Jonas; Elbern, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    The optimal operation of concentrating solar thermal power plants (CSP) or concentrating photovoltaic plants (CPV) requires precise forecasts of direct normal irradiance (DNI). Aerosols have a strong impact on DNI. High aerosol loads may cause a reduction of DNI of up to 20-30% under clear-sky conditions. Thus, an accurate representation of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) is crucial for reliable DNI forecasts. Concentrating solar power plants are often located in desert/arid regions where dust events are likely to occur. For those locations with strong aerosol or especially dust sources in the vicinity, using only large scale, low resolution aerosol information from satellites might not be sufficient. Ground-based measurements of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) provide additional, more precise, local information. On the other hand, sparsely populated desert areas are only poorly equipped with in-situ measurement devices. Thus, data assimilation seeks to make optimal use of all available observations. Within the EU FP7 project DNICast, assimilation based simulations are performed using the EURopean pollution Dispersion-Inverse Model (EURAD-IM) including a 3D/4D- Var data assimilation scheme and sophisticated aerosol dynamics and aerosol chemistry schemes. The setup includes all aerosol related observation streams along with routine data assimilation plus available on-site data and will provide assimilation based short term forecasts of AOD at selected test sites. The system is embedded in the European Earth observation system MACC (now: CAMS) and benefits from near-real time in situ and space borne measurements. The system is coupled to the WRF model to provide radiation forecasts based on aerosol information from the EURAD-IM data assimilation scheme. We will present simulation results for CSP sites on the Iberian Peninsula evaluating the gain of information obtained by data assimilation to capture small-scale dust events and large scale Saharan dust events

  1. Aerosol indirect effect on tropospheric ozone via lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Remer, L. A.; Bian, H.; Ziemke, J. R.; Albrecht, R. I.; Pickering, K. E.; Oreopoulos, L.; Goodman, S. J.; Yu, H.; Allen, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a pollutant and major greenhouse gas and its radiative forcing is still uncertain. The unresolved difference between modeled and observed natural background O3 concentrations is a key source of the uncertainty. Here we demonstrate remarkable sensitivity of lightning activity to aerosol loading with lightning activity increasing more than 30 times per unit of aerosol optical depth over our study area. We provide observational evidence that indicates the observed increase in lightning activity is caused by the influx of aerosols from a volcano. Satellite data analyses suggest O3 is increased as a result of aerosol-induced increase in lightning and lightning produced NOx. Model simulations with prescribed lightning change corroborate the satellite data analysis. This aerosol-O3 connection is achieved via aerosol increasing lightning and thus lightning produced nitrogen oxides. This aerosol-lightning-ozone link provides a potential physical mechanism that may account for a part of the model-observation difference in background O3 concentration. More importantly, O3 production increase from this link is concentrated in the upper troposphere, where O3 is most efficient as a greenhouse gas. Both of these implications suggest a stronger O3 historical radiative forcing. This introduces a new pathway, through which increasing in aerosols from pre-industrial time to present day enhances tropospheric O3 production. Aerosol forcing thus has a warming component via its effect on O3 production. Sensitivity simulations suggest that 4-8% increase of tropospheric ozone, mainly in the tropics, is expected if aerosol-lighting-ozone link is parameterized, depending on the background emission scenario. We note, however, substantial uncertainties remain on the exact magnitude of aerosol effect on tropospheric O3 via lightning. The challenges for obtaining a quantitative global estimate of this effect are also discussed. Our results have significant implications

  2. Evolution of Ozone, Particulates, and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Vicinity of Houston Using a Fully Coupled Meteorology-Chemistry-Aerosol Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg; Peckham, S. E.

    2006-11-11

    A new fully-coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban to regional scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a five day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still under-estimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  3. Direct radiative feedback due to biogenic secondary organic aerosol estimated from boreal forest site observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lihavainen, Heikki; Asmi, Eija; Aaltonen, Veijo; Makkonen, Ulla; Kerminen, Veli-Matti

    2015-10-01

    We used more than five years of continuous aerosol measurements to estimate the direct radiative feedback parameter associated with the formation of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) at a remote continental site at the edge of the boreal forest zone in Northern Finland. Our upper-limit estimate for this feedback parameter during the summer period (ambient temperatures above 10 °C) was -97 ± 66 mW m-2 K-1 (mean ± STD) when using measurements of the aerosol optical depth (fAOD) and -63 ± 40 mW m-2 K-1 when using measurements of the ‘dry’ aerosol scattering coefficient at the ground level (fσ). Here STD represents the variability in f caused by the observed variability in the quantities used to derive the value of f. Compared with our measurement site, the magnitude of the direct radiative feedback associated with BSOA is expected to be larger in warmer continental regions with more abundant biogenic emissions, and even larger in regions where biogenic emissions are mixed with anthropogenic pollution.

  4. International Workshop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Properties, and Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Following a mandate by the International Aerosol Climatology Program under the auspices of International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics International Radiation Commission, 45 scientists from five nations convened to discuss relevant issues associated with the measurement, properties, and effects of stratospheric aerosols. A summary is presented of the discussions on formation and evolution, transport and fate, effects on climate, role in heterogeneous chemistry, and validation of lidar and satellite remote sensing of stratospheric aerosols. Measurements are recommended of the natural (background) and the volcanically enhanced aerosol (sulfuric acid and silica particles), the exhaust of shuttle, civil aviation and supersonic aircraft operations (alumina, soot, and ice particles), and polar stratospheric clouds (ice, condensed nitric and hydrochloric acids).

  5. Effects of Aircraft On Aerosol Abundance in the Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Strawa, A. W.; Howard, S. D.; Verma, S.; Mahoney, M. J.; Bui, T. P.; Hannan, J. R.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Condon, Estelle P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A significant increase in sulfuric acid aerosol concentration was detected above 10 km pressure altitude during a cross-corridor flight out of Shannon on October 23, 1997. The source of this aerosol is ascribed to commercial aircraft operations in flight corridors above 10 km, because (1) a stable atmosphere prevented vertical air mass exchanges and thus eliminated surface sources, (2) air mass back trajectories documented the absence of remote continental sources, and (3) temperature profiler data showed the tropopause at least one kilometers above flight altitude throughout the flight. Particle volatility identified 70% H2SO4, 20% (NH4)2SO4 and 10% nonvolatile aerosol in the proximity of flight corridors, and (10-30)% H2SO4, up to 50% (NH4)2SO4, and (40-60)% nonvolatile aerosols in air that was not affected by aircraft operations below 10 km. Only a very small fraction of the nonvolatile particles (determined with a condensation nucleus counter) could be morphologically identified as soot aerosol (validated by scanning electron microscopy of wire impactor samples). The newly formed H2SO4 particles did not measurably affect surface area and volume of the background aerosol due to their small size, hence did not affect radiative transfer directly.

  6. Effect of photosensitized chemistry on organic aerosol evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvière, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Ammann, M.

    2009-12-01

    Photochemistry in aerosol particles is an emerging new field of atmospheric science. Up to now, photochemical processes in the condensed phase of atmospheric aerosol particles are not well understood. Primary and secondary compounds in the gas and aerosol phase continuously interact and change phase during their or their descendants life time in the atmosphere. Partially oxised aromatic compounds such as aromatic ketones may act as photosensitizer to promote charge and energy transfer to other organic compounds under conditions, where direct photolysis processes of the latter are not possible. The resulting radicals undergo numerous secondary chemical reactions, some of which may lead to polymerization. In this study we show that the presence of a photosensitizer in the aerosol phase leads to significant processing of simple organic compounds such as small organic acids due to exposure to simulated sunlight. The aerosol flow tube experiments were performed in a photoreactor, which was coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer and a scanning mobility particle sizer. For some experiments an aerosol mass spectrometer was also used. We used ammonium sulfate and organic acids as matrix and Benzoyl Benzoic Acid (BBA) as sensitizer. BBA is a well known photosensitizer absorbing in the UV. The results will be shown and discussed.

  7. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  8. Aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival: fireworks, secondary aerosol, and holiday effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z.; Yin, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Aerosol particles were characterized by an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) along with various collocated instruments in Beijing, China to investigate the aerosol composition and sources during the Chinese Spring Festival, 2013. Three fireworks (FW) events exerting significant and short-term impacts on fine particles (PM2.5) were observed on the days of Lunar New Year, Lunar Fifth Day, and Lantern Festival. The FW showed major impacts on non-refractory potassium, chloride, sulfate, and organics in PM1, of which the FW organics appeared to be mainly secondary with its mass spectrum resembling to that of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Pollution events (PEs) and clean periods (CPs) alternated routinely throughout the study. Secondary particulate matter (SPM = SOA + sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) dominated PM1 accounting for 63-82% during the nine PEs observed. The elevated contributions of secondary species during PEs resulted in a higher mass extinction efficiency of PM1 (6.4 m2 g-1) than that during CPs (4.4 m2 g-1). The Chinese Spring Festival also provides a unique opportunity to study the impacts of reduced anthropogenic emissions on aerosol chemistry in the city. The primary species showed ubiquitous reductions during the holiday period with the largest reduction for cooking OA (69%), nitrogen monoxide (54%), and coal combustion OA (28%). The secondary sulfate, however, remained minor change, and the SOA and the total PM2.5 even slightly increased. These results have significant implications that controlling local primary source emissions, e.g., cooking and traffic activities, might have limited effects on improving air quality during PEs when SPM that is formed over regional scales dominates aerosol particle composition.

  9. Aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions in a regional coupled model: the effects of convective parameterisation and resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer-Nicholls, Scott; Lowe, Douglas; Schultz, David M.; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) has been used to simulate a region of Brazil heavily influenced by biomass burning. Nested simulations were run at 5 and 1 km horizontal grid spacing for three case studies in September 2012. Simulations were run with and without fire emissions, convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, and aerosol-radiation interactions in order to explore the differences attributable to the parameterisations and to better understand the aerosol direct effects and cloud responses. Direct aerosol-radiation interactions due to biomass burning aerosol resulted in a net cooling, with an average short-wave direct effect of -4.08 ± 1.53 Wm-2. However, around 21.7 Wm-2 is absorbed by aerosol in the atmospheric column, warming the atmosphere at the aerosol layer height, stabilising the column, inhibiting convection, and reducing cloud cover and precipitation. The changes to clouds due to radiatively absorbing aerosol (traditionally known as the semi-direct effects) increase the net short-wave radiation reaching the surface by reducing cloud cover, producing a secondary warming that counters the direct cooling. However, the magnitude of the semi-direct effect was found to be extremely sensitive to the model resolution and the use of convective parameterisation. Precipitation became organised in isolated convective cells when not using a convective parameterisation on the 5 km domain, reducing both total cloud cover and total precipitation. The SW semi-direct effect varied from 6.06 ± 1.46 with convective parameterisation to 3.61 ± 0.86 Wm-2 without. Convective cells within the 1 km domain are typically smaller but with greater updraft velocity than equivalent cells in the 5 km domain, reducing the proportion of the domain covered by cloud in all scenarios and producing a smaller semi-direct effect. Biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), increasing the droplet number

  10. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the urban-industrial megacity Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Yu, Xingna; Yin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured and analyzed through the ground-based remote sensing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) over an urban-industrial site, Nanjing (32.21° N, 118.72° E, and 62 m above sea level), in the Yangtze River Delta, China, during September 2007-August 2008. The annual averaged values of aerosol optical depth (AOD500) and the Ångström exponent (AE440-870) were measured to be 0.94 ± 0.52 and 1.10 ± 0.21, respectively. The seasonal averaged values of AOD500 (AE440-870) were noticed to be high in summer (autumn) and low in autumn (spring). The characterization of aerosol types showed the dominance of mixed type followed by the biomass burning and urban-industrial type of aerosol at Nanjing. Subsequently, the curvature (a 2) obtained from the second-order polynomial fit and the second derivative of AE (α') were also analyzed to understand the dominant aerosol type. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA440) varied from 0.88 to 0.93 with relatively lower (higher) values during the summer (spring), suggesting an increase in black carbon and mineral dust (desert dust) aerosols of absorbing (scattering) nature. The averaged monthly and seasonal evolutions of shortwave (0.3-4.0 μm) direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and bottom of atmosphere (SUR) during the study period. Further, the aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) and the corresponding atmospheric heating rates (AHR) were also estimated from the forcing within the atmosphere (ATM). The derived DARF values, therefore, produced a warming effect within the atmosphere due to strong absorption of solar radiation.

  11. Column-integrated aerosol optical properties and direct radiative forcing over the urban-industrial megacity Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Kang, Na; Kumar, K Raghavendra; Yu, Xingna; Yin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol optical properties were measured and analyzed through the ground-based remote sensing Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) over an urban-industrial site, Nanjing (32.21° N, 118.72° E, and 62 m above sea level), in the Yangtze River Delta, China, during September 2007-August 2008. The annual averaged values of aerosol optical depth (AOD500) and the Ångström exponent (AE440-870) were measured to be 0.94 ± 0.52 and 1.10 ± 0.21, respectively. The seasonal averaged values of AOD500 (AE440-870) were noticed to be high in summer (autumn) and low in autumn (spring). The characterization of aerosol types showed the dominance of mixed type followed by the biomass burning and urban-industrial type of aerosol at Nanjing. Subsequently, the curvature (a 2) obtained from the second-order polynomial fit and the second derivative of AE (α') were also analyzed to understand the dominant aerosol type. The single scattering albedo at 440 nm (SSA440) varied from 0.88 to 0.93 with relatively lower (higher) values during the summer (spring), suggesting an increase in black carbon and mineral dust (desert dust) aerosols of absorbing (scattering) nature. The averaged monthly and seasonal evolutions of shortwave (0.3-4.0 μm) direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) values were computed from the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model both at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and bottom of atmosphere (SUR) during the study period. Further, the aerosol forcing efficiency (AFE) and the corresponding atmospheric heating rates (AHR) were also estimated from the forcing within the atmosphere (ATM). The derived DARF values, therefore, produced a warming effect within the atmosphere due to strong absorption of solar radiation. PMID:27234827

  12. Effect of tropospheric aerosols on environment

    SciTech Connect

    Indira, K.

    1995-12-31

    The primary mechanism by which aerosols influences the environment is through changes in the amount of energy reaching the ground and the energy diffusing back to space. Keeping the above in view, a study has been undertaken to observe the effect of fire from an oil well at Pasarlapudi near Amalapuram, situated almost in the middle of the coastal Andhra belt, on environment. Fire started from an oil well at Pasarlapudi (16{degrees}N 82{degrees}E) near Amalapuram in Andhra Pradesh on 8 January 1995 and continues till today. For the above study daily maximum and minimum temperatures in celsius and rainfall in mm were collected from India Meteorological Department for two stations Kakinada and Machilipatnam from 19 January 1995 to 1 March 1995. It is seen from the above data at both Kakinada and Machilipatnam from 19 January to 1 February 1995 a decrease in minimum temperature from 0.5{degrees}C to 1.0{degrees}C. There is not much change in maximum temperature. 35 mm of excess rainfall was reported in coastal Andhra Pradesh from 1 Jan. to 25 Jan 1995 when the fire from the oil well was at maximum intensity. Some places near the Pasarlapudi reported rain with black carbon particles during third week of January. Pictures of the raging fire show a jet of burning gas extending into the atmosphere. The accompanying heat and smoke from the oil well fire could have led to cloud formation and rain containing black carbon particles in coastal belt of Andhra Pradesh.

  13. Direct radiative forcing properties of atmospheric aerosols over semi-arid region, Anantapur in India.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Raja Obul Reddy; Gugamsetty, Balakrishnaiah; Kotalo, Rama Gopal; Nagireddy, Siva Kumar Reddy; Tandule, Chakradhar Rao; Thotli, Lokeswara Reddy; Rajuru Ramakrishna, Reddy; Surendranair, Suresh Babu

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the aerosols optical, physical characteristics and the aerosol radiative forcing pertaining to semi-arid region, Anantapur for the period January 2013-December 2014. Collocated measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Black Carbon mass concentration (BC) are carried out by using MICROTOPS II and Aethalometer and estimated the aerosol radiative forcing over this location. The mean values of AOD at 500nm are found to be 0.47±0.09, 0.34±0.08, 0.29±0.06 and 0.30±0.07 during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon respectively. The Angstrom exponent (α380-1020) value is observed maximum in March (1.25±0.19) and which indicates the predominance of fine - mode aerosols and lowest in the month of July (0.33±0.14) and may be due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols. The diurnal variation of BC is exhibited two height peaks during morning 07:00-08:00 (IST) and evening 19:00-21:00 (IST) hours and one minima noticed during afternoon (13:00-16:00). The highest monthly mean BC concentration is observed in the month of January (3.4±1.2μgm(-3)) and the lowest in July (1.1±0.2μgm(-3)). The estimated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (ADRF) in the atmosphere is found to be +36.8±1.7Wm(-2), +26.9±0.2Wm(-2), +18.0±0.6Wm(-2) and +18.5±3.1Wm(-2) during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Large difference between TOA and BOA forcing is observed during summer which indicate the large absorption of radiant energy (36.80Wm(-2)) which contributes more increase in atmospheric heating by ~1K/day. The BC contribution on an average is found to be 64% and is responsible for aerosol atmospheric heating.

