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Sample records for aerosol droplet size

  1. Aerosol sampling: Comparison of two rotating impactors for field droplet sizing and volumetric measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper compares the collection characteristics of a new rotating impactor for ultra fine aerosols (FLB) with the industry standard (Hock). The volume and droplet size distribution collected by the rotating impactors were measured via spectroscopy and microscopy. The rotary impactors were co-lo...

  2. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  3. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Juenemann, P J; Tom, H; Boudreau, R J; Chandler, R P; Loken, M K

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using [99mTc]DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, we have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of [99mTc]DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. Use of higher concentration of ethanol to the nebulizer solution did not further improve delivery efficiency. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of [99mTc]DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution. PMID:3889235

  4. Effect of ethanol on droplet size, efficiency of delivery, and clearance characteristics of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Sirr, S.A.; Juenemann, P.J.; Tom, H.; Boudreau, R.J.; Chandler, R.P.; Loken, M.K.

    1985-06-01

    With recent technical advances in aerosol technology, the study of regional ventilation using (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol has become increasingly popular. Using a cascade impactor, the authors have assessed droplet size distribution from a newly designed nebulizer. Delivery efficiency of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA aerosol to normal subjects was improved 70% with a 10% concentration of ethanol in the nebulizer. Using filter paper fixed to the delivery end of the aerosol device, and varying ethanol concentrations from 0-10%, an 87% increase of deposited radioactivity is measured. The addition of ethanol did not alter clearance characteristics of (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA from the lung nor did it affect droplet size distribution.

  5. Aerosol/cloud Base Droplet Size Distribution Characteristics and the Onset of Coalescence in Shallow and Deep Convective Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruintjes, R. T.; Lawson, P.; Lance, S.; Axisa, D.; Woods, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is clear that aerosols contribute to the observed differences in cloud droplet size distributions between maritime and continental and between non-polluted and polluted convection. In addition, other factors such as cloud base temperature, boundary layer depth, thermodynamic profile (updraft speeds) that vary between land and ocean regions, could also be contributing to the observed differences or acting in concert with aerosol effects. In addition, the initial cloud droplet spectra at cloud base to a large extent determines the microphysical processes of precipitation formation (water and ice) at higher levels in the clouds and thus the vertical transport of aerosols and gases in deep convective clouds. During the 2013 NASA SEAC4RS field campaign we have collected a large amount of microphysical data in both shallow and deep convective clouds. This data will be compared to data from other field campaigns to detect specific characteristics of the cloud base droplet size distribution and relate it to onset and evolution of the coalescence process in clouds. The presentation will provide a survey of the cloud droplet size distributions at cloud base in both shallow and deep convective clouds and will relate them to environmental parameters to better understand aerosol-cloud interactions and the other parameters that play a role in the onset of coalescence in convective clouds. We will relate the airborne aerosol variations (size and concentration in different environments) to the cloud droplet size distribution. Model simulations using a detailed coalescence model will be used to obtain a better understanding of the onset of the coalescence process.

  6. Airship measurements of aerosol size distributions, cloud droplet spectra, and trace gas concentrations in the marine boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, G.M.; Hoppel, W.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The use of an airship as a platform to conduct atmospheric chemistry, aerosol, and cloud microphysical research is described, and results from demonstration flights made off the Oregon coast are presented. The slow speed of the airship makes it an ideal platform to do high-spatial resolution profiling both vertically and horizontally, and to measure large aerosol and cloud droplet distributions without the difficulties caused by high-speed aircraft sampling. A unique set of data obtained during the demonstration flights show the effect that processing marine boundary layer aerosol through stratus clouds has on the aerosol size distribution. Evidence of new particle formation (nucleation of particles) was also observed on about half the days on which flights were made. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Silicon Wafer Cleaning Using New Liquid Aerosol with Controlled Droplet Velocity and Size by Rotary Atomizer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seike, Yoshiyuki; Miyachi, Keiji; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro

    2010-06-01

    A liquid aerosol, which sprays cleaning liquid with a carrier gas, is widely used for cleaning semiconductor devices. The liquid aerosol using a conventional two-fluid nozzle may cause pattern damage on the wafer. To resolve this problem, we have made a prototype new rotary atomizing two-fluid cleaning nozzle (RAC nozzle), which can control the velocity distribution and size distribution of flying liquid droplets separately. It was confirmed by measuring flying liquid droplets using a shadow Doppler particle analyzer system that the mean volumetric diameter of the droplets could be atomized to 20 µm or less at a rotational speed of the air turbine of 50,000 min-1 and that the mean velocity of the flying liquid droplets could be controlled in the range under 65 m/s independently. It was confirmed in a cleaning experiment using polystyrene latex (PSL) particles on a wafer that particle removal efficiency increased when shaping air pressure increased. Also, the particle removal efficiency was improved with the finer atomization promoted by a higher rotational speed of the air turbine.

  8. Silicon Wafer Cleaning Using New Liquid Aerosol with Controlled Droplet Velocity and Size by Rotary Atomizer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiyuki Seike,; Keiji Miyachi,; Tatsuo Shibata,; Yoshinori Kobayashi,; Syuhei Kurokawa,; Toshiro Doi,

    2010-06-01

    A liquid aerosol, which sprays cleaning liquid with a carrier gas, is widely used for cleaning semiconductor devices. The liquid aerosol using a conventional two-fluid nozzle may cause pattern damage on the wafer. To resolve this problem, we have made a prototype new rotary atomizing two-fluid cleaning nozzle (RAC nozzle), which can control the velocity distribution and size distribution of flying liquid droplets separately. It was confirmed by measuring flying liquid droplets using a shadow Doppler particle analyzer system that the mean volumetric diameter of the droplets could be atomized to 20 μm or less at a rotational speed of the air turbine of 50,000 min-1 and that the mean velocity of the flying liquid droplets could be controlled in the range under 65 m/s independently. It was confirmed in a cleaning experiment using polystyrene latex (PSL) particles on a wafer that particle removal efficiency increased when shaping air pressure increased. Also, the particle removal efficiency was improved with the finer atomization promoted by a higher rotational speed of the air turbine.

  9. Increase of Cloud Droplet Size with Aerosol Optical Depth: An Observational and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Tianle; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Renyi; Fan, Jiwen

    2008-02-21

    Cloud droplet effective radius (DER) is generally negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a proxy of cloud condensation nuclei. In this study, cases of positive correlation were found over certain portions of the world by analyzing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite products, together with a general finding that DER may increase or decrease with aerosol loading depending on environmental conditions. The slope of the correlation between DER and AOD is driven primarily by water vapor amount, which explains 70% of the variance in our study. Various potential artifacts that may cause the positive relation are investigated including water vapor swelling, partially cloudy, atmospheric dynamics, cloud three-dimensional (3-D) and surface influence effects. None seems to be the primary cause for the observed phenomenon, although a certain degree of influence exists for some of the factors. Analyses are conducted over seven regions around the world representing different types of aerosols and clouds. Only two regions show positive dependence of DER on AOD, near coasts of the Gulf of Mexico and South China Sea, which implies physical processes may at work. Using a 2-D spectral-bin microphysics Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) which incorporated a reformulation of the Köhler theory, two possible physical mechanisms are hypothesized. They are related to the effects of slightly soluble organics (SSO) particles and giant CCNs. Model simulations show a positive correlation between DER and AOD, due to a decrease in activated aerosols with an increasing SSO content. Addition of a few giant CCNs also increases the DER. Further investigations are needed to fully understand and clarify the observed phenomenon.

  10. Whispering Gallery Modes Used to Determine the Changing Size of Levitated Aerosol Droplets in a Fluctuating Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludvigsen, Angela; McCann, Lowell

    A laser can be used as an optical trap to catch and hold small, transparent objects. Observations of optically trapped aqueous aerosol droplets have demonstrated that the droplet moves between two or more stable positions dependent upon the power of the trapping laser. It is hypothesized that this movement coincides with a resonance between the trapping light and the droplet's surface, called a Whispering Gallery Mode. When this resonance occurs, forces acting on the droplet cause it to move. To investigate this behavior, Raman scattered light from the droplet as well as the droplet's position are measured. The Raman spectrum exhibits a series of peaks resulting from the droplet's spherical shape, referred to as Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. The location and spacing of these peaks are known to be related to the diameter and the optical properties of the droplet. From this spectrum, the magnitude of the electric and magnetic fields of the scattered light are calculated. This allows for a precise measurement of the droplet's radius at the moment that the droplet moves between stable positions. After determining the droplet's radius from the spectrum, the effect of varying the intensity of the trapping laser beam on the droplet radius can be investigated.

  11. Aerosol and cloud droplet number concentrations observed in marine stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.J.; Covert, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    The relationship between measurements of cloud droplet number concentration and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, as inferred from aerosol size spectra, was investigated at a {open_quote}clean air{close_quote}, marine site (Cheeka Peak) located near the coast of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. Preliminary results demonstrated that cloud droplet number increased and droplet diameter decreased as aerosol number concentration (CCN) increased. These results support predictions of a climate cooling due to any future increases in marine aerosol concentrations.

  12. Aerosol droplets: Nucleation dynamics and photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorell, Ruth

    This talk addresses two fundamental aerosol processes that play a pivotal role in atmospheric processes: The formation dynamics of aerosol particles from neutral gas phase precursors and photochemical reactions in small aerosol droplets induced by ultraviolet and visible light. Nucleation is the rate determining step of aerosol particle formation. The idea behind nucleation is that supersaturation of a gas leads to the formation of a critical cluster, which quickly grows into larger aerosol particles. We discuss an experiment for studying the size and chemical composition of critical clusters at the molecular level. Much of the chemistry happening in planetary atmospheres is driven by sunlight. Photochemical reactions in small aerosol particles play a peculiar role in this context. Sunlight is strongly focused inside these particles which leads to a natural increase in the rates of photochemical reactions in small particles compared with the bulk. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been recognised but so far escaped direct observation and quantification. The development of a new experimental setup has finally made it possible to directly observe this nanofocusing effect in droplet photokinetics. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and ETH Zurich.

  13. Aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes of cloud droplet formation: influence of particle number, size and hygroscopicity on the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, P.; Su, H.; Trentmann, J.; Simmel, M.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S. S.; Wernli, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets under pyro-convective conditions using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral microphysics and with the κ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles. Assuming a typical biomass burning aerosol size distribution (accumulation mode centred at 120 nm), we have calculated initial cloud droplet number concentrations (NCD) for a wide range of updraft velocities (w=0.25-20 m s-1) and aerosol particle number concentrations (NCN=200-105 cm-3) at the cloud base. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration (w/NCN), we found three distinctly different regimes of CCN activation and cloud droplet formation: (1) An aerosol-limited regime that is characterized by high w/NCN ratios (>≈10-3 m s-1 cm3), high maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax>≈0.5%), and high activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCN/NCN>≈90%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to NCN and practically independent of w. (2) An updraft-limited regime that is characterized by low w/NCN ratios (<≈10-4 m s-1 cm3), low maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax<≈0.2%), and low activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCD/NCN<≈20%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to w and practically independent of NCN. (3) An aerosol- and updraft-sensitive regime (transitional regime), which is characterized by parameter values in between the two other regimes and covers most of the conditions relevant for pyro-convection. In this regime NCD depends non-linearly on both NCN and w. In sensitivity studies we have tested the influence of aerosol particle size distribution and hygroscopicity on NCD. Within the range of effective hygroscopicity parameters that is characteristic for continental atmospheric aerosols (κ≈0.05-0.6), we found that NCD depends rather weakly on the actual value of κ

  14. Organic aerosol effects on fog droplet spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Yi; Russell, Lynn M.

    2004-05-01

    Organic aerosol alters cloud and fog properties through surface tension and solubility effects. This study characterizes the role of organic compounds in affecting fog droplet number concentration by initializing and comparing detailed particle microphysical simulations with two field campaigns in the Po Valley. The size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were based on the measurements made in the Po Valley Fog Experiments in 1989 and 1998-1999. Two types of aerosol with different hygroscopicity were considered: the less hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of organic compounds, and the more hygroscopic particles, composed mainly of inorganic salts. The organic fraction of aerosol mass was explicitly modeled as a mixture of seven soluble compounds [, 2001] by employing a functional group-based thermodynamic model [, 2002]. Condensable gases in the vapor phase included nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and ammonia. The maximum supersaturation in the simulation is 0.030% and is comparable to the calculation by [1992] inferred from measured residual particle fractions. The minimum activation diameters of the less and more hygroscopic particles are 0.49 μm and 0.40 μm, respectively. The predicted residual particle fractions are in agreement with measurements. The organic components of aerosol account for 34% of the droplet residual particle mass and change the average droplet number concentration by -10-6%, depending on the lowering of droplet surface tension and the interactions among dissolving ions. The hygroscopic growth of particles due to the presence of water-soluble organic compounds enhances the condensation of nitric acid and ammonia due to the increased surface area, resulting in a 9% increase in the average droplet number concentration. Assuming ideal behavior of aqueous solutions of water-soluble organic compounds overestimates the hygroscopic growth of particles and increases droplet numbers by 6%. The results are sensitive to microphysical

  15. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruehl, Christopher R.; Davies, James F.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation.

  16. An interfacial mechanism for cloud droplet formation on organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Ruehl, Christopher R; Davies, James F; Wilson, Kevin R

    2016-03-25

    Accurate predictions of aerosol/cloud interactions require simple, physically accurate parameterizations of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of aerosols. Current models assume that organic aerosol species contribute to CCN activity by lowering water activity. We measured droplet diameters at the point of CCN activation for particles composed of dicarboxylic acids or secondary organic aerosol and ammonium sulfate. Droplet activation diameters were 40 to 60% larger than predicted if the organic was assumed to be dissolved within the bulk droplet, suggesting that a new mechanism is needed to explain cloud droplet formation. A compressed film model explains how surface tension depression by interfacial organic molecules can alter the relationship between water vapor supersaturation and droplet size (i.e., the Köhler curve), leading to the larger diameters observed at activation. PMID:27013731

  17. Cloud Droplet Size and Liquid Water Path Retrievals From Zenith Radiance Measurements: Examples From the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program and the Aerosol Robotic Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Marshak, A.; Huang, C.-H.; Varnai, T.; Hogan, R. J.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Knyazikhin, Y.; O'Connor, E. J.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ground-based Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) and NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) routinely monitor clouds using zenith radiances at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Using the transmittance calculated from such measurements, we have developed a new retrieval method for cloud effective droplet size and conducted extensive tests for non-precipitating liquid water clouds. The underlying principle is to combine a water-absorbing wavelength (i.e. 1640 nm) with a nonwater-absorbing wavelength for acquiring information on cloud droplet size and optical depth. For simulated stratocumulus clouds with liquid water path less than 300 g/sq m and horizontal resolution of 201m, the retrieval method underestimates the mean effective radius by 0.8 m, with a root-mean-squared error of 1.7 m and a relative deviation of 13 %. For actual observations with a liquid water path less than 450 gm.2 at the ARM Oklahoma site during 2007-2008, our 1.5 min-averaged retrievals are generally larger by around 1 m than those from combined ground-based cloud radar and microwave radiometer at a 5min temporal resolution. We also compared our retrievals to those from combined shortwave flux and microwave observations for relatively homogeneous clouds, showing that the bias between these two retrieval sets is negligible, but the error of 2.6 m and the relative deviation of 22% are larger than those found in our simulation case. Finally, the transmittance-based cloud effective droplet radii agree to better than 11% with satellite observations and have a negative bias of 1 m. Overall, the retrieval method provides reasonable cloud effective radius estimates, which can enhance the cloud products of both ARM and AERONET.

  18. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single-droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with an average radius of 21.6 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer polystyrene latex (PSL) sphere particles of known sizes and concentrations. Two relative humidity (RH) conditions, 15 ± 3 % and 88 ± 3 %, hereafter termed "low" and "high", respectively, were varied with different particles sizes and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single-droplet basis. "Coagulated droplets" (droplets that collected aerosols) had mass spectra that contained signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 2.0 × 10-1 to 1.6 for the low-RH case and from 1.5 × 10-2 to 9.0 × 10-2 for the high-RH case. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this study were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first collection experiment performed on a single-droplet basis with atmospherically relevant conditions such as droplet sizes, droplet charges and flow.

  19. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  20. Measuring droplet size distributions from overlapping interferometric particle images.

    PubMed

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van der Voort, Dennis; Bertens, Guus; van de Water, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Interferometric particle imaging provides a simple way to measure the probability density function (PDF) of droplet sizes from out-focus images. The optical setup is straightforward, but the interpretation of the data is a problem when particle images overlap. We propose a new way to analyze the images. The emphasis is not on a precise identification of droplets, but on obtaining a good estimate of the PDF of droplet sizes in the case of overlapping particle images. The algorithm is tested using synthetic and experimental data. We next use these methods to measure the PDF of droplet sizes produced by spinning disk aerosol generators. The mean primary droplet diameter agrees with predictions from the literature, but we find a broad distribution of satellite droplet sizes. PMID:25725854

  1. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Beiping; Peter, Thomas; Crutzen, Paul

    Theoretical calculations are presented for homogeneous and heterogeneous freezing of sulfuric acid droplets under stratospheric conditions, based on classical nucleation theory. In contrast to previous results it is shown that a prominent candidate for freezing, sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT ≡ H2SO4·4H2O), does not freeze homogeneously. The theoretical results limit the homogeneous freezing rate at 200 K to much less than 1 cm-3s-1, a value that may be estimated from bulk phase laboratory experiments. This suggests that the experimental value is likely to be a measure of heterogeneous, not homogeneous nucleation. Thus, under statospheric conditions, freezing of SAT can only occur in the presence of suitable nuclei; however, even for heterogeneous nucleation experimental results impose strong constraints. Since a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) embryo probably needs a solid body for nucleation, these results put an important constraint on the theory of NAT formation in polar stratospheric clouds.

  2. Evaporation of ethanol/water droplets: examining the temporal evolution of droplet size, composition and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Rebecca J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2005-09-01

    The evolving size, composition, and temperature of evaporating ethanol/water aerosol droplets 25-57 microm in radius are probed by cavity enhanced Raman scattering (CERS) and laser induced fluorescence. This represents the first study in which the evolving composition of volatile droplets has been probed with spatial selectivity on the millisecond time scale, providing a new strategy for exploring mass and heat transfer in aerosols. The Raman scattering intensity is shown to depend exponentially on species concentration due to the stimulated nature of the CERS technique, providing a sensitive measure of the concentration of the volatile ethanol component. The accuracy with which we can determine droplet size, composition, and temperature is discussed. We demonstrate that the CERS measurements of evolving size and composition of droplets falling in a train can be used to characterize, and thus avoid, droplet coagulation. By varying the surrounding gas pressure (7-77 kPa), we investigate the dependence of the rate of evaporation on the rate of gas diffusion, and behavior consistent with gas diffusion-limited evaporation is observed. We suggest that such measurements can allow the determination of the vapor pressures of components within the droplet and can allow the determination of activity coefficients of volatile species. PMID:16834174

  3. TRAJECTORY OF AEROSOL DROPLETS FROM A SPRAYED BACTERIAL SUSPENSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated droplet trajectories of a polydispersed microbial aerosol in a laminar air flow regimen were compared with observed ispersal patterns of aerosolized Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spores in quasilaminar airflow. imulated dispersal patterns could be explained in terms of...

  4. Laboratory studies of collection efficiency of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets on a single droplet basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardon-Dryer, K.; Huang, Y.-W.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the Collection Efficiency (CE) of sub-micrometer aerosol particles by cloud droplets. Water droplets of a dilute aqueous ammonium sulfate solution with a radius of ~20 μm fall freely into a chamber and collide with sub-micrometer Polystyrene Latex Sphere (PSL) particles of variable size and concentrations. Two RH conditions, ~15 and ~88%, hereafter termed "Low" and "High", respectively, were varied with different particles size and concentrations. After passing through the chamber, the droplets and aerosol particles were sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument to determine chemical compositions on a single particle basis. Coagulated droplets had mass spectra that contain signatures from both an aerosol particle and a droplet residual. CE values range from 5.7 × 10-3 to 4.6 × 10-2 for the Low RH and from 6.4 × 10-3 to 2.2 × 10-2 for the High RH cases. CE values were, within experimental uncertainty, independent of the aerosol concentrations. CE values in this work were found to be in agreement with previous experimental and theoretical studies. To our knowledge, this is the first coagulation experiment performed on a single droplet basis.

  5. Effects of Image Charges on the Scavenging of Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets and on Droplet Charging and Possible Ice Nucleation Processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.; Rohrbaugh, R. P.; Hei, M.; Beard, K. V.

    2000-07-01

    Previous calculations of the rate at which falling droplets in clouds collide with aerosols have led to the conclusion that except in thunderclouds any electrical charges on the aerosols or droplets have little effect on the collision rate. However, it had been assumed that the aerosols would have only a few elementary charges on them, whereas it is now known that at the tops of nonthunderstorm clouds the evaporating droplets may have several hundred elementary charges on them and that much of this charge remains on the residual aerosol for 5 min or so after the evaporation. Also, most previous calculations neglected image charge forces that provide strong attraction at close range even when droplet and aerosol have charges of the same sign and of comparable magnitude.The authors present numerical calculations showing that electrical effects dominate collision rates for charged evaporation aerosols. The calculations are for the size range of 0.1- to 1.0-m radius with the collision efficiency compared to that for phoretic and Brownian effects being greater by up to a factor of 30 greater for droplets from 18.6- to 106-m radius with relative humidity in the range 95%-100% and only 50 elementary charges on the aerosol. The results imply that electrical effects can be important for the scavenging of evaporation aerosol particles in the size range of the Greenfield gap.The authors call this process `electroscavenging.' Electroscavenging of charged particles, when the particles are mostly of the same sign, is a previously unrecognized droplet charging process. Electroscavenging also provides a pathway for contact ice nucleation when charged aerosol particles from evaporated charged droplets collide with supercooled droplets. Ice nucleation can occur because aerosol particles from the evaporation of cloud droplets have been found to be more effective as ice forming nuclei than other aerosol particles that have not been processed through droplets.

  6. Aspects of droplet and particle size control in miniemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi-Arslan, Oznur

    potential application of the method. Molecular weight control was found to be achieved via diffusion of the CFRP agents through the aqueous phase owing to limited water solubilities. The effects of adsorption rate and energy on the droplet size and size distribution of miniemulsions using different surfactants (sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), Dowfax 2A1, Aerosol OT-75PG, sodium n-octyl sulfate (SOS), and sodium n-hexadecyl sulfate (SHS)) were analyzed. For this purpose, first, the dynamics of surfactant adsorption at an oil/water interface were examined over a range of surfactant concentrations by the drop volume method and then adsorption rates of the different surfactants were determined for the early stages of adsorption. The results do not show a direct relationship between adsorption rate and miniemulsion droplet size and size distribution. Adsorption energies of these surfactants were also calculated by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation and no correlation between adsorption energy and miniemulsion droplet size was found. In order to understand the mechanism of miniemulsification process, the effects of breakage and coalescence processes on droplet size distributions were observed at different surfactant concentrations, monomer ratios, and homogenization conditions. A coalescence and breakup mechanism for miniemulsification is proposed to explain the size distribution of droplets. The multimodal droplet size distribution of ODMA miniemulsions was controlled by the breakage mechanism. The results also showed that, at a surfactant concentration when 100% surface coverage was obtained, the droplet size distribution became unimodal.

  7. Quantifying compositional impacts of ambient aerosol on cloud droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, Sara

    It has been historically assumed that most of the uncertainty associated with the aerosol indirect effect on climate can be attributed to the unpredictability of updrafts. In Chapter 1, we analyze the sensitivity of cloud droplet number density, to realistic variations in aerosol chemical properties and to variable updraft velocities using a 1-dimensional cloud parcel model in three important environmental cases (continental, polluted and remote marine). The results suggest that aerosol chemical variability may be as important to the aerosol indirect effect as the effect of unresolved cloud dynamics, especially in polluted environments. We next used a continuous flow streamwise thermal gradient Cloud Condensation Nuclei counter (CCNc) to study the water-uptake properties of the ambient aerosol, by exposing an aerosol sample to a controlled water vapor supersaturation and counting the resulting number of droplets. In Chapter 2, we modeled and experimentally characterized the heat transfer properties and droplet growth within the CCNc. Chapter 3 describes results from the MIRAGE field campaign, in which the CCNc and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) were deployed at a ground-based site during March, 2006. Size-resolved CCN activation spectra and growth factor distributions of the ambient aerosol in Mexico City were obtained, and an analytical technique was developed to quantify a probability distribution of solute volume fractions for the CCN in addition to the aerosol mixing-state. The CCN were shown to be much less CCN active than ammonium sulfate, with water uptake properties more consistent with low molecular weight organic compounds. The pollution outflow from Mexico City was shown to have CCN with an even lower fraction of soluble material. "Chemical Closure" was attained for the CCN, by comparing the inferred solute volume fraction with that from direct chemical measurements. A clear diurnal pattern was observed for the CCN solute

  8. Droplet Impact onto an Immiscible, Floating Oil Layer: Splash Behavior and Droplet Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Li, Cheng; D'Albignac, Vincent; Morra, David; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The high speed impact of a raindrop on a fluid surface at Wed = ρ u2d/ σ>2000 affects environmental processes like marine aerosol production. High speed imaging shows that a floating immiscible oil layer, such as a crude oil slick, modifies the splash behavior. Tests performed for a wide range of layer thicknesses (h), viscosities, and surface and interfacial tensions facilitate behavioral categorization in terms of Weh =ρh u2h/σh and ReFrh =ρd u3d/μhgh, where h and d subscripts refer to layer and droplet properties, respectively. Included are multi-layer/level crowns, and due to the high Oh = μ /(ρσ d)1/2 of oil, formation of an intact ejecta sheet within 50 μs after impact, which subsequently ruptures to form aerosolized oil droplets. High speed holographic microscopy provides the size and spatial distributions of airborne droplets, which are bimodal with peaks at 50 and 225 μm. Small droplets (50 μm) are ejected primarily at shallow angles and remain at low elevation by microligament breakup within the first 50 μs of impact. Larger droplets (225 μm) are ejected at a steeper angle and produced later by breakup of larger ligaments protruding vertically from the splash crown. Small droplet frequency at high elevation increases when crude oil is introduced, mostly as satellite droplets resulting from the large ligament breakup. Funding provided by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  9. Nanofocusing, shadowing, and electron mean free path in the photoemission from aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signorell, Ruth; Goldmann, Maximilian; Yoder, Bruce L.; Bodi, Andras; Chasovskikh, Egor; Lang, Lukas; Luckhaus, David

    2016-08-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol droplets is a promising method for the determination of electron mean free paths in liquids. It is particularly attractive for volatile liquids, such as water. Here we report the first angle-resolved photoelectron images of droplets with defined sizes, viz. of water, glycerol, and dioctyl phthalate droplets. Simulations of water droplet photoelectron images and data for electron mean free paths for liquid water at low kinetic energy (<3 eV) are provided. We present an approach that allows one to gradually vary the conditions from shadowing to nanofocusing to optimize the information content contained in the photoelectron images.

  10. Factors Controlling Droplet Concentration and Size Distribution in Clouds over Dominica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, R. D.; Storelvmo, T.; Smith, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    Since precipitation in convective, tropical clouds, and the impact of these clouds on Earth's radiation budget, are dependent on the concentration and size distribution of the water droplets that make up the clouds, we are interested in understanding the factors controlling the droplet concentration and size distribution in these clouds. Previous studies from field campaigns have led to contradictory conclusions, with some research pointing to updraft velocity as the most influential factor, and other studies pointing to aerosol concentration. The 2011 Dominica Experiment (DOMEX) field campaign provides a wealth of data with which to study this problem, and to test existing models of droplet activation and growth; these data include aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and size distributions, and wind speed measurements, from research flights above and upwind of the island of Dominica, as well as precipitation data from rain gauges installed on the island. Over 17 DOMEX research flights, cloud droplet concentrations averaged over flight legs above the island were positively correlated with aerosol concentrations from legs flown upwind of the island at 305 m altitude, while cloud droplet mean diameters were negatively correlated with oversea aerosol concentrations, supporting the idea that higher aerosol concentrations (if they are water soluble aerosols, such as sea salt) result in more droplets becoming activated and not growing as large. Meanwhile, average horizontal wind speeds in the oversea legs were negatively correlated with droplet concentrations in clouds over the island, and positively correlated with the mean diameter, the opposite of what would be expected if stronger convection accompanied the higher horizontal wind speeds. The horizontal wind speeds were also negatively correlated with the aerosol concentrations, especially at very low wind speeds, suggesting that the negative impact of wind speed on droplet concentration may have been due to a

  11. Charge separation in the aerodynamic breakup of micrometer-sized water droplets.

    PubMed

    Zilch, Lloyd W; Maze, Joshua T; Smith, John W; Ewing, George E; Jarrold, Martin F

    2008-12-25

    Charged water droplets generated by electrospray, sonic spray, and a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG) have been studied by digital macrophotography and image charge detection mass spectrometry. Image charge detection mass spectrometry provides information on the droplet size, charge, and velocity after transmission through a capillary interface. The digital images provide the droplet size distribution before they enter the capillary. Droplets with 10-100 microm radii generated by sonic spray and VOAG are reduced to 2-3 microm radii by transmission through the capillary interface. The droplets from sonic spray and VOAG are much more highly charged than expected for random charging, and positive droplets are much more prevalent than negative. For positive mode electrospray, >99% of the detected droplets carry a positive charge, whereas for negative mode electrospray, <30% of the detected droplets carry a negative charge (i.e., >70% carry a positive charge). These observation can all be accounted for by the aerodynamic breakup of the droplets in the capillary interface. This breakup reduces the droplets to a terminal size at which point further breakup does not occur. Charge separation during droplet breakup is responsible for the relatively high charges on the sonic spray and VOAG droplets and for the preference for positively charged droplets. The charge separation can be explained using the bag mechanism for droplet breakup and the electrical bilayer at the surface of water. PMID:19035820

  12. A New Method to Generate Micron-Sized AerosolS With Narrow Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gañón-Calvo, Alfonso; Barrero, Antonio

    1996-11-01

    Aerosols in the micron-size range with a remarkable monodisperse size distribution can be generated from the breaking up process of a capillary microjet. The size of the main droplets and satellites depend on the jet diameter, d_j, as well as the flow rate, Q, and liquid properties which eventually determine the jet`s breaking up. Therefore, the generation and control of capillary microjets is essential to produce sprays of small droplets with narrow size histograms. Electrosprays has been up to now one of the most successful techniques to produce monodisperse micron-size aerosols. As an alternative, we report here a new method, aerospray, to generate capillary micro jets which can compete against the electrospray for the production of aerosols of small droplets with very narrow size distribution. The method is outlined in the following. Liquid coming out from the exit of a capillary needle is sucked by means of a high speed gas stream (usually air) which flows throughout a hole separating two chambers at different pressures. Under certain parametric conditions of liquid properties, liquid and air flow rates, and geometric characteristics (needle and hole diameters, distance from the needle to the hole, etc), the liquid forms a steady capillary microjet of very small diameter which is speeded up an stabilized by the action of the viscous stresses at the gas liquid interface. The jet passes through the hole and goes out the outside chamber where eventually breaks up into microdroplets by varicose instabilities. Measurements from Laser-Doppler PDA Analizer of these aerosprays show that both the droplet size and its standard deviation are comparable to those obtained by electrospray techniques. On the other hand, using the aerospray, the standard deviation of the resulting droplet size distribution is of the order of those that can be obtained by ultrasonic atomization but the mean diameters can be more than one order of magnitude smaller.

  13. Minimising oil droplet size using ultrasonic emulsification.

    PubMed

    Leong, T S H; Wooster, T J; Kentish, S E; Ashokkumar, M

    2009-08-01

    The efficient production of nanoemulsions, with oil droplet sizes of less than 100nm would facilitate the inclusion of oil soluble bio-active agents into a range of water based foods. Small droplet sizes lead to transparent emulsions so that product appearance is not altered by the addition of an oil phase. In this paper, we demonstrate that it is possible to create remarkably small transparent O/W nanoemulsions with average diameters as low as 40nm from sunflower oil. This is achieved using ultrasound or high shear homogenization and a surfactant/co-surfactant/oil system that is well optimised. The minimum droplet size of 40nm, was only obtained when both droplet deformability (surfactant design) and the applied shear (equipment geometry) were optimal. The time required to achieve the minimum droplet size was also clearly affected by the equipment configuration. Results at atmospheric pressure fitted an expected exponential relationship with the total energy density. However, we found that this relationship changes when an overpressure of up to 400kPa is applied to the sonication vessel, leading to more efficient emulsion production. Oil stability is unaffected by the sonication process. PMID:19321375

  14. A parametric investigation of electrical effects on aerosol scavenging by droplets over large fires

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, T.F.; Edwards, L.L.

    1990-05-01

    Our nucleation model of strong up-drafts over large fires (such as those ignited by nuclear blasts) show that many droplets in the size range of 1 to 10 {mu}m are rapidly formed when the cloud becomes supersaturated. In this study we calculate aerosol/droplet collection kernels for electrical parameters commonly seen in cloud air. These kernels are used with aged droplet distributions to determine instantaneous scavenging rates of unwettable aerosols with cloud droplets. We find that within a portion of this parameter space the aerosol may be removed from the cloud air with time constants substantially below 1-hour over the entire aerosol size range of .01 to 0.5{mu}m. The aging of the droplet distribution incorporates the detailed microphysics of nucleation and condensation in a Lagrangian parcel with forces up-draft of 50 m/s. We assume an initial aerosol distribution that is lognormal about a median radius of 0.05{mu}m with a geometric standard deviation of two. Initially there are 10{sup 6} insoluble aerosol particles per cubic centimeter of air with one-half of them being wettable and the other half being non-wettable. We present our results as a set of curves showing collection kernels and instantaneous scavenging rates versus aerosol radius and electric field strengths. The collection kernel curves are parametrically displayed for droplets of radii 1-, 3-, and 10-{mu}m and electrical parameters typical of cumulus and thunderstorm clouds. The instantaneous scavenging curve versus aerosol radius is displayed as a function of electrical parameters. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Characterizing interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hendrik; Cermak, Jan

    2016-04-01

    This contribution presents a method to characterize the nonlinearities of interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds based on global MODIS observations. Clouds play a crucial role in the climate system as their radiative properties and precipitation patterns significantly impact the Earth's energy balance. Cloud properties are determined by environmental conditions, as cloud formation requires the availability of water vapour ("precipitable water") and condensation nuclei in sufficiently saturated conditions. The ways in which aerosols as condensation nuclei in particular influence the optical, micro- and macrophysical properties of clouds are one of the largest remaining uncertainties in climate-change research. In particular, cloud droplet size is believed to be impacted, and thereby cloud reflectivity, lifetime, and precipitation susceptibility. However, the connection between aerosols and cloud droplets is nonlinear, due to various factors and processes. The impact of aerosols on cloud properties is thought to be strongest with low aerosol loadings, whereas it saturates with high aerosol loadings. To gain understanding of the processes that govern low cloud water properties in order to increase accuracy of climate models and predictions of future changes in the climate system is thus of great importance. In this study, global Terra MODIS L3 data sets are used to characterize the nonlinearities of the interactions between aerosols and cloud droplets in marine boundary layer clouds. MODIS observations are binned in classes of aerosol loading to identify at what loading aerosol impact on cloud droplets is the strongest and at which loading it saturates. Results are connected to ERA-Interim and MACC data sets to identify connections of detected patterns to meteorology and aerosol species.

  16. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    goes through a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), which rejects aerosol particles and transmits larger particles that are either droplet residuals or coagulated particles. The larger particles are sent to the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures from both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will present the collection efficiency data of a suite of dust particles with well-defined types, sizes and concentrations under atmospherically relevant temperatures and relative humidity conditions.

  17. Aerosol effect on the mobility of cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Ilan; Altaratz, Orit; Dagan, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Cloud droplet mobility is referred to here as a measure of the droplets’ ability to move with ambient air. We claim that an important part of the aerosol effect on convective clouds is driven by changes in droplet mobility. We show that the mass-weighted average droplet terminal velocity, defined here as the ‘effective terminal velocity’ (η) and its spread ({σ }η ) serve as direct measures of this effect. Moreover, we develop analytical estimations for η and {σ }η to show that changes in the relative dispersion of η ({\\varepsilon }η ={σ }η /η ) can serve as a sensitive predictor of the onset of droplet-collection processes.

  18. Radiation-stimulated explosive evaporation and burning of hydrogen droplets in hot aerosol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Marchenko, M. P.; Khasin, M.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of analytical and numerical investigation of explosive evaporation and burning scenarios of hydrogen droplets in hydrogen/oxygen aerosols. The following two scenarios have been elucidated. The first scenario, corresponding to sufficiently large droplets, is characterized by three stages: (i) an essentially homogeneous heating of a droplet to a near-critical temperature by IR radiation from the hot gas; (ii) explosive evaporation; and (iii) burning of hydrogen cloud formed by evaporation. The second scenario, corresponding to small droplets, differs in that a droplet is heated mainly by thermal conduction from the hot gas. The heating is accompanied by evaporation which can become explosive at the final stage of evaporation. The crossover droplet size separating the two scenarios is calculated. Conservative finite-difference numerical analysis is used to explore the predicted scenarios and verify analytical estimates.

  19. A novel micropump droplet generator for aerosol drug delivery: Design simulations

    PubMed Central

    Su, Guoguang; Longest, P. Worth; Pidaparti, Ramana M.

    2010-01-01

    One challenge of generating a liquid aerosol is finding an efficient way to break up bulk amounts of the compound into micron-sized droplets. Traditional methods of aerosol generation focus on the principle of creating the liquid droplets by blowing air at high speed over or through a liquid. In this study, a novel micropump droplet generator (MDG) is proposed based on a microfluidics device to produce monodisperse droplets on demand (DoD). The micropump design was employed to both pump the fluid into the air and to encourage droplet breakup and aerosol formation. Computational simulation modeling of the new MDG was developed and validated with comparisons to experimental data for current generators. The device was found to produce an aerosol similar to a vibrating orifice DoD device. Most importantly, the input power required by the newly proposed device (MDG) was several orders of magnitude below existing DoD generators for a similar droplet output. Based on the simulation results obtained in comparison with current DoD generators, the MDG device performed effectively at higher frequencies, smaller nozzle diameters, and regardless of the liquid viscosity of the solution. PMID:21151580

  20. Global Survey of the Relationship Between Cloud Droplet Size and Albedo Using ISCCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyuan; Rossow, William B.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    Aerosols affect climate through direct and indirect effects. The direct effect of aerosols (e.g., sulfates) includes reflection of sunlight back toward space and for some aerosols (e.g., smoke particles), absorption in the atmosphere; both effects cool the Earth's surface. The indirect effect of aerosols refers to the modification of cloud microphysical properties, thereby affecting the radiation balance. Higher concentrations of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) generally produce higher concentrations of cloud droplets, which are also usually assumed to lead to decreased cloud droplet sizes. The result is an increase in cloud albedo, producing a net radiative cooling, opposite to the warming caused by greenhouse gases (Charlson et al. 1992). The change in clouds that is directly induced by an increase of aerosol concentration is an increase of cloud droplet number density, N; but is is usually assumed that cloud droplet size decreases as if the water mass density Liquid Water Content (LWC) were constant. There is actually no reason why this should be the case. Shifting the cloud droplet size distribution to more numerous smaller droplets can change the relative rates of condensational and coalescence growth, leading to different LWC (e.g., Rossow 1978). Moreover, the resulting change in cloud albedo is usually ascribed to more efficient scattering by smaller droplets, when in fact it is the increase in droplet number density (assuming constant LWC) that produces the most important change in cloud albedo: e.g., holding N constant and decreasing the droplet size would actually decrease the scattering cross-section and, thus, the albedo much more than it is increased by the increased scattering efficiency.

  1. Experimental study of the interaction of THz radiation FEL with the atmosphere and water droplet aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Lisenko, A. A.; Babchenko, S. V.; Kargin, B. A.; Kablukova, E. G.; Kubarev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of radiation of the Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (FEL) at a wavelength of 130 μm in the atmospheric transmission window with a model aerosol cloud having the known droplet size distribution function has been studied experimentally. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical calculations obtained from solution of the lidar equation for the conditions of the experiment.

  2. Cloud droplet nucleation and its connection to aerosol properties

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1996-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols influence the earth`s radiation balance and climate directly, by scattering shortwave (solar) radiation in cloud-free conditions and indirectly, by increasing concentrations of cloud droplets thereby enhancing cloud shortwave reflectivity. These effects are thought to be significant in the context of changes in the earth radiation budget over the industrial period, exerting a radiative forcing that is of comparable magnitude to that of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases over this period but opposite in sign. However the magnitudes of both the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite uncertain. Much of the uncertainty of the indirect effect arises from incomplete ability to describe changes in cloud properties arising from anthropogenic aerosols. This paper examines recent studies pertaining to the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on loading and properties of aerosols affecting their cloud nucleating properties and indicative of substantial anthropogenic influence on aerosol and cloud properties over the North Atlantic.

  3. Applying super-droplets as a compact representation of warm-rain microphysics for aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabas, S.; Jaruga, A.; Pawlowska, H.; Grabowski, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    Clouds may influence aerosol characteristics of their environment. The relevant processes include wet deposition (rainout or washout) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) recycling through evaporation of cloud droplets and drizzle drops. Recycled CCN physicochemical properties may be altered if the evaporated droplets go through collisional growth or irreversible chemical reactions (e.g. SO2 oxidation). The key challenge of representing these processes in a numerical cloud model stems from the need to track properties of activated CCN throughout the cloud lifecycle. Lack of such "memory" characterises the so-called bulk, multi-moment as well as bin representations of cloud microphysics. In this study we apply the particle-based scheme of Shima et al. 2009. Each modelled particle (aka super-droplet) is a numerical proxy for a multiplicity of real-world CCN, cloud, drizzle or rain particles of the same size, nucleus type,and position. Tracking cloud nucleus properties is an inherent feature of the particle-based frameworks, making them suitable for studying aerosol-cloud-aerosol interactions. The super-droplet scheme is furthermore characterized by linear scalability in the number of computational particles, and no numerical diffusion in the condensational and in the Monte-Carlo type collisional growth schemes. The presentation will focus on processing of aerosol by a drizzling stratocumulus deck. The simulations are carried out using a 2D kinematic framework and a VOCALS experiment inspired set-up (see http://www.rap.ucar.edu/~gthompsn/workshop2012/case1/).

  4. Characterization of organic residues of size-resolved fog droplets and their atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Ervens, Barbara; Gupta, Tarun; Tripathi, Sachchida N.

    2016-04-01

    Size-resolved fog water samples were collected in two consecutive winters at Kanpur, a heavily polluted urban area of India. Samples were analyzed by an aerosol mass spectrometer after drying and directly in other instruments. Residues of fine fog droplets (diameter: 4-16 µm) are found to be more enriched with oxidized (oxygen to carbon ratio, O/C = 0.88) and low volatility organics than residues of coarse (diameter > 22 µm) and medium size (diameter: 16-22 µm) droplets with O/C of 0.68 and 0.74, respectively. These O/C ratios are much higher than those observed for background ambient organic aerosols, indicating efficient oxidation in fog water. Accompanying box model simulations reveal that longer residence times, together with high aqueous OH concentrations in fine droplets, can explain these trends. High aqueous OH concentrations in smaller droplets are caused by their highest surface-volume ratio and high Fe and Cu concentrations, allowing more uptake of gas phase OH and enhanced Fenton reaction rates, respectively. Although some volatile organic species may have escaped during droplet evaporation, these findings indicate that aqueous processing of dissolved organics varies with droplet size. Therefore, large (regional, global)-scale models need to consider the variable reaction rates, together with metal-catalyzed radical formation throughout droplet populations for accurately predicting aqueous secondary organic aerosol formation.

  5. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  6. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. W.; Ardon-Dryer, K.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The interplay between aerosol particles and water droplets in the atmosphere, especially in clouds, influences both aerosol and cloud properties. The major uncertainty in our understanding of climate arises in the indirect effect of aerosol and their ability to impact cloud formation and consequently alter the global radiative balance. The collision between a water droplet and aerosol particles that results in coalescence is termed "collection" or "coagulation". Coagulation can lead to aerosol removal from the atmosphere or induce ice nucleation via contact freezing. There is a theoretical collection efficiency minimum of particles with diameter between 0.1-2 µm, called the "Greenfield Gap". Experimental effort, however, was limited to drizzle and rain drops until recently, and has not constrained parameters that describe particle collection efficiency by cloud droplets. Collection efficiency is also an important parameter for assessing contact freezing, the least known ice nucleation mechanism today. Experimentally assessing collection efficiency can prove the existence of the "Greenfield Gap" and lay the foundation for studying contact freezing. We recently constructed the MIT-Contact Freezing Chamber (MIT-CFC) to study coagulation experimentally. A stream of 40 µm cloud droplets fall freely into the chamber and collide with aerosol particles with known size and concentration. The outflow goes through a series of dryers before entering the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument for chemical composition analysis. PALMS is a true single-particle instrument and gives information on the size and the chemical composition of each particle. Coagulated particles from the MIT-CFC have mass spectral signatures of both the aerosol particles and the droplet residuals, while the droplet residual contains no signature of the aerosol particles. To our knowledge, this is the first time coagulation has been seen on a single-particle basis. We will

  7. Research study of droplet sizing technology leading to the development of an advanced droplet sizing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.; Smart, A. E.; Espinosa, V. E.

    1985-01-01

    An instrument to measure the size and velocity of droplets was developed. The instrument uses one of two techniques, as appropriate. In the first technique two small laser beams of one color identify the center of a larger laser beam of a different color. This defines a region of almost uniform intensity where the light scattered by the individual droplets can be related to their size. The first technique uses the visibility of a Doppler burst and validates it against the peak intensity of the signal's pedestal. Results are presented for monodisperse, bimodal, trimodal, and polydisperse sprays produced by the Berglund-Liu droplet generator and a pressure nozzle. Size distributions of a given spray obtained using three different size ranges show excellent self-consistency in the overlapping region. Measurements of sprays of known characteristics exhibit errors in the order of 10%. The principles of operation and design criteria of the instrument are discussed in great detail.

  8. Susceptibility of Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to pyrethrin aerosol: effects of aerosol particle size, concentration, and exposure conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted to assess effect of droplet size on efficacy of pyrethrin aerosol against adults of Tribolium confusum Jacqueline DuVal, the confused flour beetle. A vertical flow aerosol exposure chamber that generated a standardized particle size diameter was used for...

  9. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  10. Determination of Maintaining Time of Temperature Traces of Aerosol Droplet Water Flows During Motion in a Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Voitkov, I. S.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    To develop fire fighting technologies, the temperatures of combustible products were measured after passing an aerosol droplet flow of water through the flames (with monitored temperatures). It was applied the aerosol flows with droplets of sizes less than 100 μm, 100-200 μm, and 200-300 μm. Investigations were conducted at a temperature of combustible products from 500 K to 900 K. Temperatures of gases in droplet flow traces and maintaining times of relatively low temperatures in these areas (it can be considered as temperature trace) were defined. It was obtained the satisfactory agreement of experimental results and numerical simulation data.

  11. Volatility of Organic Aerosol: Evaporation of Ammonium Sulfate/Succinic Acid Aqueous Solution Droplets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Condensation and evaporation modify the properties and effects of atmospheric aerosol particles. We studied the evaporation of aqueous succinic acid and succinic acid/ammonium sulfate droplets to obtain insights on the effect of ammonium sulfate on the gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric organic acids. Droplet evaporation in a laminar flow tube was measured in a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer setup. A wide range of droplet compositions was investigated, and for some of the experiments the composition was tracked using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. The measured evaporation was compared to model predictions where the ammonium sulfate was assumed not to directly affect succinic acid evaporation. The model captured the evaporation rates for droplets with large organic content but overestimated the droplet size change when the molar concentration of succinic acid was similar to or lower than that of ammonium sulfate, suggesting that ammonium sulfate enhances the partitioning of dicarboxylic acids to aqueous particles more than currently expected from simple mixture thermodynamics. If extrapolated to the real atmosphere, these results imply enhanced partitioning of secondary organic compounds to particulate phase in environments dominated by inorganic aerosol. PMID:24107221

  12. Scavenging in weakly electrified saturated and subsaturated clouds, treating aerosol particles and droplets as conducting spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Limin; Tinsley, Brian A.; Plemmons, Abigail

    2009-09-01

    The effects of electric charge on collision rate coefficients for scavenging of aerosol particles by droplets are evaluated, as appropriate to weak electrification conditions in clouds. Variations in charges on droplets and particles in clouds are proportional to the flow of current in the global electric circuit through gradients in resistivity, which are determined by gradients in droplet concentration and humidity. We obtain the collision rate coefficients by “trajectory model” calculations for spherical aerosol particles and droplets using the exact electrical force equation, with its long-range repulsion and short-range attraction, interacting with drag, inertia, and phoretic forces. The use of the exact electric force gives rate coefficients up to a factor of two greater than previous image charge calculations for particles in the “Greenfield Gap”. Rate coefficients for scavenging by Brownian diffusion are obtained by the analytic expression for “flux model” calculations. Rate coefficients for combined effects of electric and phoretic scavenging are given, as appropriate for scavenging of droplets evaporating to residual particles while temporarily retaining the original droplet charge. For particles of radii below about 0.1 μm and with charges typical of residues of freshly evaporated droplets, the long-range repulsive electrical force reduces the collision rate coefficients below those for phoretic scavenging in subsaturated air and below the rates for Brownian scavenging. Time constants for scavenging of particles are given for selected values of droplet size, particle and droplet charges, and particle density, and the applications to observed effects in the atmosphere are discussed.

  13. Steady-state droplet size in montmorillonite stabilised emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ganley, William J; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2016-08-14

    The formation of hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilised by montmorillonite platelets was studied. In this system the platelets form a monolayer around the droplets and the droplet size decreases with increasing platelet volume fraction. However, the number of platelets present exceeds that required for monolayer coverage. The kinetics of emulsification were investigated and coalescence of droplets during turbulent mixing was found to continue even after the droplets had reached their ultimate size. Non-spherical droplets, resulting from arrested coalescence, were not observed suggesting that particles may be desorbing from the interface during the turbulent flow. A kinetic model based on a competition between droplet break-up and coalescence, mediated by particle adsorption and desorption, reproduces experimental trends in droplet diameter. The model can be used to predict the most efficient formulation to minimise droplet diameters for given materials and mixing conditions and sheds light on the processes occurring during emulsification in this system. PMID:27407026

  14. Droplet size characterization of hand-held atomization equipment typically used in vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The atomization characteristics from four hand-held sprayers (Leco P-1, Colt ULV Aerosol Generator, UlVAFAN MK2, Turbair ElectraFan 12) and a Stihl SR400 backpack sprayer were evaluated using water- and oil-based solutions. The effects on droplet size spectrum for three insecticides (Tempo SC Ultra...

  15. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  16. Comparison of drop size distributions from two droplet sizing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the combined measurements from Particle Measuring Systems' Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the supercooled water droplet cloud. Clouds having a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A volume median diameter was calculated from combining the droplet distributions of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement from 10 microns up to 30 microns. Typical drop size distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented for several median volume diameters. A comparison of the distributions illustrates regions of the distributions where there is good agreement and other regions where there are discrepancies between the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and the Particle Measuring Systems' droplet size instruments.

  17. Aerosol yields and losses of aldehydes and amines from evaporating cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haan, D. O.; Hawkins, L. N.; Rynaski, A. D.; Wood, S.

    2010-12-01

    In evaporating aqueous droplets, the alpha-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal and methylglyoxal can form oligomers and partly avoid loss to the gas phase. In clouds and aerosol, amines and ammonium salts react with volatile dicarbonyls to form semi-volatile imines, imidazoles and light-absorbing oligomer compounds. Particle size measurements during droplet evaporation experiments (both polydisperse and monodisperse) show that the fast production of semivolatile products is significant. Reactions of volatile methylamine with dicarbonyl compounds increase the resulting dry aerosol volumes, but do not change the fraction of dicarbonyls lost to the gas phase. Low volatility amines and ammonium sulfate, on the other hand, have reduced dry aerosol volumes in the presence of dicarbonyl compounds. The formation of semi-volatile products in these cases causes a net loss of aerosol material as non-volatile reactants are converted into semivolatile products. Thus, while these reactions provide a means for small aldehydes and amines to be converted into secondary organic aerosol (SOA), for low volatility amine and ammonia salts already in the condensed phase, these reactions do not significantly increase SOA mass. However, in both cases these reactions may be significant sources of “brown carbon,” light-absorbing compounds that increase the radiative forcing of clouds and aerosol.

  18. GCM estimate of the indirect aerosol forcing using satellite-retrieved cloud droplet effective radii

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, O.

    1995-05-01

    In a recent paper, satellite data radiances were analyzed to retrieve cloud droplet effective radii and significant interhemispheric differences for both maritime and continental clouds were reported. The mean cloud droplet radius in the Northern Hemisphere is smaller than in the Southern Hemisphere by about 0.7 {mu}m. This hemispheric contrast suggests the presence of an aerosol effect on cloud droplet size and is consistent with higher cloud condensation nuclei number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere due to anthropogenic production of aerosol precursors. In the present study, we constrain a climate model with the satellite retrievals and discuss the climate forcing that can be inferred from the observed distribution of cloud droplet radius. Based on two sets of experiments, this sensitivity study suggests that the indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols could be about -0.6 or -1 W m{sup -2} averaged in the 0{degrees}-50{degrees}N latitude band. The uncertainty of these estimates is difficult to assess but is at least 50%. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Organic films on atmospheric aerosol particles, fog droplets, cloud droplets, raindrops, and snowflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, P. S.; Graedel, T. E.; Weschler, C. J.

    1983-05-01

    If surface-active organic molecules are present as surface films, the transfer of gases into the atmospheric water system could be impeded, evaporation could be slowed, and the aqueous chemical reactions could be influenced. The results of new measurements of the surface tension of aqueous solutions of common atmospheric organic compounds (beta-pinene, n-hexanol, eugenol, and anethole) are reported, and it is shown that the compounds produce films with properties similar to those of the better known surfactants. It is concluded that organic films are probably common on atmospheric aerosol particles and that they may occur under certain circumstances on fog droplets, cloud droplets, and snowflakes. If they are present, they will increase the lifetimes of aerosol particles, fog droplets, and cloud droplets, both by inhibiting water vapor evaporation and by reducing the efficiency with which these atmospheric components are scavenged. It is thought likely that the transport of gaseous molecules into and out of the aqueous solution will be impeded by factors of several hundred or more when organic films are present.

  20. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol.

    PubMed

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry. PMID:27125240

  1. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry.

  2. Evaporation of droplets in a Champagne wine aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Séon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In a single glass of champagne about a million bubbles nucleate on the wall and rise towards the surface. When these bubbles reach the surface and rupture, they project a multitude of tiny droplets in the form of a particular aerosol holding a concentrate of wine aromas. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the key features of the champagne aerosol are identified. In particular, we show that film drops, critical in sea spray for example, are here nonexistent. We then demonstrate that compared to a still wine, champagne fizz drastically enhances the transfer of liquid into the atmosphere. There, conditions on bubble radius and wine viscosity that optimize aerosol evaporation are provided. These results pave the way towards the fine tuning of flavor release during sparkling wine tasting, a major issue for the sparkling wine industry. PMID:27125240

  3. Dynamics of submicron aerosol droplets in a robust optical trap formed by multiple Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thanopulos, Ioannis; Luckhaus, David; Signorell, Ruth; Preston, Thomas C.

