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Sample records for aerosol filter samples

  1. The filter-loading effect by ambient aerosols in filter absorption photometers depends on the coating of the sampled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinovec, Luka; Gregorič, Asta; Zotter, Peter; Wolf, Robert; Bruns, Emily Anne; Prévôt, André S. H.; Petit, Jean-Eudes; Favez, Olivier; Sciare, Jean; Arnold, Ian J.; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Moosmüller, Hans; Filep, Agnes; Močnik, Griša

    2017-03-01

    Black carbon is a primary aerosol tracer for high-temperature combustion emissions and can be used to characterize the time evolution of its sources. It is correlated with a decrease in public health and contributes to atmospheric warming. Black carbon measurements are usually conducted with absorption filter photometers, which are prone to several artifacts, including the filter-loading effect - a saturation of the instrumental response due to the accumulation of the sample in the filter matrix. In this paper, we investigate the hypothesis that this filter-loading effect depends on the optical properties of particles present in the filter matrix, especially on the black carbon particle coating. We conducted field campaigns in contrasting environments to determine the influence of source characteristics, particle age and coating on the magnitude of the filter-loading effect. High-time-resolution measurements of the filter-loading parameter in filter absorption photometers show daily and seasonal variations of the effect. The variation is most pronounced in the near-infrared region, where the black carbon mass concentration is determined. During winter, the filter-loading parameter value increases with the absorption Ångström exponent. It is suggested that this effect is related to the size of the black carbon particle core as the wood burning (with higher values of the absorption Ångström exponent) produces soot particles with larger diameters. A reduction of the filter-loading effect is correlated with the availability of the coating material. As the coating of ambient aerosols is reduced or removed, the filter-loading parameter increases. Coatings composed of ammonium sulfate and secondary organics seem to be responsible for the variation of the loading effect. The potential source contribution function analysis shows that high values of the filter-loading parameter in the infrared are indicative of local pollution, whereas low values of the filter

  2. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreiss, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Alves, C.; Bossi, R.; Bjerke, A.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Gülcin, A.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-07-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wild fire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for biomass burning particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied High-Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography (HPAEC), four used High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) or Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC), and six resorted to Gas Chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 23%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e., for 33% of

  3. An intercomparison study of analytical methods used for quantification of levoglucosan in ambient aerosol filter samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yttri, K. E.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Maenhaut, W.; Abbaszade, G.; Alves, C.; Bjerke, A.; Bonnier, N.; Bossi, R.; Claeys, M.; Dye, C.; Evtyugina, M.; García-Gacio, D.; Hillamo, R.; Hoffer, A.; Hyder, M.; Iinuma, Y.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; López-Mahia, P. L.; Pio, C.; Piot, C.; Ramirez-Santa-Cruz, C.; Sciare, J.; Teinilä, K.; Vermeylen, R.; Vicente, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide anhydrides (MAs) levoglucosan, galactosan and mannosan are products of incomplete combustion and pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicelluloses, and are found to be major constituents of biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles. Hence, ambient aerosol particle concentrations of levoglucosan are commonly used to study the influence of residential wood burning, agricultural waste burning and wildfire emissions on ambient air quality. A European-wide intercomparison on the analysis of the three monosaccharide anhydrides was conducted based on ambient aerosol quartz fiber filter samples collected at a Norwegian urban background site during winter. Thus, the samples' content of MAs is representative for BB particles originating from residential wood burning. The purpose of the intercomparison was to examine the comparability of the great diversity of analytical methods used for analysis of levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in ambient aerosol filter samples. Thirteen laboratories participated, of which three applied high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC), four used high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and six resorted to gas chromatography (GC). The analytical methods used were of such diversity that they should be considered as thirteen different analytical methods. All of the thirteen laboratories reported levels of levoglucosan, whereas nine reported data for mannosan and/or galactosan. Eight of the thirteen laboratories reported levels for all three isomers. The accuracy for levoglucosan, presented as the mean percentage error (PE) for each participating laboratory, varied from -63 to 20%; however, for 62% of the laboratories the mean PE was within ±10%, and for 85% the mean PE was within ±20%. For mannosan, the corresponding range was -60 to 69%, but as for levoglucosan, the range was substantially smaller for a subselection of the laboratories; i.e. for 33% of the

  4. Thermodesorption of aerosol matter on multiple filters of different materials for a more detailed evaluation of sampling artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus; Keck, Lothar

    2004-10-01

    Multiple, essentially identical samples of PM2.5, PM10 and TSP aerosol matter were collected on filters of cellulose acetate-nitrate membrane (CA), quartz fiber (QF) and glass fiber (GF) material. The samples were analyzed in terms of the gravimetric mass and the mass of nine inorganic ions. These parameters were also measured after step-wise thermodesorption of aerosol matter by 1-h heating in ambient air up to 350 °C. The observed thermograms of the analyzed ions were compared with results obtained using pure and mixed salts on filter. In summer the apparent mass concentration of aerosol matter collected on CA was always larger than on QF and GF filter. The excess mass on CA was found to be highly volatile, i.e. completely removable at 120 °C, and composed of both ionic and non-ionic matter. The apparent nitrate concentration sampled on QF and GF was almost an order of magnitude lower than on CA. The very pronounced nitrate losses from the fiber filters are attributed to volatilization of ammonium nitrate. In contrast, nitrate losses from CA were small or even negligible for two reasons, pile-up of aerosol matter predominantly on (rather than in) the filter ("cake" formation) and, more importantly, re-adsorption of volatilized ammonia and nitric acid in the filter. Sampling on GF filters was found to suffer from severe problems due to chemical reactions between Na+ of the glass and SO42- of the aerosol matter. A novel type of artifact was observed in sampling campaigns during fall. Presumably as a results of a high water content, the collected aerosol matter became liquefied and a large fraction of the water soluble components was driven through the filter into the support pad underneath. The negative "wetting artifact" was much more pronounced for the thin CA than for the relatively thick QF filters. The total amount of aerosol matter in the CA/pad and QF/pad combinations was the same, indicating that this kind of artifact can be corrected for. Ammonium

  5. On-Line Measurements of Beryllium, Chromium, and Mercury by Using Aerosol Beam Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectrometer and Time-Integrated Filter Sampling Reference Method

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.D.

    2003-05-15

    A novel real-time monitor for aerosol particles has been developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The instrument is designed to perform in-situ measurement for the elemental composition of aerosol particles in flue gas. We had tested this monitor at the Eastman Chemical Company in July 2001 taking advantage of the emissions from a waste incinerator operated by the company as the background. To investigate the behavior and response of the monitor under simulated/known conditions, stock solutions of prepared metal concentration(s) were nebulized to provide spikes for the instrument testing. Strengths of the solutions were designed such that a reference method (RM) was able to collect sufficient material on filter samples that were subsequently analyzed in a laboratory to produce 30-minute average data points. Parallel aerosol measurements were performed by using the ORNL instrument. Recorded signal of an individual element was processed and the concentration calculated from a calibration curve established prior to the campaign. RM data were able to reflect the loads simulated in the spiked waste stream. However, it missed one beryllium sample. The possibility of bias exists in the RM determination of chromium that could lead to erroneous comparison between the RM and the real-time monitoring data. With the real-time detection capability, the ORNL instrument was able to reveal the emission variation by making seven measurements within a 30-minute cycle. The ability of the instrument also enables the reconstruction of the baseline chromium emission concentration. The measurements for mercury by both methods are in good agreement.

  6. Sampling stratospheric aerosols with impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.

    1989-01-01

    Derivation of statistically significant size distributions from impactor samples of rarefield stratospheric aerosols imposes difficult sampling constraints on collector design. It is shown that it is necessary to design impactors of different size for each range of aerosol size collected so as to obtain acceptable levels of uncertainty with a reasonable amount of data reduction.

  7. Air Sampling Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Metal Works' Accu-Vol is a high-volume air sampling system used by many government agencies to monitor air quality for pollution control purposes. Procedure prevents possible test-invalidating contamination from materials other than particulate pollutants, caused by manual handling or penetration of windblown matter during transit, a cassette was developed in which the filter is sealed within a metal frame and protected in transit by a snap-on aluminum cover, thus handled only under clean conditions in the laboratory.

  8. Aerosol sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  9. NASA's Aerosol Sampling Experiment Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit E.

    2016-01-01

    In a spacecraft cabin environment, the size range of indoor aerosols is much larger and they persist longer than on Earth because they are not removed by gravitational settling. A previous aerosol experiment in 1991 documented that over 90 of the mass concentration of particles in the NASA Space Shuttle air were between 10 m and 100 m based on measurements with a multi-stage virtual impactor and a nephelometer (Liu et al. 1991). While the now-retired Space Shuttle had short duration missions (less than two weeks), the International Space Station (ISS) has been continually inhabited by astronauts for over a decade. High concentrations of inhalable particles on ISS are potentially responsible for crew complaints of respiratory and eye irritation and comments about 'dusty' air. Air filtration is the current control strategy for airborne particles on the ISS, and filtration modeling, performed for engineering and design validation of the air revitalization system in ISS, predicted that PM requirements would be met. However, aerosol monitoring has never been performed on the ISS to verify PM levels. A flight experiment is in preparation which will provide data on particulate matter in ISS ambient air. Particles will be collected with a thermophoretic sampler as well as with passive samplers which will extend the particle size range of sampling. Samples will be returned to Earth for chemical and microscopic analyses, providing the first aerosol data for ISS ambient air.

  10. Filter and electrostatic samplers for semivolatile aerosols: physical artifacts.

    PubMed

    Volckens, John; Leith, David

    2002-11-01

    Adsorptive and evaporative artifacts often bias measurements of semivolatile aerosols. Adsorption occurs when the sampling method disrupts the gas-particle partitioning equilibrium. Evaporation occurs because concentrations of semivolatiles are rarely constant over time. Filtration is subject to both adsorptive and evaporative artifacts. By comparison, electrostatic precipitation reduces these artifacts by minimizing the surface area of collected particles without substantially disrupting the gas-particle equilibrium. The extent of these artifacts was determined for filter samplers and electrostatic precipitator samplers for semivolatile alkane aerosols in the laboratory. Adsorption of gas-phase semivolatiles was lower in electrostatic precipitators by factors of 5-100 compared to the filter method. Particle evaporation from the electrostatic sampler was 2.3 times lower than that from TFE-coated glass-fiber filters. Use of a backup filter to correct for compound-specific adsorption artifacts can introduce positive or negative errors to the measured particle-phase concentration due to competition among the adsorbates for available adsorption sites. Adsorption of evaporated particles from the front filter onto the backup filter increased the measured evaporative artifact by a factor of 1.5-2.

  11. Aerosol Sampling and Analysis for the GEOTRACES Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    The GEOTRACES Science Plan emphasizes the importance of atmospheric deposition on the budgets and biogeochemistry of trace elements and isotopes in the world's oceans. With funding from the National Science Foundation, an aerosol and rainfall sampling program is being developed for use on future GEOTRACES cruises. This includes preparation and testing of dual high-volume TISCH 5170-VBL aerosol samplers for inorganic trace elements and isotopes, major ions, organic material, and isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen. A third 5170-VBL aerosol sampler is equipped with a 5-stage Sierra-style slotted impactor to collect size-fractionated aerosols for chemical measurements. The aerosol samplers will be operated using wind speed and wind sector control to avoid contamination from ship's exhaust. Duplicate automated rain samplers have also been developed to collect unfiltered and filtered rain samples. Rainfall will be filtered immediately (during collection) to avoid re-adsorption artifacts. Two intercalibration experiments are planned where aerosol and rainfall subsamples will be distributed to the community for testing and validation of analytical methods. The first experiment is being conducted in early September 2008 on the roof at RSMAS/University of Miami. Results from the GEOTRACES aerosol samplers will be compared to a multi-channel aerosol sampling system (using 47mm PCTE filters), and with ongoing aerosol collections at RSMAS. The second experiment is planned for the atmospheric sampling tower at Bellows AFB (Oahu, HI) in summer 2009. Details of the sampling equipment and sample collection methods will be discussed, along with preliminary results from the first intercalibration experiment. Community input will be solicited for planning the second intercalibration experiment.

  12. Aerosol penetration through filtering facepieces and respirator cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Lehtimäki, M; Willeke, K

    1992-09-01

    Air-purifying respirators must be certified following the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) filter test criteria (30 CFR 11). The criteria specify a range for the mean particle size and the measure of spread permissible for the test aerosol. The authors' experiments have shown that aerosol penetration as a function of particle size differs considerably among certified respirators of the same type. Filtering facepieces (disposable respirators) and cartridges of the dust-mist, dust-mist-fume, and high-efficiency particulate air type were tested. The respirators were sealed to mannequins in a test chamber. The aerosol concentrations inside and outside the respirator were measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer and a laser aerosol spectrometer over a particle size range of 0.1 to 15 microns. Five flow rates ranging from 5 to 100 L/min were used to study flow dependency. The aerosol penetration through the filters is presented as a function of particle size. Aerosol penetration and pressure drop are combined to express the performance of each filter in terms of "quality factor." Under the same test conditions, the quality factor of one respirator may be as much as 6.6 times more than that of another respirator of the same type. The filter quality factor has a greater aerosol size dependency as airflow and aerosol size increase. In general, cartridges have a larger surface area than filtering facepieces but not necessarily lower filter penetration or higher filter quality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Aerosol Sampling with Low Wind Sensitivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalatoor, Suresh

    Occupational exposure to airborne particles is generally evaluated by wearing a personal sampler that collects aerosol particles from the worker's breathing zone during the work cycle. The overall sampling efficiency of most currently available samplers is sensitive to wind velocity and direction. In addition, most samplers have internal losses due to gravitational settling, electrostatic interactions, and internal turbulence. A new sampling technique has been developed, theoretically and experimentally evaluated, and compared to existing techniques. The overall sampling efficiency of the protoype sampler was compared to that of a commonly used sampler, 25 mm closed-face cassette. Uranine was used as the challange aerosol with particle physical diameters 13.5, 20 and 30 mum. The wind velocity ranged from 100 to 300 cm s^ {-1}. It was found to have less internal losses and less dependence on wind velocity and direction. It also yielded better uniformity in the distribution of large particles on the filter surface, an advantage for several types of analysis. A new general equation for sharp-edged inlets was developed that predicts the sampling efficiency of sharp-edged (or thin-walled) inlets in most occupational environments that are weakly disturbed with air motions that cannot be strictly classified as calm-air or fast -moving air. Computational analysis was carried out using the new general equation and was applied to situations when the wind velocity vector is not steady, but fluctuates around predominant average values of its magnitude and orientation. Two sampling environments, horizontal aerosol flow (ambient atmosphere) and vertical aerosol flow (industrial stacks) have been considered. It was found, that even for small fluctuations in wind direction the sampling efficiency may be significantly less than that obtained for the mean wind direction. Time variations in wind magnitude at a fixed wind direction were found to affect the sampling efficiency to a

  14. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  15. Leaks in nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters

    SciTech Connect

    Scripsick, Ronald Clyde

    1994-07-01

    Nuclear grade high efficiency aerosol filters, also known as high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, are commonly used in air cleaning systems for removal of hazardous aerosols. Performance of the filter units is important in assuring health and environmental protection. The filter units are constructed from pleated packs of fiberglass filter media sealed into rigid frames. Results of previous studies on such filter units indicate that their performance may not be completely predicted by ideal performance of the fibrous filter media. In this study, departure from ideal performance is linked to leaks existing in filter units and overall filter unit performance is derived from independent performance of the individual filter unit components. The performance of 14 nuclear grade HEPA filter units (size 1, 25 cfm) with plywood frames was evaluated with a test system that permitted independent determination of penetration as a function of particle size for the whole filter unit, the filter unit frame, and the filter media pack. Tests were performed using a polydisperse aerosol of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate with a count median diameter of 0.2 {mu}m and geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Flow rate and differential pressure were controlled from 1% to 100% of design values. Particle counts were made upstream and downstream of the filter unit with an optical particle counter (OPC). The OPC provided count information in 28 size channels over the particle diameter range from 0.1 to 0.7 μm. Results provide evidence for a two component leak model of filler unit performance with: (1) external leaks through filter unit frames, and (2) internal leaks through defects in the media and through the seal between the media pack and frame. For the filter units evaluated, these leaks dominate overall filter unit performance over much of the flow rate and particle size ranges tested.