  14. Direct radiative forcing properties of atmospheric aerosols over semi-arid region, Anantapur in India.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Raja Obul Reddy; Gugamsetty, Balakrishnaiah; Kotalo, Rama Gopal; Nagireddy, Siva Kumar Reddy; Tandule, Chakradhar Rao; Thotli, Lokeswara Reddy; Rajuru Ramakrishna, Reddy; Surendranair, Suresh Babu

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the aerosols optical, physical characteristics and the aerosol radiative forcing pertaining to semi-arid region, Anantapur for the period January 2013-December 2014. Collocated measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Black Carbon mass concentration (BC) are carried out by using MICROTOPS II and Aethalometer and estimated the aerosol radiative forcing over this location. The mean values of AOD at 500nm are found to be 0.47±0.09, 0.34±0.08, 0.29±0.06 and 0.30±0.07 during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon respectively. The Angstrom exponent (α380-1020) value is observed maximum in March (1.25±0.19) and which indicates the predominance of fine - mode aerosols and lowest in the month of July (0.33±0.14) and may be due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols. The diurnal variation of BC is exhibited two height peaks during morning 07:00-08:00 (IST) and evening 19:00-21:00 (IST) hours and one minima noticed during afternoon (13:00-16:00). The highest monthly mean BC concentration is observed in the month of January (3.4±1.2μgm(-3)) and the lowest in July (1.1±0.2μgm(-3)). The estimated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (ADRF) in the atmosphere is found to be +36.8±1.7Wm(-2), +26.9±0.2Wm(-2), +18.0±0.6Wm(-2) and +18.5±3.1Wm(-2) during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Large difference between TOA and BOA forcing is observed during summer which indicate the large absorption of radiant energy (36.80Wm(-2)) which contributes more increase in atmospheric heating by ~1K/day. The BC contribution on an average is found to be 64% and is responsible for aerosol atmospheric heating. PMID:27344510

  15. Effect of Air Ions on Submicron T1 Bacteriophage Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Happ, John W.; Harstad, J. Bruce; Buchanan, Lee M.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of a high concentration of ionized air molecules on sampling T1 phage aerosols of submicron particle size was evaluated by comparing the phage recoveries of all-glass impingers (AGI-4) and type 6 filter papers. Sampler recoveries of all ionized aerosols were less than the recoveries of nonionized control aerosols. These reductions in recovery were greater with positive ions than with negative ions or ions of mixed polarity. The AGI-4 allowed considerable slippage, which was not affected by the air ions. Type 6 filter paper recoveries were less than AGI-4 recoveries. The air ions did not appear to affect the aerosol particle size as determined by an electron microscope. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:16349691

  16. Aerosol Microphysical and Macrophysical Effects on Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, T.; Li, Z.; Wilcox, E. M.; Oreopoulos, L.; Remer, L. A.; Yu, H.; Platnick, S. E.; Posselt, D. J.; Zhang, Z.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    We illustrate a conceptual model of hydrometeor vertical development inside a convective cloud and its utility in studying of aerosol-DCC interactions. Both case studies and ensemble means are used to investigate aerosol-DCC interactions. We identify a few scenarios where possible signal of aerosol effect on DCC may be extracted. The results show a consistent and physically sound picture of aerosols affecting DCC microphysics as well as macrophysical properties. Specifically, pollutions and smokes are shown to consistently decrease ice particle size. On the contrary, dust particles close to source regions are shown to make cloud ice particle size more maritime like. We postulate that dust may achieve this by acting as either heterogeneous ice nuclei or giant cloud condensation nuclei. This contrast between smoke or pollution and dust also exists for their effects on cloud glaciation temperature. Smoke and pollution aerosols are shown to decrease glaciation temperature while dust particles do the opposite. Possible Implications of our results for studying aerosol indirect forcing, cirrus cloud properties, troposphere-stratosphere water vapor exchange and cloud latent heating are discussed.

  17. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

  18. Direct evidence of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation in forest atmosphere through heteromolecular nucleation.

    PubMed

    Kavouras, Ilias G; Stephanou, Euripides G

    2002-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in climate and atmospheric chemistry. Organic matter frequently composes aerosol major fraction over continental areas. Reactions of natural volatile organic compounds, with atmospheric oxidants, are a key formation pathway of fine particles. The gas and particle atmospheric concentration of organic compounds directly emitted from conifer leaf epicuticular wax and of those formed through the photooxidation of alpha- and beta-pinene were simultaneously collected and measured in a conifer forest by using elaborated sampling and GC/ MS techniques. The saturation concentrations of acidic and carbonyl photooxidation products were estimated, by taking into consideration primary gas- and particle-phase organic species. Primary organic aerosol components represented an important fraction of the atmospheric gas-phase organic content Consequently, saturation concentrations of photooxidation products have been lowered facilitating new particle formation between molecules of photooxidation products and semi-volatile organic compounds. From the measured concentrations of the above-mentioned compounds, saturation concentrations (Csat,i) of alpha- and beta-pinene photooxidation products were calculated for nonideal conditions using a previously developed absorptive model. The results of these calculations indicated that primarily emitted organic species and ambient temperature play a crucial role in secondary organic aerosol formation. PMID:12523424

  19. Type-segregated aerosol effects on regional monsoon activity: A study using ground-based experiments and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Sonbawne, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Classification of observed aerosols into key types [e.g., clean-maritime (CM), desert-dust (DD), urban-industrial/biomass-burning (UI/BB), black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC) and mixed-type aerosols (MA)] would facilitate to infer aerosol sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms, not only to improve the accuracy of satellite retrievals but also to quantify the assessment of aerosol radiative impacts on climate. In this paper, we report the results of a study conducted in this direction, employing a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune, India during 2008 and 2009, which represent two successive contrasting monsoon years. The study provided an observational evidence to show that the local sources are subject to heavy loading of absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon), with strong seasonality closely linked to the monsoon annual rainfall cycle over Pune, a tropical urban station in India. The results revealed the absence of CM aerosols in the pre-monsoon as well as in the monsoon seasons of 2009 as opposed to 2008. Higher loading of dust aerosols is observed in the pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons of 2009; majority may be coated with fine BC aerosols from local emissions, leading to reduction in regional rainfall. Further, significant decrease in coarse-mode AOD and presence of carbonaceous aerosols, affecting the aerosol-cloud interaction and monsoon-rain processes via microphysics and dynamics, is considered responsible for the reduction in rainfall during 2009. Additionally, we discuss how optical depth, contributed by different types of aerosols, influences the distribution of monsoon rainfall over an urban region using the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) aerosol reanalysis. Furthermore, predictions of the Dust REgional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) simulations combined with HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) cluster model are also discussed in support of the

  20. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  1. Evaluating the aerosol first indirect effect using satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hongfei

    First proposed by Twomey, the aerosol first indirect effect hypothesizes that increased aerosol concentration leads to a larger number of cloud condensation nuclei, and therefore smaller but more numerous cloud droplets, which results in greater reflection of incoming solar radiation. It is known that this phenomenon has a net effect to cool the Earth radiatively and offset a substantial amount of the warming caused by the increasing of greenhouse gases. However, the magnitude of this effect has been very uncertain. For example, discrepancies of more than a factor of 2 have been reported among various observational results. This uncertainty is a major hurdle in advancing our understanding of how humans have altered, and may in the future alter the Earth's climate. One of the difficulties in deriving the magnitude of this effect from observational data arises from the fact that the aerosol abundance often varies coherently with meteorological conditions, which makes it extremely hard to distinguish between the changes in cloud microphysical parameters caused by varying aerosol concentration and by varying meteorological conditions. Therefore, the goal of this study is to find a reliable method to extract the real strength and to narrow the uncertainty in the estimates of the indirect radiative effect of aerosols. To achieve this goal, first, a satellite visible/near-infrared algorithm is developed to retrieve cloud optical depth and effective radius simultaneously at solar wavelengths (0.63 and 1.61 mum), and a satellite microwave algorithm is developed to retrieve liquid water path in the microwave range (19 and 37 GHz). Using these algorithm we derive cloud microphysical variables in relation to the aerosol first indirect effect. Second, a drizzle index is introduced to discriminate the drizzle clouds from non-drizzle clouds from satellite, which ensures our estimation of the first indirect effect not being contaminated by precipitation related processes. Third

  2. Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

    2007-11-26

    We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present

  3. Indirect aerosol effect increases CMIP5 models projected Arctic warming

    DOE PAGES

    Chylek, Petr; Vogelsang, Timothy J.; Klett, James D.; Hengartner, Nicholas; Higdon, Dave; Lesins, Glen; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2016-02-20

    Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate models’ projections of the 2014–2100 Arctic warming under radiative forcing from representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) vary from 0.9° to 6.7°C. Climate models with or without a full indirect aerosol effect are both equally successful in reproducing the observed (1900–2014) Arctic warming and its trends. However, the 2014–2100 Arctic warming and the warming trends projected by models that include a full indirect aerosol effect (denoted here as AA models) are significantly higher (mean projected Arctic warming is about 1.5°C higher) than those projected by models without a full indirect aerosolmore » effect (denoted here as NAA models). The suggestion is that, within models including full indirect aerosol effects, those projecting stronger future changes are not necessarily distinguishable historically because any stronger past warming may have been partially offset by stronger historical aerosol cooling. In conclusion, the CMIP5 models that include a full indirect aerosol effect follow an inverse radiative forcing to equilibrium climate sensitivity relationship, while models without it do not.« less

  4. Effects of biomass burning aerosols on CO2 fluxes on Amazon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Moreira, Demerval; Freitas, Saulo; Longo, Karla; Rosario, Nilton

    2015-04-01

    During the dry season in Central Brazil and Southern Amazon, there is an usually high concentration of aerosol particles associated with intense human activities, with extensive biomass burning. It has been observed through remote sensing that the smoke clouds in these areas often cover an area of about 4 to 5 million km2. Thus, the average aerosol optical depth of these regions at 500 ηm, is usually below 0.1 during the rainy season and can exceed 0.9 in the fire season. Aerosol particles act as condensation nuclei and also increase scattering and absorption of the incident radiation. Therefore, the layer of the aerosol alters the precipitation rate; reduces the amount of solar energy that reaches the surface, producing a cooling; and causes an increase of diffuse radiation. These factors directly and indirectly affect the CO2 fluxes at the surface. In this work, the chemical-atmospheric model CCATT-BRAMS (Coupled Chemistry-Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) coupled to the surface model JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) was used to simulate the effects of biomass burning aerosols in CO2 fluxes in the Amazon region. Both the total effect of the aerosols and the contribution related only to the increase of the diffuse fraction caused by the their presence were analyzed. The results show that the effect of the scattered fraction is dominant over all other effects. It was also noted that the presence of aerosols from fires can substantially change biophysiological processes of the carbon cycle. In some situations, it can lead to a sign change in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE), turning it from a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, when the aerosol is not considered in the simulations, to a sink, when it is considered. Thus, this work demonstrates the importance of considering the presence of aerosols in numerical simulations of weather and climate, since carbon dioxide is a major

  5. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  6. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  7. Whole-atmosphere aerosol microphysics simulations of the Mt Pinatubo eruption: Part 2: Quantifying the direct and indirect (dynamical) radiative forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Graham; Dhomse, Sandip; Carslaw, Ken; Chipperfield, Martyn; Lee, Lindsay; Emmerson, Kathryn; Abraham, Luke; Telford, Paul; Pyle, John; Braesicke, Peter; Bellouin, Nicolas; Dalvi, Mohit; Johnson, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Mt Pinatubo volcanic eruption in June 1991 injected between 10 and 20 Tg of sulphur dioxide into the tropical lower stratosphere. Following chemical conversion to sulphuric acid, the stratospheric aerosol layer thickened substantially causing a strong radiative, dynamical and chemical perturbation to the Earth's atmosphere with effects lasting several years. In this presentation we show results from model experiments to isolate the different ways the enhanced stratospheric aerosol from Pinatubo influenced the Earth's climate. The simulations are carried out in the UK Chemistry and Aerosol composition-climate model (UKCA) which extends the high-top (to 80km) version of the UK Met Office Unified Model (UM). The UM-UKCA model uses the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics module coupled with a stratosphere-troposphere chemistry scheme including sulphur chemistry. By running no-feedback and standard integrations, we separate the main radiative forcings due to aerosol-radiation interactions (i.e. the direct forcings) from those induced by dynamical changes which alter meridional heat transport and distributions of aerosol, ozone and water vapour.

  8. Development of RAMS-CMAQ to Simulate Aerosol Optical Depth and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing and Its Application to East Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J; Xin, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Li-Li

    2009-11-16

    The air quality modeling system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) is developed to simulate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and aerosol direct forcing (DF). The aerosol-specific extinction, single scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor are parameterized based on Mie theory taking into account the aerosol size distribution, composition, refractive index, and water uptake of solution particles. A two-stream solar radiative model considers all gaseous molecular absorption, Rayleigh scattering, and aerosols and clouds. RAMSCMAQ is applied to simulate all major aerosol concentrations (e.g., sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, black carbon, fine soil, and sea salt) and AOD and DF over East Asia in 2005. To evaluate its performance, the simulated AOD values were compared with ground-based in situ measurements. The comparison shows that RAMSCMAQ performed well in most of the model domain and generally captured the observed variations. High AOD values (0.2-1.0) mainly appear in the Sichuan Basin as well as in central and southeastern China. The geographic distribution of DF generally follows the AOD distribution patterns, and the DF at the top-of-the-atmosphere is less than -25 and -20 W m-2 in clear-sky and all-sky over the Sichuan Basin. Both AOD and DF exhibit seasonal variations with lower values in July and higher ones in January. The DF could obviously be impacted by high cloud fractions.

  9. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol refractive index and particle size distribution from ground-based measurements of direct and scattered solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, P; O'Neill, N T; Royer, A; McArthur, B L

    1999-12-20

    Ground-based sunphotometer observation of direct and scattered solar radiation is a traditional tool for providing data on aerosol optical properties. Spectral transmission and solar aureole measurements provide an optical source of aerosol information, which can be inverted for retrieval of microphysical properties (particle size distribution and refractive index). However, to infer these aerosol properties from ground-based remote-sensing measurements, special numerical inversion methods should be developed and applied. We propose two improvements to the existing inversion techniques employed to derive aerosol microphysical properties from combined atmospheric transmission and solar aureole measurements. First, the aerosol refractive index is directly included in the inversion procedure and is retrieved simultaneously with the particle size spectra. Second, we allow for real or effective instrumental pointing errors by including a correction factor for scattering angle errors as a retrieved inversion parameter. The inversion technique is validated by numerical simulations and applied to field data. It is shown that ground-based sunphotometer measurements enable one to derive the real part of the aerosol refractive index with an absolute error of 0.03-0.05 and to distinguish roughly between weakly and strongly absorbing aerosols. The aureole angular observation scheme can be refined with an absolute accuracy of 0.15-0.19 deg. Offset corrections to the scattering angle error are generally found to be small and consistently of the order of -0.17. This error magnitude is deduced to be due primarily to nonlinear field-of-view averaging effects rather than to instrumental errors.

  10. Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to pyrethrin aerosol: effects of aerosol particle size, concentration, and exposure conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted to assess effect of droplet size on efficacy of pyrethrin aerosol against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, the confused flour beetle. A vertical flow aerosol exposure chamber that generated a standardized particle size diameter was used for...