    2014-04-21

    In this paper, we model the three-dimensional escape dynamics of single submicron-sized aerosol droplets in optical multiple Bessel beam traps. Trapping in counter-propagating Bessel beams (CPBBs) is compared with a newly proposed quadruple Bessel beam (QBB) trap, which consists of two perpendicularly arranged CPBB traps. Calculations are performed for perfectly and imperfectly aligned traps. Mie-theory and finite-difference time-domain methods are used to calculate the optical forces. The droplet escape kinetics are obtained from the solution of the Langevin equation using a Verlet algorithm. Provided the traps are perfectly aligned, the calculations indicate very long lifetimes for droplets trapped either in the CPBB or in the QBB trap. However, minor misalignments that are hard to control experimentally already severely diminish the stability of the CPBB trap. By contrast, such minor misalignments hardly affect the extended droplet lifetimes in a QBB trap. The QBB trap is found to be a stable, robust optical trap, which should enable the experimental investigation of submicron droplets with radii down to 100 nm. Optical binding between two droplets and its potential role in preventing coagulation when loading a CPBB trap is briefly addressed.

  4. Effects of aerosol sources and chemical compositions on cloud drop sizes and glaciation temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipori, Assaf; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tirosh, Ofir; Teutsch, Nadya; Erel, Yigal

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aerosols on cloud properties, such as its droplet sizes and its glaciation temperatures, depends on their compositions and concentrations. In order to examine these effects, we collected rain samples in northern Israel during five winters (2008-2011 and 2013) and determined their chemical composition, which was later used to identify the aerosols' sources. By combining the chemical data with satellite-retrieved cloud properties, we linked the aerosol types, sources, and concentrations with the cloud glaciation temperatures (Tg). The presence of dust increased Tg from -26°C to -12°C already at relatively low dust concentrations. This result is in agreement with the conventional wisdom that desert dust serves as good ice nuclei (INs). With higher dust concentrations, Tg saturated at -12°C, even though cloud droplet sizes decreased as a result of the cloud condensation nucleating (CCN) activity of the dust. Marine air masses also encouraged freezing, but in this case, freezing was enhanced by the larger cloud droplet sizes in the air masses (caused by low CCN concentrations) and not by IN concentrations or by aerosol type. An increased fraction of anthropogenic aerosols in marine air masses caused a decrease in Tg, indicating that these aerosols served as poor IN. Anthropogenic aerosols reduced cloud droplet sizes, which further decreased Tg. Our results could be useful in climate models for aerosol-cloud interactions, as we investigated the effects of aerosols of different sources on cloud properties. Such parameterization can simplify these models substantially.

  5. Size-variable droplet actuation by interdigitated electrowetting electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianfeng; Yu, Yuhua; Li, Jia; Lai, Yongjun; Zhou, Jia

    2012-12-01

    We propose electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) electrodes to actuate size-variable droplets. By using interdigitated fingers and maximizing them in optimized construction, we can control droplets in different sizes with the same electrode array automatically. We both do the theory calculation and experiment verification to study the electrode with rectangular fingers. It is found that the electrode with triangle fingers can actuate droplets as small as 1/36 of that actuated by conventional square electrode array. It can actuate large droplets more efficiently than rectangular fingers. This work provides an approach to achieve multifunctional EWOD devices in the future.

  6. Fuel droplet size measurements with a laser Doppler interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. R.

    1985-07-01

    It is pointed out that the injection and atomization of liquid fuel into a gas turbine combustion system plays a major role in many key aspects of combustion system performance. Fuel droplet diameters represent one of the parameters which determine the burning rate. The present investigation is concerned with a commercially available laser Doppler interferometer which has been used by an American manufacturer of aircraft engines to measure fuel droplet size distributions downstream of several different fuel injectors and combinations of fuel injectors and combustor dome swirl cups. The considered instrument has a very small sample volume, which permits measurements of droplet size distributions and droplet Sauter Mean Diameters (SMD) at a large number of discrete points in the spray pattern. The design and the principles of operation of the droplet sizing interferometer (DSI) are discussed along with alignment procedures, test configurations, and test results.

  7. From bubble bursting to droplet evaporation in the context of champagne aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Thomas; Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Liger-Belair, Gerard

    2015-11-01

    As champagne or sparkling wine is poured into a glass, a myriad of ascending bubbles collapse and therefore radiate a multitude of tiny droplets above the free surface into the form of very characteristic and refreshing aerosols. Because these aerosols have been found to hold the organoleptic ``essence'' of champagne they are believed to play a crucial role in the flavor release in comparison with that from a flat wine for example. Based on the model experiment of a single bubble bursting in idealized champagnes, the velocity, radius and maximum height of the first jet drop following bubble collapse have been characterized, with varying bubble size and liquid properties in the context of champagne aerosols. Using the experimental results and simple theoretical models for drop and surface evaporation, we show that bubble bursting aerosols drastically enhance the transfer of liquid in the atmosphere with respect to a flat liquid surface. Contrary to popular opinion, we exhibit that small bubbles are negative in terms of aroma release, and we underline bubble radii enabling to optimize the droplet height and evaporation in the whole range of champagne properties. These results pave the road to the fine tuning of champagne aroma diffusion, a major issue of the sparkling wine industry.

  8. Oil droplet collisions with marine snow: effect of manipulating droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, R. A.; Variano, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solid particle aggregates in the ocean, such as marine snow, can scavenge oil droplets as they are transported in the ocean, resulting in the removal of oil from the water column. Often, chemical dispersant is applied to oil spills to manipulate the oil droplet size; we study how such manipulations affect the rate at which oil is removed from the water column by collision with marine snow. We model the collision process using the particle pair methodology. Three dominant collision mechanisms are considered for particle pairs in the ocean environment: turbulent shear, differential settling and Brownian motion. A comparison of the removal rate of oil from the water column for large and small droplets size is conducted at constant volume fraction. The results of the study show that, for a constant volume of oil, droplet size does alter the amount of oil removed from the water column during collisions with marine snow, and that a greater amount of oil is removed when the droplets are large. This finding holds regardless of which collision mechanism is considered. Of the three mechanisms, differential settling results in the largest constant-volume removal rate (since oil droplets rise while marine floc settle downward) while Brownian diffusion results in the lowest removal rate. These finding suggest that using chemical dispersant on deep-sea oil spills to reduce droplet size will reduce the total volume of oil that becomes attached to marine snow and reduce the amount removed from the water column by this mechanism.

  9. Cross-Interface Emulsification for Generating Size-Tunable Droplets.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Zheng, Xu; Tao, Yi; Du, Wenbin

    2016-03-15

    We report cross-interface emulsification (XiE), a simple method for the generation of monodisperse droplets of controllable volumes from picoliter to nanoliter. A device is set up in which a fused-silica capillary is vibrating across the surface of the continuous phase (mineral oil) in a reservoir, and the flow of the dispersed phase (aqueous solution) in the capillary is segmented into monodisperse droplets at the air/oil interface. We find that the volume of droplets is mainly dominated by the flow rate and vibrating frequency and not significantly influenced by other factors, such as the viscosity of the continuous phase and dispersed phase, the inner diameter of the capillary (20-100 μm), or the shape of the tip (tapered or flat). These features reflect high robustness, flexibility, and precision of XiE for on-demand volume control of droplets. The droplets automatically assemble into planar monolayer droplet arrays (PMDA) in flat-bottomed microwells of 96-well plates, offering excellent convenience for imaging of droplets. As a representative application, we carry out digital loop-mediated isothermal amplification using PMDAs with multivolume droplets for the absolute quantification of nucleic acids. Our results demonstrate that XiE is simple and controllable for the production of monodisperse size-tunable droplets, and it offers opportunities for common laboratories, even without microfabrication facilities, to perform digital quantification, single cell analysis, and other biochemical assays with high throughput. PMID:26849419

  10. Volatility and oxidative aging of aqueous maleic acid aerosol droplets and the dependence on relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Dennis-Smither, Benjamin J; Marshall, Frances H; Miles, Rachael E H; Preston, Thomas C; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-07-31

    The microphysical structure and heterogeneous oxidation by ozone of single aerosol particles containing maleic acid (MA) has been studied using aerosol optical tweezers and cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The evaporation rate of MA from aqueous droplets has been measured over a range of relative humidities and the pure component vapor pressure determined to be (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10(-3) Pa. Variation in the refractive index (RI) of an aqueous MA droplet with relative humidity (RH) allowed the subcooled liquid RI of MA to be estimated as 1.481 ± 0.001. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth are shown to be consistent with equilibrium model predictions from previous studies. Simultaneous measurements of the droplet composition, size, and refractive index have been made during ozonolysis at RHs in the range 50-80%, providing insight into the volatility of organic products, changes in the droplet hygroscopicity, and optical properties. Exposure of the aqueous droplets to ozone leads to the formation of products with a wide range of volatilities spanning from involatile to volatile. Reactive uptake coefficients show a weak dependence on ozone concentration, but no dependence on RH or salt concentration. The time evolving RI depends significantly on the RH at which the oxidation proceeds and can even show opposing trends; while the RI increases with ozone exposure at low relative humidity, the RI decreases when the oxidation proceeds at high relative humidity. The variations in RI are broadly consistent with a framework for predicting RIs for organic components published by Cappa et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 2011 , 116 , D15204 ). Once oxidized, particles are shown to form amorphous phases on drying rather than crystallization, with slow evaporation kinetics of residual water. PMID:25003240

  11. Experimental Assessment of Collection Efficiency of Submicron Aerosol Particles by Cloud Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Oo, K.; Brown, M. D.; Dhaniyala, S.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    An experimental setup has been constructed to measure the collection efficiency of submicron aerosol particles by cloud droplets. The collection efficiency study is a prelude to studying contact nucleation, which is a potentially important ice nucleation mode that is not well-understood. This laboratory setup is a step closer to experimentally assessing the importance of contact nucleation. Water droplets with 20 micron diameter and submicron aerosol particles are brought into contact in an injector situated inside a chilled glass flow tube. The water droplets that collect aerosol particles are allowed to pass through a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), which accepts large droplets and rejects aerosol particles that have not coagulated with the water droplets. The collected droplets are sent into the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument which performs in situ chemical analysis of a single particle. The number of aerosol particles collected by the single water droplet is quantified by calibrating the PALMS with known concentrations of aerosol particles. The water droplets contain a known amount of ammonium sulfate for identification purpose in the mass spectrometry. Preliminary results from the experiment will be discussed and compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies.

  12. Assessing the size distribution of droplets in a cloud chamber from light extinction data during a transient regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vâjâiac, Sorin Nicolae; Filip, Valeriu; Štefan, Sabina; Boscornea, Andreea

    2014-03-01

    The paper describes a method of assessing the size distribution of fog droplets in a cloud chamber, based on measuring the time variation of the transmission of a light beam during the gravitational settling of droplets. Using a model of light extinction by floating spherical particles, the size distribution of droplets is retrieved, along with characteristic structural parameters of the fog (total droplet concentration, liquid water content and effective radius). Moreover, the time variation of the effective radius can be readily extracted from the model. The errors of the method are also estimated and fall within acceptable limits. The method proves sensitive enough to resolve various modes in the droplet distribution and to point out changes in the distribution due to diverse types of aerosol present in the chamber or to the thermal condition of the fog. It is speculated that the method can be further simplified to reach an in-situ version for real-time field measurements.

  13. Droplet size measurements for spray dryer scale-up.

    PubMed

    Thybo, Pia; Hovgaard, Lars; Andersen, Sune Klint; Lindeløv, Jesper Saederup

    2008-01-01

    This study was dedicated to facilitate scale-up in spray drying from an atomization standpoint. The purpose was to investigate differences in operating conditions between a pilot and a production scale nozzle. The intension was to identify the operating ranges in which the two nozzles produced similar droplet size distributions. Furthermore, method optimization and validation were also covered. Externally mixing two-fluid nozzles of similar designs were used in this study. Both nozzles are typically used in commercially available spray dryers, and they have been characterized with respect to droplet size distributions as a function of liquid type, liquid flow rate, atomization gas flow rate, liquid orifice diameter, and atomization gas orifice diameter. All droplet size measurements were carried out by using the Malvern Spraytec with nozzle operating conditions corresponding to typical settings for spray drying. This gave droplets with Sauter Mean Diameters less than 40 microm and typically 5-20 microm. A model previously proposed by Mansour and Chigier was used to correlate the droplet size to the operating parameters. It was possible to make a correlation for water incorporating the droplet sizes for both the pilot scale and the production scale nozzle. However, a single correlation was not able to account properly for the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the droplet size distributions of ethanol could not be adequately predicted on the basis of the water data. This study has shown that it was possible to scale up from a pilot to production scale nozzle in a systematic fashion. However, a prerequisite was that the nozzles were geometrically similar. When externally mixing two-fluid nozzles are used as atomizers, the results obtained from this study could be a useful guideline for selecting appropriate operating conditions when scaling up the spray-drying process. PMID:18379901

  14. Collision of oil droplets with marine aggregates: Effect of droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Ruth A.; Variano, Evan A.

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between oil droplets and marine particle aggregates, such as marine snow, may affect the behavior of oil spills. Marine snow is known to scavenge fine particles from the water column, and has the potential to scavenge oil droplets in the same manner. To determine the degree to which such a process is important in the evolution of oil spills, we quantify the collision of oil droplets and marine aggregates using existing collision rate equations. Results show that interaction of drops and aggregates can substantially influence the drop size distribution, but like all such processes this result is sensitive to the local concentration of oil and aggregates. The analysis also shows that as the size distribution of oil droplets shifts toward larger droplets, a greater fraction of the total oil volume collides with marine aggregates. This result is robust to a variety of different assumptions in the collision model. Results also show that there is not always a dominant collision mechanism. For example, when droplets and aggregates are both close to 10 μm in radius, shear and differential settling contribute nearly equally to the collision rate. This overlap suggests that further research on the interaction of shear and differential settling could be useful.

  15. Continuous standalone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry highly charged cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm) with minimum losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was > 94% during these five months.

  16. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges). One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K) and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  17. Performance of Nanoliter-Sized Droplet-based Microfluidic PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Burns, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device was used to characterize PCR in aqueous-in-oil droplets for potential point-of-care applications. Droplets with a volume range of 5–250nL can be formed on-chip reproducibly, and PCR in the droplets shows amplification efficiencies comparable to benchtop reactions with no evaporation loss. A higher polymerase concentration is required in the reaction droplet while the optimal Magnesium ion concentration is the same for both on-chip and benchtop systems. The optimal hold time is 9 and 30 seconds for denaturation and annealing/extension in thermal cycling, respectively. With the optimized cycling parameters, the total reaction time is reduced to half of that required for benchtop PCR. For the droplets containing the same quantity of template DNA, the PCR yield is approximately the same with either fixed droplet size or fixed template DNA concentration. The droplet-based PCR can be monitored in real time with FRET probes, and provide amplification with a cycle threshold of ~10 cycles earlier than the benchtop instruments. PMID:19479169

  18. What does Reflection from Cloud Sides tell us about Vertical Distribution of Cloud Droplet Sizes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Martins, J. V.; Zubko, V.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud development, the onset of precipitation and the effect of aerosol on clouds depend on the structure of the cloud profiles of droplet size and phase. Aircraft measurements of cloud profiles are limited in their temporal and spatial extent. Satellites were used to observe cloud tops not cloud profiles with vertical profiles of precipitation-sized droplets anticipated from CloudSat. The recently proposed CLAIM-3D satellite mission (cloud aerosol interaction mission in 3-D) suggests to measure profiles of cloud microphysical properties by retrieving them from the solar and infrared radiation reflected or emitted from cloud sides. Inversion of measurements from the cloud sides requires rigorous understanding of the 3-dimentional(3-D) properties of clouds. Here we discuss the reflected sunlight from the cloud sides and top at two wavelengths: one nonabsorbing to solar radiation (0.67 microns) and one with liquid water efficient absorption of solar radiation (2.1 microns). In contrast to the plane-parallel approximation, a conventional approach to all current operational retrievals, 3-D radiative transfer is used for interpreting the observed reflectances. General properties of the radiation reflected from the sides of an isolated cloud are discussed. As a proof of concept, the paper shows a few examples of radiation reflected from cloud fields generated by a simple stochastic cloud model with the prescribed vertically resolved microphysics. To retrieve the information about droplet sizes, we propose to use the probability density function of the droplet size distribution and its first two moments instead of the assumption about fixed values of the droplet effective radius. The retrieval algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem that combines prior information about cloud structure and microphysics with radiative transfer calculations.

  19. What Does Reflection from Cloud Sides Tell Us About Vertical Distribution of Cloud Droplet Sizes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Zubko, Victor; Kaufman, Yoram, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cloud development, the onset of precipitation and the effect of aerosol on clouds depend on the structure of the cloud profiles of droplet size and phase. Aircraft measurements of cloud profiles are limited in their temporal and spatial extent. Satellites were used to observe cloud tops not cloud profiles with vertical profiles of precipitation-sized droplets anticipated from Cloudsat. The recently proposed CLAIM-3D satellite mission (cloud aerosol interaction mission in 3D) suggests to measure profiles of cloud microphysical properties by retrieving them from the solar and infrared radiation reflected or emitted from cloud sides. Inversion of measurements from the cloud sides requires rigorous understanding of the 3-dimensional (3D) properties of clouds. Here we discuss the reflected sunlight from the cloud sides and top at two wavelengths: one nonabsorbing to solar radiation (0.67 micrometers) and one with liquid water efficient absorption of solar radiation (2.1 micrometers). In contrast to the plane-parallel approximation, a conventional approach to all current operational retrievals, 3D radiative transfer is used for interpreting the observed reflectances. General properties of the radiation reflected from the sides of an isolated cloud are discussed. As a proof of concept, the paper shows a few examples of radiation reflected from cloud fields generated by a simple stochastic cloud model with the prescribed vertically resolved microphysics. To retrieve the information about droplet sizes, we propose to use the probability density function of the droplet size distribution and its first two moments instead of the assumption about fixed values of the droplet effective radius. The retrieval algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem that combines prior information about cloud structure and microphysics with radiative transfer calculations.

  20. IN-SITU AERODYNAMIC SIZING OF AEROSOL PARTICLES WITH THE SPART ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single particle aerodynamic relaxation time (SPART) analyzer has been developed to measure the aerodynamic size distribution of aerosol particulates in the range 0.1 to 10.0 micrometer in diameter. The analyzer sizes and counts individual suspended particles and droplets from s...

  1. Method for determining the droplet size distribution of emulsified water

    SciTech Connect

    Rzaev, A.G.

    1988-09-10

    Accelerating crude-oil processing requires estimation of the major parameters, including the droplet size distribution of the oil emulsion (OE) in the flow ahead of the settlers. This is handled here as follows. Under industrial conditions, samples are taken ahead of the settler into a calibrated vessel specially designed for the purpose and allowed to separate at a temperature equal to the flow temperature, where the amount of water deposited and the settling time are recorded. A hyperbolic relation applies quite closely to those data. The model expresses the droplet size as a function of the hydrodynamic parameters and can be used in optimizing dewatering and desalting oil.

  2. Influence of droplet size and velocity on droplet impact process on waxy leaf surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A custom-designed system consisting of two high-speed digital cameras, a uniform-size droplet generator, a constant-speed linear track unit, light sources and a 3-dimensional (3-D) image analytical program was used to investigate the impact processes. Leaves of Dracaena deremensis, Euphorbia pulche...

  3. Droplet-size characterization of handheld atomization equipment typically used in vector control.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, W Clint; Walker, Todd W; Smith, Vince L; Martin, Dan E; Fritz, Brad K

    2007-09-01

    The atomization characteristics of 4 handheld sprayers (Leco P-1, Colt ULV Aerosol Generator, ULVAFAN MK2, Turbair ElectraFan 12) and a Stih1 SR400 backpack sprayer were evaluated with the use of water- and oil-based solutions. The effects on droplet-size spectrum (i.e., droplet size) for 3 insecticides (Tempo SC Ultra, Anvil 10+10, and Aqua-Reslin) were also evaluated. Generic solutions were used to simulate the physical properties of the active-ingredient solutions in some tests. Significant differences were observed in the droplet spectrum generated by the different sprayers. The volume median diameter of the equipment tested ranged from 14.9 to 90.5 microm for the water-based solutions and from 11.7 to 92.4 microm for the oil-based solutions. The Colt ULV sprayer was the only one tested that complied with label requirements for aerosols, yielding acceptable Dv0.5 values of 14.9 16.0 microm with water-based Aqua-Reslin and 14.1 microm with Anvil 10+10. The information presented will allow equipment operators to make an informed decision when selecting equipment and operational parameters. PMID:17939513

  4. Measuring spray droplet size from agricultural nozzles using laser diffraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When making an application of any crop protection material such as a herbicide or pesticide, the applicator uses a variety of skills and information to make an application so that the material reaches the target site (i.e. plant). Information critical in this process is the droplet size that a parti...

  5. Effects of nozzle spray angle on droplet size and velocity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray applicators have many choices in selecting a spray nozzle to make an application of an agricultural product. They must balance flowrate, spray pressure, and nozzle type and setup to deliver their agrochemical in the right droplet size for their particular needs. Studies were conducted to det...

  6. Volumetric Collection Efficiency and Droplet Sizing Accuracy of Rotary Impactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurements of spray volume and droplet size are critical to evaluating the movement and transport of applied sprays associated with both crop production and protection practices and vector control applications for public health. Any sampling device used for this purpose will have an efficiency of...

  7. DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS OF ISO NOZZLES BY SHADOWGRAPHY METHOD.

    PubMed

    De Cock, N; Massinon, M; Salah, S Ouled Taleb; Mercatoris, B C; Lebeau, F

    2015-01-01

    The droplet size distribution of agricultural sprays is a key parameter during the plant protection product applications. Therefore, measurement of the drop size distribution is an important concern for spray users as well as nozzle manufacturers. The present work assessed the capability of a shadowgraphy technique to distinguish correctly the 6 spray class boundaries defined in the ISO draft standard (ISO 25358). The measurement set-up is composed by a high speed camera synchronized with a LED backlighting. The tested spray is positioned between the camera and the light. The droplets appear on the images as shadows on a brighter background. For each acquisition, two frames are recorded within a small time laps (38 μI. The droplet diameter and velocity are retrieved by using advanced image analysis algorithm on each pair of frames. Then, the drop size distribution is obtained by gathering the data retrieved from all the images. The global results showed that the 6 drop size distributions were correctly separated highlighting the ability of the method to measure small as well as large droplets using the same set-up configuration. The spatial analysis showed that the spray scanning should be extended in the minor axis direction in order to catch the whole spray. PMID:27141727

  8. Adipocyte size fluctuation, mechano-active lipid droplets and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Le Lay, Soazig; Briand, Nolwenn; Dugail, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell size fluctuation, a key property in adipocyte pathophysiology primarily dependent on lipid storage, is linked to a novel function of lipid droplet organelles acting as mechano-active organelles to regulate cell membrane remodeling and caveolae dynamics. PMID:26167412

  9. Aerosol and air pollution size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Gad; Haccoun, A.; Kushelevsky, A.

    The size distribution of aerosols was measured in a moderately industrial city, in a semi-arid zone on the Negev desert border. The aerosols in the city of Beer Sheva are from two sources: the dust coming from the desert and urban pollution. The size measurements were done with a cascade impactor. The elemental content of the aerosols was investigated by neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence. The main elements of the dust are: Ca, Si, Fe, Na and the trace elements are: Sc, Se, La, Sm, Hf and others. The main elements of the urban pollution are S, Br, Pb, Cl, Hg and others. It was found that the elements belonging to each group can easily be classified by the size distribution. The analytical consideration of the aerosol size distribution of each group are discussed and two corresponding analytical expressions are suggested. It is shown that aerosols originating in the dust have a hump shape distribution around ~ 4μm, and those originating in urban pollution have a distribution decreasing with increasing aerosol diameter. Many examples are given to prove the conclusions.

  10. Adaptation of a Cascade Impactor to Flight Measurement of Droplet Size in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joseph; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.

    1951-01-01

    A cascade impactor, an instrument for obtaining: the size distribution of droplets borne in a low-velocity air stream, was adapted for flight cloud droplet-size studies. The air containing the droplets was slowed down from flight speed by a diffuser to the inlet-air velocity of the impactor. The droplets that enter the impactor impinge on four slides coated with magnesium oxide. Each slide catches a different size range. The relation between the size of droplet impressions and the droplet size was evaluated so that the droplet-size distributions may be found from these slides. The magnesium oxide coating provides a permanent record. of the droplet impression that is not affected by droplet evaporation after the. droplets have impinged.

  11. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols - Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1989-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystalization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  12. Backscatter laser depolarization studies of simulated stratospheric aerosols: Crystallized sulfuric acid droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassen, Kenneth; Zhao, Hongjie; Yu, Bing-Kun

    1988-01-01

    The optical depolarizing properties of simulated stratospheric aerosols were studied in laboratory laser (0.633 micrometer) backscattering experiments for application to polarization lidar observations. Clouds composed of sulfuric acid solution droplets, some treated with ammonia gas, were observed during evaporation. The results indicate that the formation of minute ammonium sulfate particles from the evaporation of acid droplets produces linear depolarization ratios of beta equivalent to 0.02, but beta equivalent to 0.10 to 0.15 are generated from aged acid cloud aerosols and acid droplet crystallization effects following the introduction of ammonia gas into the chamber. It is concluded that partially crystallized sulfuric acid droplets are a likely candidate for explaining the lidar beta equivalent to 0.10 values that have been observed in the lower stratosphere in the absence of the relatively strong backscattering from homogeneous sulfuric acid droplet (beta equivalent to 0) or ice crystal (beta equivalent to 0.5) clouds.

  13. Hydrophobic polymers in nano-sized water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilakaratne, Buddhi; Masood, Samina; Cheung, Margaret

    2008-03-01

    As simulations of biopolymers take place in confined and tight spaces, such as protein folding in the interior of bacteria chaperones or the exit tunnels of ribosomes, quantitative analyses of the confinement effects on both biopolymers and solvent molecules become the center of attention as the solvent-mediated interactions are too profound to solve analytically. We are in the progress to investigate the solvation of hexane molecules in various nano-sized water droplets. Free energy profiles for a single hexane molecule in droplets show that the droplet surfaces are favored. Averaged configurations of hexane molecules at the interior and the surface are computed using the umbrella sampling methods. The implications of our results for protein stability in confined spaces will be discussed.

  14. Exploration of Whispering Gallery Modes in an Optically Trapped Aerosol Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludvigsen, Angela; McCann, Lowell

    2015-03-01

    Optical traps use a laser beam to catch and hold small transparent objects. Past observations of optically trapped aqueous aerosol droplets have shown that the droplet moves between two or more stable positions depending upon the power of the trapping laser. It is hypothesized that this movement coincides with a resonance of the light with the droplet called a Whispering Gallery Mode. When the resonance occurs, additional forces act on the droplet. To investigate this behavior, Raman scattered light from the droplet is measured using a spectrometer while simultaneously recording the droplet's position. The Raman spectrum exhibits a series of peaks that appear due to the very spherical shape of the droplet called Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. The location and spacing of the peaks are related to the diameter and the optical properties of the droplet. In order to achieve an accurate determination of the radius from this spectrum, the magnitude of the electric and magnetic fields of the light scattered off the droplet are calculated. This allows for a precise measurement of the droplet's radius at the moment that the droplet moves between stable positions.

  15. Cloud droplet size distributions in low-level stratiform clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, N.L.; Verlinde, J.; Clothiaux, E.E.

    2000-01-15

    A database of stratus cloud droplet size distribution parameters, derived from in situ data reported in the existing literature, was created, facilitating intercomparison among datasets and quantifying typical values and their variability. From the datasets, which were divided into marine and continental groups, several parameters are presented, including the total number concentration, effective diameter, mean diameter, standard deviation of the droplet diameters about the mean diameter, and liquid water content, as well as the parameters of modified gamma and lognormal distributions. In light of these results, the appropriateness of common assumptions used in remote sensing of cloud droplet size distributions is discussed. For example, vertical profiles of mean diameter, effective diameter, and liquid water content agreed qualitatively with expectations based on the current paradigm of cloud formation. Whereas parcel theory predicts that the standard deviation about the mean diameter should decrease with height, the results illustrated that the standard deviation generally increases with height. A feature common to all marine clouds was their approximately constant total number concentration profiles; however, the total number concentration profiles of continental clouds were highly variable. Without cloud condensation nuclei spectra, classification of clouds into marine and continental groups is based on indirect methods. After reclassification of four sets of measurements in the database, there was a fairly clear dichotomy between marine and continental clouds, but a great deal of variability within each classification. The relevant applications of this study lie in radiative transfer and climate issues, rather than in cloud formation and dynamics. Techniques that invert remotely sensed measurements into cloud droplet size distributions frequently rely on a priori assumptions, such as constant number concentration profiles and constant spectral width. The

  16. On the sensitivity of droplet size relative dispersion to warm cumulus cloud evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, E.; Koren, I.; Altaratz, O.

    2012-07-01

    Relative dispersion (ɛ), defined as the ratio between cloud droplet size distribution width (σ) and cloud droplet average radius (), is a key factor used to parameterize various cloud processes in global circulation models (GCMs) and bulk microphysical scheme models (BSMs). Recent studies indicate that the impact of aerosol loading (N) and atmospheric thermodynamic conditions on ɛ are far from fully understood. Currently, a fixed value per hydrometeor type is used in most BSMs and GCMs, which imposes significant limitations on our ability to model and predict cloud processes and their impact on the environment, on regional to global scales. In this study, we use a detailed bin microphysics single cloud model to investigate the combined impact of atmospheric thermodynamic conditions and N on ɛ, in warm cumulus clouds. As initial conditions, we used different lapse-rates combined with 8 scenarios of aerosol loading, representing very clean (N = 25 cm-3) to heavily polluted (N = 1600 cm-3) conditions. Moreover, the results are analyzed per cloud evolutionary stage according to the dominance of microphysical processes. The use of this method indicated a different pattern of ɛ at each stage. Specifically, during the mature stage fitting of ɛ to rv is relatively resilient to changes in the environmental conditions. Such findings suggest a new view of the effect of aerosols on clouds, via changes in the cloud evolution patterns and a new approach to parameterization of ɛ based on rv, which can significantly improve the prediction of cloud processes by GCMs and BSMs.

  17. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  18. Noncircular glories and their relationship to cloud droplet size.

    PubMed

    Laven, Philip

    2008-12-01

    The atmospheric glory caused by backscattering of sunlight from clouds usually has circular colored rings. However, glories with noncircular rings are frequently observed, especially along the edges of clouds. Noting that the angular radius of the rings of glories is a sensitive indicator of the size of the water droplets in clouds, several images of glories have been examined in an attempt to explain the formation of noncircular glories. PMID:19037347

  19. Modal characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol size distribution in an urban atmosphere of South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zi-Juan; Chen, Dong-Lei; Li, Xiang; Huang, Xiao-Feng; He, Ling-Yan; Deng, Yan-Ge; Feng, Ning; Hu, Min

    2011-04-01

    Size distributions can provide important information about aerosol sources, formation, and growth mechanisms. However, compared to size distributions of inorganic aerosols, size distributions of carbonaceous aerosols have been much less studied and reported in the literature. In this paper, we systematically measured size distributions of elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), oxalate, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as major inorganic ions in urban aerosols in Shenzhen, China. Totally 24 sets of samples were collected using a ten-stage micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) during October 2009 to February 2010. Three lognormal modes contained in the size distributions of species were resolved based on positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the measured dataset, corresponding to the condensation (peak = 0.34 μm), droplet (peak = 0.84 μm), and coarse (peak = 5.4 μm) modes, respectively. The mean concentrations of EC in the condensation, droplet, and coarse modes were 2.20, 1.18, and 0.64 μg m -3, respectively, and the modal characteristics of EC indicate that fresher local combustion emissions contributed mostly to aerosol EC in the urban atmosphere of Shenzhen. The mean concentrations of OC in the condensation, droplet, and coarse modes were 2.29, 3.34, and 3.51 μg m -3, respectively, and the modal characteristics of OC indicate that its sources were more primary in the condensation mode while more secondary in the droplet mode. The modal characteristics of aerosol oxalate and PAHs suggest that they were predominantly from in-cloud secondary formation and local emissions, respectively.

  20. Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Adam P; Nizkorodov, Sergey A; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-07-14

    The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was prepared by the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene at 0.05-1 ppm precursor concentrations and collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS). The PILS extracts were photolyzed by 300-400 nm radiation for up to 24 h. Water-soluble SOA constituents were analyzed using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) at different stages of photolysis for all SOA precursor concentrations. Exposure to UV radiation increased the average O/C ratio and decreased the average double bond equivalent (DBE) of the dissolved SOA compounds. Oligomeric compounds were significantly decreased by photolysis relative to the monomeric compounds. Direct pH measurements showed that acidic compounds increased in abundance upon photolysis. Methanol reactivity analysis revealed significant photodissociation of molecules containing carbonyl groups and the formation of carboxylic acids. Aldehydes, such as limononaldehyde, were almost completely removed. The removal of carbonyls was further confirmed by the UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy of the SOA extracts where the absorbance in the carbonyl n→π* band decreased significantly upon photolysis. The effective quantum yield (the number of carbonyls destroyed per photon absorbed) was estimated as ∼0.03. The total concentration of peroxides did not change significantly during photolysis as quantified with an iodometric test. Although organic peroxides were photolyzed, the likely end products of photolysis were smaller peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, resulting in a no net change in the peroxide content. Photolysis of dry limonene SOA deposited on substrates was investigated in a separate set of experiments. The observed effects on the average O/C and DBE were similar to the aqueous photolysis, but the extent of chemical change was smaller in dry SOA. Our results suggest

  1. CCN Activity, Hygroscopicity, and Droplet Activation Kinetics of Secondary Organic Aerosol Resulting from the 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R.; Lathem, T. L.; Cerully, K.; Bahreini, R.; Brock, C. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Nenes, A.; Calnex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    We present an analysis of the hygroscopicity and droplet activation kinetics of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) sampled onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration WP-3D aircraft downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site on June 8th and 10th, 2010. This set of measurements provides a unique case study for assessing in-situ the impact of fresh, hydrocarbonlike aerosols, which are expected to be formed via gas-to-particle conversion of the semi-volatile vapors released from oil evaporation. Similar hydrocarbon-rich aerosols constitute an important local emissions source in urban areas, but often coexist as an external/partially-internal mixture with more-oxidized, aged organic and sulfate aerosol. The DWH site provides the means to study the hygroscopic properties of these less-oxidized organic aerosols above a cleaner environmental background typical of marine environments in order to better discern their contribution to CCN activity and droplet growth. Measurements were performed with a Droplet Measurement Technologies Streamwise, Thermal-Gradient CCN counter, operating both as a counter (s=0.3%) and as a spectrometer (s=0.2-0.6%) using the newly-developed Scanning Flow CCN Analysis (SFCA) technique [1]. The instrument measures both the number concentration of particles able to nucleate droplets and also their resulting droplet sizes. The measured size information combined with a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics instrument model enables us to determine the rate of water uptake onto the particles and parameterize it in terms of an effective mass transfer coefficient [2], a key parameter needed to predict the number of activated droplets in ambient clouds. Non-refractory aerosol chemical composition was measured with an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer. It was observed that the aerosols sampled downwind of the site on both days were composed predominantly of organics with a low degree of oxidation and low

  2. On the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy to measure aerosols: Observations of water droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hashmonay, R.A.; Yost, M.G.

    1999-04-01

    This paper proposes the application of Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to measure aerosols. A preliminary experiment conducted in a standard shower chamber generated a condensed water aerosol cloud. The OP-FTIR beam acquired spectra through the cloud of water droplets. The authors matched calculated extinction spectra to measured extinction in the spectral range between 500 and 5,000 wavenumbers by using Mie theory for spherical particles. The results indicate that size distribution parameters may be retrieved from OP-FTIR spectra acquired over a 1 km optical path with reasonable detection limits on the order of 10 {micro}g{center_dot}m{sup {minus}3} for aerosols with optical properties equivalent to water.

  3. Arctic low-level boundary layer clouds: in-situ measurements and simulations of mono- and bimodal supercooled droplet size distributions at the cloud top layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingebiel, M.; de Lozar, A.; Molleker, S.; Weigel, R.; Roth, A.; Schmidt, L.; Meyer, J.; Ehrlich, A.; Neuber, R.; Wendisch, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-06-01

    Aircraft borne optical in-situ size distribution measurements were performed within Arctic boundary layer clouds, with a special emphasis on the cloud top layer, during the VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic Clouds (VERDI) campaign. The observations were carried out within a joint research activity of seven German institutes to investigate Arctic boundary layer-, mixed-phase clouds in April and May 2012. An instrumented Basler BT-67 research aircraft operated out of Inuvik over the Mackenzie River delta and the Beaufort Sea in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Besides the cloud particle and hydrometeor size spectrometers the aircraft was equipped with instrumentation for aerosol, radiation and other parameters. Inside the cloud, droplet size distributions with monomodal shapes were observed for predominantly liquid-phase Arctic stratocumulus. With increasing altitude inside the cloud the droplet mean diameters grew from 10 μm to 20 μm. In the upper transition zone (i.e. adjacent to the cloud-free air aloft) changes from monomodal to bimodal droplet size distributions were observed. It is shown that droplets of both modes co-exist in the same (small) air volume and the bimodal shape of the measured size distributions cannot be explained as an observational artifact caused by accumulating two droplet populations from different air volumes. The formation of a second size mode can be explained by (a) entrainment and activation/condensation of fresh aerosol particles, or (b) by differential evaporation processes occurring with cloud droplets engulfed in different eddies. Activation of entrained particles seemed a viable possibility as a layer of dry Arctic enhanced background aerosol was detected directly above the stratus cloud might form a second mode of small cloud droplets. However, theoretical considerations and a model simulation revealed that, instead, turbulent mixing and evaporation of larger droplets most likely are the main reasons for the formation

  4. Use of active and passive ground based remote sensors to explore cloud droplet modifications in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zaw Thet

    We explore the potential aerosol impact on cloud optical properties which is a strong modifier of climate forcing. Previous studies have shown that increased aerosol loading can affect the cloud optical properties such as cloud optical depth and cloud droplet effective radius in rural areas, particularly at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement, Southern Great Plain site. In this study, we attempt to observe and quantify aerosol-cloud interaction over New York City, using a combination of passive and active radiometric sensors. In particular, we look for signatures of the Twomey indirect effect which states that the droplet size of water phase clouds will decrease with increasing aerosols. We find that under certain conditions, a strong signature is found between the cloud drop effective radius and extinction and this effect is in part due to vertical wind uptake. In demonstrating the Aerosol Cloud Interaction, we use multiple approaches. For example, we derive the integrated liquid water path using both a multiband neural network and dual channel approach and show general agreement between two methods while the DC approach seems more robust. We also find that these measurements are difficult and sensitive to the position of the aerosols relative to the cloud base. As a corollary, we explore whether near surface aerosol loading can effecting the cloud by using particulate matter (PM2.5) and find that the effects are too variable to be given any statistical weight. Finally, we explore the potential of modifying our approach to remove the noisy and difficult measurement of Raman LIDAR derived extinction with calibrated LIDAR backscatter. The results seem to show a general improvement in correlation and offer the possibility of increasing the number of cases observed.

  5. Secondary organic aerosol formation in cloud and fog droplets: a literature evaluation of plausibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blando, James D.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    This paper investigates the hypothesis that cloud and fog processes produce fine organic particulate matter in the atmosphere. The evidence provided suggests that cloud and fog processes could be important contributors to secondary organic aerosol formation, and the contribution of this formation pathway should be further investigated. This conclusion is based on the following observations: (1) many organic vapors present in the atmosphere are sorbed by suspended droplets and have been measured in cloud and fog water, (2) organics participate in aqueous-phase reactions, and (3) organic particulate matter is sometimes found in the size mode attributed to cloud processing (i.e. the droplet mode). Specific compounds identified as potential precursors include aldehydes (e.g. formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and propionaldehyde), acetone, alcohols (e.g. methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and phenol), monocarboxylic acids, and organic peroxides. Carboxylic acids (e.g. diacids and oxo-acids), glyoxal, esters, organosulfur compounds, polyols, amines and amino acids are potential products of cloud and fog processing.

  6. Analytic modeling of aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepack, A.; Box, G. P.

    1979-01-01

    Mathematical functions commonly used for representing aerosol size distributions are studied parametrically. Methods for obtaining best fit estimates of the parameters are described. A catalog of graphical plots depicting the parametric behavior of the functions is presented along with procedures for obtaining analytical representations of size distribution data by visual matching of the data with one of the plots. Examples of fitting the same data with equal accuracy by more than one analytic model are also given.

  7. Indoor aerosol size distributions in a gymnasium.

    PubMed

    Castro, Amaya; Calvo, Ana I; Alves, Célia; Alonso-Blanco, Elisabeth; Coz, Esther; Marques, Liliana; Nunes, Teresa; Fernández-Guisuraga, Jose Manuel; Fraile, Roberto

    2015-08-15

    In this study, an indoor/outdoor monitoring program was carried out in a gymnasium at the University of Leon, Spain. The main goal was a characterization of aerosol size distributions in a university gymnasium under different conditions and sports activities (with and without magnesia alba) and the study of the mass fraction deposited in each of the parts of the respiratory tract. The aerosol particles were measured in 31 discrete channels (size ranges) using a laser spectrometer probe. Aerosol size distributions were studied under different conditions: i) before sports activities, ii) activities without using magnesia alba, iii) activities using magnesia alba, iv) cleaning procedures, and v) outdoors. The aerosol refractive index and density indoors were estimated from the aerosol composition: 1.577-0.003i and 2.055 g cm(-3), respectively. Using the estimated density, the mass concentration was calculated, and the evolution of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 for different activities was assessed. The quality of the air in the gymnasium was strongly influenced by the use of magnesia alba (MgCO3) and the number of gymnasts who were training. Due to the climbing chalk and the constant process of resuspension, average PM10 concentrations of over 440 μg m(-3) were reached. The maximum daily concentrations ranged from 500 to 900 μg m(-3). Particle size determines the place in the respiratory tract where the deposition occurs. For this reason, the inhalable, thoracic, tracheobronchial and respirable fractions were assessed for healthy adults and high risk people, according to international standards. The estimations show that, for healthy adults, up to 300 μg m(-3) can be retained by the trachea and bronchi, and 130 μg m(-3) may reach the alveolar region. The different physical activities and the attendance rates in the sports facility have a significant influence on the concentration and size distributions observed. PMID:25897726

  8. Accuracy Assessments of Cloud Droplet Size Retrievals from Polarized Reflectance Measurements by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail Dmitrievic; Cairns, Brian; Emde, Claudia; Ackerman, Andrew S.; vanDiedenhove, Bastiaan

    2012-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the retrieval of cloud droplet size distribution parameters (effective radius and variance) from the Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) measurements. The RSP is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetery Sensor (APS), which was on-board of the NASA Glory satellite. This instrument measures both polarized and total reflectance in 9 spectral channels with central wavelengths ranging from 410 to 2260 nm. The cloud droplet size retrievals use the polarized reflectance in the scattering angle range between 135deg and 165deg, where they exhibit the sharply defined structure known as the rain- or cloud-bow. The shape of the rainbow is determined mainly by the single scattering properties of cloud particles. This significantly simplifies both forward modeling and inversions, while also substantially reducing uncertainties caused by the aerosol loading and possible presence of undetected clouds nearby. In this study we present the accuracy evaluation of our algorithm based on the results of sensitivity tests performed using realistic simulated cloud radiation fields.

  9. Comparison of model results of collection efficiency of aerosol particles by individual water droplets and ice crystals in a subsaturated atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K.; Lin, H.

    The aerosol collection efficiencies of water droplets and ice crystals are compared based on the concept of equivalent geometrical kernel K ∗ which is the geometrical sweep-out volume per unit time by the collector. It is thought that the comparison based on this quantity reveals the real difference of the aerosol collecting abilities of different collectors and sheds lights on the precipitation scavenging mechanisms. The collection efficiencies are taken from theoretical model results computed by us previously at relative humidities of 95% for water droplets, columnar and hexagonal plate ice crystals. It is shown that the efficiencies are rather insensitive to collector shape for aerosol particles smaller than 0.01 μm. The shape factor becomes more important for larger aerosol particles, especially in the Greenfield-Gap size range.

  10. Size dependence of phase transitions in aerosol nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Koop, Thomas; Mikhailov, Eugene; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Phase transitions of nanoparticles are of fundamental importance in atmospheric sciences, but current understanding is insufficient to explain observations at the nano-scale. In particular, discrepancies exist between observations and model predictions of deliquescence and efflorescence transitions and the hygroscopic growth of salt nanoparticles. Here we show that these discrepancies can be resolved by consideration of particle size effects with consistent thermodynamic data. We present a new method for the determination of water and solute activities and interfacial energies in highly supersaturated aqueous solution droplets (Differential Köhler Analysis). Our analysis reveals that particle size can strongly alter the characteristic concentration of phase separation in mixed systems, resembling the influence of temperature. Owing to similar effects, atmospheric secondary organic aerosol particles at room temperature are expected to be always liquid at diameters below ~20 nm. We thus propose and demonstrate that particle size should be included as an additional dimension in the equilibrium phase diagram of aerosol nanoparticles. PMID:25586967

  11. Secondary organic aerosol formation by self-reactions of methylglyoxal and glyoxal in evaporating droplets.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Wood, Stephanie E; Turley, Jacob J

    2009-11-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are scavenged by clouds, where a fraction of these compounds are oxidized during the lifetime of the droplet. As a cloud droplet evaporates, the remaining glyoxal and methylglyoxal must either form low-volatility compounds such as oligomers and remain in the aerosol phase, or transfer back to the gas phase. A series of experiments on evaporating aqueous aerosol droplets indicates that over the atmospherically relevant concentration range for clouds and fog (4-1000 microM), 33 +/- 11% of glyoxal and 19 +/- 13% of methylglyoxal remains in the aerosol phase while the remainder evaporates. Measurements of aerosol density and time-dependent AMS signal changes are consistent with the formation of oligomers by each compound during the drying process. Unlike glyoxal, which forms acetal oligomers, exact mass AMS data indicates that the majority of methylglyoxal oligomers are formed by aldol condensation reactions, likely catalyzed by pyruvic acid, formed from methylglyoxal disproportionation. Our measurements of evaporation fractions can be used to estimate the global aerosol formation potential of glyoxal and methylglyoxal via self-reactions at 1 and 1.6 Tg C yr(-1), respectively. This is a factor of 4 less than the SOA formed by these compounds if their uptake is assumed to be irreversible. However, these estimates are likely lower limits for their total aerosol formation potential because oxidants and amines will also react with glyoxal and methylglyoxal to form additional low-volatility products. PMID:19924942

  12. Average size and size distribution of large droplets produced in a free-jet expansion of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Henne, U.

    1999-02-01

    The experimental parameters and fluid properties affecting the average size N¯ and the size distribution P(N) of droplets formed by fragmentation of a liquid after expansion into a vacuum are investigated. The mean droplet size is found to be a function of the surface tension of the liquid, the nozzle diameter, and a characteristic flow speed. The size distribution is found to be a linear exponential distribution; measurements deviate from this distribution at small sizes if a factor which is a function of the cluster size is included in the measuring process. Good agreement with measured distributions of both positive and negative droplet ions formed from neutral 4He droplets by electron impact is found. The strong dependence of mean droplet size on source-orifice diameter found in the present analysis indicates that earlier correlations of droplet size with specific entropy in the source were useful at best only for a fixed nozzle size.

  13. Global Distribution of Cloud Droplet Number Concentration, Autoconversion Rate, and Aerosol Indirect Effect Under Diabatic Droplet Activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, Donifan; Sotiropoulou, Rafaella; Nenes, Athanasios

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a global assessment of the sensitivity of droplet number to diabatic activation (i.e., including effects from entrainment of dry air) and its first-order tendency on indirect forcing and autoconversion. Simulations were carried out with the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) atmospheric and transport model using climatological metereorological fields derived from the former NASA Data Assimilation Office (DAO), the NASA Finite volume GCM (FVGCM) and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies version II (GISS) GCM. Cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) is calculated using a physically based prognostic parameterization that explicitly includes entrainment effects on droplet formation. Diabatic activation results in lower CDNC, compared to adiabatic treatment of the process. The largest decrease in CDNC (by up to 75 percent) was found in the tropics and in zones of moderate CCN concentration. This leads to a global mean effective radius increase between 0.2-0.5 micrometers (up to 3.5 micrometers over the tropics), a global mean autoconversion rate increase by a factor of 1.1 to 1.7 (up to a factor of 4 in the tropics), and a 0.2-0.4 W m(exp -2) decrease in indirect forcing. The spatial patterns of entrainment effects on droplet activation tend to reduce biases in effective radius (particularly in the tropics) when compared to satellite retrievals. Considering the diabatic nature of ambient clouds, entrainment effects on CDNC need to be considered in GCM studies of the aerosol indirect effect.

  14. Definition of water droplets "strain cycles" in air times dependences on their sizes and movement velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Roman; Zhdanova, Alena; Zabelin, Maxim; Kuznetsov, Geniy; Strizhak, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Experimental investigation of water droplets deformation regularities during their motion in the air by the action of gravitational forces was executed. Characteristic sizes of droplets were varied in the range from 3 mm to 6 mm. Velocities of droplets movement attained to 5 m/s. The cross-correlation system of video registration was used. More than ten characteristic "strain cycles" of droplets during the 1 m distance motion by them thought the air were established. Characteristic of droplets forms, periods, dimensions and ranges were determined for all "strain cycles". "Strain cycle" times dependences on velocity and sizes of droplets were established.

  15. Optical manipulation of aerosol droplets using a holographic dual and single beam trap.

    PubMed

    Brzobohatý, Oto; Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Jákl, Petr; Zemánek, Pavel

    2013-11-15

    We present optical trapping and manipulation of pure water and salt water airborne droplets of various sizes ranging from sub-micrometers up to several tens of micrometers in a holographic dual and single beam trap. In the dual beam trap, successful fusion of droplets as well as precise delivery of many droplets and manipulation of multiple droplets are demonstrated. Furthermore, employing the transfer of the orbital angular momentum of light from Laguerre-Gaussian beams, we show that the water droplets orbit around the beam propagation axis and their tangential speed can be controlled by beam waist magnitude. We also demonstrate that sub-micrometer sized pure water droplets can be trapped and manipulated by a single beam trap with a relatively low numerical aperture. In this case, multiple stable trapping positions were observed, both theoretically and experimentally, which were due to the optical intensity oscillations in the focal region of the laser beam. PMID:24322084

  16. Arctic low-level boundary layer clouds: in situ measurements and simulations of mono- and bimodal supercooled droplet size distributions at the top layer of liquid phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingebiel, M.; de Lozar, A.; Molleker, S.; Weigel, R.; Roth, A.; Schmidt, L.; Meyer, J.; Ehrlich, A.; Neuber, R.; Wendisch, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft borne optical in situ size distribution measurements were performed within Arctic boundary layer clouds with a special emphasis on the cloud top layer during the VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic clouds (VERDI) campaign in April and May 2012. An instrumented Basler BT-67 research aircraft operated out of Inuvik over the Mackenzie River delta and the Beaufort Sea in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Besides the cloud particle and hydrometeor size spectrometers the aircraft was equipped with instrumentation for aerosol, radiation and other parameters. Inside the cloud, droplet size distributions with monomodal shapes were observed for predominantly liquid-phase Arctic stratocumulus. With increasing altitude inside the cloud the droplet mean diameters grew from 10 to 20 μm. In the upper transition zone (i.e., adjacent to the cloud-free air aloft) changes from monomodal to bimodal droplet size distributions (Mode 1 with 20 μm and Mode 2 with 10 μm diameter) were observed. It is shown that droplets of both modes co-exist in the same (small) air volume and the bimodal shape of the measured size distributions cannot be explained as an observational artifact caused by accumulating data point populations from different air volumes. The formation of the second size mode can be explained by (a) entrainment and activation/condensation of fresh aerosol particles, or (b) by differential evaporation processes occurring with cloud droplets engulfed in different eddies. Activation of entrained particles seemed a viable possibility as a layer of dry Arctic enhanced background aerosol (which was detected directly above the stratus cloud) might form a second mode of small cloud droplets. However, theoretical considerations and model calculations (adopting direct numerical simulation, DNS) revealed that, instead, turbulent mixing and evaporation of larger droplets are the most likely reasons for the formation of the second droplet size mode in the uppermost region

  17. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Chato, D. J.; Jurns, J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates a turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  18. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  19. Influence of droplet size, pH and ionic strength on endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions in liquid crystalline droplets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    We report an investigation of ordering transitions that are induced in water-dispersed, micrometer-sized droplets of a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. We reveal that the ordering transitions induced by endotoxin – from a bipolar state of the droplets to a radial state – are strongly dependent on the size of the LC droplets. Specifically, as the diameters of the LC droplets increase from 2 μm to above 10 μm (in phosphate buffered saline with an ionic strength of 90 mM and a pH of 7.2), we measured the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of 100 pg/mL endotoxin to decrease from 98 ± 1 % to 3 ± 2 %. In addition, we measured a decrease in either the ionic strength or pH of the aqueous phase to reduce the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of endotoxin. These results, when interpreted within the context of a simple thermodynamic model that incorporates the contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the LC droplets, lead us to conclude that (i) the elastic constant K24 plays a central role in determining the size-dependent response of the LC droplets to endotoxin, and (ii) endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions occur only under solution conditions (pH, ionic strength) where the combined contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the bipolar and radial configurations of the LC droplets are similar in magnitude. Our analysis also suggests that the presence of endotoxin perturbs the free energies of the LC droplets by ~10−17 J/droplet, which is comparable to the standard free energy of self-association of ~103 endotoxin molecules. These results, when combined with prior reports of localization of endotoxin at the center of LC droplets, are consistent with the hypothesis that self-assembly of endotoxin within micrometer-sized LC droplets provides the driving force for the ordering

  20. Residual Particle Sizes of Evaporating Droplets: Ammonium Sulfate and Aldehydes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, N.; Galloway, M. M.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    The reactions of carbonyls like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde, with ammonium salts have been proposed as significant sources of atmospheric organic aerosol. Aerosol containing these compounds was generated in the laboratory using the Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG). The particles were completely dried before they were measured using a SMPS system. The nonvolatile fraction of the resulting aerosol was measured. The drying times were varied between two and twenty minutes, and for ammonium sulfate and glyoxal reactions, minimum residual particle sizes were reached after 3.5 minutes. Reactions of glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate appeared to have lower non-volatile fractions remaining at higher starting concentrations, suggesting that a constant 'excess volume,' likely water, was present in the residual particles that could not be evaporated even after 20 minutes of drying. These excess volumes were not observed in our previous experiments with aldehydes but no ammonium sulfate present. At the highest concentrations tested (100 uM), non-volatile fractions of aldehydes present in residual particles were 16 (±17) %, 41 (±28) %, and 17(±32) % for glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and methylglyoxal, respectively.

  1. Spatial characterization of droplet size and droplet velocity in a liquid atomized spray

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Liquid fuel injection devices are critical components of many power generation systems. The importance of such systems has necessitated developing a detailed understanding of the interaction between the liquid and gaseous phases, common to liquid fueled power generation equipment. This research addresses the development and application of experimental tools to characterize the liquid phase. Three laser-based droplet sizing techniques are employed in the research: Visibility/Intensity Validation, Phase Doppler, and Malvern. The first two methods are interferometric. They provide a measurement of both droplet size and velocity. They offer the potential for making the required measurements of the liquid phase, but have not been rigorously evaluated. The Malvern device is diffraction based. It has a well established history of performance but does not offer the measurement detail required. The interferometric measurement techniques were evaluated against each other. Simultaneous measurements and separate spray characterizations were performed with the two instruments. The interferometric units were evaluated against the performance of the Malvern. Two weight distribution algorithms of the Malvern were used: Rosin-Rammler and Model Independent.