  16. A direct method for e-cigarette aerosol sample collection.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Pablo; Navas-Acien, Ana; Hess, Catherine; Jarmul, Stephanie; Rule, Ana

    2016-08-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing in populations around the world. Recent evidence has shown that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes can contain a variety of toxicants. Published studies characterizing toxicants in e-cigarette aerosol have relied on filters, impingers or sorbent tubes, which are methods that require diluting or extracting the sample in a solution during collection. We have developed a collection system that directly condenses e-cigarette aerosol samples for chemical and toxicological analyses. The collection system consists of several cut pipette tips connected with short pieces of tubing. The pipette tip-based collection system can be connected to a peristaltic pump, a vacuum pump, or directly to an e-cigarette user for the e-cigarette aerosol to flow through the system. The pipette tip-based system condenses the aerosol produced by the e-cigarette and collects a liquid sample that is ready for analysis without the need of intermediate extraction solutions. We tested a total of 20 e-cigarettes from 5 different brands commercially available in Maryland. The pipette tip-based collection system condensed between 0.23 and 0.53mL of post-vaped e-liquid after 150 puffs. The proposed method is highly adaptable, can be used during field work and in experimental settings, and allows collecting aerosol samples from a wide variety of e-cigarette devices, yielding a condensate of the likely exact substance that is being delivered to the lungs.

  17. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  18. In-place testing of tandem HEPA filter stages using fluorescent aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Kyle, T.G.; Tillery, M.I.; Ettinger, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluorescent test aerosols were used in field testing of large multiple-stage HEPA filter systems. The technique excluded interference from non-fluorescent background particles known to leak into the plenum or ducting between the filters and the downstream sampling probe. This technique solved the problem of measuring extremely low concentrations of the test aerosol in the presence of background aerosol. The upstream fluorescent test aerosol was diluted with clean air and drawn into a single particle aerosol spectrometer capable of counting, sizing, and detecting fluorescence of each particle. The particle sizing function was performed on light scattered by the particle passing through the beam of a helium-cadmium laser. Concurrently the fluorescence excited by the laser illumination was detected at a longer wavelength. Since spectrometer response in the fluorescent mode was <2% of naturally occurring aerosols, background aerosols were insignificant as an interference to the downstream concentration measurement. Decontamination factors (DF) on the order of 10/sup 8/ were measured in the field studies on >9.4 m/sup 3//s (20,000 cfm) systems. Additional generator capacity and acceptably lower test aerosol to background aerosol concentraion ratios could be used to extend this capability to measure DF greater than 10/sup 8/. Dye-tagged DOP aerosols were generated either by gas-thermal or sonic nozzle generators. Experiments with the gas-thermal generator showed only 20% of fluorescence from the dye was degraded by the vaporization process. A single sonic nozzle was shown to aerosolize 0.7 to 1.0 L/h of dye-tagged DOP aerosol in the proper size range for HEPA filter testing. A multiple sonic nozzle generator is a practical consideration to provide greater capacity.

  19. Study on dicarboxylic acids in aerosol samples with capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Adler, Heidi; Sirén, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The research was performed to study the simultaneous detection of a homologous series of α , ω -dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10), oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, suberic, azelaic, and sebacic acids, with capillary electrophoresis using indirect UV detection. Good separation efficiency in 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid as background electrolyte modified with myristyl trimethyl ammonium bromide was obtained. The dicarboxylic acids were ionised and separated within five minutes. For the study, authentic samples were collected onto dry cellulose membrane filters of a cascade impactor (12 stages) from outdoor spring aerosols in an urban area. Hot water and ultrasonication extraction methods were used to isolate the acids from membrane filters. Due to the low concentrations of acids in the aerosols, the extracts were concentrated with solid-phase extraction (SPE) before determination. The enrichment of the carboxylic acids was between 86 and 134% with sample pretreatment followed by 100-time increase by preparation of the sample to 50  μ L. Inaccuracy was optimised for all the sample processing steps. The aerosols contained dicarboxylic acids C2-C10. Then, mostly they contained C2, C5, and C10. Only one sample contained succinic acid. In the study, the concentrations of the acids in aerosols were lower than 10 ng/m(3).

  20. Frequency sampling filters, design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliphas, A.

    A linear programming method of reduced complexity is developed for the design of FIR frequency sampling digital filters. The frequency sampling method can be used directly in the frequency domain when implementing filtering by fast convolution using discrete Fourier transforms. For narrowband filters or filter banks, methods are shown which significantly reduce the required multiplication operations per data point in filter implementations. A general result is presented on the problem of finding the zeros of the transfer function of an FIR filter. This problem arises when it is necessary to convert a linear phase digital filter design into a minimum phase design. It also arises if it is desired to implement a high order filter by the cascading of a number of low order filters. A method is developed for the computation of the zeros of filters which have been designed by the frequency sampling technique. For such designs the locations of all zeros on the unit circle are known.

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: sampling criteria and aerosol characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Jared L.; Friend, Sherri; Porter, Dale W.; Castranova, Vincent; Frazer, David G.

    2015-01-01

    This study intends to develop protocols for sampling and characterizing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) aerosols in workplaces or during inhalation studies. Manufactured dry powder containing MWCNT’s, combined with soot and metal catalysts, form complex morphologies and diverse shapes. The aerosols, examined in this study, were produced using an acoustical generator. Representative samples were collected from an exposure chamber using filters and a cascade impactor for microscopic and gravimetric analyses. Results from filters showed that a density of 0.008–0.10 particles per µm2 filter surface provided adequate samples for particle counting and sizing. Microscopic counting indicated that MWCNT’s, resuspended at a concentration of 10 mg/m3, contained 2.7 × 104 particles/cm3. Each particle structure contained an average of 18 nanotubes, resulting in a total of 4.9 × 105 nanotubes/cm3. In addition, fibrous particles within the aerosol had a count median length of 3.04 µm and a width of 100.3 nm, while the isometric particles had a count median diameter of 0.90 µm. A combination of impactor and microscopic measurements established that the mass median aerodynamic diameter of the mixture was 1.5 µm. It was also determined that the mean effective density of well-defined isometric particles was between 0.71 and 0.88 g/cm3, and the mean shape factor of individual nanotubes was between 1.94 and 2.71. The information obtained from this study can be used for designing animal inhalation exposure studies and adopted as guidance for sampling and characterizing MWCNT aerosols in workplaces. The measurement scheme should be relevant for any carbon nanotube aerosol. PMID:23033994

  2. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Klocksieben, R.H.

    1984-04-11

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage t

  3. Comparison of aerosol and bioaerosol collection on air filters.

    PubMed

    Miaskiewicz-Peska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Air filters efficiency is usually determined by non-biological test aerosols, such as potassium chloride particles, Arizona dust or di-ethyl-hexyl-sebacate (DEHS) oily liquid. This research was undertaken to asses, if application of non-biological aerosols reflects air filters capacity to collect particles of biological origin. The collection efficiency for non-biological aerosol was tested with the PALAS set and ISO Fine Test Dust. Flow rate during the filtration process was 720 l/h, and particles size ranged 0.246-17.165 μm. The upstream and downstream concentration of the aerosol was measured with a laser particle counter PCS-2010. Tested bioaerosol contained 4 bacterial strains of different shape and size: Micrococcus luteus,Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. Number of the biological particles was estimated with a culture-based method. Results obtained with bioaerosol did not confirmed 100% filters efficiency noted for the mineral test dust of the same aerodynamic diameter. Maximum efficiency tested with bacterial cells was 99.8%. Additionally, cells reemission from filters into air was also studied. Bioaerosol contained 3 bacterial strains: Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis. It was proved that the highest intensity of the reemission process was during the first 5 min. and reached maximum 0.63% of total number of bacteria retained in filters. Spherical cells adhered stronger to the filter fibres than cylindrical ones. It was concluded that non-biological aerosol containing particles of the same shape and surface characteristics (like DEHS spherical particles) can not give representative results for all particles present in the filtered air.

  4. Method for HEPA filter leak scanning with differentiating aerosol detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.

    1997-08-01

    While scanning HEPA filters for leaks with {open_quotes}Off the Shelf{close_quote} aerosol detection equipment, the operator`s scanning speed is limited by the time constant and threshold sensitivity of the detector. This is based on detection of the aerosol density, where the maximum signal is achieved when the scanning probe resides over the pinhole longer than several detector time-constants. Since the differential value of the changing signal can be determined by observing only the first small fraction of the rising signal, using a differentiating amplifier will speed up the locating process. The other advantage of differentiation is that slow signal drift or zero offset will not interfere with the process of locating the leak, since they are not detected. A scanning hand-probe attachable to any NUCON{reg_sign} Aerosol Detector displaying the combination of both aerosol density and differentiated signal was designed. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Herceg, Joseph E.; Klocksieben, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus for sampling and characterizing aerosols having a wide particle size range at relatively low velocities may comprise a chamber having an inlet and an outlet, the chamber including: a plurality of vertically stacked, successive particle collection stages; each collection stage includes a separator plate and a channel guide mounted transverse to the separator plate, defining a labyrinthine flow path across the collection stage. An opening in each separator plate provides a path for the aerosols from one collection stage to the next. Mounted within each collection stage are one or more particle collection frames.

  6. Filtering Drifter Trajectories Sampled at Submesoscale Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-11

    40, NO. 3, JULY 2015 497 Filtering Drifter Trajectories Sampled at Submesoscale Resolution Max Yaremchuk and Emanuel F. Coelho Abstract—In this paper...accel- erations while keeping the difference between the filtered and ob- served trajectories within the error bars of the positioning noise...Mexico in 2012. Index Terms—Computers and information processing/data pro- cessing,mathematics/ filtering algorithms, optimization, smoothing methods

  7. Emery 3004 as a challenge aerosol for HEPA filter testing

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.D.; Gilles, D.A.

    1994-02-01

    HEPA filters are used in nuclear facilities for contamination control and air treatment and are constructed to be 99.97% efficient in trapping particles of 0.3 microns or larger in size. Prior to installation at Hanford facilities HEPA filters are tested against the manufacturer`s efficiency specifications by the Hanford Environmental Health Foundation using an aerosol with a monodispersed particle size of 0.3 microns. The oil or material used for generating the aerosol, has historically been Dioctl Phthalate (DOP). But, in 1980 DOP was classified as a suspected carcinogen, and the search for substitute materials was under way. Corn oil produced good quantities of the correct sized particles but it tended to clog the generating equipment; Polyethylene Glycol 400 (PEG) and Dioctl Sebacate (DOS) were also tried but failed for various reasons. Emery 304 was tested and produced a good quantity of correctly sized aerosol and did not clog or damage the equipment in any way. Upon further testing, in September 1992, the DOE Richland Operations authorized the use of Emery 304 for in situ HEPA filter testing on the Hanford site.

  8. Effect of filter type and temperature on volatilisation losses from ammonium salts in aerosol matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, Lothar; Wittmaack, Klaus

    During a 10-month sampling period, cellulose acetate-nitrate (CA), quartz fibre (QF), Teflon (Tf), and glass fibre (GF) filters were used to collect 19 ambient PM2.5 aerosol samples at mean temperatures between -10 and +25 °C. The standard procedure of sampling involved filters that were incorporated in monitor cassettes with cellulose support pads underneath. For comparison, measurements were carried out using a denuder-filter system. The samples were analysed for mass and major inorganic ions. At mean temperatures below 0 °C, CA, QF and Tf filters were found to properly collect particulate ammonium nitrate and chloride. At above 0 °C, the salts were lost from QF and Tf filters, more so the higher the temperature and with no significant difference between QF and Tf. The salts were lost completely from denuded QF filters above about 20 °C, from undenuded QF and Tf filters above about 25 °C. In contrast, the losses from CA filters were negligible or small up to 25 °C, but positive artefacts due to gas retention could occur at high concentrations of gaseous nitrate (and ammonia). The cellulose support pads collected evaporating equimolar ammonia and nitric acid quantitatively and also a small fraction of (pure) ambient gaseous ammonia. With the exception of GF, the filter face velocity had no significant effect on the PM concentrations measured on front filters. The observed sampling artefacts are in accordance with our recently reported gas retention efficiencies derived from laboratory studies. We conclude that, without additional means, inert QF and Tf filters are not suited for routine sampling of particulate ammonium nitrate and chloride at temperatures exceeding ˜0 °C.

  9. DWPF GC FILTER ASSEMBLY SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Imrich, K.

    2009-11-11

    On March 18, 2009 a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) GC Line Filter Assembly was received at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This filter assembly was removed from operation following the completion of Sludge Batch 4 processing in the DWPF. Work on this sample was requested in a Technical Assistance Request. This document reports the pictures, observations, samples collected, and analytical results for the assembly. The assembly arrived at SRNL separated into its three component filters: high efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-1, HEPA-2, and a high efficiency mist evaporator (HEME). Each stage of the assembly's media was sampled and examined visually and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solids built up in the filter housing following the first stage HEME, were dissolved in dilute nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-AES and the undissolved white solids were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD). The vast majority of the material in each of the three stages of the DWPF GC Line Filter Assembly appears to be contaminated with a Hg compound that is {approx}59 wt% Hg on a total solids basis. The Hg species was identified by XRD analysis to contain a mixture of Hg{sub 4}(OH)(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Hg{sub 10}(OH){sub 4}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}. Only in the core sample of the second stage HEPA, did this material appear to be completely covering portions of the filter media, possibly explaining the pressure drops observed by DWPF. The fact that the material migrates through the HEME filter and both HEPA filters, and that it was seen collecting on the outlet side of the HEME filter, would seem to indicate that these filters are not efficient at removing this material. Further SRAT off-gas system modeling should help determine the extent of Hg breakthrough past the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT). The SRAT off-gas system has not been modeled since startup of the facility. Improvements to the efficiency of Hg stripping prior to the ammonia scrubber would seem to be

  10. Microanalysis of indoor aerosols and the impact of a compact high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system.

    PubMed

    Abraham, M E

    1999-03-01

    Aerosol particles in municipal atmospheres are of increasing public health concern; however, since most of our time is spent indoors, indoor aerosols must be researched in counterpart. Compact High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter systems are commonly employed in residences to alleviate airborne dust concentrations. In this study, a detailed and original methodology was used to determine concentrations and types of submicrometer aerosols, as well as of large (> 4 microns) dust particles. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify and characterize ambient aerosols collected from filtered and non-filtered rooms. Particle concentrations were significantly lower in samples collected in the presence of the filter system (mean 23 to 8 coarse particles liter-1, 63% reduction; 13 to 3 inorganic submicron particles cm-3, 76% reduction; 85 to 33 total submicron particles cm-3, 62% reduction; all P < 0.05). This study provides a new methodology for analysis of indoor aerosols and new data on their physico-chemical characteristics. Since the filter systems are effective at reducing submicron aerosol concentrations, they may improve the health of individuals such as asthmatics, who experience health problems caused by anthropogenic fine particles.

  11. Quantitative filter forensics for indoor particle sampling.

    PubMed

    Haaland, D; Siegel, J A

    2017-03-01

    Filter forensics is a promising indoor air investigation technique involving the analysis of dust which has collected on filters in central forced-air heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) or portable systems to determine the presence of indoor particle-bound contaminants. In this study, we summarize past filter forensics research to explore what it reveals about the sampling technique and the indoor environment. There are 60 investigations in the literature that have used this sampling technique for a variety of biotic and abiotic contaminants. Many studies identified differences between contaminant concentrations in different buildings using this technique. Based on this literature review, we identified a lack of quantification as a gap in the past literature. Accordingly, we propose an approach to quantitatively link contaminants extracted from HVAC filter dust to time-averaged integrated air concentrations. This quantitative filter forensics approach has great potential to measure indoor air concentrations of a wide variety of particle-bound contaminants. Future studies directly comparing quantitative filter forensics to alternative sampling techniques are required to fully assess this approach, but analysis of past research suggests the enormous possibility of this approach.