  11. Assessing aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Wang, Minghuai; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Barahona, Donifan; Kooperman, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    Ice clouds play an important role in regulating the Earth's radiative budget and influencing the hydrological cycle. Aerosols can act as solution droplets or ice nuclei for ice crystal formation, thus affecting the physical properties of ice clouds. Because the related dynamical and microphysical processes happen at very small spatial and temporal scales, it is a great challenge to accurately represent them in global climate models. Consequently, the aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds (ice AIE) estimated by global climate models is associated with large uncertainties. In order to better understand these processes and improve ice cloud parameterization in the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5 (CAM5), we analyze in-situ measurements from various research campaigns, and use the derived statistical information to evaluate and constrain the model [1]. We also make use of new model capabilities (prescribed aerosols and nudging) to estimate the aerosol indirect effect through ice clouds, and quantify the uncertainties associated with ice nucleation processes. In this study, a new approach is applied to separate the impact of aerosols on warm and cold clouds by using the prescribed-aerosol capability in CAM5 [2]. This capability allows a single simulation to simultaneously include up to three aerosol fields: online calculated, as well as prescribed pre-industrial (PI) and present-day conditions (PD). In a set of sensitivity simulations, we use the same aerosol fields to drive droplet activation in warm clouds, and different (PD and PI) conditions for different components of the ice nucleation parameterization in pure ice clouds, so as to investigate various ice nucleation mechanisms in an isolated manner. We also applied nudging in our simulations, which helps to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in much shorter simulation period [3] and isolate the impact of aerosols on ice clouds from other factors, such as temperature and relative humidity change. The

  12. Effect of hydrophilic organic seed aerosols on secondary organic aerosol formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Shilling, John E; Alexander, M Lizabeth; Newburn, Matt

    2011-09-01

    Gas-particle partitioning theory is widely used in atmospheric models to predict organic aerosol loadings. This theory predicts that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of an oxidized volatile organic compound product will increase as the mass loading of preexisting organic aerosol increases. In a previous work, we showed that the presence of model hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA) had no detectable effect on the SOA yields from ozonolysis of α-pinene, suggesting that the condensing SOA compounds form a separate phase from the preexisting POA. However, a substantial faction of atmospheric aerosol is composed of polar, hydrophilic organic compounds. In this work, we investigate the effects of model hydrophilic organic aerosol (OA) species such as fulvic acid, adipic acid, and citric acid on the gas-particle partitioning of SOA from α-pinene ozonolysis. The results show that only citric acid seed significantly enhances the absorption of α-pinene SOA into the particle-phase. The other two seed particles have a negligible effect on the α-pinene SOA yields, suggesting that α-pinene SOA forms a well-mixed organic aerosol phase with citric acid and a separate phase with adipic acid and fulvic acid. This finding highlights the need to improve the thermodynamics treatment of organics in current aerosol models that simply lump all hydrophilic organic species into a single phase, thereby potentially introducing an erroneous sensitivity of SOA mass to emitted OA species. PMID:21790137

  13. Measurements of aerosol optical depth and diffuse-to-direct irradiance ratios in the Northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.; Larson, N.; Michalsky, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous observations of total and diffuse irradiance on a horizontal surface in six narrowband filtered detectors and one broadband shortwave detector have been made since late 1991 at a nine-site network of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers. From these measurements, the direct normal irradiance values are calculated. These data are then used to calculate the outside-the-atmosphere direct irradiance (lo) and total optical depth using the Langley method of regressing the natural logarithm of the direct irradiance against air mass for cloud-free conditions. Frequent determinations of lo allow tracking of changes in lo caused by soiling and filter degradation. The daily average total optical depth is calculated in two ways: (1) from the slope of the Langley regression line and (2) from 30-minute averages calculated from the Beer-Lambert-Bougeur law using the median lo for that day. Finally, aerosol optical depths for five wavelengths (the other narrowband wavelength is used to estimate water vapor) are obtained by subtracting Rayleigh scattering and Chappuis ozone absorption optical depths from the total optical depths. The aerosol pattern at each site is consistent with an annual cycle superimposed on a decaying aerosol loading associated with the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. Moreover, the wavelength dependence of the aerosol pattern shows seasonal changes in the aerosol size distribution. The irradiance data are also used to calculate the diffuse-to-direct irradiance ratio, a quantity which in theory is related to the aerosol optical depth and surface albedo. A radiative transfer model based on the adjoint method, combined with a nonlinear least squares method. is used to estimate aerosol optical depth and surface albedo from the observed diffuse-to-direct ratios. The aerosol optical depths are in good agreement with those calculated from the direct beam data and the surface albedos are in accord with other observations.

  14. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    PubMed Central

    Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1–0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4–20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate. PMID:27551086

  15. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions.

    PubMed

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the "brown" carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate. PMID:27551086

  16. Direct observation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol from biomass-burning emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardoni, Stefania; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Giulianelli, Lara; Carbone, Claudio; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Sandrini, Silvia; Costabile, Francesca; Gobbi, Gian Paolo; Chiara Pietrogrande, Maria; Visentin, Marco; Scotto, Fabiana; Fuzzi, Sandro; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are an important subject of ongoing research for both air quality and climate. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that reactions taking place in the atmospheric liquid phase represent a potentially significant source of SOA mass. Here, we report direct ambient observations of SOA mass formation from processing of biomass-burning emissions in the aqueous phase. Aqueous SOA (aqSOA) formation is observed both in fog water and in wet aerosol. The aqSOA from biomass burning contributes to the “brown” carbon (BrC) budget and exhibits light absorption wavelength dependence close to the upper bound of the values observed in laboratory experiments for fresh and processed biomass-burning emissions. We estimate that the aqSOA from residential wood combustion can account for up to 0.1-0.5 Tg of organic aerosol (OA) per y in Europe, equivalent to 4-20% of the total OA emissions. Our findings highlight the importance of aqSOA from anthropogenic emissions on air quality and climate.

  17. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  18. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effects on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007) during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations) ground-based measurements) and intensive field experiments have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends and their relationship to the changes of aerosol and precursor emissions and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world) including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America) Europe) Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions) dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities) downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area) and remote regions that are considered to representing "backgroundH conditions.

  19. Effects of aerosol phase and water uptake for understanding organic aerosol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, C.; Gallimore, P. J.; Fuller, S.; Lee, J.; Garrascon, V.; Achakulwisut, P.; Björkegren, A.; Spring, D. R.; Pope, F. D.; Kalberer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Oxidation reactions of atmospheric organic aerosols strongly influence many important processes in the atmosphere such as aerosol-cloud interactions or heterogeneous chemistry. We present results of an experimental laboratory study with three organic model aerosol systems (maleic, arachidonic and oleic acid) investigating the effect of particle phase and humidity on the oxidative processing of the particle. Two experimental techniques are combined in this investigation. An electrodynamic balance is used to levitate single particles and assess changes in particle size and mass (due to water uptake and/or loss of volatile oxidation products) and phase (liquid or solid) during and after chemical processing with ozone. An aerosol flow tube was used to investigate the detailed chemical composition of the oxidized aerosol with offline ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. The role of water (i.e., relative humidity) in the oxidation scheme of the three carboxylic acids is very compound specific and the particle phase has a strong effect on the particle processing. Relative humidity was observed to have a major influence on the oxidation scheme of maleic acid and arachidonic acid, whereas no dependence was observed for the oxidation of oleic acid. In both, maleic acid and arachidonic acid, an evaporation of volatile oxidation products could only be observed when the particle was exposed to high relative humidities. Maleic and arachidonic acid change their phase from liquid to solid upon oxidation or upon changes in humidity and efficient oxidative processing of the particle bulk can only occur when the particle is in liquid form. A detailed oxidation mechanism for maleic acid is presented taking the strong effects of water into account. In contrast, oleic acid is liquid under all conditions at room temperature (dry or elevated humidity, pure or oxidized particle). Thus ozone can easily diffuse into the bulk of the particle irrespective of the oxidation conditions. In

  20. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  1. Quantifying Aerosol influences on the Cloud Radiative Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feingold, Graham; McComiskey, Allison; Sena, Elisa; Yamaguchi, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Although evidence of aerosol influences on the microphysical properties of shallow liquid cloud fields abounds, a rigorous assessment of aerosol effects on the radiative properties of these clouds has proved to be elusive because of adjustments in the evolving cloud system. We will demonstrate through large numbers of idealized large eddy simulation and 14 years of surface-based remote sensing at a continental US site that the existence of a detectable cloud microphysical response to aerosol perturbations is neither a necessary, nor a sufficient condition for detectability of a radiative response. We will use a new framework that focuses on the cloud field properties that most influence shortwave radiation, e.g., cloud fraction, albedo, and liquid water path. In this framework, scene albedo is shown to be a robust function of cloud fraction for a variety of cloud systems, and appears to be insensitive to averaging scale. The albedo-cloud fraction framework will be used to quantify the cloud radiative effect of shallow liquid clouds and to demonstrate (i) the primacy of cloud field properties such as cloud fraction and liquid water path for driving the cloud radiative effect; and (ii) that the co-variability between meteorological and aerosol drivers has a strong influence on the detectability of the cloud radiative effect, regardless of whether a microphysical response is detected. A broad methodology for systematically quantifying the cloud radiative effect will be presented.

  2. Toward understanding the climatic effects of aerosols under hazy environments: an overview of field observations in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing

    2009-03-01

    Due to its fast economical growth and high density of population, China presents a unique environment to study the direct and indirect effects of heavy aerosol loadings on regional and global climates. Thanks to the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) (Li et al. 2007a), much knowledge has been gained concerning the temporal and spatial distributions of aerosol loading and single scattering albedo, their radiative effects and transportation mechanisms, among others. Deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in China (AMF-China) in 2008 and enhancement of the EAST-AIRE observation capability will further help tackle with the effects of aerosols on cloud microphysics, precipitation, atmospheric adiabatic heating rate and circulation, especially on the Asian monsoon system. An overview is presented of the EAST-AIRE routine measurements and AMF intensive field campaign in 2008 in China.

  3. Comparison of Aerosol Classification From Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar and the CALIPSO Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Omar, Ali H.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris a.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of aerosol composition and vertical distribution is crucial for assessing the impact of aerosols on climate. In addition, aerosol classification is a key input to CALIOP aerosol retrievals, since CALIOP requires an inference of the lidar ratio in order to estimate the effects of aerosol extinction and backscattering. In contrast, the NASA airborne HSRL-1 directly measures both aerosol extinction and backscatter, and therefore the lidar ratio (extinction-to-backscatter ratio). Four aerosol intensive properties from HSRL-1 are combined to infer aerosol type. Aerosol classification results from HSRL-1 are used here to validate the CALIOP aerosol type inferences.

  4. Improved retrieval of direct and diffuse downwelling surface shortwave flux in cloudless atmosphere using dynamic estimates of aerosol content and type: application to the LSA-SAF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceamanos, X.; Carrer, D.; Roujean, J.-L.

    2014-08-01

    .9, 6.5, and 19.1% for global, direct, and diffuse DSSF with regard to the McClear algorithm). The main limitation of the proposed approach is its high sensitivity to the quality of the ECMWF aerosol inputs, which is proved to be sufficiently accurate for reanalyses but not for forecast data. Given the proximity of DSSF retrieval to the modeling of the atmospheric direct effect, SIRAMix is also able to quantify the direct radiative forcing at the surface due to a given atmospheric component (e.g., gases or aerosols).

  5. Simulating Changes in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden and its Radiative Effects across the Northern Hemisphere: Contrasting Multi-Decadal Trends between Asia and North America

    EPA Science Inventory

    Though aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challeng...

  6. The effect of aerosol on radiation fog life-cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romakkaniemi, Sami; Maalick, Zubair; Tonttila, Juha; Kuhn, Thomas; Kokkola, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Radiation fog is formed during the night under clear skies when emission of long wave radiation cools the surface and air above it. After formation, the development of fog is further influenced by longwave cooling and turbulence entrainment-detrainment at the top of the fog layer, and microphysical processes through droplet activation and sedimentation. After sunrise, the fog is dissipated due heating of the surface and the air above it. Like in the case of clouds, atmospheric aerosol particles also affect the properties of fog and together with meteorological conditions determine their life cycle from formation to dissipation. To explore how aerosols are affecting radiation fog properties and lifetime, we have used a Large Eddy Model with explicit representation of aerosol particles and aerosol-fog droplet interactions. Our results show that the fog droplet concentration increases with increasing aerosol concentration. In the early stages of fog formation the radiative cooling at the top of the fog controls the maximum water supersaturation and droplet formation in a similar manner than the updraft velocity does at the base of a cloud. The liquid water content in the fog is mainly determined by the droplet concentration as large droplets are efficiently removed through sedimentation. Thus, with increasing aerosol particle concentration, the more numerous, but smaller fog droplets increase the fog's optical depth and thereby delay the fog dissipation after sunrise, because the surface warms more slowly. This effect is further enhanced if turbulence inside the fog leads to secondary activation of droplets. Overall, the radiation fog dissipation in polluted conditions can be delayed up to hours when compared to clean conditions.

  7. Potential Climate Effects of Dust Aerosols' over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JI, Z.; Wang, G.; Pal, J. S.; Yu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate in West Africa is under the influence of the West African monsoon circulation and mineral dust emitted from the Sahara desert (which is the world's largest source of mineral dust emission). Dust aerosols alter the atmospheric radiative fluxes and act as cloud condensation nuclei in the process of emission, transportation and deposition. However, our understanding regarding how dust aerosols influence the present-day and future climate of West Africa is very limited. In this study, a regional climate model RegCM4.3.4-CLM4.5 is used to investigate the potential climatic effects of dust aerosols both in present (1981-2000) and future (2081-2100) periods over WA. First, the model performance and dust climatic effects are evaluated. The contribution of dust climatic effects under RCP8.5 scenario and their confounding effects with land use change are assessed. Our results indicate that the model can reproduce with reasonable accuracy the spatial and temporal distribution of climatology, aerosol optical depth and surface concentration over WA. The shortwave radiative forcing of dust is negative in the surface and positive in the atmosphere, with greater changes in JJA and MAM compared to those in SON and DJF. Over most of West Africa, cooling is the dominant effect on temperature. Their impact on precipitation features a dipole pattern, with decrease in the north and increase in the south of West Africa. Despite the dust-induced decrease of precipitation amount, dusts cause extreme precipitation to increase. To evaluate the uncertainties surrounding our modeling results, sensitivity experiments driven by ICBC from MIROC-ESM and CESM and their dynamic downscaling results are used for comparisons. Results from these sensitivity experiments indicate that the impact of dust aerosols on present and future climate is robust.

  8. Effect of Hydrophilic Organic Seed Aerosols on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ozonolysis of α-Pinene

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Alexander, M. L.; Newburn, Matthew K.

    2011-07-26

    Gas-particle partitioning theory is widely used in atmospheric models to predict organic aerosol loadings. This theory predicts that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield of an oxidized VOC product will increase as the mass loading of preexisting organic aerosol increases. In a previous study, we showed that the presence of model hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA) had no detectable effect on the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from ozonolysis of {alpha}-pinene, suggesting that the condensing SOA compounds form a separate phase from the preexisting POA. However, non-polar, hydrophobic POA may gradually become polar and hydrophilic as it undergoes oxidative aging while POA formed from biomass burning is already somewhat polar and hydrophilic. In this study, we investigate the effects of model hydrophilic POA such as fulvic acid, adipic acid and citric acid on the gas-particle partitioning of SOA from {alpha}-pinene ozonolysis. The results show that only citric acid seed significantly enhances the absorption of {alpha}-pinene SOA into the particle-phase. The other two POA seed particles have negligible effect on the {alpha}-pinene SOA yields, suggesting that {alpha}-pinene SOA forms a well-mixed organic aerosol phase with citric acid while a separate phase with adipic acid and fulvic acid. This finding highlights the need to improve the thermodynamics treatment of organics in current aerosol models that simply lump all hydrophilic organic species into a single phase, thereby potentially introducing an erroneous sensitivity of SOA mass to emitted POA.

  9. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  10. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M. Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO2 were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 × 106 cm−3, were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m−3, were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control recommendations

  11. Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H

    2010-07-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO(2) were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 x 10(6) cm(-3), were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m(-3), were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control

  12. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  13. Black carbon reduction will weaken the aerosol net cooling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. L.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), a distinct type of carbonaceous material formed from the incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass based fuels under certain conditions, can interact with solar radiation and clouds through its strong light-absorption ability, thereby warming the Earth's climate system. Some studies have even suggested that global warming could be slowed down in a short term by eliminating BC emission due to its short lifetime. In this study, we estimate the influence of removing some sources of BC and other co-emitted species on the aerosol radiative effect by using an aerosol-climate coupled model BCC_AGCM2.0.1_CUACE/Aero, in combination with the aerosol emissions from the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) scenarios. We find that the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) will be enhanced by 0.12 W m-2 compared with present-day conditions if the BC emission is reduced exclusively to the level projected for 2100 based on the RCP2.6 scenario. This will be beneficial for the mitigation of global warming. However, the global annual mean aerosol net cooling effect at the TOA will be weakened by 1.7-2.0 W m-2 relative to present-day conditions if emissions of BC and co-emitted sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are simultaneously reduced as the most close conditions to the actual situation to the level projected for 2100 in different ways based on the RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5 scenarios. Because there are no effective ways to remove the BC exclusively without influencing the other co-emitted components, our results therefore indicate that a reduction in BC emission can lead to an unexpected warming on the Earth's climate system in the future.

  14. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Initial Results from the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J.; Sheridan, P. J.; Perry, L. B.; Neufeld, H.; Emanuel, R. E.; Tashakkori, R.; Bowman, D.; Long, C.

    2009-12-01

    AppalAIR (Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research, http://appalair.appstate.edu/) is a new interdisciplinary, atmospheric research facility located on the campus of Appalachian State University (1076 m; 36.2° N, 81.7° W) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The facility was designed to investigate air pollution formation and transport, the relationships among biogenic and anthropogenic inputs to a changing climate, and the effects of these factors on regional ecosystems. AppalAIR is a collaborating member of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division (NOAA/ESRL GMD) Collaborative Global Aerosol Network (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aero/net/app/index.html). Measurements are made from a 34 m tower and include aerosol light scattering (3-λ nephelometer) and absorption (3-λ PSAP, 7-λ aethalometer, 6-λ UV aethalometer), particle number concentration (CPC), and aerosol chemistry, size, and morphology using SPME/GC-MS and SEM analyses on 24 h filter samples. Initial results indicate alternating periods of small, highly absorptive (ssa < 0.90) fractal agglomerates and large, highly scattering (ssa > 0.95) spherical particles that are strongly dependent upon the highly variably meteorological patterns that have occurred over the summertime (JJA) in the southeastern U.S. By quantifying the aerosol direct radiative forcing during discrete meteorological patterns as defined by statistical cluster analysis as well as from specific aerosol chemical sources, we are able to extrapolate the results beyond the immediate region.