  2. Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number

    PubMed Central

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in current capabilities to constrain aerosols adversely impact atmospheric simulations. Typically, aerosol burdens within models are constrained employing satellite aerosol optical properties, which are not available under cloudy conditions. Here we set the first steps to overcome the long-standing limitation that aerosols cannot be constrained using satellite remote sensing under cloudy conditions. We introduce a unique data assimilation method that uses cloud droplet number (Nd) retrievals to improve predicted below-cloud aerosol mass and number concentrations. The assimilation, which uses an adjoint aerosol activation parameterization, improves agreement with independent Nd observations and with in situ aerosol measurements below shallow cumulus clouds. The impacts of a single assimilation on aerosol and cloud forecasts extend beyond 24 h. Unlike previous methods, this technique can directly improve predictions of near-surface fine mode aerosols responsible for human health impacts and low-cloud radiative forcing. Better constrained aerosol distributions will help improve health effects studies, atmospheric emissions estimates, and air-quality, weather, and climate predictions. PMID:22778436

  3. Development of empirical correlations to predict the secondary droplet size of impacting droplets onto heated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moita, Ana Sofia; Moreira, António L. N.

    2009-10-01

    The present article reports an experimental analysis of the mechanisms of secondary atomization which occur at the impact of individual droplets onto heated targets. The experiments follow those reported in a previous article (Moreira et al. 2007) and encompass the use of different liquids and impact conditions. An image analysis system is combined with a phase Doppler interferometer to measure extended size distributions, which cover the full range of diameters generated at all heat transfer regimes. The results evidence that disintegration mechanisms depend on the heat transfer regimes; therefore, a universal relation cannot be devised for the outcome of droplet impact. Analysis shows that droplets impacting within the nucleate-boiling regime break-up by a thermal-induced mechanism associated with the vapour pressure at bubble nucleation sites, combined with liquid surface tension. On the other hand, within the film-boiling regime, disintegration is associated with radial disruption of the rim at the early instants after impact, as in non-heated targets, and with the rupture of the ligaments of the cellular structures. Functional relations available at the literature, mostly developed for impacts onto non-heated surfaces, are well fitted to the experimental results obtained within the film-boiling regime, since the break-up mechanisms are qualitatively similar. On the other hand, such relations cannot predict the secondary atomization occurring within the nucleate-boiling regime, as the break-up mechanisms within this regime have significantly different characteristics. In this context, the present article recognizes the relevance of the relations devised for ‘cold impacts’, to fit the size of secondary droplets within the film-boiling regime, as the correlation formulated here has a similar form: SMD/ D 0 = f( We, Re) ~ A 1 We {/N -0.6} Re -0.23 and proposes a new correlation for impacts within the nucleate-boiling regime: SMD/ D 0 = f( We, Re, Ja) ~ A 2 We

  4. Regional Biases in Droplet Activation Parameterizations: Strong Influence on Aerosol Second Indirect Effect in the Community Atmosphere Model v5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate change estimates. The magnitude of these interactions as represented in climate models strongly depends on the process of aerosol activation. This process is the most direct physical link between aerosols and cloud microphysical properties. Calculation of droplet number in GCMs requires the computation of new droplet formation (i.e., droplet activation), through physically based activation parameterizations. Considerable effort has been placed in ensuring that droplet activation parameterizations have a physically consistent response to changes in aerosol number concentration. However, recent analyses using an adjoint sensitivity approach showed that parameterizations can exhibit considerable biases in their response to other aerosol properties, such as aerosol modal diameter or to the aerosol chemical composition. This is a potentially important factor in estimating aerosol indirect effects since changes in aerosol properties from pre-industrial times to present day exhibit a very strong regional signature. In this work we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) to show that the regional imprint of the changes in aerosol properties during the last century interacts with the droplet activation parameterization in a way that these biases are amplified over climatically relevant regions. Two commonly used activation routines, the CAM5 default, Abdul-Razzak and Ghan parameterization, as well as the Fountoukis and Nenes parameterization are used in this study. We further explored the impacts of Nd parameterization biases in the first and second aerosol indirect effects separately, by performing simulations were droplet number was not allowed to intervene in the precipitation initiation process. The simulations performed show that an unphysical response to changes in the diameter of accumulation mode aerosol translates into extremely high Nd concentrations over South

  5. Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Ingebrethsen, Bradley J; Cole, Stephen K; Alderman, Steven L

    2012-12-01

    The particle size distribution of aerosols produced by electronic cigarettes was measured in an undiluted state by a spectral transmission procedure and after high dilution with an electrical mobility analyzer. The undiluted e-cigarette aerosols were found to have particle diameters of average mass in the 250-450 nm range and particle number concentrations in the 10(9) particles/cm(3) range. These measurements are comparable to those observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke in prior studies and also measured in the current study with the spectral transmission method and with the electrical mobility procedure. Total particulate mass for the e-cigarettes calculated from the size distribution parameters measured by spectral transmission were in good agreement with replicate determinations of total particulate mass by gravimetric filter collection. In contrast, average particle diameters determined for e-cigarettes by the electrical mobility method are in the 50 nm range and total particulate masses calculated based on the suggested diameters are orders of magnitude smaller than those determined gravimetrically. This latter discrepancy, and the very small particle diameters observed, are believed to result from almost complete e-cigarette aerosol particle evaporation at the dilution levels and conditions of the electrical mobility analysis. A much smaller degree, ~20% by mass, of apparent particle evaporation was observed for tobacco burning cigarette smoke. The spectral transmission method is validated in the current study against measurements on tobacco burning cigarette smoke, which has been well characterized in prior studies, and is supported as yielding an accurate characterization of the e-cigarette aerosol particle size distribution. PMID:23216158

  6. Spatial Variability of CCN Sized Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, A.; Väänänen, R.

    2014-12-01

    The computational limitations restrict the grid size used in GCM models, and for many cloud types they are too large when compared to the scale of the cloud formation processes. Several parameterizations for e.g. convective cloud formation exist, but information on spatial subgrid variation of the cloud condensation nuclei (CCNs) sized aerosol concentration is not known. We quantify this variation as a function of the spatial scale by using datasets from airborne aerosol measurement campaigns around the world including EUCAARI LONGREX, ATAR, INCA, INDOEX, CLAIRE, PEGASOS and several regional airborne campaigns in Finland. The typical shapes of the distributions are analyzed. When possible, we use information obtained by CCN counters. In some other cases, we use particle size distribution measured by for example SMPS to get approximated CCN concentration. Other instruments used include optical particle counters or condensational particle counters. When using the GCM models, the CCN concentration used for each the grid-box is often considered to be either flat, or as an arithmetic mean of the concentration inside the grid-box. However, the aircraft data shows that the concentration values are often lognormal distributed. This, combined with the subgrid variations in the land use and atmospheric properties, might cause that the aerosol-cloud interactions calculated by using mean values to vary significantly from the true effects both temporary and spatially. This, in turn, can cause non-linear bias into the GCMs. We calculate the CCN aerosol concentration distribution as a function of different spatial scales. The measurements allow us to study the variation of these distributions within from hundreds of meters up to hundreds of kilometers. This is used to quantify the potential error when mean values are used in GCMs.

  7. The secondary formation of inorganic aerosols in the droplet mode through heterogeneous aqueous reactions under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Lingxiao; Gao, Xiaomei; Nie, Wei; Yu, Yangchun; Xu, Pengju; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Zhe

    2012-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols play important roles in visibility reduction and in regional haze pollution. To investigate the characteristics of size distributions of secondary sulfates and nitrates as well as their formation mechanisms under hazes, size-resolved aerosols were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at an urban site in Jinan, China, in all four seasons (December 2007-October 2008). In haze episodes, the secondary sulfates and nitrates primarily formed in fine particles, with elevated concentration peaks in the droplet mode (0.56-1.8 μm). The fine sulfates and nitrates were completely neutralized by ammonia and existed in the forms of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3, respectively. The secondary formation of sulfates, nitrates and ammonium (SNA) was found to be related to heterogeneous aqueous reactions and was largely dependent on the ambient humidity. With rising relative humidity, the droplet-mode SNA concentration, the ratio of droplet-mode SNA to the total SNA, the fraction of SNA in droplet-mode particles and the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SNA presented an exponential, logarithmic or linear increase. Two heavily polluted multi-day haze episodes in winter and summer were analyzed in detail. The secondary sulfates were linked to heterogeneous uptake of SO2 followed by the subsequent catalytic oxidation by oxygen together with iron and manganese in winter. The fine nitrate formation was strongly associated with the thermodynamic equilibrium among NH4NO3, gaseous HNO3 and NH3, and showed different temperature-dependences in winter and summer.

  8. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, S.J. ); Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization.

  9. Predicting the size of droplets produced through Laplace pressure induced snap-off.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Solomon; Scarfe, Samantha J; Weeks, Eric R; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-09-21

    Laplace pressure driven snap-off is a technique that is used to produce droplets for emulsions and microfluidics purposes. Previous predictions of droplet size have assumed a quasi-equilibrium low flow limit. We present a simple model to predict droplet sizes over a wide range of flow rates, demonstrating a rich landscape of droplet stability depending on droplet size and growth rate. The model accounts for the easily adjusted experimental parameters of geometry, interfacial tension, and the viscosities of both phases. PMID:27535011

  10. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  11. Particle size distribution of indoor aerosol sources

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, K.B.

    1990-10-24

    As concern about Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) has grown in recent years, it has become necessary to determine the nature of particles produced by different indoor aerosol sources and the typical concentration that these sources tend to produce. These data are important in predicting the dose of particles to people exposed to these sources and it will also enable us to take effective mitigation procedures. Further, it will also help in designing appropriate air cleaners. A new state of the art technique, DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer) System is used to determine the particle size distributions of a number of sources. This system employs the electrical mobility characteristics of these particles and is very effective in the 0.01--1.0 {mu}m size range. A modified system that can measure particle sizes in the lower size range down to 3 nm was also used. Experimental results for various aerosol sources is presented in the ensuing chapters. 37 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Comparison of sprinkler droplet size and velocity measurements using a laser precipitation meter and photographic method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kinetic energy of water droplets has a substantial effect on development of a soil surface seal and infiltration rate of bare soil. Methods for measuring sprinkler droplet size and velocity needed to calculate droplet kinetic energy have been developed and tested over the past 50 years, each with ad...

  13. Controlling the droplet size of formulations nebulized by vibrating-membrane technology.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Knuedeler, Marie-Christine; Seeger, Werner; Schmehl, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Manipulation of aerosol characteristics is of special interest for pulmonary therapy, as a suitable particle size optimizes pulmonary deposition. The present study investigated the impact of formulation variables on the aerodynamic particle diameter (d(a)) when nebulized by vibrating-membrane technology. Membranes implemented in the Aeroneb® Pro and eFlow®rapid nebulizer revealed difference in metal composition and nozzle morphology as determined by energy dispersive X-ray measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Laser diffraction analysis of generated aerosol droplets identified the conductivity and dynamic viscosity of formulations as parameters with significant influence on the d(a) for both nebulizers. Accordingly, sample supplementation with particular excipients (conductivity: >50 μS/cm, dynamic viscosity: >1.5 mPa s) facilitated a reduction of the d(a) from ⩾8 μm, which is clearly in conflict with inhalative drug delivery, to respirable d(a) as small as ~3 μm. Overall, controlling the d(a) of formulations nebulized by vibrating-membrane technology seems to be technical feasible by an adequate adaption of samples' physicochemical properties. The Aeroneb® Pro and eFlow®rapid device are both qualified for the production of respirable aerosol clouds from specified formulations. PMID:24657823

  14. Droplet size effects on NO/x/ formation in a one-dimensional monodisperse spray combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarv, H.; Nizami, A. A.; Cernansky, N. P.

    1982-01-01

    A one-dimensional monodisperse aerosol spray combustion facility is described and experimental results of post flame NO/NO(x) emissions are presented. Four different hydrocarbon fuels were studied: isopropanol, methanol, n-heptane, and n-octane. The results indicate an optimum droplet size in the range of 48-58 microns for minimizing NO/NO(x) production for all of the test fuels. This NO(x) behavior is associated with droplet interactions and the transition from diffusive type of spray burning to that of a prevaporized and premixed case. Decreasing the droplet size results in a trend of increasing droplet interactions, which suppresses temperatures and reduces NO(x). This trend continues until prevaporization effects begin to dominate and the system tends towards the premixed limit. The occurrence of the minimum NO(x) point at different droplet diameters for the different fuels appears to be governed by the extent of prevaporization of the fuel in the spray, and is consistent with theoretical calculations based on each fuel's physical properties.

  15. Numerical Model to Characterize the Size Increase of Combination Drug and Hygroscopic Excipient Nanoparticle Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Longest, P. Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced excipient growth is a newly proposed respiratory delivery strategy in which submicrometer or nanometer particles composed of a drug and hygroscopic excipient are delivered to the airways in order to minimize extrathoracic depositional losses and maximize lung retention. The objective of this study was to develop a validated mathematical model of aerosol size increase for hygroscopic excipients and combination excipient-drug particles and to apply this model to characterize growth under typical respiratory conditions. Compared with in vitro experiments, the droplet growth model accurately predicted the size increase of single component and combination drug and excipient particles. For typical respiratory drug delivery conditions, the model showed that droplet size increase could be effectively correlated with the product of a newly defined hygroscopic parameter and initial volume fractions of the drug and excipient in the particle. A series of growth correlations was then developed that successively included the effects of initial drug and excipient mass loadings, initial aerosol size, and aerosol number concentration. Considering EEG delivery, large diameter growth ratios (2.1–4.6) were observed for a range of hygroscopic excipients combined with both hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic drugs. These diameter growth ratios were achieved at excipient mass loadings of 50% and below and at realistic aerosol number concentrations. The developed correlations were then used for specifying the appropriate initial mass loadings of engineered insulin nanoparticles in order to achieve a predetermined size increase while maximizing drug payload and minimizing the amount of hygroscopic excipient. PMID:21804683

  16. Chemical and size effects of hygroscopic aerosols on light scattering coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ignatius N.

    1996-08-01

    The extensive thermodynamic and optical properties recently reported [Tang and Munkelwitz, 1994a] for sulfate and nitrate solution droplets are incorporated into a visibility model for computing light scattering by hygroscopic aerosols. The following aerosol systems are considered: NH4HSO4, (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)3H(SO4), NaHSO4, Na2SO4, NH4NO3, and NaNO3. In addition, H2SO4 and NaCl are included to represent freshly formed sulfate and background sea-salt aerosols, respectively. Scattering coefficients, based on 1 μg dry salt per cubic meter of air, are calculated as a function of relative humidity for aerosols of various chemical compositions and lognormal size distributions. For a given size distribution the light scattered by aerosol particles per unit dry-salt mass concentration is only weakly dependent on chemical constituents of the hygroscopic sulfate and nitrate aerosols. Sulfuric acid and sodium chloride aerosols, however, are exceptions and scatter light more efficiently than all other inorganic salt aerosols considered in this study. Both internal and external mixtures exhibit similar light-scattering properties. Thus for common sulfate and nitrate aerosols, since the chemical effect is outweighed by the size effect, it follows that observed light scattering by the ambient aerosol can be approximated, within practical measurement uncertainties, by assuming the aerosol being an external mixture. This has a definite advantage for either visibility degradation or climatic impact modeling calculations, because relevant data are now available for external mixtures but only very scarce for internal mixtures.

  17. Vapour pressures and hygroscopicity of semi-volatile organic components in ternary organic/inorganic/water aerosol droplet trapped by aerosol optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chen; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the vapour pressures of semi-volatile organic compounds is of critical importance in determining their partitioning behaviour into atmospheric aerosol. Quantifying the gas/particle partitioning of organic compounds is of great importance since at present published results of the vapour pressures of compounds of interest (typically with vapour pressures lower than 0.01 Pa) can be different by several orders of magnitude and influences on SVOCs evaporation from participation of inorganic compounds remains unclear. In this study we present a new method for the retrieval of SVOCs vapour pressures from single aerosol droplets in an aerosol optical tweezers system. Measurements of the concentration of SVOC (derived from experimentally determined RI) and radius of SVOC aqueous droplets are correlated in an expression derived from the Maxwell gas phase diffusion equation for the determination of vapour pressure. ( ) dmi-= 4π dr3Conc + dConcir3 = 4πrMiDi,gas-(p ‑ p) dt 3 dt i dt RT i,∞ i,r Relationship between r dr/dt (nm2s‑1) and r2dConcentration/dt (nm2gL‑1s‑1) is presented, in which the slope is derived for determination of hygroscopic line whilst the axis intercept can be determined to estimate vapour pressure. Briefly the method relies on the levitation of a droplet (3-7 μm radius) in an aerosol optical tweezers system. In this system the droplet acts as a microcavity and the size and refractive index of the particle can be extracted by using Mie theory to fit the positions of the "whispering gallery modes" in the cavity enhanced Raman spectroscopy fingerprint. The vapour pressure can then be extracted from the correlation between the rate of change of particle radius with the rate of change of composition (refractive index, n). We will show that information about the hygroscopicity of the particle and how this changes as the particle evaporates can also be determined from the changing slopes of these plots.

  18. The Turnbull correlation and the freezing of stratospheric aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, A. Robert; Laaksonen, Ari; Batris, Evangelos; Kulmala, Markku

    1998-05-01

    An empirical correlation that is important in the calculation of homogeneous freezing probabilities, the "Turnbull correlation" for interfacial tensions, has been reevaluated and applied to systems of interest as possible components of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). The systems studied were: sulphuric acid solutions freezing to water ice and sulphuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT); and nitric acid solutions freezing to nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD). The calculations have been compared to experimental data: agreement is generally good, although aerosol freezing experiments, which would rigorously test the theory, have not been made for NAT. Of the three measurements of aerosol freezing to NAD, the calculations are closer to those measurements showing a lower freezing temperature, of about 175-177 K. The comparison substantially improves our confidence in our understanding of the mechanisms of PSC formation. Freezing of stratospheric aerosol to water ice remains the most plausible first step in solid-particle PSC formation if homogeneous freezing is the mechanism by which solid-particle PSC formation occurs.

  19. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  20. The effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols on marine cloud droplet concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakov, T.; Rivera-Carpio, C.; Penner, J. E.; Rogers, C. F.

    1994-04-01

    Nonseasalt sulfate (nss SO42-) mass concentrations, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations, and cloud droplet concentrations in warm cumulus and stratocumulus clouds were simultaneously measured in situ in marine air masses on El Yunque peak in Puerto Rico. Our results show that CNN number concentrations (measured at 0.5% supersaturation) and nss SO42- mass concentrations (in the range of ˜ 400 1700ng m-342- mass concentrations (in the range of ˜ 300 1400ng m-3). In stratocumulus clouds, a small increase in droplet concentration with nss SO42- mass concentrations in the range of ˜ 300 1100ng m-3 was observed. We attribute the low sensitivities of the droplet number concentrations to nss SO42- mass concentrations to the entrainment/mixing processes in these clouds. The magnitudes of the empirically derived sensitivities are considerably lower than those assumed in recent assessments of the effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols on cloud albedo.

  1. Droplet Size Distributions in Atomization of Dilute Viscoelastic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Bavand; McKinley, Gareth; Houze, Eric; Moore, John; Pottiger, Michael; Cotts, Patricia; M. I. T. Collaboration; DuPont Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    The droplet size probability distribution functions (PDF) for atomization/fragmentation processes in Newtonian fluids are now generally accepted to be close to Gamma distributions. Despite the great practical importance, little is known about the nature of corresponding distributions for viscoelastic liquids, e.g. polymeric solutions such as pesticide sprays and paints. We present data from air-assisted atomization experiments for model viscoelastic solutions composed of very dilute solutions of polyethylene oxide. Although the addition of small amounts of high molecular weight polymer keeps the fluid shear viscosity and surface tension close to the solvent values, the size distributions are skewed towards higher values of the Sauter mean diameter. We show that the PDF curves for these weakly-elastic fluids are well described by Gamma distributions, but the exponent n is systematically decreased by fluid elasticity. Flow visualization images show that this behavior arises from the non-linear dynamics close to the break-up point which are dominated by an elasto-capillary force balance within the thinning ligaments and the magnitude of the extensional viscosity in the viscoelastic fluid. Mechanical Engineering Department, Cambridge, MA.

  2. Impact of plasma induced liquid chemistry and charge on bacteria loaded aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, David; McDowell, David; Mariotti, Davide; Mahony, Charles; Diver, Declan; Potts, Hugh; Bennet, Euan; Maguire, Paul

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of living organisms, such as bacteria, into atmospheric pressure microplasmas offers a unique opportunity to study the local chemical and electrical effects on cell structure and viability. Individual bacteria, each encapsulated in an aerosol droplet, were successfully transmitted through a non-thermal equilibrium RF coaxial plasma, using a custom-design concentric double gas shroud interface and via adjustment of transit times and plasma parameters, we can control cell viability. Plasma electrical characteristics (ne ~ 1013 cm-3), droplet velocity profiles and aspects of plasma-induced droplet chemistry were determined in order to establish the nature of the bacteria in droplet environment. Plasma-exposed viable E coli cells were subsequently cultured and the growth rate curves (lag and exponential phase gradient) used to explore the effect of radical chemistry and electron bombardment on cell stress. The extent and nature of membrane disruption in viable and non-viable cells were investigated through genomic and protein/membrane lipid content estimation. We will also compare our results with simulations of the effect of bacterial presence on plasma induced droplet charging and evaporation. Funding from EPSRC acknowledged (Grants EP/K006088/1 and EP/K006142/1).

  3. Measuring the effect of spray plume angle on the accuracy of droplet size data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analysis of droplet size data using laser diffraction allows for quick and easy assessment of droplet size for agricultural spray nozzles and pesticides; however, operation and setup of the instrument and test system can potentially influence the accuracy of the data. One of the factors is the orie...

  4. Spray droplet sizes with additives discharged from an air-assisted variable-rate nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding droplet size distributions is essential to achieve constant spray quality for real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes were measured for a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse width modulated (...

  5. Spray adjuvant effects on droplet size spectra measured by three laser-based systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spray droplet size has long been recognized as the most important variable that aerial applicators can influence to mitigate spray drift from the application site. There are several different technologies that are used by researchers to measure droplet size from spray nozzles. The objective of thes...

  6. Segregation by size difference in binary suspensions of fluid droplets in channel flow.

    PubMed

    Makino, Masato; Sugihara-Seki, Masako

    2013-01-01

    In channel flow of multicomponent suspensions, segregation behavior of suspended components perpendicular to the flow direction is often observed, which is considered to be caused by the differential properties of the lateral migration depending on their shape, size, flexibility, and other characteristics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of size differences between suspended components on the segregation behavior, by a two-dimensional numerical simulation for binary dispersed suspensions of fluid droplets of two different sizes subjected to a plane Poiseuille channel flow. The small and large droplets are assumed to have equal surface tensions and equal viscosity ratios of internal to external fluids. The time evolutions of the lateral positions of large and small droplets relative to the channel centerline were computed by changing the area fraction of the small droplets in a mixture with a constant total area fraction. The large droplets are found to migrate closer to the channel centerline and the small droplets are found to migrate closer to the channel wall compared to the corresponding lateral positions in mono-dispersed suspensions at the same area fractions, although the mean lateral positions of the large and small droplets in mono-dispersed suspension are comparable. This segregation behavior as well as the margination of small droplets are enhanced when the size difference between large and small droplets is increased and the area fraction of large droplets is increased. These results may arise from higher tendencies for the large droplets to approach the channel centerline compared to the small droplets, which consequently expel small droplets from the central region toward the channel walls. PMID:23863280

  7. Modeling global impacts of heterogeneous loss of HO2 on cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijnen, V.; Williams, J. E.; Flemming, J.

    2014-03-01

    The abundance and spatial variability of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the troposphere strongly affects atmospheric composition through tropospheric ozone production and associated HOx chemistry. One of the largest uncertainties in the chemical HO2 budget is its heterogeneous loss on the surface of cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols. We quantify the importance of the heterogeneous HO2 loss at global scale using the latest recommendations on the scavenging efficiency on various surfaces. For this we included the simultaneous loss on cloud droplets and ice particles as well as aerosol in the Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS). We show that cloud surface area density (SAD) is typically an order of magnitude larger than aerosol SAD, using assimilated satellite retrievals to constrain both meteorology and global aerosol distributions. Depending on the assumed uptake coefficients, loss on liquid water droplets and ice particles accounts for ∼53-70% of the total heterogeneous loss of HO2, due to the ubiquitous presence of cloud droplets. This indicates that HO2 uptake on cloud should be included in chemistry transport models that already include uptake on aerosol. Our simulations suggest that the zonal mean mixing ratios of HO2 are reduced by ∼25% in the tropics and up to ∼50% elsewhere. The subsequent decrease in oxidative capacity leads to a global increase of the tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) burden of up to 7%, and an increase in the ozone tropospheric lifetime of ∼6%. This increase results in an improvement in the global distribution when compared against CO surface observations over the Northern Hemisphere, although it does not fully resolve the wintertime bias in the C-IFS. There is a simultaneous increase in the high bias in C-IFS for tropospheric CO over the Southern Hemisphere, which constrains on the assumptions regarding HO2 uptake on a global scale. We show that enhanced HO2 uptake on aerosol types associated with

  8. Effects of oil and drug concentrations on droplets size of palm oil esters (POEs) nanoemulsion.

    PubMed

    Sakeena, M H F; Elrashid, S M; Munavvar, A S; Azmin, M N

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the present work is to study the effects of oil and drug concentrations on droplets size of a nanoemulsion. Newly introduced oil, palm oil esters (POEs) by Universiti Putra Malaysia researchers was selected for the oil phase of the nanoemulsion, because the oil was reported to be a good vehicle for pharmaceutical use. Nanoemulsions were prepared with different concentrations of oil and drug and their effects on droplets size were studied by laser scattering spectroscopy (Nanophox). The results of droplets size analysis shows the droplets size increase with increasing concentration of oil and drug concentrations. It can be concluded from this study, that oil and drug concentrations have an effect on the droplets size of POEs nanoemulsion system. PMID:21427510

  9. Size-isolation of ultrasound-mediated phase change perfluorocarbon droplets using differential centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Karla P; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Stewart, Kyle; Snider, Lindsay; Ryan, Devin; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets that are capable of an ultrasound-mediated phase transition have applications in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Techniques to modify the droplet size distribution are of interest because of the size-dependent acoustic response of the droplets. Differential centrifugation has been used to isolate specific sizes of microbubbles. In this work, differential centrifugation was employed to isolate droplets with diameters between 1 and 3 μm and 2 and 5 μm from an initially polydisperse distribution. Further, an empirical model was developed for predicting the droplet size distribution following differential centrifugation and to facilitate the selection of centrifugation parameters for obtaining desired size distributions. PMID:27250199

  10. Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Timothy C.; Wham, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

  11. Global Survey of the Relationship Between Cloud Droplet Size and Albedo Using ISCCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Qingyuan; Rossow, William B.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1997-01-01

    The possible indirect aerosol effect on climate is examined. First, the spatial relationship is checked between cloud droplet radii and cloud albedo in different areas where aerosol concentration are known to differ significantly. Second, the temporal relationship between r(sub e) and cloud albedo is explored for each 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg grid box to reveal in which regions of the globe the variations of cloud albedo are correlated with changes in r(sub e) consistent with the indirect aerosol effect hypothesis.

  12. Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2011-05-26

    The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was prepared by the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene at 0.05 - 1 ppm precursor concentrations and collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS). The PILS extracts were photolyzed by 300 - 400 nm radiation for up to 24 hours. Water-soluble SOA constituents were analyzed using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) at different stages of photolysis for all SOA precursor concentrations. Exposure to UV radiation increased the average O/C ratio and decreased the average double bond equivalent (DBE) of the dissolved SOA compounds. Oligomeric compounds were significantly reduced by photolysis relative to the monomeric compounds. Direct pH measurements showed that compounds containing carboxylic acids increased upon photolysis. Methanol reactivity analysis revealed significant photodissociation of molecules containing carbonyl groups and formation of carboxylic acids. Aldehydes, such as limononaldehyde, were almost completely removed. The removal of carbonylswas confirmed by the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of the SOA extracts where the absorbance in the carbonyl n→π* band decreased significantly upon photolysis. The effective quantum yield (the number of carbonyls destroyed per photon absorbed) was estimated as ~ 0.03. The concentration of peroxides did not change significantly during photolysis as quantified with an iodometric test. Although organic peroxides were photolyzed, the likely end products of photolysis were smaller peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, resulting in a no net change in the peroxide content.

  13. An investigation into a micro-sized droplet impinging on a surface with sharp wettability contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C. Y.; Lam, Y. C.

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted into a micro-sized droplet jetted onto a surface with sharp wettability contrast. The dynamics of micro-sized droplet impingement on a sharp wettability contrast surface, which is critical in inkjet printing technology, has not been investigated in the literature. Hydrophilic lines with line widths ranging from 27 to 53 µm, and contact angle ranging from 17° to 77°, were patterned on a hydrophobic surface with a contact angle of 107°. Water droplets with a diameter of 81 µm were impinged at various offset distances from the centre of the hydrophilic line. The evolution of the droplet upon impingement can be divided into three distinct phases, namely the kinematic phase, the translating phase where the droplet moves towards the centre of the hydrophilic line, and the conforming phase where the droplet spreads along the line. The key parameters affecting the conformability of the droplet to the hydrophilic line pattern are the ratio of the line width to the initial droplet diameter and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line. The droplet will only conform completely to the hydrophilic pattern if the line width is not overly small relative to the droplet and the contact angle of the hydrophilic line is sufficiently low. The impact offset distance does not affect the final shape and final location of the droplet, as long as part of the droplet touches the hydrophilic line upon impingement. This process has a significant impact on inkjet printing technology as high accuracy of inkjet droplet deposition and shape control can be achieved through wettability patterning.

  14. Energy characteristics of photothermal vibrational instability at stimulated Raman and Mandelstam-Brillouin scattering in aerosol droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravlev, M. V.

    2009-04-01

    The threshold intensity and the combination frequencies for photothermal vibrational instability in high- Q aqueous aerosol droplets in the two-mode regime have been calculated. The selection rules for coupling electromagnetic and temperature modes in a droplet are obtained. A comparative analysis of the threshold excitation intensities of photothermal vibrational instability, stimulated Mandelstam-Brillouin scattering, and stimulated Raman scattering in droplets is performed. It is shown that photothermal vibrational instability in the two-mode regime can be developed at a pump intensity of about 104 W/cm2 for droplets with radii of 2-20 μm for a pump wavelength of 0.532 μm. A method of remote measurement of the microphysical droplet parameters from the additional periodic temperature shift of droplet eigenfrequencies in the spectrum of stimulated Raman scattering and lasing is proposed.

  15. Droplet sizes and velocities in vaporizing sprays. [using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ereaut, P. R.; Ungut, A.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse height laser Doppler anemometer particle sizing technique has been refined to permit simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements in sprays. The improvements include (1) the use of a specially tailored 'top hat' light distribution, to provide unambiguous particle diameter-signal amplitude relations, (2) the use of back scattered light collection, and (3) the utilization of Mie theory to compute the relations between signal amplitude and particle diameter, in the backscatter mode. Twin-fluid atomized kerosene sprays have been investigated using the new technique. In these sprays distributions have been mapped of mean droplet diameters, droplet size distributions, and the local correlations between droplet diameters and velocities. The data show the variation of spray structure with atomizer input parameters, the preferential vaporization of smaller droplets, and the differing trajectories of the large and small droplets.

  16. Characterizing ambient and spray mixture effects on droplet size represented by water sensitive paper (WSP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water sensitive paper (WSP) cards are frequently used to provide visual representation of droplet size and density for spray drift and deposition studies. Droplets collected on WSP spread out on the surface of the paper, and standard “spread factor” equations are used to compensate for spread to cha...

  17. An Instrument Employing a Coronal Discharge for the Determination of Droplet-Size Distribution in Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brun, Rinaldo J.; Levine, Joseph; Kleinknecht, Kenneth S.

    1951-01-01

    A flight instrument that uses electric means for measuring the droplet-size distribution in above-freezing clouds has been devised and given preliminary evaluation in flight. An electric charge is placed on the droplets and they are separated aerodynamically according to their mass. Because the charge placed on the droplets is a. function of the droplet size, the size spectrum can 'be determined by measurement of the charge deposited on cylinders of several different sizes placed to intercept the charged droplets. An expression for the rate of charge acquisition by a water droplet in a field of coronal discharge is derived. The results obtained in flight with an instrument based on the method described indicate that continuous records of droplet-size spectrum variations in clouds can be obtained. The experimental instrument was used to evaluate the method and was not refined to the extent necessary for obtaining conclusive meteorological data. The desirable features of an instrument based on the method described are (i) The instrument can be used in clouds with temperatures above freezing; (2) the size and the shape of the cylinders do not change during the exposure time; (3) the readings are instantaneous and continuous; (4) the available sensitivity permits the study of variations in cloud structures of less than 200 feet in extent.

  18. Oil droplet size determination in complex flavor delivery systems by diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Hafner, Valeria; Normand, Valéry

    2011-04-15

    Droplet size distribution of flavor oils in two different solid flavor delivery systems were determined with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy: yeast encapsulation system, a spray dried flavor encapsulation system based on empty yeast cells, and glassy encapsulation system, an extruded solid water soluble carbohydrate delivery system. The oil droplet sizes are limited by the yeast cell walls in the yeast encapsulation system and the size distribution is unimodal according to images from transmission electron microscopy. The droplet size determination with diffusion NMR is based on the Murday and Cotts theory of restricted diffusion of liquids in geometrical confinements. Good fits of the diffusion data could be obtained by applying a unimodal, log-normal size distribution model and average droplet sizes of about 2 μm were found that correspond approximately to the inner diameter of the yeast cells. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a multimodal droplet size distribution in the glassy extruded delivery systems. To fit the NMR data a bimodal log-normal distribution function with five independent fitting parameters was implemented that yielded consistent and robust results. The two size populations were found in the micron and sub-micron range, respectively. The method was sufficiently accurate to depict variation of droplet size distributions in glassy encapsulation systems of different formulation. PMID:21316700

  19. Accounting for dust aerosol size distribution in radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangnan; Min, Qilong; Peng, Yiran; Sun, Zhian; Zhao, Jian-Qi

    2015-07-01

    The impact of size distribution of mineral dust aerosol on radiative transfer was investigated using the Aerosol Robotic Network-retrieved aerosol size distributions. Three methods for determining the aerosol optical properties using size distributions were discussed. The first is referred to as a bin method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined for each bin of the size distribution. The second is named as an assembly mean method in which the aerosol optical properties are determined with an integration of the aerosol optical parameters over the observed size distribution. The third is a normal parameterization method based on an assumed size distribution. The bin method was used to generate the benchmark results in the radiation calculations against the methods of the assembly mean, and parameterizations based on two size distribution functions, namely, lognormal and gamma were examined. It is seen that the assembly mean method can produce aerosol radiative forcing with accuracy of better than 1%. The accuracies of the parameterizations based on lognormal and gamma size distributions are about 25% and 5%, respectively. Both the lognormal and gamma size distributions can be determined by two parameters, the effective radius and effective variance. The better results from the gamma size distribution can be explained by a third parameter of skewness which is found to be useful for judging how close the assumed distribution is to the observation result. The parameterizations based on the two assumed size distributions are also evaluated in a climate model. The results show that the reflected solar fluxes over the desert areas determined by the scheme based on the gamma size distribution are about 1 W m-2 less than those from the scheme based on the lognormal size distribution, bringing the model results closer to the observations.

  20. Research on droplet size measurement of impulse antiriots water cannon based on sheet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa-dong, Zhao; Hong-wei, Zhuang; Ren-jun, Zhan

    2014-04-01

    As a new-style counter-personnel non-lethal weapon, it is the non-steady characteristic and large water mist field that increase the difficulty of measuring the droplet size distribution of impulse anti-riots water cannon which is the most important index to examine its tactical and technology performance. A method based on the technologies of particle scattering, sheet laser imaging and high speed handling was proposed and an universal droplet size measuring algorithm was designed and verified. According to this method, the droplet size distribution was measured. The measuring results of the size distribution under the same position with different timescale, the same axial distance with different radial distance, the same radial distance with different axial distance were analyzed qualitatively and some rational cause was presented. The droplet size measuring method proposed in this article provides a scientific and effective experiment method to ascertain the technical and tactical performance and optimize the relative system performance.

  1. Condensational growth and trace species scavenging in stratospheric sulfuric acid/water aerosol droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompson, Robert V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols play a significant role in the environment. The composition of aerosols is believed to be a liquid solution of sulfuric acid and water with numerous trace species. Of these trace species, ozone in particular was recognized as being very important in its role of shielding the environment from harmful ultraviolet radiation. Also among the trace species are HCl and ClONO2, the so called chlorine reservoir species and various oxides of nitrogen. The quantity of stratospheric aerosol and its particle size distribution determines, to a large degree, the chemistry present in the stratosphere. Aerosols experience 3 types of growth: nucleation, condensation, and coagulation. The application of condensation investigations to the specific problem of stratospheric aerosols is discussed.

  2. Controlling micro-sized droplet generation using electrical pulses for studying liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandino, M.; La Forgia, N.; Vera, A. J.; Bjerknes, J.; Dorao, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Water droplets removal from oil is a critical process in several industries, in particular in the oil and gas industry. Water/oil separation is commonly done in large gravitational sedimentation tanks, which are over dimensioned due to the lack of accurate models to allow for optimization. This can become challenging for off-shore and subsea processing installations. One of the bottlenecks to study droplet dynamics in the micron range, is the generation of droplets with less than 100μm in diameter. In this regard, one of the most promising techniques for controlling the generated droplet size is based on the use of a high voltage electrical signal or electro-hydrodynamic technique (EHD). Although much work on EHD and droplet generation can been found in the literature, many challenges still remain. One of this is the generation of droplets smaller than 100μm in diameter in a controllable, on-demand manner. In this work, the effect of the meniscus shape and the electric pulse characteristics on the size of the generated droplet is investigated. Both the meniscus height and width help to determine the droplet size, with the latter having a stronger effect. No significant influence of the pulse amplitude and pulse width was observed for the tested conditions.

  3. Size Distribution of NaK Droplets Released During Rorsat Reactor Core Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Oswald, M.; Stabroth, S.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    NaK droplets consist of eutectic sodium-potassium alloy and have been released during RORSAT reactor core ejections mostly on orbits close to 950 km altitude. They contributed to the space debris environment in the centimeter and millimeter size regime. NaK droplets have been modeled before in ESA's MASTER Debris and Meteoroid Environment Model. The approach is currently revised for the MASTER 2005 upgrade. The new NaK model gives estimations of the parameters of the size distribution function, which are based on physical relations only. This physical approach confirms NASA radar observations. The core ejection causes an opening of the primary coolant circuit. The liquid coolant is released into space forming droplets up to a diameter of 5.5 cm. The reactor design is investigated to understand the possible mechanisms that cause the droplets generation. It is likely that the droplet generation process can be both capillary jet breakup and atomization. This paper presents results of the estimation of droplets sizes. A droplet size distribution is introduced, which is scientifically justified. The physical process of atomization resp. liquid jet breakup is considered, to derive the parameters of the size distribution function. The introduction of an improved distribution function is important. So far the cumulative size distribution function was a combination of several fitting curve segments to agree with measured data. The definition of several functions results in a large number of parameters. This drawback is corrected. The droplet size can be defined as function of the orifice diameter. The droplets sizes are related to the parameters of the size distribution function. The size distribution function shall contain only two parameters, which can be derived from the orifice diameter and the atomization conditions. In this way scientifically based estimations of the parameters are introduced. An estimation of the maximum droplet diameter assuming capillary jet

  4. Sources of Size Segregated Sulfate Aerosols in the Arctic Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Abbatt, J.; Levasseur, M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor fitted to a high volume sampler was used for this study and was modified to permit collection of SO2 after aerosols were removed from the gas stream. The isotopic composition of sulfate aerosols and SO2 was measured and apportionment calculations have been performed to quantify the contribution of biogenic as well as anthropogenic sources to the growth of different aerosol size fractions in the atmosphere. The presence of sea salt sulfate aerosols was especially high in coarse mode aerosols as expected. The contribution of biogenic sulfate concentration in this study was higher than anthropogenic sulfate. Around 70% of fine aerosols (<0.49 μm) and 86% of SO2 were from biogenic sources. Concentrations of biogenic sulfate for fine aerosols, ranging from 18 to 625 ng/m3, were five times higher than total biogenic sulfate concentrations measured during Fall in the same region (Rempillo et al., 2011). A comparison of the isotope ratio for SO2 and fine aerosols offers a way to determine aerosol growth from local SO2 oxidation. For some samples, the values for SO2 and fine aerosols were close together suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfur.Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor

  5. A microfluidic platform for size-dependent generation of droplet interface bilayer networks on rails

    PubMed Central

    Carreras, P.; Elani, Y.; Law, R. V.; Brooks, N. J.; Seddon, J. M.; Ces, O.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are emerging as a cornerstone technology for the bottom up construction of cell-like and tissue-like structures and bio-devices. They are an exciting and versatile model-membrane platform, seeing increasing use in the disciplines of synthetic biology, chemical biology, and membrane biophysics. DIBs are formed when lipid-coated water-in-oil droplets are brought together—oil is excluded from the interface, resulting in a bilayer. Perhaps the greatest feature of the DIB platform is the ability to generate bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together, which can in turn be used in applications ranging from tissue mimics, multicellular models, and bio-devices. For such applications, the construction and release of DIB networks of defined size and composition on-demand is crucial. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized DIB networks (300–1500 pl droplets) on-chip. We do this by employing a droplet-on-rails strategy where droplets are guided down designated paths of a chip with the aid of microfabricated grooves or “rails,” and droplets of set sizes are selectively directed to specific rails using auxiliary flows. In this way we can uniquely produce parallel bilayer networks of defined sizes. By trapping several droplets in a rail, extended DIB networks containing up to 20 sequential bilayers could be constructed. The trapped DIB arrays can be composed of different lipid types and can be released on-demand and regenerated within seconds. We show that chemical signals can be propagated across the bio-network by transplanting enzymatic reaction cascades for inter-droplet communication. PMID:26759638

  6. A microfluidic platform for size-dependent generation of droplet interface bilayer networks on rails.

    PubMed

    Carreras, P; Elani, Y; Law, R V; Brooks, N J; Seddon, J M; Ces, O

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayer (DIB) networks are emerging as a cornerstone technology for the bottom up construction of cell-like and tissue-like structures and bio-devices. They are an exciting and versatile model-membrane platform, seeing increasing use in the disciplines of synthetic biology, chemical biology, and membrane biophysics. DIBs are formed when lipid-coated water-in-oil droplets are brought together-oil is excluded from the interface, resulting in a bilayer. Perhaps the greatest feature of the DIB platform is the ability to generate bilayer networks by connecting multiple droplets together, which can in turn be used in applications ranging from tissue mimics, multicellular models, and bio-devices. For such applications, the construction and release of DIB networks of defined size and composition on-demand is crucial. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic method for the generation of different sized DIB networks (300-1500 pl droplets) on-chip. We do this by employing a droplet-on-rails strategy where droplets are guided down designated paths of a chip with the aid of microfabricated grooves or "rails," and droplets of set sizes are selectively directed to specific rails using auxiliary flows. In this way we can uniquely produce parallel bilayer networks of defined sizes. By trapping several droplets in a rail, extended DIB networks containing up to 20 sequential bilayers could be constructed. The trapped DIB arrays can be composed of different lipid types and can be released on-demand and regenerated within seconds. We show that chemical signals can be propagated across the bio-network by transplanting enzymatic reaction cascades for inter-droplet communication. PMID:26759638

  7. Particle size distributions of several commonly used seeding aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswy, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the course of experimentation, no solid particle powder could be found which produced an aerosol with a narrow particle size distribution when fluidization was the only flow process used in producing the aerosol. The complication of adding particle size fractionation processes to the aerosol generation effort appears to be avoidable. In this regard, a simple sonic orifice is found to be effective in reducing the percentage of agglomerates in the several metal oxide powders tested. Marginally beneficial results are obtained for a 0.5/99.5 percent by weight mixture of the flow agent and metal oxide powder. However, agglomeration is observed to be enhanced when the flow agent percentage is increased to 5 percent. Liquid atomization using the Collison nebulizer as well as a version of the Laskin nozzle resulted in polydispersed aerosols with particle size distributions heavily weighted by the small particle end of the size spectrum. The aerosol particle size distributions produced by the vaporization/condensation seeder are closer to the ideal monodispersed aerosol than any of the other aerosols tested. In addition, this seeding approach affords a measure of control over particle size and particle production rate.

  8. Analysis of visual perception of light emitting diode brightness in dense fog with various droplet sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Bobsy Arief; Nakashima, Yoshio; Takamatsu, Mamoru

    2008-05-01

    Road signs must provide a conspicuous signal to a wide variety of drivers over a broad range of environmental and geometric conditions. Recently, there are an increasing number of applications in which light emitting diodes (LEDs) are used as the light source, including critical transportation signaling. In the presence of fog, the resulting visual signal is disturbed due to light scattering by airborne water droplets. By measuring LED brightness with human spectral sensitivity in various densities and various droplet sizes (10, 30, 50, and 100 μm), it is understood that the particle size distribution (fog droplet size) and density of fog does affect visibility in fog. The colored LEDs that contain a yellow component had high brightness evaluation, blue component had low brightness evaluation in all densities and different droplet sizes. The result in this paper can contribute to air and land traffic safety and the prevention of accidents.

  9. Initial size distributions and hygroscopicity of indoor combustion aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Hopke, P.K.

    1993-10-01

    Cigarette smoke, incense smoke, natural gas flames, propane fuel flames, and candle flames are contributors of indoor aerosol particles. To provide a quantitative basis for the modeling of inhaled aerosol deposition pattern, the hygroscopic growth of particles from these five sources as well as the source size distributions were measured. Because the experiments were performed on the bases of particles of single size, it provided not only the averaged particle`s hygroscopic growth of each source, but also the detailed size change for particles of different sizes within the whole size spectrum. The source particle size distribution measurements found that cigarette smoke and incense smoke contained particles in the size range of 100-700 nm, while the natural gas, propane, and candle flames generated particles between 10 and 100 nm. The hygroscopic growth experiments showed that these combustion aerosol particles could grow 10% to 120%, depending on the particle sizes and origins. 18 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Observations of stimulated Raman scattering and laser-induced breakdown in millimeter-sized droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Pinnick, R. G.; Xie, J.-G.; Ruekgauer, T. E.; Armstrong, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    We report the first observations, to our knowledge, of nonlinear optical effects in large (millimeter-sized) droplets. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser-induced breakdown (LIB) are simultaneously observed in acoustically levitated millimeter-sized glycerol droplets irradiated by either a frequency-doubled (532-nm) or a frequency-tripled (355-nm) Nd:YAG laser. The two processes, which occur above a nearby coincident irradiation threshold, are conjectured to arise from a common initiation mechanism: self-focusing. LIB generates vapor bubbles within the droplet, resulting in the quenching of SRS emission.

  11. Droplet-Shooting and Size-Filtration (DSSF) Method for Synthesis of Cell-Sized Liposomes with Controlled Lipid Compositions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masamune; Onoe, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Miho; Ito, Hiroaki; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Fujiwara, Kei; Saito, Hirohide; Takinoue, Masahiro

    2015-09-21

    We report a centrifugal microfluidic method, droplet-shooting and size-filtration (DSSF), for the production of cell-sized liposomes with controlled lipid compositions. This involves the generation of large and small droplets from the tip of a glass capillary and the selective transfer of small droplets through an oil-water interface, thus resulting in the generation of cell-sized liposomes. We demonstrate control of the microdomain formation as well as the formation of asymmetric lipid bilayer liposomes of uniform size by the control of lipid composition. The DSSF method involves simple microfluidics and is easy to use. In addition, only a small volume (0.5-2 μL) of sample solution is required for the formation of hundreds of cell-sized liposomes. We believe that this method can be applied to generate cell-sized liposomes for a wide variety of uses, such as the construction of artificial cell-like systems. PMID:26212462

  12. Measurements of Hygroscopicity- and Size-Resolved Sea Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Royalty, T. M.; Reed, R. E.; Petters, M.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a central role in many environmental processes by influencing the Earth's radiative balance, tropospheric chemistry, clouds, biogeochemical cycles, and visibility as well as adversely impacting human health. Based on their origin, atmospheric aerosols can be defined as anthropogenic or natural. Recent studies have shown that a large fraction of uncertainty in the radiative effects of anthropogenic aerosols is related to uncertainty in natural—background—aerosols. Marine aerosols are of particular interest due to the abundance of oceans covering the Earth's surface. Despite their importance, limited information is currently available for size- and composition-resolved marine aerosol emission fluxes. Our group has designed and built an instrument for measuring the size- and hygroscopicity-resolved sea spray aerosol fluxes. The instrument was first deployed during spring 2015 at the end of the 560 m pier of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Field Research Facility in Duck, NC. Measurements include 200 nm-sized diameter growth factor (hygroscopicity) distributions, sea spray particle flux measurements, and total sub-micron sized aerosol concentration. Ancillary ocean data includes salinity, pH, sea surface temperature, dissolved oxygen content, and relative fluorescence (proxy for [Chl-a]). Hygroscopicity distribution measurements show two broad peaks, one indicative of organics and sulfates and another suggestive of sea salt. The fraction of 200 nm-sized salt particles having hygroscopicity similar to that of sea-spray aerosol contributes up to ~24% of the distribution on days with high-speed onshore winds and up to ~3% on calm days with winds blowing from the continent. However, the total concentration of sea-spray-like particles originating from offshore versus onshore winds was relatively similar. Changes in the relative contribution of sea-salt to number concentration were caused by a concomitant changes in total aerosol concentration

  13. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach. The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).

  14. Impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Abdul-Razzak, H.

    2002-11-07

    In this study, we use a 1-D version of a climate-aerosol-chemistry model with both modal and sectional aerosol size representations to evaluate the impact of aerosol size representation on modeling aerosol-cloud interactions in shallow stratiform clouds observed during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment. Both the modal (with prognostic aerosol number and mass or prognostic aerosol number, surface area and mass, referred to as the Modal-NM and Modal-NSM) and the sectional approaches (with 12 and 36 sections) predict total number and mass for interstitial and activated particles that are generally within several percent of references from a high resolution 108-section approach.more » The modal approach with prognostic aerosol mass but diagnostic number (referred to as the Modal-M) cannot accurately predict the total particle number and surface areas, with deviations from the references ranging from 7-161%. The particle size distributions are sensitive to size representations, with normalized absolute differences of up to 12% and 37% for the 36- and 12-section approaches, and 30%, 39%, and 179% for the Modal-NSM, Modal-NM, and Modal-M, respectively. For the Modal-NSM and Modal-NM, differences from the references are primarily due to the inherent assumptions and limitations of the modal approach. In particular, they cannot resolve the abrupt size transition between the interstitial and activated aerosol fractions. For the 12- and 36-section approaches, differences are largely due to limitations of the parameterized activation for non-log-normal size distributions, plus the coarse resolution for the 12-section case. Differences are larger both with higher aerosol (i.e., less complete activation) and higher SO2 concentrations (i.e., greater modification of the initial aerosol distribution).« less

  15. Mixing state and compositional effects on CCN activity and droplet growth kinetics of size-resolved CCN in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padró, L. T.; Moore, R. H.; Zhang, X.; Rastogi, N.; Weber, R. J.; Nenes, A.

    2012-11-01

    Aerosol composition and mixing state near anthropogenic sources can be highly variable and can challenge predictions of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The impacts of chemical composition on CCN activation kinetics is also an important, but largely unknown, aspect of cloud droplet formation. Towards this, we present in-situ size-resolved CCN measurements carried out during the 2008 summertime August Mini Intensive Gas and Aerosol Study (AMIGAS) campaign in Atlanta, GA. Aerosol chemical composition was measured by two particle-into-liquid samplers measuring water-soluble inorganic ions and total water-soluble organic carbon. Size-resolved CCN data were collected using the Scanning Mobility CCN Analysis (SMCA) method and were used to obtain characteristic aerosol hygroscopicity distributions, whose breadth reflects the aerosol compositional variability and mixing state. Knowledge of aerosol mixing state is important for accurate predictions of CCN concentrations and that the influence of an externally-mixed, CCN-active aerosol fraction varies with size from 31% for particle diameters less than 40 nm to 93% for accumulation mode aerosol during the day. Assuming size-dependent aerosol mixing state and size-invariant chemical composition decreases the average CCN concentration overprediction (for all but one mixing state and chemical composition scenario considered) from over 190-240% to less than 20%. CCN activity is parameterized using a single hygroscopicity parameter, κ, which averages to 0.16 ± 0.07 for 80 nm particles and exhibits considerable variability (from 0.03 to 0.48) throughout the study period. Particles in the 60-100 nm range exhibited similar hygroscopicity, with a κ range for 60 nm between 0.06-0.076 (mean of 0.18 ± 0.09). Smaller particles (40 nm) had on average greater κ, with a range of 0.20-0.92 (mean of 0.3 ± 0.12). Analysis of the droplet activation kinetics of the aerosol sampled suggests that most of the CCN activate as rapidly as

  16. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy: an efficient tool for measuring size, size-distribution and polydispersity of microemulsion droplets in solution.

    PubMed

    Pal, Nibedita; Dev Verma, Sachin; Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Sen, Sobhan

    2011-10-15

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an ideal tool for measuring molecular diffusion and size under extremely dilute conditions. However, the power of FCS has not been utilized to its best to measure diffusion and size parameters of complex chemical systems. Here, we apply FCS to measure the size, and, most importantly, the size distribution and polydispersity of a supramolecular nanostructure (i.e., microemulsion droplets, MEDs) in dilute solution. It is shown how the refractive index mismatch of a solution can be corrected in FCS to obtain accurate size parameters of particles, bypassing the optical matching problem of light scattering techniques that are used often for particle-size measurements. We studied the MEDs of 13 different W(0) values from 2 to 50 prepared in a ternary mixture of water, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), and isooctane, with sulforhodamine-B as a fluorescent marker. We find that, near the optical matching point of MEDs, the dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements underestimate the droplet sizes while FCS estimates the accurate ones. A Gaussian distribution model (GDM) and a maximum-entropy-based FCS data fitting model (MEMFCS) are used to analyze the fluorescence correlation curves that unfold Gaussian-type size distributions of MEDs in solution. We find the droplet size varies linearly with W(0) up to ~20, but beyond this W(0) value, the size variation deviates from this linearity. To explain nonlinear variation of droplet size for W(0) values beyond ~20, we invoke a model (the coated-droplet model) that incorporates the size polydispersity of the droplets. PMID:21899251

  17. Ultraviolet broadband light scattering for optically-trapped submicron-sized aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Ritsch, Irina; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-02-21

    We describe a broadband light scattering setup for the characterization of size and refractive index of single submicron-to-micron sized aerosol particles. Individual particles are isolated in air by a quadruple Bessel beam optical trap or a counter-propagating optical tweezer. The use of very broadband radiation in the wavelength range from 320 to 700 nm covering the ultraviolet region allows to size submicron particles. We show that a broad wavelength range is required to determine the particle radius and the refractive index with an uncertainty of several nanometers and ∼ 0.01, respectively. The smallest particle radius that can be accurately determined lies around 300 nm. Wavelength-dependent refractive index data over a broad range are obtained, including the ultraviolet region where corresponding data are rare. Four different applications are discussed: (1) the sizing of submicron polystyrene latex spheres, (2) the evaporation of binary glycerol water droplets, (3) hydration/dehydration cycling of aqueous potassium carbonate droplets, and (4) photochemical reactions of oleic acid droplets. PMID:26863396

  18. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-21

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO{sub 2} from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25% of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50% of aerosol with D{sub p} > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two

  19. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2011-06-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O3 and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate in agreement with the dominant pollution source being SO2 from Cu smelters and power plants. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 °C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a BL contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (Dp > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of ~150 cm-3, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that ~25 % of aerosol in the PCASP size range are interstitial (not activated). One hundred and two constant altitude cloud transects were identified and used to determine properties of interstitial aerosol. One transect is examined in detail as a case study. Approximately 25 to 50 % of aerosol with Dp > 110 nm were not activated, the difference between the two approaches possibly representing

  20. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-08-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth.