  12. Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Thomas D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Hoover, Mark D.

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post-impact, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the vehicle commander, loader, gunner, and driver. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for depleted uranium concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol.

  13. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol.

  14. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  15. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  16. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Subramanian, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  17. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for direct analysis of aerosol particle samples.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, E; Zacco, A; Benedetti, D; Borgese, L; Colombi, P; Stosnach, H; Finzi, G; Apostoli, P; Buttini, P; Depero, L E

    2010-04-14

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have a great impact on the environment and on human health. Routine analysis of the particles usually involves only the mass determination. However, chemical composition and phases provide fundamental information about the particles' origins and can help to prevent health risks. For example, these particles may contain heavy metals such as Pb, Ni and Cd, which can adversely affect human health. In this work, filter samples were collected in Brescia, an industrial town located in Northern Italy. In order to identify the chemical composition and the phases of the atmospheric aerosols, the samples were analysed by means of total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry with a laboratory instrument and X-ray microdiffraction at Synchrotron Daresbury Laboratories, Warrington (Cheshire, UK). The results are discussed and correlated to identify possible pollution sources. The novelty of this analytical approach is that filter samples for TXRF were analysed directly and did not require chemical pretreatment to leach elements from the aerosol particulates. The results of this study clearly show that TXRF is a powerful technique for the analysis of atmospheric aerosols on 'as-received' filters, thereby leaving samples intact and unaltered for possible subsequent analyses by other methods. In addition, the low detection limits for many elements (low ng/cm2) indicate that this method may hold promise in various application fields, such as nanotechnology.

  18. An automated baseline correction protocol for infrared spectra of atmospheric aerosols collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmiakova, Adele; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    A growing body of research on statistical applications for characterization of atmospheric aerosol Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) samples collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filters (e.g., Russell et al., 2011; Ruthenburg et al., 2014) and a rising interest in analyzing FT-IR samples collected by air quality monitoring networks call for an automated PTFE baseline correction solution. The existing polynomial technique (Takahama et al., 2013) is not scalable to a project with a large number of aerosol samples because it contains many parameters and requires expert intervention. Therefore, the question of how to develop an automated method for baseline correcting hundreds to thousands of ambient aerosol spectra given the variability in both environmental mixture composition and PTFE baselines remains. This study approaches the question by detailing the statistical protocol, which allows for the precise definition of analyte and background subregions, applies nonparametric smoothing splines to reproduce sample-specific PTFE variations, and integrates performance metrics from atmospheric aerosol and blank samples alike in the smoothing parameter selection. Referencing 794 atmospheric aerosol samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011, we start by identifying key FT-IR signal characteristics, such as non-negative absorbance or analyte segment transformation, to capture sample-specific transitions between background and analyte. While referring to qualitative properties of PTFE background, the goal of smoothing splines interpolation is to learn the baseline structure in the background region to predict the baseline structure in the analyte region. We then validate the model by comparing smoothing splines baseline-corrected spectra with uncorrected and polynomial baseline (PB)-corrected equivalents via three statistical applications: (1) clustering analysis, (2) functional group quantification

  19. Advanced Aerosol Sampling Technologies For Point Biodetection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-17

    Impaction Aerosol Particle Behavior TAKE-HOME MESSAGE: Aerosols are NOT gases. Their inertia gives us a handle on them. Their inertia can confound...tubing to collector without wall losses0 25 50 75 100 0 2 4 6 8 10 Particle Size (m) S a m p l i n g E f f i c i e n c y , % Typical sampler ...efficiency data 10 Aerosol Sampler Technology Challenges Description Goals • High efficiency inlets for 1-10 micron particles and wind speeds

  20. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  1. Low-level atmospheric radioactivity measurement using a NaI(Tl) spectrometer during aerosol sampling.

    PubMed

    Hýža, Miroslav; Rulík, Petr

    2016-12-22

    In order to increase the early warning ability of the radiation monitoring network of the Czech republic, a high-volume aerosol sampler was upgraded with a NaI(Tl) probe placed directly above the aerosol filter. The paper demonstrates the possibility of using a method based on principal component regression to accurately subtract the complicated natural background caused by radon decay products. This approach yielded minimum detectable activities of 8mBq/m(3), 3mBq/m(3) and 7mBq/m(3) for (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively, after 24h of sampling.

  2. Characterization of Viable Fungal Spores in PM 2.5 Filter Samples Reaching the Eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    Aerosols from Africa travel across the tropical Atlantic Ocean carrying particulates, microorganisms and other contaminants into the Caribbean region. An air sampling station was installed at Castle Bruce, Dominica on March 31, 2002 and operated continuously until August 1, 2002 for the characterization of fungi species present in the Saharan dust. The sequential air sampler collected PM 2.5 samples, which were subsequently analyzed for fungal spores. The input of aerosols into this region was traced by AVHRR and SeaWiFS satellite imagery as well as by NAAPS and Hysplit models. The climatology of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) data from AVHRR for the study site show higher aerosol concentrations for the period of May through July with peak values during the last week of June. Some filters were used for determination of PM 2.5 concentration by gravimetric analysis. Results ranged from 3.08 to 18.06 ug/m3. The number of colony forming units in the sampled filters ranged from 0.08 to 2.5 m-3 with peak values during the last week of June. Fungal identification to gender level was based on macro and micro morphological features and species characterization was performed using molecular techniques. Among the identified species there are some plant pathogens that affect economically important crops and some human pathogens responsible of serious respiratory diseases. The relation between aerosol optical depth and fungi concentration, as well as the link between these organisms and health issues will be presented.

  3. THE REAL ISSUE WITH WALL DEPOSITS IN CLOSED FILTER CASSETTES - WHAT'S THE SAMPLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Brisson, M.

    2009-09-12

    The measurement of aerosol dusts has long been utilized to assess the exposure of workers to metals. Tools used to sample and measure aerosol dusts have gone through many transitions over the past century. In particular, there have been several different techniques used to sample for beryllium, not all of which might be expected to produce the same result. Today, beryllium samples are generally collected using filters housed in holders of several different designs, some of which are expected to produce a sample that mimics the human capacity for dust inhalation. The presence of dust on the interior walls of cassettes used to hold filters during metals sampling has been discussed in the literature for a number of metals, including beryllium, with widely varying data. It appears that even in the best designs, particulates can enter the sampling cassette and deposit on the interior walls rather than on the sampling medium. The causes are not well understood but are believed to include particle bounce, electrostatic forces, particle size, particle density, and airflow turbulence. Historically, the filter catch has been considered to be the sample, but the presence of wall deposits, and the potential that the filter catch is not representative of the exposure to the worker, puts that historical position into question. This leads to a fundamental question: What is the sample? This article reviews the background behind the issue, poses the above-mentioned question, and discusses options and a possible path forward for addressing that question.

  4. Theory and applications of sampled analog recursive CTD comb filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, T. F.; Holmes, S. V.; Ejaz, A.; Piazza, F.; Saetre, L. T.; Freund, B.

    1976-01-01

    Sampled analog comb filter using a recursive filter implementation was studied. Charge transfer device delay lines were used as the delay elements. The similarities and differences between sampled analog recursive filter and digital recursive filter were pointed out. Both canceller type and integrator type comb filter using the first order or the second order canonical circuits were studied. Experimental results of frequency response are presented to show their difference from that of digital filters. A theoretical analysis was presented based essentially on the digital filter theory but modified to take into account the differences described above. The usefulness of this theory in analyzing the comb filter characteristics was discussed. Several applications of both the canceller type comb filter and the integrator type comb filter were demonstrated.

  5. Characteristics and Sampling Efficiencies of OMNI 3000 Aerosol Samplers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    they impact on walls and on the slit and not reaching the inside of the contactor, compared to PSL particles that bounce off surfaces. The Omni...SAMPLING EFFICIENCIES OF OMNI 3000 AEROSOL SAMPLERS Jana S. Kesavan RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE Deborah R. Schepers MITRETEK SYSTEMS, INC. Falls...2006 Final Feb 2006 - Mar 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Characteristics and Sampling Efficiencies of Omni 3000 Aerosol Samplers 5b

  6. Volcanic Aerosol Evolution: Model vs. In Situ Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, M. A.; Rietmeijer, F. J.; Brearley, A. J.; Fischer, T. P.

    2002-12-01

    Volcanoes are the most significant non-anthropogenic source of tropospheric aerosols. Aerosol samples were collected at different distances from 92°C fumarolic source at Poás Volcano. Aerosols were captured on TEM grids coated by a thin C-film using a specially designed collector. In the sampling, grids were exposed to the plume for 30-second intervals then sealed and frozen to prevent reaction before ATEM analysis to determine aerosol size and chemistry. Gas composition was established using gas chromatography, wet chemistry techniques, AAS and Ion Chromatography on samples collected directly from a fumarolic vent. SO2 flux was measured remotely by COSPEC. A Gaussian plume dispersion model was used to model concentrations of the gases at different distances down-wind. Calculated mixing ratios of air and the initial gas species were used as input to the thermo-chemical model GASWORKS (Symonds and Reed, Am. Jour. Sci., 1993). Modeled products were compared with measured aerosol compositions. Aerosols predicted to precipitate out of the plume one meter above the fumarole are [CaSO4, Fe2.3SO4, H2SO4, MgF2. Na2SO4, silica, water]. Where the plume leaves the confines of the crater, 380 meters distant, the predicted aerosols are the same, excepting FeF3 replacing Fe2.3SO4. Collected aerosols show considerable compositional differences between the sampling locations and are more complex than those predicted. Aerosols from the fumarole consist of [Fe +/- Si,S,Cl], [S +/- O] and [Si +/- O]. Aerosols collected on the crater rim consist of the same plus [O,Na,Mg,Ca], [O,Si,Cl +/- Fe], [Fe,O,F] and [S,O +/- Mg,Ca]. The comparison between results obtained by the equilibrium gas model and the actual aerosol compositions shows that an assumption of chemical and thermal equilibrium evolution is invalid. The complex aerosols collected contrast the simple formulae predicted. These findings show that complex, non-equilibrium chemical reactions take place immediately upon volcanic

  7. Digital Integrate-And-Dump Filter With Offset Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Hurd, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    Detection of weak signals improved slightly. Digital integrate-and-dump filter proposed for detection of weak rectangular-pulse signals corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise. Theory of filter takes account of degradation of performance caused by offset sampling.

  8. Two techniques enable sampling of filtered and unfiltered molten metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burris, L., Jr.; Pierce, R. D.; Tobias, K. R.; Winsch, I. O.

    1967-01-01

    Filtered samples of molten metals are obtained by filtering through a plug of porous material fitted in the end of a sample tube, and unfiltered samples are obtained by using a capillary-tube extension rod with a perforated bucket. With these methods there are no sampling errors or loss of liquid.

  9. Aircraft studies of size-dependent aerosol sampling through inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, J. N.; Clarke, A. D.; Ferry, G.; Pueschel, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Representative measurement of aerosol from aircraft-aspirated systems requires special efforts in order to maintain near isokinetic sampling conditions, estimate aerosol losses in the sample system, and obtain a measurement of sufficient duration to be statistically significant for all sizes of interest. This last point is especially critical for aircraft measurements which typically require fast response times while sampling in clean remote regions. This paper presents size-resolved tests, intercomparisons, and analysis of aerosol inlet performance as determined by a custom laser optical particle counter. Measurements discussed here took place during the Global Backscatter Experiment (1988-1989) and the Central Pacific Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (1988). System configurations are discussed including (1) nozzle design and performance, (2) system transmission efficiency, (3) nonadiabatic effects in the sample line and its effect on the sample-line relative humidity, and (4) the use and calibration of a virtual impactor.

  10. Aerosol sampling and characterization in the developing US oil-shale industry

    SciTech Connect

    Hargis, K.M.; Tillery, M.I.; Gonzales, M.; Garcia, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    Aerosol sampling and characterization studies of workplace air were conducted at four demonstration-scale oil shale facilities located in northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. These facilities consisted of an underground mining/aboveground retorting facility, two modified in situ retorting facilities with associated underground mining, and a true in situ retorting facility. Emphasis was placed on study of the retorting phase of operation at these facilities. Aerosol samples were collected on filter media by high volume air samplers, low volume portable sampling pumps with or without cyclone pre-separators, and cascade impactors. Samples were analyzed to determine total and respirable dust concentrations, particle size distributions, free silica content, total benzene or cyclohexane extractables, and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Total and respirable dust were observed to range from very low to very high concentrations, with significant free silica content. Measurable levels of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were also observed at each of the facilities.

  11. Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

    2000-06-19

    The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

  12. Culturability of Bacillus spores on aerosol collection filters exposed to airborne combustion products of Al, Mg, and B·Ti.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Atin; Yermakov, Michael; Indugula, Reshmi; Reponen, Tiina; Driks, Adam; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2016-05-01

    Destruction of bioweapon facilities due to explosion or fire could aerosolize highly pathogenic microorganisms. The post-event air quality assessment is conducted through air sampling. A bioaerosol sample (often collected on a filter for further culture-based analysis) also contains combustion products, which may influence the microbial culturability and, thus, impact the outcome. We have examined the interaction between spores deposited on collection filters using two simulants of Bacillus anthracis [B. thuringiensis (Bt) and B. atrophaeus (referred to as BG)] and incoming combustion products of Al as well as Mg and B·Ti (common ingredient of metalized explosives). Spores extracted from Teflon, polycarbonate, mixed cellulose ester (MCE), and gelatin filters (most common filter media for bioaerosol sampling), which were exposed to combustion products during a short-term sampling, were analyzed by cultivation. Surprisingly, we observed that aluminum combustion products enhanced the culturability of Bt (but not BG) spores on Teflon filters increasing the culturable count by more than an order of magnitude. Testing polycarbonate and MCE filter materials also revealed a moderate increase of culturability although gelatin did not. No effect was observed with either of the two species interacting on either filter media with products originated by combustion of Mg and B·Ti. Sample contamination, spore agglomeration, effect of a filter material on the spore survival, changes in the spore wall ultrastructure and germination, as well as other factors were explored to interpret the findings. The study raises a question about the reliability of certain filter materials for collecting airborne bio-threat agents in combustion environments.

  13. Permeability optimization and performance evaluation of hot aerosol filters made using foam incorporated alumina suspension.

    PubMed

    Innocentini, Murilo D M; Rodrigues, Vanessa P; Romano, Roberto C O; Pileggi, Rafael G; Silva, Gracinda M C; Coury, José R

    2009-02-15

    Porous ceramic samples were prepared from aqueous foam incorporated alumina suspension for application as hot aerosol filtering membrane. The procedure for establishment of membrane features required to maintain a desired flow condition was theoretically described and experimental work was designed to prepare ceramic membranes to meet the predicted criteria. Two best membranes, thus prepared, were selected for permeability tests up to 700 degrees C and their total and fractional collection efficiencies were experimentally evaluated. Reasonably good performance was achieved at room temperature, while at 700 degrees C, increased permeability was obtained with significant reduction in collection efficiency, which was explained by a combination of thermal expansion of the structure and changes in the gas properties.