  15. Effects of diesel exhaust aftertreatment devices on concentrations and size distribution of aerosols in underground mine air.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D; Schnakenberg, George H; Hummer, Ion A; Cauda, Emanuele; Janisko, Samuel I; Patts, Larry D

    2009-09-01

    Three types of uncatalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF) systems, three types of high-temperature disposable filter elements (DFEs), and one diesel oxidation catalytic converter (DOC) were evaluated in underground mine conditions for their effects on the concentrations and size distributions of diesel aerosols. Those effects were compared with the effects of a standard muffler. The experimental work was conducted directly in an underground environment using a unique diesel laboratory developed in an underground experimental mine. The DPF systems reduced total mass of aerosols in the mine air approximately 10-fold for light-load and 20-fold or more for high-load test conditions. The DFEs offered similar reductions in aerosol mass concentrations. The efficiency of the new DFEs significantly increased with accumulation of operating time and buildup of diesel particulate matter in the porous structure of the filter elements. A single laundering process did not exhibit substantial effects on performance of the filter element The effectiveness of DPFs and DFEs in removing aerosols by number was strongly influenced by engine operating mode. The concentrations of nucleation mode aerosols in the mine air were found to be substantially higher for both DPFs and DFEs when the engine was operated at high-load modes than at low-load modes. The effects of the DOC on mass and number concentrations of aerosols in mine air were relatively minor when compared to those of the DPF and DFE systems.

  16. Global Impacts of Gas-Phase Chemistry-Aerosol Interactions on Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-01-01

    We present here a first global modeling study on the influence of gas-phase chemistry/aerosol interactions on estimates of anthropogenic forcing by tropospheric O3 and aerosols. Concentrations of gas-phase species and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols in the preindustrial, present-day, and year 2100 (IPCC SRES A2) atmospheres are simulated online in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II' (GISS GCM II'). With fully coupled chemistry and aerosols, the preindustrial, presentday, and year 2100 global burdens of tropospheric ozone are predicted to be 190, 319, and 519 Tg, respectively. The burdens of sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted respectively to be 0.32. 0.18, 0.01, 0.33 Tg in preindustrial time, 1.40, 0.48, 0.23, 1.60 Tg in presentday, and 1.37, 1.97, 0.54, 3.31 Tg in year 2100. Anthropogenic O3 is predicted to have a globally and annually averaged present-day forcing of +0.22 W m(sup -2) and year 2100 forcing of +0.57 W m(sup -2) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Net anthropogenic TOA forcing by internally mixed sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols is estimated to be virtually zero in the present-day and +0.34 W m(sup -2) in year 2100, whereas it is predicted to be -0.39 W m(sup -2) in present-day and -0.61 W m(sup -2) in year 2100 if the aerosols are externally mixed. Heterogeneous reactions are shown to be important in affecting anthropogenic forcing. When reactions of N2O5, NO3, NO2, and HO2 on aerosols are accounted for, TOA anthropogenic O3 forcing is less by 20-45% in present-day and by 20-32% in year 2100 at mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, as compared with values predicted in the absence of heterogeneous gas aerosol reactions. Mineral dust uptake of HNO3 and O3 is shown to have practically no influence on anthropogenic O3 forcing. Heterogeneous reactions of N2Os

  17. Use of ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) Data to Study Aerosol Indirect Effects in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhanqing

    2012-12-19

    General goals: 1) Facilitating the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and Ancillary Facility (AAF) in China in 2008, 2) Processing, retrieving, improving and analyzing observation data from ground-based, air-borne and space-borne instruments; 3) Conducting a series of studies to gain insights into the direct and indirect effects of these aerosols on radiation, clouds, and precipitation using both

  18. Case studies on aerosol feedback effects in online coupled chemistry-meteorology models during the 2010 Russian fire event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forkel, Renate; Brunner, Dominik; Balzarini, Alessandra; Baró, Rocio; Hirtl, Marcus; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro; Jorba, Oriol; Perez, Juan L.; Pirovano, Guido; San Jose, Roberto; Schröder, Wolfram; Werhahn, Johannes; Wolke, Ralf; Žabkar, Rahela

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol particles are known to have an impact on weather and climate directly via radiation and via their impact on cloud formation and subsequent modified optical properties of clouds. Integrated or "online" coupled regional meteorology-chemistry models like WRF-Chem, COSMO-ART, COSMO-Muscat, EnviroHIRLAM, NMMB/BSC-CTM, RAMS/ICLAMS or WRF-CMAQ are able to account for this impact of aerosol on simulated meteorological variables. However, besides of the meteorological situation simulated effects may also depend on model configuration. In order to analyse these effects and to compare their representation in different models currently used in Europe, multi model simulations were performed for two episodes with high aerosol loads as a coordinated exercise of the COST Action ES1004 (EuMetChem). Here we analyze the first of these two case studies, the severe Russian forest fires in summer 2010. Emission data, boundary conditions, simulation strategy and data output format were harmonized as much as possible to maximize the comparability of the results from the different models. The high aerosol emissions during the summer 2010 Russian wildfire episode led to pronounced feedback effects. For example, the direct aerosol effect lowered the summer mean solar radiation by 20 W m-3 and seasonal mean temperature by 0.25 degrees. This might be considered as a lower limit as it must be taken into account that aerosol concentrations were generally underestimated by the WRF-Chem simulations by up to 50%. The high aerosol concentrations emitted from the wildfires over Russia were found to decrease the small amount of precipitation over Russia during this episode by another 10% to 30% when aerosol cloud interactions were taken into account. The focus of the discussion will be on case study results from WRF-Chem and a comparison with results from COSMO-ART, COSMO-Muscat, and NMMB/BSC-CTM.

  19. Investigation on seasonal variations of aerosol properties and its influence on radiative effect over an urban location in central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Subin; Gharai, Biswadip; Niranjan, K.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol plays an important role in modulating solar radiation, which are of great concern in perspective of regional climate change. The study analysed the physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban area and estimated radiative effect using three years in-situ data from sunphotometer, aethalometer and nephelometer as input to radiative transfer model. Aerosols properties indicate the dominance of fine mode aerosols over the study area. However presence of coarse mode aerosols is also found during pre-monsoon [March-April-May]. Daily mean aerosol optical depth showed a minimum during winter [Dec-Jan-Feb] (0.45-0.52) and a maximum during pre-monsoon (0.6-0.7), while single scattering albedo (ω) attains its maximum (0.78 ± 0.05) in winter and minimum (0.67 ± 0.06) during pre-monsoon and asymmetry factor varied in the range between 0.48 ± 0.02 to 0.53 ± 0.04. Episodic events of dust storm and biomass burning are identified by analyzing intrinsic aerosol optical properties like scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) during the study periods and it has been observed that during dust storm events ω is lower (˜0.77) than that of during biomass burning (˜0.81). The aerosol direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere during winter is -11.72 ± 3.5 Wm-2, while during pre-monsoon; it is -5.5 ± 2.5 Wm-2, which can be due to observed lower values of ω during pre-monsoon. A large positive enhancement of atmospheric effect of ˜50.53 Wm-2 is observed during pre-monsoon compared to winter. Due to high aerosol loading in pre-monsoon, a twofold negative surface forcing is also observed in comparison to winter.

  20. Radiative Effects and Feedbacks of Saharan Dust and Biomass Burning Aerosol over West Africa and the Northern Tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinold, Bernd; Tegen, Ina; Bauer, Stefan; Wendisch, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    Soil dust aerosol from the world's arid and semi-arid regions and land fire smoke represent major components of the atmospheric aerosol load. They influence the climate system by changing the atmospheric radiation balance through direct and indirect effects and play an important role in the biogeochemical and hydrological cycle. However, in particular the magnitude and sign of the radiative effects are highly uncertain due to still existing uncertainties in their optical properties and the variability and complexity of the spatio-temporal distribution. The dust and biomass burning aerosol from Africa is of particular interest since the continent harbours the largest and most active sources of both aerosol types. The Saharan and Sahel regions contribute at least 50% to the global dust emissions and a considerable amount of smoke originates from active biomass burning areas in west and central Africa. Within continuous aerosol outbreaks, the Saharan dust and land fire smoke are transported towards the West African Monsoon region and across the tropical Atlantic Ocean. In boreal winter, when the most land fires are active, the Saharan dust layer merges with the West African smoke plumes resulting in a complex aerosol layering. Here, the results of a regional model study on direct radiative forcing and dynamic atmospheric response due to dust and biomass burning aerosol will be presented. Particular focus will be on radiative impacts on regional circulation patterns and implications for the aerosol transport. For simulations of the complex spatial distribution of the West African aerosol and estimates of direct radiative effects and feedbacks, the regional model system COSMO-MUSCAT is used. The model allows online interaction of the computed dust and biomass burning aerosol load with the solar and thermal radiation and with the model dynamics. The simulations are performed for the second field campaign of the SAharan Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) that was conducted

  1. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of tropospheric aerosols on atmospheric infrared cooling rates is investigated by the use of recent models of infrared gaseous absorption. A radiative model of the atmosphere that incorporates dust as an absorber and scatterer of infrared radiation is constructed by employing the exponential kernel approximation to the radiative transfer equation. Scattering effects are represented in terms of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetry factor. The model is applied to estimate the effect of an aerosol layer made of spherical quartz particles on the infrared cooling rate. Calculations performed for a reference wavelength of 0.55 microns show an increased greenhouse effect, where the net upward flux at the surface is reduced by 10% owing to the strongly enhanced downward emission. There is a substantial increase in the cooling rate near the surface, but the mean cooling rate throughout the lower troposphere was only 10%.

  2. Light absorption by secondary organic aerosol from α-pinene: Effects of oxidants, seed aerosol acidity, and relative humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chen; Gyawali, Madhu; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shilling, John E.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2013-10-25

    It is well known that light absorption from dust and black carbon aerosols has a warming effect on climate while light scattering from sulfate, nitrate, and sea salt aerosols has a cooling effect. However, there are large uncertainties associated with light absorption and scattering by different types of organic aerosols, especially in the near-UV and UV spectral regions. In this paper, we present the results from a systematic laboratory study focused on measuring light absorption by secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated from dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems in the presence of neutral and acidic sulfate seed aerosols. Light absorption was monitored using photoacoustic spectrometers at four different wavelengths: 355, 405, 532, and 870 nm. Significant light absorption at 355 and 405 nm was observed for the SOA formed from α-pinene + O3 + NO3 system only in the presence of highly acidic sulfate seed aerosols under dry conditions. In contrast, no absorption was observed when the relative humidity was elevated to greater than 27% or in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols. Organic nitrates in the SOA formed in the presence of neutral sulfate seed aerosols were found to be nonabsorbing, while the light-absorbing compounds are speculated to be aldol condensation oligomers with nitroxy organosulfate groups that are formed in highly acidic sulfate aerosols. Finally and overall, these results suggest that dark α-pinene + O3 and α-pinene + NOx + O3 systems do not form light-absorbing SOA under typical atmospheric conditions.

  3. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  4. Climate impact of biofuels in shipping: global model studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

    PubMed

    Righi, Mattia; Klinger, Carolin; Eyring, Veronika; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Petzold, Andreas

    2011-04-15

    Aerosol emissions from international shipping are recognized to have a large impact on the Earth's radiation budget, directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by altering cloud properties. New regulations have recently been approved by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) aiming at progressive reductions of the maximum sulfur content allowed in marine fuels from current 4.5% by mass down to 0.5% in 2020, with more restrictive limits already applied in some coastal regions. In this context, we use a global bottom-up algorithm to calculate geographically resolved emission inventories of gaseous (NO(x), CO, SO(2)) and aerosol (black carbon, organic matter, sulfate) species for different kinds of low-sulfur fuels in shipping. We apply these inventories to study the resulting changes in radiative forcing, attributed to particles from shipping, with the global aerosol-climate model EMAC-MADE. The emission factors for the different fuels are based on measurements at a test bed of a large diesel engine. We consider both fossil fuel (marine gas oil) and biofuels (palm and soy bean oil) as a substitute for heavy fuel oil in the current (2006) fleet and compare their climate impact to that resulting from heavy fuel oil use. Our simulations suggest that ship-induced surface level concentrations of sulfate aerosol are strongly reduced, up to about 40-60% in the high-traffic regions. This clearly has positive consequences for pollution reduction in the vicinity of major harbors. Additionally, such reductions in the aerosol loading lead to a decrease of a factor of 3-4 in the indirect global aerosol effect induced by emissions from international shipping.

  5. Climate impact of biofuels in shipping: global model studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

    PubMed

    Righi, Mattia; Klinger, Carolin; Eyring, Veronika; Hendricks, Johannes; Lauer, Axel; Petzold, Andreas

    2011-04-15

    Aerosol emissions from international shipping are recognized to have a large impact on the Earth's radiation budget, directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and indirectly by altering cloud properties. New regulations have recently been approved by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) aiming at progressive reductions of the maximum sulfur content allowed in marine fuels from current 4.5% by mass down to 0.5% in 2020, with more restrictive limits already applied in some coastal regions. In this context, we use a global bottom-up algorithm to calculate geographically resolved emission inventories of gaseous (NO(x), CO, SO(2)) and aerosol (black carbon, organic matter, sulfate) species for different kinds of low-sulfur fuels in shipping. We apply these inventories to study the resulting changes in radiative forcing, attributed to particles from shipping, with the global aerosol-climate model EMAC-MADE. The emission factors for the different fuels are based on measurements at a test bed of a large diesel engine. We consider both fossil fuel (marine gas oil) and biofuels (palm and soy bean oil) as a substitute for heavy fuel oil in the current (2006) fleet and compare their climate impact to that resulting from heavy fuel oil use. Our simulations suggest that ship-induced surface level concentrations of sulfate aerosol are strongly reduced, up to about 40-60% in the high-traffic regions. This clearly has positive consequences for pollution reduction in the vicinity of major harbors. Additionally, such reductions in the aerosol loading lead to a decrease of a factor of 3-4 in the indirect global aerosol effect induced by emissions from international shipping. PMID:21428387

  6. In situ observations of aerosol and chlorine monoxide after the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo - Effect of reactions on sulfate aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Jonsson, H. H.; Brock, C. A.; Toohey, D. W.; Avallone, L. M.; Baumgardner, D.; Dye, J. E.; Poole, L. R.; Woods, D. C.; Decoursey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Highly resolved aerosol size distributions measured from high-altitude aircraft can be used to describe the effect of the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo on the stratospheric aerosol. In some air masses, aerosol mass mixing ratios increased by factors exceeding 100 and aerosol surface area concentrations increased by factors of 30 or more. Increases in aerosol surface area concentration were accompanied by increases in chlorine monoxide at mid-latitudes when confounding factors were controlled. This observation supports the assertion that reactions occurring on the aerosol can increase the fraction of stratospheric chlorine that occurs in ozone-destroying forms.

  7. A new chemistry option in WRF/Chem v. 3.4 for the simulation of direct and indirect aerosol effects using VBS: evaluation against IMPACT-EUCAARI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccella, P.; Curci, G.; Grell, G. A.; Visconti, G.; Crumeroylle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Mensah, A. A.

    2015-02-01

    A parameterization for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production based on the volatility basis set (VBS) approach has been coupled with microphysics and radiative scheme in WRF/Chem model. The new chemistry option called "RACM/MADE/VBS" was evaluated on a cloud resolving scale against ground-based and aircraft measurements collected during the IMPACT-EUCAARI campaign, and complemented with satellite data from MODIS. The day-to-day variability and the diurnal cycle of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the surface is captured by the model. Surface aerosol mass of sulphate (SO4), nitrate (NO3), ammonium (NH4), and organic matter (OM) is simulated with a correlation larger than 0.55. WRF/Chem captures the vertical profile of the aerosol mass in both the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and free troposphere (FT) as a function of the synoptic condition, but the model does not capture the full range of the measured concentrations. Predicted OM concentration is at the lower end of the observed mass. The bias may be attributable to the missing aqueous chemistry processes of organic compounds, the uncertainties in meteorological fields, the assumption on the deposition velocity of condensable organic vapours, and the uncertainties in the anthropogenic emissions of primary organic carbon. Aerosol particle number concentration (condensation nuclei, CN) is overestimated by a factor 1.4 and 1.7 within PBL and FT, respectively. Model bias is most likely attributable to the uncertainties of primary particle emissions (mostly in the PBL) and to the nucleation rate. The overestimation of simulated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is more contained with respect to that of CN. The CCN efficiency, which is a measure of the ability of aerosol particles to nucleate cloud droplets, is underestimated by a factor of 1.5 and 3.8 in the PBL and FT, respectively. The comparison with MODIS data shows that the model overestimates the aerosol optical thickness (AOT). The domain averages (for

  8. MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth retrieval over land considering surface BRDF effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere play an important role in the climate system and human health. Retrieval from satellite data, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD), one of most important indices of aerosol optical properties, has been extensively investigated. Benefiting from the high resolution at spatial and temporal and the maturity of the aerosol retrieval algorithm, MOderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Dark Target AOD product has been extensively applied in other scientific research such as climate change and air pollution. The latest product - MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target AOD (C6_DT) has been released. However, the accuracy of C6_DT AOD (global mean ±0.03) over land is still too low for the constraint on radiative forcing in the climate system, where the uncertainty should be reduced to ±0.02. The major uncertainty mainly lies on the underestimation/overestimation of the surface contribution to the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA) radiance since a lambertian surface is assumed in the C6_DT land algorithm. In the real world, it requires considering the heterogeneity of the surface reflection in the radiative transfer process. Based on this, we developed a new algorithm to retrieve AOD by considering surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effects. The surface BRDF is much more complicated than isotropic reflection, described as 4 elements: directional-directional, directional-hemispherical, hemispherical-directional and hemispherical-hemispherical reflectance, and coupled into radiative transfer equation to generate an accurate top of atmosphere reflectance. The limited MODIS measurements (three channels available) allow us to retrieve only three parameters, which including AOD, the surface directional-directional reflectance and fine aerosol ratio η. The other three elements of the surface reflectance are expected to be constrained by ancillary data and assumptions or "a priori" information since there are more unknowns than MODIS

  9. The Effect of Recent Aerosol Trends on Solar Radiation in the Central and Southeastern United States: Implications for Regional Hydrology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusworth, D.; Mickley, L. J.; Leibensperger, E. M.; Iacono, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Observations show large increases in summertime (JJA) surface solar radiation (SWdn) over the central and southeastern United States during the last 20 years, as much as a +40 Wm-2 at midday. At the same time, in response to environmental regulations in the early 1990s, emissions of U.S. aerosol precursors have decreased by as much as 60%. Detecting a possible connection between these two trends has been difficult due to the secondary effects of aerosols on cloud concentration and lifetime, and previous efforts have failed to find a direct link. Here we investigate the clear-sky direct effect of decreasing U.S. aerosols on climate, using a radiative transfer model (RRTMG) driven by 1997-2014 measurements of aerosol optical depth at Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) sites in the central and southeastern United States. We impose aerosol asymmetry parameters and single scattering albedos from nearby Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. Preliminary results indicate that declining aerosols drive a summer noontime change in clear-sky SWdn of +25 Wm-2 since 1997 at Goodwin Creek, MS, accounting for 56% of the observed increase in SWdn at that site. Similarly, we find that aerosols increase clear-sky SWdn by +6.5 Wm-2 in Bondville, IL, which accounts for 21% of the observed SWdn trend there. These results suggest that the climate in these regions of the U.S. may be sensitive to recent reductions in aerosol concentrations, especially during summer months. We also analyze in situ soil measurements from the Illinois Climate Network from 1990-present, and find that a significant decrease in soil moisture (-0.6 m3 m-3 a-1) accompanies the increase in SWdn, implying a link between aerosol trends and regional hydrology. Aerosol reductions are expected to continue in the United States and may further influence regional climate including hydrological factors. Our work has implications for polluted regions outside the U.S., where future reductions in the aerosol burden

  10. Overview of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins: exposures and effects.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lora E; Backer, Lorraine C; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Florida red tide is caused by Karenia brevis, a dinoflagellate that periodically blooms, releasing its potent neurotoxin, brevetoxin, into the surrounding waters and air along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. Exposure to Florida red tide toxins has been associated with adverse human health effects and massive fish and marine mammal deaths. The articles in this mini-monograph describe the ongoing interdisciplinary and interagency research program that characterizes the exposures and health effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins). The interdisciplinary research program uses animal models and laboratory studies to develop hypotheses and apply these findings to in situ human exposures. Our ultimate goal is to develop appropriate prevention measures and medical interventions to mitigate or prevent adverse health effects from exposure to complex mixtures of aerosolized red tide toxins.