  1. A novel method for producing unequal sized droplets in micro- and nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Bedram, Ahmad; Moosavi, Ali; Kazemzadeh Hannani, Siamak

    2015-09-01

    We propose a novel method for producing unequal sized droplets through breakup of droplets. This method does not have the disadvantages of the available methods and also reduces the dependence of the droplets volume ratio on the inlet velocity of the system by up to 26 percent. The employed method for investigating the proposed system relies on 3D numerical simulation using the VOF algorithm and the results have been obtained with various valve ratios for both the micro- and nanoscale. The results indicate that the droplet length during the breakup process increases linearly with time. The droplet length at the nanoscale is smaller than that at the micro scale. It has been shown that the maximum local capillary number in this system is 2.5 times the average capillary number. Therefore one can use the analytical theories based on the low capillary number assumptions to investigate the method. PMID:26354737

  2. Terminal Liquid Mass Fractions and Terminal Mean Droplet Sizes in He Free-Jet Expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Knuth, E. L.; Kornilov, O.; Toennies, J. P.

    2011-05-20

    The terminal liquid mass fraction in He free-jet expansions is deduced from time-of-flight measurements using conservation of energy. Both the present results and results from prior measurements are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating droplet size as a function of source conditions. Deduced values of the mass fraction range from 0.047 to 0.42. The terminal mean droplet size is determined using a novel technique based on a size-dependent attenuation of the beam droplets when impacted by electrons. The determined sizes are in agreement with sizes obtained previously by crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam, confirming the suitability of the present technique, which is relatively simple in comparison with crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam. Measured values of the terminal velocity of the droplets are compared with values calculated for a model in which real-fluid properties are used for the enthalpy in the source but conversion of heat of condensation into energy of directed motion is neglected. The deviations from perfect-gas behavior in free-jet expansions are shown to be due to real-fluid properties and condensation.

  3. Aerosol concentration and size distribution measured below, in, and above cloud from the DOE G-1 during VOCALS-REx

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman L. I.; Daum, P. H.; Lee, Y.-N.; Lewis, E. R.; Sedlacek III, A. J.; Senum, G. I.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Jayne, J.; Min, Q.; Yum, S. S.; Allen, G.

    2012-01-04

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment, the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample a varying aerosol environment pertinent to properties of stratocumulus clouds over a longitude band extending 800 km west from the Chilean coast at Arica. Trace gas and aerosol measurements are presented as a function of longitude, altitude, and dew point in this study. Spatial distributions are consistent with an upper atmospheric source for O{sub 3} and South American coastal sources for marine boundary layer (MBL) CO and aerosol, most of which is acidic sulfate. Pollutant layers in the free troposphere (FT) can be a result of emissions to the north in Peru or long range transport from the west. At a given altitude in the FT (up to 3 km), dew point varies by 40 C with dry air descending from the upper atmospheric and moist air having a boundary layer (BL) contribution. Ascent of BL air to a cold high altitude results in the condensation and precipitation removal of all but a few percent of BL water along with aerosol that served as CCN. Thus, aerosol volume decreases with dew point in the FT. Aerosol size spectra have a bimodal structure in the MBL and an intermediate diameter unimodal distribution in the FT. Comparing cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and pre-cloud aerosol (D{sub p} > 100 nm) gives a linear relation up to a number concentration of {approx}150 cm{sup -3}, followed by a less than proportional increase in CDNC at higher aerosol number concentration. A number balance between below cloud aerosol and cloud droplets indicates that {approx}25 % of aerosol with D{sub p} > 100 nm are interstitial (not activated). A direct comparison of pre-cloud and in-cloud aerosol yields a higher estimate. Artifacts in the measurement of interstitial aerosol due to droplet shatter and evaporation are discussed. Within each of 102 constant altitude cloud transects, CDNC and interstitial aerosol were anti-correlated. An examination of one cloud as a case study shows that the

  4. Estimation and control of droplet size and frequency in projected spray mode of a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process.

    PubMed

    Anzehaee, Mohammad Mousavi; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    New estimators are designed based on the modified force balance model to estimate the detaching droplet size, detached droplet size, and mean value of droplet detachment frequency in a gas metal arc welding process. The proper droplet size for the process to be in the projected spray transfer mode is determined based on the modified force balance model and the designed estimators. Finally, the droplet size and the melting rate are controlled using two proportional-integral (PI) controllers to achieve high weld quality by retaining the transfer mode and generating appropriate signals as inputs of the weld geometry control loop. PMID:21444083

  5. Dynamics of Particle Size on Inhalation of Environmental Aerosol and Impact on Deposition Fraction.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Reid, Jonathan P

    2015-12-15

    Inhalation of elevated levels of particulate air pollution has been shown to elicit the onset of adverse health effects in humans, where the magnitude of the response is a product of where in the lung the particulate dose is delivered. At any point in time during inhalation the depositional flux of the aerosol is a function of the radius of the droplet, thus a detailed understanding of the rate and magnitude of the mass flux of water to the droplet during inhalation is crucial. In this study, we assess the impact of aerosol hygroscopicity on deposited dose through the inclusion of a detailed treatment of the mass flux of water to account for the dynamics of particle size in a modified version of the standard International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) whole lung deposition model. The ability to account for the role of the relative humidity (RH) of the aerosol prior to, and during, inhalation on the deposition pattern is explored, and found to have a significant effect on the deposition pattern. The model is verified by comparison to previously published measurements, and used to demonstrate that ambient RH affects where in the lung indoor particulate air pollution is delivered. PMID:26568475

  6. Comparison of aerosol size distribution in coastal and oceanic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta; van Eijk, Alexander M.

    2006-08-01

    The results of applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) method to decomposition and approximation of aerosol size distributions are presented. A comparison was made for two aerosol data sets, representing coastal and oceanic environments. The first data set includes measurements collected at the Irish Atlantic coast in 1994 and 1995, the second one data collected during the Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment that took place off Oahu, Hawaii in 2001. The main finding is that aerosol size distributions can be represented by a superposition of the mean size distribution and the first eigenvector multiplied by an amplitude function. For the two aerosol data sets the mean size distribution is very similar in the range of small particles sizes (radius < 1μm) but the main difference appears for larger aerosols (radius > 1μm). It is also reflected by the spectral shape of the eigenvector. The differences can be related to the type of aerosols present at both locations, and the amplitude function can be associated to meteorological conditions. The amplitude function also indicates the episodes with the maximum/minimum continental influence. The results of this analysis will be used in upgrades of the ANAM model.

  7. Nano-sized fine droplets of liquid crystals for optical application

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shiro; Houlbert, M.; Hayashi, Takayoshi; Kubodera, Kenichi

    1997-09-01

    Nano-sized fine droplets of liquid crystal (LC) were obtained by phase separation of nematic LC in UV curing polymer. The polymer composite had a high transparency in the infrared region. The fine droplets responded to an electric field causing a change in birefringence. Output power change was brought about by the generated retardation between two polarizations, parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field. This differs from the composite containing much larger droplets, where output depends on the degree of scattering. The birefringence changed by 0.001 at the applied voltage of 7.5 V/{micro}m.

  8. Surface Tension Gradients on Mixing Processes after Coalescence of Binary Equal-Sized Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Guo, Yin-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2013-07-01

    Numerical simulations on coalescence of binary equal-sized droplets with surface tension gradients are carried out by using the front tracking method. Mixing process of the fluid from each droplet is investigated. The tangential flow caused by the Marangoni effect and the interface replacement by the fluid with small surface tension coefficient are simulated successfully. Asymmetry caused by the surface tension gradients can generate some extent of mixing within the coalesced droplet. The effects of the surface tension gradients and viscosity on the tangential velocity, replacement time of interface and mixing are investigated.

  9. Processes controlling the annual cycle of Arctic aerosol number and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Tunved, Peter; Breider, Thomas J.; D'Andrea, Stephen D.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements at high-Arctic sites (Alert, Nunavut, and Mt. Zeppelin, Svalbard) during the years 2011 to 2013 show a strong and similar annual cycle in aerosol number and size distributions. Each year at both sites, the number of aerosols with diameters larger than 20 nm exhibits a minimum in October and two maxima, one in spring associated with a dominant accumulation mode (particles 100 to 500 nm in diameter) and a second in summer associated with a dominant Aitken mode (particles 20 to 100 nm in diameter). Seasonal-mean aerosol effective diameter from measurements ranges from about 180 in summer to 260 nm in winter. This study interprets these annual cycles with the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. Important roles are documented for several processes (new-particle formation, coagulation scavenging in clouds, scavenging by precipitation, and transport) in controlling the annual cycle in Arctic aerosol number and size. Our simulations suggest that coagulation scavenging of interstitial aerosols in clouds by aerosols that have activated to form cloud droplets strongly limits the total number of particles with diameters less than 200 nm throughout the year. We find that the minimum in total particle number in October can be explained by diminishing new-particle formation within the Arctic, limited transport of pollution from lower latitudes, and efficient wet removal. Our simulations indicate that the summertime-dominant Aitken mode is associated with efficient wet removal of accumulation-mode aerosols, which limits the condensation sink for condensable vapours. This in turn promotes new-particle formation and growth. The dominant accumulation mode during spring is associated with build up of transported pollution from outside the Arctic coupled with less-efficient wet-removal processes at colder temperatures. We recommend further attention to the key processes of new-particle formation, interstitial coagulation, and wet removal and their delicate

  10. Aerosolization of Respirable Droplets from a Domestic Spa Pool and the Use of MS-2 Coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as Markers for Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, Matthew; Stevenson, David; Walker, Jimmy T.; Bennett, Allan M.

    2014-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease can result when droplets or aerosols containing legionella bacteria are inhaled and deposited in the lungs. A number of outbreaks have been associated with the use of a spa pool where aeration, a high water temperature, and a large and variable organic load make disinfectant levels difficult to maintain. Spa pool ownership is increasing, and the aim of this study, using two surrogate organisms (MS-2 coliphage and Pseudomonas aeruginosa [a natural contaminant]), was to assess the potential risk to domestic users when disinfection fails. A representative “entry level” domestic spa pool was installed in an outdoor courtyard. The manufacturer's instructions for spa pool maintenance were not followed. A cyclone sampler was used to sample the aerosols released from the spa pool with and without activation of the air injection system. Samples were taken at increasing heights and distances from the pool. An aerodynamic particle sizer was used to measure the water droplet size distribution at each sample point. When the air injection system was inactivated, neither surrogate organism was recovered from the air. On activation of the air injection system, the mean mass of droplets within the respirable range (10 cm above the water line) was 36.8 μg cm−3. This corresponded to a mean air concentration of P. aeruginosa of 350 CFU m−3. From extrapolation from animal data, the estimated risk of infection from aerosols contaminated with similar concentrations of Legionella pneumophila was 0.76 (males) and 0.65 (females). At 1 m above and/or beyond the pool, the mean aerosol mass decreased to 0.04 μg cm−3 and corresponded to a 100-fold reduction in mean microbial air concentration. The estimated risk of infection at this distance was negligible. PMID:25381233

  11. Real-time characterization of the size and chemical composition of individual particles in ambient aerosol systems in Riverside, California

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, C.A.; Prather, K.A.

    1995-12-31

    Atmospheric aerosols, although ubiquitous, are highly diverse and continually fluctuating systems. A typical aerosol system may consist of particles with diameters between {approximately}0.002 {mu}m and {approximately}200 {mu}m. Even in rural or pristine areas, atmospheric particle concentration is significant, with concentrations up to 10{sup 8} particles/cm{sup 3} not being uncommon. Chemical composition of atmospheric particles vary from simple water droplets or acidic ices to soot particles and cigarette smoke. Due to changes in atmospheric conditions, processes such as nucleation, coagulation or heterogeneous chemistry may effect both physical and chemical properties of individual particles over relatively short time intervals. Recently, aerosol measurement techniques are focusing on determining the size and/or chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. This research group has recently developed aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), a technique which allows for real-time determination of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Single particle measurements are performed in one instrument using dual laser aerodynamic particle sizing and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Aerosol-time-of-flight mass spectrometry is briefly described in several other abstracts in this publication.

  12. Models of size spectrum of tropospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.

    Quality criteria of a model distribution are considered. Information losses due to the nonorthogonality of the spectrum parameter transformation are discussed. Models are compared with a view to approximation accuracy and losses of information. Smerkalov's average tropospheric aerosol spectrum and 271 observed spectra have been used for test. Highest accuracy and lowest losses of information were yielded by a distribution having power asymptotes on both the left and the right sides.

  13. Velocity and size distribution measurement of suspension droplets using PDPA technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Shahin; Akbarnozari, Ali; Moreau, Christian; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The creation of fine and uniform droplets from a bulk of liquid is a vital process in a variety of engineering applications, such as atomization in suspension plasma spray (SPS) in which the submicron coating materials are injected to the plasma gas through the suspension droplets. The size and velocity of these droplets has a great impact on the interaction of the suspension with the gas flow emanating from a plasma torch and can consequently affect the mechanical and chemical properties of the resultant coatings. In the current study, an aqueous suspension of small glass particles (2-8 μm) was atomized by utilizing an effervescent atomizer of 1 mm orifice diameter which involves bubbling gas (air) directly into the liquid stream. The gas to liquid ratio (GLR) was kept constant at 6% throughout this study. The mass concentration of glass particles varied in the range between 0.5 to 5% in order to investigate the effect of suspension viscosity and surface tension on the droplet characteristics, such as velocity and size distributions. These characteristics were simultaneously measured by using a non-intrusive optical technique, Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA), which is based on the light signal scattered from the droplets moving in a measurement volume. The velocity and size distribution of suspension droplets were finally compared to those of distilled water under identical conditions. The results showed a different atomization behaviors due to the reduction in surface tension of the suspension spray.

  14. Partitioned EDGE devices for high throughput production of monodisperse emulsion droplets with two distinct sizes.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sami; Schroën, Karin

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel microfluidic EDGE (Edge based Droplet GEneration) device with regularly spaced micron-sized partitions, which is aimed at upscaling of o/w emulsion preparation. By this means, remarkably higher pressure stability was obtained, and two orders of magnitude higher droplet formation frequency was achieved compared to regular EDGE devices. Interestingly, we observed two different monodisperse droplet formation regimes for plateaus that were 2 micrometres in height, and to the best of our knowledge, no other microfluidic device has this ability. The average diameters of the droplets were 9 and 28 μm, both with a coefficient of variation (CV) below 5%. Based on the experimental throughput and a plausible mass parallelization scenario, the amount of hexadecane that can be emulsified is estimated to be between 6 and 25 m(3) m(-2) h(-1) depending on the required droplet size. With its high throughput potential and ability to produce uniform droplets of two different sizes, the partitioned EDGE device is promising for industrial emulsion production. PMID:25953515

  15. Measurement of the droplets sizes of a flash boiling spray using an improved extended glare point velocimetry and sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shiquan; Jia, Ming; Wang, Tianyou; Lü, Qieni; Sun, Kai

    2016-04-01

    An improved extended glare point velocimetry and sizing (EGPVS) is proposed to investigate the droplets sizes of a flash boiling spray. When a spherical droplet with a relative refractive index from 1.16 to 1.41 is illuminated by two opposite laser sheets and a charge-coupled device camera is used to collect the s-polarization light at an observation angle of 90°, the intensities of the reflected lights are much stronger than the other order scattering lights. If the intensity of incident laser is controlled appropriately, two glare points from the reflected lights for the droplet are formed at the focused plane, while the intensities of the other order scattering lights are too weak to form any glare points. Then, the droplet diameter can be derived from the distance between the two glare points. In addition, the focused image is relative small, making it possible to measure dense spray. First, the characteristics of the improved EGPVS are discussed, and a series of standard particles are measured for validating this technique. Then, the technique is applied to investigate the droplets sizes of flash boiling spray. It is found that the minimum measurable diameter of droplets is 7.1 μm, and the relative error is less than 4.7 %. The droplet size distributions of spray are different at different stages. The Sauter mean diameter (SMD) of gasoline spray decreases gradually as the fuel temperature increases, which is different from that of a single-component fuel with a sharp decrease in SMD at the flash boiling stage.

  16. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-07-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 μg m-3 and in September-October of 0.36-0.57 μg m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  17. Droplet size distributions in turbulent emulsions: breakup criteria and surfactant effects from direct numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Skartlien, R; Sollum, E; Schumann, H

    2013-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations of water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsions of moderate viscosity ratio (≃1/3) and with oil soluble amphiphilic surfactant were used to study the droplet size distribution in forced, steady, homogeneous turbulence, at a water volume fraction of 20%. The viscous stresses internal to the droplets were comparable to the interfacial stress (interfacial tension), and the droplet size distribution (DSD) equilibrated near the Kolmogorov scale with droplet populations in both the viscous and inertial subranges. These results were consistent with known breakup criteria for W/O and oil-in-water emulsions, showing that the maximum stable droplet diameter is proportional to the Kolmogorov scale when viscous stresses are important (in contrast to the inviscid Hinze-limit where energy loss by viscous deformation in the droplet is negligible). The droplet size distribution in the inertial subrange scaled with the known power law ~d(-10/3), as a consequence of breakup by turbulent stress fluctuations external to the droplets. When the turbulent kinetic energy was sufficiently large (with interfacial Péclet numbers above unity), we found that turbulence driven redistribution of surfactant on the interface inhibited the Marangoni effect that is otherwise induced by film draining during coalescence in more quiescent flow. The coalescence rates were therefore not sensitive to varying surfactant activity in the range we considered, and for the given turbulent kinetic energies. Furthermore, internal viscous stresses strongly influenced the breakup rates. These two effects resulted in a DSD that was insensitive to varying surfactant activity. PMID:24206328

  18. Droplet size distributions in turbulent emulsions: Breakup criteria and surfactant effects from direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skartlien, R.; Sollum, E.; Schumann, H.

    2013-11-01

    Lattice Boltzmann simulations of water-in-oil (W/O) type emulsions of moderate viscosity ratio (≃1/3) and with oil soluble amphiphilic surfactant were used to study the droplet size distribution in forced, steady, homogeneous turbulence, at a water volume fraction of 20%. The viscous stresses internal to the droplets were comparable to the interfacial stress (interfacial tension), and the droplet size distribution (DSD) equilibrated near the Kolmogorov scale with droplet populations in both the viscous and inertial subranges. These results were consistent with known breakup criteria for W/O and oil-in-water emulsions, showing that the maximum stable droplet diameter is proportional to the Kolmogorov scale when viscous stresses are important (in contrast to the inviscid Hinze-limit where energy loss by viscous deformation in the droplet is negligible). The droplet size distribution in the inertial subrange scaled with the known power law ˜d-10/3, as a consequence of breakup by turbulent stress fluctuations external to the droplets. When the turbulent kinetic energy was sufficiently large (with interfacial Péclet numbers above unity), we found that turbulence driven redistribution of surfactant on the interface inhibited the Marangoni effect that is otherwise induced by film draining during coalescence in more quiescent flow. The coalescence rates were therefore not sensitive to varying surfactant activity in the range we considered, and for the given turbulent kinetic energies. Furthermore, internal viscous stresses strongly influenced the breakup rates. These two effects resulted in a DSD that was insensitive to varying surfactant activity.

  19. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  20. Size-resolved aerosol water-soluble ionic compositions in the summer of Beijing: implication of regional secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Hu, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Slanina, J.; Zhao, Y. L.

    2010-02-01

    To characterize aerosol pollution in Beijing, size-resolved aerosols were collected by MOUDIs during CAREBEIJING-2006 field campaign at Peking University (urban site) and Yufa (upwind rural site). Fine particle concentrations (PM1.8 by MOUDI) were 99.8±77.4 μg/m3 and 78.2±58.4 μg/m3, with PM1.8/PM10 ratios of 0.64±0.08 and 0.76±0.08 at PKU and Yufa, respectively, and secondary compounds accounted for more than 50% in fine particles. PMF model analysis was used to resolve the particle modes. Three modes were resolved at Yufa, representing condensation, droplet and coarse mode. However, one more droplet mode with bigger size was resolved, which was considered probably from regional transport. Condensation mode accounted for 10%-60% of the total mass at both sites, indicating that the gas-to-particle condensation process was important in summer. The formation of sulfate was mainly attributed to in-cloud or aerosol droplet process (PKU 80%, Yufa 70%) and gas condensation process (PKU 14%, Yufa 22%). According to the thermodynamic instability of NH4NO3, size distributions of nitrate were classified as three categories by RH. The existence of Ca(NO3)2 in droplet mode indicated the reaction of HNO3 with crustal particles was also important in fine particles. A rough estimation was given that 69% of the PM10 and 87% of the PM1.8 in Beijing urban were regional contributions. Sulfate, ammonium and oxalate were formed regionally, with the regional contributions of 90%, 87% and 95% to PM1.8. Nitrate formation was local dominant. In summary regional secondary formation led to aerosol pollution in the summer of Beijing.

  1. Size-resolved aerosol water-soluble ionic compositions in the summer of Beijing: implication of regional secondary formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S.; Hu, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Slanina, J.; Zhao, Y. L.

    2009-11-01

    To characterize aerosol pollution in Beijing, size-resolved aerosols were collected by MOUDIs during CAREBEIJING-2006 field campaign at Peking University (urban site) and Yufa (upwind rural site). Fine particle concentrations (PM1.8 by MOUDI) were 99.8±77.4 μg/m3 and 78.2±58.4 μg/m3, with PM1.8/PM10 ratios of 0.64±0.08 and 0.76±0.08 at PKU and Yufa, respectively, and secondary compounds accounted for more than 50% in fine particles. PMF model was used to resolve the particle modes. Three modes were resolved at Yufa, representing condensation, droplet and coarse mode. However, one more droplet mode with bigger size was resolved, which was considered probably from regional transport. Condensation mode accounted for 10%-60% of the total mass at both sites, indicating it must be taken into account in summer. The formation of sulfate was mainly attributed to in-cloud or aerosol droplet process (PKU 80%, Yufa 70%) and gas condensation process (PKU 14%, Yufa 22%). According to the thermodynamic instability of NH4NO3, size distributions of nitrate were classified as three categories by RH. The existence of Ca(NO3)2 in droplet mode indicated the reaction of HNO3 with crustal particles was also important in fine particles. Linear regression gave a rough estimation that 69% of the PM10 and 87% of the PM1.8 at PKU were regional contributions. Sulfate, ammonium and oxalate were formed regionally, with the regional contributions of 90%, 87% and 95% to PM1.8. Nitrate formation was local dominant. In summary regional secondary formation led to aerosol pollution in the summer of Beijing.

  2. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements.

    PubMed

    Wang, P H; McCormick, M P; McMaster, L R; Chu, W P; Swissler, T J; Osborn, M T; Russell, P B; Oberbeck, V R; Livingston, J; Rosen, J M; Hofmann, D J; Grams, G W; Fuller, W H; Yue, G K

    1989-06-20

    This paper describes an investigation of the comprehensive aerosol correlative measurement experiments conducted between November 1984 and July 1986 for satellite measurement program of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The correlative sensors involved in the experiments consist of the NASA Ames Research Center impactor/laser probe, the University of Wyoming dustsonde, and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne 14-inch (36 cm) lidar system. The approach of the analysis is to compare the primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments with the calculated ones based on the aerosol size distributions retrieved from the SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. The analysis shows that the aerosol size distributions derived from the SAGE II observations agree qualitatively with the in situ measurements made by the impactor/laser probe. The SAGE II-derived vertical distributions of the ratio N0.15/N0.25 (where Nr is the cumulative aerosol concentration for particle radii greater than r, in micrometers) and the aerosol backscatter profiles at 0.532- and 0.6943-micrometer lidar wavelengths are shown to agree with the dustsonde and the 14-inch (36-cm) lidar observations, with the differences being within the respective uncertainties of the SAGE II and the other instruments. PMID:11539801

  3. Transport of Colloid-Size Oil Droplets in Saturated and Unsaturated Sand Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Travis, M.; Gross, A.

    2011-12-01

    Oil in wastewater poses significant treatment and subsequent environmental challenges. Accumulation of oils in soil leads to hydrophobicity, and the transport of colloidal-sized oil droplets may facilitate the co-transport of oil soluble contaminants such as pesticides or pharmaceutical materials. In order to determine transport characteristics of colloidal-sized, edible oil droplets, short-pulse column breakthrough experiments were conducted. Oil droplets (mean diameter 0.7 μm, ζ-potential -34±1, density 0.92 g cm-3) were injected simultaneously with latex microspheres (0.02, 0.2 and 1.0 μm, ζ-potentials -16±1, -30±2, and -49±1, respectively, density 1.055 g cm-3) and bromide in saturated and unsaturated quartz sand (ζ-potential -63±2 mV). Breakthrough of oil droplets was consistently detected first and recovery of oil droplets from the column was 20% greater than similarly sized microspheres in the saturated column, and 16% greater in high (0.18±0.01) volumetric water content (VWC) unsaturated columns. Higher variability was observed in the lower VWC (0.14±0.01) column experiments, and oil droplet recovery was just slightly greater than similarly sized microspheres and statistically higher only compared to the 0.02 μm microspheres. The research demonstrated that oil droplets are able to be transported as colloids in both saturated and unsaturated porous media. An important finding was that transport of oil droplets exceeded that of microspheres within the same size range and similar electrostatic properties. Classical filtration theory indicates that oil droplets in the diameter range of about 0.5 to 2 μm will exhibit reduced deposition due to buoyancy. However, current improvements to the theory do not accommodate prediction of buoyant particle transport and the theory needs review. High recovery of oil droplets in unsaturated porous media is a novel finding. As expected, straining appeared to be an important removal mechanism in unsaturated

  4. Aerodynamic size associations of natural radioactivity with ambient aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Bondietti, E.A.; Papastefanou, C.; Rangarajan, C.

    1986-04-01

    The aerodynamic size of /sup 214/Pb, /sup 212/Pb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 35/S (as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/), and stable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was measured using cascade impactors. The activity distribution of /sup 212/Pb and /sup 214/Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with aerosols smaller than 0.52 ..mu..m. Based on 46 measurements, the activity median aerodynamic diameter of /sup 212/Pb averaged 0.13 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.97), while /sup 214/Pb averaged 0.16 ..mu..m (sigma/sub g/ = 2.86). The larger median size of /sup 214/Pb was attributed to ..cap alpha..-recoil depletion of smaller aerosols following decay of aerosol-associated /sup 218/Po. Subsequent /sup 214/Pb condensation on all aerosols effectively enriches larger aerosols. /sup 212/Pb does not undergo this recoil-driven redistribution. Low-pressure impactor measurements indicated that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was about three times larger than the activity median diameter /sup 212/Pb, reflecting differences in atmospheric residence times as well as the differences in surface area and volume distributions of the atmospheric aerosol. Cosmogenic radionuclides, especially /sup 7/Be, were associated with smaller aerosols than SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ regardless of season, while /sup 210/Pb distributions in summer measurements were similar to sulfate but smaller in winter measurements. Even considering recoil following /sup 214/Po ..cap alpha..-decay, the avervage /sup 210/Pb labeled aerosol grows by about a factor of two during its atmospheric lifetime. The presence of 5 to 10% of the /sup 7/Be on aerosols greater than 1 ..mu..m was indicative of post-condensation growth, probably either in the upper atmosphere or after mixing into the boundary layer.

  5. Microfluidic production of single micrometer-sized hydrogel beads utilizing droplet dissolution in a polar solvent

    PubMed Central

    Sugaya, Sari; Yamada, Masumi; Hori, Ayaka; Seki, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic process is proposed for preparing monodisperse micrometer-sized hydrogel beads. This process utilizes non-equilibrium aqueous droplets formed in a polar organic solvent. The water-in-oil droplets of the hydrogel precursor rapidly shrunk owing to the dissolution of water molecules into the continuous phase. The shrunken and condensed droplets were then gelled, resulting in the formation of hydrogel microbeads with sizes significantly smaller than the initial droplet size. This study employed methyl acetate as the polar organic solvent, which can dissolve water at 8%. Two types of monodisperse hydrogel beads—Ca-alginate and chitosan—with sizes of 6–10 μm (coefficient of variation < 6%) were successfully produced. In addition, we obtained hydrogel beads with non-spherical morphologies by controlling the degree of droplet shrinkage at the time of gelation and by adjusting the concentration of the gelation agent. Furthermore, the encapsulation and concentration of DNA molecules within the hydrogel beads were demonstrated. The process presented in this study has great potential to produce small and highly concentrated hydrogel beads that are difficult to obtain by using conventional microfluidic processes. PMID:24396529

  6. Characterizations of particle size distribution of the droplets exhaled by sneeze.

    PubMed

    Han, Z Y; Weng, W G; Huang, Q Y

    2013-11-01

    This work focuses on the size distribution of sneeze droplets exhaled immediately at mouth. Twenty healthy subjects participated in the experiment and 44 sneezes were measured by using a laser particle size analyser. Two types of distributions are observed: unimodal and bimodal. For each sneeze, the droplets exhaled at different time in the sneeze duration have the same distribution characteristics with good time stability. The volume-based size distributions of sneeze droplets can be represented by a lognormal distribution function, and the relationship between the distribution parameters and the physiological characteristics of the subjects are studied by using linear regression analysis. The geometric mean of the droplet size of all the subjects is 360.1 µm for unimodal distribution and 74.4 µm for bimodal distribution with geometric standard deviations of 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. For the two peaks of the bimodal distribution, the geometric mean (the geometric standard deviation) is 386.2 µm (1.8) for peak 1 and 72.0 µm (1.5) for peak 2. The influences of the measurement method, the limitations of the instrument, the evaporation effects of the droplets, the differences of biological dynamic mechanism and characteristics between sneeze and other respiratory activities are also discussed. PMID:24026469

  7. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  8. Liquid water content and droplet size calibration of the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Robert F.

    1989-01-01

    The icing research tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center underwent a major rehabilitation in 1986 to 1987, necessitating recalibration of the icing cloud. The methods used in the recalibration, including the procedure used to establish a uniform icing cloud and the use of a standard icing blade technique for measurement of liquid water content are described. PMS Forward Scattering Spectrometer and Optical Array probes were used for measurement of droplet size. Examples of droplet size distributions are shown for several median volumetric diameters. Finally, the liquid water content/droplet size operating envelopes of the icing tunnel are shown for a range of airspeeds and are compared to the FAA icing certification criteria.

  9. Liquid water content and droplet size calibration of the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The icing research tunnel at the NASA Lewis Research Center underwent a major rehabilitation in 1986 to 1987, necessitating recalibration of the icing cloud. The methods used in the recalibration, including the procedure used to establish a uniform icing cloud and the use of a standard icing blade technique for measurement of liquid water content are described. PMS Forward Scattering Spectrometer and Optical Array probes were used for measurement of droplet size. Examples of droplet size distributions are shown for several median volumetric diameters. Finally, the liquid water content/droplet size operating envelopes of the icing tunnel are shown for a range of airspeeds and are compared to the FAA icing certification criteria.

  10. Changes in droplet surface tension affect the observed hygroscopicity of photochemically aged biomass burning aerosol.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Michael R; Short, Daniel Z; Hosseini, Seyedehsan; Lichtenberg, William; Asa-Awuku, Akua A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the hygroscopic and surface tension properties as a function of photochemical aging of the aerosol emissions from biomass burning. Experiments were conducted in a chamber setting at the UC-Riverside Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) Atmospheric Processes Lab using two biomass fuel sources, manzanita and chamise. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements and off-line filter sample analysis were conducted. The water-soluble organic carbon content and surface tension of the extracted filter samples were measured. Surface tension information was then examined with Köhler theory analysis to calculate the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Laboratory measurement of biomass burning smoke from two chaparral fuels is shown to depress the surface tension of water by 30% or more at organic matter concentrations relevant at droplet activation. Accounting for surface tension depression can lower the calculated κ by a factor of 2. This work provides evidence for surface tension depression in an important aerosol system and may provide closure for differing sub- and supersaturated κ measurements. PMID:23957441

  11. Effects of emulsion droplet sizes on the crystallisation of milk fat.

    PubMed

    Truong, Tuyen; Bansal, Nidhi; Sharma, Ranjan; Palmer, Martin; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2014-02-15

    The crystallisation properties of milk fat emulsions containing dairy-based ingredients as functions of emulsion droplet size, cooling rate, and emulsifier type were investigated using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Anhydrous milk fat and its fractions (stearin and olein) were emulsified with whey protein concentrate, sodium caseinate, and Tween80 by homogenisation to produce emulsions in various size ranges (0.13-3.10 μm). Particle size, cooling rate, and types of emulsifier all had an influence on the crystallisation properties of fat in the emulsions. In general, the crystallisation temperature of emulsified fats decreased with decreasing average droplet size and was of an exponent function of size, indicating that the influence of particle size on crystallisation temperature is more pronounced in the sub-micron range. This particle size effect was also verified by electron microscopy. PMID:24128537

  12. Numerical methods for the simulation of a coalescence-driven droplet size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordás, Róbert; John, Volker; Schmeyer, Ellen; Thévenin, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    The droplet size distribution in a turbulent flow field is considered and modeled by means of a population balance system. This paper studies different numerical methods for the 4D population balance equation and their impact on an output of interest, the time-space-averaged droplet size distribution at the outlet, which is known from experiments. These methods include different interpolations of the experimental data at the inlet, various discretizations in time and space, and different schemes for computing the coalescence integrals. It will be shown that noticeable changes in the output of interest might occur. In addition, the computational efficiency of the studied methods is discussed.

  13. Drop size measurement of liquid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Y. H.; Pui, D. Y. H.; Xian-Qing, Wang

    The factor B = D/ D' relating the diameter D of a spherical liquid drop to the diameter, D˜, of the same drop collected on a microscope slide has been measured for DOP (di-octyl phthalate) and oleic acid aerosols. The microscope slide was coated with a fluorocarbon, oleophobic surfactant (L-1428, 3M Co., St. Paul, MN). The ratio was found to be independent of drop diameter in the 2-50 μm range and the mean value of B was found to be 0.700 for oleic acid and 0.690 for DOP. Similar measurements for oleic acid and DOP drops collected on a clean, uncoated slide resulted in the values of 0.419 and 0.303, respectively. The experimental values of B were compared with the theoretical values based on contact angle measurements. Good agreement was obtained.

  14. Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yanan; Qiao, Li

    2011-02-15

    The burning characteristics of fuel droplets containing nano and micron-sized aluminum particles were investigated. Particle size, surfactant concentration, and the type of base fluid were varied. In general, nanosuspensions can last much longer than micron suspensions, and ethanol-based fuels were found to achieve much better suspension than n-decane-based fuels. Five distinctive stages (preheating and ignition, classical combustion, microexplosion, surfactant flame, and aluminum droplet flame) were identified for an n-decane/nano-Al droplet, while only the first three stages occurred for an n-decane/micron-Al droplet. For the same solid loading rate and surfactant concentration, the disruption and microexplosion behavior of the micron suspension occurred later with much stronger intensity. The intense droplet fragmentation was accompanied by shell rupture, which caused a massive explosion of particles, and most of them were burned during this event. On the contrary, for the nanosuspension, combustion of the large agglomerate at the later stage requires a longer time and is less complete because of formation of an oxide shell on the surface. This difference is mainly due to the different structure and characteristics of particle agglomerates formed during the early stage, which is a spherical, porous, and more-uniformly distributed aggregate for the nanosuspension, but it is a densely packed and impermeable shell for the micron suspension. A theoretical analysis was then conducted to understand the effect of particle size on particle collision mechanism and aggregation rate. The results show that for nanosuspensions, particle collision and aggregation are dominated by the random Brownian motion. For micron suspensions, however, they are dominated by fluid motion such as droplet surface regression, droplet expansion resulting from bubble formation, and internal circulation. And the Brownian motion is the least important. This theoretical analysis explains the

  15. Turbulent crude oil jets in crossflow: holographic measurements of droplet size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xinzhi; Murphy, David; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Buoyant, immiscible jets and plumes are created by subsurface oil well blowouts. In this experimental study, high speed visualizations and digital holography follow vertical crude oil turbulent jets of varying Reynolds and Ohnesorge numbers, all falling in the atomization range, while being towed in a towing tank generating `crossflows' at varying crossflow-to-exit speed velocity ratios. The droplet size distributions are measured using a submerged miniature holographic microscopy system, enabling comparison between the plume behavior and the droplet size distributions. Due to variations in rise-velocity with droplet size, the shape and dispersion rate of the plume depends on the interfacial tension. Hence, the crude oil plume rises faster than a `control' miscible oil analog with the same density and viscosity. Premixing the oil with dispersant (Corexit 9500A) at dispersant to oil (DOR) ratios of 1:100 and 1:25 reduces the oil-seawater interfacial tension by up to two orders of magnitude, promoting formation of micro-droplets. Hence, the plume rises at a slower rate, with the large droplets rapidly escaping, leaving smaller ones behind. Furthermore, for the DOR 1:25 case, some of the microdroplets are entrained into the vortices prominent in the wake region under the plume. Funding provided by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative.

  16. Direct and accurate measurement of size dependent wetting behaviors for sessile water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jimin; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jee-Wook; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Jeon, Hojeong

    2015-12-01

    The size-dependent wettability of sessile water droplets is an important matter in wetting science. Although extensive studies have explored this problem, it has been difficult to obtain empirical data for microscale sessile droplets at a wide range of diameters because of the flaws resulting from evaporation and insufficient imaging resolution. Herein, we present the size-dependent quantitative change of wettability by directly visualizing the three phase interfaces of droplets using a cryogenic-focused ion beam milling and SEM-imaging technique. With the fundamental understanding of the formation pathway, evaporation, freezing, and contact angle hysteresis for sessile droplets, microdroplets with diameters spanning more than three orders of magnitude on various metal substrates were examined. Wetting nature can gradually change from hydrophobic at the hundreds-of-microns scale to super-hydrophobic at the sub-μm scale, and a nonlinear relationship between the cosine of the contact angle and contact line curvature in microscale water droplets was demonstrated. We also showed that the wettability could be further tuned in a size-dependent manner by introducing regular heterogeneities to the substrate.

  17. Direct and accurate measurement of size dependent wetting behaviors for sessile water droplets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jimin; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jee-Wook; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Jeon, Hojeong

    2015-01-01

    The size-dependent wettability of sessile water droplets is an important matter in wetting science. Although extensive studies have explored this problem, it has been difficult to obtain empirical data for microscale sessile droplets at a wide range of diameters because of the flaws resulting from evaporation and insufficient imaging resolution. Herein, we present the size-dependent quantitative change of wettability by directly visualizing the three phase interfaces of droplets using a cryogenic-focused ion beam milling and SEM-imaging technique. With the fundamental understanding of the formation pathway, evaporation, freezing, and contact angle hysteresis for sessile droplets, microdroplets with diameters spanning more than three orders of magnitude on various metal substrates were examined. Wetting nature can gradually change from hydrophobic at the hundreds-of-microns scale to super-hydrophobic at the sub-μm scale, and a nonlinear relationship between the cosine of the contact angle and contact line curvature in microscale water droplets was demonstrated. We also showed that the wettability could be further tuned in a size-dependent manner by introducing regular heterogeneities to the substrate. PMID:26657208

  18. Size sorting of floating spheres based on Marangoni forces in evaporating droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendarto, Erwin; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-07-01

    The high throughput size sorting of particles in liquid suspensions is of interest for a variety of microanalytical and micromanufacturing applications. Hollow glass cenospheres of various diameters ranging from 5 to 200 µm are sorted according to size by evaporation of isopropyl alcohol droplets on an unpatterned glass substrate. By raising the temperature of the glass substrate, a stable Marangoni convection is developed inside the droplet. At a substrate temperature of 55 °C, more of the larger spheres (150-200 µm) are deposited near the droplet center, but smaller spheres <50 µm are found everywhere throughout the dried region. Better sorting is observed when the temperature of the substrate is above the boiling point of the liquid. When the substrate temperature is 85 °C, higher than the boiling point of IPA, most of the spheres <50 µm are transported close to the droplet edge. In the center of the dried pattern obtained from a 0.5 µl droplet, the spheres with >150 µm diameter outnumber those with <50 µm diameter by 6×. The deposited spheres remain attached to the substrate surface when dry. The self-assembled nature of this drying pattern results in size sorting.

  19. Direct and accurate measurement of size dependent wetting behaviors for sessile water droplets.

    PubMed

    Park, Jimin; Han, Hyung-Seop; Kim, Yu-Chan; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, Jee-Wook; Cha, Pil-Ryung; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Jeon, Hojeong

    2015-01-01

    The size-dependent wettability of sessile water droplets is an important matter in wetting science. Although extensive studies have explored this problem, it has been difficult to obtain empirical data for microscale sessile droplets at a wide range of diameters because of the flaws resulting from evaporation and insufficient imaging resolution. Herein, we present the size-dependent quantitative change of wettability by directly visualizing the three phase interfaces of droplets using a cryogenic-focused ion beam milling and SEM-imaging technique. With the fundamental understanding of the formation pathway, evaporation, freezing, and contact angle hysteresis for sessile droplets, microdroplets with diameters spanning more than three orders of magnitude on various metal substrates were examined. Wetting nature can gradually change from hydrophobic at the hundreds-of-microns scale to super-hydrophobic at the sub-μm scale, and a nonlinear relationship between the cosine of the contact angle and contact line curvature in microscale water droplets was demonstrated. We also showed that the wettability could be further tuned in a size-dependent manner by introducing regular heterogeneities to the substrate. PMID:26657208

  20. Three optical methods for remotely measuring aerosol size distributions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, J. A.; Herman, B. M.

    1971-01-01

    Three optical probing methods for remotely measuring atmospheric aerosol size distributions are discussed and contrasted. The particular detection methods which are considered make use of monostatic lidar (laser radar), bistatic lidar, and solar radiometer sensing techniques. The theory of each of these measurement techniques is discussed briefly, and the necessary constraints which must be applied to obtain aerosol size distribution information from such measurements are pointed out. Theoretical and/or experimental results are also presented which demonstrate the utility of the three proposed probing methods.

  1. Numerical study of nanosecond laser interactions with micro-sized single droplets and sprays of xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Auguste, T.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de; Ceccotti, T.; Hergott, J. F.; Sublemontier, O.; Descamps, D.; Schmidt, M.

    2007-02-15

    We present a thorough numerical study on interactions of a nanosecond laser with micro-sized xenon droplets. We developed a code which allows simulation of laser interactions with a single droplet as well as a spray. We give a detailed description of the code, and we present results on the dynamics of a microplasma produced by irradiation of a single xenon droplet with a laser focused at peak vacuum intensity in the 5x10{sup 10}-5x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} range. We find that the heating of the plasma depends dramatically on the laser parameters (duration, pulse shape, and intensity) on one hand, and on the droplet diameter on the other. We also present results obtained with a spray which show that the dynamics of the microplasmas is very sensitive to the position of the droplets in the interaction volume. The predictions of our model agree well with recent experimental observations performed on laser-produced plasma sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography. In particular, the postprocessing of our data with a sophisticated atomic physics code has allowed us to reproduce quite well the spectrum emitted in the extreme ultraviolet range by a xenon plasma generated by laser irradiation of a spray of droplets.

  2. 3D Droplet velocities and sizes in the Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, R.; Zeegers, J. C. H.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Michalek, W. R.

    2012-11-01

    The Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a known device that is used to generate spot cooling. In this study, we experimentally investigate the behavior of small water droplets in the vortex tube by means of Phase Doppler Particle Analysis. In an experimental vortex tube, droplets were injected together with a carrier gas to form a fast rotating (up to 80.000 rpm) droplet-gas mixture. Droplet sizes, 3D velocity components, and turbulent properties were measured, showing high intensity isotropic turbulence in the core region. To investigate the cause of the high intensity turbulence, a frequency analysis was applied on the measured velocity. The frequency spectrum of the velocity is presented and indicates that wobbling of the vortex axis is the cause of the high turbulence intensity. It was expected that larger droplets have a higher radial velocity because of the larger centrifugal force. Results show, however, that small and lager droplets behave similar. This research is supported by the Dutch Technology Foundation STW, which is the applied science division of NWO, and the Technology Programme of the Ministry of Economic Affairs.

  3. Transport phenomena in picoliter size solder droplet dispension on a composite substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Waldvogel, J.M.; Poulikakos, D.; Wallace, D.B.; Marusak, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a study of the presolidification fluid dynamics and heat transfer phenomena occurring during the impingement of a picoliter size liquid solder droplet upon a multi-layer, composite substrate. The theoretical model, based on the Lagrangian formulation, is solved numerically with the finite element method. A deforming mesh is utilized to accurately simulate the large deformations, as well as the domain nonuniformities characteristic of the spreading process. The occurrence of droplet recoiling and mass accumulation around the deposit periphery (which yields doughnut-shaped solder bumps) are standout features of the numerical simulations and yield a nonmonotonic dependence of the maximum radius on time. The results also document the transient temperature fields developing in both the solder droplet and the substrate during the impingement process. Convection effects on the temperature field development in a deforming droplet are found to be important for the entire history of spreading. These effects are demonstrated by the two-dimensional features of the temperature field in the droplet. The work is directly applicable to the miniature solder droplet dispension technology for the mounting of microscopic electronic components on various substrates under development at MicroFab Inc. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to solidified microscopic solder bumps obtained at MicroFab Inc.

  4. Systematic Relationships Between Lidar Observables And Sizes And Mineral Composition Of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Diedenhoven, B.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Fridlind, A. M.; Chowdhary, J.; Cairns, B.; Stangl, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The physical and chemical properties of soil dust aerosol particles fundamentally affect their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates on the surface of dust particles, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Lidar measurements, such as extinction-to-backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, are frequently used to distinguish between aerosol types with different physical and chemical properties. The chemical composition of aerosol particles determines their complex refractive index, hence affecting their backscattering properties. Here we present a study on how dust aerosol backscattering and depolarization properties at wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm are related to size and complex refractive index, which varies with the mineral composition of the dust. Dust aerosols are represented by collections of spheroids with a range of prolate and oblate aspect ratios and their optical properties are obtained using T-matrix calculations. We find simple, systematic relationships between lidar observables and the dust size and complex refractive index that may aid the use of space-based or airborne lidars for direct retrieval of dust properties or for the evaluation of chemical transport models using forward simulated lidar variables. In addition, we present first results on the spatial variation of forward-simulated lidar variables based on a dust model that accounts for the atmospheric cycle of eight different mineral types plus internal mixtures of seven mineral types with iron oxides, which was recently implemented in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE2.

  5. Systematic Relationships Between Lidar Observables and Sizes And Mineral Composition Of Dust Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Stangl, Alexander; Perlwitz, Jan; Fridlind, Ann M.; Chowdhary, Jacek; Cairns, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The physical and chemical properties of soil dust aerosol particles fundamentally affect their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates on the surface of dust particles, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Lidar measurements, such as extinction-to-backscatter, color and depolarization ratios, are frequently used to distinguish between aerosol types with different physical and chemical properties. The chemical composition of aerosol particles determines their complex refractive index, hence affecting their backscattering properties. Here we present a study on how dust aerosol backscattering and depolarization properties at wavelengths of 355, 532 and 1064 nm are related to size and complex refractive index, which varies with the mineral composition of the dust. Dust aerosols are represented by collections of spheroids with a range of prolate and oblate aspect ratios and their optical properties are obtained using T-matrix calculations. We find simple, systematic relationships between lidar observables and the dust size and complex refractive index that may aid the use of space-based or airborne lidars for direct retrieval of dust properties or for the evaluation of chemical transport models using forward simulated lidar variables. In addition, we present first results on the spatial variation of forward-simulated lidar variables based on a dust model that accounts for the atmospheric cycle of eight different mineral types plus internal mixtures of seven mineral types with iron oxides, which was recently implemented in the NASA GISS Earth System ModelE2.

  6. Endotoxin in Size-Separated Metal Working Fluid Aerosol Particles.

    PubMed

    Dahlman-Höglund, Anna; Lindgren, Åsa; Mattsby-Baltzer, Inger

    2016-08-01

    Patients with airway symptoms working in metal working industries are increasing, despite efforts to improve the environmental air surrounding the machines. Our aim was to analyse the amount of endotoxin in size-separated airborne particles of metal working fluid (MWF) aerosol, by using the personal sampler Sioutas cascade impactor, to compare filter types, and to compare the concentration of airborne endotoxin to that of the corresponding MWFs. In a pilot field study, aerosols were collected in two separate machine halls on totally 10 occasions, using glass fibre and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters in parallel at each station. Airborne endotoxin was distributed over all size fractions. While a major part was found in the largest size fraction (72%, 2.5-10 µm), up to 8% of the airborne endotoxin was detected in the smallest size fraction (<0.25 µm). Comparing the efficiency of the filter types, a significantly higher median endotoxin level was found with glass fibres filters collecting the largest particle-size fraction (1.2-fold) and with PTFE filters collecting the smallest ones (5-fold). The levels of endotoxin in the size-separated airborne particle fractions correlated to those of the MWFs supporting the aerosol-generating machines. Our study indicates that a significant part of inhalable aerosols of MWFs consists of endotoxin-containing particles below the size of intact bacteria, and thus small enough to readily reach the deepest part of the lung. Combined with other chemical irritants of the MWF, exposure to MWF aerosols containing endotoxin pose a risk to respiratory health problems. PMID:27268595

  7. Estimation of cloud droplet size distribution parameters from measurements of polarized reflection by the Research Scanning Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, M. D.; Cairns, B.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) is an airborne prototype for the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), which is due to be launched in 2009 as part of the NASA Glory Project. The RSP measures both polarized and total reflectances in 9 spectral channels with center wavelengths of 410, 470, 555, 670, 865, 960, 1590, 1880 and 2250 nm. The data from actual RSP scans is aggregated into "virtual" scans, each consisting of all reflectances (at a variety of scattering angles) from a single point on the ground or at the cloud top. This aggregation can be done using the aircraft attitude data (altitude, speed, pitch and crab angles), or statistically using a procedure based on cross-correlation between subsequent scans. For our cloud droplet size retrievals we utilize the dependences on the scattering angle of the polarized reflectances in 410, 865, and 2250 nm spectral channels. Our technique is based on the fact that the polarized reflectances of clouds within the scattering angle range between 140 and 170 degrees exhibit sharply defined structure ("rainbow"), which is determined mainly by single scattering properties of the cloud particles. The latter observation significantly simplifies both forward modeling and inversions, while also eliminating uncertainties from unknown aerosol load and possible presence of undetected clouds nearby. The dependence of the rainbow signature on the cloud droplet effective radius has the form of dilation of the curve along the scattering angle axis, while increase of the effective variance results in smoothing of the curve making the extrema less pronounced. Our fitting technique has 2 steps. On the first ("digital") step we count minima and maxima in the observed rainbow signature and match these numbers (give or take one) with those from the lookup table computed for the specific scattering range. On the next ("analog") step we directly look for the best fit (up to an arbitrary multiplier) among the plausible subset of forward

  8. Shock-induced behavior in micron-sized water aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Thomas C.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a suite of tools for studying aerosols behind shock waves. A Mie-extinction particle sizing diagnostic and a computational model, along with a specially designed square-section shock tube were developed to study the time-history of micrometer-sized aerosols behind shock waves. These tools are critically needed to pursue the use of shock tubes to study the combustion behavior of low-vapor-pressure fuels. While the facility is designed to study reactive systems, we began by measuring the behavior of water aerosols in the range of 1-10μm behind shock waves with temperatures between 450 and 600K and pressures between 0.64 and 1.1atm. From these data we determined evaporation rates and found a correlation that provides the noncontinuum evaporation rate in terms of the d2 evaporation rate and a correction function.

  9. Aircraft studies of size-dependent aerosol sampling through inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. N.; Clarke, A. D.; Ferry, G.; Pueschel, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Representative measurement of aerosol from aircraft-aspirated systems requires special efforts in order to maintain near isokinetic sampling conditions, estimate aerosol losses in the sample system, and obtain a measurement of sufficient duration to be statistically significant for all sizes of interest. This last point is especially critical for aircraft measurements which typically require fast response times while sampling in clean remote regions. This paper presents size-resolved tests, intercomparisons, and analysis of aerosol inlet performance as determined by a custom laser optical particle counter. Measurements discussed here took place during the Global Backscatter Experiment (1988-1989) and the Central Pacific Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (1988). System configurations are discussed including (1) nozzle design and performance, (2) system transmission efficiency, (3) nonadiabatic effects in the sample line and its effect on the sample-line relative humidity, and (4) the use and calibration of a virtual impactor.

  10. Modulation of isotropic turbulence by deformable droplets of Taylor lengthscale size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the effects of finite-size deformable droplets on decaying isotropic turbulence via direct numerical simulation (DNS). DNS is performed using the two-fluid pressure-correction method by Dodd and Ferrante [J. Comput. Phys. 273, 416 (2014)] coupled with the volume of fluid method by Baraldi et al. [Comput. & Fluids 96, 322 (2014)]. We fully-resolve the flow around and inside 3130 droplets of Taylor lengthscale size, resulting in a droplet volume fraction of 0.05. The initial Taylor lengthscale Reynolds number is Reλ0 = 75 , and the computational mesh has 10243 grid points. We analyze the effects on turbulence modulation of varying the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 <=μd /μc <= 100) and the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s velocity of turbulence (0 . 1 <=Werms <= 5). We discuss how varying these parameters affects the turbulence kinetic energy budget, and explain the physical mechanisms for such modulation. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, Grant Number OCI-1054591.

  11. APPARATUS AND PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINING OIL DROPLET SIZE DISTRIBUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This program was initiated to develop a method and apparatus for determining the oil drop size distribution in flowing oily brine during brine cleanup treatment. An automated photomicrographic apparatus for taking time-lapse photographs of oily brine that was briefly at rest is d...

  12. Effects of water hardness on spray droplet size under aerial application conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Minerals and organic matter in spray carrier water can reduce the effectiveness of some plant protection products. Water hardness has been found to have a significant impact of the efficacy of some crop protection materials and has shown conflicting influence on spray droplet size. The objectives ...

  13. The effects of spray application rate and droplet size on applications to control soybean rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of foliar soybean diseases such as Asian Soybean Rust requires good canopy penetration and thorough spray coverage. The purpose of this study was to examine how spray application rate and spray droplet size affect the efficacy of rust applications in wide-row (36 inch) soybean plantings....

  14. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS FOR AN OFFICE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses an evaluation of the effect of percent outdoor air supplied and occupation level on the particle size distributions and mass concentrations for a typical office building. (NOTE: As attention has become focused on indoor air pollution control, it has become i...

  15. The clouds of Venus. II - An investigation of the influence of coagulation on the observed droplet size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate numerical technique is used to investigate the influence of coagulation, sedimentation and turbulent motions on the observed droplet size distribution in the upper layers of the Venus clouds. If the cloud mass mixing ratio is less than 0.000001 at 250 K or the eddy diffusivity throughout the cloud is greater than 1,000,000 sq cm per sec, then coagulation is unimportant. In this case, the observed droplet size distribution is the initial size distribution produced by the condensation of the droplets. It is found that all cloud models with droplet formation near the cloud top (e.g., a photochemical model) must produce the observed droplet size distribution by condensation without subsequent modification by coagulation. However, neither meteoritic or surface dust can supply sufficient nucleating particles to account for the observed droplet number density. If the cloud droplets are formed near the cloud bottom, the observed droplet size distribution can be produced solely by the interaction of coagulation and dynamics; all information about the initial size distribution is lost. If droplet formation occurs near the cloud bottom, the lower atmosphere of Venus is oxidizing rather than reducing.