  14. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  15. Assessment of increased sampling pump flow rates in a disposable, inhalable aerosol sampler.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Justin; Sleeth, Darrah K; Handy, Rod G; Pahler, Leon F; Anthony, T Renee; Volckens, John

    2017-03-01

    A newly designed, low-cost, disposable inhalable aerosol sampler was developed to assess workers personal exposure to inhalable particles. This sampler was originally designed to operate at 10 L/min to increase sample mass and, therefore, improve analytical detection limits for filter-based methods. Computational fluid dynamics modeling revealed that sampler performance (relative to aerosol inhalability criteria) would not differ substantially at sampler flows of 2 and 10 L/min. With this in mind, the newly designed inhalable aerosol sampler was tested in a wind tunnel, simultaneously, at flows of 2 and 10 L/min flow. A mannequin was equipped with 6 sampler/pump assemblies (three pumps operated at 2 L/min and three pumps at 10 L/min) inside a wind tunnel, operated at 0.2 m/s, which has been shown to be a typical indoor workplace wind speed. In separate tests, four different particle sizes were injected to determine if the sampler's performance with the new 10 L/min flow rate significantly differed to that at 2 L/min. A comparison between inhalable mass concentrations using a Wilcoxon signed rank test found no significant difference in the concentration of particles sampled at 10 and 2 L/min for all particle sizes tested. Our results suggest that this new aerosol sampler is a versatile tool that can improve exposure assessment capabilities for the practicing industrial hygienist by improving the limit of detection and allowing for shorting sampling times.

  16. Impact of culture media and sampling methods on Staphylococcus aureus aerosols.

    PubMed

    Chang, C-W; Wang, L-J

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been detected indoors and is associated with human infection. Reliable quantification of S. aureus using a sampling technique followed by culture assay helps in assessing the risks of human exposure. The efficiency of five culture media and eight sampling methods in recovering S. aureus aerosols were evaluated. Methods to extract cells from filters were also studied. Tryptic soy agar (TSA) presented greater bacterial recovery than mannitol salt agar (MSA), CHROMagar staph aureus, Chapman stone medium, and Baird-Park agarose (P < 0.05). Moreover, 93 ± 2%-95 ± 2% and 42 ± 1%-49 ± 2% of S. aureus were, respectively, recovered by a 15-min heating of gelatin filters and 2-min vortex of polycarbonate (PC) filters. Evaluation of two filtration (IOM with gelatin filter and cassette with PC filter), two impaction (Andersen 1-STG loaded with TSA and MSA) and four impingement methods [AGI-30 and BioSampler filled with Tween mixture (TM) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)] revealed the BioSampler/TM performed best over 30 and 60 min of sampling (P < 0.05), while low recovery efficiencies were associated with the IOM/gelatin, cassette/PC, and AGI-30/PBS combinations (P < 0.05). In addition to BioSampler/TM, collecting S. aureus onto TSA from the Andersen 1-STG is also recommended, as it is the second best method at the 60-min sampling (P < 0.05).

  17. Aerosol Filter Loading Data for a Simulated Jet Engine Test Cell Aerosol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    media. M SECTION II TEST PROGRAM I. TESTING PROCEDURE Sheets of the filter media were obtained from Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation. Ten centimeter...loading cycle. 2. TEST FILTERS The four following glass fiber filter medias were obtained from Owens - Corning Fiberglas Corporation (OCF) and tested both...shown in Table 22. Filters were washed from the back side. 5. ONCLUSIONS Four glass fiber filters, specified in the contract, were obtained from Owens

  18. Denuder/filter sampling of organic acids and organosulfates at urban and boreal forest sites: Gas/particle distribution and possible sampling artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Bilde, Merete; Aalto, Pasi P.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Glasius, Marianne

    2016-04-01

    Carboxylic acids and organosulfates comprise an important fraction of atmospheric secondary organic aerosols formed from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors. The partitioning of these compounds between the gas and particle phase is still unclear and further research is warranted to better understand the abundance and effect of organic acids and organosulfates on the formation and properties of atmospheric aerosols. This work compares atmospheric aerosols collected at an urban and a boreal forest site using two side-by-side sampling systems; a high volume sampler (HVS) and a low volume (LVS) denuder/filter sampling system allowing for separate collection of gas- and particle-phase organics. All particle filters and denuder samples were collected at H.C. Andersen Boulevard (HCAB), Copenhagen, Denmark in the summer of 2010, and at the remote boreal forest site at Hyytiälä forestry field station in Finland in the summer of 2012. The chemical composition of gas- and particle-phase secondary organic aerosol was investigated by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-Q-TOFMS), with a focus on carboxylic acids and organosulfates. Results show gas-phase concentrations higher than those observed in the particle phase by a factor of 5-6 in HCAB 2010 and 50-80 in Hyytiälä 2012. Although abundant in the particle phase, no organosulfates were detected in the gas phase at either site. Through a comparison of samples collected by the HVS and the LVS denuder/filter sampling system we evaluate the potential artifacts associated with sampling of atmospheric aerosols. Such comparison shows that particle phase concentrations of semi-volatile organic acids obtained from the filters collected by HVS are more than two times higher than concentrations obtained from filters collected using LVS denuder/filter system. In most cases, higher concentrations of organosulfates are observed in particles

  19. Respirator Filter Efficiency Testing Against Particulate and Biological Aerosols Under Moderate to High Flow Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    stopped and the filter removed from the system for analysis. Polonium - 210 static eliminators were used to minimize particle loss during transport to...may provide a considerable overestimate of filter performance. Brosseau et al. (1990) compared the collection of silica and asbestos aerosols by DM...a half times as great as that measured under steady flow conditions, which is consistent with the results of Stafford et al. (1973). The asbestos

  20. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  1. Is There a Common Correction for Biases in Historic Filter-Based Aerosol Absorption Measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComiskey, A. C.; Jefferson, A.; Dubey, M. K.; Aiken, A. C.; Fast, J. D.; Flynn, C. J.; Kassianov, E.

    2014-12-01

    Improved characterization of aerosol absorption is a pressing need for improving estimates of climate forcing by aerosols. Measurements of aerosol absorption are difficult to make with the accuracy and precision demanded by climate science. While several different approaches have been employed and new techniques have emerged, none can yet be considered a true 'gold standard'. Instruments that use filter-based methods have been the most widely used and are the basis of historic records. However, several studies using direct photoacoustic techniques have shown that filter-based measurements can be biased relative to these direct measurements. It has been demonstrated that this bias depends strongly on aerosol chemical composition, specifically concentration of organic mass. The wealth of information in the extensive set of historical filter-based data demands that this bias be diagnosed and corrected. A correction is critical for proper evaluation and development of chemical transport models, improved retrievals from remote sensing measurements, and integrating aerosol absorption surface and sub-orbital in situ measurements with knowledge gained from these other approaches. We have performed an intercomparison of absorption coefficients from a photoacoustic and two filter-based instruments with co-located organic mass concentrations from continuous, half-hourly averaged measurements over six months at a remote, continental site in the US (ARM SGP). The results show a bias in the filter-based measurements with organic concentration that is consistent with previous studies. Previous results come from controlled lab studies or field campaigns where absorption coefficients and organic concentrations are high and may represent aerosol close to the source. The current study is important in that these quantities are much lower and the aerosol likely more aged, representing a larger portion of the global conditions, yet shows a similar bias. This site provides other measures

  2. Automated aerosol Raman spectrometer for semi-continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, David C.; Hill, Steven C.

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) is useful in characterizing atmospheric aerosol. It is not commonly used in studying ambient particles partly because automated instrumentation for aerosol RS has not been available. Battelle (Columbus, Ohio, USA) has developed the Resource Effective Bioidentification System (REBS) for automated detection of airborne bioagents based on RS. We use a version of the REBS that measures Raman spectra of one set of particles while the next set of particles is collected from air, then moves the newly collected particles to the analysis region and repeats. Here we investigate the use of the REBS as the core of a general-purpose automated Aerosol Raman Spectrometer (ARS) for atmospheric applications. This REBS-based ARS can be operated as a line-scanning Raman imaging spectrometer. Spectra measured by this ARS for single particles made of polystyrene, black carbon, and several other materials are clearly distinguishable. Raman spectra from a 15 min ambient sample (approximately 35-50 particles, 158 spectra) were analyzed using a hierarchical clustering method to find that the cluster spectra are consistent with soot, inorganic aerosol, and other organic compounds. The ARS ran unattended, collecting atmospheric aerosol and measuring spectra for a 7 hr period at 15-min intervals. A total of 32,718 spectra were measured; 5892 exceeded a threshold and were clustered during this time. The number of particles exhibiting the D-G bands of amorphous carbon plotted vs time (at 15-min intervals) increases during the morning commute, then decreases. This data illustrates the potential of the ARS to measure thousands of time resolved aerosol Raman spectra in the ambient atmosphere over the course of several hours. The capability of this ARS for automated measurements of Raman spectra should lead to more extensive RS-based studies of atmospheric aerosols.

  3. A quantitative sampling method for Oncomelania quadrasi by filter paper.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Santos, M J; Matsuda, H; Yasuraoka, K; Santos, A T

    1975-08-01

    Filter paper was found to attract Oncomelania quadrasi in waters the same way as fallen dried banana leaves, although less number of other species of snails was collected on the former than on the latter. Snails were collected in limited areas using a tube (85 cm2 area at cross-section) and a filter paper (20 X 20 CM) samplers. The sheet of filter paper was placed close to the spot where a tube sample was taken, and recovered after 24 hours. At each sampling, 30 samples were taken by each method in an area and sampling was made four times. The correlation of the number of snails collected by the tube and that by filter paper was studied. The ratio of the snail counts by the tube sampler to those by the filter paper was 1.18. A loose correlation was observed between snail counts of both methods as shown by the correlation coefficient r = 0.6502. The formulas for the regression line were Y = 0.77 X + 1.6 and X = 0.55 Y + 1.35 for 3 experiments where Y is the number of snails collected by tube sampling and X is the number of snails collected in the sheet of filter paper. The type of snail distribution was studied in the 30 samples taken by each method and this was observed to be nearly the same in both sampling methods. All sampling data were found to fit the negative binomial distribution with the values of the constant k varying very much from 0.5775 to 5.9186 in (q -- p)-k. In each experiment, the constant k was always larger in tube sampling than in filter paper sampling. This indicates that the uneven distribution of snails on the soil surface becomes more conspicuous by the filter paper sampling.

  4. Experiments with the assimilation of fine aerosols using an ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, Mariusz; Grell, Georg A.

    2011-11-01

    In a series of experiments we issue forecasts of fine aerosol concentration over the coterminous USA and southern Canada using the Weather Research and Forecasting - Chemistry model initialized with 3D-VAR or ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation methods. Assimilated observations include surface measurements of fine aerosols from the United States Environmental Protection Agency AIRNow Data Exchange program. Evaluation statistics calculated over a month-and-half-long summer period demonstrate the advantage of EnKF over 3D-VAR and point to the limitations of applying a simple aerosol parameterization for predicting air quality over the forecast area. Strategies for further improvement of forecasting aerosol concentrations are discussed.

  5. Experiments with the assimilation of fine aerosols using an ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagowski, Mariusz; Grell, Georg A.

    2012-11-01

    In a series of experiments we issue forecasts of fine aerosol concentration over the coterminous USA and southern Canada using the Weather Research and Forecasting - Chemistry model initialized with 3D-VAR or ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation methods. Assimilated observations include surface measurements of fine aerosols from the United States Environmental Protection Agency AIRNow Data Exchange program. Evaluation statistics calculated over a month-and-half-long summer period demonstrate the advantage of EnKF over 3D-VAR and point to the limitations of applying a simple aerosol parameterization for predicting air quality over the forecast area. Strategies for further improvement of forecasting aerosol concentrations are discussed.

  6. Variation in penetration of submicrometric particles through electrostatic filtering facepieces during exposure to paraffin oil aerosol.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Carmela; Listrani, Stefano; Tranfo, Giovanna; Tombolini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Several studies show the increase of penetration through electrostatic filters during exposure to an aerosol flow, because of particle deposition on filter fibers. We studied the effect of increasing loads of paraffin oil aerosol on the penetration of selected particle sizes through an electrostatic filtering facepiece. FFP2 facepieces were exposed for 8 hr to a flow rate of 95.0 ± 0.5 L/min of polydisperse paraffin aerosol at 20.0 ± 0.5 mg/m(3). The penetration of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (DEHS) monodisperse neutralized aerosols, with selected particle size in the 0.03-0.40 μm range, was measured immediately prior to the start of the paraffin aerosol loading and at 1, 4, and 8 hr after the start of paraffin aerosol loading. Penetration through isopropanol-treated facepieces not oil paraffin loaded was also measured to evaluate facepiece behavior when electrostatic capture mechanisms are practically absent. During exposure to paraffin aerosol, DEHS penetration gradually increased for all aerosol sizes, and the most penetrating particle size (0.05 μm at the beginning of exposure) shifted slightly to larger diameters. After the isopropanol treatment, the higher penetration value was 0.30 μm. In addition to an increased penetration during paraffin loading at a given particle size, the relative degree of increase was greater as the particle size increased. Penetration value measured after 8 hr for 0.03-μm particles was on average 1.6 times the initial value, whereas it was about 8 times for 0.40-μm particles. This behavior, as well evidenced in the measurements of isopropanol-treated facepieces, can be attributed to the increasing action in particle capture of the electrostatic forces (Coulomb and polarization), which depend strictly on the diameter and electrical charge of neutralized aerosol particles. With reference to electrostatic filtering facepieces as personal protective equipment, results suggest the importance of complying with the manufacturer

  7. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  8. Technical note: An improved approach to determining background aerosol concentrations with PILS sampling on aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Christine S.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Ryan Fulgham, S.; Murschell, Trey; Borch, Thomas; Smith, James N.; Farmer, Delphine K.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-into-Liquid Samplers (PILS) have become a standard aerosol collection technique, and are widely used in both ground and aircraft measurements in conjunction with off-line ion chromatography (IC) measurements. Accurate and precise background samples are essential to account for gas-phase components not efficiently removed and any interference in the instrument lines, collection vials or off-line analysis procedures. For aircraft sampling with PILS, backgrounds are typically taken with in-line filters to remove particles prior to sample collection once or twice per flight with more numerous backgrounds taken on the ground. Here, we use data collected during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ) to demonstrate that not only are multiple background filter samples are essential to attain a representative background, but that the chemical background signals do not follow the Gaussian statistics typically assumed. Instead, the background signals for all chemical components analyzed from 137 background samples (taken from ∼78 total sampling hours over 18 flights) follow a log-normal distribution, meaning that the typical approaches of averaging background samples and/or assuming a Gaussian distribution cause an over-estimation of background samples - and thus an underestimation of sample concentrations. Our approach of deriving backgrounds from the peak of the log-normal distribution results in detection limits of 0.25, 0.32, 3.9, 0.17, 0.75 and 0.57 μg m-3 for sub-micron aerosol nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), ammonium (NH4+), sulfate (SO42-), potassium (K+) and calcium (Ca2+), respectively. The difference in backgrounds calculated from assuming a Gaussian distribution versus a log-normal distribution were most extreme for NH4+, resulting in a background that was 1.58× that determined from fitting a log-normal distribution.

  9. Charge integration in external PIXE-PIGE for the analysis of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. F.; Wang, G. F.; Chu, J. H.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-10-01

    The beam current in an external-beam PIXE-PIGE is difficult to accurately measure due to ionization along the beam path in the atmosphere. Charge integration was measured using a homemade Faraday cup, and assessed by the peak area of Ar Kα X-rays, which were induced by protons near the sample. The X-ray peak integral from a thin Fe reference sample, which was positioned between the exit window and the Faraday cup, was determined to evaluate the performance of the homemade Faraday cup. Moreover, the effects of different membrane filters and samples with different elements on the beam current measurement of the aforementioned methods were studied by placing different blank films or reference standards behind a reference Mn target. The results indicated that the charge measurement of the homemade Faraday cup was reliable for external PIXE-PIGE analysis of aerosol samples.

  10. Space-Time Filtering, Sampling and Motion Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    02i0 22cr consists of two parts. -I the first, we -rosec, the cascade of Space-time DOG as enerq, filLer, discuss its general properties nd show how to...Basically, this paper consists of two parts. In the first one, we present the cascade of space-time DOG as an energy filter, discuss its general...intensity based approaches versus space-time filtering, and preent the space-time DOG cascade as an energy filter. In section 3 we analyse sampling issues

  11. BIASES IN CASTNET FILTER PACK RESULTS ASSOCIATED WITH SAMPLING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the current study, single filter weekly (w) results are compared with weekly results aggregated from day and night (dn) weekly samples. Comparisons of the two sampling protocols for all major constituents (SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, HNO3, and SO2) show median bias (MB) of < 5 nmol m-3...