  11. Aerosol Radiative Effects: Expected Variations in Optical Depth Spectra and Climate Forcing, with Implications for Closure Experiment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Stowe, L. L.; Hobbs, P. V.; Podolske, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We examine measurement strategies for reducing uncertainties in aerosol direct radiative forcing by focused experiments that combine surface, air, and space measurements. Particularly emphasized are closure experiments, which test the degree of agreement among different measurements and calculations of aerosol properties and radiative effects. By combining results from previous measurements of large-scale smokes, volcanic aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols with models of aerosol evolution, we estimate the spatial and temporal variability in optical depth spectra to be expected in the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, planned for summer 1996 off the Eastern U.S. seaboard). In particular, we examine the expected changes in the wavelength dependence of optical depth as particles evolve through nucleation, growth by condensation and coagulation, and removal via sedimentation. We then calculate the expected radiative climate forcing (i.e. change in net radiative flux) for typical expected aerosols and measurement conditions (e.g. solar elevations, surface albedos, radiometer altitudes). These calculations use new expressions for flux and albedo changes, which account not only for aerosol absorption, but also for instantaneous solar elevation angles and the dependence of surface albedo on solar elevation. These factors, which are usually ignored or averaged in calculations of global aerosol effects, can have a strong influence on fluxes measured in closure experiments, and hence must be accounted for in calculations if closure is to be convincingly tested. We compare the expected measurement signal to measurement uncertainties expected for various techniques in various conditions. Thereby we derive recommendations for measurement strategies that combine surface, airborne, and spaceborne measurements.

  12. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  13. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-28

    In this study, aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ε, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ε increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitionalmore » regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ε further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.« less

  14. Observations of the first aerosol indirect effect in shallow cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Barnard, James C.; Senum, Gunar; Springston, Stephen R.

    2011-02-08

    Data from the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) are used to estimate the impact of both aerosol indirect effects and cloud dynamics on the microphysical and optical properties of shallow cumuli observed in the vicinity of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Not surprisingly, we find that the amount of light scattered by the clouds is dominated by their liquid water content (LWC), which in turn is driven by cloud dynamics. However, removing the effect of cloud dynamics by examining the scattering normalized by LWC shows a strong sensitivity of scattering to pollutant loading. These results suggest that even moderately sized cities, like Oklahoma City, can have a measureable impact on the optical properties of shallow cumuli.

  15. Effect of aerosol concentration and absorbing aerosol on the radiation fog life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maalick, Z.; Kühn, T.; Korhonen, H.; Kokkola, H.; Laaksonen, A.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Analogous to cloud formation, the formation and life cycle of fogs is largely influenced by aerosol particles. The objective of this work is to analyze how changes in aerosol properties affect the fog life cycle, with special emphasis on how droplet concentrations change with cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and on the effect that absorbing black carbon (BC) particles have on fog dissipation. For our simulation case study, we chose a typical fall time radiation fog at mid-latitudes (45° north) in fairly highly polluted conditions. Our results show that CCN concentrations have a strong influence on the fog lifetime. This is because the immediate effect of CCN on cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC) is enhanced through two positive feedback loops: (1) Higher CDNC leads to more radiative cooling at the fog top, which leads to even stronger activation and (2) if CDNC is higher, the average droplet size is smaller, which slows down droplet removal through sedimentation. The effect that radiation fogs have on solar surface irradiation is large - the daily mean can change by 50% if CCN concentrations are doubled or halved (considering a reference CCN mixing ratio of 800 #/mg). With the same changes in CCN, the total fog lifetime increases 160 min or decreases 65 min, respectively. Although BC has a noticeable effect on fog height and dissipation time, its relative effect compared to CCN is small, even if BC concentrations are high. The fog formation is very sensitive to initial meteorological conditions which may be altered considerably if fog was present the previous day. This effect was neglected here, and future simulations, which span several days, may thus be a valuable extension of this study.

  16. Discernible signals of aerosol effects on the diurnal, weekly and decadal variations in thunderstorm activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol can affect atmospheric convection, cloud and precipitation in a variety of means by altering energy balance at the surface and in the atmospheric column, and by altering cloud micro- and macro-physical properties. The effects are often contingent upon meteorological variables and aerosol properties. By reducing surface energy budget, aerosol tends to suppress convection, but aerosol-induced heating in the lower atmosphere can destabilize the upper atmosphere and strengthen convection. Aerosol-induced altering cloud microphysics may also suppress or invigorate cloud development pending on various factors. In this talk, I will illustrate how aerosols likely contribute to the thunderstorm variability on three distinct time scales from diurnal, weekly to decadal and how different types of aerosols and varying meteorological conditions may affect with the observed trends. I will first demonstrate the opposite effects of conservative scattering and hygroscopic aerosols versus absorbing and hydrophobic aerosol on the long-term trends of thunderstorms. I will then illustrate that aerosol can have a discernible effect on the weekly cycle of thunderstorms and there is the dependence of the phase of the weekly cycle on aerosol types. Last, I will show how aerosol delays the occurrence of thunderstorms. Of course, the plausible connections are subject to various uncertainties that should be tackled with more rigorous modeling and extensive observation studies.

  17. Observed aerosol-induced radiative effect on plant productivity in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, S.; Unger, N.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    We apply satellite observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in conjunction with flux tower-derived estimates of gross primary productivity (GPP) to probe the relationship between atmospheric aerosol loading and carbon uptake rate at 10 select sites (4 deciduous broadleaf, 3 cropland, 1 evergreen needle leaf, 1 mixed forest and 1 grassland) on hourly time scales in the growing season in the eastern United States. For deciduous and mixed forests, the aerosol light scattering increases GPP with a maximum effect observed under polluted conditions (AOD >0.6), when diffuse radiation is 40-60%. During midday hours, high AOD conditions (>0.4) enhance plant productivity by ∼13% in deciduous forests. In contrast, we find that high diffuse light fraction does not increase the carbon uptake rate in croplands and grasslands; for these ecosystems, we estimate that high AOD conditions reduce GPP by ∼17% during midday hours. Our findings are consistent with previous studies that have attributed these contrasting response sensitivities to the complex and closed canopy architecture of forests versus crops and grasslands. C4 but not C3 crops may benefit from pollution-induced changes in diffuse and direct light. Further research is needed to investigate the role of local meteorology as a possible confounder in the connection between atmospheric aerosols and plant productivity.

  18. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and Their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Tan, Qian; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007, during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations and ground-based remote sensing and in-situ measurements have become available. We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol optical depth and concentration trends and their relationship to the changes of emissions" and assess the role aerosols play in the multi-decadal change of solar radiation reaching the surface (known as "dimming" or "brightening") at different regions of the world, including the major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variabilities, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  19. Aerosol indirect effects – general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

    2009-11-16

    -wave total aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5±0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estim¬ate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic τa and satellite-retrieved Nd – τa regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) es¬timate of -0.4±0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7±0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2±0.4 Wm-2.

  20. Can anthropogenic aerosol concentrations effect the snowfall rate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Zhang, J.; Pi, J.

    2003-04-01

    The mesoscale model GESIMA is used to simulate microphysical properties of Arctic clouds and their effect on radiation. Different case studies during the FIRE.ACE/SHEBA project show that GESIMA is able to simulate the cloud boundaries, ice and liquid water content and effective radii in good agreement with observations. For two different aerosol scenarios, the simulation results show that the anthropogenic aerosol can alter microphysical properties of Arctic clouds, and consequently modify surface precipitation. Borys et al. (2000) proposed that anthropogenically-induced decreases in cloud droplet size inhibit the riming process. On the contrary, we find that the accretion of snow crystals with cloud droplets is increased in the polluted cloud due to its higher cloud droplet number concentration. Instead the autoconversion rate of cloud droplets and accretion of drizzle by snow decreases caused by the shut-down of the collision-coalescence process in the polluted cloud. The amount of precipitation reaching the surface as snow depends crucially on the crystal shape. If aggregates are assumed, then a 10-fold increase in aerosol concentration leads to an increase in accumulated snow by 40% after 7 hours of simulation whereas the snow amount decreases by 30% when planar crystals are assumed because of the larger accretion efficiency of snow crystals with cloud droplets in case of aggregates. We will also perform climate model simulations to estimate the importance of this effect globally.

  1. Dependence of the spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio on aerosol spectral distribution and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Kambezidis, H. D.; Dumka, U. C.; Psiloglou, B. E.

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the modification of the clear-sky spectral diffuse-direct irradiance ratio (DDR) as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA), spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA). The solar spectrum under various atmospheric conditions is derived with Simple Model of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer of Sunshine (SMARTS) radiative transfer code, using the urban and continental aerosol models as inputs. The spectral DDR can be simulated with great accuracy by an exponentially decreasing curve, while the aerosol optical properties strongly affect the scattering processes in the atmosphere, thus modifying the DDR especially in the ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Furthermore, the correlation between spectral DDR and spectral AOD can be represented precisely by an exponential function and can give valuable information about the dominance of specific aerosol types. The influence of aerosols on spectral DDR increases with increasing SZA, while the simulations using the urban aerosol model as input in SMARTS are closer to the measurements taken in the Athens urban environment. The SMARTS simulations are interrelated with spectral measurements and can be used for indirect estimations of SSA. Overall, the current work provides some theoretical approximations and functions that help in understanding the dependence of DDR on astronomical and atmospheric parameters.

  2. Simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and surface optical properties from combined airborne- and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer, CAR, and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 μm) and angular range (180°) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  3. Simultaneous Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Optical Properties from Combined Airborne- and Ground-Based Direct and Diffuse Radiometric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Dubovik, O.; King, M. D.; Sinyuk, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for simultaneously retrieving aerosol and surface reflectance properties from combined airborne and ground-based direct and diffuse radiometric measurements. The method is based on the standard Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) method for retrieving aerosol size distribution, complex index of refraction, and single scattering albedo, but modified to retrieve aerosol properties in two layers, below and above the aircraft, and parameters on surface optical properties from combined datasets (Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) and AERONET data). A key advantage of this method is the inversion of all available spectral and angular data at the same time, while accounting for the influence of noise in the inversion procedure using statistical optimization. The wide spectral (0.34-2.30 m) and angular range (180 ) of the CAR instrument, combined with observations from an AERONET sunphotometer, provide sufficient measurement constraints for characterizing aerosol and surface properties with minimal assumptions. The robustness of the method was tested on observations made during four different field campaigns: (a) the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2000 over Mongu, Zambia, (b) the Intercontinental Transport Experiment-Phase B over Mexico City, Mexico (c) Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Central Facility, Oklahoma, USA, and (d) the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) over Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Alaska, USA. The four areas are dominated by different surface characteristics and aerosol types, and therefore provide good test cases for the new inversion method.

  4. Simulating Changes in Tropospheric Aerosol Burden and its Radiative Effects across the Northern Hemisphere: Contrasting Multi-Decadal Trends between Asia and North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, R.; Xing, J.; Pleim, J. E.; Wong, D. C.; Hogrefe, C.; Gan, C. M.; Wei, C.

    2014-12-01

    Though aerosol radiative effects have been recognized as some of the largest sources of uncertainty among the forcers of climate change, the verification of the spatial and temporal variability of the magnitude and directionality of aerosol radiative forcing has remained challenging. Significant and contrasting changes in tropospheric aerosol burden have occurred over the past two decades as a result of changing patterns of emissions of primary aerosol and gaseous precursors. During this period, SO2 and NOx emissions across the US have reduced by about 66% & 50%, respectively. In contrast, anthropogenic emissions have increased dramatically across Asia. These changes provide an opportunity for conducting a systematic investigation of the processes regulating aerosol distributions, their optical properties, and verification of their simulated radiative effects for past conditions relative to measurements. We conduct multi-decadal simulations for the 1990-2010 period with the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system over a domain covering the northern hemisphere and a nested finer resolution continental U.S. domain. Simulated aerosol size and composition and size are used to estimate their optical properties which are then used in the radiation calculations impacting both photolysis rates and atmospheric dynamics. Model results (aerosol burden and composition, radiation, temperature) over North America and Asia are analyzed in conjunction surface, aloft and remote sensing measurements to contrast the differing trends in aerosol-radiation interactions in these regions over the past two decades. Both model and measurements indicate significant reductions in tropospheric aerosol burden across North America and an associated increase in shortwave radiation at the surface. In contrast, an increase in tropospheric aerosol burden and reduction in surface shortwave radiation in noted across large portions of Asia during the past two decades. Simulated trends in aerosol

  5. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  6. Delineating the effect of El-Nino Southern Oscillations using oxygen and sulfur isotope anomalies of sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaheen, R.; Abaunza Quintero, M. M.; Jackson, T.; McCabe, J.; Savarino, J. P.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols, unlike greenhouse gases, contribute to global cooling by acting as cloud condensation nuclei in the troposphere and by directly reflecting solar radiation in the stratosphere. To understand the long-term effect of natural and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol on the climate cycle, it is critical to obtain a clear picture of the factors controlling the transport and transformation of sulfate aerosols. We have employed both oxygen triple isotopes and sulfur quadruple isotopes on sulfates from Antarctic ice samples to define the oxidation history, long range transport dynamics, and sources of sulfate aerosols over time. The measurements are used to deconvolve the impact of natural and anthropogenic aerosols on the stratospheric sulfate aerosol composition. Sulfate aerosols were extracted from a snow pit at the South Pole (1979-2002) with a high resolution temporal (6 month) record of the winter and summer seasons covering two largest volcanic events, Pinatubo and El-chichon and three largest ENSO events of the century. All three oxygen and four sulfur isotopes were measured on the extracted sulfate (Shaheen et al., 2013). The high temperature pyrolysis (1000oC) of silver sulfate yielded O2 and SO2. The oxygen triple isotopic composition of the O2 gas was used to determine the oxidation history of sulfate aerosol and SO2 gas obtained during this reaction was utilized to measure sulfur quadruple isotopes following appropriate reaction chemistry (Farquhar et al., 2001). The data revealed that oxygen isotope anomalies in Antarctic aerosols (Δ17O = 0.8-3.7‰) from 1990 to 2001 are strongly linked to the variation in ozone levels in the upper stratosphere/lower stratosphere. The variations in ozone levels are reflective of the intensity of the ENSO events and changes in relative humidity in the atmosphere during this time period. Sulfate concentrations and sulfur quadruple isotopic composition and associated anomalies were used to elucidate the sources of

  7. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  8. Effect of Tropospheric Aerosols in Satellite-Based Trace Gas Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Torres, Omar; Yang, Kai; Vassilkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Scattering and absorption by tropospheric aerosol particles have an effect on the airmass factor (AMF), a fundamental quantity for trace gas concentration retrieval by inversion of satellite measurements. The interference effect depends on the aerosols micro-physical and optical properties as well as the relative distribution of the tropospheric trace gas and aerosol load. Quantifying the aerosol impact on trace gas retrieval requires a sensitivity study using radiative transfer calculations. In this presentation we will describe a recently initiated effort to characterize the aerosol-related error in trace gas retrievals when the presence of aerosol particles is not accounted in the inversion procedure. A general description of the project will be presented and preliminary results on aerosol effects on SO2 retrieved concentrations will be discussed.