  16. Aerosolized droplet mediated self-assembly of photosynthetic pigment analogues and deposition onto substrates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vivek B; Biswas, Pratim

    2014-02-25

    Self-assembled photosynthetic molecules have a high extinction coefficient and a broad absorption in the infrared region, and these properties can be used to improve the efficiency of solar cells. We have developed a single-step method for the self-assembly of synthetic chlorin molecules (analogues of native bacteriochlorophylls) in aerosolized droplets, containing a single solvent and two solvents, to synthesize biomimetic light-harvesting structures. In the single-solvent approach, assembly is promoted by a concentration-driven process due to evaporation of the solvent. The peak absorbance of Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-phenyl-13(1)-oxophorbine (1) in methanol shifted from 646 nm to 725 nm (∼ 80 nm shift) after assembly, which is comparable to the shift observed in the naturally occurring assembly of bacteriochlorophyll c. Although assembly is thermodynamically favorable, the kinetics of self-assembly play an important role, and this was demonstrated by varying the initial concentration of the pigment monomer. To overcome kinetic limitations, a two-solvent approach using a volatile solvent (tetrahydrofuran) in which the dye is soluble and a less volatile solvent (ethanol) in which the dye is sparingly soluble was demonstrated to be effective. The effect of molecular structure is demonstrated by spraying the sterically hindered Zn(II) 3-(1-hydroxyethyl)-10-mesityl-13(1)-oxophorbine (2), which is an analogue of 1, under similar conditions. The results illustrate a valuable and facile aerosol-based method for the formation of films of supramolecular assemblies. PMID:24422474

  17. Droplet size distributions of adjuvant-amended sprays from an air-assisted five-port PWM nozzle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verification of droplet size distributions is essential for the development of real-time variable-rate sprayers that synchronize spray outputs with canopy structures. Droplet sizes from a custom-designed, air-assisted, five-port nozzle coupled with a pulse-width-modulated (PWM) solenoid valve were m...

  18. Visual Measurements of Droplet Size in Gas Liquid Annular Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Fore, L.B.; Ibrahim, B.B.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-07-01

    Drop size distributions have been measured for nitrogen-water annular flow in a 9.67 mm hydraulic diameter duct, at system pressures of 3.4 and 17 atm and a temperature of 38 C. These new data extend the range of conditions represented by existing data in the open literature, primarily through an increase in system pressure. Since most existing correlations were developed from data obtained at lower pressures, it should be expected that the higher-pressure data presented in this paper would not necessarily follow those correlations. The correlation of Tatterson, et al. (1977) does not predict the new data very well, while the correlation of Kataoka, et al. (1983) only predicts those data taken at the lower pressure of 3.4 atm. However, the maximum drop size correlation of Kocamustafaogullari, et al. (1994) does predict the current data to a reasonable approximation. Similarly, their correlation for the Sauter mean diameter can predict the new data, provided the coefficient in the equation is adjusted.

  19. Effects of Droplet Size on Intrusion of Sub-Surface Oil Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Eric; Chan, Godine; Wang, Dayang

    2014-11-01

    We explore effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion and transport in sub-surface oil spills. Negatively buoyant glass beads released continuously to a stratified ambient simulate oil droplets in a rising multiphase plume, and distributions of settled beads are used to infer signatures of surfacing oil. Initial tests used quiescent conditions, while ongoing tests simulate currents by towing the source and a bottom sled. Without current, deposited beads have a Gaussian distribution, with variance increasing with decreasing particle size. Distributions agree with a model assuming first order particle loss from an intrusion layer of constant thickness, and empirically determined flow rate. With current, deposited beads display a parabolic distribution similar to that expected from a source in uniform flow; we are currently comparing observed distributions with similar analytical models. Because chemical dispersants have been used to reduce oil droplet size, our study provides one measure of their effectiveness. Results are applied to conditions from the `Deep Spill' field experiment, and the recent Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and are being used to provide ``inner boundary conditions'' for subsequent far field modeling of these events. This research was made possible by grants from Chevron Energy Technology Co., through the Chevron-MITEI University Partnership Program, and BP/The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative, GISR.

  20. Oil Droplet Size Distribution and Optical Properties During Wave Tank Simulated Oil Spills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conmy, R. N.; Venosa, A.; Courtenay, S.; King, T.; Robinson, B.; Ryan, S.

    2013-12-01

    Fate and transport of spilled petroleum oils in aquatic environments is highly dependent upon oil droplet behavior which is a function of chemical composition, dispersibility (natural and chemically-enhanced) and droplet size distribution (DSD) of the oil. DSD is influenced by mixing energy, temperature, salinity, pressure, presence of dissolved and particulate materials, flow rate of release, and application of dispersants. To better understand DSD and droplet behavior under varying physical conditions, flask-scale experiments are often insufficient. Rather, wave tank simulations allow for scaling to field conditions. Presented here are experiment results from the Bedford Institute of Oceanography wave tank facility, where chemically-dispersed (Corexit 9500; DOR = 1:20) Louisiana Sweet crude, IFO-120 and ANS crude oil were exposed to mixing energies to achieve dispersant effectiveness observed in the field. Oil plumes were simulated, both surface and subsea releases with varying water temperature and flow rate. Fluorometers (Chelsea Technologies Group AQUATracka, Turner Designs Cyclops, WET Labs Inc ECO) and particle size analyzers (Sequoia LISST) were used to track the dispersed plumes in the tank and characterize oil droplets. Sensors were validated with known oil volumes (down to 300 ppb) and measured Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) and Benzene-Toluene-Ethylbenzene-Xylene (BTEX) values. This work has large implications for tracking surface and deep sea oil plumes with fluorescence and particle size analyzers, improved weathering and biodegradation estimates, and understanding the fate and transport of spill oil.

  1. Droplet size prediction in the production of drug delivery microsystems by ultrasonic atomization

    PubMed Central

    Dalmoro, Annalisa; d’Amore, Matteo; Barba, Anna Angela

    Microencapsulation processes of drugs or other functional molecules are of great interest in pharmaceutical production fields. Ultrasonic assisted atomization is a new technique to produce microencapsulated systems by mechanical approach. It seems to offer several advantages (low level of mechanical stress in materials, reduced energy request, reduced apparatuses size) with respect to more conventional techniques. In this paper the groundwork of atomization is briefly introduced and correlations to predict droplet size starting from process parameters and material properties are presented. PMID:24251250

  2. Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, William; de Gouw, Joost; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-11

    Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California, from 15 May to 4 June 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (κCCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of κCCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on κCCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (κorg) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived κorg generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in κorg could be explained by the variation of the organic O : C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded κorg = (0.83 ± 0.06) × (O:C) + (-0.19 ± 0.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, κorg derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O : C atomic ratio and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O : C greater than 0.5.

  3. Nanometer aerosol size analyzer (nASA) and data inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hee Siew

    A fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds was developed. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (Po 210), an extended-length Nano DMA, and an electrometer. This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time induced smearing. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr, corresponding to measurement at an altitude of 10 km. The second part of this study is devoted to the selection of an accurate data inversion algorithm. From the simulation results, it is found that MICRON provides the most stable solutions with good accuracy and reasonable convergent speed especially when aerosol distribution functions are bi-modal. All subsequent nASA measurement results are inverted using the MICRON algorithm. A second generation nASA was developed for the later series of engine exhaust measurements. Several improvements are implemented to the nASA to enhance its performance and ease of use. First, its physical size is reduced and the capability for controlling the DMA flow rates via computer software is added. The former improves the portability of the instrument and the latter allows the nASA to have an wider aerosol size ranges. Finally, the system was used in the EXperiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace species Emissions (EXCAVATE) workshop to investigate aerosol size distribution from a Boeing 757 engine. The results show that the aerosol size distributions from the engine are

  4. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate

    PubMed Central

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  5. Growth and wetting of water droplet condensed between micron-sized particles and substrate.

    PubMed

    Quang, Tran Si Bui; Leong, Fong Yew; An, Hongjie; Tan, Beng Hau; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    We study heterogeneous condensation growth of water droplets on micron-sized particles resting on a level substrate. Through numerical simulations on equilibrium droplet profiles, we find multiple wetting states towards complete wetting of the particle. Specifically, a partially wetting droplet could undergo a spontaneous transition to complete wetting during condensation growth, for contact angles above a threshold minimum. In addition, we find a competitive wetting behavior between the particle and the substrate, and interestingly, a reversal of the wetting dependence on contact angles during late stages of droplet growth. Using quasi-steady assumption, we simulate a growing droplet under a constant condensation flux, and the results are in good agreement with our experimental observations. As a geometric approximation for particle clusters, we propose and validate a pancake model, and with it, show that a particle cluster has greater wetting tendency compared to a single particle. Together, our results indicate a strong interplay between contact angle, capillarity and geometry during condensation growth. PMID:27487977

  6. Annular flow of R-134a through a high aspect ratio duct: Local void fraction, droplet velocity and droplet size measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trabold, T.A.; Kumar, R.; Vassallo, P.F.

    1998-11-01

    Local measurements were made in annular flow of R-134a through a vertical duct. Using a gamma densitometer, hot-film anemometer and laser Doppler velocimeter, profiles of void fraction, liquid droplet frequency and droplet velocity were acquired across the narrow test section dimension. Based upon these results, data for liquid droplet size were obtained and compared to previous experimental results from the literature. These data are useful for developing an improved understanding of practical two-phase refrigerant flows, and for assessment of advanced two-fluid computer codes.

  7. Some Algorithms For Simulating Size-resolved Aerosol Dynamics Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debry, E.; Sportisse, B.

    The objective of this presentation is to show some algorithms used to solve aerosol dynamics in 3D dispersion models. INTRODUCTION The gas phase pollution has been widely studied and some models are now available . The situation is quite different with respect to atmospheric aerosols . However at- mospheric particulate matter significantly influences atmospheric properties such as radiative balance, cloud formation, gas pollutants concentrations ( gas to particle con- version ), and has an impact on man health. As aerosols properties ( optical, hygroscopic, noxiousness ) depend mainly on their size, it appears important to be able to follow the aerosol ( or particle ) size distribution (PSD) during time. This former is modified by physical processes as coagulation, condensation or evaporation, nucleation and removal. Aerosol dynamics is usually modelized by the well-known General Dynamics Equation (GDE) [1]. MODELS Several models already exist to solve this equation. Multi-modal models are widely used [2] [3] because of the few parameters needed, but the GDE is solved only on its moments and the PSD is assumed to remain in a log-normal form. On the contrary, size-resolved models implies a discretization of the aerosol size spec- trum into several bins and to solve the GDE within each one. This step can be per- formed either by resolving each process separately ( splitting ), for example coagula- tion can be resolved by the well-known "size-binning" algorithms [4] and condensa- tion leads to an advection equation on the PSD [5], or by coupling all processes, what the finite elements [6] and stochastic methods [7] allows. Stochastic algorithms may not be competitive compared to deterministic ones with respect to the computation time, but they provide reference solutions useful to validate more operational codes on realistic cases, as analytic solutions of the GDE exist only for academic cases. REFERENCES [1] Seinfeld, J.H. and Pandis,S.N. Atmospheric chemistry and

  8. Contact freezing efficiency of mineral dust aerosols studied in an electrodynamic balance: quantitative size and temperature dependence for illite particles.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nadine; Duft, Denis; Kiselev, Alexei; Leisner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Contact freezing has long been discussed as a candidate for cloud ice formation at temperatures warmer than about -25 degrees C, but until now the molecular mechanism underlying this process has remained obscure and little quantitative information about the size and temperature dependent contact freezing properties of the various aerosol species is available. In this contribution, we present the first quantitative measurements of the freezing probability of a supercooled droplet upon a single contact with a size selected illite mineral particle. It is found that this probability is a strong function of temperature and aerosol particle size. For the particles investigated and on the minute time scale of the experiment, contact freezing indeed dominates immersion freezing for all temperatures. PMID:24601013

  9. Angular diagram of broadband emission of millimeter-sized water droplets exposed to gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Geints, Yurii E; Zemlyanov, Alexander A; Kabanov, Andrey M; Bykova, Elena E; Apeksimov, Dmitrii V; Bukin, Oleg A; Sokolova, Ekaterina B; Golik, Sergey S; Ilyin, Aleksey A

    2011-09-20

    We report on the experiments on the interaction of gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses with suspended millimeter-sized water droplets. The transparent droplets experienced laser-induced breakdown and explosive boiling up and emitted a broadband radiation. This radiation covers the spectral range from 450 to 1100 nm and consists of the spectrum of laser pulse scattered and transformed by the droplet due to self-phase modulation and plasma emission produced in water during photoionization. The droplet emission spectrum showed remarkable broadening at all viewing angles and is maximal in the direction of the laser exit from the droplet. The enlargement of the droplet results in additional spectral spreading of the emitted radiation. The depth and amount of laser pulse spectral self-transformations upon propagation through the water droplet are simulated by means of numerical calculations. PMID:21947048

  10. Influenza A virus transmission via respiratory aerosols or droplets as it relates to pandemic potential.

    PubMed

    Richard, Mathilde; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2016-01-01

    Many respiratory viruses of humans originate from animals. For instance, there are now eight paramyxoviruses, four coronaviruses and four orthomxoviruses that cause recurrent epidemics in humans but were once confined to other hosts. In the last decade, several members of the same virus families have jumped the species barrier from animals to humans. Fortunately, these viruses have not become established in humans, because they lacked the ability of sustained transmission between humans. However, these outbreaks highlighted the lack of understanding of what makes a virus transmissible. In part triggered by the relatively high frequency of occurrence of influenza A virus zoonoses and pandemics, the influenza research community has started to investigate the viral genetic and biological traits that drive virus transmission via aerosols or respiratory droplets between mammals. Here we summarize recent discoveries on the genetic and phenotypic traits required for airborne transmission of zoonotic influenza viruses of subtypes H5, H7 and H9 and pandemic viruses of subtypes H1, H2 and H3. Increased understanding of the determinants and mechanisms of respiratory virus transmission is not only key from a basic scientific perspective, but may also aid in assessing the risks posed by zoonotic viruses to human health, and preparedness for such risks. PMID:26385895

  11. Variations in Aerosol Size and Number during Discover-Aq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission is a multi-year campaign designed to improve the use of satellites to monitor surface-level air quality. DISCOVER-AQ is addressing its goals by conducting a series of coordinated ground-based and flight experiments over urban areas with well-established air quality issues to obtain vertically resolved measurements of trace gas and aerosol components for comparing with satellite observations of column-integrated quantities. The first flight mission was conducted over the Washington D.C. - Baltimore metropolitan area during July, 2011. It consisted of 14 science flights by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility P-3B aircraft over 6 highly-instrumented ground sites located around Baltimore. This region frequently violates ambient air quality standards for particulate matter as well as ozone and has a complex mixture of biogenic and anthropogenic sources. A large suite of aerosol instruments were flown onboard the P-3B aircraft to measure the microphysical, optical and chemical properties of aerosols during spirals over the ground sites and during low level flights over Interstates 95 and 695 connecting Washington and Baltimore. The package included condensation nuclei (CN) counters to provide measurements of total aerosols greater than 3 nm (UCN) and 10 nm (CN); a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure size in the 10 to 300 nm diameter range; an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS) for sizing 90 to 1000 nm diameter particles, and a Laser Aerosol Spectrometer for sizing 100 to 7500 nm particles. This presentation examines the variability of aerosol size and number in both time and space over the Baltimore metropolitan region. Within the atmospheric boundary layer between 0.3 and 1 km, particle number densities and size distributions varied considerable over short time periods and across horizontal distances

  12. Relationship Between Aerosol Number Size Distribution and Atmospheric Electric Potential Gradient in an Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Matthew; Matthews, James; Bacak, Asan; Silva, Hugo; Priestley, Michael; Percival, Carl; Shallcross, Dudley

    2016-04-01

    Small ions are created in the atmosphere by ground based radioactive decay and solar and cosmic radiation ionising the air. The ionosphere is maintained at a high potential relative to the Earth due to global thunderstorm activity, a current from the ionosphere transfers charge back to the ground through the weakly ionised atmosphere. A potential gradient (PG) exists between the ionosphere and the ground that can be measured in fair weather using devices such as an electric field mill. PG is inversely-proportional to the conductivity of the air and therefore to the number of ions of a given electrical mobility; a reduction of air ions will cause an increase of PG. Aerosols in the atmosphere act as a sink of air ions with an attachment rate dependent on aerosol size distribution and ion mobility. These relationships have been used to infer high particulate, and hence pollution, levels in historic datasets of atmospheric PG. A measurement campaign was undertaken in Manchester, UK for three weeks in July and August where atmospheric PG was measured with an electric field mill (JCI131, JCI Chilworth) on a second floor balcony, aerosol size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI3936), aerosol concentration measured with a condensation particle counter (CPC, Grimm 5.403) and local meteorological measurements taken on a rooftop measurement site ~200 m away. Field mill and CPC data were taken at 1 s intervals and SMPS data in 2.5 minute cycles. Data were excluded for one hour either side of rainfall as rainclouds and droplets can carry significant charge which would affect PG. A quantity relating to the attachment of ions to aerosol (Ion Sink) was derived from the effective attachment coefficient of the aerosols. Further measurements with the field mill and CPC were taken at the same location in November 2015 when bonfire events would be expected to increase aerosol concentrations. During the summer measurements, particle number count (PNC

  13. Optics of Water Cloud Droplets Mixed with Black-Carbon Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Cairns, Brian; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    We use the recently extended superposition T-matrix method to calculate scattering and absorption properties of micrometer-sized water droplets contaminated by black carbon. Our numerically exact results reveal that, depending on the mode of soot-water mixing, the soot specific absorption can vary by a factor exceeding 6.5. The specific absorption is maximized when the soot material is quasi-uniformly distributed throughout the droplet interior in the form of numerous small monomers. The range of mixing scenarios captured by our computations implies a wide range of remote sensing and radiation budget implications of the presence of black carbon in liquid-water clouds. We show that the popular Maxwell-Garnett effective-medium approximation can be used to calculate the optical cross sections, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry parameter for the quasi-uniform mixing scenario, but is likely to fail in application to other mixing scenarios and in computations of the elements of the scattering matrix.

  14. An Oil-Stream Photomicrographic Aeroscope for Obtaining Cloud Liquid-Water Content and Droplet Size Distributions in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Paul T.

    1956-01-01

    An airborne cloud aeroscope by which droplet size, size distribution, and liquid-water content of clouds can be determined has been developed and tested in flight and in wind tunnels with water sprays. In this aeroscope the cloud droplets are continuously captured in a stream of oil, which Is then photographed by a photomicrographic camera. The droplet size and size distribution can be determined directly from the photographs. With the droplet size distribution known, the liquid-water content of the cloud can be computed from the geometry of the aeroscope, the airspeed, and the oil-flow rate. The aeroscope has the following features: Data are obtained semi-automatically, and permanent data are taken in the form of photographs. A single picture usually contains a sufficient number of droplets to establish the droplet size distribution. Cloud droplets are continuously captured in the stream of oil, but pictures are taken at Intervals. The aeroscope can be operated in icing and non-icing conditions. Because of mixing of oil in the instrument, the droplet-distribution patterns and liquid-water content values from a single picture are exponentially weighted average values over a path length of about 3/4 mile at 150 miles per hour. The liquid-water contents, volume-median diameters, and distribution patterns obtained on test flights and in the Lewis icing tunnel are similar to previously published data.

  15. Influence of Droplet Size on the Growth of Self-Catalyzed Ternary GaAsP Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunyan; Sanchez, Ana M; Sun, Yue; Wu, Jiang; Aagesen, Martin; Huo, Suguo; Kim, Dongyoung; Jurczak, Pamela; Xu, Xiulai; Liu, Huiyun

    2016-02-10

    The influences of droplet size on the growth of self-catalyzed ternary nanowires (NWs) were studied using GaAsP NWs. The size-induced Gibbs-Thomson (GT) effect makes the smaller catalytic droplets have lower effective supersaturations and hence slower nucleation rates than the larger ones. Large variation in droplet size thus led to the growth of NWs with low uniformity, while a good size uniformity of droplets resulted in the production of highly uniform NWs. Moreover, thinner NWs were observed to be richer in P, indicating that P is more resistant to the GT effect than As because of a higher chemical potential inside Ga droplets. These results provide useful information for understanding the mechanisms of self-catalyzed III-V NW nucleation and growth with the important ternary III-V material systems. PMID:26708002

  16. Influence of palmitoyl pentapeptide and Ceramide III B on the droplet size of nanoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondari, Dewi; Haryono, Agus; Harmami, Sri Budi; Randy, Ahmad

    2010-05-01

    The influence of the Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPp) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm III B) as active ingredients on the droplet size of nano-emulsion was studied using different kinds of oil (avocado oil, sweet almond oil, jojoba oil, mineral oil and squalene). The formation of nano-emulsions were prepared in water mixed non ionic surfactant/oils system using the spontaneous emulsification mechanism. The aqueous solution, which consist of water and Tween® 20 as a hydrophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously. The organic solution, which consist of oil and Span® 80 as a lipophilic surfactant was mixed homogenously in ethanol. Ethanol was used as a water miscible solvent, which can help the formation of nano-emulsion. The oil phase (containing the blend of surfactant Span® 80, ethanol, oil and active ingredient) and the aqueous phase (containing water and Tween® 20) were separately prepared at room temperatures. The oil phase was slowly added into aqueous phase under continuous mechanical agitation (18000 rpm). All samples were subsequently homogenized with Ultra-Turrax for 30 minutes. The characterizations of nano-emulsion were carried out using photo-microscope and particle size analyzer. Addition of active ingredients on the formation of nano-emulsion gave smallest droplet size compared without active ingredients addition on the formation of nano-emulsion. Squalene oil with Palmitoyl Pentapeptide (PPm) and Ceramide IIIB (Cm IIIB) gave smallest droplet size (184.0 nm) compared without Palmitoyl Pentapeptide and Ceramide IIIB (214.9 nm), however the droplets size of the emulsion prepared by the other oils still in the range of nano-emulsion (below 500 nm). The stability of nano-emulsion was observed using two methods. In one method, the stability of nano-emulsion was observed for three months at temperature of 5°C and 50°C, while in the other method, the stability nano-emulsion was observed by centrifuged at 12000 rpm for 30 minutes. Nanoemulsion with active ingredient

  17. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2016-02-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from the Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi, Russia, are analyzed. Tiksi is located in a region where in situ information on aerosol particle properties has not been previously available. Particle size distributions were measured with a differential mobility particle sizer (in the diameter range of 7-500 nm) and with an aerodynamic particle sizer (in the diameter range of 0.5-10 μm). Source region effects on particle modal features and number, and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July, with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June (0.42 μg m-3) and in September-October (0.36-0.57 μg m-3). These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated processes and phenomena such as Arctic haze in early spring, which increases accumulation and coarse-mode numbers, and secondary particle formation in spring and summer, which affects the nucleation and Aitken mode particle concentrations. Secondary particle formation was frequently observed in Tiksi and was shown to be slightly more common in marine, in comparison to continental, air flows. Particle formation rates were the highest in spring, while the particle growth rates peaked in summer. These results suggest two different origins for secondary particles, anthropogenic pollution being the important source in spring and biogenic emissions being significant in summer. The impact of temperature-dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant: the increase in both the particle mass and the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) number with temperature was found to be higher than in any previous study done over the boreal forest region. In addition

  18. Characterization of the Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) for size-resolved quantitative measurements of ice nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Ryan; Si, Meng; Li, Jixiao; Huffman, J. Alex; McCluskey, Christina; Levin, Ezra; Irish, Victoria; Chou, Cédric; Hill, Thomas; Ladino, Luis; Yakobi, Jacqueline; Schiller, Corinne; Abbatt, Jon; DeMott, Paul; Bertram, Allan

    2014-05-01

    Ice formation within a cloud system can significantly modify its lifetime and radiative forcing. Many current instruments for measuring atmospheric concentrations of ice nuclei (IN) are not capable of providing size-resolved information. Such knowledge is useful in identifying the sources of IN and predicting their transport in the atmosphere. Furthermore, those that use size-discrimination to identify IN typically exclude particles with an aerodynamic diameter greater than 2.5 μm from analysis. Several studies have indicated this may be an important size regime for IN, particularly with those activating at warmer temperatures. The recently developed Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor-droplet freezing technique (MOUDI-DFT) addresses these limitations through combining sample collection by a model of cascade impactor with an established immersion freezing apparatus. Here we present a characterization of the MOUDI-DFT and the development of a modified technique which address experimental uncertainties arising from sample deposit inhomogeneity and the droplet freezing method. An intercomparison with a continuous-flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) was performed. We also show preliminary results from a campaign undertaken in a remote coastal region of western Canada. Correlations between atmospheric IN concentrations and the abundance of suspended submicron and supermicron particles, biological aerosols, carbonaceous aerosols, and prevailing meteorological conditions were investigated.

  19. Initial Droplet Size Impacts pH-Induced Structural Changes in Phase-Separated Polymer Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Thongkaew, Chutima; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of pH change on the morphology of whey protein isolate (WPI)-pectin dispersions obtained from phase-separated systems after mild shear was studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mixing speed on the initial particle size of biopolymer complexes and their structure morphology after sequentially changing the pH. Therefore, solutions of WPI and pectin were combined at pH 6.1, allowed to phase separate and were then mildly homogenized at 50, 100, and 150 rpm, respectively, to form a dispersion containing differently sized WPI droplets in a surrounding pectin-rich phase. Each dispersion was then subjected to a pH change, such as 6.1 to 5.2 and 3.2, by slowly adding hydrochloric acid. The systems morphology, size, appearance, rheology, and storage stability was then characterized by optical microscopy, static light scattering, visual inspections, and steady shear rheometry to gain insights into the structural rearrangements. Results indicated substantial changes in the structure of the dispersion when the pH was changed. Formation of core-shell structures from the WPI droplets was observed at an intermediate pH. There, initial droplet size was found to affect structures formed, that is, core-shell type particles would only form if droplets were large (>1.5 μm) prior to pH change. Insights gained may be of importance to food manufacturers intending to create new structures from mixtures of proteins and carbohydrates. PMID:27061600

  20. Size determination of mixed liquid and frozen water droplets using interferometric out-of-focus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot Kielar, Justin; Wu, Yingchun; Coëtmellec, Sébastien; Lebrun, Denis; Gréhan, Gérard; Brunel, Marc

    2016-07-01

    We record simultaneously interferometric out-of-focus images and digital in-line holograms of liquid and frozen water droplets. We show that the analysis of speckle-like out-of-focus images allows a quantitative estimation of the size of the particles which is corroborated by numerical reconstruction of holograms recorded simultaneously. Interferometric out-of-focus imaging could be extended to the characterization of ice in clouds in the atmosphere.

  1. Environmental and spray mixture effects on droplet size represented by water sensitive paper used in spray studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water sensitive paper (WSP) cards are frequently used to provide visual representation of droplet size and density for spray drift and deposition studies. Droplets collected on WSP spread out on the surface of the paper, and standard “spread factor” equations are used to compensate for spread to cha...

  2. Droplet Size Distributions Resulting form Entrainment of Surface Oil Slick by Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    A spectrum of droplet sizes, ranging from submicron to several millimeters, is generated by breaking waves impinging on an oil slick. Their size distribution is crucial for modeling the fate of oil spill, and understanding the underlying flow physics. Digital holography microscopy (DHM) is used for measuring the droplet size distributions at high resolution (1.1 μm/pixel), and at varying temporal scale, from the initial plunging phase (seconds) to long term (hours). The time-resolved DHM data is acquired simultaneously with high speed visualizations of the breakup and large scale features of the entrainment process. Experimental conditions include: (i) plunging and spilling breakers with wave heights of 28.8, 24.9, 22.28 cm; (ii) crude oil (MC252 surrogate), and oil premixed with dispersants (Corexit-9500A) giving two order of magnitude range of water-oil interfacial tension; (iii) Crude, fish, and motor oils with viscosity of 9.4, 63.1 and 306.5 cst, respectively. Shortly after entrainment of crude oil, the droplet radius distribution is bimodal, with a primary peak in the 0-25 μm range, and a secondary peak at 200-250 μm. Adding dispersants reduces the latter to 150 μm. The drastic reduction in interfacial tension upon introduction of dispersants increases the primary peak, and causes short term micro threading. The Secondary peaks dampen within seconds, as the larger droplets rise, whereas the primary peaks are sustained for longer periods. Supported by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  3. Aged boreal biomass burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ∼1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter), σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.05-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8 (the ranges are due to uncertainty in the entrainment rate). Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is relatively unconstrained due to the uncertainties in

  4. Concentrations and size distributions of Antarctic stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Neish, E.; Schultz, M.

    1989-01-01

    Particle Measuring Systems laser particle spectrometer (ASAS-X and FSSP) probes were used to measure aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions during 11 ER-2 flights between Punta Arenas (53 deg S) and Antarctica (up to 72 deg S) from August 17 to September 22, 1987. The time resolution was 10 s, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 2 km. The data were divided into two size classes (0.05-0.25 and 0.53-5.5 micron radius) to separate the small particle from the coarse particle populations. Results show that the small-particle concentrations are typical for a background aerosol during volcanic quiescence. This concentration is generally constant along a flight track; in only one instance a depletion of small particles during a polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) encounter was measured, suggesting a nucleation of type I PSC particles on background aerosols. Temporary increases of the coarse particle concentrations indicated the presence of tenuous polar stratospheric clouds that were encountered most frequently at the southernmost portion of a flight track and when the aircraft descended to lower altitudes. During 'particle events', particle modes were found at 0.6-micron radius, corresponding to type I PSCs, and occasionally, at 2.0-micron radius corresponding to type II PSCs.

  5. Particle size influences aerosol deposition in guinea pigs during bronchoconstriction

    SciTech Connect

    Praud, J.P.; Macquin-Mavier, I.; Wirquin, V.; Meignan, M.; Harf, A.

    1986-03-01

    The role of two factors determining the deposition of aerosols in the respiratory tract was investigated: the particle size and the nature of the airflow in the airways. An aerosol of Tc99 m-DTPA was generated, with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of either 3 ..mu..m (Bird nebulizer) or 0.5 ..mu..m (Jouan nebulizer). The vehicle was either saline (S) or histamine (H) at a concentration which was previously shown to induce a 50% decrease of specific airway conductance. Spontaneously breathing guinea pigs were exposed during 2 minutes to the aerosol, then killed and the radioactivity in the pharynx, the trachea, the large bronchi and the remaining parenchyma was measured. Results are evaluated as the percentage of total radioactivity in the respiratory tract (mean +/- SEM). Analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference in the pattern of deposition for large particles (3 ..mu..m) during bronchoconstriction: the more proximal deposition can be ascribed to inertial impaction. Particle size should be clearly defined during histamine challenge in experimental animals.

  6. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  7. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m3/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m3 (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m3 (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources. PMID:26644919

  8. The vertical distribution of Martian aerosol particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Smith, Michael D.; Wolff, Michael J.

    2014-12-01

    Using approximately 410 limb-viewing observations from the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM), we retrieve the vertical distribution of Martian dust and water ice aerosol particle sizes. We find that dust particles have an effective radius of 1.0 µm over much of the atmospheric column below 40 km throughout the Martian year. This includes the detached tropical dust layers detected in previous studies. Little to no variation with height is seen in dust particle size. Water ice clouds within the aphelion cloud belt exhibit a strong sorting of particle size with height, however, and the effective radii range from >3 µm below 20 km to near 1.0 µm at 40 km altitude. Conversely, water ice clouds in the seasonal polar hoods show a near-uniform particle size with an effective radius of approximately 1.5 µm throughout the atmospheric column.

  9. Correlating droplet size with temperature changes in electrospray source by optical methods.

    PubMed

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Dagany, Xavier; Dugourd, Philippe; Girod, Marion; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2015-08-18

    We investigated how the temperature and size of charged droplets are affected by the electrospray ionization (ESI) process, using in situ measurements involving laser-induced fluorescence and Mie scattering on a thermal gradient focusing ESI source. Rhodamine dyes were employed as temperature indicators using ratiometric intensity-based fluorescence techniques. The results were compared to lifetime-based techniques using tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate, [Ru(bpy)3](2+). Both methods gave similar profiles. Nevertheless, the precision and sensitivity were higher for lifetime-based techniques in comparison to intensity-based techniques. Global warming (with ΔT ∼10 K) of the ESI plume is reported while the size of the droplet decreases along the plume. The global warming indicates that the conductive thermal transfer (between the superheated sheath gas and the solvent) is predominant and stronger than the cooling effect due to the evaporation of the droplets, and this outcome is effectively reproduced by a diffusion-controlled evaporation model. Thermal gradient focusing ESI sources therefore appear to be efficient sources for evaporating large amounts of solvent, along with an increase in temperature. PMID:26110558

  10. Effect of drop size on the impact thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet in aircraft icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Supercooled large droplet (SLD), which can cause abnormal icing, is a well-known issue in aerospace engineering. Although efforts have been exerted to understand large droplet impact dynamics and the supercooled feature in the film/substrate interface, respectively, the thermodynamic effect during the SLD impact process has not received sufficient attention. This work conducts experimental studies to determine the effects of drop size on the thermodynamics for supercooled large droplet impingement. Through phenomenological reproduction, the rapid-freezing characteristics are observed in diameters of 400, 800, and 1300 μm. The experimental analysis provides information on the maximum spreading rate and the shrinkage rate of the drop, the supercooled diffusive rate, and the freezing time. A physical explanation of this unsteady heat transfer process is proposed theoretically, which indicates that the drop size is a critical factor influencing the supercooled heat exchange and effective heat transfer duration between the film/substrate interface. On the basis of the present experimental data and theoretical analysis, an impinging heating model is developed and applied to typical SLD cases. The model behaves as anticipated, which underlines the wide applicability to SLD icing problems in related fields.

  11. Aerosol Size Distribution Response to Anthropogenically Driven Historical Changes in Biogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, J. R.; D'Andrea, S.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S.; Scott, C.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-12-01

    Emissions of biological volatile organic compounds (BVOC) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature and CO2 concentrations. A recent model reconstruction of BVOC emissions over the past millennium predicted the changes in the three dominant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) producing BVOC classes (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes). The reconstruction predicted that in global averages isoprene emissions have decreased (land-use changes to crop/grazing land dominate the reduction), while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased (temperature increases dominate the increases); however, all three show both increases and decreases in certain regions due to competition between the various influencing factors. These BVOC changes have largely been anthropogenic in nature, and land-use change was shown to have the most dramatic effect by decreasing isoprene emissions. We use these modeled estimates of these three dominant BVOC classes' emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on SOA formation and global aerosol size distributions using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g. SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) held at present day values and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of >25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000. This change in N80 was predominantly driven by a shift towards crop/grazing land that produces less BVOC than the natural vegetation. Similar sensitivities to year 1000 vs. year 2000 BVOC emissions exist when anthropogenic emissions are turned off. This large decrease in N80 could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  12. Characterizing the Retrieval of Cloud Optical Thickness and Droplet Effective Radius to Overlying Aerosols Using a General Inverse Theory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Pilewskie, P.; Schmidt, S.

    2013-12-01

    The upwelling shortwave irradiance measured by the airborne Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) flying above a cloud and aerosol layer is influenced by the properties of the cloud and aerosol particles below, just as would the radiance measured from satellite. Unlike satellite measurements, those from aircraft provide the unique capability to fly a lower-level leg above the cloud, yet below the aerosol layer, to characterize the extinction of the aerosol layer and account for its impact on the measured cloud albedo. Previous work [Coddington et al., 2010] capitalized on this opportunity to test the effects of aerosol particles (or more appropriately, the effects of neglecting aerosols in forward modeling calculations) on cloud retrievals using data obtained during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation of anthropogenic pollution (INTEX-A/ITCT) study. This work showed aerosols can cause a systematic bias in the cloud retrieval and that such a bias would need to be distinguished from a true aerosol indirect effect (i.e. the brightening of a cloud due to aerosol effects on cloud microphysics) as theorized by Haywood et al., [2004]. The effects of aerosols on clouds are typically neglected in forward modeling calculations because their pervasiveness, variable microphysical properties, loading, and lifetimes makes forward modeling calculations under all possible combinations completely impractical. Using a general inverse theory technique, which propagates separate contributions from measurement and forward modeling errors into probability distributions of retrieved cloud optical thickness and droplet effective radius, we have demonstrated how the aerosol presence can be introduced as a spectral systematic error in the distributions of the forward modeling solutions. The resultant uncertainty and bias in cloud properties induced by the aerosols is identified by the shape and peak of the posteriori

  13. Deriving Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Sizes from TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, M. J.; Clancy, R. T.; Smith, M. D.; McConnochie, T. H.; Flittner, D. E.; Fouchet, T.

    2011-12-01

    Vertical variations in aerosol particle sizes can have a dramatic effect in their net impact on the state and evolution of the Martian atmosphere. Recent analyses of data from the Spectroscopy for the Investigation of the Characteristics of the Atmosphere of Mars (SPICAM) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments offer some long overdue progress in constraining this aspect of aerosols. However, significantly more work remains to be done along these lines in order to better constrain and inform modern dynamical simulations of the Martian atmosphere. Thus, the primary goal of our work is to perform retrievals of particle size as a function of altitude for both dust and water ice aerosols. The choice of the TES dataset, with pole-to-pole coverage over a period of nearly three martian years, provides the crucial systematic temporal and spatial sampling. Additional leverage on the particle size will be obtained by using both solarband bolometry and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Our presentation will include: 1) A summary of our limb radiative transfer comparison/validation exercises which include Monte Carlo, Gauss-Seidel, and discrete-ordinate algorithms (including the plane-parallel source function approximation). 2) The initial results of the application of our particle size retrieval scheme to the TES observations of the 2001 planet encircling dust event. 3) A few test applications to the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) radiance profiles (enabled by the recent solarband radiometric calibration by Bandfield and collaborators). 4) Our plans for additional retrievals (aphelion cloud season, lower optical depth locations and seasons, etc.) and the distribution of the derived profiles.

  14. Sensitivity of Satellite-Retrieved Cloud Properties to the Effective Variance of Cloud Droplet Size Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arduini, R.F.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W.L.Jr.; Ayers, J.K.; Khaiyer, M.M.; Heck, P.

    2005-03-18

    Cloud reflectance models currently used in cloud property retrievals from satellites have been developed using size distributions defined by a set of fixed effective radii with a fixed effective variance. The satellite retrievals used for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program assume droplet size distributions with an effective variance value of 0.10 (Minnis et al. 1998); the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project uses 0.15 (Rossow and Schiffer 1999); and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) team uses 0.13 (Nakajima and King 1990). These distributions are not necessarily representative of the actual sizes present in the clouds being observed. Because the assumed distributions can affect the reflectance patterns and near-infrared absorption, even for the same droplet effective radius reff, it is desirable to use the optimal size distributions in satellite retrievals of cloud properties. Collocated observations of the same clouds from different geostationary satellites, at different viewing angles, indicate that the current models may not be optimal (Ayers et al. 2005). Similarly, hour-to-hour variations in effective radius and optical depth reveal an unexplained dependence on scattering angle. To explore this issue, this paper examines the sensitivity of the cloud reflectance at 0.65 and 3.90-{micro}m to changes in the effective variance, or the spectral dispersion, of the modeled size distributions. The effects on the scattering phase functions and on the cloud reflectances are presented, as well as some resultant effects on the retrieved cloud properties.

  15. AEROSOL MEASUREMENTS IN THE SUBMICRON SIZE RANGE, STUDIES WITH AN AEROSOL CENTRIFUGE, A NEW DIFFUSION BATTERY, A LOW PRESSURE IMPACTOR AND AN ADVANCED CONDENSATION NUCLEI COUNTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the investigations of four aerosol classifiers which cover finite, but overlapping ranges of the aerosol particle size spectrum. The first part is concerned with a cylindrical aerosol centrifuge, which measures aerodynamic equivalent diameters precisely. Thi...

  16. Aerosol size distribution characteristics of organosulfates in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Bin Yu; Lin, Peng; Hu, Min; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Organosulfates (OSs) have been detected in various atmospheric environments, but their particle size distribution characteristics are unknown. In this work, we examined their size distributions in ambient aerosols to gain insights into the formation processes. Size-segregated aerosol samples in the range of 0.056-18 μm were collected using a ten-stage impactor at a receptor site in Hong Kong in both summer and winter and in Nansha in the Pearl River Delta in winter. The humic-like substances fraction in the size-segregated samples was isolated and analyzed using electrospray ionization coupled with an Orbitrap Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometer. Through accurate mass measurements, ∼190 CHOS and ∼90 CHONS formulas were tentatively identified to be OS compounds. Among them, OS compounds derived from isoprene, α-/β-pinene, and limonene and alkyl OSs having low double bond equivalents (DBE = 0,1) and 0-2 extra O beyond those in -OSO3 were found with high intensity. The biogenic volatile organic compounds-derived OS formulas share a common characteristic with sulfate in that the droplet mode dominated, peaking in either 0.56-1.0 or 1.0-1.8 μm size bin, reflecting sulfate as their common precursor. Most of these OSs have a minor coarse mode, accounting for 0-45%. The presence of OSs on the coarse particles is hypothesized to be a result of OSs on small particle (<0.32 μm) coagulating with coarse particles, as the abundance ratios of OS to non-sea-salt sulfate present on the coarse particles were similar to those on particles <0.32 μm. Among a few pairs of CHONS and CHOS that could be linked up through hydrolysis of a nitrooxy group in the CHONS form (e.g., m/z 294: C10H16O7NS- vs. m/z 249 C10H17O5S- from α/β-pinene, differing by (+H2O-HNO3)), the CHONS compounds had an enhanced coarse mode presence. This could be interpreted as a result of slower hydrolysis of the CHONS compounds on the alkali coarse particles. The low DBE alkyl OS compounds have a

  17. Stable water isotopologue ratios in fog and cloud droplets of liquid clouds are not size-dependent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiegel, J.K.; Aemisegger, F.; Scholl, M.; Wienhold, F.G.; Collett, J.L., Jr.; Lee, T.; van Pinxteren, D.; Mertes, S.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.; Werner, Roland A.; Buchmann, N.; Eugster, W.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we present the first observations of stable water isotopologue ratios in cloud droplets of different sizes collected simultaneously. We address the question whether the isotope ratio of droplets in a liquid cloud varies as a function of droplet size. Samples were collected from a ground intercepted cloud (= fog) during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia 2010 campaign (HCCT-2010) using a three-stage Caltech Active Strand Cloud water Collector (CASCC). An instrument test revealed that no artificial isotopic fractionation occurs during sample collection with the CASCC. Furthermore, we could experimentally confirm the hypothesis that the δ values of cloud droplets of the relevant droplet sizes (μm-range) were not significantly different and thus can be assumed to be in isotopic equilibrium immediately with the surrounding water vapor. However, during the dissolution period of the cloud, when the supersaturation inside the cloud decreased and the cloud began to clear, differences in isotope ratios of the different droplet sizes tended to be larger. This is likely to result from the cloud's heterogeneity, implying that larger and smaller cloud droplets have been collected at different moments in time, delivering isotope ratios from different collection times.

  18. Effect of molecular exchange on water droplet size analysis in W/O emulsions as determined by diffusion NMR.

    PubMed

    Vermeir, Lien; Sabatino, Paolo; Balcaen, Mathieu; Declerck, Arnout; Dewettinck, Koen; Martins, José C; Van der Meeren, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Using NMR diffusometry, the diffusion of water and tetramethylammonium chloride was recorded in order to determine the water droplet size distribution in W/O emulsions. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of extradroplet diffusion of water on the estimated droplet size distribution upon comparison to the real droplet size distribution. The latter originated from the diffusion behavior of the tetramethylammonium cation (TMA+), which is known to have a much lower permeability through the oil phase as compared to water. Whereas both low-resolution and high-resolution pulsed field gradient NMR revealed that the water droplet size overestimation could be reduced selecting either a lower measurement temperature during diffusion analysis, or a smaller diffusion delay value Δ, still comparison to TMA+ diffusion indicated that artefacts were unavoidable even at low Δ and temperature. In order to correct for this extradroplet water diffusion phenomenon, different data analysis methods were evaluated. The previously described Pfeuffer exchange model could only partly compensate for the effect of extradroplet diffusion on the water droplet size determination. On the other hand, accurate water droplet size analysis results were obtained by correcting the experimentally determined diffusion distances based on Einstein's diffusion law. As such, reliable data could be obtained by low resolution NMR based on water diffusion at or even above room temperature. PMID:26520819

  19. Retrieval of particle size distribution from aerosol optical thickness using an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiandong; Li, Jinxuan

    2015-10-01

    Particle size distribution is essential for describing direct and indirect radiation of aerosols. Because the relationship between the aerosol size distribution and optical thickness (AOT) is an ill-posed Fredholm integral equation of the first type, the traditional techniques for determining such size distributions, such as the Phillips-Twomey regularization method, are often ambiguous. Here, we use an approach based on an improved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IPSO) to retrieve aerosol size distribution. Using AOT data measured by a CE318 sun photometer in Yinchuan, we compared the aerosol size distributions retrieved using a simple genetic algorithm, a basic particle swarm optimization algorithm and the IPSO. Aerosol size distributions for different weather conditions were analyzed, including sunny, dusty and hazy conditions. Our results show that the IPSO-based inversion method retrieved aerosol size distributions under all weather conditions, showing great potential for similar size distribution inversions.

  20. The effect of dispersed Petrobaltic oil droplet size on photosynthetically active radiation in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Haule, Kamila; Freda, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Oil pollution in seawater, primarily visible on sea surface, becomes dispersed as an effect of wave mixing as well as chemical dispersant treatment, and forms spherical oil droplets. In this study, we examined the influence of oil droplet size of highly dispersed Petrobaltic crude on the underwater visible light flux and the inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater, including absorption, scattering, backscattering and attenuation coefficients. On the basis of measured data and Mie theory, we calculated the IOPs of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil in constant concentration, but different log-normal size distributions. We also performed a radiative transfer analysis, in order to evaluate the influence on the downwelling irradiance Ed, remote sensing reflectance Rrs and diffuse reflectance R, using in situ data from the Baltic Sea. We found that during dispersion, there occurs a boundary size distribution characterized by a peak diameter d0  = 0.3 μm causing a maximum E d increase of 40% within 0.5-m depth, and the maximum Ed decrease of 100% at depths below 5 m. Moreover, we showed that the impact of size distribution on the "blue to green" ratios of Rrs and R varies from 24% increase to 27% decrease at the same crude oil concentration. PMID:26635218

  1. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  2. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-07

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  3. Droplet Number Concentration Value Added Product

    2015-08-06

    Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration (Nd) will increase and droplet size will decrease, for a given liquid water path. This will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation; however, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain.McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based onBoers andmore » Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions. In order to provide data sets for studying aerosol-cloud interactions, the McComiskey et al. (2009) method was implemented as the Droplet Number Concentration (NDROP) value-added product (VAP).« less

  4. Local cooling, plasma reheating and thermal pinching induced by single aerosol droplets injected into an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-07-01

    The injection of a single micrometer-sized droplet into an analytical inductively coupled plasma (ICP) perturbs the plasma and involves three sequential effects: local cooling, thermal pinching and plasma reheating. Time-resolved two-dimensional monochromatic imaging of the load-coil region of an ICP was used to monitor this sequence of plasma perturbations. When a microdroplet enters the plasma, it acts as a local heat sink and cools the nearby plasma region. The cooling effect is considered local, although the cooling volume can be large and extends 6 mm from the physical location of the vaporizing droplet. The liberated hydrogen, from decomposition of water, causes a thermal pinch effect by increasing the thermal conductivity of the bulk plasma and accelerating heat loss at the plasma periphery. As a response to the heat loss, the plasma shrinks in size, which increases its power density. Plasma shrinkage starts around the same time when the microdroplet enters the plasma and lasts at least 2 ms after the droplet leaves the load-coil region. Once the vaporizing droplet passes through a particular plasma volume, that volume is reheated to an even higher temperature than under steady-state conditions. Because of the opposing effects of plasma cooling and reheating, the plasma conditions are different upstream (downward) and downstream (upward) from a vaporizing droplet - cooling dominates the downstream region whereas reheating controls in the upstream domain. The boundary between the local cooling and reheating zones is sharp and is only ~ 1 mm thick. The reheating effect persists a relatively long time in the plasma, at least up to 4 ms after the droplet moves out of the load-coil region. The restoration of plasma equilibrium after the perturbation induced by microdroplet injection is slow. Microdroplet injection also induces a momentary change in plasma impedance, and the impedance change was found to correlate qualitatively with the different stages of plasma

  5. A model for the prediction of droplet size in Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged particles.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Trivikram; Mani, Ethayaraja; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2014-08-12

    Colloidal particles irreversibly adsorb at fluid-fluid interfaces stabilizing what are commonly called "Pickering" emulsions and foams. A simple geometrical model, the limited coalescence model, was earlier proposed to estimate droplet sizes in emulsions. This model assumes that all of the particles are effective in stabilization. The model predicts that the average emulsion drop size scales inversely with the total number of particles, confirmed qualitatively with experimental data on Pickering emulsions. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in synthesizing emulsions with oppositely charged particles (OCPs). In our experimental study, we observed that the drop size varies nonmonotonically with the number ratio of oppositely charged colloids, even when a fixed total number concentration of colloids is used, showing a minimum. We develop a mathematical model to predict this dependence of drop size on number ratio in such a mixed particle system. The proposed model is based on the hypothesis that oppositely charged colloids form stable clusters due to the strong electrostatic attraction between them and that these clusters are the effective stabilizing agents. The proposed model is a two-parameter model, parameters being the ratio of effective charge of OCPs (denoted as k) and the size of the aggregate containing X particles formed due to aggregation of OCPs. Because the size of aggregates formed during emulsification is not directly measurable, we use suitable values of parameters k and X to best match the experimental observations. The model predictions are in qualitative agreement with experimentally observed nonmonotonic variation of droplet sizes. Using experiments and theory, we present a physical insight into the formation of OCP stabilized Pickering emulsions. Our model upgrades the existing Wiley's limited coalescence model as applied to emulsions containing a binary mixture of oppositely charged particles. PMID:25054284

  6. Size distribution of NaK droplets released during RORSAT reactor core ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Oswald, M.; Stabroth, S.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    NaK droplets consist of eutectic sodium-potassium alloy and have been released during RORSAT reactor core ejections mostly on orbits close to 950 km altitude. They contributed to the space debris environment in the centimeter and millimeter regime. NaK droplets have been modeled before in ESAs MASTER Debris and Meteoroid Environment Model. The approach is currently revised for the MASTER 2005 upgrade. The new NaK model gives estimations of the parameters of the size distribution function, which are based on physical relations only. NASA radar observations confirm this physical approach. A bimodal size distribution is derived, which is based on the Rosin-Rammler equation. The Rosin-Rammler equation is an empirical volume distribution function. The number of parameters is limited to two. It is likely that the coolant system contains two types of orifice diameters. This makes it necessary to apply the Rosin-Rammler distribution twice, resulting in a bimodal size distribution with altogether four parameters. The comparison shows that the new NaK model is in good agreement with the NASA model, which is based on radar observations. Results of orbit propagation simulation runs are presented.

  7. Cloud condensation nuclei activity, droplet growth kinetics, and hygroscopicity of biogenic and anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. F.; Buchholz, A.; Kortner, B.; Schlag, P.; Rubach, F.; Fuchs, H.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Watne, Å. K.; Hallquist, M.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.; Kristensen, K.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Glasius, M.; Kourtchev, I.; Kalberer, M.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2016-02-01

    Interaction of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with Anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) affects the physicochemical properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We investigated cloud droplet activation (CCN activity), droplet growth kinetics, and hygroscopicity of mixed anthropogenic and biogenic SOA (ABSOA) compared to pure biogenic SOA (BSOA) and pure anthropogenic SOA (ASOA). Selected monoterpenes and aromatics were used as representative precursors of BSOA and ASOA, respectively.

    We found that BSOA, ASOA, and ABSOA had similar CCN activity despite the higher oxygen to carbon ratio (O/C) of ASOA compared to BSOA and ABSOA. For individual reaction systems, CCN activity increased with the degree of oxidation. Yet, when considering all different types of SOA together, the hygroscopicity parameter, κCCN, did not correlate with O/C. Droplet growth kinetics of BSOA, ASOA, and ABSOA were comparable to that of (NH4)2SO4, which indicates that there was no delay in the water uptake for these SOA in supersaturated conditions.

    In contrast to CCN activity, the hygroscopicity parameter from a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) measurement, κHTDMA, of ASOA was distinctively higher (0.09-0.10) than that of BSOA (0.03-0.06), which was attributed to the higher degree of oxidation of ASOA. The ASOA components in mixed ABSOA enhanced aerosol hygroscopicity. Changing the ASOA fraction by adding biogenic VOC (BVOC) to ASOA or vice versa (AVOC to BSOA) changed the hygroscopicity of aerosol, in line with the change in the degree of oxidation of aerosol. However, the hygroscopicity of ABSOA cannot be described by a simple linear combination of pure BSOA and ASOA systems. This indicates that additional processes, possibly oligomerization, affected the hygroscopicity.

    Closure analysis of CCN and HTDMA data showed κHTDMA was lower than κCCN by 30-70 %. Better closure was achieved for ASOA compared to BSOA. This

  8. Properties of the size-resolved and individual cloud droplets collected in western Japan during the Asian dust storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chang-Jin; Tohno, Susumu; Kasahara, Mikio; Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    With the point of view of the removal mechanism of Asian dust storm particles, in order to study the physiochemical properties of clouds a field campaign was conducted in western Japan during the Asian dust storm event. The polymeric water absorbent film and collodion film replication techniques were employed in the measurements of size-fractionated precipitation cloud and individual cloud droplets, respectively. In addition, to investigate the source profiles of the elements retained in cloud samples, the original desert sand was collected. Particle-induced X-ray emission was applied for the elemental analysis of size-resolved cloud droplets and desert sand. Also for the quantification analysis of the ultra trace elements in residual particles in individual cloud droplets, the X-ray microprobe system equipped at Super Photon ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) BL-37XU was newly applied. Soil derived components like Si, Ca, and Fe show higher mass concentrations in small droplets (<6.4 μm) than in large droplets (>6.4 μm), while S and Cl dominate at droplet size larger than 20 μm. Three cloud samples have liquid water content ranging from 0.04 to 0.11 g m -3. The number size distribution of droplets collected at cloud base is monomodal with the maximum level around 15 μm. The size distribution of cloud droplets is widespread (up to 60 μm). The droplet residues mainly consisting of crustal components were successively reconstructed as elemental maps by the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analytical technique. From these XRF elemental maps, it can be understood that crustal components are significantly distributed on and/or in the residual particles in individual cloud droplets. The plotting of enrichment factors calculated from the elemental composition of original desert sand in China not only indicates the good correlationship between elemental masses in residual particles of cloud base droplets and those of precipitation cloud, but also classify elements into soil

  9. On the concentration and size distribution of sub-micron aerosol in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribas, M.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Cuevas, C. A.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, F.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the CHARLEX campaign in the Galápagos Islands, a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer was deployed on San Cristobal Island in July-August 2011 to carry out size-resolved measurements of the concentration of submicron aerosols. To our knowledge these are the first measurements of aerosol concentrations in this unique environment. The particles with marine origin displayed a tri-modal number size distribution with peak diameters of 0.016 μm, 0.050 μm and 0.174 μm and a cloud-processed intermodal minimum at 0.093 μm. The mean total aerosol number concentration for the marine contribution was 470 ± 160 cm-3. A low particle concentration of 70 ± 50 cm-3 for the nucleation size range was measured, but no evidence of new particle production in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) was observed. The concentration of the Aitken size mode was found to be related to aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere off the coast of Chile followed by transport within the MBL to the Galápagos Islands. Cloud processing may activate the particles in the Aitken size range, growing through 'in-cloud' sulphate production and increasing the particle concentration in the accumulation size range. The 0.093 μm cloud processed minima suggests that the critical supersaturation at which the particle is activated to a cloud droplet is in the 0.14-0.21% range. The daytime marine particle background concentration was influenced by human activity around the sampling site, as well as by new particle formation triggered by biogenic emissions from the vegetation cover of the island's semiarid lowlands. Effective CCN formation may play a role in the formation and properties of the stratus clouds, which permanently cover the top of the windward side of the islands and establish one of their characteristic climatic bands.