  12. Rapid cleanup of bacterial DNA from samples containing aerosol contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Kracke, Suzanne K.; Emanuel, Peter A.; Valdes, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is an in vitro enzymatic, synthetic method used to amplify specific DNA sequences from organisms. Detection of DNA using gene probes allows for absolute identification not only of specific organisms, but also of genetic material in recombinant organisms. PCR is an exquisite biological method for detecting bacteria in aerosol samples. A major challenge facing detection of DNA from field samples is that they are almost sure to contain impurities, especially impurities that inhibit amplification through PCR. DNA is being extracted from air, sewage/stool samples, food, sputum, a water and sediment; however, multi- step, time consuming methods are required to isolate the DNA from the surrounding contamination. This research focuses on developing a method for rapid cleanup of DNA which combines extraction and purification of DNA while, at the same time, removing inhibitors from 'dirty samples' to produce purified, PCR-ready DNA. GeneReleaser produces PCR-ready DNA in a rapid five-minute protocol. GeneReleaser resin was able to clean up sample contain micrograms of typical aerosol and water contaminants. The advantages of using GR are that it is rapid, inexpensive, requires one-step, uses no hazardous material and produces PCR-ready DNA.

  13. Effects of Relative Humidity and Spraying Medium on UV Decontamination of Filters Loaded with Viral Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Myung-Heui; Grippin, Adam; Anwar, Diandra; Smith, Tamara; Wander, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    Although respirators and filters are designed to prevent the spread of pathogenic aerosols, a stockpile shortage is anticipated during the next flu pandemic. Contact transfer and reaerosolization of collected microbes from used respirators are also a concern. An option to address these potential problems is UV irradiation, which inactivates microbes by dimerizing thymine/uracil in nucleic acids. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of transmission mode and environmental conditions on decontamination efficiency by UV. In this study, filters were contaminated by different transmission pathways (droplet and aerosol) using three spraying media (deionized water [DI], beef extract [BE], and artificial saliva [AS]) under different humidity levels (30% [low relative humidity {LRH}], 60% [MRH], and 90% [HRH]). UV irradiation at constant intensity was applied for two time intervals at each relative humidity condition. The highest inactivation efficiency (IE), around 5.8 logs, was seen for DI aerosols containing MS2 on filters at LRH after applying a UV intensity of 1.0 mW/cm2 for 30 min. The IE of droplets containing MS2 was lower than that of aerosols containing MS2. Absorption of UV by high water content and shielding of viruses near the center of the aggregate are considered responsible for this trend. Across the different media, IEs in AS and in BE were much lower than in DI for both aerosol and droplet transmission, indicating that solids present in AS and BE exhibited a protective effect. For particles sprayed in a protective medium, RH is not a significant parameter. PMID:22685135

  14. Health-related aerosol measurement: a review of existing sampling criteria and proposals for new ones.

    PubMed

    Vincent, James H

    2005-11-01

    Interest in particle size-selective sampling for aerosols in working and ambient living environments began in the early 1900s when it became apparent that the penetration into-and deposition in-the respiratory tract of aerosol-exposed humans of inhaled particles was dependent on particle size. Coarse particles tended to be filtered out during inhalation and in the upper parts of the respiratory tract, so only progressively smaller particles penetrated down to the deep regions of the lung. Over time, following experimental studies with 'breathing' mannequins in wind tunnels and with human volunteer subjects in the laboratory, a clear picture has emerged of the physical, physiological and anatomical factors that control the extent to which particles may or may not reach certain parts of the respiratory tract. Such understanding has increasingly been the subject of discussions about aerosol standards, in particular the criteria by which exposure might be defined in relation to given classes of aerosol-related health effect-and in to turn aerosol monitoring. The ultimate goal has been to develop a set of criteria by which exposure standards are scientifically relevant to the health effects in question. This paper reviews the scientific basis for such criteria. It discusses the criteria that have already been widely discussed and so are either being applied or are on the threshold of practical application in standards. It also discusses how new advanced knowledge may allow us to extend the list of particle size-selective criteria to fractions that have not yet been widely discussed but which may be of importance in the future.

  15. Effects of humidity and filter material on diffusive sampling of isocyanates using reagent-coated filters.

    PubMed

    Henneken, Hartmut; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2006-10-01

    Diffusive sampling of methyl isocyanate (MIC) on 4-nitro-7-piperazinobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBDPZ)-coated glass fibre (GF) filters is strongly affected by high relative humidity (RH) conditions. It is shown that the humidity interference is a physical phenomenon, based on displacement of reagent from the filter surface. In this paper, this drawback has been overcome by changing the filter material to the less polar polystyrene divinyl benzene (SDB). A series of experiments was performed to compare the analyte uptake on the two filter materials for different sampling periods and analyte concentrations at both low and high RH conditions. Additionally, the materials were investigated as well for passive sampling of ethyl (EIC) and phenyl isocyanate (PhIC) with NBDPZ and 1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine (2-MP) as an alternative derivatising agent. Using 2-MP, the mean GF/SDB response ratios were determined to be 1.02 for MIC (RSD: 6.1%) and 1.03 for EIC (RSD: 6.8%), whereas PhIC could only be determined on SDB filters. Using NBDPZ as reagent, the negative influence of high humidity disappeared when SDB filters were used instead of GF filters. Even at low RH conditions, sampling with SDB material generally resulted in a higher analyte uptake than with GF filters. The GF/SDB response ratios were independent of sampling time or analyte concentration and were determined to be 0.70 (RSD: 4.7%) for MIC, 0.84 (RSD: 4.5%) for EIC and 0.95 (RSD 5.4%) for PhIC, meaning that the NBDPZ diffusive sampler based on SDB can be used at all humidity conditions without any restrictions.

  16. Development of a double-layered ceramic filter for aerosol filtration at high-temperatures: the filter collection efficiency.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Normanda L; Gonçalves, José A S; Innocentini, Murilo D M; Coury, José R

    2006-08-25

    The performance of double-layered ceramic filters for aerosol filtration at high temperatures was evaluated in this work. The filtering structure was composed of two layers: a thin granular membrane deposited on a reticulate ceramic support of high porosity. The goal was to minimize the high pressure drop inherent of granular structures, without decreasing their high collection efficiency for small particles. The reticulate support was developed using the technique of ceramic replication of polyurethane foam substrates of 45 and 75 pores per inch (ppi). The filtering membrane was prepared by depositing a thin layer of granular alumina-clay paste on one face of the support. Filters had their permeability and fractional collection efficiency analyzed for filtration of an airborne suspension of phosphatic rock in temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 degrees C. Results revealed that collection efficiency decreased with gas temperature and was enhanced with filtration time. Also, the support layer influenced the collection efficiency: the 75 ppi support was more effective than the 45 ppi. Particle collection efficiency dropped considerably for particles below 2 microm in diameter. The maximum collection occurred for particle diameters of approximately 3 microm, and decreased again for diameters between 4 and 8 microm. Such trend was successfully represented by the proposed correlation, which is based on the classical mechanisms acting on particle collection. Inertial impaction seems to be the predominant collection mechanism, with particle bouncing/re-entrainment acting as detachment mechanisms.

  17. Real-Time Investigation of Tuberculosis Transmission: Developing the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC)

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Robin; Morrow, Carl; Barry, Clifton E.; Bryden, Wayne A.; Call, Charles J.; Hickey, Anthony J.; Rodes, Charles E.; Scriba, Thomas J.; Blackburn, Jonathan; Issarow, Chacha; Mulder, Nicola; Woodward, Jeremy; Moosa, Atica; Singh, Vinayak; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the airborne nature of respiratory disease transmission owes much to the pioneering experiments of Wells and Riley over half a century ago. However, the mechanical, physiological, and immunopathological processes which drive the production of infectious aerosols by a diseased host remain poorly understood. Similarly, very little is known about the specific physiological, metabolic and morphological adaptations which enable pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to exit the infected host, survive exposure to the external environment during airborne carriage, and adopt a form that is able to enter the respiratory tract of a new host, avoiding innate immune and physical defenses to establish a nascent infection. As a first step towards addressing these fundamental knowledge gaps which are central to any efforts to interrupt disease transmission, we developed and characterized a small personal clean room comprising an array of sampling devices which enable isolation and representative sampling of airborne particles and organic matter from tuberculosis (TB) patients. The complete unit, termed the Respiratory Aerosol Sampling Chamber (RASC), is instrumented to provide real-time information about the particulate output of a single patient, and to capture samples via a suite of particulate impingers, impactors and filters. Applying the RASC in a clinical setting, we demonstrate that a combination of molecular and microbiological assays, as well as imaging by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, can be applied to investigate the identity, viability, and morphology of isolated aerosolized particles. Importantly, from a preliminary panel of active TB patients, we observed the real-time production of large numbers of airborne particles including Mtb, as confirmed by microbiological culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping. Moreover, direct imaging of captured samples revealed the presence of multiple rod-like Mtb organisms whose

  18. An evaluation of the "GGP" personal samplers under semi-volatile aerosols: sampling losses and their implication on occupational risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Dragan, George C; Breuer, Dietmar; Blaskowitz, Morten; Karg, Erwin; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Arteaga-Salas, Jose M; Nordsieck, Hermann; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    Semi-volatile (SV) aerosols still represent an important challenge to occupational hygienists due to toxicological and sampling issues. Particularly problematic is the sampling of hazardous SV that are present in both particulate and vapour phases at a workplace. In this study we investigate the potential evaporation losses of SV aerosols when using off-line filter-adsorber personal samplers. Furthermore, we provide experimental data showing the extent of the evaporation loss that can bias the workplace risk assessment. An experimental apparatus consisting of an aerosol generator, a flow tube and an aerosol monitoring and sampling system was set up inside a temperature controlled chamber. Aerosols from three n-alkanes were generated, diluted with nitrogen and sampled using on-line and off-line filter-adsorber methods. Parallel measurements using the on-line and off-line methods were conducted to quantify the bias induced by filter sampling. Additionally, two mineral oils of different volatility were spiked on filters and monitored for evaporation depending on the samplers flow rate. No significant differences between the on-line and off-line methods were detected for the sum of particles and vapour. The filter-adsorber method however tended to underestimate up to 100% of the particle mass, especially for the more volatile compounds and lower concentrations. The off-line sampling method systematically returned lower particle and higher vapour values, an indication for particle evaporation losses. We conclude that using only filter sampling for the assessment of semi-volatiles may considerably underestimate the presence of the particulate phase due to evaporation. Thus, this underestimation can have a negative impact on the occupational risk assessment if the evaporated particle mass is no longer quantified.

  19. A CLOSURE STUDY OF AEROSOL MASS CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS: COMPARISON OF VALUES OBTAINED WITH FILTERS AND BY DIRECT MEASUREMENTS OF MASS DISTRIBUTIONS. (R826372)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compare measurements of aerosol mass concentrations obtained gravimetrically using Teflon coated glass fiber filters and by integrating mass distributions measured with the differential mobility analyzer–aerosol particle mass analyzer (DMA–APM) technique (Aero...

  20. Stratospheric trace gas sampling with chemical absorption filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelli, J. E.; Lazrus, A. L.; Gandrud, B. W.

    1978-01-01

    Recent interest in stratospheric chemistry, sparked in part by the suggested roles of atomic chlorine (Cl) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the catalytic destruction of ozone (O3), has made sampling and measurement of trace constituents above the tropopause highly desirable. An ongoing research program in the In Situ Studies Project at the National Center for Atmospheric Research carries out aircraft and balloon-borne stratospheric chemical sampling at regular intervals by using chemically impregnated filters to collect particles and reactive gases.

  1. Quality assurance and quality control for thermal/optical analysis of aerosol samples for organic and elemental carbon.

    PubMed

    Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Robles, Jerome; Wang, Xiaoliang; Chen, L-W Antony; Trimble, Dana L; Kohl, Steven D; Tropp, Richard J; Fung, Kochy K

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, precise, and valid organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, respectively) measurements require more effort than the routine analysis of ambient aerosol and source samples. This paper documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures that should be implemented to ensure consistency of OC and EC measurements. Prior to field sampling, the appropriate filter substrate must be selected and tested for sampling effectiveness. Unexposed filters are pre-fired to remove contaminants and acceptance tested. After sampling, filters must be stored in the laboratory in clean, labeled containers under refrigeration (<4 °C) to minimize loss of semi-volatile OC. QA activities include participation in laboratory accreditation programs, external system audits, and interlaboratory comparisons. For thermal/optical carbon analyses, periodic QC tests include calibration of the flame ionization detector with different types of carbon standards, thermogram inspection, replicate analyses, quantification of trace oxygen concentrations (<100 ppmv) in the helium atmosphere, and calibration of the sample temperature sensor. These established QA/QC procedures are applicable to aerosol sampling and analysis for carbon and other chemical components.

  2. Comparison of aerosol backscatter and wind field estimates from the REAL and the SAMPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Shane D.; Dérian, Pierre; Mauzey, Christopher F.; Spuler, Scott M.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Pruitt, Jeff; Ramsey, Darrell; Higdon, Noah S.

    2015-09-01

    Although operating at the same near-infrared 1.5- m wavelength, the Raman-shifted Eye-safe Aerosol Lidar (REAL) and the Scanning Aerosol Micro-Pulse Lidar-Eye-safe (SAMPLE) are very different in how they generate and detect laser radiation. We present results from an experiment where the REAL and the SAMPLE were operated side-by-side in Chico, California, in March of 2015. During the non-continuous, eleven day test period, the SAMPLE instrument was operated at maximum pulse repetition frequency (15 kHz) and integrated over the interpulse period of the REAL (0.1 s). Operation at the high pulse repetition frequency resulted in second trip echoes which contaminated portions of the data. The performance of the SAMPLE instrument varied with background brightness--as expected with a photon counting receiver|--yet showed equal or larger backscatter intensity signal to noise ratio throughout the intercomparison experiment. We show that a modest low-pass filter or smooth applied to the REAL raw waveforms (that have 5x higher range resolution) results in significant increases in raw signal-to-noise ratio and image signal-to-noise ratio--a measure of coherent aerosol feature content in the images resulting from the scans. Examples of wind fields and time series of wind estimates from both systems are presented. We conclude by reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of each system and sketch a plan for future research and development activities to optimize the design of future systems.

  3. [A membrane filter sampling method for determining microbial air pollution].

    PubMed

    Cherneva, P; Kiranova, A

    1996-01-01

    The method is a contribution in the evaluation of the exposition and the control of the standards for organic powders. The method concerns the sample-taking procedure and the analysis-making technique for determining of the concentration of the microbial pollution of the air. It is based on filtering of some amount of air through a membrane filter which is then processed for cultivating of microbial colonies on its surface. The results are obtained in number of microbial colonies per unit of air. The method presents opportunity to select and vary the filtered volume of air, to determine the respirable fraction, to determine the personal exposition, as well as for the simultaneous determining of the microbial pollution together with other important parameters of the particle pollutants of the air (metal, fibre and others).

  4. AMS-C14 analysis of graphite obtained with an Automated Graphitization Equipment (AGE III) from aerosol collected on quartz filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, C.; Chávez, E.; Ortiz, M. E.; Andrade, E.; Ortíz, E.; Szidat, S.; Wacker, L.

    2015-10-01

    AMS-14C applications often require the analysis of small samples. Such is the case of atmospheric aerosols where frequently only a small amount of sample is available. The ion beam physics group at the ETH, Zurich, has designed an Automated Graphitization Equipment (AGE III) for routine graphite production for AMS analysis from organic samples of approximately 1 mg. In this study, we explore the potential use of the AGE III for graphitization of particulate carbon collected in quartz filters. In order to test the methodology, samples of reference materials and blanks with different sizes were prepared in the AGE III and the graphite was analyzed in a MICADAS AMS (ETH) system. The graphite samples prepared in the AGE III showed recovery yields higher than 80% and reproducible 14C values for masses ranging from 50 to 300 μg. Also, reproducible radiocarbon values were obtained for aerosol filters of small sizes that had been graphitized in the AGE III. As a study case, the tested methodology was applied to PM10 samples collected in two urban cities in Mexico in order to compare the source apportionment of biomass and fossil fuel combustion. The obtained 14C data showed that carbonaceous aerosols from Mexico City have much lower biogenic signature than the smaller city of Cuernavaca.