  9. Aerosol Properties Derived from Airborne Sky Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent NASA and DoE Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions.The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS (Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys) experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE (Department of Energy)-sponsored TCAP (Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013) experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and air-mass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance

  10. Aerosol properties derived from airborne sky radiance and direct beam measurements in recent NASA and DoE field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Russell, P. B.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; LeBlanc, S. E.; Schmidt, S.; Pilewskie, P.; Song, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new 4STAR capabilities, with an emphasis on 26 high-quality sky radiance measurements carried out by 4STAR in SEAC4RS. We compare collocated 4STAR and AERONET sky radiances, as well as their retrievals of aerosol microphysical properties for a subset of the available case studies. We summarize the particle property and airmass characterization studies made possible by the combined 4STAR direct beam and sky radiance observations.

  11. Observed aerosol effects on marine cloud nucleation and supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Sorooshian, Armin; Seinfeld, John H.; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Nenes, Athanasios; Leaitch, W. Richard; Macdonald, Anne Marie; Ahlm, Lars; Chen, Yi-Chun; Coggon, Matthew; Corrigan, Ashley; Craven, Jill S.; Flagan, Richard C.; Frossard, Amanda A.; Hawkins, Lelia N.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Jung, Eunsil; Lin, Jack J.; Metcalf, Andrew R.; Modini, Robin; Mülmenstädt, Johannes; Roberts, Greg C.; Shingler, Taylor; Song, Siwon; Wang, Zhen; Wonaschütz, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer include primary organic and salt particles from sea spray and combustion-derived particles from ships and coastal cities. These particle types serve as nuclei for marine cloud droplet activation, although the particles that activate depend on the particle size and composition as well as the supersaturation that results from cloud updraft velocities. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) 2011 was a targeted aircraft campaign to assess how different particle types nucleate cloud droplets. As part of E-PEACE 2011, we studied the role of marine particles as cloud droplet nuclei and used emitted particle sources to separate particle-induced feedbacks from dynamical variability. The emitted particle sources included shipboard smoke-generated particles with 0.05-1 μm diameters (which produced tracks measured by satellite and had drop composition characteristic of organic smoke) and combustion particles from container ships with 0.05-0.2 μm diameters (which were measured in a variety of conditions with droplets containing both organic and sulfate components) [1]. Three central aspects of the collaborative E-PEACE results are: (1) the size and chemical composition of the emitted smoke particles compared to ship-track-forming cargo ship emissions as well as background marine particles, with particular attention to the role of organic particles, (2) the characteristics of cloud track formation for smoke and cargo ships, as well as the role of multi-layered low clouds, and (3) the implications of these findings for quantifying aerosol indirect effects. For comparison with the E-PEACE results, the preliminary results of the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) 2012 provided evidence of the cloud-nucleating roles of both marine organic particles and coastal urban pollution, with simultaneous measurements of the effective supersaturations of the clouds in the

  12. Meteorological and aerosol effects on marine cloud microphysical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Corrigan, C. E.; Roberts, G. C.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Bertram, A. K.; Zhao, R.; Lee, A. K. Y.; Lin, J. J.; Nenes, A.; Wang, Z.; Wonaschütz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K. J.; Jonsson, H.; Toom, D.; Macdonald, A. M.; Leaitch, W. R.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation, cloud droplet distributions, and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets studies provided measurements in six case studies of cloud thermodynamic properties, initial particle number distribution and composition, and cloud drop distribution. In this study, we use simulations from a chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce observed cloud droplet distributions of the case studies. Four cases had subadiabatic lapse rates, resulting in fewer activated droplets, lower liquid water content, and higher cloud base height than an adiabatic lapse rate. A weighted ensemble of simulations that reflect measured variation in updraft velocity and cloud base height was used to reproduce observed droplet distributions. Simulations show that organic hygroscopicity in internally mixed cases causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (CR) (<0.01), except for cargo ship and smoke plumes, which increased CR by 0.02 and 0.07, respectively, owing to their high organic mass fraction. Organic hygroscopicity had larger effects on droplet concentrations for cases with higher aerosol concentrations near the critical diameter (namely, polluted cases with a modal peak near 0.1 µm). Differences in simulated droplet spectral widths (k) caused larger differences in CR than organic hygroscopicity in cases with organic mass fractions of 60% or less for the cases shown. Finally, simulations from a numerical parameterization of cloud droplet activation suitable for general circulation models compared well with the ACP model, except under high organic mass fraction.

  13. Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Data Sets and Application of Radiative Transfer Models to Compute Aerosol Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat

    2005-01-01

    The Bay Area Environmental Research Institute (BAER) scientists have worked with the NASA Ames Research Center sunphotometer group led by Dr. Philip Russell for many years researching the climatic effects of aerosol particles in the stratosphere and troposphere. We have continued to work with the NASA Ames sunphotometer group in research activities representing funded, peer-reviewed proposals to NASA, NOAA and DOE. The activities are described in those proposals and also in the documents provided to the Grants Office earlier. This is the final report from January 1,2002 - June 30, 2005. The report consists of a compilation of 41 peer-reviewed publications (published, in press or submitted) produced under this Cooperative Agreement and 43 first-authored conference presentations. To save paper, reprints are not included but will, of course, be provided upon request.

  14. Untangling aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation in a buffered system.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Bjorn; Feingold, Graham

    2009-10-01

    It is thought that changes in the concentration of cloud-active aerosol can alter the precipitation efficiency of clouds, thereby changing cloud amount and, hence, the radiative forcing of the climate system. Despite decades of research, it has proved frustratingly difficult to establish climatically meaningful relationships among the aerosol, clouds and precipitation. As a result, the climatic effect of the aerosol remains controversial. We propose that the difficulty in untangling relationships among the aerosol, clouds and precipitation reflects the inadequacy of existing tools and methodologies and a failure to account for processes that buffer cloud and precipitation responses to aerosol perturbations.

  15. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution and associated radiative effects in the Yangtze Delta region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianjun; Zheng, Youfei; Li, Zhanqing; Flynn, Connor; Cribb, Maureen

    2012-08-01

    Four years of columnar aerosol optical properties and a one-year vertical profiles of aerosol particle extinction coefficient at 527 nm are analyzed at Taihu in the central Yangtze River Delta region in eastern China. Seasonal variations of aerosol optical properties, vertical distribution, and influence on shortwave radiation and heating rates were investigated. Multiyear variations of aerosol optical depths (AOD), Ångstrom exponents, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry factor (ASY) are analyzed, together with the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. AOD is largest in summer and smallest in winter. SSAs exhibit weak seasonal variation with the smallest values occurring during winter and the largest during summer. The vast majority of aerosol particles are below 2 km, and about 62%, 67%, 67% and 83% are confined to below 1 km in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. Five-day back trajectory analyses show that the some aerosols aloft are traced back to northern/northwestern China, as far as Mongolia and Siberia, in spring, autumn and winter. The presence of dust aerosols were identified based on the linear depolarization measurements together with other information (i.e., back trajectory, precipitation, aerosol index). Dust strongly impacts the vertical particle distribution in spring and autumn, with much smaller effects in winter. The annual mean aerosol direct shortwave radiative forcing (efficiency) at the bottom, top and within the atmosphere are -34.8 ± 9.1 (-54.4 ± 5.3), -8.2 ± 4.8 (-13.1 ± 1.5) and 26.7 ± 9.4 (41.3 ± 4.6) W/m2 (Wm-2 τ-1), respectively. The mean reduction in direct and diffuse radiation reaching surface amount to 109.2 ± 49.4 and 66.8 ± 33.3 W/m2, respectively. Aerosols significantly alter the vertical profile of solar heating, with great implications for atmospheric stability and dynamics within the lower troposphere.

  16. Effects of flame made zinc oxide particles in human lung cells - a comparison of aerosol and suspension exposures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Predominantly, studies of nanoparticle (NPs) toxicology in vitro are based upon the exposure of submerged cell cultures to particle suspensions. Such an approach however, does not reflect particle inhalation. As a more realistic simulation of such a scenario, efforts were made towards direct delivery of aerosols to air-liquid-interface cultivated cell cultures by the use of aerosol exposure systems. This study aims to provide a direct comparison of the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs when delivered as either an aerosol, or in suspension to a triple cell co-culture model of the epithelial airway barrier. To ensure dose–equivalence, ZnO-deposition was determined in each exposure scenario by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Biological endpoints being investigated after 4 or 24h incubation include cytotoxicity, total reduced glutathione, induction of antioxidative genes such as heme-oxygenase 1 (HO–1) as well as the release of the (pro)-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Results Off-gases released as by-product of flame ZnO synthesis caused a significant decrease of total reduced GSH and induced further the release of the cytokine TNFα, demonstrating the influence of the gas phase on aerosol toxicology. No direct effects could be attributed to ZnO particles. By performing suspension exposure to avoid the factor “flame-gases”, particle specific effects become apparent. Other parameters such as LDH and HO–1 were not influenced by gaseous compounds: Following aerosol exposure, LDH levels appeared elevated at both timepoints and the HO–1 transcript correlated positively with deposited ZnO-dose. Under submerged conditions, the HO–1 induction scheme deviated for 4 and 24h and increased extracellular LDH was found following 24h exposure. Conclusion In the current study, aerosol and suspension-exposure has been compared by exposing cell cultures to equivalent amounts of ZnO. Both exposure strategies differ fundamentally in their dose–response pattern

  17. Effects of aerosol on evaporation, freezing and precipitation in a multiple cloud system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoung Soo; Kim, Byung-Gon; Yum, Seong Soo; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Jung, Chang-Hoon; Um, Jun Shik; Li, Zhanqing; Hong, JinKyu; Chang, Ki-Ho; Jeong, Jin-Yim

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol effects on clouds and precipitation account for a large portion of uncertainties in the prediction of the future course of global hydrologic circulations and climate. As a process of a better understanding of interactions between aerosol, clouds and precipitation, simulations are performed for a mixed-phase convective multiple-cloud system over the tropics. Studies on single-cloud systems have shown that aerosol-induced increases in freezing, associated increases in parcel buoyancy and thus the intensity of clouds (or updrafts) are a main mechanism which controls aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions in convective clouds. However, in the multiple-cloud system that plays much more important roles in global hydrologic circulations and thus climate than single-cloud systems, aerosol effects on condensation play the most important role in aerosol-induced changes in the intensity of clouds and the effects on freezing play a negligible role in those changes. Aerosol-induced enhancement in evaporation intensifies gust fronts and increases the number of subsequently developing clouds, which leads to the substantial increases in condensation and associated intensity of convection. Although aerosol-induced enhancement in freezing takes part in the increases in condensation by inducing stronger convergence around cloud bottom, the increases in condensation are ~one order of magnitude larger than those in freezing. It is found that while aerosol-induced increases in freezing create intermittent extremely heavy precipitation, aerosol-induced increases in evaporation enhance light and medium precipitation in the multiple-cloud system here. This increase in light and medium precipitation makes it possible that cumulative precipitation increases with increasing aerosol concentration, although the increase is small. It is interesting that the altitude of the maximum of the time- and domain-averaged hydrometeor mass densities is quite robust to increases in aerosol

  18. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Tripathi, Sachchida; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs throughout the world, it contains substantial quantity of liquid water and generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but it also has the potential to form highly oxidized secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient aerosols. On the other hand higher organic aerosols (OA) loading tend to decrease the overall oxidation level (O/C) of the particle phase organics, due to enhanced partitioning of less oxidized organics from gas to particle phase. However, combined impact of these two parameters; aqueous oxidation and OA loading, on the overall oxidation ratio (O/C) of ambient OA has never been studied. To assess this, real time ambient sampling using HR-ToF-AMS was carried out at Kanpur, India from 15 December 2014 - 10 February 2015. In first 3 weeks of this campaign, very high OA loading is (134 ± 42 μg/m3) observed (termed as high loading or HL period) while loading is substantially reduced from 2nd January, 2016 (56 ± 20 μg/m3, termed as low loading or LL period) . However, both the loading period was affected by several fog episodes (10 in HL and 7 in LL), thus providing the opportunity of studying the combined effects of fog and OA loading on OA oxidation. It is found that O/C ratio is very strongly anti-correlated with OA loading in both the loading period, however, slope of this ant-correlation is much steep during HL period than in LL period. Source apportionment of OA revealed that there is drastic change in the types of OA from HL to LL period, clearly indicating difference in OA composition from HL to LL period. During foggy night continuous oxidation of OA is observed from early evening to early morning with 15-20% enhancement in O/C ratio, while the same is absent during non-foggy period, clearly indicating the efficient fog processing of ambient OA. It is also found that night time fog aqueous oxidation can be as effective as daytime photo chemistry in oxidation of OA. Fog

  19. Aerosol Indirect Effect on Warm Clouds over Eastern China Using Combined CALIOP and MODIS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianping; Wang, Fu; Huang, Jingfeng; Li, Xiaowen

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol, one of key components of the climate system, is highly variable, both temporally and spatially. It often exerts great influences on the cloud-precipitation chain processes by serving as CCN/IN, altering cloud microphysics and its life cycle. Yet, the aerosol indirect effect on clouds remains largely unknown, because the initial changes in clouds due to aerosols may be enhanced or dampened by such feedback processes as modified cloud dynamics, or evaporation of the smaller droplets due to the competition for water vapor. In this study, we attempted to quantify the aerosol effects on warm cloud over eastern China, based on near-simultaneous retrievals from MODIS/AQUA, CALIOP/CALIPSO and CPR/CLOUDSAT during the period 2006 to 2010. The seasonality of aerosol from ground-based PM10 is quite different from that estimated from MODIS AOD. This result is corroborated by lower level profile of aerosol occurrence frequency from CALIOP, indicating the significant role CALIOP could play in aerosol-cloud interaction. The combined use of CALIOP and CPR facilitate the process to exactly determine the (vertical) position of warm cloud relative to aerosol, out of six scenarios in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status in terms of aerosol-cloud mixing status, which shows as follows: AO (Aerosol only), CO (Cloud only), SASC (Single aerosol-single cloud), SADC (single aerosol-double cloud), DASC (double aerosol-single cloud), and others. Results shows that about 54% of all the cases belong to mixed status, among all the collocated aerosol-cloud cases. Under mixed condition, a boomerang shape is observed, i.e., reduced cloud droplet radius (CDR) is associated with increasing aerosol at moderate aerosol pollution (AOD<0.4), becoming saturated at AOD of 0.5, followed by an increase in CDR with aerosol. In contrast, there is no such boomerang shape found for (aerosol-cloud) separated cases. We categorize dataset into warm-season and cold-season subsets to figure out how the

  20. Effects of tropospheric aerosols on radiative flux calculations at UV and visible wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.S.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-08-01

    The surface fluxes in the wavelength range 175 to 735nm have been calculated for an atmosphere which contains a uniformly mixed aerosol layer of thickness 1km at the earth`s surface. Two different aerosol types were considered, a rural aerosol, and an urban aerosol. The visibility range for the aerosol layers was 95 to 15 km. Surface flux ratios (15km/95km) were in agreement with previously published results for the rural aerosol layer to within about 2%. The surface flux ratios vary from 7 to 14% for the rural aerosol layer and from 13 to 23% for the urban aerosol layer over the wavelength range. A tropospheric radiative forcing of about 1.3% of the total tropospheric flux was determined for the 95km to 15km visibility change in the rural aerosol layer, indicating the potential of tropospheric feedback effects on the surface flux changes. This effect was found to be negligible for the urban aerosol layer. Stratospheric layer heating rate changes due to visibility changes in either the rural or urban aerosol layer were found to be negligible.

  1. Improving Bulk Microphysics Parameterizations in Simulations of Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Renyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Franklin, Charmaine N.

    2013-06-05

    To improve the microphysical parameterizations for simulations of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) in regional and global climate models, a double-moment bulk microphysical scheme presently implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is modified and the results are compared against atmospheric observations and simulations produced by a spectral bin microphysical scheme (SBM). Rather than using prescribed aerosols as in the original bulk scheme (Bulk-OR), a prognostic doublemoment aerosol representation is introduced to predict both the aerosol number concentration and mass mixing ratio (Bulk-2M). The impacts of the parameterizations of diffusional growth and autoconversion and the selection of the embryonic raindrop radius on the performance of the bulk microphysical scheme are also evaluated. Sensitivity modeling experiments are performed for two distinct cloud regimes, maritime warm stratocumulus clouds (SC) over southeast Pacific Ocean from the VOCALS project and continental deep convective clouds (DCC) in the southeast of China from the Department of Energy/ARM Mobile Facility (DOE/AMF) - China field campaign. The results from Bulk-2M exhibit a much better agreement in the cloud number concentration and effective droplet radius in both the SC and DCC cases with those from SBM and field measurements than those from Bulk-OR. In the SC case particularly, Bulk-2M reproduces the observed drizzle precipitation, which is largely inhibited in Bulk-OR. Bulk-2M predicts enhanced precipitation and invigorated convection with increased aerosol loading in the DCC case, consistent with the SBM simulation, while Bulk-OR predicts the opposite behaviors. Sensitivity experiments using four different types of autoconversion schemes reveal that the autoconversion parameterization is crucial in determining the raindrop number, mass concentration, and drizzle formation for warm 2 stratocumulus clouds. An embryonic raindrop size of 40 μm is determined as a more

  2. The effect of the tramway track construction on the aerosol pollution in Debrecen, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furu, E.; Katona-Szabo, I.; Angyal, A.; Szoboszlai, Z.; Török, Zs.; Kertész, Zs.