  10. Micrometer-sized water droplet impingement dynamics and evaporation on a flat dry surface.

    PubMed

    Briones, Alejandro M; Ervin, Jamie S; Putnam, Shawn A; Byrd, Larry W; Gschwender, Lois

    2010-08-17

    A comprehensive numerical and experimental investigation on micrometer-sized water droplet impact dynamics and evaporation on an unheated, flat, dry surface is conducted from the standpoint of spray-cooling technology. The axisymmetric time-dependent governing equations of continuity, momentum, energy, and species are solved. Surface tension, wall adhesion effect, gravitational body force, contact line dynamics, and evaporation are accounted for in the governing equations. The explicit volume of fluid (VOF) model with dynamic meshing and variable-time stepping in serial and parallel processors is used to capture the time-dependent liquid-gas interface motion throughout the computational domain. The numerical model includes temperature- and species-dependent thermodynamic and transport properties. The contact line dynamics and the evaporation rate are predicted using Blake's and Schrage's molecular kinetic models, respectively. An extensive grid independence study was conducted. Droplet impingement and evaporation data are acquired with a standard dispensing/imaging system and high-speed photography. The numerical results are compared with measurements reported in the literature for millimeter-size droplets and with current microdroplet experiments in terms of instantaneous droplet shape and temporal spread (R/D(0) or R/R(E)), flatness ratio (H/D(0)), and height (H/H(E)) profiles, as well as temporal volume (inverted A) profile. The Weber numbers (We) for impinging droplets vary from 1.4 to 35.2 at nearly constant Ohnesorge number (Oh) of approximately 0.025-0.029. Both numerical and experimental results show that there is air bubble entrapment due to impingement. Numerical results indicate that Blake's formulation provides better results than the static (SCA) and dynamic contact angle (DCA) approach in terms of temporal evolution of R/D(0) and H/D(0) (especially at the initial stages of spreading) and equilibrium flatness ratio (H(E)/D(0)). Blake's contact line

  11. Vertical profile and aerosol size distribution measurements in Iceland (LOAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur; Arnalds, Olafur; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Vignelles, Damien; Verdier, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Cold climate and high latitudes regions contain important dust sources where dust is frequently emitted, foremost from glacially-derived sediments of riverbeds or ice-proximal areas (Arnalds, 2010; Bullard, 2013). Iceland is probably the most active dust source in the arctic/sub-arctic region (Dagsson-Waldhauserova, 2013). The frequency of days with suspended dust exceeds 34 dust days annually. Icelandic dust is of volcanic origin; it is very dark in colour and contains sharp-tipped shards with bubbles. Such properties allow even large particles to be easily transported long distances. Thus, there is a need to better understand the spatial and temporal variability of these dusts. Two launch campaigns of the Light Optical Aerosols Counter (LOAC) were conducted in Iceland with meteorological balloons. LOAC use a new optical design that allows to retrieve the size concentrations in 19 size classes between 0.2 and 100 microm, and to provide an estimate of the main nature of aerosols. Vertical stratification and aerosol composition of the subarctic atmosphere was studied in detail. The July 2011 launch represented clean non-dusty season with low winds while the November 2013 launch was conducted during the high winds after dusty period. For the winter flight (performed from Reykjavik), the nature of aerosols strongly changed with altitude. In particular, a thin layer of volcanic dust was observed at an altitude of 1 km. Further LOAC measurements are needed to understand the implication of Icelandic dust to the Arctic warming and climate change. A new campaign of LAOC launches is planned for May 2014. Reference: Arnalds, O., 2010. Dust sources and deposition of aeolian materials in Iceland. Icelandic Agricultural Sciences 23, 3-21. Bullard, J.E., 2013. Contemporary glacigenic inputs to the dust cycle. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 38, 71-89. Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P., Arnalds O., Olafsson H. 2013. Long-term frequency and characteristics of dust storm events in

  12. Numerical evaluation of droplet sizing based on the ratio of fluorescent and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique)

    SciTech Connect

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2011-03-20

    The dependence of fluorescent and scattered light intensities from spherical droplets on droplet diameter was evaluated using Mie theory. The emphasis is on the evaluation of droplet sizing, based on the ratio of laser-induced fluorescence and scattered light intensities (LIF/Mie technique). A parametric study is presented, which includes the effects of scattering angle, the real part of the refractive index and the dye concentration in the liquid (determining the imaginary part of the refractive index). The assumption that the fluorescent and scattered light intensities are proportional to the volume and surface area of the droplets for accurate sizing measurements is not generally valid. More accurate sizing measurements can be performed with minimal dye concentration in the liquid and by collecting light at a scattering angle of 60 deg. rather than the commonly used angle of 90 deg. Unfavorable to the sizing accuracy are oscillations of the scattered light intensity with droplet diameter that are profound at the sidescatter direction (90 deg.) and for droplets with refractive indices around 1.4.

  13. Method for determining aerosol particle size device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, Vincent J.

    1998-01-01

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data.

  14. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  15. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols I: Uranium Concentration in Aerosols as a Function of Time and Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Traub, Richard J.

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing depleted uranium were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time particularly within the first minute after the shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% 30 min after perforation. In the Bradley vehicle, the initial (and maximum) uranium concentration was lower than those observed in the Abrams tank and decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in the cyclone samplers, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h post perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages from the Abrams tank tests ranged from 38% to 72% and, in most cases, varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Results with the Bradley vehicle ranged from 18% to 29% and were not specifically correlated with particle size.

  16. Particle size distributions in Arctic polar stratospheric clouds, growth and freezing of sulfuric acid droplets, and implications for cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, James E.; Baumgardner, D.; Gandrud, B. W.; Kawa, S. R.; Kelly, K. K.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.; Gary, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper uses particle size and volume measurements obtained with the forward scattering spectrometer probe model 300 during January and February 1989 in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Experiment to investigate processes important in the formation and growth of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. It is suggested on the basis of comparisons of the observations with expected sulfuric acid droplet deliquescence that in the Arctic a major fraction of the sulfuric acid droplets remain liquid until temperatures at least as low as 193 K. It is proposed that homogeneous freezing of the sulfuric acid droplets might occur near 190 K and might play a role in the formation of PSCs.

  17. Method for determining aerosol particle size, device for determining aerosol particle size

    DOEpatents

    Novick, V.J.

    1998-10-06

    A method for determining the mass median diameter D of particles contained in a fluid is provided wherein the data of the mass of a pre-exposed and then a post-exposed filter is mathematically combined with data concerning the pressure differential across the same filter before and then after exposure to a particle-laden stream. A device for measuring particle size is also provided wherein the device utilizes the above-method for mathematically combining the easily quantifiable data. 2 figs.

  18. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  19. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  20. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, Ivar H.

    1990-01-01

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  1. Chemical characteristics of size-resolved aerosols from Asian dust and haze episode in Seoul Metropolitan City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Eunha; Han, Jihyun; Lee, Meehye; Lee, Gangwoong; Kim, Jong Chun

    2013-06-01

    We collected aerosol particles in Seoul using a 10 stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) to investigate the size distributions of aerosol mass and water-soluble inorganic ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42 -) for the two high-mass episodes taking place in February and April, 2009. The former was a heavy Asian dust (AD) event and the latter was a haze episode associated with stagnant condition that prevailed over the Yellow Sea region. In AD plume, the mass peak was noticeable at coarse mode between 1.0 and 1.8 μm but SO42 - and NH4+ were enriched in condensation mode between 0.056 and 0.1 μm. There was little chance for the heavy AD plume to pick up SO2 and water vapor, which are in good accordance with its transport paths and the chemical characteristics of aerosols and gaseous species. These results imply that the heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on dust particles would not be substantial in determining sulfate concentrations for this particular type of dust plume, considering the possibility of loss of large soil particles in MOUDI. During the haze episode, both total aerosol mass and water-soluble inorganic ions showed bimodal size distributions with the droplet (0.32-0.56 μm) and coarse (1.0-1.8 μm) mode peaks. In this haze event, acidic gases tend to be dissolved more efficiently in larger particles, shifting the peaks of SO42 - and NO3- to larger droplet particles. For NH4+, however, the mode change was not observed, which was probably due to the depleted source and high solubility of NH3. These results demonstrated that the availability of precursor gases such as SO2, NO2, and NH3, and the water-vapor contents were important factor to determine the formation of droplet-mode particles and their sizes.

  2. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  3. Cloud water composition during HCCT-2010: Scavenging efficiencies, solute concentrations, and droplet size dependence of inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Fomba, K. W.; Mertes, S.; Müller, K.; Spindler, G.; Schneider, J.; Lee, T.; Collett, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2015-09-01

    caused by systematic differences and limitations of the approaches (such as outgassing of dissolved gases during residual particle sampling). Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) of aerosol constituents were 0.56-0.94, 0.79-0.99, 0.71-98, and 0.67-0.92 for SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and DOC, respectively, when calculated as event means with in-cloud data only. SEs estimated using data from an upwind site were substantially different in many cases, revealing the impact of gas-phase uptake (for volatile constituents) and mass losses across Mt. Schmücke likely due to physical processes such as droplet scavenging by trees and/or entrainment. Drop size-resolved cloud water concentrations of major ions SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ revealed two main profiles: decreasing concentrations with increasing droplet size and "U"-shapes. In contrast, profiles of typical coarse particle mode minor ions were often increasing with increasing drop size, highlighting the importance of a species' particle concentration size distribution for the development of size-resolved solute concentration patterns. Concentration differences between droplet size classes were typically < 2 for major ions from the 3-stage collector and somewhat more pronounced from the 5-stage collector, while they were much larger for minor ions. Due to a better separation of droplet populations, the 5-stage collector was capable of resolving some features of solute size dependencies not seen in the 3-stage data, especially sharp concentration increases (up to a factor of 5-10) in the smallest droplets for many solutes.

  4. Cloud water composition during HCCT-2010: Scavenging efficiencies, solute concentrations, and droplet size dependence of inorganic ions and dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, Dominik; Wadinga Fomba, Khanneh; Mertes, Stephan; Müller, Konrad; Spindler, Gerald; Schneider, Johannes; Lee, Taehyoung; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-03-01

    differences and limitations of the approaches (such as outgassing of dissolved gases during residual particle sampling). Scavenging efficiencies (SEs) of aerosol constituents were 0.56-0.94, 0.79-0.99, 0.71-98, and 0.67-0.92 for SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and DOC respectively when calculated as event means with in-cloud data only. SEs estimated using data from an upwind site were substantially different in many cases, revealing the impact of gas-phase uptake (for volatile constituents) and mass losses across Mt. Schmücke likely due to physical processes such as droplet scavenging by trees and/or entrainment. Drop size-resolved cloud water concentrations of major ions SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ revealed two main profiles: decreasing concentrations with increasing droplet size and "U" shapes. In contrast, profiles of typical coarse particle mode minor ions were often increasing with increasing drop size, highlighting the importance of a species' particle concentration size distribution for the development of size-resolved solute concentration patterns. Concentration differences between droplet size classes were typically < 2 for major ions from the three-stage collector and somewhat more pronounced from the five-stage collector, while they were much larger for minor ions. Due to a better separation of droplet populations, the five-stage collector was capable of resolving some features of solute size dependencies not seen in the three-stage data, especially sharp concentration increases (up to a factor of 5-10) in the smallest droplets for many solutes.

  5. Canopy-atmosphere interactions under foggy condition—Size-resolved fog droplet fluxes and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Madany, T. S.; Walk, J. B.; Deventer, M. J.; Degefie, D. T.; Chang, S.-C.; Juang, J.-Y.; Griessbaum, F.; Klemm, O.

    2016-03-01

    Microphysical processes of fog and their spatial and temporal pattern are a challenge to study under natural conditions. This work focuses on the development of bidirectional fluxes of fog droplets above a forest canopy in northeastern Taiwan. Bidirectional fluxes occurred regularly, start from the smallest droplet class (<2.66 µm diameter), and subsequently extend to larger droplets up to 7.41 µm diameter. The development of the bidirectional fluxes with positive (upward) fluxes of smaller droplets and downward fluxes of larger fluxes is associated with a temperature gradient and with the activation of fog droplets according to the Köhler theory. Small fog droplets develop close to the canopy as result of evapotranspiration and subsequent condensation. The rapid growth of small fog droplets and the accelerated growth of activated droplets, a process which is more likely to occur at higher levels of the fog layer, lead to a sink of small droplets and a source of larger droplets within the fog. This is in accordance with the observation that positive droplet number fluxes of small fog droplets outnumber the negative fluxes from the larger fog droplets. For liquid water, the net flux is negative.

  6. Aerosol Droplet Delivery of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Strategy for Respiratory-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueting; Xue, Min; Raabe, Otto G.; Aaron, Holly L.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Evans, James E.; Hayes, Fred A.; Inaga, Sumire; Tagmout, Abderrahmane; Takeuchi, Minoru; Vulpe, Chris; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Risbud, Subhash H.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A highly versatile nanoplatform that couples mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) with an aerosol technology to achieve direct nanoscale delivery to the respiratory tract is described. This novel method can deposit MSN nanoparticles throughout the entire respiratory tract, including nasal, tracheobronchial and pulmonary regions using a water-based aerosol. This delivery method was successfully tested in mice by inhalation. The MSN nanoparticles used have the potential for carrying and delivering therapeutic agents to highly specific target sites of the respiratory tract. The approach provides a critical foundation for developing therapeutic treatment protocols for a wide range of diseases where aerosol delivery to the respiratory system would be desirable. PMID:25819886

  7. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  8. Size-Resolved Volatility and Chemical Composition of Aged European Aerosol Measured During FAME-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Mohr, C.; Lee, B.; Engelhart, G. J.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S.; Baltensperger, U.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We present first results on the volatility and chemical composition of aged organic aerosol measured during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008 (FAME-2008). Finokalia is located in the Southeast of Crete, Greece, and this remote site allows for the measurement of aged European aerosol as it is transported from Central to Southeastern Europe. We measured the volatility of the aerosol at Finokalia as a function of its size by combining several instruments. We used an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of the particles, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) to measure the volume distribution of particles, and a thermodenuder system to induce changes in size and composition via moderate heating of the particles. The largest fraction of the non-refractory material in the aerosol sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organic material and a small contribution from nitrate. Most of the organic aerosol was highly oxidized, even after only a few days of transport over continental Europe. These highly oxidized organics had lower volatility than fresh primary or secondary aerosol measured in the laboratory. Significant changes in air-parcel trajectories and wind direction led to changes in the chemical composition of the sampled aerosol and corresponding changes of the volatility. These results allow the quantification of the effect of atmospheric processing on organic aerosol volatility and can be used as constraints for atmospheric Chemical Transport Models that predict the aerosol volatility.

  9. Regulation of Lipid Droplet Size in Mammary Epithelial Cells by Remodeling of Membrane Lipid Composition—A Potential Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bat-Chen; Shamay, Avi; Argov-Argaman, Nurit

    2015-01-01

    Milk fat globule size is determined by the size of its precursors—intracellular lipid droplets—and is tightly associated with its composition. We examined the relationship between phospholipid composition of mammary epithelial cells and the size of both intracellular and secreted milk fat globules. Primary culture of mammary epithelial cells was cultured in medium without free fatty acids (control) or with 0.1 mM free capric, palmitic or oleic acid for 24 h. The amount and composition of the cellular lipids and the size of the lipid droplets were determined in the cells and medium. Mitochondrial quantity and expression levels of genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and polar lipid composition were determined. Cells cultured with oleic and palmitic acids contained similar quantities of triglycerides, 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than in controls, respectively (P < 0.0001). When cultured with oleic acid, 22% of the cells contained large lipid droplets (>3 μm) and phosphatidylethanolamine concentration was higher by 23 and 63% compared with that in the control and palmitic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the presence of palmitic acid, only 4% of the cells contained large lipid droplets and the membrane phosphatidylcholine concentration was 22% and 16% higher than that in the control and oleic acid treatments, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the oleic acid treatment, approximately 40% of the lipid droplets were larger than 5 μm whereas in that of the palmitic acid treatment, only 16% of the droplets were in this size range. Triglyceride secretion in the oleic acid treatment was 2- and 12-fold higher compared with that in the palmitic acid and control treatments, respectively. Results imply that membrane composition of bovine mammary epithelial cells plays a role in controlling intracellular and secreted lipid droplets size, and that this process is not associated with cellular triglyceride content. PMID:25756421

  10. Fungal contribution to size-segregated aerosol measured through biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Filippo, Patrizia; Pomata, Donatella; Riccardi, Carmela; Buiarelli, Francesca; Perrino, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Fungal spores are the dominant biological component of air. Although ubiquitous in outdoor air, they are scarcely measured due to the inadequacy of measurement methods. The use of biomarkers as tools for the determination of fungal contribution to bioaerosol has often been suggested, and ergosterol, arabitol and mannitol have been associated to fungal spores as tracers. In the present paper, the fungal component of aerosol was studied at suburban/rural and at urban sites. Ergosterol, arabitol, and mannitol contents in airborne particulate matter, even at different sizes, were determined. Literature conversion factors and calculated conversion factors correlating ergosterol, arabitol, and mannitol masses to fungi mass were applied and compared to each other. The obtained fungal spore concentrations were different depending on the marker utilized both with the conversion factors found in literature and the calculated ones. Size-segregated marker distribution suggested different sources for the three tracers indicating ergosterol as the only reliable biomarker at our latitudes. The fungal spore concentrations were higher at the suburban/rural location and respectively inversely and directly proportional to temperature and relative humidity.

  11. Location and Influence of Added Block Copolymers on the Droplet Size in Oil-in-Oil Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Asano, Itaru; So, Soonyong; Lodge, Timothy P

    2015-07-14

    We have investigated the effect of added polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SO) copolymer on the stability of oil-in-oil (O/O) emulsions containing polystyrene (PS) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in chloroform (CHCl3) and directly visualized the location of SO in the emulsions by using dye-labeled SO (SO*) with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The emulsion formed by PS/PEG/CHCl3 = 14/6/80 (wt %) consisted of a droplet phase of PS in CHCl3 and a continuous phase containing PEG in CHCl3. SO*s with various molecular weights (Mn,SO) and volume fractions of the PS block in SO (fPS) were prepared via living anionic polymerization and subsequent end-esterification. The effect of SO on the droplet size in the emulsions was investigated as a function of both Mn,SO and fPS. Increasing Mn,SO and decreasing fPS were effective at reducing the droplet size down to less than 1 μm, which is 100 times smaller than in the absence of SO. The location of SO*s in the O/O emulsions was further investigated by CLSM. We found that the location of SO*s changed from the droplet interior to the liquid-liquid interface and then to the continuous phase with decreasing fPS. We discuss the possible mechanism in terms of the relation of SO* location to the droplet size. PMID:26134549

  12. Survey of recent Al2O3 droplet size data in solid rocket chambers, nozzles, and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salita, Mark

    1994-10-01

    The size distribution of Al2O3 droplets in a solid propellant rocket is very different in the chamber, nozzle, and plume, primarily due to breakup and collision/coalescence in the nozzle. This paper attempts to summarize, evaluate, and relate the results of 19 recent experimental and analytical studies of droplet size in order to construct a unified model of droplet size evolution from the chamber through the nozzle and into the plume. It is believed that the distribution of droplet mass in the chamber is bimodal log-normal, with 1 micron smoke comprising about 80% of the mass and 50-100 micron caps comprising the remaining 20%. During passage through the nozzle, the caps shatter to product droplets whose diameters are about 10% of the caps but still 10 times those of smoke, while all but 1-2% of the smoke mass collides and coalesces with the shatter products to generate an essentially monomodal mass distribution at the nozzle exit whose D43 agrees with Hermsen's correlation and whose standard deviation alpha approximately or equal to 0.13 is smaller than both the chamber smoke (alpha approximately or equal to 0.40) or caps (alpha approximately or equal to 0.20).

  13. Survey of recent Al2O3 droplet size data in solid rocket chambers, nozzles, and plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salita, Mark

    1994-10-01

    The size distribution of Al2O3 droplets in a solid propellant rocket is very different in the chamber, nozzle, and plume, primarily due to breakup and collision/coalescence in the nozzle. This paper attempts to summarize, evaluate, and relate the results of 19 recent experimental and analytical studies of droplet size in order to construct a unified model of droplet size evolution from the chamber through the nozzle and into the plume. It is believed that the distribution of droplet mass in the chamber is bimodal lognormal, with 1 micrometer smoke comprising about 80 percent of the mass and 50-100 micrometer caps comprising the remaining 20 percent. During passage through the nozzle, the caps shatter to product droplets whose diameters are about 10 percent of the caps but still 10 times those of smoke, while all but 1-2 percent of the smoke mass collides and coalesces with the shatter products to generate an essentially monomodal mass distribution at the nozzle exit whose D(sub 43) agrees with Hermsen's correlation and whose standard deviation sigma approximately equals 0.13 is smaller than both the chamber smoke (sigma approximately equals 0.40) or caps (sigma approximately equals 0.20).

  14. Raman spectroscopy on deformed droplets: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esen, Cemal; Weigel, Thomas; Sprynchak, Vitaliy; Schweiger, Gustav

    2004-11-01

    Raman scattering on deformed droplets was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The investigated droplets were levitated by an acoustic levitator or produced by a vibrating orifice aerosol generator. Our samples in acoustic levitation experiments were DEHS-droplets in the millimeter-size range and ethanol droplets in the size range of 50- 100 μm in the case of vibrating orifice generation. The C-H stretching region between 2800 and 3100cm-1 was investigated. We found that the Raman intensity measured by a scattering angle of 90∘ depends on the shape of the droplets. Raman scattering on spherical droplets was up to 50% smaller than scattering on spheroidal droplets with the same volume. The calculated results show also an enhancement of the Raman scattering for non-spherical particles and were in good agreement with the measurements.

  15. Fast Airborne Size Distribution Measurements of an Aerosol Processes and Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Zhou, J.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C. S.; Howell, S.

    2009-12-01

    During MILAGRO/INTEX experiment the Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research (HIGEAR) deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard NSF C-130 and NASA DC-8. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering - f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). We also flew the Fast Mobility Particle Spectrometer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) to measure aerosol size distributions in a range 5.6 - 560 nm. For all our flights around Mexico City, an aerosol number concentration usually was well above the nominal FMPS sensitivity (from ~100 particles/cc @ Dp = 5.6 nm to 1 part/cc @ 560nm), providing us with reliable size distributions even at 1 sec resolution. FMPS measurements revealed small scale structure of an aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved. These 1-Hz measurements during aircraft profiles captured variations in size distributions within shallow layers. Other dynamic processes observed included orography induced aerosol layers and evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation. We put FMPS high resolution size distribution data in a context of aerosol evolution and aging, using a range of established (for MIRAGE/INTEX) chemical, aerosol and transport aging parameters.

  16. Online Aerosol Size and Composition Measurements in Coastal Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Giordano, M.; Kalnajs, L.; Johnson, A.; Davis, S. M.; Deshler, T.; Toohey, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles play a critical role in the chemical and radiative balance of the Antarctic atmosphere. Aerosols are both a source and sink of gas phase constituents, as well as a transport mechanism for oceanic chemical species into the continental interior. The interaction between aerosols, the gas phase, sea ice and the snow pack is complex and not well understood. Recent observations of ozone depletion events coupled with submicron aerosol mass increase highlight the interaction between the gas and particle phases. These interactions can lead to aerosol formation as well as the deposition of trace elements to the snow pack. To determine the composition and source regions of aerosols in the coastal Antarctic atmosphere, a suite of instruments was deployed in the 2014 Antarctic measurement season including a High Resolution Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS), Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), Ozone analyzer, Scanning Electrical Mobility Sizer (SEMS), and Particle-into-Liquid Sampler (PILS). Measurements of gas phase constituents and aerosol composition were interpreted in the context of back trajectories and local meteorological conditions to link the measured air masses to their source regions.

  17. Mass size distributions of soluble sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in the Madrid urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, J.; Pujadas, M.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Sánchez, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2011-09-01

    This paper analyzes the mass size distribution of some inorganic species present in the atmospheric aerosol from a field campaign carried out in Madrid throughout a complete year (February 2007-February 2008). Samplings were performed by means of a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Ambient air was sampled during consecutive nocturnal and diurnal periods, and diurnal/nocturnal behaviors were compared for the twenty night-day sampling pairs that were gathered. Annual and seasonal averages were obtained, and some case studies under specific atmospheric conditions are discussed in the paper. Results have shown that the sulfate and ammonium mass was concentrated in the accumulation mode, between 0.18 and 0.56 μm, so that gas-phase and condensation processes for secondary aerosol formation prevailed during the sampling periods in this area. An exception to this behavior was found during a fog event when distributions for these two species were centered in the 0.56-1 and 1-1.8 μm size stages, corresponding to the droplet mode. In most of the samples, the ammonium mass measured in these size ranges was enough or almost enough to neutralize inorganic acidity by formation of ammonium sulfate and nitrate. However, a significant sulfate mass not neutralized by ammonium was found in the impactor backup quartz filter (aerodynamic diameter < 0.056 μm). The concentration of this sulfate and its contribution to the ultrafine fraction mass was higher under good dispersive conditions, prevailing in summer, when particle growth processes are not so favored due to the higher atmospheric dilution factors. The origin of this ultrafine sulfate has been attributed to direct emissions from traffic, associated to the nucleation mode. Regarding the nitrate concentration, it was found higher in the coarse mode than in the accumulation mode on an annual basis. The highest concentrations were measured in winter episodic situations. The marked seasonal variability shown in the

  18. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  19. Size distribution and scattering phase function of aerosol particles retrieved from sky brightness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Gitelson, A.; Karnieli, A.; Ganor, E. (Editor); Fraser, R. S.; Nakajima, T.; Mattoo, S.; Holben, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    Ground-based measurements of the solar transmission and sky radiance in a horizontal plane through the Sun are taken in several geographical regions and aerosol types: dust in a desert transition zone in Israel, sulfate particles in Eastern and Western Europe, tropical aerosol in Brazil, and mixed continental/maritime aerosol in California. Stratospheric aerosol was introduced after the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. Therefore measurements taken before the eruption are used to analyze the properties of tropospheric aerosol; measurements from 1992 are also used to detect the particle size and concentration of stratospheric aerosol. The measurements are used to retrieve the size distribution and the scattering phase function at large scattering angles of the undisturbed aerosol particles. The retrieved properties represent an average on the entire atmospheric column. A comparison between the retrieved phase function for a scattering angle of 120 deg, with phase function predicted from the retrieved size distribution, is used to test the assumption of particle homogeneity and sphericity in radiative transfer models (Mie theory). The effect was found to be small (20% +/- 15%). For the stratospheric aerosol (sulfates), as expected, the phase function was very well predicted using the Mie theory. A model with a power law distribution, based on the spectral dependence of the optical thickness, alpha, cannot estimate accurately the phase function (up to 50% error for lambda = 0.87 microns). Before the Pinatubo eruption the ratio between the volumes of sulfate and coarse particles was very well correlated with alpha. The Pinatubo stratospheric aerosol destroyed this correlation. The aerosol optical properties are compared with analysis of the size, shape, and composition of the individual particles by electron microscopy of in situ samples. The measured volume size distribution before the injection of stratospheric aerosol consistently show two modes, sulfate

  20. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature, and CO2 concentrations. Recent reconstructions of BVOC emissions have predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased, while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased; however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS (Goddard Earth Observing System; TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional) global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g., SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) turned off and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of > 25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in the combined aerosol radiative effect (direct and indirect) of > 0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields, and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2 and the global mean cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of between -0.008 and -0.056 W m-2. This change in aerosols, and the associated radiative forcing, could be a largely overlooked and important anthropogenic aerosol effect on regional climates.

  1. Size Resolved measurements of aerosol hygroscopicity and mixing state during Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R. M.; Artaxo, P.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Day, D. A.; de Sá, S. S.; Hu, W.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kuang, C.; Palm, B. B.; Krüger, M. L.; Manzi, A. O.; Martin, S. T.; Poeschl, U.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Senum, G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Springston, S. R.; Alexander, M. L.; Watson, T. B.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of size-resolved cloud condensation nucleai (CCN) spectra were performed at the T3 site of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) field project located near Manacapuru, Brazil during 2014. The T3 site is a receptor site for both polluted urban down-wind (Manaus, BR a city of several million 70 km up wind) and background (Amazon rainforest) air-masses and can provide a contrast between clean and polluted conditions. Particle hygroscopicity (kappa) and mixing state were calculated from the particle activation spectrum measured by size selecting aerosols and exposing them to a wide range of supersaturation in the CCN counter (Droplet Measurement Technologies Continuous-Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber). The supersaturation was varied between 0.07 and 1.1% by changing a combination of both total flow rate and temperature gradient in the CCN counter. Measured spectra were examined for air masses with different level of influence from Manaus plume. Particle hygroscopicity generally peaked near noon local time which was broadly consistent with the trend in aerosol sulfate. The average kappa values during the first intensive operation period were 0.14±0.05, 0.14±0.04 and 0.16±0.06 for 75, 112 and 171 nm particles respectively. Evaluation of particle hygroscopicity and dispersion (mixing state) will be presented with respect to size and level of pollution.

  2. COMPOSITION OF SIZE-FRACTIONATED AEROSOL IN CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric aerosols were collected during a 21 day period in late summer of 1976 in Charleston, West Virginia, using five dichotomous virtual impactor samplers simultaneously. The resulting coarse and fine aerosol were analyzed with a variety of physical and chemical methods: gr...

  3. A better understanding of POLDER's cloud droplet size retrieval: impact of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and directional sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, H.; Chen, L.; Bréon, F.-M.; Letu, H.; Li, S.; Wang, Z.; Su, L.

    2015-07-01

    The principles of the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) cloud droplet size retrieval requires that clouds are horizontally homogeneous. Nevertheless, the retrieval is applied by combining all measurements from an area of 150 km × 150 km to compensate for POLDER's insufficient directional sampling. Using the POLDER-like data simulated with the RT3 model, we investigate the impact of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and directional sampling on the retrieval, and then analyze which spatial resolution is potentially accessible from the measurements. Case studies show that the sub-scale variability in droplet effective radius (CDR) can mislead both the CDR and effective variance (EV) retrievals. Nevertheless, the sub-scale variations in EV and cloud optical thickness (COT) only influence the EV retrievals and not the CDR estimate. In the directional sampling cases studied, the retrieval is accurate using limited observations and is largely independent of random noise. Several improvements have been made to the original POLDER droplet size retrieval. For example, the measurements in the primary rainbow region (137-145°) are used to ensure accurate large droplet (> 15 μm) retrievals and reduce the uncertainties caused by cloud heterogeneity. We apply the improved method using the POLDER global L1B data for June 2008, the new CDR results are compared with the operational CDRs. The comparison show that the operational CDRs tend to be underestimated for large droplets. The reason is that the cloudbow oscillations in the scattering angle region of 145-165° are weak for cloud fields with CDR > 15 μm. Lastly, a sub-scale retrieval case is analyzed, illustrating that a higher resolution, e.g., 42 km × 42 km, can be used when inverting cloud droplet size parameters from POLDER measurements.

  4. Impact of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and directional sampling on the retrieval of cloud droplet size by the POLDER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, H.; Chen, L.; Bréon, F. M.; Letu, H.; Li, S.; Wang, Z.; Su, L.

    2015-11-01

    The principles of cloud droplet size retrieval via Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance (POLDER) requires that clouds be horizontally homogeneous. The retrieval is performed by combining all measurements from an area of 150 km × 150 km to compensate for POLDER's insufficient directional sampling. Using POLDER-like data simulated with the RT3 model, we investigate the impact of cloud horizontal inhomogeneity and directional sampling on the retrieval and analyze which spatial resolution is potentially accessible from the measurements. Case studies show that the sub-grid-scale variability in droplet effective radius (CDR) can significantly reduce valid retrievals and introduce small biases to the CDR (~ 1.5 μm) and effective variance (EV) estimates. Nevertheless, the sub-grid-scale variations in EV and cloud optical thickness (COT) only influence the EV retrievals and not the CDR estimate. In the directional sampling cases studied, the retrieval using limited observations is accurate and is largely free of random noise. Several improvements have been made to the original POLDER droplet size retrieval. For example, measurements in the primary rainbow region (137-145°) are used to ensure retrievals of large droplet (> 15 μm) and to reduce the uncertainties caused by cloud heterogeneity. We apply the improved method using the POLDER global L1B data from June 2008, and the new CDR results are compared with the operational CDRs. The comparison shows that the operational CDRs tend to be underestimated for large droplets because the cloudbow oscillations in the scattering angle region of 145-165° are weak for cloud fields with CDR > 15 μm. Finally, a sub-grid-scale retrieval case demonstrates that a higher resolution, e.g., 42 km × 42 km, can be used when inverting cloud droplet size distribution parameters from POLDER measurements.

  5. β-lactoglobulin stabilized nanemulsions--Formulation and process factors affecting droplet size and nanoemulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali; Mekhloufi, Ghozlene; Huang, Nicolas; Agnely, Florence

    2016-03-16

    To avoid the toxicological concerns associated to synthetic surfactants, proteins might be an alternative for the stabilization of pharmaceutical nanoemulsions. The present study investigates the use of β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) to stabilize oil in water biocompatible nanoemulsions intended for a pharmaceutical use and prepared by high pressure homogenization (HPH). The effects of composition (nature and weight fraction of oil, β-lg concentration) and of process parameters (pressure and number of cycles) on the droplet size and on the stability of nanoemulsions were thoroughly assessed. The nanoemulsions prepared with β-lg at 1 wt% and with 5 wt% Miglyol 812 (the oil with the lowest viscosity) displayed a relatively small particle size (about 200 nm) and a low polydispersity when a homogenization pressure of 100 MPa was applied for 4 cycles. These nanoemulsions were the most stable formulations over 30 days at least. Emulsification efficiency of β-lg was reduced at higher homogenization pressures (200 MPa and 300 MPa). The effect of HPH process on the interfacial properties of β-lg was evaluated by drop shape analysis. This treatment had an effect neither on the interfacial tension nor on the interfacial dilatational rheology of β-lg at the Miglyol 812/water interface. PMID:26784982

  6. Fat Emulsion Intragastric Stability and Droplet Size Modulate Gastrointestinal Responses and Subsequent Food Intake in Young Adults1234

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mahamoud O; Hoad, Caroline L; Wright, Jeff; Singh, Gulzar; Stephenson, Mary C; Cox, Eleanor F; Placidi, Elisa; Pritchard, Susan E; Costigan, Carolyn; Ribeiro, Henelyta; Ciampi, Elisabetta; Nandi, Asish; Hedges, Nick; Sanderson, Paul; Peters, Harry PF; Rayment, Pip; Spiller, Robin C; Gowland, Penny A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intragastric creaming and droplet size of fat emulsions may affect intragastric behavior and gastrointestinal and satiety responses. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that gastrointestinal physiologic responses and satiety will be increased by an increase in intragastric stability and by a decrease in fat droplet size of a fat emulsion. Methods: This was a double-blind, randomized crossover study in 11 healthy persons [8 men and 3 women, aged 24 ± 1 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 24.4 ± 0.9] who consumed meals containing 300-g 20% oil and water emulsion (2220 kJ) with 1) larger, 6-μm mean droplet size (Coarse treatment) expected to cream in the stomach; 2) larger, 6-μm mean droplet size with 0.5% locust bean gum (LBG; Coarse+LBG treatment) to prevent creaming; or 3) smaller, 0.4-μm mean droplet size with LBG (Fine+LBG treatment). The participants were imaged hourly by using MRI and food intake was assessed by using a meal that participants consumed ad libitum. Results: The Coarse+LBG treatment (preventing creaming in the stomach) slowed gastric emptying, resulting in 12% higher gastric volume over time (P < 0.001), increased small bowel water content (SBWC) by 11% (P < 0.01), slowed appearance of the 13C label in the breath by 17% (P < 0.01), and reduced food intake by 9% (P < 0.05) compared with the Coarse treatment. The Fine+LBG treatment (smaller droplet size) slowed gastric emptying, resulting in 18% higher gastric volume (P < 0.001), increased SBWC content by 15% (P < 0.01), and significantly reduced food intake by 11% (P < 0.05, equivalent to an average of 411 kJ less energy consumed) compared with the Coarse+LBG treatment. These high-fat meals stimulated substantial increases in SBWC, which increased to a peak at 4 h at 568 mL (range: 150–854 mL; P < 0.01) for the Fine+LBG treatment. Conclusion: Manipulating intragastric stability and fat emulsion droplet size can influence human gastrointestinal physiology and food intake. PMID

  7. Size distribution of carbonaceous aerosols at a high-altitude site on the central Tibetan Plateau (Nam Co Station, 4730 m a.s.l.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xin; Kang, Shichang; Wang, Yuesi; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Bin; Guo, Yuhong; Wen, Tianxue; Zhang, Guoshuai; Cong, Zhiyuan

    2015-02-01

    The chemical composition and size distribution characteristics of atmospheric aerosols have important effects on the environment, human health and climate change. In this paper, we study the size distribution of carbonaceous aerosols at the remote and pristine site, Nam Co Monitoring and Research Station for Multisphere Interactions, in the inland Tibetan Plateau (TP) based on collected size-segregated aerosols during 2012. The samples were quantified using the thermal/optical (TOR) method. The overall average concentrations of OC and EC in TSP, PM9.0, PM2.1, and PM1.0 were 4.61 μg m- 3 and 0.19 μg m- 3, 4.52 μg m- 3 and 0.18 μg m- 3, 2.72 μg m- 3 and 0.11 μg m- 3, and 2.11 μg m- 3 and 0.09 μg m- 3, respectively. Generally, the highest concentration of OC and EC in different aerosol size occurred during winter. The low level of EC indicated that direct anthropogenic disturbances in the interior of the TP still remain insignificant. The size distributions of OC and EC concentrations presented bimodal variations. In winter, pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon seasons, the peaks for OC were in droplet mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and coarse mode (4.7-5.8 μm); while in the monsoon period, the coarse mode shifted to a smaller size bin (3.3-4.7 μm). The coarse mode may be due to dust particles while the droplet mode may be due to the growth process of particles. For EC, the peaks variations in coarse mode were as same as OC, while the other peaks were complicated: the peaks during winter, pre-monsoon, and monsoon seasons exhibited in droplet mode (1.1-2.1 μm, 0.65-1.1 μm, and 0.43-0.65 μm, respectively), and in post-monsoon period, the peak located in condensation mode. The highest peak concentrations for OC and EC occurred in winter and the pre-monsoon period, while the lowest peak values in the monsoon and post-monsoon periods, respectively. The size distribution variations may be caused by deposition, gas/particles exchange, hygroscopic growth, external mixing

  8. Measuring Size, Size Distribution, and Polydispersity of Water-in-Oil Microemulsion Droplets using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: Comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-02-11

    Water-in-oil microemulsion droplets (MEDs) are thermodynamically stable supramolecular structures formed in a mixture of water and oil, stabilized by surfactant layer. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to measure the diffusion, and the size, size distribution, and polydispersity of MEDs prepared in ternary mixtures of water/oil/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in heptane, isooctane, and nonane at (near) single droplet level. We compare FCS data directly to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data, which shows that the optical matching point (OMP) conditions of MEDs in different oils (where excess optical polarizability of droplets vanish) severely influence DLS data, while FCS extracts the accurate size, size distribution, and polydispersity of AOT-MEDs in all three oils. This suggests that extreme precaution must be taken in acquiring and explaining DLS data of MEDs in solution. FCS data show nearly identical W0-dependent (peak) size variations of AOT-MEDs in all three oils, though a subtle increase in (average) polydispersity of droplets is observed with increase in carbon chain length of oils. Establishing the accuracy of FCS data for AOT-MEDs, we further apply FCS to measure the size parameters of MEDs prepared in a quaternary mixture of water/oil/cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/1-butanol in hexane, heptane, and isooctane. Unlike AOT-MEDs, FCS data show substantial effect of added cosurfactant (1-butanol) and external oil on size, size distribution and polydispersity of quaternary CTAB-MEDs. Analysis of size distributions reveals large variation of polydispersity which possibly indicates the existence of larger shape heterogeneity, together with size heterogeneity, of CTAB-MEDs compared to AOT-MEDs in solution. PMID:26784288

  9. Size Resolved Measurements of Springtime Aerosol Particles over the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Samuel A.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Cliff, Stephen S.; Zhao, Yongjing; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Chu, Yu-Chi; Westphal, Douglas L.

    2012-01-01

    Large sources of aerosol particles and their precursors are ubiquitous in East Asia. Such sources are known to impact the South China Sea (henceforth SCS), a sometimes heavily polluted region that has been suggested as particularly vulnerable to climate change. To help elucidate springtime aerosol transport into the SCS, an intensive study was performed on the remote Dongsha (aka Pratas) Islands Atoll in spring 2010. As part of this deployment, a Davis Rotating-drum Uniform size-cut Monitor (DRUM) cascade impactor was deployed to collect size-resolved aerosol samples at the surface that were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence for concentrations of selected elements. HYSPLIT backtrajectories indicated that the transport of aerosol observed at the surface at Dongsha was occurring primarily from regions generally to the north and east. This observation was consistent with the apparent persistence of pollution and dust aerosol, along with sea salt, in the ground-based dataset. In contrast to the sea-level observations, modeled aerosol transport suggested that the westerly flow aloft (w700 hPa) transported smoke-laden air toward the site from regions from the south and west. Measured aerosol optical depth at the site was highest during time periods of modeled heavy smoke loadings aloft. These periods did not coincide with elevated aerosol concentrations at the surface, although the model suggested sporadic mixing of this free-tropospheric aerosol to the surface over the SCS. A biomass burning signature was not clearly identified in the surface aerosol composition data, consistent with this aerosol type remaining primarily aloft and not mixing strongly to the surface during the study. Significant vertical wind shear in the region also supports the idea that different source regions lead to varying aerosol impacts in different vertical layers, and suggests the potential for considerable vertical inhomogeneity in the SCS aerosol environment.

  10. Estimation of Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content Using Radar and Lidar: Marine Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J. Vivek; Jensen, Jorgen; Ellis, Scott; Morley, Bruce; Tsai, Peisang; Spuler, Scott; Ghate, Virendra; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    During the Cloud Systems Evolution in the Trades (CSET) field campaign airborne measurements from the High-Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Cloud Radar (HCR) and the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) were made in the North Pacific. In addition, in situ observations of cloud and aerosols size distributions and radiation were also collected. The HCR operated at a frequency of 94 GHz (3 mm wavelength) and collected observations at high temporal (0.5 sec) and range (30 m) resolution. The capability of HCR is enhanced by the coordination with the HSRL that made high temporal and range resolution observations of calibrated backscatter and extinction. The lidar, designed and built by the University of Wisconsin. The radar and lidar are designed to fly on the NCAR Gulfstream V HIAPER aircraft. The remote and in situ measurements collected during CSET offer opportunities for evaluating the engineering performance of the instruments and developing cloud microphysical scientific products. The coincident HCR and HSRL measurements are analyzed for assess their utility to characterize cloud boundaries, estimate liquid water content (LWC) and mean particle size. Retrievals of LWC and mean particle sizes from remote radar and lidar measurements will be compared with those from the in situ instruments.

  11. IS THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF URBAN AEROSOLS DETERMINED BY THERMODYNAMIC EQUILIBRIUM? (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size-resolved equilibrium model, SELIQUID, is presented and used to simulate the size–composition distribution of semi-volatile inorganic aerosol in an urban environment. The model uses the efflorescence branch of aerosol behavior to predict the equilibrium partitioni...

  12. TIME-OF-FLIGHT AEROSOL BEAM SPECTROMETER FOR PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A time-of-flight aerosol beam spectrometer (TOFABS) is described. The instrument has been designed and constructed to perform in situ real time measurements of the aerodynamic size of individual aerosol particles in the range 0.3 to 10 micrometers diameter. The measurement method...

  13. Influence of droplet size on the efficacy of oil-in-water emulsions loaded with phenolic antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Terjung, Nino; Löffler, Myriam; Gibis, Monika; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2012-03-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of droplet size on the antimicrobial activity of emulsions containing two essential oil compounds that are known for their antimicrobial effectiveness: carvacrol and eugenol. Coarse emulsions were prepared by blending a triacylglyceride (Miglyol 812N) containing various concentrations of carvacrol or eugenol (5, 15, 30, 50 wt%) at an oil droplet mass fraction of 10 wt% with an aqueous phase containing 2 wt% Tween 80(®). Premixes were then further dispersed using a high shear blender, a high pressure homogenizer at different pressures or an ultrasonicator to produce droplets with a variety of mean diameters. Microscopy and light scattering storage stability studies over 10 days indicated that manufactured emulsions were stable, i.e. that no aggregation, creaming or other destabilization mechanisms occurred and droplet size distributions remained unchanged. The antimicrobial activity of emulsions was assessed against two model microorganisms, the Gram negative Escherichia coli C 600 and the Gram positive Listeria innocua, by determining growth over time behavior. The analysis yielded the unexpected result that emulsions with larger droplet sizes were more effective at inhibiting growth and inactivating cells than smaller ones. For example, emulsions with a mean oil droplet size of 3000 nm at a concentration of 800 ppm carvacrol completely inhibited L. innocua, while for 80 nm emulsions, only a delay of growth could be observed. Measurements of the concentration of the antimicrobial compounds in the aqueous phase indicated that concentrations of eugenol and carvacrol decreased with decreasing oil droplet sizes. Determination of interfacial tension further showed that eugenol and carvacrol are preferentially located in the oil-water interfaces. Theoretical calculations of Tween 80(®) concentrations needed to saturate interfaces suggested that in small emulsions for the given formulation less Tween 80(®) micelles are present

  14. Cloud Nucleating Properties of Aerosols During TexAQS - GoMACCS 2006: Influence of Aerosol Sources, Composition, and Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.; Coffman, D. J.; Covert, D. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Alllan, J. D.; Worsnop, D.

    2006-12-01

    TexAQS - GoMACCS 2006 was conducted from July to September 2006 in the Gulf of Mexico and Houston Ship Channel to investigate sources and processing of gas and particulate phase species and to determine their impact on regional air quality and climate. As part of the experiment, the NOAA R.V. Ronald H. Brown transited from Charleston, S.C. to the study region. The ship was equipped with a full compliment of gas and aerosol instruments. To determine the cloud nucleating properties of aerosols, measurements were made of the aerosol number size distribution, aerosol chemical composition, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration at five supersaturations. During the transit and over the course of the experiment, a wide range of aerosol sources and types was encountered. These included urban and industrial emissions from the S.E. U.S. as the ship left Charleston, a mixture of Saharan dust and marine aerosol during the transit around Florida and across the Gulf of Mexico, urban emissions from Houston, and emissions from the petrochemical industries, oil platforms, and marine vessels in the Gulf coast region. Highest activation ratios (ratio of CCN to total particle number concentration at 0.4 percent supersaturation) were measured in anthropogenic air masses when the aerosol was composed primarily of ammonium sulfate salts and in marine air masses with an aerosol composed of sulfate and sea salt. A strong gradient in activation ratio was measured as the ship moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the end of the Houston Ship Channel (values decreasing from about 0.8 to less than 0.1) and the aerosol changed from marine to industrial. The activation ratio under these different regimes in addition to downwind of marine vessels and oil platforms will be discussed in the context of the aerosol size distribution and chemical composition. The discussion of composition will include the organic mass fraction of the aerosol, the degree of oxidation of the organics, and the water

  15. Development and application of an aerosol screening model for size-resolved urban aerosols.

    PubMed

    Stanier, Charles O; Lee, Sang-Rin

    2014-06-01

    Predictive models of vehicular ultrafine particles less than 0.1 microm in diameter (UFPs*) and other urban pollutants with high spatial and temporal variation are useful and important in applications such as (1) decision support for infrastructure projects, emissions controls, and transportation-mode shifts; (2) the interpretation and enhancement of observations (e.g., source apportionment, extrapolation, interpolation, and gap-filling in space and time); and (3) the generation of spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates where monitoring is unfeasible. The objective of the current study was to develop, test, and apply the Aerosol Screening Model (ASM), a new physically based vehicular UFP model for use in near-road environments. The ASM simulates hourly average outdoor concentrations of roadway-derived aerosols and gases. Its distinguishing features include user-specified spatial resolution; use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorologic model for winds estimates; use of a database of more than 100,000 road segments in the Los Angeles, California, region, including freeway ramps and local streets; and extensive testing against more than 9000 hours of observed particle concentrations at 11 sites. After initialization of air parcels at an upwind boundary, the model solves for vehicle emissions, dispersion, coagulation, and deposition using a Lagrangian modeling framework. The Lagrangian parcel of air is subdivided vertically (into 11 levels) and in the crosswind direction (into 3 parcels). It has overall dimensions of 10 m (downwind), 300 m (vertically), and 2.1 km (crosswind). The simulation is typically started 4 km upwind from the receptor, that is, the location at which the exposure is to be estimated. As parcels approach the receptor, depending on the user-specified resolution, step size is decreased, and crosswind resolution is enhanced through subdivision of parcels in the crosswind direction. Hourly concentrations and size

  16. Anionic, Cationic, and Nonionic Surfactants in Atmospheric Aerosols from the Baltic Coast at Askö, Sweden: Implications for Cloud Droplet Activation.

    PubMed

    Gérard, Violaine; Nozière, Barbara; Baduel, Christine; Fine, Ludovic; Frossard, Amanda A; Cohen, Ronald C

    2016-03-15

    Recent analyses of atmospheric aerosols from different regions have demonstrated the ubiquitous presence of strong surfactants and evidenced surface tension values, σ, below 40 mN m(-1), suspected to enhance the cloud-forming potential of these aerosols. In this work, this approach was further improved and combined with absolute concentration measurements of aerosol surfactants by colorimetric titration. This analysis was applied to PM2.5 aerosols collected at the Baltic station of Askö, Sweden, from July to October 2010. Strong surfactants were found in all the sampled aerosols, with σ = (32-40) ± 1 mN m(-1) and concentrations of at least 27 ± 6 mM or 104 ± 21 pmol m(-3). The absolute surface tension curves and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) determined for these aerosol surfactants show that (1) surfactants are concentrated enough in atmospheric particles to strongly depress the surface tension until activation, and (2) the surface tension does not follow the Szyszkowski equation during activation but is nearly constant and minimal, which provides new insights on cloud droplet activation. In addition, both the CMCs determined and the correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.7) between aerosol surfactant concentrations and chlorophyll-a seawater concentrations suggest a marine and biological origin for these compounds. PMID:26895279

  17. Spatio-temporal droplet size statistics in developing spray of starchy solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2015-07-01

    In the given research, the spray jet breakup of a modified starch solution was studied as a function of jet injection time and nozzle orifice diameter. The starch-urea-borax solution was prepared and tested with three axisymmetric full cone nozzles at service temperature of 80°C and the injection pressure of 5 bar. It is worth mentioning that no jet breakup was seen below these temperature and pressure values. The imaging studies on the time based spray evolution revealed monotonic increase in both; spray cone angle and tip penetration with an increase in injection time form 0-300 mm. Hereinafter, both parameters exhibited constants value over injection time. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements of the droplet size revealed significant decrease in the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) along the spray centerline. However, a steady decrease in SMD was seen towards the spray boundary. For fixed injection time of 300 ms, the overall SMD was decreased from 112 to 71 µm at 60 mm downstream, from 102 to 64 µm at 100 mm downstream and from 85 to 61 µm at 140 mm downstream with an increase in orifice diameter from 1.19 to 1.59 mm.

  18. Parametric retrieval model for estimating aerosol size distribution via the AERONET, LAGOS station.

    PubMed

    Emetere, Moses Eterigho; Akinyemi, Marvel Lola; Akin-Ojo, Omololu

    2015-12-01

    The size characteristics of atmospheric aerosol over the tropical region of Lagos, Southern Nigeria were investigated using two years of continuous spectral aerosol optical depth measurements via the AERONET station for four major bands i.e. blue, green, red and infrared. Lagos lies within the latitude of 6.465°N and longitude of 3.406°E. Few systems of dispersion model was derived upon specified conditions to solve challenges on aerosols size distribution within the Stokes regime. The dispersion model was adopted to derive an aerosol size distribution (ASD) model which is in perfect agreement with existing model. The parametric nature of the formulated ASD model shows the independence of each band to determine the ASD over an area. The turbulence flow of particulates over the area was analyzed using the unified number (Un). A comparative study via the aid of the Davis automatic weather station was carried out on the Reynolds number, Knudsen number and the Unified number. The Reynolds and Unified number were more accurate to describe the atmospheric fields of the location. The aerosols loading trend in January to March (JFM) and August to October (ASO) shows a yearly 15% retention of aerosols in the atmosphere. The effect of the yearly aerosol retention can be seen to partly influence the aerosol loadings between October and February. PMID:26452005

  19. Influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of rosemary extract loaded oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Martin E; Zeeb, Benjamin; Salminen, Hanna; Gibis, Monika; Lautenschlaeger, Ralf; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    The influence of droplet size on the antioxidant activity of oil-in-water emulsions loaded with rosemary extract in mixed emulsion systems was investigated. Firstly, differently sized hexadecane-in-water model emulsions (10% (w/w) hexadecane, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) containing 4000 ppm rosemary extract in the oil phase or without added antioxidant were prepared using a high shear blender and/or high-pressure homogenizer. Secondly, emulsions were mixed with fish oil-in-water emulsions (10% (w/w) fish oil, 2% (w/w) Tween 80, pH 5 or 7) at a mixing ratio of 1 : 1. Optical microscopy and static light scattering measurements indicated that emulsions were physically stable for 21 days, except for the slight aggregation of emulsions with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm. The droplet size of hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract had no influence on the formation of lipid hydroperoxides at pH 5 and 7. Significantly lower concentrations of propanal were observed for the emulsions loaded with rosemary extract with a mean droplet size d₄₃ of 4500 nm from day 12 to 16 at pH 7. Finally, hexadecane-in-water emulsions containing rosemary extract significantly retarded lipid oxidation of fish oil-in-water emulsions in mixed systems, but no differences in antioxidant efficacy between the differently sized emulsions were observed at pH 5. PMID:25586114

  20. Identification of key aerosol populations through their size and composition resolved spectral scattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Barnaba, F.; Angelini, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    Characterizing chemical and physical aerosol properties is important to understand their sources, effects, and feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere. This study proposes a scheme to classify aerosol populations based on their spectral optical properties (absorption and scattering). The scheme is obtained thanks to the outstanding set of information on particle size and composition these properties contain. The spectral variability of the aerosol single scattering albedo (dSSA), and the extinction, scattering and absorption Angstrom exponents (EAE, SAE and AAE, respectively) were observed on the basis of two-year measurements of aerosol optical properties (scattering and absorption coefficients at blue, green and red wavelengths) performed in the suburbs of Rome (Italy). Optical measurements of various aerosol types were coupled to measurements of particle number size distributions and relevant optical properties simulations (Mie theory). These latter allowed the investigation of the role of the particle size and composition in the bulk aerosol properties observed. The combination of simulations and measurements suggested a general "paradigm" built on dSSA, SAE and AAE to optically classify aerosols. The paradigm proved suitable to identify the presence of key aerosol populations, including soot, biomass burning, organics, dust and marine particles. The work highlights that (i) aerosol populations show distinctive combinations of SAE and dSSA times AAE, these variables being linked by a linear inverse relation varying with varying SSA; (ii) fine particles show EAE > 1.5, whilst EAE < 2 is found for both coarse particles and ultrafine soot-rich aerosols; (iii) fine and coarse particles both show SSA > 0.8, whilst ultrafine urban Aitken mode and soot particles show SSA < 0.8. The proposed paradigm agrees with aerosol observations performed during past major field campaigns, this indicating that relations concerning the paradigm have a general validity.