  5. Photoacoustic and filter-based ambient aerosol light absorption measurements: Instrument comparisons and the role of relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmüller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.; Raspet, R.; Slaton, W. V.; Hand, J. L.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    Ambient measurements are reported of aerosol light absorption from photoacoustic and filter-based instruments (aethalometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP)) to provide insight on the measurement science. Measurements were obtained during the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study at the Big Bend National Park in South Texas. The aethalometer measurements of black carbon concentration at this site correlate reasonably well with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption, with a slope of 8.1 m2/g and a small offset. Light absorption at this site never exceeded 2.1 Mm-1 during the month of collocated measurements. Measurements were also obtained, as a function of controlled relative humidity between 40% and 90%, during the Photoacoustic IOP in 2000 at the Department of Energy Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site (SGP). PSAP measurements of aerosol light absorption correlated very well with photoacoustic measurements, but the slope of the correlation indicated the PSAP values were larger by a factor of 1.61. The photoacoustic measurements of light absorption exhibited a systematic decrease when the RH increased beyond 70%. This apparent decrease in light absorption with RH may be due to the contribution of mass transfer to the photoacoustic signal. Model results for the limiting case of full water saturation are used to evaluate this hypothesis. A second PSAP measured the light absorption for the same humidified samples, and indicated very erratic response as the RH changed, suggesting caution when interpreting PSAP data under conditions of rapid relative humidity change.

  6. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

    2010-02-03

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

  7. The NYC native air sampling pilot project: using HVAC filter data for urban biological incident characterization.

    PubMed

    Ackelsberg, Joel; Leykam, Frederic M; Hazi, Yair; Madsen, Larry C; West, Todd H; Faltesek, Anthony; Henderson, Gavin D; Henderson, Christopher L; Leighton, Terrance

    2011-09-01

    Native air sampling (NAS) is distinguished from dedicated air sampling (DAS) devices (eg, BioWatch) that are deployed to detect aerosol disseminations of biological threat agents. NAS uses filter samples from heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in commercial properties for environmental sampling after DAS detection of biological threat agent incidents. It represents an untapped, scientifically sound, efficient, widely distributed, and comparably inexpensive resource for postevent environmental sampling. Calculations predict that postevent NAS would be more efficient than environmental surface sampling by orders of magnitude. HVAC filter samples could be collected from pre-identified surrounding NAS facilities to corroborate the DAS alarm and delineate the path taken by the bioaerosol plume. The New York City (NYC) Native Air Sampling Pilot Project explored whether native air sampling would be acceptable to private sector stakeholders and could be implemented successfully in NYC. Building trade associations facilitated outreach to and discussions with property owners and managers, who expedited contact with building managers of candidate NAS properties that they managed or owned. Nominal NAS building requirements were determined; procedures to identify and evaluate candidate NAS facilities were developed; data collection tools and other resources were designed and used to expedite candidate NAS building selection and evaluation in Manhattan; and exemplar environmental sampling playbooks for emergency responders were completed. In this sample, modern buildings with single or few corporate tenants were the best NAS candidate facilities. The Pilot Project successfully demonstrated that in one urban setting a native air sampling strategy could be implemented with effective public-private collaboration.

  8. Determination of the organic aerosol mass to organic carbon ratio in IMPROVE samples.

    PubMed

    El-Zanan, Hazem S; Lowenthal, Douglas H; Zielinska, Barbara; Chow, Judith C; Kumar, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    The ratio of organic mass (OM) to organic carbon (OC) in PM(2.5) aerosols at US national parks in the IMPROVE network was estimated experimentally from solvent extraction of sample filters and from the difference between PM(2.5) mass and chemical constituents other than OC (mass balance) in IMPROVE samples from 1988 to 2003. Archived IMPROVE filters from five IMPROVE sites were extracted with dichloromethane (DCM), acetone and water. The extract residues were weighed to determine OM and analyzed for OC by thermal optical reflectance (TOR). On average, successive extracts of DCM, acetone, and water contained 64%, 21%, and 15%, respectively, of the extractable OC, respectively. On average, the non-blank-corrected recovery of the OC initially measured in these samples by TOR was 115+/-42%. OM/OC ratios from the combined DCM and acetone extracts averaged 1.92 and ranged from 1.58 at Indian Gardens, AZ in the Grand Canyon to 2.58 at Mount Rainier, WA. The average OM/OC ratio determined by mass balance was 2.07 across the IMPROVE network. The sensitivity of this ratio to assumptions concerning sulfate neutralization, water uptake by hygroscopic species, soil mass, and nitrate volatilization were evaluated. These results suggest that the value of 1.4 for the OM/OC ratio commonly used for mass and light extinction reconstruction in IMPROVE is too low.

  9. K West Basin Sand Filter Backwash Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Smoot, Margaret R.; Coffey, Deborah S.; Pool, Karl N.

    2016-03-01

    A sand filter is used to help maintain water clarity at the K West Basin where highly radioactive sludge is stored. Eventually that sand filter will require disposal. The radionuclide content of the solids trapped in the sand filter will affect the selection of the sand filter disposal pathway. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted by the K Basin Operations & Plateau Remediation Project (operations contractor CH2M Hill) to analyze the radionuclide content of the solids collected from the backwash of the K West Basin sand filter. The radionuclide composition in the sand filter backwash solids will be used by CH2M Hill to determine if the sand filter media and retained sludge solids will be designated as transuranic waste for disposal purposes or can be processed through less expensive means. On October 19, 2015, K Basin Operations & Plateau Remediation Project staff backwashed the sand filter into the North Load-Out Pit (NLOP) and immediately collected sample slurry from a sampling tube positioned 24 in. above the NLOP floor. The 764 g sand filter backwash slurry sample, KW-105 SFBW-001, was submitted to PNNL for analysis on October 20, 2015. Solids from the slurry sample were consolidated into two samples (i.e., a primary and a duplicate sample) by centrifuging and measured for mass (0.82 g combined – wet centrifuged solids basis) and volume (0.80 mL combined). The solids were a dark brown/orange color, consistent with iron oxide/hydroxide. The solids were dried; the combined dry solids mass was 0.1113 g, corresponding to 0.0146 weight percent (wt%) solids in the original submitted sample slurry. The solids were acid-digested using nitric and hydrochloric acids. Insoluble solids developed upon dilution with 0.5 M HNO3, corresponding to an average 6.5 wt% of the initial dry solids content. The acid digestate and insoluble solids were analyzed separately by gamma spectrometry. Nominally, 7.7% of the 60Co was present

  10. Digital timing: sampling frequency, anti-aliasing filter and signal interpolation filter dependence on timing resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sanghee; Grazioso, Ron; Zhang, Nan; Aykac, Mehmet; Schmand, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of our study is to investigate how the performance of digital timing methods is affected by sampling rate, anti-aliasing and signal interpolation filters. We used the Nyquist sampling theorem to address some basic questions such as what will be the minimum sampling frequencies? How accurate will the signal interpolation be? How do we validate the timing measurements? The preferred sampling rate would be as low as possible, considering the high cost and power consumption of high-speed analog-to-digital converters. However, when the sampling rate is too low, due to the aliasing effect, some artifacts are produced in the timing resolution estimations; the shape of the timing profile is distorted and the FWHM values of the profile fluctuate as the source location changes. Anti-aliasing filters are required in this case to avoid the artifacts, but the timing is degraded as a result. When the sampling rate is marginally over the Nyquist rate, a proper signal interpolation is important. A sharp roll-off (higher order) filter is required to separate the baseband signal from its replicates to avoid the aliasing, but in return the computation will be higher. We demonstrated the analysis through a digital timing study using fast LSO scintillation crystals as used in time-of-flight PET scanners. From the study, we observed that there is no significant timing resolution degradation down to 1.3 Ghz sampling frequency, and the computation requirement for the signal interpolation is reasonably low. A so-called sliding test is proposed as a validation tool checking constant timing resolution behavior of a given timing pick-off method regardless of the source location change. Lastly, the performance comparison for several digital timing methods is also shown.

  11. Concentrations of iodine isotopes ((129)I and (127)I) and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from Northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Daraoui, A; Riebe, B; Walther, C; Wershofen, H; Schlosser, C; Vockenhuber, C; Synal, H-A

    2016-04-01

    New data about (129)I, (127)I concentrations and their isotopic ratios in aerosol samples from the trace survey station of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig, Northern Germany, are presented and discussed in this paper. The investigated samples were collected on a weekly basis during the years 2011 to 2013. Iodine was extracted from aerosol filters using a strong basic solution and was separated from the matrix elements with chloroform and was analysed by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for (129)I and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for (127)I. The concentrations of (127)I and (129)I in aerosol filters ranged from 0.31 to 3.71 ng m(-3) and from 0.06 to 0.75 fg m(-3), respectively. The results of (129)I/(127)I isotopic ratios were in the order 10(-8) to 10(-7). The (129)I originated directly from gaseous emissions and indirectly from liquid emissions (via sea spray) from the reprocessing plants in Sellafield and La Hague. In comparison with the results of (131)I after the Fukushima accident, no contribution of (129)I from this accident was detectable in Central Europe due to the high background originating from the (129)I releases of the European reprocessing plants. (129)I atmospheric activity concentrations were compared with those of an anthropogenic radionuclide ((85)Kr). We did not find any correlation between (129)I and (85)Kr, both having nuclear reprocessing plant as the main source.

  12. Sulfate and nitrate collected by filter sampling near the tropopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humenik, F. M.; Lezberg, E. A.; Otterson, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Filter samples collected near the tropopause with an F-106 aircraft and two Boeing 747 aircraft were analyzed for sulfate and nitrate ion content. Within the range of routine commercial flight altitudes (at or below 12.5 km), stratospheric mass mixing ratios for the winter-spring group averaged 0.26 ppbm for sulfate and 0.35 ppbm for nitrate. For the summer-fall group, stratosphere mixing ratios averaged 0.13 ppbm and 0.25 ppbm for sulfate and nitrate, respectively. Winter-spring group tropospheric mass mixing ratios averaged 0.08 ppbm for sulfate and 0.10 ppbm for nitrate, while summer-fall group tropospheric mixing ratios averaged 0.05 ppbm for sulfate and 0.08 ppbm for nitrate. Correlations of the filter data with available ozone data suggest that the sulfate and nitrate are transported from the stratosphere to the troposphere.

  13. High Resolution Mass Spectrometry of Seasonal Aerosol Samples From an Urban Location in the Italian Po Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Brendan; Giorio, Chiara; Gallimore, Peter J.; Zielinski, Arthur T.; Tapparo, Andrea; Kalberer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The Po Valley in Northern Italy represents one of the most polluted environments in Europe, with PM2.5 and ozone concentrations regularly exceeding 100μg/m3 and 50ppb respectively. Particularly during winter, prolonged inversion conditions together with biomass burning and anthropogenic emissions regularly lead to severe air pollution events. Over the course of several months in 2013-14, we carried out a sampling program at a city-centre site in Padova, Italy, collecting 24-hour high-volume aerosol filter samples, 18 in winter (mid December - mid March) and 20 in summer (late May - late July). Utilising high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry techniques, we have characterised these sample sets to examine the long-term variation in aerosol composition over the sampling campaign and to determine the effect of anthropogenic gaseous pollutants such as NOx and SO2 on the composition of organic particle components. The results showed that between ca. 450-700 ions were measured in each sample in both the summer and winter sample sets, however the majority (90%) of ions in the winter samples were below 300m/z and below 380m/z in the summer samples. A much higher percentage of CHO-only ions were found in winter (ca. 27%) compared to the summer samples (ca. 6%), indicating a higher degree of photochemical reactions taking place involving pollutants such as NOx and SO2 in summer. Our results represent the first long term data set of high-resolution measurements of aerosol composition and demonstrate that this technique is an important tool in evaluating the composition of aerosol particles in complex polluted urban areas.

  14. Size-separated sampling and analysis of isocyanates in workplace aerosols. Part I. Denuder--cascade impactor sampler.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jakob; Spanne, Mårten; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2008-07-01

    Isocyanates in the workplace atmosphere are typically present both in gas and particle phase. The health effects of exposure to isocyanates in gas phase and different particle size fractions are likely to be different due to their ability to reach different parts in the respiratory system. To reveal more details regarding the exposure to isocyanate aerosols, a denuder-impactor (DI) sampler for airborne isocyanates was designed. The sampler consists of a channel-plate denuder for collection of gaseous isocyanates, in series with three-cascade impactor stages with cut-off diameters (d(50)) of 2.5, 1.0 and 0.5 mum. An end filter was connected in series after the impactor for collection of particles smaller than 0.5 mum. The denuder, impactor plates and the end filter were impregnated with a mixture of di-n-butylamine (DBA) and acetic acid for derivatization of the isocyanates. During sampling, the reagent on the impactor plates and the end filter is continuously refreshed, due to the DBA release from the impregnated denuder plates. This secures efficient derivatization of all isocyanate particles. The airflow through the sampler was 5 l min(-1). After sampling, the samples containing the different size fractions were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)/MS. The DBA impregnation was stable in the sampler for at least 1 week. After sampling, the DBA derivatives were stable for at least 3 weeks. Air sampling was performed in a test chamber (300 l). Isocyanate aerosols studied were thermal degradation products of different polyurethane polymers, spraying of isocyanate coating compounds and pure gas-phase isocyanates. Sampling with impinger flasks, containing DBA in toluene, with a glass fiber filter in series was used as a reference method. The DI sampler showed good compliance with the reference method, regarding total air levels. For the different aerosols studied, vast differences were revealed in the distribution of isocyanate in gas and

  15. The Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) for Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrieval Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Petrenko, Maksym; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Among the known atmospheric constituents, aerosols represent the greatest uncertainty in climate research. Although satellite-based aerosol retrieval has practically become routine, especially during the last decade, there is often disagreement between similar aerosol parameters retrieved from different sensors, leaving users confused as to which sensors to trust for answering important science questions about the distribution, properties, and impacts of aerosols. As long as there is no consensus and the inconsistencies are not well characterized and understood ', there will be no way of developing reliable climate data records from satellite aerosol measurements. Fortunately, the most globally representative well-calibrated ground-based aerosol measurements corresponding to the satellite-retrieved products are available from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). To adequately utilize the advantages offered by this vital resource,., an online Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS) was recently developed. The aim of MAPSS is to facilitate detailed comparative analysis of satellite aerosol measurements from different sensors (Terra-MODIS, Aqua-MODIS, Terra-MISR, Aura-OMI, Parasol-POLDER, and Calipso-CALIOP) based on the collocation of these data products over AERONET stations. In this presentation, we will describe the strategy of the MAPSS system, its potential advantages for the aerosol community, and the preliminary results of an integrated comparative uncertainty analysis of aerosol products from multiple satellite sensors.

  16. Use of Whatman-41 filters in air quality sampling networks (with applications to elemental analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    The operation of a 16-site parallel high volume air sampling network with glass fiber filters on one unit and Whatman-41 filters on the other is reported. The network data and data from several other experiments indicate that (1) Sampler-to-sampler and filter-to-filter variabilities are small; (2) hygroscopic affinity of Whatman-41 filters need not introduce errors; and (3) suspended particulate samples from glass fiber filters averaged slightly, but not statistically significantly, higher than from Whatman-41-filters. The results obtained demonstrate the practicability of Whatman-41 filters for air quality monitoring and elemental analysis.