    2015-11-01

    In this study the effect of a new tramway track construction on the atmospheric aerosol concentration and composition in Debrecen, Hungary, was investigated. The tramway track construction started in 2011 and it was finished in 2013. PM2.5 and PM10 daily samples were collected with a Gent type filter unit in an urban background site 2 times a week. In addition, a sampling campaign direct next to the construction site was performed with 2-stage personal samplers between the 21st and 30th of September, 2011 - four hours a day, during working hours. We studied the change in concentration and composition of fine and coarse fraction aerosol in comparison with the average of the past 5 years. An additional goal was to investigate the personal aerosol exposure near to the construction sites. In the urban background site a significant increase could be observed both for the PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations for 2012 and 2013. In the elemental composition the concentration of Fe, Mn, Ni, and Cr increased significantly for the construction period. The PM10 concentrations measured direct next to the construction site were 10-20 higher than those measured at our urban background site or the data provided by the Hungarian Air Quality monitoring network. Days with very high Pb pollution level (∼3000 ng/m3) was also recorded.

  3. Atmospheric aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects (supplement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A digest of technical papers is presented. Topics include aerosol size distribution from spectral attenuation with scattering measurements; comparison of extinction and backscattering coefficients for measured and analytic stratospheric aerosol size distributions; using hybrid methods to solve problems in radiative transfer and in multiple scattering; blue moon phenomena; absorption refractive index of aerosols in the Denver pollution cloud; a two dimensional stratospheric model of the dispersion of aerosols from the Fuego volcanic eruption; the variation of the aerosol volume to light scattering coefficient; spectrophone in situ measurements of the absorption of visible light by aerosols; a reassessment of the Krakatoa volcanic turbidity, and multiple scattering in the sky radiance.

  4. Effects of aerosol from biomass burning on the global radiation budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Dickinson, Robert E.; O'Neill, Christine A.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the likely contribution of smoke particles from biomass burning to the global radiation balance. These particles act to reflect solar radiation directly; they also can act as cloud condensation nuclei, increasing the reflectivity of clouds. Together these effects, although uncertain, may add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 watts per square meter, comparable to the estimated contribution to sulfate aerosols. Anthropogenic increases of smoke emission thus may have helped weaken the net greenhouse warming from anthropogenic trace gases.

  5. Effects of aerosol from biomass burning on the global radiation budget.

    PubMed

    Penner, J E; Dickinson, R E; O'neill, C A

    1992-06-01

    An analysis is made of the likely contribution of smoke particles from biomass burning to the global radiation balance. These particles act to reflect solar radiation directly; they also can act as cloud condensation nuclei, increasing the reflectivity of clouds. Together these effects, although uncertain, may add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 watts per square meter, comparable to the estimated contribution of sulfate aerosols. Anthropogenic increases of smoke emission thus may have helped weaken the net greenhouse warming from anthropogenic trace gases.

  6. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  7. Effect of Aerosol and Ocean Representation on Simulated Climate Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated to what extent anthropogenic aerosols shaped 20th century surface temperatures, especially sea surface temperatures (SSTs), through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR). SSTs, in turn, are crucial in the context of atmospheric circulation and ocean heat uptake. Uncertainty considering anthropogenic aerosol forcing thus translates into uncertainty regarding ocean heat uptake and, ultimately, climate responses towards anthropogenic influences. We use the global climate model ECHAM to analyse the 20th century climate response towards either anthropogenic aerosols or well-mixed greenhouse gases or both with different representations of ocean and aerosols: atmosphere-only with prescribed SSTs and interactive aerosols; mixed-layer ocean and interactive or prescribed aerosols; fully coupled with prescribed aerosols. For interactive aerosols we use the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM). Our results suggest that up to 15% of global ocean surfaces undergo an SSR reduction of at least -4W/m² in the year 2000, due to anthropogenic aerosols. The area affected depends on how aerosols are represented and whether clear sky or all sky SSR is considered. In MLO equilibria with interactive aerosols, anthropogenic aerosols clearly shape surface temperature response patterns. This is to a lesser degree the case for the transient fully coupled case. Additivity of global mean temperature responses towards single forcings - an assumption often made in the literature - is not fulfilled for the MLO experiments, but for the fully coupled experiments. While some of these differences can be attributed to the differing ocean representation, it is implied that differing aerosol representation may play an even more relevant role. Thus, our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for surface temperature responses, but also highlight the relevance of choice of aerosol representation.

  8. Effects of aerosols on microphysics and on urban warm season precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosannah, Nathan

    Precipitation anomalies in and around major urban centers have been attributed to dynamic processes such as warm air updrafts induced by urban heat island events, and to microphysical processes affected by the release of natural and anthropogenic aerosols that affect atmospheric water balance. Both factors must be analyzed in order to fully understand the role that urban environments may have on precipitation. The research presented here is directed towards improving understanding of how aerosol particle size distribution (PSD) and land cover land use (LCLU) affect cloud processes and precipitation over a complex urban environment such as New York City (NYC). While aerosols are intrinsically necessary for rainfall formation, and urban environments also influence precipitation via convection enhancement, the partial contributions of each are not yet known. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate several NYC summer precipitation scenarios. PSD data from NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) complemented with National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2006 land surface data for NYC and northern New Jersey (NJ) were processed and assimilated directly into RAMS to determine the effect of varying PSD and LCLU on simulated precipitation amounts. An ensemble of 17 numerical simulations were configured and run. The first two runs were month long runs for July 2007, the first with constant PSD values, and the second with PSD updates. The third and fourth runs mirrored the first two simulations for a "No-City" case. A fifth month long simulation was run with average Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Giant CCN values. Next, twelve 24 hour simulations driven with high volumes of fine mode particles and with high volumes of coarse mode particles each under "City" and "No City" conditions were compared for 1-day localized and mesoscale events. Results suggest that RAMS precipitation results are sensitive to both PSD variation and land use variations.

  9. OMI tropospheric NO2 air mass factors over South America: effects of biomass burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Boersma, K. F.; Torres, O.; de Haan, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Biomass burning is an important and uncertain source of aerosols and NOx (NO + NO2) to the atmosphere. OMI observations of tropospheric NO2 are essential for characterizing this emissions source, but inaccuracies in the retrieval of NO2 tropospheric columns due to the radiative effects of aerosols, especially light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, are not well understood. It has been shown that the O2-O2 effective cloud fraction and pressure retrieval is sensitive to aerosol optical and physical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD). Aerosols implicitly influence the tropospheric air mass factor (AMF) calculations used in the NO2 retrieval through the effective cloud parameters used in the independent pixel approximation. In this work, we explicitly account for the effects of biomass burning aerosols in the tropospheric NO2 AMF calculation by including collocated aerosol extinction vertical profile observations from the CALIOP instrument, and aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) retrieved by the OMI near-UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) in the DISAMAR radiative transfer model for cloud-free scenes. Tropospheric AMFs calculated with DISAMAR were benchmarked against AMFs reported in the Dutch OMI NO2 (DOMINO) retrieval; the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the difference was 0.6 ± 8%. Averaged over three successive South American biomass burning seasons (2006-2008), the spatial correlation in the 500 nm AOD retrieved by OMI and the 532 nm AOD retrieved by CALIOP was 0.6, and 72% of the daily OMAERUV AOD observations were within 0.3 of the CALIOP observations. Overall, tropospheric AMFs calculated with observed aerosol parameters were on average 10% higher than AMFs calculated with effective cloud parameters. For effective cloud radiance fractions less than 30%, or effective cloud pressures greater than 800 hPa, the difference between tropospheric AMFs based on implicit and explicit aerosol parameters is on average 6 and 3

  10. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-07-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments.

  11. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  12. SEAC4RS Aerosol Radiative Effects and Heating Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, S.; Schmidt, S.; Redemann, J.; Hair, J. W.; Ferrare, R. A.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; LeBlanc, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    We will present (a) aerosol optical properties, (b) aerosol radiative forcing, (c) aerosol and gas absorption and heating rates, and (d) spectral surface albedo for cases from August 19th and 26th of the SEAC4RS mission. This analysis is based on irradiance data from the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), spectral aerosol optical depth from the Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), and extinction profiles from the DIAL/High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). We derive spectrally resolved values of single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo from the data, and determine profiles of absorption and heating rate segregated by absorber (aerosol and gas).

  13. Anthropogenic Aerosols and Tropical Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Kim, D.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Barth, M. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols can affect the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system and precipitation by acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nuclei (IN) and thus modifying the optical and microphysical properties as well as lifetimes of clouds. Recent studies have also suggested that the direct radiative effect of anthropogenic aerosols, particularly absorbing aerosols, can perturb the large-scale circulation and cause a significant change in both quantity and distribution of critical tropical precipitation systems ranging from Pacific and Indian to Atlantic Oceans. This effect of aerosols on precipitation often appears in places away from aerosol-concentrated regions and current results suggest that the precipitation changes caused by it could be much more substantial than that by the microphysics-based aerosol effect. To understand the detailed mechanisms and strengths of such a "remote impact" and the climate response/feedback to anthropogenic aerosols in general, an interactive aerosol-climate model has been developed based on the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) of NCAR. Its aerosol module describes size, chemical composition, and mixing states of various sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols. Several model processes are derived based on 3D cloud-resolving model simulations. We have conducted a set of long integrations using the model driven by radiative effects of different combinations of various carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols and their mixtures. The responses of tropical precipitation systems to the forcing of these aerosols are analyzed using both model and observational data. Detailed analyses on the aerosol-precipitation causal relations of two systems: i.e., the Indian summer monsoon and Pacific ITCZ will be specifically presented.

  14. Meteorological and Aerosol effects on Marine Cloud Microphysical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Modini, R. L.; Frossard, A. A.; Ahlm, L.; Roberts, G.; Hawkins, L. N.; Schroder, J. C.; Wang, Z.; Lee, A.; Abbatt, J.; Lin, J.; Nenes, A.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.; Noone, K.; Jonsson, H.; Albrecht, B. A.; Desiree, T. S.; Macdonald, A. M.; Seinfeld, J.; Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    Both meteorology and microphysics affect cloud formation and consequently their droplet distributions and shortwave reflectance. The Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (EPEACE) and the Stratocumulus Observations of Los-Angeles Emissions Derived Aerosol-Droplets (SOLEDAD) studies provide detailed measurements in 6 case studies of both cloud thermodynamic properties and initial particle number distribution and composition, as well as the resulting cloud drop distribution and composition. This study uses simulations of a detailed chemical and microphysical aerosol-cloud parcel (ACP) model with explicit kinetic drop activation to reproduce the observed cloud droplet distribution and composition. Four of the cases examined had a sub-adiabatic lapse rate, which was shown to have fewer droplets due to decreased maximum supersaturation, lower LWC and higher cloud base height, consistent with previous findings. These detailed case studies provided measured thermodynamics and microphysics that constrained the simulated droplet size distribution sufficiently to match the droplet number within 6% and the size within 19% for 4 of the 6 cases, demonstrating "closure" or consistency of the measured composition with the measured CCN spectra and the inferred and modeled supersaturation. The contribution of organic components to droplet formation shows small effects on the droplet number and size in the 4 marine cases that had background aerosol conditions with varying amounts of coastal, ship or other non-biogenic sources. In contrast, the organic fraction and hygroscopicity increased the droplet number and size in the cases with generated smoke and cargo ship plumes that were freshly emitted and not yet internally mixed with the background particles. The simulation results show organic hygroscopicity causes small effects on cloud reflectivity (<0.7%) with the exception of the cargo ship plume and smoke plume which increased absolute cloud reflectivity fraction by 0

  15. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  16. Influence of aerosol vertical distribution on radiative budget and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Michou, Martine; Saint-Martin, David; Watson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    Aerosols interact with shortwave and longwave radiation with ensuing consequences on radiative budget and climate. Aerosols are represented in climate models either using an interactive aerosol scheme including prognostic aerosol variables, or using climatologies, such as monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD) fields. In the first case, aerosol vertical distribution can vary rapidly, at a daily or even hourly scale, following the aerosol evolution calculated by the interactive scheme. On the contrary, in the second case, a fixed aerosol vertical distribution is generally imposed by climatological profiles. The objective of this work is to study the impact of aerosol vertical distribution on aerosol radiative forcing, with ensuing effects on climate. Simulations have thus been carried out using CNRM-CM, which is a global climate model including an interactive aerosol scheme representing the five main aerosol species (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfate, black carbon and organic matter). Several multi-annual simulations covering the past recent years are compared, including either the prognostic aerosol variables, or monthly AOD fields with different aerosol vertical distributions. In the second case, AOD fields directly come from the first simulation, so that all simulations have the same integrated aerosol loads. The results show that modifying the aerosol vertical distribution has a significant impact on radiative budget, with consequences on global climate. These differences, highlighting the importance of aerosol vertical distribution in climate models, probably come from the modification of atmospheric circulation induced by changes in the heights of the different aerosols. Besides, nonlinear effects in the superposition of aerosol and clouds reinforce the impact of aerosol vertical distribution, since aerosol radiative forcing depends highly upon the presence of clouds, and upon the relative vertical position of aerosols and clouds.

  17. Sensitivity of aerosol-induced effects on numerically simulated squall lines to the vertical distribution of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, Z. J.

    2013-12-01

    The sensitivity of aerosol-induced enhancement of convective strength and precipitation to the vertical distribution is analyzed in the context of numerically simulated squall lines. Recent investigations have hypothesized and demonstrated that an increase in an aerosol loading may lead to enhanced vertical updrafts and potentially more precipitation in a variety of deep convective systems. One of the generally accepted hypotheses for such an enhancement in convective strength suggests that the predominant effect of an increase in aerosol loading is related to enhanced latent heat release in the mid to upper levels of the convective cores. This enhancement has been attributed to an increase in supercooled liquid water that tends to exist in clouds formed in more polluted environments and it is suggested that this water is lofted from below the freezing level to the mixed-phase region of the cloud where the latent heating effects are maximized. However, deep convective cores are quite strong and so a reduction in cloud droplet size due to enhanced aerosol number concentration (which reduces the terminal fall speed) ought to have a negligible effect on the trajectory of the droplets (since the updraft velocity is much larger than the terminal fall speed). Thus, it should be expected that low-level aerosol pollution would have little to no effect on latent heating rates aloft since the droplets will end up in the mixed-phase region regardless of size. Moreover, more recent investigations have shown that aerosol perturbations, especially in squall lines, can lead to less intense cold pools and thus a more optimal state according to RKW theory. Numerical simulations of idealized squall lines are performed to specifically analyze the sensitivity of the aforementioned effects to the vertical distribution of aerosols. The simulations suggest that low-level air tends to either be detrained at the bottom of the convective cores or remains in the convective cores throughout

  18. Multi-Decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang, Weiguo

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model, GOCART, along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from BSRN and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRS (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions. The comparisons and methods from this study can be applied to multiple model analysis in the AeroCom framework.

  19. Multi-decadal Change of Atmospheric Aerosols and their Effect on Surface Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diel, Thomas; Streets, David; Wild, Martin; Qian, Yun; Yu, Hongbin; Tan, Qian; Bian, Huisheng; Wang. Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    We present an investigation on multi-decadal changes of atmospheric aerosols and their effects on surface radiation using a global chemistry transport model GOCART along with the near-term to long-term data records. We focus on a 28-year time period of satellite era from 1980 to 2007 during which a suite of aerosol data from satellite observations, ground-based measurements, and intensive field experiments have become available. Particularly: (1) We compare the model calculated clear sky downward radiation at the surface with surface network data from Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and CMA (2) We compare the model and surface data with satellite derived downward radiation products from ISCCP and SRB (3) We analyze the long-term global and regional aerosol trends in major anthropogenic source regions (North America, Europe, Asia) that have been experiencing considerable changes of emissions during the three decades, dust and biomass burning regions that have large interannual variability, downwind regions that are directly affected by the changes in the source area, and remote regions that are considered to representing "background" conditions.

  20. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  1. Direct Aqueous Photochemistry of Isoprene High-NOx Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2012-05-17

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the high-NOx photooxidation of isoprene was dissolved in water and irradiated with {lambda} > 290 nm light to simulate direct photolytic processing of organics in atmospheric water droplets. High-resolution mass spectrometry was used to characterize the composition at four time intervals (0, 1, 2, and 4 h). Photolysis resulted in the decomposition of high molecular weight (MW) oligomers, reducing the average length of organics by 2 carbon units. Approximately 65% by count of SOA molecules decomposed during photolysis, accompanied by the formation of new products. An average of 30 % of the organic mass was modified after 4 h of direct photolysis. In contrast, only a small fraction of the mass (<2 %), belonging primarily to organic nitrates, decomposed in the absence of irradiation by hydrolysis. We observed a statistically-significant increase in average O/C, decrease in H/C, and increase in N/C ratios resulting from photolysis. Furthermore, the concentration of aromatic compounds increased significantly during photolysis. Approximately 10 % of photodegraded compounds and 50 % of the photoproducts contain nitrogen. Organic nitrates and multifunctional oligomers were identified as compounds degraded by photolysis. Low-MW 0N (compounds with 0 nitrogen atoms in their structure) and 2N compounds were the dominant photoproducts. Fragmentation experiments using tandem mass spectrometry (MSn, n = 2-3) indicate that the 2N products are likely heterocyclic/aromatic and are tentatively identified as furoxans. Although the exact mechanism is unclear, these 2N heterocyclic compounds are produced by reactions between photochemically-formed aqueous NOx species and SOA organics.