  1. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  2. Multi-modal analysis of aerosol robotic network size distributions for remote sensing applications: dominant aerosol type cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2014-03-01

    To date, size distributions obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET) have been fit with bi-lognormals defined by six secondary microphysical parameters: the volume concentration, effective radius, and the variance of fine and coarse particle modes. However, since the total integrated volume concentration is easily calculated and can be used as an accurate constraint, the problem of fitting the size distribution can be reduced to that of deducing a single free parameter - the mode separation point. We present a method for determining the mode separation point for equivalent-volume bi-lognormal distributions based on optimization of the root mean squared error and the coefficient of determination. The extracted secondary parameters are compared with those provided by AERONET's Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion algorithm for a set of benchmark dominant aerosol types, including desert dust, biomass burning aerosol, urban sulphate and sea salt. The total volume concentration constraint is then also lifted by performing multi-modal fits to the size distribution using nested Gaussian mixture models, and a method is presented for automating the selection of the optimal number of modes using a stopping condition based on Fisher statistics and via the application of statistical hypothesis testing. It is found that the method for optimizing the location of the mode separation point is independent of the shape of the aerosol volume size distribution (AVSD), does not require the existence of a local minimum in the size interval 0.439 μm ≤ r ≤ 0.992 μm, and shows some potential for optimizing the bi-lognormal fitting procedure used by AERONET particularly in the case of desert dust aerosol. The AVSD of impure marine aerosol is found to require three modes. In this particular case, bi-lognormals fail to recover key features of the AVSD. Fitting the AVSD more generally with multi-modal models allows automatic detection of a statistically significant number of aerosol

  3. Design of Experiments to Study the Impact of Process Parameters on Droplet Size and Development of Non-Invasive Imaging Techniques in Tablet Coating.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Thomas J; Smith, Julian; Hofmann, Michael P; Bland, Charlotte E; Badhan, Raj K; Al-Khattawi, Ali; Mohammed, Afzal R

    2016-01-01

    Atomisation of an aqueous solution for tablet film coating is a complex process with multiple factors determining droplet formation and properties. The importance of droplet size for an efficient process and a high quality final product has been noted in the literature, with smaller droplets reported to produce smoother, more homogenous coatings whilst simultaneously avoiding the risk of damage through over-wetting of the tablet core. In this work the effect of droplet size on tablet film coat characteristics was investigated using X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A quality by design approach utilising design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise the conditions necessary for production of droplets at a small (20 μm) and large (70 μm) droplet size. Droplet size distribution was measured using real-time laser diffraction and the volume median diameter taken as a response. DOE yielded information on the relationship three critical process parameters: pump rate, atomisation pressure and coating-polymer concentration, had upon droplet size. The model generated was robust, scoring highly for model fit (R2 = 0.977), predictability (Q2 = 0.837), validity and reproducibility. Modelling confirmed that all parameters had either a linear or quadratic effect on droplet size and revealed an interaction between pump rate and atomisation pressure. Fluidised bed coating of tablet cores was performed with either small or large droplets followed by CLSM and XμCT imaging. Addition of commonly used contrast materials to the coating solution improved visualisation of the coating by XμCT, showing the coat as a discrete section of the overall tablet. Imaging provided qualitative and quantitative evidence revealing that smaller droplets formed thinner, more uniform and less porous film coats. PMID:27548263

  4. Design of Experiments to Study the Impact of Process Parameters on Droplet Size and Development of Non-Invasive Imaging Techniques in Tablet Coating

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Thomas J.; Smith, Julian; Hofmann, Michael P.; Bland, Charlotte E.; Badhan, Raj K.; Al-Khattawi, Ali; Mohammed, Afzal R.

    2016-01-01

    Atomisation of an aqueous solution for tablet film coating is a complex process with multiple factors determining droplet formation and properties. The importance of droplet size for an efficient process and a high quality final product has been noted in the literature, with smaller droplets reported to produce smoother, more homogenous coatings whilst simultaneously avoiding the risk of damage through over-wetting of the tablet core. In this work the effect of droplet size on tablet film coat characteristics was investigated using X-ray microcomputed tomography (XμCT) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). A quality by design approach utilising design of experiments (DOE) was used to optimise the conditions necessary for production of droplets at a small (20 μm) and large (70 μm) droplet size. Droplet size distribution was measured using real-time laser diffraction and the volume median diameter taken as a response. DOE yielded information on the relationship three critical process parameters: pump rate, atomisation pressure and coating-polymer concentration, had upon droplet size. The model generated was robust, scoring highly for model fit (R2 = 0.977), predictability (Q2 = 0.837), validity and reproducibility. Modelling confirmed that all parameters had either a linear or quadratic effect on droplet size and revealed an interaction between pump rate and atomisation pressure. Fluidised bed coating of tablet cores was performed with either small or large droplets followed by CLSM and XμCT imaging. Addition of commonly used contrast materials to the coating solution improved visualisation of the coating by XμCT, showing the coat as a discrete section of the overall tablet. Imaging provided qualitative and quantitative evidence revealing that smaller droplets formed thinner, more uniform and less porous film coats. PMID:27548263

  5. Evaluation of a size-resolved aerosol model based on satellite and ground observations and its implication on aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fangqun

    2016-04-01

    The latest AeroCom phase II experiments have showed a large diversity in the simulations of aerosol concentrations, size distribution, vertical profile, and optical properties among 16 detailed global aerosol microphysics models, which contribute to the large uncertainty in the predicted aerosol radiative forcing and possibly induce the distinct climate change in the future. In the last few years, we have developed and improved a global size-resolved aerosol model (Yu and Luo, 2009; Ma et al., 2012; Yu et al., 2012), GEOS-Chem-APM, which is a prognostic multi-type, multi-component, size-resolved aerosol microphysics model, including state-of-the-art nucleation schemes and condensation of low volatile secondary organic compounds from successive oxidation aging. The model is one of 16 global models for AeroCom phase II and participated in a couple of model inter-comparison experiments. In this study, we employed multi-year aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from 2004 to 2012 taken from ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite retrievals to evaluate the performance of the GEOS-Chem-APM in predicting aerosol optical depth, including spatial distribution, reginal variation and seasonal variabilities. Compared to the observations, the modelled AOD is overall good over land, but quite low over ocean possibly due to low sea salt emission in the model and/or higher AOD in satellite retrievals, specifically MODIS and MISR. We chose 72 AERONET sites having at least 36 months data available and representative of high spatial domain to compare with the model and satellite data. Comparisons in various representative regions show that the model overall agrees well in the major anthropogenic emission regions, such as Europe, East Asia and North America. Relative to the observations, the modelled AOD is

  6. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  7. Measurements of Aerosol Charge and Size Distribution for Graphite, Gold, Palladium, and Silver Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Simones, Matthew P.; Gutti, Veera R.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.

    2011-11-01

    The role of charge on aerosol evolution and hence the nuclear source term has been an issue of interest, and there is a need for both experimental techniques and modeling for quantifying this role. Our focus here is on further exploration of a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique to simultaneously measure both the size and charge (positive, negative and neutral) dependent aerosol distributions. We have generated graphite, gold, silver, and palladium nanoparticles (aerosol) using a spark generator. We measure the electrical mobility-size distributions for these aerosols using a TDMA, and from these data we deduce the full charge-size distributions. We observe asymmetry in the particle size distributions for negative and positive charges. This asymmetry could have a bearing on the dynamics of charged aerosols, indicating that the assumption of symmetry for size distributions of negatively and positively charged particles in source term simulations may not be always appropriate. Also, the experimental technique should find applications in measurements of aerosol rate processes that are affected by both particle charge and size (e.g. coagulation, deposition, resuspension), and hence in modeling and simulation of the nuclear source term.

  8. An explicit study of aerosol mass conversion and its parameterization in warm rain formation of cumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Fen, J.; Ungar, R. K.

    2013-10-01

    The life time of atmospheric aerosols is highly affected by in-cloud scavenging processes. Aerosol mass conversion from aerosols embedded in cloud droplets into aerosols embedded in raindrops is a pivotal pathway for wet removal of aerosols in clouds. The aerosol mass conversion rate in the bulk microphysics parameterizations is always assumed to be linearly related to the precipitation production rate, which includes the cloud water autoconversion rate and the cloud water accretion rate. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration has typically been considered to be the same as the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration. However, the mass of an aerosol embedded in a cloud droplet is not linearly proportional to the mass of the cloud droplet. A simple linear relationship cannot be drawn between the precipitation production rate and the aerosol mass concentration conversion rate. In this paper, we studied the evolution of aerosol mass concentration conversion rates in a warm rain formation process with a 1.5-dimensional non-hydrostatic convective cloud and aerosol interaction model in the bin microphysics. We found that the ratio of the aerosol mass conversion rate to the cloud aerosol mass concentration can be statistically expressed by the ratio of the precipitation production rate to the cloud droplet mass concentration with an exponential function. We further gave some regression equations to determine aerosol conversions in the warm rain formation under different threshold radii of raindrops and different aerosol size distributions.

  9. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols II: particle size distributions as a function of time.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, which generated and characterized aerosols containing DU from perforation of armored vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, incorporated a sampling protocol to evaluate particle size distributions. Aerosol particle size distribution is an important parameter that influences aerosol transport and deposition processes as well as the dosimetry of the inhaled particles. These aerosols were collected on cascade impactor substrates using a pre-established time sequence following the firing event to analyze the uranium concentration and particle size of the aerosols as a function of time. The impactor substrates were analyzed using proportional counting, and the derived uranium content of each served as input to the evaluation of particle size distributions. Activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMADs) of the particle size distributions were evaluated using unimodal and bimodal models. The particle size data from the impactor measurements were quite variable. Most size distributions measured in the test based on activity had bimodal size distributions with a small particle size mode in the range of between 0.2 and 1.2 microm and a large size mode between 2 and 15 microm. In general, the evolution of particle size over time showed an overall decrease of average particle size from AMADs of 5 to 10 microm shortly after perforation to around 1 microm at the end of the 2-h sampling period. The AMADs generally decreased over time because of settling. Additionally, the median diameter of the larger size mode decreased with time. These results were used to estimate the dosimetry of inhaled DU particles. PMID:19204485

  10. Evaluation of aerosol indirect radiative forcing in MIRAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghan, Steven; Easter, Richard; Hudson, James; BréOn, Francois-Marie

    2001-03-01

    We evaluate aerosol indirect radiative forcing simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchange (MIRAGE). Although explicit measurements of aerosol indirect radiative forcing do not exist, measurements of many of the links between aerosols and indirect radiative forcing are available and can be used for evaluation. These links include the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, the ratio of droplet number to aerosol number, the droplet number concentration, the column droplet number, the column cloud water, the droplet effective radius, the cloud optical depth, the correlation between cloud albedo and droplet effective radius, and the cloud radiative forcing. The CCN concentration simulated by MIRAGE agrees with measurements for supersaturations larger than 0.1% but not for smaller supersaturations. Simulated droplet number concentrations are too low in most but not all locations with available measurements, even when normalized by aerosol number. MIRAGE correctly simulates the higher droplet numbers and smaller droplet sizes over continents and in the Northern Hemisphere. Biases in column cloud water, cloud optical depth, and shortwave cloud radiative forcing are evident in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and in the subtropical oceans. MIRAGE correctly simulates a negative correlation between cloud albedo and droplet size over remote oceans for cloud optical depths greater than 15 and a positive correlation for cloud optical depths less than 15 but fails to simulate a negative correlation over land.

  11. Evaluation of Aerosol Indirect Radiative Forcing in MIRAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Hudson, J D.; Breon, Francois

    2001-04-01

    We evaluate aerosol indirect radiative forcing simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). Although explicit measurements of aerosol indirect radiative forcing do not exist, measurements of many of the links between aerosols and indirect radiative forcing are available and can be used for evaluation. These links include the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, the ratio of droplet number to aerosol number, the droplet number concentration, the column droplet number, the column cloud water, the droplet effective radius, the cloud optical depth, the correlation between cloud albedo and droplet effective radius, and the cloud radiative forcing. The CCN concentration simulated by MIRAGE agrees with measurements for supersaturations larger than 0.1%, but not for smaller supersaturations. Simulated droplet number concentrations are too low in most, but not all, locations with available measurements, even when normalized by aerosol number. MIRA GE correctly simulates the higher droplet numbers and smaller droplet sizes over continents and in the Northern Hemisphere. Biases in column cloud water, cloud optical depth, and shortwave cloud radiative forcing are evident in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and in the subtropical oceans. MIRAGE correctly simulates a negative correlation between cloud albedo and droplet size over remote oceans for cloud optical depths greater than 15 and a positive correlation for cloud optical depths less than 15, but fails to simulate a negative correlation over land.

  12. Size matters in the water uptake and hygroscopic growth of atmospherically relevant multicomponent aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Laskina, Olga; Morris, Holly S; Grandquist, Joshua R; Qin, Zhen; Stone, Elizabeth A; Tivanski, Alexei V; Grassian, Vicki H

    2015-05-14

    Understanding the interactions of water with atmospheric aerosols is crucial for determining the size, physical state, reactivity, and climate impacts of this important component of the Earth's atmosphere. Here we show that water uptake and hygroscopic growth of multicomponent, atmospherically relevant particles can be size dependent when comparing 100 nm versus ca. 6 μm sized particles. It was determined that particles composed of ammonium sulfate with succinic acid and of a mixture of chlorides typical of the marine environment show size-dependent hygroscopic behavior. Microscopic analysis of the distribution of components within the aerosol particles show that the size dependence is due to differences in the mixing state, that is, whether particles are homogeneously mixed or phase separated, for different sized particles. This morphology-dependent hygroscopicity has consequences for heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry as well as aerosol interactions with electromagnetic radiation and clouds. PMID:25521409

  13. Role of nucleation mechanism on the size dependent morphology of organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Muhammad Bilal; Zuend, Andreas; Freedman, Miriam Arak

    2016-07-28

    The origins of the size dependent morphology of organic aerosol are explored by probing the morphology of poly(ethylene glycol)-400/ammonium sulfate mixtures using cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy. Surprisingly, we observe a size dependence at some compositions, but not at others. Our results suggest that size dependence occurs due to an activated process. PMID:27356885

  14. Conductivity of laser printed copper structures limited by nano-crystal grain size and amorphous metal droplet shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Shoshana; Zenou, Michael; Kotler, Zvi

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of the morphology and electrical properties of copper structures which are printed by laser induced forward transfer from bulk copper. The percentage of voids and the oxidation levels are too low to account for the high resistivities (~4 to 14 times the resistivity of bulk monocrystalline copper) of these structures. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of slices cut from the printed areas using a focused ion beam (FIB) show nano-sized crystal structures with grain sizes that are smaller than the electron free path length. Scattering from such grain boundaries causes a significant increase in the resistivity and can explain the measured resistivities of the structures. The TEM images also show a nano-amorphous layer (~5 nm) at the droplet boundaries which also contributes to the overall resistivity. Such morphological characteristics are best explained by the ultrafast cooling rate of the molten copper droplets during printing.

  15. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF ELEMENTAL CARBON IN ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental problems caused by atmospheric aerosols are well documented in the specialized literature. Studies reporting on the role of dense clouds of soil particles in past mass extinctions of life on Earth and, more recently (Turco et al., 1983), on calculations of potential...

  16. Change Volumetric Distribution Spectrum of Atmospheric Aerosol Size Before Strong Earthquakes Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomin, Maxim

    A comparison of generalized portraits volumetric distribution of atmospheric aerosol size over seismic regions (Turkey) is carried out. The data from the World Observation Network «AERONET» - the results of remote radiometric observations of solar radiation and aerosol content in the atmosphere were used for analysis. Portraits for 30 daily time intervals with crustal earthquakes with magnitude greater than 5 and hypocenter not deeper than 30 kilometers, and for the background variations when the earthquake didn’t occur, were calculated. Abnormality of number effects in the morphology of the spectrum volumetric distribution of atmospheric aerosol size before strong crustal earthquakes was estimated, statistical analysis of identified forerunner effects was held. Possible reasons for changes in spectrum size of aerosols were discussed.

  17. Droplet Growth Kinetics in Various Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T. E.; Lathem, T. L.; Moore, R.; Lin, J. J.; Cerully, K. M.; Padro, L.; Lance, S.; Cozic, J.; Anderson, B. E.; Nenes, A.

    2012-12-01

    The largest uncertainties in the effects of atmospherics aerosols on the global radiation budget are related to their indirect effects on cloud properties (IPCC, the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2007). Cloud formation is a kinetic process where the resulting cloud properties depend on aerosol properties and meteorological parameters such as updraft velocity (e.g. McFiggans et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 2593-2649, 2006). Droplet growth rates are limited by the water vapor diffusion, but additional kinetic limitations, e.g., due to organic surface films, slow solute dissociation or highly viscous or glassy aerosol states have been hypothesized. Significant additional kinetic limitations can lead to increased cloud droplet number concentration, thus the effect is similar to those of increased aerosol number concentration or changes in vertical velocity (e.g. Nenes et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 29, 1848, 2002). There are a few studies where slow droplet growth has been observed (e.g. Ruehl et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L15814, 2009), however, little is currently known about their global occurrence and magnitude. Cloud micro-physics models often describe kinetic limitations by an effective water vapor uptake coefficient or similar parameter. Typically, determining aerosol water vapor uptake coefficients requires experimental observations of droplet growth which are interpreted by a numerical droplet growth model where the uptake coefficient is an adjustable parameter (e.g. Kolb et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 10, 10561-10605, 2010). Such methods have not been practical for high time-resolution or long term field measurements, until a model was recently developed for analyzing Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter data (Raatikainen et al., Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 4227-4243, 2012). Model verification experiments showed that the calibration aerosol droplet size can be predicted accurately

  18. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  19. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  20. A new stochastic algorithm for inversion of dust aerosol size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Li, Feng; Yang, Ma-ying

    2015-08-01

    Dust aerosol size distribution is an important source of information about atmospheric aerosols, and it can be determined from multiwavelength extinction measurements. This paper describes a stochastic inverse technique based on artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm to invert the dust aerosol size distribution by light extinction method. The direct problems for the size distribution of water drop and dust particle, which are the main elements of atmospheric aerosols, are solved by the Mie theory and the Lambert-Beer Law in multispectral region. And then, the parameters of three widely used functions, i.e. the log normal distribution (L-N), the Junge distribution (J-J), and the normal distribution (N-N), which can provide the most useful representation of aerosol size distributions, are inversed by the ABC algorithm in the dependent model. Numerical results show that the ABC algorithm can be successfully applied to recover the aerosol size distribution with high feasibility and reliability even in the presence of random noise.

  1. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Kohn, M.; Pekour, M. S.; Nelson, D. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2011-10-01

    Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC) as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS) instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts) but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid). The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  2. Size-resolved parameterization of primary organic carbon in fresh marine aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Michael S; Keene, William C; Erickson III, David J

    2009-12-01

    Marine aerosols produced by the bursting of artificially generated bubbles in natural seawater are highly enriched (2 to 3 orders of magnitude based on bulk composition) in marine-derived organic carbon (OC). Production of size-resolved particulate OC was parameterized based on a Langmuir kinetics-type association of OC to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from highly productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to account for the influence of adsorption on the size-resolved association between marine aerosols and OC. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated number and inorganic sea-salt mass production fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower limit of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (2.1 x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC (49 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper limits of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physiochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  3. Aerosol measurements at a high-elevation site: composition, size, and cloud condensation nuclei activity

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth; Zelenyuk, Alla; Beranek, Josef; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Hallar, Anna G.; McCubbin, Ian; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2013-12-09

    We present measurements of CCN concentrations and associated aerosol composition and size properties at a high-elevation research site in March 2011. CCN closure and aerosol hygroscopicity were assessed using simplified assumptions of bulk aerosol properties as well as a new method utilizing single particle composition and size to assess the importance of particle mixing state in CCN activation. Free troposphere analysis found no significant difference between the CCN activity of free tropospheric aerosol and boundary layer aerosol at this location. Closure results indicate that using only size and number information leads to adequate prediction, in the majority of cases within 50%, of CCN concentrations, while incorporating the hygroscopicity parameters of the individual aerosol components measured by single particle mass spectrometry adds to the agreement, in most cases within 20%, between predicted and measured CCN concentrations. For high-elevation continental sites, with largely aged aerosol and low amounts of local area emissions, a lack of chemical knowledge and hygroscopicity may not hinder models in predicting CCN concentrations. At sites influenced by fresh emissions or more heterogeneous particle types, single particle composition information may be more useful in predicting CCN concentrations and understanding the importance of particle mixing state on CCN activation.

  4. Size distribution and source analysis of ionic compositions of aerosols in polluted periods at Xinken in Pearl River Delta (PRD) of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang; Hu, Min; Slanina, Sjaak; He, Ling-Yan; Niu, Yu-Wen; Bruegemann, Erika; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    Size-resolved chemical composition of aerosol was investigated during the PRIDE intensive field campaign in October 2004 at Xinken, at Pearl River Delta (PRD), China. Xinken is a rural/coastal site located south of Guangzhou. Size-segregated particles were sampled using Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) in order to characterize regional aerosol pollution. The meteorological conditions during the measurements were stable with low wind speed, high temperature and high RH, leading to high concentrations of fine particles, especially due to secondary components. The average concentrations of PM 1.8 and PM 10 were 51±19 and 84±27 μg m -3, respectively, with a ratio of PM 1.8/PM 10 0.64±0.09, which indicates that fine particles dominated in PM 10. Sulfate, nitrate and ammonium were major ionic components. Aerosol mass size distributions showed either two or three modes. Land-sea circulation brought back aged aerosols to the sampling site leading to an increase of the concentrations of sodium and chloride in aerosols. The "condensation mode" of sulfate, which was formed by gas-to-particle conversion, was in the size range of 0.32-0.56 μm, and the "droplet mode" of sulfate was observed in the size range of 0.56-1.0 or 1.0-1.8 μm. Nitrate was distributed evenly over fine and coarse particles. The analysis of measured and calculated equilibrium constant of NH 4NO 3 indicates that dissociation of NH 4NO 3 in daytime is favored, but that at night ammonium nitrate is stable and constitutes the fine mode nitrate, while the coarse mode nitrate may be formed by the reaction of HNO 3 and sea-salt or soil components. Chemical mass closures showed reasonable agreement.

  5. Enhancement of carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots using excipient emulsions: influence of particle size of digestible lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruojie; Zhang, Zipei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Guodong; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2016-01-01

    The influence of initial lipid droplet size on the ability of excipient emulsions to increase carotenoid bioaccessibility from carrots was investigated using a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Corn oil-in-water excipient emulsions were fabricated with different surface-weighted mean droplet diameters: d32 = 0.17 μm (fine), 0.46 μm (medium), and, 10 μm (large). Bulk oil containing a similar quantity of lipids as the emulsions was used as a control. The excipient emulsions and control were mixed with pureed carrots, and then passed through a simulated GIT (mouth, stomach, and small intestine), and changes in particle size, charge, microstructure, lipid digestion, and carotenoid bioaccessibility were measured. Carotenoid bioaccessibility significantly increased with decreasing lipid droplet size in the excipient emulsions, which was attributed to the rapid formation of mixed micelles that could solubilize the carotenoids in the intestinal fluids. These results have important implications for designing excipient foods, such as dressings, dips, creams, and sauces, to increase the bioavailability of health-promoting nutraceuticals in foods. PMID:26583923

  6. Application of global rainbow technique in sprays with a dependence of the refractive index on droplet size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saengkaew, S.; Bodoc, V.; Lavergne, G.; Grehan, G.

    2013-01-01

    In liquid combustion, the evaporation process is one of the key parameters which controls combustion efficiency. To understand the combustion process, and to be able to develop an efficient combustor which produces less pollutant, it is necessary to be able to measure evaporation properties. Several techniques exist to measure the physical properties of fuel droplets, but very few exist to measure the thermo-chemical properties. The global rainbow technique (GRT) has been proposed and successfully used to measure the average temperature and the size distribution of sprays under the assumption that all the droplets are at the same temperature. This paper explores the applicability of GRT to sprays where the refractive index is a function of the particle size. A first result proves that the refractive index measured by GRT is weighted by the droplet diameter to the power of 7/3. This result permits accurate and fast comparisons between the numerical simulations and the experiments. A second result is the measurement of the refractive index by the size class by coupling GRT and Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) measurements (or another measurement technique with a low sensitivity to the refractive index such as holography, diffractometry, etc).

  7. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions.

  8. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Johannes W; Thaler, Klemens M; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  9. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions. PMID:26979973

  10. Sizing of individual aerosol particles using TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) pattern total intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zallie, J. T.; Aptowicz, K. B.; Martin, S.; Pan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The morphology of single aerosol particles has been explored previously using the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) technique, which captures angularly resolved scattering patterns. Particle size is known to strongly influence the light scattering properties of aerosols and therefore is a critical parameter to discern from the TAOS patterns. In this work, T-matrix simulation of light scattering from spherical and spheroidal particles is used to explore the possibility of sizing particles from the total light scattering signal detected using the TAOS technique. Scattering patterns were calculated for particles that span various particle sizes, spheroidal shapes, complex refractive indices and particles orientations representative of atmospheric aerosol distributions. A power law relationship between particle size and total scattering intensity was found that could crudely size particles but with significant error.

  11. Particle size distribution of the stratospheric aerosol from SCIAMACHY limb measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei; Malinina, Elizaveta; Rozanov, Vladimir; Hommel, Rene; Burrows, John

    2016-04-01

    Stratospheric aerosols are of a great scientific interest because of their crucial role in the Earth's radiative budget as well as their contribution to chemical processes resulting in ozone depletion. While the permanent aerosol background in the stratosphere is determined by the tropical injection of SO2, COS and sulphate particles from the troposphere, major perturbations of the stratospheric aerosol layer result form an uplift of SO2 after strong volcanic eruptions. Satellite measurements in the visible spectral range represent one of the most important sources of information about the vertical distribution of the stratospheric aerosol on the global scale. This study employs measurements of the scattered solar light performed in the limb viewing geometry from the space borne spectrometer SCIAMACHY, which operated onboard the ENVISAT satellite, from August 2002 to April 2012. A retrieval approach to obtain parameters of the stratospheric aerosol particle size distribution will be reported along with the sensitivity studies and first results.

  12. Multi-modal analysis of aerosol robotic network size distributions for remote sensing applications: dominant aerosol type cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2013-12-01

    To date, size distributions obtained from the aerosol robotic network have been fit with bi-lognormals defined by six secondary microphysical parameters: the volume concentration, effective radius, and the variance of fine and coarse particle modes. However, since the total integrated volume concentration is easily calculated and can be used as an accurate constraint, the problem of fitting the size distribution can be reduced to that of deducing a single free parameter - the mode separation point. We present a method for determining the mode separation point for equivalent-volume bi-lognormal distributions based on optimisation of the root mean squared error and the coefficient of determination. The extracted secondary parameters are compared with those provided by AERONET's Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion algorithm for a set of benchmark dominant aerosol types including: desert dust, biomass burning aerosol, urban sulphate and sea salt. The total volume concentration constraint is then also lifted by performing multi-modal fits to the size distribution using nested Gaussian mixture models and a method is presented for automating the selection of the optimal number of modes using a stopping condition based on Fisher statistics and via the application of statistical hypothesis testing. It is found that the method for optimizing the location of the mode separation point is independent of the shape of the AVSD, does not require the existence of a local minimum in the size interval 0.439 μm ≤ r ≤ 0.992 μm, and shows some potential for optimizing the bi-lognormal fitting procedure used by AERONET particularly in the case of desert dust aerosol. The AVSD of impure marine aerosol is found to require 3 modes. In this particular case, bi-lognormals fail to recover key features of the AVSD. Fitting the AVSD more generally with multi-modal models allows automatic detection of a statistically-significant number of aerosol modes, is applicable to a very diverse range of

  13. Seasonal variation and secondary formation of size-segregated aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions during pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wen, Tianxue; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution is a serious issue that has aroused great public attention in Beijing. To examine the seasonal characteristics of aerosols in typical pollution episodes, water-soluble inorganic ions (SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+, Cl-, K+, Na+, Ca2 + and Mg2 +) in size-segregated PM collected by an Anderson sampler (equipped with 50% effective cut-off diameters of 9.0, 5.8, 4.7, 3.3, 2.1, 1.1, 0.65, 0.43 μm and an after filter) were investigated in four intensive campaigns from June 2013 to May 2014 in the Beijing urban area. Pronounced seasonal variation of TWSIs in fine particles (aerodynamic diameter less than 2.1 μm) was observed, with the highest concentration in summer (71.5 ± 36.3 μg/m3) and the lowest in spring (28.1 ± 15.2 μg/m3). Different ion species presented different seasonal characteristics of mass concentration and size distribution, reflecting their different dominant sources. As the dominant component, SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) in fine particles appeared to play an important role in the formation of high PM pollution since its contribution to the TWSIs and PM2.1 mass increased significantly during pollution episodes. Due to the hygroscopic growth and enhanced secondary formation in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm) from clean days to polluted days, the size distribution peak of SNA in the fine mode tended to shift from 0.43-0.65 μm to 0.65-2.1 μm. Relative humidity (RH) and temperature contributed to influence the secondary formation and regulate the size distributions of sulfates and nitrates. Partial correlation analysis found that high RH would promote the sulfur and nitrogen oxidation rates in the fine mode, while high temperature favored the sulfur oxidation rate in the condensation mode (0.43-0.65 μm) and reduced the nitrogen oxidation rate in the droplet mode (0.65-2.1 μm). The NO3-/SO42 - mass ratio in PM2.1 (73% of the samples) exceeded 1.0, suggesting that vehicle exhaust currently makes a greater contribution to aerosol

  14. Organized Assemblies of Colloids Formed at the Poles of Micrometer-Sized Droplets of Liquid Crystal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Miller, Daniel S.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the formation of organized assemblies of 1 μm-in-diameter colloids (polystyrene (PS)) at the poles of water-dispersed droplets (diameters 7 - 20 μm) of nematic liquid crystal (LC). For 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl droplets decorated with two to five PS colloids, we found 32 distinct arrangements of the colloids to form at the boojums of bipolar droplet configurations. Significantly, all but one of these configurations (a ring comprised of five PS colloids) could be mapped onto a local (non-close packed) hexagonal lattice. To provide insight into the origin of the hexagonal lattice, we investigated planar aqueous—LC interfaces, and found that organized assemblies of PS colloids did not form at these interfaces. Experiments involving the addition of salts revealed that a repulsive interaction of electrostatic origin prevented formation of assemblies at planar interfaces, and that regions of high splay near the poles of the LC droplets generated cohesive interactions between colloids that could overcome the repulsion. Support for this interpretation was obtained from a model that included (i) a long-range attraction between adsorbed colloids and the boojum due to the increasing rate of strain (splay) of LC near the boojum (splay attraction), (ii) an attractive inter-colloid interaction that reflects the quadrupolar symmetry of the strain in the LC around the colloids, and (iii) electrostatic repulsion between colloids. The model predicts that electrostatic repulsion between colloids can lead to a ∼1,000 kBT energy barrier at planar interfaces of LC films, and that the repulsive interaction can be overcome by splay attraction of the colloids to the boojums of the LC droplets. Overall, the results reported in this paper advance our understanding of the directed assembly of colloids at interfaces of LC droplets. PMID:25284139

  15. Aerosol size distribution and radiative forcing response to anthropogenically driven historical changes in biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, S. D.; Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Farina, S. C.; Scott, C. E.; Rap, A.; Farmer, D. K.; Spracklen, D. V.; Riipinen, I.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) have changed in the past millennium due to changes in land use, temperature and CO2 concentrations. Recent model reconstructions of BVOC emissions over the past millennium predicted changes in dominant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) producing BVOC classes (isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes). The reconstructions predicted that global isoprene emissions have decreased (land-use changes to crop/grazing land dominate the reduction), while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions have increased (temperature increases dominate the increases); however, all three show regional variability due to competition between the various influencing factors. These BVOC changes have largely been anthropogenic in nature, and land-use change was shown to have the most dramatic effect by decreasing isoprene emissions. In this work, we use two modeled estimates of BVOC emissions from the years 1000 to 2000 to test the effect of anthropogenic changes to BVOC emissions on SOA formation, global aerosol size distributions, and radiative effects using the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. With anthropogenic emissions (e.g. SO2, NOx, primary aerosols) held at present day values and BVOC emissions changed from year 1000 to year 2000 values, decreases in the number concentration of particles of size Dp > 80 nm (N80) of >25% in year 2000 relative to year 1000 were predicted in regions with extensive land-use changes since year 1000 which led to regional increases in direct plus indirect aerosol radiative effect of >0.5 W m-2 in these regions. We test the sensitivity of our results to BVOC emissions inventory, SOA yields and the presence of anthropogenic emissions; however, the qualitative response of the model to historic BVOC changes remains the same in all cases. Accounting for these uncertainties, we estimate millennial changes in BVOC emissions cause a global mean direct effect of between +0.022 and +0.163 W m-2

  16. Biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt sulfate size-segregated aerosols in the Arctic summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhad, Roghayeh; Norman, Ann-Lise; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Levasseur, Maurice; Thomas, Jennie L.

    2016-04-01

    Size-segregated aerosol sulfate concentrations were measured on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic during July 2014. The objective of this study was to utilize the isotopic composition of sulfate to address the contribution of anthropogenic and biogenic sources of aerosols to the growth of the different aerosol size fractions in the Arctic atmosphere. Non-sea-salt sulfate is divided into biogenic and anthropogenic sulfate using stable isotope apportionment techniques. A considerable amount of the average sulfate concentration in the fine aerosols with a diameter < 0.49 µm was from biogenic sources (> 63 %), which is higher than in previous Arctic studies measuring above the ocean during fall (< 15 %) (Rempillo et al., 2011) and total aerosol sulfate at higher latitudes at Alert in summer (> 30 %) (Norman et al., 1999). The anthropogenic sulfate concentration was less than that of biogenic sulfate, with potential sources being long-range transport and, more locally, the Amundsen's emissions. Despite attempts to minimize the influence of ship stack emissions, evidence from larger-sized particles demonstrates a contribution from local pollution. A comparison of δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols was used to show that gas-to-particle conversion likely occurred during most sampling periods. δ34S values for SO2 and fine aerosols were similar, suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfate, except for two samples with a relatively high anthropogenic fraction in particles < 0.49 µm in diameter (15-17 and 17-19 July). The high biogenic fraction of sulfate fine aerosol and similar isotope ratio values of these particles and SO2 emphasize the role of marine organisms (e.g., phytoplankton, algae, bacteria) in the formation of fine particles above the Arctic Ocean during the productive summer months.

  17. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  18. [Determination of the retrieval arithmetic of aerosol size distribution measured by DOAS].

    PubMed

    Si, Fu-qi; Xie, Pin-hua; Liu, Jian-guo; Zhang, Yu-jun; Liu, Wen-qing; Hiroaki, Kuze; Nobuo, Takeuchi

    2008-10-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is not only an important factor for the change in global climate, but also a polluting matter. Moreover, aerosol plays a main role in chemical reaction of polluting gases. Determination of aerosol has become an important re- search in the study of atmospheric environment. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is a very useful technique that allows quantitative measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations based on their fingerprint absorption. It also can be used to retrieve aerosol extinction coefficient. In the present work, the method of determination of aerosol size distribution measured by flash DOAS is described, and the arithmetic based on Monte-Carlo is the emphasis. By comparison with the concentration of PM10, visibility and Angstrom wavelength exponent, a good correlation can be found. Application of DOAS in aerosol field not only provides a novel method for aerosol detection, but also extends the field of application of DOAS technology. Especially, aerosol DOAS plays an important role in the study of atmospheric chemistry. PMID:19123420

  19. Analysis of Droplet Size during the Ice Accumulation Phase Of Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Eric James

    2004-01-01

    weather data from certain flights and analyzing the type of precipitation that the plane is flying through. During flight tests there is a probe on the bottom of the aircraft that gathers information on the size and shape of the particles that it is flying through. The data can then be viewed on a computer. After grouping the weather into certain groups we can then pick certain groups which we think should be analyzed farther. The goal is to remove all the ice particles because they do not contribute to the icing on an aircraft. We use a 2D analyzer which measures the droplet size and categorizes the drops into bins of certain sizes. We can then look at what the characteristics of the weather that we were flying through such as the temperature and dew point and compare this with the size of the drops that the 2D analyzer measured. We can then look at what type and shape of ice that formed on the wing during this time period. Having this data will help us to reproduce these conditions using LEWICE and the wind tunnel. Having consistency among the tests will make things more accurate. With respect to weather forecasting we will be able to learn which conditions can lead to icing. Better accuracy in weather reporting will lead to fewer run-ins with icing which will also lead to fewer accidents.

  20. Electrical Mobility Spectrometer Using a Diethylene Glycol Condensation Particle Counter for Measurement of Aerosol Size Distributions Down to 1 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Kuang, C.; Chen, M.; Attoui, M.; McMurry, P. H.

    2011-02-01

    We report a new scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) for measuring number size distributions of particles down to {approx}1 nm mobility diameter. This SMPS includes an aerosol charger, a TSI 3085 nano differential mobility analyzer (nanoDMA), an ultrafine condensation particle counter (UCPC) using diethylene glycol (DEG) as the working fluid, and a conventional butanol CPC (the 'booster') to detect the small droplets leaving the DEG UCPC. The response of the DEG UCPC to negatively charged sodium chloride particles with mobility diameters ranging from 1-6 nm was measured. The sensitivity of the DEG UCPC to particle composition was also studied by comparing its response to positively charged 1.47 and 1.70 nm tetra-alkyl ammonium ions, sodium chloride, and silver particles. A high resolution differential mobility analyzer was used to generate the test particles. These results show that the response of this UCPC to sub-2 nm particles is sensitive to particle composition. The applicability of the new SMPS for atmospheric measurement was demonstrated during the Nucleation and Cloud Condensation Nuclei (NCCN) field campaign (Atlanta, Georgia, summer 2009). We operated the instrument at saturator and condenser temperatures that allowed the efficient detection of sodium chloride particles but not of air ions having the same mobility. We found that particles as small as 1 nm were detected during nucleation events but not at other times. Factors affecting size distribution measurements, including aerosol charging in the 1-10 nm size range, are discussed. For the charger used in this study, bipolar charging was found to be more effective for sub-2 nm particles than unipolar charging. No ion induced nucleation inside the charger was observed during the NCCN campaign.

  1. Size segregated water uptake of the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massling, A.; Stock, M.; Wehner, B.; Wu, Z. J.; Hu, M.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    Physical and chemical properties of submicrometer aerosol particles were measured in summer 2004 (June/July) and winter 2005 (January/February) in Beijing, Peoples Republic of China, using a Twin-Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (T-DMPS), a Hygroscopicity-Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA), and a Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI). Particle number-size distributions were measured in the diameter range Dp = 3-800 nm and hygroscopic properties were determined at initial dry particle diameters of Dp j ( j = 30, 50, 80, 150, 250, and 350 nm) at a relative humidity (RH) of 90%. Hygroscopic properties were compared with chemical analyses of aerosol samples taken with the MOUDI. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the total hygroscopic particle volume was modeled, including dependence on dry particle size, season and level of pollution using a simple approach. Overall, the chemical analysis showed ammonium sulfate to be the major inorganic component of the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing along with relatively high fractions of elemental carbon (10-25%) and organic matter (15-60%) depending on particle size and season. The hygroscopic growth distributions (H-TDMA) subdivided the aerosol population into three different groups of particles with varying growth factors depending on dry particle size, namely nearly hydrophobic (growth factor = 0.96-1.07), less hygroscopic (1.06-1.29) and more hygroscopic (1.26-1.62). Hydrophobic particle fractions indicating freshly emitted soot/carbonaceous particles varied between 10 and 32% depending on dry particle size and season. During heavily polluted times, a decreasing number of hydrophobic particle fractions indicated that the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing was highly influenced by more aged aerosol transported from the industrial regions around Beijing containing sulfate as a major component. Based on model calculations, the urban submicrometer aerosol in Beijing showed strong compositional

  2. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: Laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Kohn, Monika; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.; Shilling, John E.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-24

    Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nucleus chamber as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (ammonium sulfate) but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres). The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from atmospheric measurements using this technique indicate that aerosol particles often activate predominantly as a function of particle size. Chemical composition is not irrelevant, however, and we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals using single particle analysis.

  3. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Kohn, M.; Pekour, M. S.; Nelson, D. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nucleus chamber as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (ammonium sulfate) but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres). The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from atmospheric measurements using this technique indicate that aerosol particles often activate predominantly as a function of particle size. Chemical composition is not irrelevant, however, and we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals using single particle analysis.

  4. Stratospheric aerosol particle size information in Odin-OSIRIS limb scatter spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, L. A.; Bourassa, A. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2014-02-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) onboard the Odin satellite has now taken over a decade of limb scatter measurements that have been used to retrieve the version 5 stratospheric aerosol extinction product. This product is retrieved using a representative particle size distribution to calculate scattering cross sections and scattering phase functions for the forward model calculations. In this work the information content of OSIRIS measurements with respect to stratospheric aerosol is systematically examined for the purpose of retrieving particle size information along with the extinction coefficient. The benefit of using measurements at different wavelengths and scattering angles in the retrieval is studied, and it is found that incorporation of the 1530 nm radiance measurement is key for a robust retrieval of particle size information. It is also found that using OSIRIS measurements at the different solar geometries available on the Odin orbit simultaneously provides little additional benefit. Based on these results, an improved aerosol retrieval algorithm is developed that couples the retrieval of aerosol extinction and mode radius of a log-normal particle size distribution. Comparison of these results with coincident measurements from SAGE III shows agreement in retrieved extinction to within approximately 10% over the bulk of the aerosol layer, which is comparable to version 5. The retrieved particle size, when converted to Ångström coefficient, shows good qualitative agreement with SAGE II measurements made at somewhat shorter wavelengths.

  5. Aerosol Size Distribution Determined From Multiple Field-Of-View Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.; Uesugi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of aerosol size distribution is essential for its influence on atmosphere and human health, especially for small particles because they are able to penetrate lung tissues, thus increasing the risk of bronchitis or lung diseases. Lidar as an active optical remote sensing technique is effective for monitoring aerosols with high temporal and spatial variations. Particles with diameters comparable to the detecting light wavelength have been effectively detected by using UV, VIS, and near-IR wavelengths. However, to quantitatively estimate the shape of the particle size distribution, more information is required with respect to sub-micrometer and smaller particles. Conventional lidar employs tiny field-of-view (FOV) to detect single scatter reflected from aerosols in the direction opposite to incident light. However, the complicated reflection on the path of laser causes multiple scatter which contains also the size distribution information of aerosols. In this study, a UV Lidar with multiple FOV receiver was used for detecting such multiple scattering effects in order to obtain more quantitative information related to particle size distribution. The FOV of Lidar receiver was program controlled in a range from 0.1 mrad to 12.4 mrad. The pacific retrieval method for aerosol size distribution using this feature and field measurement results will be introduced in the presentation.

  6. Effect of aerosol particle size on bronchodilatation with nebulised terbutaline in asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Clay, M M; Pavia, D; Clarke, S W

    1986-05-01

    The bronchodilatation achieved by the beta 2 agonist terbutaline sulphate given as nebulised aerosol from different devices has been measured in seven patients with mild asthma (mean FEV1 76% predicted) over two hours after inhalation. The subjects were studied on four occasions. On three visits they received 2.5 mg terbutaline delivered from three different types of nebuliser, selected on the basis of the size distribution of the aerosols generated; and on a fourth (control) visit no aerosol was given. The size distributions of the aerosols expressed in terms of their mass median diameter (MMD) were: A: MMD 1.8 microns; B: 4.6 microns; C: 10.3 microns. The aerosols were given under controlled conditions of respiratory rate and tidal volume to minimise intertreatment variation. Bronchodilator response was assessed by changes in FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and maximal flow after expiration of 50% and 75% FVC (Vmax50, Vmax25) from baseline (before aerosol) and control run values. For each pulmonary function index all three aerosols gave significantly better improvement over baseline than was seen in the control (p less than 0.05) and had an equipotent effect on FEV1, FVC, and PEF. Aerosol A (MMD 1.8 microns) produced significantly greater improvements in Vmax50 and Vmax25 than did B or C (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that for beta 2 agonists small aerosols (MMD less than 2 microns) might be advantageous in the treatment of asthma. PMID:3750243

  7. The Dependence of Cloud Particle Size on Non-Aerosol-Loading Related Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, H.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18

    An enhanced concentration of aerosol may increase the number of cloud drops by providing more cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), which in turn results in a higher cloud albedo at a constant cloud liquid water path. This process is often referred to as the aerosol indirect effect (AIE). Many in situ and remote sensing observations support this hypothesis (Ramanathan et al. 2001). However, satellite observed relations between aerosol concentration and cloud drop size are not always in agreement with the AIE. Based on global analysis of cloud effective radius (r{sub e}) and aerosol number concentration (N{sub a}) derived from satellite data, Sekiguchi et al. (2003) found that the correlations between the two variables can be either negative, or positive, or none, depending on the location of the clouds. They discovered that significantly negative r{sub e} - N{sub a} correlation can only be identified along coastal regions of the continents where abundant continental aerosols inflow from land, whereas Feingold et al. (2001) found that the response of r{sub e} to aerosol loading is the greatest in the region where aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) is the smallest. The reason for the discrepancy is likely due to the variations in cloud macroscopic properties such as geometrical thickness (Brenguier et al. 2003). Since r{sub e} is modified not only by aerosol but also by cloud geometrical thickness (H), the correlation between re and {tau}{sub a} actually reflects both the aerosol indirect effect and dependence of H. Therefore, discussing AIE based on the r{sub e}-{tau}{sub a} correlation without taking into account variations in cloud geometrical thickness may be misleading. This paper is motivated to extract aerosols' effect from overall effects using the independent measurements of cloud geometrical thickness, {tau}{sub a} and r{sub e}.

  8. Development of PIXE, PESA and Transmission Ion Microscopy Capability to Measure Aerosols by Size and Time

    SciTech Connect

    Shutthanandan, Shuttha ); Thevuthasan, Theva ); Disselkamp, Robert S. ); Stroud, Ashley M.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Adams, Evan M.; Baer, Donald R. ); Barrie, Leonard A. ); Cliff, Steven S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M; Cahill, Thomas A.

    2002-01-01

    The elemental analysis of aerosol composition with high time and spatial resolution is crucial in the studies related to environmental issues such as human health, urban smog formation, regional visibility, and climate change. The effects of atmospheric aerosols are closely related to their size distribution, which plays a major role in understanding transport and removal processes and in pinpointing possible aerosol sources. Hence, there is a need for simultaneous measurements of compositions and particle size distribution of aerosols. We have developed a capability that consists of a combination of PIXE, PESA and STIM (same location on the sample) at the accelerator facility in Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) to address some of the needs associated with time series and size distribution. Simultaneous measurements of PIXE and PESA can be performed on aerosols collected using 3 stage improved rotating drum impactor by size (3 modes, 2.5 to 0.07 um) and time (2 mm rotation for every 8 hours) on a 20 cm long Teflon strips with a time resolution of 2 hours (using 500 micron size proton beam). Two Teflon strips can be mounted on the manipulator at the same time without breaking the vacuum through a load-lock. Movable and fixed surface barrier detectors are used for PESA and STIM measurements respectively. Preliminary measurements were carried out using the aerosol samples collected at the 62nd floor of Williams Tower in Houston, Texas. These aerosol samples were also analyzed by synchrotron x-ray microprobe (S-XRF) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) and the comparison of XRF and ion beam results along with the details of the capability will be discussed.

  9. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions at Puijo measurement station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2014-06-01

    Interactions between aerosols and liquid water clouds were studied during autumns 2010-2011 at a semiurban measurement station on Puijo tower in Kuopio, Finland. Cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopicity and cloud droplet size distribution were measured, with a focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. On average, the polluted air contained more particles than the clean air masses, and generally the concentrations decreased during cloud events. Cloud processing was found to take place, especially in the clean air masses, and to a lesser extent in the polluted air. Some, mostly minor, differences in the average particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail, with a special focus on the emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. This revealed larger variations in particle and cloud properties than the analysis of the whole data set. Clear differences in the total (between 214 and 2200 cm-3) and accumulation mode particle concentrations (between 62 and 169 cm-3) were observed. Particle chemical composition, especially the concentrations of organics (between 0.42 and 1.28 μg m-3) and sulfate (between 0.16 and 4.43 μg m-3), varied considerably. This affected the hygroscopic growth factor: for example, for 100 nm particles the range was from 1.21 to 1.45 at 90% relative humidity. Particularly, large particles, high hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganics were linked with the pollutant plumes. Moreover, the particle hygroscopicity distributions in the polluted air were clearly bimodal, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions also had an impact on cloud droplet

  10. Aerosol size distribution, composition, and CO sub 2 backscatter at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, A.D.; Porter, J.N. )

    1991-03-20

    Continuous measurements of aerosol size distributions were obtained during Jan-Mar and Nov-Dec periods of 1988 at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii. These periods were chosen in order to characterize aerosol physiochemistry during periods representative of low-dust atmospheric conditions and periods associated with appreciable Asian dust transport to that site. Size distributions for particles with diameters between 0.15 and 7.6 {mu}m were accumulated in 256 size bins of a laser optical particle counter for 3-hour intervals during most of the period. The aerosol sample stream was heated to selected temperatures in order to provide size-discriminated measurements of aerosol volatility. Resulting data were used to assess the variability in aerosol concentrations and properties related to aerosol backscatter values at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m, {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}}, in the mid-troposphere. Low aerosol concentrations, considered representative of mid-tropospheric air, occurred in downslope flow between midnight and sunrise. Measurements for these time periods suggest that {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} varied from a low of about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} to a high of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1}. Coarse particles with diameters between 1.0 and 5.0 {mu}m account for most of the derived values of {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at all but the highest and lowest aerosol mass concentrations. Volatile aerosol appears to dominate aerosol mass during the cleanest periods but was a small fraction of the total during dust events. The authors estimate that minimum values for {beta}{sub CO{sub 2}} at about 8 km should usually fall in the range of 1-3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}m{sup {minus}1}sr{sup {minus}1} and be dominated by a sulfate aerosol.

  11. a Study of Liquid - of Atomization Droplet Size Velocity and Temperature Distribution via Information Theory Spray Interaction with Ambient Air Motion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianguo

    Linear temporal instability analysis of a moving thin viscous liquid sheet of uniform thickness in an inviscid gas medium shows that surface tension always opposes, while surrounding gas and relative velocity between the sheet and gas favour the onset and development of instability. For gas Weber number smaller than the density ratio of gas to liquid, liquid viscosity enhances instability; If gas Weber number is slightly larger, aerodynamic and viscosity -induced instabilities interact with each other, displaying complicated effects of viscosity via Ohnesorge number; For much larger values of gas Weber numbers, aerodynamic instability dominates, liquid viscosity reduces disturbance growth rate and increases the dominant wavelength. Droplet probability distribution function (PDF) in sprays is formulated through information theory without resorting to the details of atomization processes. The derived analytical droplet size PDF is Nukiyama-Tanasawa type if conservation of mass is considered alone. If conservation of mass, momentum and energy is all taken into account, the joint droplet size and velocity PDF depends on Weber number, and compares favourably with measurements. Droplet velocity PDF is truncated Gaussian for any specific droplet size. Mean velocity approaches a constant value and velocity variance decreases as droplet size increases. Mean droplet diameters calculated agree well with observations. The computation indicates that atomization efficiency is very low, usually less than 1%. Droplet size, velocity and temperature PDF in sprays under combusting environment has also been derived. Effects of combustion on PDF occur mainly through the heat transferred into liquid sheet prior to its breakup. Experimental studies identify three modes of spray behaviours due to its interaction with various annular air flows, and show that bluff-body type of combustor has ability and easement to control aerodynamically spray angle, shape and droplet trajectories. It is

  12. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  13. Effect of particle size on droplet infiltration into hydrophobic porous media as a model of water repellent soil.

    PubMed

    Hamlett, Christopher A E; Shirtcliffe, Neil J; McHale, Glen; Ahn, Sujung; Bryant, Robert; Doerr, Stefan H; Newton, Michael I

    2011-11-15

    The wettability of soil is of great importance for plants and soil biota, and in determining the risk for preferential flow, surface runoff, flooding,and soil erosion. The molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) test is widely used for quantifying the severity of water repellency in soils that show reduced wettability and is assumed to be independent of soil particle size. The minimum ethanol concentration at which droplet penetration occurs within a short time (≤ 10 s) provides an estimate of the initial advancing contact angle at which spontaneous wetting is expected. In this study, we test the assumption of particle size independence using a simple model of soil, represented by layers of small (~0.2-2 mm) diameter beads that predict the effect of changing bead radius in the top layer on capillary driven imbibition. Experimental results using a three-layer bead system show broad agreement with the model and demonstrate a dependence of the MED test on particle size. The results show that the critical initial advancing contact angle for penetration can be considerably less than 90° and varies with particle size, demonstrating that a key assumption currently used in the MED testing of soil is not necessarily valid. PMID:22011323

  14. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  15. Investigation of vortex clouds and droplet sizes in heated water spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  16. Comparison of two droplet sizing systems in an icing wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, J. R.; Ide, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Analyzer and the combined measurements from the Particle Measuring Systems Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the icing cloud. Clouds with a range of volume median diameters from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A comparison of the volume median diameter from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and only the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe indicated agreement up to 18 microns. A combined volume median diameter was calculated from the droplet distribution of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement up to 30 microns with the agreement deteriorating rapidly above 30 microns. Droplet distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented.

  17. Comparison of two droplet sizing systems in an icing wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, John R.; Ide, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A comparison between the Phase Doppler Analyzer and the combined measurements from the Particle Measuring Systems Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and the Optical Array Probe was conducted in an icing wind tunnel using NASA Icing Research Tunnel spray nozzles to produce the icing cloud. Clouds with a range of volume median diameterss from 10 to greater than 50 microns were used for the instrument comparisons. A comparison of the volume median diameter from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and only the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe indicated agreement up to 18 microns. A combined volume median diameter was calculated from the droplet distribution of the Optical Array Probe and the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. A comparison of the combined volume median diameters and the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer volume median diameters showed agreement up to 30 microns with the agreement deteriorating rapidly above 30 microns. Droplet distributions from the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe, and Optical Array Probe are presented.

  18. Aerosol size distribution variability as a function of distance to Caribbean Trade Wind Cumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Robles, M.; Rauber, R.; di Girolamo, L.; Jensen, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Shallow maritime cumuli continually modify aerosol size distributions in the trade wind regime, which leads to sampling problems due to this continual aerosol-cloud interaction. Because of the ubiquity of trade wind clouds across the world’s tropical oceans, understanding the relationship between trade wind cumuli and aerosol spectra in the trade wind layer is required to evaluate the role of aerosols in Earth's radiation balance and climate. Studies in the past typically select either cloudy or cloud free areas to obtain aerosol size distributions. However, conclusions of past studies point to the fact that distance to cloud is an important parameter to consider when reporting aerosol size distributions. In this work, data collected from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Hercules C-130 during the Rain in Cumulus over the Ocean (RICO) field campaign, which took place during November 2004 - January 2005 in the trades over the western Atlantic, is used to study the variations of deliquesced and dry particle size distributions of sub-micron (dry radius, r = 0.05 - 1.0 μm) and giant (1 < r ≤ 10 μm) particles as function of distance to cloud and altitude above the ocean surface. Data collected from 13 research flights using aircraft mounted probes, PCASP/SPP-200 and FSSP/SPP-100, are used to obtain variations in particle spectra as a function of distance to cloud between 600m and 2000m above the ocean surface. Statistical summaries of the aerosol characteristics of the trade wind environment in the vicinity of clouds observed during RICO will be presented.