  17. Sampling Versus Filtering in Large-Eddy Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debliquy, O.; Knaepen, B.; Carati, D.; Wray, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    A LES formalism in which the filter operator is replaced by a sampling operator is proposed. The unknown quantities that appear in the LES equations originate only from inadequate resolution (Discretization errors). The resulting viewpoint seems to make a link between finite difference approaches and finite element methods. Sampling operators are shown to commute with nonlinearities and to be purely projective. Moreover, their use allows an unambiguous definition of the LES numerical grid. The price to pay is that sampling never commutes with spatial derivatives and the commutation errors must be modeled. It is shown that models for the discretization errors may be treated using the dynamic procedure. Preliminary results, using the Smagorinsky model, are very encouraging.

  18. Portable XRF analysis of occupational air filter samples from different workplaces using different samplers: final results, summary and conclusions.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Pacolay, Bruce; Hintz, Patrick; Bartley, David L; Slaven, James E; Andrew, Michael E

    2007-11-01

    This paper concludes a five-year program on research into the use of a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer for analyzing lead in air sampling filters from different industrial environments, including mining, manufacturing and recycling. The results from four of these environments have already been reported. The results from two additional metal processes are presented here. At both of these sites, lead was a minor component of the total airborne metals and interferences from other elements were minimal. Nevertheless, only results from the three sites where lead was the most abundant metal were used in the overall calculation of method accuracy. The XRF analyzer was used to interrogate the filters, which were then subjected to acid digestion and analysis by inductively-coupled plasma optical-emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The filter samples were collected using different filter-holders or "samplers" where the size (diameter), depth and homogeneity of aerosol deposit varied from sampler to sampler. The aerosol collection efficiencies of the samplers were expected to differ, especially for larger particles. The distribution of particles once having entered the sampler was also expected to differ between samplers. Samplers were paired to allow the between-sampler variability to be addressed, and, in some cases, internal sampler wall deposits were evaluated and compared to the filter catch. It was found, rather surprisingly, that analysis of the filter deposits (by ICP-OES) of all the samplers gave equivalent results. It was also found that deposits on some of the sampler walls, which in some protocols are considered part of the sample, could be significant in comparison to the filter deposit. If it is concluded that wall-deposits should be analyzed, then XRF analysis of the filter can only give a minimum estimate of the concentration. Techniques for the statistical analysis of field data were also developed as part of this program and have been reported

  19. Aerosol Sample Inhomogeneity with Debris from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Reynaido; Biegalski, Steven R.; Woods, Vincent T.

    2014-09-01

    Radionuclide aerosol sampling is a vital component in the detection of nuclear explosions, nuclear accidents, and other radiation releases. This was proven by the detection and tracking of emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi incident across the globe by IMS stations. Two separate aerosol samplers were operated in Richland, WA following the event and debris from the accident were measured at levels well above detection limits. While the atmospheric activity concentration of radionuclides generally compared well between the two stations, they did not agree within uncertainties. This paper includes a detailed study of the aerosol sample homogeneity of 134Cs and 137Cs, then relates it to the overall uncertainty of the original measurement. Our results show that sample inhomogeneity adds an additional 5–10% uncertainty to each aerosol measurement and that this uncertainty is in the same range as the discrepancies between the two aerosol sample measurements from Richland, WA.

  20. Chemical Aerosol Characterization Sampling in Santa Ana during the MCMA-2003 Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabe, R.; Castro, T.; Marquez, C.; Cardenas, B.; Salcedo, D.

    2004-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected during the intensive MCMA-2003 campaign in Santa Ana (19.1772° N, 98.99° W), Mexico City. This small rural town lies near the southeastern border of Mexico City and on the western rim of a mountain pass that channels the southern outflow of air from the city. Particles smaller than 10 μ m in aerodynamic diameter were collected on aluminum foils using three 8-stage micro orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI), while fine particles (PM2.5) were collected in quartz fiber filters using manual samplers (MiniVol air samplers, Airmetrics). Samples were taken every 3 days starting at 2am in 6 hr intervals (total time 18 hrs for MOUDI and 24 hrs for MiniVol) from April 10-22, 2003. The MOUDI was operated at a flow rate of 30 l/min with calibrated impaction cut-points in the range of 10 - 0.18 μ m; while the MiniVol operation flow rate was 5 l/min. Prior to sampling, the aluminum foils were pre-conditioned (at 450° C) in a furnace for 8 hrs to eliminate impurities. Both types of filters were weighted using an Ultra Microbalance (Cahn, with a sensitivity of 0.1 μ g) for particulate matter under controlled conditions (20° C and 50% relative humidity). The aluminum foils were cut in halves, one half for Total Carbon (TC) determination with a thermal method, Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA), and the other half for analysis of inorganic ions (Cl-, NO3, SO42-, NA+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg+) by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometer analytic method. Organic and elemental carbon was done according to the IMPROVE Thermal Protocol. Aerosol measurements made with MOUDI showed that the particle size distribution was bimodal in the three sampling periods. During daylight periods, 75% of the collected samples consisted of particles with aerodynamic diameter < 1 μ m whereas the major mass concentration was dominated by particles > 1 μ m during night. PM2.5 results reveal that the highest and lowest levels were obtained during the afternoon (60.6 μ g

  1. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  2. Evaluation of membrane filter field monitors for microbiological air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, N. D.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Puleo, J. R.; Herring, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Due to area constraints encountered in assembly and testing areas of spacecraft, the membrane filter field monitor (MF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration-accepted Reyniers slit air sampler were compared for recovery of airborne microbial contamination. The intramural air in a microbiological laboratory area and a clean room environment used for the assembly and testing of the Apollo spacecraft was studied. A significantly higher number of microorganisms was recovered by the Reyniers sampler. A high degree of consistency between the two sampling methods was shown by a regression analysis, with a correlation coefficient of 0.93. The MF samplers detected 79% of the concentration measured by the Reyniers slit samplers. The types of microorganisms identified from both sampling methods were similar.

  3. Sampling and Filtering in Photovoltaic System Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Driesse, Anton; Stein, Joshua S.; Riley, Daniel M.; Carmignani, Craig K.

    2014-10-01

    The performance of photovoltaic systems must be monitored accurately to ensure profitable long-term operation. The most important signals to be measured—irradiance and temperature, as well as power, current and voltage on both DC and AC sides of the system—contain rapid fluctuations that are not observable by typical monitoring systems. Nevertheless these fluctuations can affect the accuracy of the data that are stored. This report closely examines the main signals in one operating PV system, which were recorded at 2000 samples per second. It analyzes the characteristics and causes of the rapid fluctuations that are found, such as line-frequency harmonics, perturbations from anti-islanding detection, MPPT searching action and others. The operation of PV monitoring systems is then simulated using a wide range of sampling intervals, archive intervals and filtering options to assess how these factors influence data accuracy. Finally several potential sources of error are discussed with real-world examples.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AN RH -DENUDED MIE ACTIVE SAMPLING SYSTEM AND TARGETED AEROSOL CALIBRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MIE pDR 1200 nephelometer provides time resolved aerosol concentrations during personal and fixed-site sampling. Active (pumped) operation allows defining an upper PM2.5 particle size, however, this dramatically increases the aerosol mass passing through the phot...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.590 - PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM sampling media (e.g., filters... Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.590 PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing. Before an emission test, take the following steps to prepare PM sampling media (e.g., filters) and...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.590 - PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PM sampling media (e.g., filters... Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.590 PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing. Before an emission test, take the following steps to prepare PM sampling media (e.g., filters) and...

  7. Science of Test Measurement Accuracy - Data Sampling and Filter Selection during Data Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    sampling rate, aliasing, filtering, butterworth, chebyshev, Bessel, PSD and Bode plots 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Unclassified 17. LIMITATION...and PSD plots . SCIENCE OF TEST Measurement Accuracy - Data Sampling and Filter Selection during Data Acquisition David Kidman Air...Use both Bode and PSD plots to evaluate filter and sample rate effects prior to implementation Summary Reference: The Scientist and Engineer’s

  8. 40 CFR 1065.590 - PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PM sampling media (e.g., filters... Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.590 PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing. Before an emission test, take the following steps to prepare PM sampling media (e.g., filters) and...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.590 - PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PM sampling media (e.g., filters... Specified Duty Cycles § 1065.590 PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing. Before an emission test, take the following steps to prepare PM sampling media (e.g., filters) and...

  10. Comparison of polycarbonate and cellulose acetate membrane filters for isolation of Campylobacter concisus from stool samples.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Engberg, Jørgen; Ejlertsen, Tove; Nielsen, Henrik

    2013-08-01

    One thousand seven hundred ninety-one diarrheic stool samples were cultivated for Campylobacter spp. We found a high prevalence of Campylobacter concisus with use of a polycarbonate filter (n = 114) compared to a cellulose acetate filter (n = 79) (P < .0001). The polycarbonate filter is superior to the commonly used cellulose acetate filter for detection of C. concisus.

  11. In situ fabrication of depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber filters for high efficiency filtration of sub-micron aerosols and high water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Zong, Yichen; Zhang, Yingying; Yang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Rufan; Li, Shuiqing; Wei, Fei

    2013-03-01

    We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols. Moreover, the CNT/QF filters show high water repellency, implying their superiority for applications in humid conditions.We fabricated depth-type hierarchical CNT/quartz fiber (QF) filters through in situ growth of CNTs upon quartz fiber (QF) filters using a floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The filter specific area of the CNT/QF filters is more than 12 times higher than that of the pristine QF filters. As a result, the penetration of sub-micron aerosols for CNT/QF filters is reduced by two orders of magnitude, which reaches the standard of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Simultaneously, due to the fluffy brush-like hierarchical structure of CNTs on QFs, the pore size of the hybrid filters only has a small increment. The pressure drop across the CNT/QF filters only increases about 50% with respect to that of the pristine QF filters, leading to an obvious increased quality factor of the CNT/QF filters. Scanning electron microscope images reveal that CNTs are very efficient in capturing sub-micron aerosols

  12. Improved measurement of carbonaceous aerosol in Beijing, China: intercomparison of sampling and thermal-optical analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K. B.; Duan, F. K.; Zheng, M.; Ma, Y. L.; Tan, J. H.; Du, Z. Y.

    2010-06-01

    The sampling artifacts (both positive and negative) and the influence of thermal-optical methods (both charring correction method and the peak inert mode temperature) on the split of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were evaluated in Beijing. The positive sampling artifact constituted 10% and 23% of OC concentration determined by the bare quartz filter during winter and summer, respectively. For summer samples, the adsorbed gaseous organics were found to continuously evolve off the filter during the whole inert mode when analyzed by the IMPROVE-A temperature protocol. This may be due to the oxidation of the adsorbed organics during sampling (reaction artifact) which would increase their thermal stability. The backup quartz approach was evaluated by a denuder-based method for assessing the positive artifact. The quartz-quartz (QBQ) in series method was demonstrated to be reliable, since all of the OC collected by QBQ was from originally gaseous organics. Negative artifact that could be adsorbed by quartz filter was negligible. When the activated carbon impregnated glass fiber (CIG) filter was used as the denuded backup filter, the denuder efficiency for removing gaseous organics that could be adsorbed by the CIG filter was only about 30%. EC values were found to differ by a factor of about two depending on the charring correction method. Influence of the peak inert mode temperature was evaluated based on the summer samples. The EC value was found to continuously decrease with the peak inert mode temperature. Premature evolution of light absorbing carbon began when the peak inert mode temperature was increased from 580 to 650 °C; when further increased to 800 °C, the OC and EC split frequently occurred in the He mode, and the last OC peak was characterized by the overlapping of two separate peaks. The discrepancy between EC values defined by different temperature protocols was larger for Beijing carbonaceous aerosol compared with North America and

  13. Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... article title:  Aerosols over Central and Eastern Europe     View Larger Image ... last weeks of March 2003, widespread aerosol pollution over Europe was detected by several satellite-borne instruments. The Multi-angle ...

  14. The use of Whatman-41 filters for high volume air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neustadter, H. E.; Sidik, S. M.; King, R. B.; Fordyce, J. S.; Burr, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using W41 filter media on a routine TSP high-volume monitoring network was determined by comparison with glass fiber (GF) filtering. Results indicate that suspended particulate samples from GF filters averaged slightly, but not significantly, higher than those from Whatman-41 filters. Some extra handling procedures were required to avoid errors due to the hygroscopic nature of W41 filters; these added procedures are not overly burdensome, however, and they allow the performance of analytical work, thus extending the capabilities of high-volume sampling. It was demonstrated that W41 filters are practical for air quality monitoring and elemental analysis in environments similar to Cleveland's.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A TAMPER RESISTANT/INDICATING AEROSOL COLLECTION SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AT BULK HANDLING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, L.

    2012-06-06

    Environmental sampling has become a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards approaches since its approval for use in 1996. Environmental sampling supports the IAEA's mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a Nation State. Swipe sampling is the most commonly used method for the collection of environmental samples from bulk handling facilities. However, augmenting swipe samples with an air monitoring system, which could continuously draw samples from the environment of bulk handling facilities, could improve the possibility of the detection of undeclared activities. Continuous sampling offers the opportunity to collect airborne materials before they settle onto surfaces which can be decontaminated, taken into existing duct work, filtered by plant ventilation, or escape via alternate pathways (i.e. drains, doors). Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been working to further develop an aerosol collection technology that could be installed at IAEA safeguarded bulk handling facilities. The addition of this technology may reduce the number of IAEA inspector visits required to effectively collect samples. The principal sample collection device is a patented Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) which utilizes electrostatic precipitation principles to deposit particulates onto selected substrates. Recent work has focused on comparing traditional swipe sampling to samples collected via an ACE system, and incorporating tamper resistant and tamper indicating (TRI) technologies into the ACE system. Development of a TRI-ACE system would allow collection of samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities in a manner that ensures sample integrity and could be an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. This work was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office

  16. Evaluation of vacuum filter sock surface sample collection method for Bacillus spores from porous and non-porous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gary S; Betty, Rita G; Brockmann, John E; Lucero, Daniel A; Souza, Caroline A; Walsh, Kathryn S; Boucher, Raymond M; Tezak, Matthew S; Wilson, Mollye C

    2007-07-01

    Vacuum filter socks were evaluated for recovery efficiency of powdered Bacillus atrophaeus spores from two non-porous surfaces, stainless steel and painted wallboard and two porous surfaces, carpet and bare concrete. Two surface coupons were positioned side-by-side and seeded with aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus spores. One of the surfaces, a stainless steel reference coupon, was sized to fit into a sample vial for direct spore removal, while the other surface, a sample surface coupon, was sized for a vacuum collection application. Deposited spore material was directly removed from the reference coupon surface and cultured for enumeration of colony forming units (CFU), while deposited spore material was collected from the sample coupon using the vacuum filter sock method, extracted by sonication and cultured for enumeration. Recovery efficiency, which is a measure of overall transfer effectiveness from the surface to culture, was calculated as the number of CFU enumerated from the filter sock sample per unit area relative to the number of CFU enumerated from the co-located reference coupon per unit area. The observed mean filter sock recovery efficiency from stainless steel was 0.29 (SD = 0.14, n = 36), from painted wallboard was 0.25 (SD = 0.15, n = 36), from carpet was 0.28 (SD = 0.13, n = 40) and from bare concrete was 0.19 (SD = 0.14, n = 44). Vacuum filter sock recovery quantitative limits of detection were estimated at 105 CFU m(-2) from stainless steel and carpet, 120 CFU m(-2) from painted wallboard and 160 CFU m(-2) from bare concrete. The method recovery efficiency and limits of detection established in this work provide useful guidance for the planning of incident response environmental sampling for biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis.