  2. Effects of anthropogenic aerosols on temperature changes in China during the twentieth century based on CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunxiang; Zhao, Tianbao; Ying, Kairan

    2016-08-01

    Using three models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), we compare the direct and other effects of anthropogenic aerosols on observed and simulated annual, winter, and summer temperature changes. Three regions, namely, arid-semiarid area, humid-semiarid area, and the whole of China, are studied. The temperature changes caused by other effects of anthropogenic aerosol (OE) are calculated from the difference between the anthropogenic aerosol forcing run (AA) and the anthropogenic aerosol direct effect forcing run (DE). When the combined effects are considered, a significant area-averaged cooling rate varies in the range of -0.86 to -0.76 °C per century throughout China. Meanwhile, the isolated direct and other effects lower the temperature nationwide by -0.66 to -0.55 °C per century, and -0.31 to -0.11 °C per century, respectively. From a nonlinear perspective, the aerosol-induced temperature experiences a cooling trend, with AA having the largest cooling trend changes both annually and in the summer, while DE has the greatest reduction in the winter. Additionally, the influence of OE cannot be detected in observed annual changes over the arid-semiarid area and the whole of China, while the others are clearly detectable in all cases. AA (DE, OE) reduces the observational temperature mainly over the humid-semihumid region, where the contribution to the observed warming ranges from -515.2 % (-298.7 %, -198.9 %) to -173.6 % (-130.3 %, -66.4 %).

  3. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H; Molina, Mario J

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by -2.5 and +1.3 W m(-2), respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale.

  4. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  5. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on Pacific storm track using a multiscale global climate model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan H; Molina, Mario J

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols affect weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track, using a multiscale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and preindustrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by -2.5 and +1.3 W m(-2), respectively, by emission changes from preindustrial to present day, and an increased cloud top height indicates invigorated midlatitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, a global perspective of the effects of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multiscale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on a global scale. PMID:24733923

  6. Regional climate effects of aerosols on precipitation and snowpack in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, L.; Su, H.; Jiang, J. H.; Zhao, C.; Qian, Y.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Water sources in California are derived predominantly from precipitation (mostly during the winter time) and storage in the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. With California facing one of the most severe droughts on record, it is important to understand the factors influencing precipitation and snowpack for water management and hydropower operation. Recent observational and numerical modeling studies have shown that aerosol pollutants can substantially change precipitation and snowpack in the Sierra Nevada. However, previous studies focused only on one of the aerosol effects or just focus on a single event. A complete view on regional climate effects of aerosol on precipitation and snowpack in California is not delivered yet. In this study, we use a fully coupled aerosol-meteorology-snowpack model (WRF-Chem-SNICAR) to investigate aerosol impacts on regional climate in California, with a focus on precipitation and snowpack. We will evaluate the performance of the WRF-Chem-SNICAR model on simulating regional climate in California. Sensitivity experiments will be conducted to disentangle the relative roles of each aerosol effect, such as aerosol radiation interaction vs. aerosol cloud interaction and aerosol snowpack interaction, local emission vs. long-range transport etc.

  7. Effect of particle shape on dust shortwave direct radiative forcing calculations based on MODIS observations for a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qian; Cui, Songxue; Zhao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    Assuming spheroidal and spherical particle shapes for mineral dust aerosols, the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals, and subsequently on instantaneous shortwave direct radiative forcing (SWDRF) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), is assessed based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data for a case study. Specifically, a simplified aerosol retrieval algorithm based on the principle of the Deep Blue aerosol retrieval method is employed to retrieve dust aerosol optical depths, and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model is used to derive the instantaneous SWDRF of dust at the TOA for cloud-free conditions. Without considering the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals, the effect of particle shape on the scattering properties of dust aerosols (e.g., extinction efficiency, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor) is negligible, which can lead to a relative difference of at most 5% for the SWDRF at the TOA. However, the effect of particle shape on the SWDRF cannot be neglected provided that the effect of particle shape on dust aerosol optical depth retrievals is also taken into account for SWDRF calculations. The corresponding results in an instantaneous case study show that the relative differences of the SWDRF at the TOA between spheroids and spheres depend critically on the scattering angles at which dust aerosol optical depths are retrieved, and can be up to 40% for low dust-loading conditions.

  8. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies.

  9. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Jathar, Shantanu H; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies. PMID:27350423

  10. Quantifying the effect of organic aerosol aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale aerosol pollution in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Wenjing; Hao, Jiming; Robinson, Allen L.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is one of the least understood constituents of fine particles; current widely-used models cannot predict its loadings or oxidation state. Recent laboratory experiments demonstrated the importance of several new processes, including aging of SOA from traditional precursors, aging of primary organic aerosol (POA), and photo-oxidation of intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). However, evaluating the effect of these processes in the real atmosphere is challenging. Most models used in previous studies are over-simplified and some key reaction trajectories are not captured, and model parameters are usually phenomenological and lack experimental constraints. Here we comprehensively assess the effect of organic aerosol (OA) aging and intermediate-volatility emissions on regional-scale OA pollution with a state-of-the-art model framework and experimentally constrained parameters. We find that OA aging and intermediate-volatility emissions together increase OA and SOA concentrations in Eastern China by about 40% and a factor of 10, respectively, thereby improving model-measurement agreement significantly. POA and IVOCs both constitute over 40% of OA concentrations, and IVOCs constitute over half of SOA concentrations; this differs significantly from previous apportionment of SOA sources. This study facilitates an improved estimate of aerosol-induced climate and health impacts, and implies a shift from current fine-particle control policies. PMID:27350423

  11. Superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces through direct incorporation of titania nanoparticles into a polymer matrix by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Crick, Colin R; Bear, Joseph C; Kafizas, Andreas; Parkin, Ivan P

    2012-07-10

    A new class of superhydrophobic photocatalytic surfaces that are self-cleaning through light-induced photodegradation and the Lotus effect are presented. The films are formed in a single-step aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) process. The films are durable and show no degradation on continuous exposure to UV-C radiation. PMID:22706974

  12. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-03-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation have been introduced in the LMDz-INCA global model. Both fine nitrate particles formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing has the same magnitude than the forcing associated with organic carbon particles and represents 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050 and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentrations of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and Northern America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative forcing calculations increases the total direct forcing of aerosols by a

  13. Aerosol radiative effects over global arid and semi-arid regions based on MODIS Deep Blue satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzianastassiou, Nikolaos; Papadimas, Christos D.; Gkikas, Antonis; Matsoukas, Christos; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hsu, N. Christina; Vardavas, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols are a key parameter for several atmospheric processes related to weather and climate of our planet. Specifically, the aerosol impact on Earth's climate is exerted and quantified through their radiative effects, which are induced by their direct, indirect and semi-direct interactions with radiation, in particular at short wavelengths (solar). It is acknowledged that the uncertainty of present and future climate assessments is mainly associated with aerosols and that a better understanding of their physico-chemical, optical and radiative effects is needed. The contribution of satellites to this aim is important as a complementary tool to climate and radiative transfer models, as well as to surface measurements, since space observations of aerosol properties offer an extended spatial coverage. However, such satellite based aerosol properties and associated model radiation computations have suffered from unavailability over highly reflecting surfaces, namely polar and desert areas. This is also the case for MODIS which, onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, has been providing high quality aerosol data since 2000 and 2002, respectively. These data, more specifically the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is the most important optical property used in radiative and climate models, are considered to be of best quality. In order to address this problem, the MODIS Deep Blue (DB) algorithm has been developed which enables the retrieval of AOD above arid and semi-arid areas of the globe, including the major deserts. In the present study we make use of the FORTH detailed spectral radiative transfer model (RTM) with MODIS DB AOD data, supplemented with single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (AP) aerosol data from the Global Aerosol DataSet (GADS) to estimate the aerosol DREs over the arid and semi-arid regions of the globe. The RTM is run using surface and atmospheric data from the ISCCP-D2 dataset and the NCEP global reanalysis project and computes the

  14. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g. formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low- and high-NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after four days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to eight days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields i.e ~15% (low-NOx) to ~45% (high-NOx) for α-pinene, ~15% for toluene, ~25% for C12-alkane, and ~10% for C16-alkane. The small effect on low volatility n-alkanes such as C16-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase where they are assumed to be protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass seems increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas-phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA=4 x 10-4JNO2. Modeling

  15. Organic photolysis reactions in tropospheric aerosols: effect on secondary organic aerosol formation and lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Tyndall, G.; Aumont, B.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Orlando, J.

    2015-08-01

    This study presents the first modeling estimates of the potential effect of gas- and particle-phase organic photolysis reactions on the formation and lifetime of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typically only photolysis of smaller organic molecules (e.g., formaldehyde) for which explicit data exist is included in chemistry-climate models. Here, we specifically examine the photolysis of larger molecules that actively partition between the gas and particle phases. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A is used to explicitly model SOA formation from α-pinene, toluene, and C12 and C16 n-alkane reactions with OH at low and high NOx. Simulations are conducted for typical mid-latitude conditions and a solar zenith angle of 45° (permanent daylight). The results show that after 4 days of chemical aging under those conditions (equivalent to 8 days in the summer mid-latitudes), gas-phase photolysis leads to a moderate decrease in SOA yields, i.e., ~15 % (low NOx) to ~45 % (high NOx) for α-pinene, ~15 % for toluene, ~25 % for C12 n-alkane, and ~10 % for C16 n-alkane. The small effect of gas-phase photolysis on low-volatility n-alkanes such as C16 n-alkane is due to the rapid partitioning of early-generation products to the particle phase, where they are protected from gas-phase photolysis. Minor changes are found in the volatility distribution of organic products and in oxygen to carbon ratios. The decrease in SOA mass is increasingly more important after a day of chemical processing, suggesting that most laboratory experiments are likely too short to quantify the effect of gas-phase photolysis on SOA yields. Our results also suggest that many molecules containing chromophores are preferentially partitioned into the particle phase before they can be photolyzed in the gas phase. Given the growing experimental evidence that these molecules can undergo in-particle photolysis, we performed sensitivity simulations using an empirically estimated SOA photolysis rate of JSOA

  16. Investigation on seasonal variations of aerosol properties and its influence on radiative effect over an urban location in central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Subin; Gharai, Biswadip; Niranjan, K.; Rao, P. V. N.

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol plays an important role in modulating solar radiation, which are of great concern in perspective of regional climate change. The study analysed the physical and optical properties of aerosols over an urban area and estimated radiative effect using three years in-situ data from sunphotometer, aethalometer and nephelometer as input to radiative transfer model. Aerosols properties indicate the dominance of fine mode aerosols over the study area. However presence of coarse mode aerosols is also found during pre-monsoon [March-April-May]. Daily mean aerosol optical depth showed a minimum during winter [Dec-Jan-Feb] (0.45-0.52) and a maximum during pre-monsoon (0.6-0.7), while single scattering albedo (ω) attains its maximum (0.78 ± 0.05) in winter and minimum (0.67 ± 0.06) during pre-monsoon and asymmetry factor varied in the range between 0.48 ± 0.02 to 0.53 ± 0.04. Episodic events of dust storm and biomass burning are identified by analyzing intrinsic aerosol optical properties like scattering Ångström exponent (SAE) and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) during the study periods and it has been observed that during dust storm events ω is lower (∼0.77) than that of during biomass burning (∼0.81). The aerosol direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere during winter is -11.72 ± 3.5 Wm-2, while during pre-monsoon; it is -5.5 ± 2.5 Wm-2, which can be due to observed lower values of ω during pre-monsoon. A large positive enhancement of atmospheric effect of ∼50.53 Wm-2 is observed during pre-monsoon compared to winter. Due to high aerosol loading in pre-monsoon, a twofold negative surface forcing is also observed in comparison to winter.

  17. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates from South Asian Clay Brick Production Based on Direct Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, C.; Athalye, V.; Ragavan, S.; Rajarathnam, U.; Kr, B.; Lalchandani, D.; Maithel, S.; Malhotra, G.; Bhanware, P.; Thoa, V.; Phuong, N.; Baum, E.; Bond, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    About 150-200 billion clay bricks are produced in India every year. Most of these bricks are fired in small-scale traditional kilns that burn coal or biomass without pollution controls. Reddy and Venkataraman (2001) estimated that 8% of fossil fuel related PM2.5 emissions and 23% of black carbon emissions in India are released from brick production. Few direct emissions measurements have been done in this industry and black carbon emissions, in particular, have not been previously measured. In this study, 9 kilns representing five common brick kiln technologies were tested for aerosol properties and gaseous pollutant emissions, including optical scattering and absorption and thermal-optical OC/EC. Simple relationships are then used to estimate the radiative-forcing impact. Kiln design and fuel quality greatly affect the overall emission profiles and relative climate warming. Batch production kilns, such as the Downdraft kiln, produce the most PM2.5 (0.97 gPM2.5/fired brick) with an OC/EC fraction of 0.3. Vertical Shaft Brick kilns using internally mixed fuels produce the least PM (0.09 gPM2.5/kg fired brick) with the least EC (OC/EC = 16.5), but these kilns are expensive to implement and their use throughout Southern Asia is minimal. The most popular kiln in India, the Bull's Trench kiln, had fewer emissions per brick than the Downdraft kiln, but an even higher EC fraction (OC/EC = 0.05). The Zig-zag kiln is similar in structure to the Bull's Trench kiln, but the emission factors are significantly lower: 50% reduction for CO, 17% for PM2.5 and 60% for black carbon. This difference in emissions suggests that converting traditional Bull's Trench kilns into less polluting Zig-zag kilns would result in reduced atmospheric warming from brick production.

  18. Direct comparison of the hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride aerosol at relative humidities approaching saturation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jim S; Wills, Jon B; Reid, Jonathan P; Wang, Liangyu; Topping, David O; Butler, Jason R; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2010-12-01

    Holographic optical tweezers are used to make comparative measurements of the hygroscopic properties of single component aqueous aerosol containing sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate over a range of relative humidity from 84% to 96%. The change in RH over the course of the experiment is monitored precisely using a sodium chloride probe droplet with accuracy better than ±0.09%. The measurements are used to assess the accuracy of thermodynamic treatments of the relationship between water activity and solute mass fraction with particular attention focused on the dilute solute limit approaching saturation vapor pressure. The consistency of the frequently used Clegg-Brimblecombe-Wexler (CBW) treatment for predicting the hygroscopic properties of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol is confirmed. Measurements of the equilibrium size of ammonium sulfate aerosol are found to agree with predictions to within an uncertainty of ±0.2%. Given the accuracy of treating equilibrium composition, the inconsistencies highlighted in recent calibration measurements of critical supersaturations of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol cannot be attributed to uncertainties associated with the thermodynamic predictions and must have an alternative origin. It is concluded that the CBW treatment can allow the critical supersaturation to be estimated for sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate aerosol with an accuracy of better than ±0.002% in RH. This corresponds to an uncertainty of ≤1% in the critical supersaturation for typical supersaturations of 0.2% and above. This supports the view that these systems can be used to accurately calibrate instruments that measure cloud condensation nuclei concentrations at selected supersaturations. These measurements represent the first study in which the equilibrium properties of two particles of chemically distinct composition have been compared simultaneously and directly alongside each other in the same environment.

  19. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes During Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, K. M.; Chin, Mian

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  20. Effects of Aerosol on Atmospheric Dynamics and Hydrologic Processes during Boreal Spring and Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, M. K.; Chin, Mian; Kim, K. M.

    2005-01-01

    Global and regional climate impacts of present-day aerosol loading during boreal spring are investigated using the NASA finite volume General Circulation Model (fvGCM). Three-dimensional distributions of loadings of five species of tropospheric aerosols, i.e., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt are prescribed from outputs of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol loadings are used to calculate the extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor at eleven spectral wavelengths in the radiative transfer code. We find that aerosol-radiative forcing during boreal spring excites a wavetrain-like pattern in tropospheric temperature and geopotential height that emanates from Northern Africa, through Eurasia, to northeastern Pacific. Associated with the teleconnection is strong surface cooling over regions with large aerosol loading, i.e., China, India, and Africa. Low-to-mid tropospheric heating due to shortwave absorption is found in regions with large loading of dust (Northern Africa, and central East Asia), and black carbon (South and East Asia). In addition pronounced surface cooling is found over the Caspian Sea and warming over Eurasian and northeastern Asia, where aerosol loadings are relatively low. These warming and cooling are components of teleconnection pattern produced primarily by atmospheric heating from absorbing aerosols, i.e., dust from North Africa and.black carbon from South and East Asia. Effects of aerosols on atmospheric hydrologic cycle in the Asian monsoon region are also investigated. Results show that absorbing aerosols, i.e., black carbon and dust, induce large-scale upper-level heating anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau in April and May, ushering in an early onset of the Indian summer monsoon. Absorbing aerosols also enhance lower-level heating and anomalous ascent over northern India, intensifying the Indian monsoon. Overall, the aerosol

  1. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying clo