  19. On the validity of the Poisson assumption in sampling nanometer-sized aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Damit, Brian E; Wu, Dr. Chang-Yu; Cheng, Mengdawn

    2014-01-01

    A Poisson process is traditionally believed to apply to the sampling of aerosols. For a constant aerosol concentration, it is assumed that a Poisson process describes the fluctuation in the measured concentration because aerosols are stochastically distributed in space. Recent studies, however, have shown that sampling of micrometer-sized aerosols has non-Poissonian behavior with positive correlations. The validity of the Poisson assumption for nanometer-sized aerosols has not been examined and thus was tested in this study. Its validity was tested for four particle sizes - 10 nm, 25 nm, 50 nm and 100 nm - by sampling from indoor air with a DMA- CPC setup to obtain a time series of particle counts. Five metrics were calculated from the data: pair-correlation function (PCF), time-averaged PCF, coefficient of variation, probability of measuring a concentration at least 25% greater than average, and posterior distributions from Bayesian inference. To identify departures from Poissonian behavior, these metrics were also calculated for 1,000 computer-generated Poisson time series with the same mean as the experimental data. For nearly all comparisons, the experimental data fell within the range of 80% of the Poisson-simulation values. Essentially, the metrics for the experimental data were indistinguishable from a simulated Poisson process. The greater influence of Brownian motion for nanometer-sized aerosols may explain the Poissonian behavior observed for smaller aerosols. Although the Poisson assumption was found to be valid in this study, it must be carefully applied as the results here do not definitively prove applicability in all sampling situations.

  20. Tropospheric aerosols: size-differentiated chemistry and large-scale spatial distributions.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M; Mohnen, Volker; Blanchard, Charles L

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide interest in atmospheric aerosols has emerged since the late 20th century as a part of concerns for air pollution and radiative forcing of the earth's climate. The use of aircraft and balloons for sampling and the use of remote sensing have dramatically expanded knowledge about tropospheric aerosols. Our survey gives an overview of contemporary tropospheric aerosol chemistry based mainly on in situ measurements. It focuses on fine particles less than 1-2.5 microm in diameter. The physical properties of particles by region and altitude are exemplified by particle size distributions, total number and volume concentration, and optical parameters such as extinction coefficient and aerosol optical depth. Particle chemical characterization is size dependent, differentiated by ubiquitous sulfate, and carbon, partially from anthropogenic activity. Large-scale particle distributions extend to intra- and intercontinental proportions involving plumes from population centers to natural disturbances such as dust storms and vegetation fires. In the marine environment, sea salt adds an important component to aerosols. Generally, aerosol components, most of whose sources are at the earth's surface, tend to dilute and decrease in concentration with height, but often show different (layered) profiles depending on meteorological conditions. Key microscopic processes include new particle formation aloft and cloud interactions, both cloud initiation and cloud evaporation. Measurement campaigns aloft are short term, giving snapshots of inherently transient phenomena in the troposphere. Nevertheless, these data, combined with long-term data at the surface and optical depth and transmission observations, yield a unique picture of global tropospheric particle chemistry. PMID:23687724

  1. Chemical Composition and Size Distributions of Coastal Aerosols Observed on the U.S. East Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Song, F.; Jusino-Atresino, R.; Thuman, C.; Gao, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol input is an important source of certain limiting nutrients, such as iron, for phytoplankton growth in several large oceanic regions. As the efficiency of biological uptake of nutrients may depend on the aerosol properties, a better knowledge of aerosol properties is critically important. Characterizing aerosols over the coastal ocean needs special attention, because the properties of aerosols could be altered by many anthropogenic processes in this land-ocean transition zone before they are transported over the remote ocean. The goal of this experiment was to examine aerosol properties, in particular chemical composition, particle-size distributions and iron solubility, over the US Eastern Seaboard, an important boundary for the transport of continental substances from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean. Our field sampling site was located at Tuckerton (39°N, 74°W) on the southern New Jersey coast. Fourteen sets of High-Volume aerosol samples and three sets of size segregated aerosol samples by a 10-stage MOUDI impactor were collected during 2007 and 2008. The ICP-MS methodology was used to analyze aerosol samples for the concentrations of thirteen trace elements: Al, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cd, Pb, Sb, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and V. The IC procedures were applied to determine five cations (sodium, ammonium, potassium, magnesium and calcium) and eleven anions (fluoride, acetate, propionate, formate, MSA, chloride, nitrate, succinate, malonate, sulfate and oxalate). The UV spectrometry was employed for the determination of iron solubility. Preliminary results suggest three major sources of aerosols: anthropogenic, crustal and marine. At this location, the concentrations of iron (II) ranged from 2.8 to 29ng m-3, accounting for ~20% of the total iron. The iron concentrations at this coastal site were substantially lower than those observed in Newark, an urban site in northern NJ. High concentrations of iron (II) were associated with both fine and coarse aerosol

  2. Deriving aerosol hygroscopic mixing state from size-resolved CCN activity and HR-ToF-AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattu, Deepika; Tripathi, S. N.; Chakraborty, Abhishek

    2016-10-01

    The ability of a particle to uptake water and form a cloud droplet depends on its hygroscopicity. To understand its impact on cloud properties and ultimately radiative forcing, knowledge of chemically-resolved mixing state information or the one based on hygroscopic growth is crucial. Typically, global models assume either pure internal or external mixing state which might not be true for all conditions and sampling locations. To investigate into this, the current study employed an indirect approach to infer the probable mixing state. The hygroscopic parameters derived from κ-Kohler theory using size-resolved CCN measurements (κCCN) and bulk/size-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements (κAMS) were compared. The accumulation mode particles were found to be more hygroscopic (κCCN = 0.24) than Aitken mode (κCCN = 0.13), perhaps due to increased ratio of inorganic to organic mass fraction. The activation diameter calculated from size-resolved CCN activity measurements at 5 different supersaturation (SS) levels varied in the range of 115 nm-42 nm with κCCN = 0.13-0.23 (avg = 0.18 ± 0.10 (±1σ)). Further, κAMS>κCCN was observed possibly due to the fact that organic and inorganic mass present in the Aitken mode was not correctly represented by bulk chemical composition and size-resolved fractional contribution of oxidized OA was not accurately accounted. Better correlation of organic fraction (forg) and κCCN at lower SS explained this behaviour. The decrease in κCCN with the time of the day was more pronounced at lower SS because of the relative mass reduction of soluble inorganic species by ∼17%. Despite the large differences between κ measured from two approaches, less over-prediction (up to 18%) between measured and predicted CCN concentration suggested lower impact of chemical composition and mixing state at higher SS. However, at lower SS, presences of externally mixed CCN-inactive aerosols lead to CCN over-prediction reflecting the

  3. Enhancement of lycopene bioaccessibility from tomato juice using excipient emulsions: Influence of lipid droplet size.

    PubMed

    Salvia-Trujillo, L; McClements, D J

    2016-11-01

    The use of excipient emulsions to increase the bioaccessibility of lycopene in tomato juice was studied by simulating gastrointestinal conditions. The influence of droplet diameter (d=0.17 or 19μm) and thermal treatment (90°C, 10min) on lycopene bioaccessibility was evaluated. Lycopene bioaccessibility was relatively low (<8%) in the absence of excipient emulsions due to the crystalline nature of the carotenoids and their entrapment within chromoplasts. Emulsions containing small droplets were fully digested within the small intestine phase, and led to a higher bioaccessibility (12.5%) than emulsions containing large droplets (10.0%) or emulsion-free samples (7.5%). The relatively modest increase in bioaccessibility was attributed to the high level of entrapment in crystalline form. Thermal processing did not appreciably disrupt tomato cells, and therefore only led to a slight increase in lycopene bioaccessibility. Overall, this study shows that excipient emulsions may increase the bioaccessibility of carotenoids in tomato juices. PMID:27211650

  4. New understanding and quantification of the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interaction for studying aerosol indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Minghua; Peng, Yiran

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol indirect effects suffer from large uncertainty in climate models and among observations. This study focuses on two plausible factors: regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions and the effect of cloud droplet spectral shape. We show, using a new parcel model, that combined consideration of droplet number concentration (Nc) and relative dispersion (ɛ, ratio of standard deviation to mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) better characterizes the regime dependence of aerosol-cloud interactions than considering Nc alone. Given updraft velocity (w), ɛ increases with increasing aerosol number concentration (Na) in the aerosol-limited regime, peaks in the transitional regime, and decreases with further increasing Na in the updraft-limited regime. This new finding further reconciles contrasting observations in literature and reinforces the compensating role of dispersion effect. The nonmonotonic behavior of ɛ further quantifies the relationship between the transitional Na and w that separates the aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes.

  5. PFG-NMR analysis of intercompartment exchange and inner droplet size distribution of W/O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hindmarsh, Jason P; Su, Jiahong; Flanagan, John; Singh, Harjinder

    2005-09-27

    Presented is a novel application of pulsed field gradient (PFG)-NMR to the analysis of intercompartment exchange and the inner compartment droplet size distribution of a W/O/W multiple emulsion. The method involves monitoring the diffusional behavior of different components of the emulsion. Pfeuffer et al. [Pfeuffer, J.; Flogel, U.; Dreher, W.; Leibfritz, D. NMR Biomed. 1998, 11(1), 19-31.](1) and Price et al. [Price, W. S.; Barzykin, A. V.; Hayamizu, K.; Tachiya, M. Biophys. J. 1998, 74(5), 2259-2271.](2) proposed methods to extend Kärger's PFG-NMR model of exchange between two compartments to accommodate spherical inner compartments. Each model enables the prediction of the oil membrane permeability, the inner compartment volume fraction, and a representation of the inner compartment droplet size distribution. The models were fitted to PFG-NMR experimental data of W/O/W emulsions. The Pfeuffer et al. model provided the best description of the observed experimental data. Predicted values of permeability and swelling were consistent with those reported in the literature for W/O/W emulsions. The addition of sorbitol to either the inner or outer water compartment resulted in an increase in the oil membrane permeability. Inner compartment droplet size distribution measurements indicate that swelling, rupture, and coalescence are likely to have occurred during the secondary emulsification and emulsion ripening. In its present form, the method still constitutes a fast, noninvasive (no addition of a tracer), and in situ method for comparative analysis of the permeability, stability, and yield of different formulations of multiple emulsions with a single PFG-NMR experiment. PMID:16171335

  6. Investigation of Marine Stratocumulus Cloud-top Droplet Size Retrievals from Observations of Supernumerary Bows and Glories in Polarized Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diner, D. J.; Xu, F.; Garay, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetry provides valuable constraints on atmospheric particle optical and microphysical properties. We have been using imagery acquired by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI) over liquid water clouds to retrieve cloud-top droplet size distributions from multiangular observations in polarized light. AirMSPI is an 8-band ultraviolet-visible-near infrared pushbroom camera, measuring polarization at 470, 660, and 865 nm. It is mounted on a gimbal to acquire multiangular observations over a ±67° along-track range from the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. Droplet size retrievals from AirMSPI and other multiangular polarimeters typically apply single scattering theory to the spectral and angular structure of polarized radiance in the supernumerary bows (interference fringes from internally reflected and transmitted waves that appear at scattering angles between ~140° and ~165°), using a two-parameter gamma distribution governed by droplet effective radius and variance to model the clouds. However, different values of these parameters are inferred from surface wave-involved interference fringes in polarized radiance observed within the glory region (scattering angles exceeding ~170°). Although multiple scattering can affect the magnitude of such oscillations, it does not affect their angular positions, suggesting the need to account more rigorously for details of the size distribution, vertical stratification, or other effects. Theoretical analysis of AirMSPI supernumerary bow and glory observations in polarized light is being undertaken in an attempt to reconcile the measurements in both angular domains, with the objective of retrieving more details about the cloud tops than can be inferred from supernumerary bow polarimetry alone.

  7. A new droplet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  8. A new droplet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, W. E.

    1982-03-01

    A new droplet generator is described. A loud speaker driven extractor needle was immersed in a pendant drop. Pulsing the speaker extracted the needle forming a fluid ligament which will decay into a droplet. The droplets were sized by stroboscopic photographs. The droplet's size was changed by varying the amplitude of the speaker pulses and the extractor needle diameter. The mechanism of droplet formation is discussed and photographs of ligament decay are presented. The droplet generator worked well on both oil and water based pesticide formulations. Current applications and results are discussed.

  9. Fast Airborne Aerosol Size and Chemistry Measurements with the High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer during the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarlo, P. F.; Dunlea, E. J.; Kimmel, J. R.; Aiken, A. C.; Sueper, D.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Emmons, L.; Shinozuka, Y.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Collins,D. R.; Knapp, D.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka,D. D.; Campos,T.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration, size, and composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM(sub l)) was measured over Mexico City and central Mexico with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) onboard the NSF/NCAR C-130 aircraft as part of the MILAGRO field campaign. This was the first aircraft deployment of the HR-ToF-AMS. During the campaign the instrument performed very well, and provided 12 s data. The aerosol mass from the AMS correlates strongly with other aerosol measurements on board the aircraft. Organic aerosol (OA) species dominate the NR-PM(sub l) mass. OA correlates strongly with CO and HCN indicating that pollution (mostly secondary OA, SOA) and biomass burning (BB) are the main OA sources. The OA to CO ratio indicates a typical value for aged air of around 80 microg/cubic m (STP) ppm(exp -1). This is within the range observed in outflow from the Northeastern US, which could be due to a compensating effect between higher BB but lower biogenic VOC emissions during this study. The O/C atomic ratio for OA is calculated from the HR mass spectra and shows a clear increase with photochemical age, as SOA forms rapidly and quickly overwhelms primary urban OA, consistent with Volkamer et al. (2006) and Kleinman et al. (2008). The stability of the OA/CO while O/C increases with photochemical age implies a net loss of carbon from the OA. BB OA is marked by signals at m/z 60 and 73, and also by a signal enhancement at large m/z indicative of larger molecules or more resistance to fragmentation. The main inorganic components show different spatial patterns and size distributions. Sulfate is regional in nature with clear volcanic and petrochemical/power plant sources, while the urban area is not a major regional source for this species. Nitrate is enhanced significantly in the urban area and immediate outflow, and is strongly correlated with CO indicating a strong urban source. The importance of nitrate decreases with distance from the city

  10. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  11. Aerosol mobility imaging for rapid size distribution measurements

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Kuang, Chongai

    2016-07-19

    A parallel plate dimensional electrical mobility separator and laminar flow water condensation provide rapid, mobility-based particle sizing at concentrations typical of the remote atmosphere. Particles are separated spatially within the electrical mobility separator, enlarged through water condensation, and imaged onto a CCD array. The mobility separation distributes particles in accordance with their size. The condensation enlarges size-separated particles by water condensation while they are still within the gap of the mobility drift tube. Once enlarged the particles are illuminated by a laser. At a pre-selected frequency, typically 10 Hz, the position of all of the individual particles illuminated by the laser are captured by CCD camera. This instantly records the particle number concentration at each position. Because the position is directly related to the particle size (or mobility), the particle size spectra is derived from the images recorded by the CCD.

  12. Droplet size spectra and water-vapor concentration of laboratory water clouds: inversion of Fourier transform infrared (500-5000 cm(-1)) optical-depth measurement.

    PubMed

    Arnott, W P; Schmitt, C; Liu, Y; Hallett, J

    1997-07-20

    Infrared extinction optical depth (500-5000 cm(-1)) has been measured with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer for clouds produced with an ultrasonic nebulizer. Direct measurement of the cloud droplet size spectra agree with size spectra retrieved from inversion of the extinction measurements. Both indicate that the range of droplet sizes is 1-14 mum. The retrieval was accomplished with an iterative algorithm that simultaneously obtains water-vapor concentration. The basis set of droplet extinction functions are computed once by using numerical integration of the Lorenz-Mie theory over narrow size bins, and a measured water-vapor extinction curve was used. Extinction and size spectra are measured and computed for both steady-state and dissipating clouds. It is demonstrated that anomalous diffraction theory produces relatively poor droplet size and synthetic extinction spectra and that extinction measurements are helpful in assessing the validity of various theories. Calculations of cloud liquid-water content from retrieved size distributions agree with a parameterization based on optical-depth measurements at a wave number of 906 cm(-1) for clouds that satisfy the size spectral range assumptions of the parameterization. Significance of droplet and vapor contribution to the total optical depth is used to evaluate the reliability of spectral inversions. PMID:18259335

  13. Improvement of the size estimation of 3D tracked droplets using digital in-line holography with joint estimation reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, N.; Grosjean, N.; Dib, E.; Méès, L.; Fournier, C.; Marié, J.-L.

    2016-04-01

    Digital holography is a valuable tool for three-dimensional information extraction. Among existing configurations, the originally proposed set-up (i.e. Gabor, or in-line holography), is reasonably immune to variations in the experimental environment making it a method of choice for studies of fluid dynamics. Nevertheless, standard hologram reconstruction techniques, based on numerical light back-propagation are prone to artifacts such as twin images or aliases that limit both the quality and quantity of information extracted from the acquired holograms. To get round this issue, the hologram reconstruction as a parametric inverse problem has been shown to accurately estimate 3D positions and the size of seeding particles directly from the hologram. To push the bounds of accuracy on size estimation still further, we propose to fully exploit the information redundancy of a hologram video sequence using joint estimation reconstruction. Applying this approach in a bench-top experiment, we show that it led to a relative precision of 0.13% (for a 60 μm diameter droplet) for droplet size estimation, and a tracking precision of {σx}× {σy}× {σz}=0.15× 0.15× 1~\\text{pixels} .

  14. Chemical consequences of the initial diffusional growth of cloud droplets - A clean marine case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Charlson, R. J.; Austin, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    A simple microphysical cloud parcel model and a simple representation of the background marine aerosol are used to predict the concentrations and compositions of droplets of various sizes near cloud base. The aerosol consists of an externally-mixed ammonium bisulfate accumulation mode and a sea-salt coarse particle mode. The difference in diffusional growth rates between the small and large droplets as well as the differences in composition between the two aerosol modes result in substantial differences in solute concentration and composition with size of droplets in the parcel. The chemistry of individual droplets is not, in general, representative of the bulk (volume-weighted mean) cloud water sample. These differences, calculated to occur early in the parcel's lifetime, should have important consequences for chemical reactions such as aqueous phase sulfate production.

  15. Seasonal Variation of Aerosol Particle Size Using MER/Pancam Sky Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Imaging of the sky taken by the Pancam cameras on-board the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) provide a useful tool for determining the optical depth and physcial properties of aerosols above the rover. Specifically, the brightness of the sky as a function of angle away from the Sun provides a powerful constraint on the size distribution and shape of dust and water ice aerosols. More than 100 Pancam "sky surveys" were taken by each of the two MER rovers covering a time span of several Mars years and a wide range of dust loading conditions including the planet-encirclind dust storm during Mars Year 28 (Earth year 2007). These sky surveys enable the time evolution of aerosol particle size to be determined including its relation to dust loading. Radiative transfer modeling is used to model the observations. Synthetic Pancam sky brightness is computed using a discrete-ordinates radiative transfer code that accounts for multiple scattering from aerosols and spherical geometry by integrating the source functions along curved paths in that coordinate system. We find that Mie scattering from spheres is not a good approximation for describing the angular variation of sky brightness far from the Sun (at scattering angles greater than 45 degrees). Significant seasonal variations are seen in the retrieved effective radius of the aerosols with higher optical depth strongly correlated with larger particle size.

  16. Size-spectra of trace elements in urban aerosol particles by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ondov, J.M.; Divita, F. Jr.; Suarez, A.

    1994-12-31

    Knowledge of composition and size of atmospheric aerosol particles is needed to elucidate their sources, atmospheric transformation processes, contributions to visibility reduction, and respiratory and environmental deposition. In a previous communication, we described size spectra and hygroscopic growth of arsenic, selenium, antimony, and zinc in College Park, Maryland, an urban, nonindustrial area located near Washington, D.C., wherein, concentrations of these elements are influenced largely by sulfate-containing aerosol transported from the Ohio River valley region, more than 200 km west of the area, and local coal utility plants and incinerators located 20 to 50 km from the sampling site. At College Park, mass median aerodynamic diameters (mmad) versus relative humidity (RH) data for these elements fell along different curves for samples influenced by local and distant aerosols; i.e., the curve for distant sources lay below the curve for local sources, at larger mmads for the same RH. In this paper we discuss size spectra, distribution parameters, and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles bearing trace elements in aerosol collected in Camden, New Jersey, a heavily industrial area in which major sources, including an antimony roaster and municipal incinerator, lie in close proximity (i.e., 5 to 15 km) to the site.

  17. A sea-state based source function for size and composition resolved marine aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Michael S; Keene, William C; Erickson III, David J

    2011-01-01

    A parameterization for the size- and composition-resolved production fluxes of nascent marine aerosol was developed from prior experimental observations and extrapolated to ambient conditions based on estimates of air entrainment by the breaking of wind-driven ocean waves. Production of particulate organic carbon (OC{sub aer}) was parameterized based on Langmuir equilibrium-type association of organic matter to bubble plumes in seawater and resulting aerosol as constrained by measurements of aerosol produced from productive and oligotrophic seawater. This novel approach is the first to parameterize size- and composition-resolved aerosol production based on explicit evaluation of wind-driven air entrainment/detrainment fluxes and chlorophyll-a as a proxy for surfactants in surface seawater. Production fluxes were simulated globally with an eight aerosol-size-bin version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.5.07). Simulated production fluxes fell within the range of published estimates based on observationally constrained parameterizations. Because the parameterization does not consider contributions from spume drops, the simulated global mass flux (1.5 x 10{sup 3} Tg y{sup -1}) is near the lower end of published estimates. The simulated production of aerosol number (1.4 x 10{sup 6} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and OC{sub aer} (29 Tg C y{sup -1}) fall near the upper end of published estimates and suggest that primary marine aerosols may have greater influences on the physicochemical evolution of the troposphere, radiative transfer and climate, and associated feedbacks on the surface ocean than suggested by previous model studies.

  18. Performance of the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer icing cloud droplet sizing probe in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudoff, R. C.; Bachalo, E. J.; Bachalo, W. D.; Oldenburg, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of an icing cloud droplet sizing probe based upon the Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) are discussed. This probe is an in-situ laser interferometry based single particle measuring device capable of determining size distributions. The probe is designed for use in harsh environments such as icing tunnels and natural icing clouds. From the measured size distribution, Median Volume Diameter (MVD) and Liquid Water Content (LWC) may be determined. Both the theory of measurement and the mechanical aspects of the probe design and development are discussed. The MVD results from the probe are compared to an existing calibration based upon different instruments in a series of tests in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel. Agreement between the PDPA probe and the existing calibration is close for MVDs between 15 to 30 microns, but the PDPA results are considerably smaller for MVDs under 15 microns.

  19. Aerosol particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal modulation of Mie scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Campillo, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Lin, H.B.

    1981-09-15

    Absorption spectroscopy of suspended submicron-sized aqueous ammonium-sulfate aerosol droplets has been performed by employing a CO/sub 2/ laser to photothermally modulate visible Mie scattered light. (AIP)

  20. Preliminary investigation of the role that DMS (dimethyl sulfide) and cloud cycles play in the formation of the aerosol size distribution. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppel, W.A.; Fitzgerald, J.W.; Frick, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Wattle, B.J.

    1987-07-29

    A series of experiments designed to study the production of new particulate matter by photolysis of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and the effect that nonprecipitating clouds have on the aerosol size distributions were carried out in Calspan Corporation's 600 cum environmental chamber during January and February 1986. The results show that DMS, the most-abundant natural source of sulfur, is photooxidized to some product of low volatility that can form new particles by homogeneous nucleation or condense on existing aerosols causing them to grow. To explain these observations, a theoretical study of the nucleation properties of methane sulfonic acid (MSA) was undertaken. The nucleation thresholds, calculated using thermodynamic data for MSA, show that at 70% RH, and MSA concentration of only 0.006 ppb will result in a supersaturated environment in which MSA will condense on preexisting particles larger than 0.02-micron radius. If the MSA concentrations increase to 30 ppb, then spontaneous formation of MSA solution droplets occurs by homogeneous binary nucleation. Simulations of the evolution of the size distribution observed for the DMS irradiation experiments with a dynamic aerosol model that includes the effects of coagulation, growth by condensation, and deposition to the walls of the chamber, yield results that are in excellent agreement with the observed evolution.

  1. The Effect of Particle Size on Iron Solubility in Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotte, A. R.; Majestic, B. J.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    The long range transport of mineral dust aerosols, which contain approximately 3% iron by mass, results in an estimated 14-16 Tg of iron deposited into the oceans annually; however, only a small percentage of the deposited iron is soluble. In high-nutrient, low chlorophyll ocean regions iron solubility may limit phytoplankton primary productivity. Although the atmospheric transport processes of mineral dust aerosols have been well studied, the role of particle size has been given little attention. In this work, the effect of particle size on iron solubility in atmospheric aerosols is examined. Iron-containing minerals (illite, kaolinite, magnetite, goethite, red hematite, black hematite, and quartz) were separated into five size fractions (10-2.5, 2.5-1, 1-0.5, 0.5-0.25, and <0.25μm) and extracted into buffer solutions simulating environments in the transport of aerosol particles for 150 minutes. Particle size was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Soluble iron content of the extracted mineral solutions was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Extracted mineral solutions were also analyzed for Fe(II) and Fe(III) content using a ferrozine/UV-VIS method. Preliminary results show that differences in solution composition are more important than differences in size. When extracted into acetate and cloudwater buffers (pH 4.25-4.3), < 0.3% of the Fe in iron oxides (hematite, magnetite, and goethite) is transferred to solution as compared to ~0.1-35% for clays (kaolinite and illite). When extracted into a marine aerosol solution (pH 1.7), the percentage of Fe of the iron oxides and clays transferred to solution increases to approximately 0.5-3% and 5-70%, respectively. However, there is a trend of increased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the largest and smallest size fractions (~0.01-0.3% and ~0.5-35% for iron oxides and clays, respectively), and decreased %Fe in the minerals transferred to solution in the mid

  2. Size-Limited Penetration of Nanoparticles into Porcine Respiratory Mucus after Aerosol Deposition.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Xabier; Pawelzyk, Paul; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Wagner, Christian; Willenbacher, Norbert; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-04-11

    We investigated the rheological properties and the penetration of differently sized carboxylated nanoparticles in pig pulmonary mucus, on different distance and time scales. Nanoparticles were either mechanically mixed into the mucus samples or deposited as an aerosol, the latter resembling a more physiologically relevant delivery scenario. After mechanical dispersion, 500 nm particles were locally trapped; a fraction of carboxylated tracer particles of 100 or 200 nm in diameter could however freely diffuse in these networks over distances of approximately 20 μm. In contrast, after aerosol deposition on top of the mucus layer only particles with a size of 100 nm were able to penetrate into mucus, suggesting the presence of smaller pores at the air-mucus interface compared to within mucus. These findings are relevant to an understanding of the fate of potentially harmful aerosol particles, such as pathogens, pollutants, and other nanomaterials after incidental inhalation, as well as for the design of pulmonary drug delivery systems. PMID:26957140

  3. Synthetic Hemozoin (β-Hematin) Crystals Nucleate at the Surface of Neutral Lipid Droplets that Control Their Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Ambele, Melvin A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Cummings, Franscious R.; Smith, Peter J.; Egan, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Emulsions of monopalmitoylglycerol (MPG) and of a neutral lipid blend (NLB), consisting of MPG, monostearoylglycerol, dipalmitoylglycerol, dioleoylglycerol and dilineoylglycerol (4:2:1:1:1), the composition associated with hemozoin from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, have been used to mediate the formation of β-hematin microcrystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction and electron spectroscopic imaging/electron energy loss spectroscopy (ESI/EELS) have been used to characterize both the lipid emulsion and β-hematin crystals. The latter have been compared with β-hematin formed at a pentanol/aqueous interface and with hemozoin both within P. falciparum parasites and extracted from the parasites. When lipid and ferriprotoporphyrin IX solutions in 1:9 v/v acetone/methanol were thoroughly pre-mixed either using an extruder or ultrasound, β-hematin crystals were found formed in intimate association with the lipid droplets. These crystals resembled hemozoin crystals, with prominent {100} faces. Lattice fringes in TEM indicated that these faces made contact with the lipid surface. The average length of these crystals was 0.62 times the average diameter of NLB droplets and their size distributions were statistically equivalent after 10 min incubation, suggesting that the lipid droplets also controlled the sizes of the crystals. This most closely resembles hemozoin formation in the helminth worm Schistosoma mansoni, while in P. falciparum, crystal formation appears to be associated with the much more gently curved digestive vacuole membrane which apparently leads to formation of much larger hemozoin crystals, similar to those formed at the flat pentanol-water interface. PMID:24244110

  4. Measurements of the Microphysics and Size Distributed Composition of Aerosol Particles at the Kosan Supersite, Jeju Island, Korea During ACE-ASIA and Their Influence on Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, K. N.; Alfarra, R.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; McFiggans, G. B.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.; Berner, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Canagaratne, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D.; Topping, D.; Burgess, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Measurements of particle number, size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were made at the Kosan supersite on the island of Jeju during the ACE-ASIA experiment. The measurements of chemical composition included those from an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, which can deliver quantitative information of the mass of a range of volatile and semi-volatile aerosol components in near real time. These include sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and the total organic fraction. The instrument also delivers measurements of the size-distributed mass of these components. In addition to the AMS, multi stage Berner impactors were also run for both mass collection on aluminium foil substrates and chemical analysis using Teflon substrates. The substrates were chemically analysed for a range of inorganic species, carbonate, a range of simple organic ions and also the water soluble organic fraction. The latter were subdivided by functionality: neutrals, mono and di carboxylix acids, and poly-carboxylic acids. A second sampling location on the mountain-side of Jeju was used to sample cloud microphysical parameters during the experiment. Measurements were made of liquid water content and cloud droplet number as a function of size during cloud events sampled during the experiment. We will show that the largest contributor to the accumulation mode particle mass is sulfate, with a variable contribution from the organic fraction. The organic is observed to be internally mixed with the sulfate in a mass mode centred at around 400 nm and using AMS data and the analyses from the impactors is oxidised and water soluble. The largest constituents of this component of the aerosol were di and poly carboxylic acids. There was little evidence for a mode of organic particles, typical of urban outflow at Jeju, indicating the particulate had been significantly processed between source and arrival at the sampling site. Little nitrate was observed in the sub micron aerosol at Jeju, but

  5. Size Dependent Ultrafast Cooling of Water Droplets in Microemulsions by Picosecond Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, G.; Patzlaff, T.; Graener, H.

    2002-04-01

    The ultrafast thermal relaxation of reversed micelles in n-octane/AOT/water (where AOT denotes sodium di-2-ethylhexyl sulfosuccinate) microemulsions was investigated by time-resolved infrared pump-probe spectroscopy. This picosecond cooling process can be described in terms of heat diffusion, demonstrating a new method to determine the nanometer radii of the water droplets. The reverse micelles are stable against transient temperatures far above the equilibrium stability range. The amphiphilic interface layer (AOT) seems to provide an efficient heat contact between the water and the nonpolar solvent.

  6. Activity size distribution and residence time of 7Be aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, Alexandra; Paatero, Jussi

    2014-05-01

    The activity size distributions of the natural radionuclide tracer 7Be in different size range fractions (<0.39 μm, 0.39-0.69 μm, 0.69-1.3 μm, 1.3-2.1 μm, 2.1-4.2 μm, 4.2-10.2 μm and >10.2 μm) were determined in the boreal atmosphere in the Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) at Sodankylä, Finland (67°22‧ N, 26°38‧ E, 180 m asl). The activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) ranged from 0.54 μm to 1.05 μm (average 0.83 μm). A residence time of about 8 days applies to aerosols of 0.83 μm diameter, representing the residence of aerosol particles in arctic environment. The observed positive correlation between AMAD values and RH% can be explained by the fact that condensation during high relative humidity conditions becomes more intense, resulting in increased particle sizes of atmospheric aerosols. However, greater aerosol particle sizes means higher wet scavenging rate of aerosols and as a result lower activity concentration of 7Be in the atmosphere, explaining the anti-correlation between the AMAD values and activity concentrations of 7Be. But this associated with possibly higher scavenging rates of aerosols does not necessarily alone explain the anti-correlation between the AMAD and the 7Be activities. The air mass origin associated with synoptic scale weather phenomena may contribute to that too. The Flextra model was used to assess the transport pattern and to explain the deviation in radionuclide activity concentrations and AMAD values observed in the site of investigation.

  7. Droplet Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  8. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration in São Paulo, Brazil: the importance of aerosol size-resolved chemical composition on CCNhack concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, G. P.; Brito, J.; Morales, C. A.; Andrade, M. F.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), aerosol size distribution and non-refractory chemical composition were performed from 16 to 31 October 2012 in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA), Brazil. CCN measurements were performed at 0.23, 0.45, 0.68, 0.90 and 1.13% water supersaturation and were subsequently compared with the Köhler theory, considering the chemical composition. Real-time chemical composition has been obtained by deploying, for the first time in the SPMA, an aerosol chemical ionization monitor (ACSM). CCN closure analyses were performed considering internal mixtures. Average aerosol composition during the studied period yielded (arithmetic mean~± standard deviation) 4.81 ± 3.05, 3.26 ± 2.10, 0.30 ± 0.27, 0.52 ± 0.32, 0.37 ± 0.21 and 0.04 ± 0.04 μg m-3 for organics, BC, NH4, SO4, NO3 and Cl, respectively. Particle number concentration was 12 813 ± 5350 cm-3, with a dominant nucleation mode. CCN concentrations were on average 1090 ± 328 and 3570 ± 1695 cm-3 at SS = 0.23% and SS = 1.13%, respectively. Results show an increase in aerosol hygroscopicity in the afternoon as a result of aerosol photochemical processing, leading to an enhancement of both organic and inorganic secondary aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as an increase in aerosol average diameter. Considering the bulk composition alone, observed CCN concentrations were substantially overpredicted when compared with the Köhler theory (44.1 ± 47.9% at 0.23% supersaturation and 91.4 ± 40.3% at 1.13% supersaturation). Overall, the impact of composition on the calculated CCN concentration (NCCN) decreases with decreasing supersaturation, partially because using bulk composition introduces less bias for large diameters and lower critical supersaturations, defined as the supersaturation at which the cloud droplet activation will take place. Results suggest that the consideration of only inorganic fraction improves the calculated NCCN. Introducing a size-dependent chemical

  9. VARIATION OF ELEMENT SPECIATION IN COAL COMBUSTION AEROSOLS WITH PARTICLE SIZE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciation of sulfur, iron and key trace elements (Cr, As, Se, Zn) in combustion ash aerosols has been examined as a function of size from experimental combustion units burning Utah and Illinois bituminous coals. Although predominantly present as sulfate, sulfur was also pre...

  10. Continuous aerosol size separator using inertial microfluidics and its application to airborne bacteria and viruses.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Chan; Kang, Joon Sang; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-04-21

    A microchannel-based aerosol size separator that separates submicron aerosols according to particle inertial differences and Dean vortices in the airflow was developed for use in low-cost, portable, real-time aerosol collectors, detectors, concentrators and other such devices. The microfluidic inertial separator was furthermore applied to simultaneously separate airborne microorganisms by size, such as airborne viruses and bacteria from larger aerosols and viral particles from bacterial cells. The entire system was designed by numerical simulation and analysis. In addition, its performance was evaluated experimentally using airborne standard polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. In addition, two airborne microorganisms, Adenovirus 40 and Staphylococcus epidermidis, were used to verify the performance of the separator. The separation ratios of each bioaerosol were measured using real-time aerosol measurement instruments and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. The system was composed of two 90° curved microchannels and three outlets for separating the virus, bacteria and larger particles. About 70% of 3 μm particles but almost none of the bioaerosols were separated out at the first outlet. In addition, more than 70% of S. epidermidis and ~70% Adenovirus were separated out at the second and third outlets, respectively. Unwanted particle loss in the system was less than 10%. The results indicated not only good separation of bioaerosols but also the potential of our separator for use in bioaerosol applications. PMID:25714231

  11. [Characteristics of Number Concentration Size Distributions of Aerosols Under Processes in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Zhao, Pu-sheng; Chen, Yi-na

    2016-04-15

    The aerosol number concentration size distributions were measured by a Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer (WPS-1000XP) at an urban site of Beijing from 2012 to 2014; and the characteristics of the size distributions in different seasons and weather conditions were discussed. The results showed that the daily average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols was highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn; the daily average number concentration of accumulation mode aerosols was bigher in the spring and winter, while lowest in summer; and the average concentration of coarse mode was highest during the winter. The Aitken mode particles had the most significant diurnal variations resulted from the traffic sources and the summer photochemical reactions. In the spring, autumn and winter, the number concentrations of accumulation mode of the nighttime was higher than that of the daytime. The coarse mode particles did not have obvious diurnal variation. During the heavy pollution process, the accumulation mode aerosols played a decisive role in PM₂.₅ concentrations and was usually removed by the north wind. The precipitation could effectively eliminate the coarse mode particles, but it bad no obvious effect on the accumulation mode particles under small speed wind and zero speed wind. During the dust process, the concentrations of coarse mode particles increased significantly, while the accumulation mode aerosol concentration was obviously decreased. PMID:27548939

  12. ARM Evaluation Product : Droplet Number Concentration Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Riihimaki, Laura

    2014-05-15

    Cloud droplet number concentration is an important factor in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. As aerosol concentration increases, it is expected that droplet number concentration, Nd, will increase and droplet size decrease, for a given liquid water path (Twomey 1977), which will greatly affect cloud albedo as smaller droplets reflect more shortwave radiation. However, the magnitude and variability of these processes under different environmental conditions is still uncertain. McComiskey et al. (2009) have implemented a method, based on Boers and Mitchell (1994), for calculating Nd from ground-based remote sensing measurements of optical depth and liquid water path. They show that the magnitude of the aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) varies with a range of factors, including the relative value of the cloud liquid water path (LWP), the aerosol size distribution, and the cloud updraft velocity. Estimates of Nd under a range of cloud types and conditions and at a variety of sites are needed to further quantify the impacts of aerosol cloud interactions.

  13. Factors Regulating the Size-Resolved Production and Composition of Nascent Marine Aerosols (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keene, W. C.; Frossard, A.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Russell, L. M.; Kieber, D. J.; Kinsey, J.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P.

    2010-12-01

    Bursting bubbles generated by breaking wind waves at the ocean surface are a major but poorly constrained global source for aerosol mass, volume, and number and associated reactive constituents all of which significantly influence the multiphase physicochemical evolution of Earth’s troposphere and climate. During a spring 2010 cruise of the R/V Atlantis in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, marine aerosols were produced in a high-capacity glass and Teflon generator by artificially injecting zero air into fresh flowing seawater via coarse (A) and fine (D) frits at 1.2 m depth and seawater jets impinging upon the surface. Size-resolved number concentrations and organic and inorganic composition, organic functional groups, bubble-plume volumes, and near-surface bubble sizes were characterized over ranges of bubble and seawater flow rates and headspace RH. Seawater temperature, salinity, and chlorophyll a concentrations were measured in parallel. Relative to fine frits, bubble-plume volumes generated with coarse frits were three times smaller due to the higher initial rise velocity and shorting lifetimes of larger bubbles. However, bubbles produced by both coarse and fine frits evolved in response to surface tension to similar size (0.2- to 0.5-mm diameter) near the water-air interface. Consequently, the two frit sizes produced similar number fluxes of size-resolved aerosols per unit volume air flux. Production fluxes of supermicron- and submicron-diameter size fractions varied as linear functions of air detrainment. Ranges in centroids for number size distributions of aerosols produced with coarse (70- to 100-nm dry diameter) and fine frits (60- to 80-nm dry diameter) overlapped. Centroids for size distributions produced by a bubbler-type generator deployed in open seawater adjacent to the ship ranged from 55- 60-nm dry diameter. Number-size distributions produced by water jets were shifted towards larger particles with centroids of 100- to 150-nm dry diameter

  14. SIZE-SELECTING AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION INSTRUMENT - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerodyne Research, Inc., proposes to develop a new monitor that provides composition information of particles in the ultrafine (10-100 nm), fine (100 nm-2.5 µm) and coarse (2.5-10 µm) size modes in near real time. Particle monitoring technologies are important f...

  15. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-01-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  16. Splashing Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.; Kizito, John Patrick; Berger, Gordon M.; Iwan, J.; Alexander, D.; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2002-11-01

    Current data on droplet breakup is scarce for the sizes and velocities typical of practical applications such as in spray combustion processes and coating processes. While much more representative of practical applications, the small spatial scales and rapid time-scales prevent detailed measurement of the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients produced by impinging upon surfaces. Realized through the extended spatial and temporal scales afforded by a microgravity environment, an improved understanding of drop breakup dynamics is sought to understand and ultimately control the impingement dynamics of droplets upon surfaces in practical situations. The primary objective of this research will be to mark the onset of different 'splashing modes' and to determine their temperature, pressure and angle dependence for impinging droplets representative of practical fluids. In addition, we are modeling the evolution of droplets that do not initially splash but rather undergo a 'fingering' evolution observed on the spreading fluid front and the transformation of these fingers into splashed products. An example of our experimental data is presented below. These images are of Isopar V impacting a mirror-polished surface. They were acquired using a high-speed camera at 1000 frames per second. They show the spreading of a single droplet after impact and ensuing finger instabilities. Normal gravity experimental data such as this will guide low gravity measurements in the 2.2 second drop tower and KC-135 aircraft as available. Presently we are in the process of comparing the experimental data of droplet shape evolution to numerical models, which can also capture the internal fluid dynamics and liquid property gradients such as produced by impingement upon a heated surface. To-date isothermal numerical data has been modeled using direct numerical simulations of representative splashing droplets. The data obtained so far indicates that the present model describes well

  17. Equilibrium size of atmospheric aerosol sulfates as a function of the relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M.; Spengler, John D.; Stern, Bonnie; Franklin, Claire A.

    1989-05-01

    Size-fractionated acid aerosols were collected, using a microorifice cascade impactor, during the summer of 1986 in Dunnville, Ontario, as part of the Canadian Children Acute Respiratory Effects Study (CARES), sponsored by the Department of National Health and Welfare, Canada. Sulfate and hydrogen ions showed similar size distributions. The molar ratio of H+/SO42- varied little with particle size, but there was a considerable time-dependent variation in aerosol acid content. It was also found that there is a distinct relationship between the geometric mean aerodynamic diameter of sulfate, da, and ambient relative humidity (RH). Atmospheric sulfate particle sizes observed in this study were slightly higher than those found in laboratory experiments at corresponding humidities. However, considering the uncertainties involved, the agreement between the field and laboratory data was remarkable.

  18. Thermal and structural behavior of milk fat. 3. Influence of cooling rate and droplet size on cream crystallization.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christelle; Bourgaux, Claudie; Lesieur, Pierre; Bernadou, Sophie; Keller, Gérard; Ollivon, Michel

    2002-10-01

    , demonstrating the usefulness of the small-angle XRD technique. Reconstituted emulsions homogenized under different pressures are used to determine the influence of droplet size on crystallization. The decrease of droplet size induces (i) a higher supercooling/supersaturation and (ii) a higher disorder and/or a smaller size of TG crystals within the emulsion droplets. At the supramolecular scale, polarized light microscopy shows that various cooling rates applied in situ using a temperature-controlled stage directly influence crystal sizes and their type of organization within milk fat globules. The faster the cooling rate, the smaller the size of the crystals within the globules. PMID:12702426

  19. Ratio of aerosol and gases of radioactive chlorine and particle size distribution of aerosol formed by high-energy proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S; Sato, K; Manabe, K; Noguchi, H; Kaneko, H; Oki, Y; Iida, T; Tanaka, Su

    2007-01-01

    To estimate internal doses due to the inhalation of radionuclides produced by the nuclear spallation of the air nuclei in high-energy proton accelerator facilities, the physicochemical properties of radionuclides are very important. Thus, the ratio of aerosol and gases of 38Cl and 39Cl formed by irradiating argon gas-added air with a 48 MeV proton beam has been measured. Radionuclides of 38Cl and 39Cl exist as aerosol, acid gas and non-acid gas. The percentages of activity of 38Cl and 39Cl aerosols are about 80%. The number size distributions of non-radioactive aerosol were characterised by two peaks with diameters of 10-20 nm and larger than 20 nm. As a result predicted by a simple surface model, it was found that the activity size distribution of 38Cl aerosols can be regarded as that having a single peak at 120 nm. PMID:18033760

  20. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  1. [Size distributions of aerosol particles and the impact on visibility in winter of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Shang, Qian; Li, Zi-Hua; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei-Juan

    2011-09-01

    High resolution instruments were used to investigate the relationship between aerosol size distribution characteristics and meteorological factors, and its possible influence on visibility in urban Nanjing from November to December 2009. Results show that the size distribution of aerosol number concentration showed a bimodal shape with the main peak value concentrating at particle sizes of 0.04-0.1 microm. Mass concentration distribution presented a bimodal shape with the two peak values concentrating at particle sizes of 0.5-0.7 microm and 2.7 microm, and the surface area concentration distribution presented two peaks from 0.1 to 0.5 microm and from 0.5 to 0.9 microm. It is found that the diurnal and interdiurnal variations of particle concentrations are obvious. Human activities and variation of atmospheric stability had great effect on daily variation of particle concentrations, while meteorological conditions such as precipitation, wind, relative humidity and so on had strong influence on interdiurnal variation. The aerosol size distribution was significantly affected by relative humidity. When RH was lower than 54%, number concentration of aerosol particles less than 1 microm in diameter increased gradually as RH increased, and concentration of particles with diameter larger than 1 microm almost had no change. When RH was higher than 54%, number concentration of aerosol particles ranging from 0.01 to 0.2 microm and from 2.7 to 10 microm decreased with the increase of RH, in contrast, concentration of aerosol particles between 0.5 and 1.5 microm in diameter increased. In addition, the particle number size distributions were different in rainy, foggy, sunny and haze weather conditions. Compared to sunny day, concentration of particles with different sizes all decreased in rainy day. In foggy weather, The number concentration of aerosol particles ranging from 0.01 to 0.3 microm and from 2.7 to 10 microm decreased, and aerosol particles between 0.3 and 2.7 microm

  2. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  3. A Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) for Rapid Measurement of High-Concentration Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Hee-Siew; Chen, Da-Ren; Pui, David Y. H.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a fast-response Nanometer Aerosol Size Analyzer (nASA) that is capable of scanning 30 size channels between 3 and 100 nm in a total time of 3 seconds. The analyzer includes a bipolar charger (P0210), an extended-length Nanometer Differential Mobility Analyzer (Nano-DMA), and an electrometer (TSI 3068). This combination of components provides particle size spectra at a scan rate of 0.1 second per channel free of uncertainties caused by response-time-induced smearing. The nASA thus offers a fast response for aerosol size distribution measurements in high-concentration conditions and also eliminates the need for applying a de-smearing algorithm to resulting data. In addition, because of its thermodynamically stable means of particle detection, the nASA is useful for applications requiring measurements over a broad range of sample pressures and temperatures. Indeed, experimental transfer functions determined for the extended-length Nano-DMA using the Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (TDMA) technique indicate the nASA provides good size resolution at pressures as low as 200 Torr. Also, as was demonstrated in tests to characterize the soot emissions from the J85-GE engine of a T38 aircraft, the broad dynamic concentration range of the nASA makes it particularly suitable for studies of combustion or particle formation processes. Further details of the nASA performance as well as results from calibrations, laboratory tests and field applications are presented.

  4. Ion balances of size-resolved tropospheric aerosol samples: implications for the acidity and atmospheric processing of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Hillamo, Risto; Teinilä, Kimmo; Pakkanen, Tuomo; Allegrini, Ivo; Sparapani, Roberto

    A large set of size-resolved aerosol samples was inspected with regard to their ion balance to shed light on how the aerosol acidity changes with particle size in the lower troposphere and what implications this might have for the atmospheric processing of aerosols. Quite different behaviour between the remote and more polluted environments could be observed. At the remote sites, practically the whole accumulation mode had cation-to-anion ratios clearly below unity, indicating that these particles were quite acidic. The supermicron size range was considerably less acidic and may in some cases have been close to neutral or even alkaline. An interesting feature common to the remote sites was a clear jump in the cation-to-anion ratio when going from the accumulation to the Aitken mode. The most likely reason for this was cloud processing which, via in-cloud sulphate production, makes the smallest accumulation-mode particles more acidic than the non-activated Aitken-mode particles. A direct consequence of the less acidic nature of the Aitken mode is that it can take up semi-volatile, water-soluble gases much easier than the accumulation mode. This feature may have significant implications for atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei production in remote environments. In rural and urban locations, the cation-to-anion ratio was close to unity over most of the accumulation mode, but increased significantly when going to either larger or smaller particle sizes. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the supermicron size range were ascribed to carbonate associated with mineral dust. The ubiquitous presence of carbonate in these particles indicates that they were neutral or alkaline, making them good sites for heterogeneous reactions involving acidic trace gases. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the Aitken mode suggest that these particles contained some water-soluble anions not detected by our chemical analysis. This is worth keeping in mind when investigating the hygroscopic

  5. Global Measurement of Junge Layer Stratospheric Aerosol with OMPS/LP. Scattering Properties and Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, D. F.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The OMPS/LP was launched on board the NPP space platform in October 2011. Over the past two years, the OMPS/LP was used to retrieve the global distribution of ozone and aerosol. The paper will describe the aerosol product, which NASA is presently preparing for public release. The current OMPS/LP aerosol product consists of latitude-altitude curtains along the NPP Sun-synchronous orbit, from cloud top to about 40 km. These curtains extend from local sunrise in Southern polar region to local sunset in Northern polar region. Aerosol extinctions are produced at five distinct wavelengths, namely 513, 525, 670, 750 and 870 nm, with a sampling of 1 km in vertical direction and 1 degree latitude in the along-track direction. The OMPS/LP aerosol dataset is fairly large, with 7000 vertical profiles produced each day for each wavelength. The aerosol product will be presented in terms of extinction monthly median values and mean Angstrom coefficient (particle size). Over the past two years, the Junge layer was affected by several events such as volcanic eruptions (Nabro and Kelut) and a meteor (Chelyabinsk), the effects of which are clearly visible in the OMPS/LP dataset. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) can also be observed in the OMPS/LP dataset. Moreover the effect of the Brewer Dobson Circulation (BDC) can be observed at high altitudes: the BDC velocity at 35 km can be estimated from the time variation of iso-density heights and was found to compare well with BDC velocities evaluated with the water vapor tape recorder technique as well as MERRA model values. Finally, aerosol filaments are clearly visible in OMPS/LP aerosol dataset as they appear as distinct "bubbles" on the OMPS/LP curtain files at periodic intervals in both the Southern and Northern hemispheres. These filaments are a main source of transport from tropical to polar region, and OMPS/LP data can therefore be instrumental in quantifying the rate of this transport. The quality of the OMPS/LP aerosol

  6. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  7. Combined effect of glycine and sea salt on aerosol cloud droplet activation predicted by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Hede, Thomas; Tu, Yaoquan; Leck, Caroline; Agren, Hans

    2013-10-17

    The present study illustrates the combined effect of organic and inorganic compounds on cloud droplet nucleation and activation processes representative for the marine environment. Amino acids and sea salt are common marine cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) which act as a prerequisite for growth of cloud droplets. The chemical and physical properties of these CCN play a key role for interfacial properties such as surface tension, which is important for the optical properties of clouds and for heterogeneous reactions. However, there is a lack of detailed information and in situ measurements of surface tension of such nanosized droplets. Here we present a study of the combined effect of zwitterionic glycine (ZGLY) and sea salt in nanosized water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations, where particular emphasis is placed on the surface tension for the nanosized droplets. The critical supersaturation is estimated by the Köhler equation. It is found that dissolved sea salt interacts with ZGLY through a water bridge and weakens the hydrogen bonds among ZGLYs, which has a significant effect on both surface tension and water vapor supersaturation. Clusters of glycine mixed with sea salt deliquesce more efficiently and have higher growth factors. PMID:24063576

  8. A Stokes' velocity photographic method for measuring the size distribution of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosol particles are allowed to settle in a vertical glass walled vessel, and their settling velocity is determined by photographing them while the light entering the camera is being chopped at a known rate. The settling velocity of each particle can be determined from the photographs, and by applying the Stokes' law, one can calculate the radius of each particle. The Stokes' law for a sphere settling freely in a quiet medium is given. If the volume of the photographed region of the illumination is known, the aerosol number density and size distribution can be obtained. Experiments with alumina particles of given size distributions indicate that the method works accurately. One set of a typical experiment with 3.0-micrometer Al2O3 particles is presented, which shows that the measured size distribution peaks at approximately 3.0 micrometer.

  9. Simulating SAL formation and aerosol size distribution during SAMUM-I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Kalenderski, Stoitchko; Osipov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To understand the formation mechanisms of Saharan Air Layer (SAL), we combine model simulations and dust observations collected during the first stage of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-I), which sampled dust events that extended from Morocco to Portugal, and investigated the spatial distribution and the microphysical, optical, chemical, and radiative properties of Saharan mineral dust. We employed the Weather Research Forecast model coupled with the Chemistry/Aerosol module (WRF-Chem) to reproduce the meteorological environment and spatial and size distributions of dust. The experimental domain covers northwest Africa including the southern Sahara, Morocco and part of the Atlantic Ocean with 5 km horizontal grid spacing and 51 vertical layers. The experiments were run from 20 May to 9 June 2006, covering the period of most intensive dust outbreaks. Comparisons of model results with available airborne and ground-based observations show that WRF-Chem reproduces observed meteorological fields as well as aerosol spatial distribution across the entire region and along the airplane's tracks. We evaluated several aerosol uplift processes and found that orographic lifting, aerosol transport through the land/sea interface with steep gradients of meteorological characteristics, and interaction of sea breezes with the continental outflow are key mechanisms that form a surface-detached aerosol plume over the ocean. Comparisons of simulated dust size distributions with airplane and ground-based observations are generally good, but suggest that more detailed treatment of microphysics in the model is required to capture the full-scale effect of large aerosol particles.

  10. Measuring the stratospheric aerosol size distribution profile following the next big volcanic eruption. What is required?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Two of the key missing features of fresh and evolving volcanic plumes are the particle size distribution and its partitioning into non-volatile ash and volatile sulfate particles. Such information would allow more refined estimates of the evolution and dispersal of the aerosol, of the impacts of the aerosol on radiation and on stratospheric chemistry, and of the overall amount of sulfur injected into the stratosphere. To provide this information aerosol measurements must be sensitive to particles in the 0.1 - 10 μm radius range, with concentration detection thresholds > 0.001 cm-3, and to the total aerosol population. An added bonus would be a size resolved measurement of the non-volatile fraction of the aerosol. The measurements must span the lower and mid stratosphere up to about 30 km. There are no remote measurements which can provide this information. In situ measurements using aerosol and condensation nuclei counters are required. Aircraft platforms are available for measurements up to 20 km, but beyond that requires balloon platforms. Measurements above 20 km would be required for a large volcanic eruption. There are balloon-borne instruments capable of fulfilling all of the measurement requirements; however such instruments are reasonably large and not expendable. The difficulty is deploying the instruments, obtaining the flight permissions from air traffic control, and recovering the instruments after flight. Such difficulties are compounded in the tropics. This talk will detail some previous experience in this area and suggest ways forward to be ready for the next big eruption.

  11. Differences between the activity size distributions of the different natural radionuclide aerosols in outdoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gründel, M.; Porstendörfer, J.

    The results of the activity size distribution of the short-lived ( 218Po, 214Bi/ 214Po) and long-lived ( 210Pb, 210Po) radon decay product aerosols, the thoron decay product aerosols ( 212Pb, 212Po) and 7Be of the outdoor atmosphere are presented. The results were obtained from measurements averaged over an extended period (4 weeks) and were carried out with a low-pressure On-Line Alpha Cascade Impactor (OLACI). The size distributions of