  17. Aerosol optical depth determination in the UV using a four-channel precision filter radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlund, Thomas; Kouremeti, Natalia; Kazadzis, Stelios; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-03-01

    The determination of aerosol properties, especially the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength region, is of great importance for understanding the climatological variability of UV radiation. However, operational retrievals of AOD at the biologically most harmful wavelengths in the UVB are currently only made at very few places. This paper reports on the UVPFR (UV precision filter radiometer) sunphotometer, a stable and robust instrument that can be used for AOD retrievals at four UV wavelengths. Instrument characteristics and results of Langley calibrations at a high-altitude site were presented. It was shown that due to the relatively wide spectral response functions of the UVPFR, the calibration constants (V0) derived from Langley plot calibrations underestimate the true extraterrestrial signals. Accordingly, correction factors were introduced. In addition, the instrument's spectral response functions also result in an apparent air-mass-dependent decrease in ozone optical depth used in the AOD determinations. An adjusted formula for the calculation of AOD, with a correction term dependent on total column ozone amount and ozone air mass, was therefore introduced. Langley calibrations performed 13-14 months apart resulted in sensitivity changes of ≤ 1.1 %, indicating good instrument stability. Comparison with a high-accuracy standard precision filter radiometer, measuring AOD at 368-862 nm wavelengths, showed consistent results. Also, very good agreement was achieved by comparing the UVPFR with AOD at UVB wavelengths derived with a Brewer spectrophotometer, which was calibrated against the UVPFR at an earlier date. Mainly due to non-instrumental uncertainties connected with ozone optical depth, the total uncertainty of AOD in the UVB is higher than that reported from AOD instruments measuring in UVA and visible ranges. However, the precision can be high among instruments using harmonized algorithms for ozone and Rayleigh optical depth as

  18. Towards understanding of shatter artifacts in airborne sampling inlets: Analysis of aerosol-cloud measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Lucas

    Atmospheric aerosols have a critical role in Earth's radiative balance through both direct and indirect effects. The direct effect of aerosols is to scatter or absorb shortwave and longwave radiation, while the indirect effect results from the role of aerosols in cloud formation. Accurate modeling of long-term global climate change requires complete knowledge of both the direct and indirect effects of atmospheric aerosol. For measurement of atmospheric aerosol and aerosol-cloud systems, aircraft sampling has been found to be the most suitable. Aircraft measurements of aerosol particles inside cloud systems are often observed to be unrealistically high. This is because, the breakup of cloud droplets creates shatter artifact particles of sizes in the same range as that of interstitial particles being sampled, resulting in the enhancement of aerosol number concentration measurements in clouds. Cloud droplet breakup results from two primary mechanisms: wall impaction and aerodynamic forces. The first mechanism is produced when a cloud droplet collides with the inlet surface and the later occurs from significant acceleration or deceleration of cloud droplets relative to the local airstream. Because of cloud droplet breakup and the resultant produce of shattered particles, atmospheric scientists discard in-cloud data, and this has limited our ability to fully characterize different kinds of aerosol-cloud systems. As part of this thesis, the extent of the shatter artifact problem in existing aerosol-cloud inlets is examined and a methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for finding their operating limits is established. Measurements from several different inlet systems, including: NCAR's Sub-micron Aerosol Inlet (SMAI) and HIAPER modular inlet (HIMIL), Clarkson's High Cross-flow Aerosol Sampler (Hi-CAS), and the Clarke Solid Diffuser inlet (Clarke SD), are analyzed to determine measurement artifacts associated with sampling in clouds. The results indicate that

  19. PIXE-PIGE analysis of size-segregated aerosol samples from remote areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Taccetti, F.; Becagli, S.; Frosini, D.; Traversi, R.; Udisti, R.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical characterization of size-segregated samples is helpful to study the aerosol effects on both human health and environment. The sampling with multi-stage cascade impactors (e.g., Small Deposit area Impactor, SDI) produces inhomogeneous samples, with a multi-spot geometry and a non-negligible particle stratification.

  20. Aerosol-phase Activity of Iodine Captured from a Triiodide Resin Filter on Fine Particles Containing an Infectious Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    phage, filter, infection , iodine, triiodide U U U SAR 6 Joseph D. Wander 850 283-6240 Reset ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aerosol-phase activity of iodine captured... infections in enclosed areas. Introduction Recurring reminders of the risk of respiratory infection by airborne pathogenic microbes include malicious...enhancing protection against the airborne infections by the integration of anti microbials such as silver (Foss Manufacturing Company, Inc. 2004; Mia

  1. Direct contact test for estimating the ecotoxicity of aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Kováts, Nora; Acs, András; Kovács, Anikó; Ferincz, Arpád; Turóczi, Beatrix; Gelencsér, András

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) and 2.5 μm (PM2.5) is now identified as one of the most dangerous pollutants on human health by the EU new directive on air quality (2008/50/CE). Although these primary pollutants are monitored in cities, little information is available on their ecotoxicity. In this paper a 'whole-aerosol' testing protocol is suggested based on the kinetic version of the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition test.

  2. Filterable redox cycling activity: a comparison between diesel exhaust particles and secondary organic aerosol constituents.

    PubMed

    McWhinney, Robert D; Badali, Kaitlin; Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-04-02

    The redox activity of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) collected from a light-duty diesel passenger car engine was examined using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. DEP was highly redox-active, causing DTT to decay at a rate of 23-61 pmol min(-1) μg(-1) of particle used in the assay, which was an order of magnitude higher than ambient coarse and fine particulate matter (PM) collected from downtown Toronto. Only 2-11% of the redox activity was in the water-soluble portion, while the remainder occurred at the black carbon surface. This is in contrast to redox-active secondary organic aerosol constituents, in which upward of 90% of the activity occurs in the water-soluble fraction. The redox activity of DEP is not extractable by moderately polar (methanol) and nonpolar (dichloromethane) organic solvents, and is hypothesized to arise from redox-active moieties contiguous with the black carbon portion of the particles. These measurements illustrate that "Filterable Redox Cycling Activity" may therefore be useful to distinguish black carbon-based oxidative capacity from water-soluble organic-based activity. The difference in chemical environment leading to redox activity highlights the need to further examine the relationship between activity in the DTT assay and toxicology measurements across particles of different origins and composition.

  3. Development of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) based high altitude balloon (HAB) platform for active aerosol sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lateran, S.; Sedan, M. F.; Harithuddin, A. S. M.; Azrad, S.

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge on the abundance and diversity of the minute particles or aerosols in the earth's stratosphere is still in its infancy as aerosol sampling at high-altitude still possess a lot of challenges. Thus far, high-altitude aerosol sampling has been conducted mostly using manned flights, which requires enormous financial and logistical resources. There had been researches for the utilisation of high altitude balloon (HAB) for active and passive aerosol samplings within the stratosphere. However, the gathered samples in the payload were either brought down by controlling the balloon air pressure or were just dropped with a parachute to slow the descend speed in order to reduce the impact upon landing. In most cases, the drop location of the sample are unfavorable such as in the middle of the sea, dense foliage, etc. Hence a system that can actively sample aerosols at high-altitude and improve the delivery method in terms of quality and reliability using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is designed and tested in this study.

  4. Aerosolization as a Means of Sample Preparation of Geological Materials for XRF Analysis and its Validity Compared to EPA Method 3050A Digestion.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Richard H

    1996-03-01

    A sample preparation method has been developed in which a powder may be aerosolized and collected onto filter media in the form of a uniform layer of participate matter similar to the EPA Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) aerodynamic diameter. Samples of dusts and powders as small as 100 mg may be prepared for metals analysis by XRF with this method. The method is also applicable to the preparation of samples such as ores, soils, sediments, etc., which may be ground to pass through a #400 Tyler equivalent sieve (37 um geometric diameter) prior to aerosolization. Samples prepared in this manner present a representative aliquot with minimal matrix interferences to the XRF instrument for elements with atomic number as low as 13 (aluminum). This method is equivalent to EPA's Method 3050A digestion and subsequent analysis by either ICP or GFAA for many analytes, while other species (notably Cr) are not as favorable in comparison.

  5. Laboratory experiments on membrane filter sampling of airborne mycotoxins produced by Stachybotrys atra corda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Nikulin, M.; Tuomainen, M.; Berg, S.; Parikka, P.; Hintikka, E.-L.

    A membrane filter method for sampling of airborne stachybotrystoxins was studied in the laboratory. Toxigenic strains of Stachybotrys atra on wallpaper, grain, hay and straw were used as toxin sources in the experiments. Air samples were collected on cellulose nitrate and polycarbonate membrane filters at air flow rates of 10-20 ℓ min -1. After the filter sampling, the air was passed through methanol. The results showed that stachybotrystoxins (trichothecenes) were concentrated in airborne fungal propagules, and thus can be collected on filters. Polycarbonate filters with a pore size of 0.2 μm collected the highest percentage of toxic samples. The laboratory experiments indicated that polycarbonate filter sampling for the collection of airborne mycotoxins is a promising method for extension to field measurements.

  6. Sampling and characterization of aerosols produced under simulated nuclear reactor accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenger, B.J.; Horton, E.L.; Herceg, J.E.; Dunn, P.F.

    1986-12-01

    An aerosol sampling system was designed and used in a series of nuclear reactor safety experiments. The system was designed to sample radioactive and chemically reactive aerosols of unknown size distributions and concentrations in high temperature, high pressure steam/hydrogen environments. The aerosol samples are being analyzed posttest to determine their composition and morphology by microanalytical techniques. Main steam particle size distributions and loadings are being computed from particle data generated from SEM micrograph images and collection efficiencies calculated with measured thermal-hydraulic data. The system would be applicable to other types of experiments in which the sampling environment is severe and/or a priori knowledge of the general particle size range and loading are limited.

  7. Production of aerosols by optical catapulting: Imaging, performance parameters and laser-induced plasma sampling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelhamid, M.; Fortes, F. J.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Harith, M. A.; Laserna, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) is a sampling and manipulation method that has been extensively studied in applications ranging from single cells in heterogeneous tissue samples to analysis of explosive residues in human fingerprints. Specifically, analysis of the catapulted material by means of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers a promising approach for the inspection of solid particulate matter. In this work, we focus our attention in the experimental parameters to be optimized for a proper aerosol generation while increasing the particle density in the focal region sampled by LIBS. For this purpose we use shadowgraphy visualization as a diagnostic tool. Shadowgraphic images were acquired for studying the evolution and dynamics of solid aerosols produced by OC. Aluminum silicate particles (0.2-8 μm) were ejected from the substrate using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, while time-resolved images recorded the propagation of the generated aerosol. For LIBS analysis and shadowgraphy visualization, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and 532 nm was employed, respectively. Several parameters such as the time delay between pulses and the effect of laser fluence on the aerosol production have been also investigated. After optimization, the particle density in the sampling focal volume increases while improving the aerosol sampling rate till ca. 90%.

  8. Define and Quantify the Physics of Air Flow, Pressure Drop and Aerosol Collection in Nuclear Grade HEPA Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2015-02-23

    Objective: Develop a set of peer-review and verified analytical methods to adjust HEPA filter performance to different flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. Experimental testing will measure HEPA filter flow rate, pressure drop and efficiency to verify the analytical approach. Nuclear facilities utilize HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filters to purify air flow for workspace ventilation. However, the ASME AG-1 technical standard (Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment) does not adequately describe air flow measurement units for HEPA filter systems. Specifically, the AG-1 standard does not differentiate between volumetric air flow in ACFM (actual cubic feet per minute)compared to mass flow measured in SCFM (standard cubic feet per minute). More importantly, the AG-1 standard has an overall deficiency for using HEPA filter devices at different air flow rates, temperatures, and altitudes. Technical Approach: The collection efficiency and pressure drops of 18 different HEPA filters will be measured over a range of flow rates, temperatures and altitudes. The experimental results will be compared to analytical scoping calculations. Three manufacturers have allocated six HEPA filters each for this effort. The 18 filters will be tested at two different flow rates, two different temperatures and two different altitudes. The 36 total tests will be conducted at two different facilities: the ATI Test facilities (Baltimore MD) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos NM). The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally designed to evaluate small air samplers. In 2010, modifications were started to convert the wind tunnel for HEPA filter testing. (Extensive changes were necessary for the required aerosol generators, HEPA test fixtures, temperature control devices and measurement capabilities.) To this date, none of these modification activities have been funded through a specific DOE or NNSA program. This is

  9. Backflushing Filters for Field Processing of Water Samples Prior to Trace-Element Analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, V.C.; Jenne, E.A.; Burchard, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A portable unit is described for filtering water samples at field sites in such a manner that the filtrate is suitable for analysis not only of major constituents but also of trace elments at the mocrogram-per-liter level. A battery-operated peristaltic pump forces the water sample through medical-grade silicone tubing into and through an all-plastic in-line filter which can be backflushed when sediment clogs the filter membrane. Initial filtration rate exceeds 500 milliliter/minute and, because of the backflushing feature, a total time for filtering high-sediment-bearing waster samples is greatly reduced. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. Water-resistant cellulosic filter for aerosol entrapment and water purification, Part I: production of water-resistant cellulosic filter.

    PubMed

    Heydarifard, Solmaz; Nazhad, Mousa M; Xiao, Huining; Shipin, Oleg; Olson, James

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic filters are neither biodegradable nor produced from renewable sources. Thus, their disposal has serious environmental impacts. There is a growing desire to produce filters from cellulosic fibers that are renewable, biodegradable, cheap and most importantly recyclable if the contamination is removed. Foam-laid process in papermaking is a promising process for the production of specialty papers. Filters produced using this process are capable of providing products with high specific surface area and tortuous structure favorable for entrapping particulate matters, while providing excellent permeability for incoming gas or liquid. Although the end product fulfills completely the requirement of a filter in a dry environment, it fails completely if it is exposed to a moist environment. This work reports on converting the hydrophilic cellulosic filter into a hydrophobic product without disturbing its original structure.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - STANDARD FILTER CORPORATION PE16ZU FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  12. EVALUATION OF THE FILTER PACK FOR LONG-DURATION SAMPLING OF AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 14-week filter pack (FP) sampler evaluation field study was conducted at a site near Bondville, IL to investigate the impact of weekly sampling duration. Simultaneous samples were collected using collocated filter packs (FP) from two independent air quality monitoring networks...

  13. Annual cycle and temperature dependence of pinene oxidation products and other water-soluble organic compounds in coarse and fine aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Müller, L.; Winterhalter, R.; Moortgat, G. K.; Hoffmann, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-05-01

    Filter samples of fine and coarse particulate matter were collected over a period of one year and analyzed for water-soluble organic compounds, including the pinene oxidation products pinic acid, pinonic acid, 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA) and a variety of dicarboxylic acids (C5-C16) and nitrophenols. Seasonal variations and other characteristic features are discussed with regard to aerosol sources and sinks and data from other studies and regions. The ratios of adipic acid (C6) and phthalic acid (Ph) to azelaic acid (C9) indicate that the investigated aerosols samples were mainly influenced by biogenic sources. An Arrhenius-type correlation was found between the 3-MBTCA concentration and inverse temperature. Model calculations suggest that the temperature dependence is largely due to enhanced emissions and OH radical concentrations at elevated temperatures, whereas the influence of gas-particle partitioning appears to play a minor role. Enhanced ratios of pinic acid to 3-MBTCA indicate strong chemical aging of the investigated aerosols in summer and spring. Acknowledgment: The authors would like to thank M. Claeys for providing synthetic 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid standards for LC-MS analysis and J. Fröhlich for providing filter samples and related information.

  14. Composition of microbial communities in aerosol, snow and ice samples from remote glaciated areas (Antarctica, Alps, Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elster, J.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Řeháková, K.

    2007-06-01

    Taxonomical and ecological analyses were performed on micro-autotrophs (cyanobacteria and algae together with remnants of diatom valves), micro-fungi (hyphae and spores), bacteria (rod, cocci and red clusters), yeast, and plant pollen extracted from various samples: Alps snow (Mt. Blank area), Andean snow (Illimani, Bolivia), Antarctic aerosol filters (Dumont d'Urville, Terre Adélie), and Antarctic inland ice (Terre Adélie). Three methods for ice and snow sample's pre-concentration were tested (filtration, centrifugation and lyophilisation). Afterwards, cultivation methods for terrestrial, freshwater and marine microorganisms (micro-autotrophs and micro-fungi) were used in combination with liquid and solid media. The main goal of the study was to find out if micro-autotrophs are commonly transported by air masses, and later stored in snow and icecaps around the world. The most striking result of this study was the absence of culturable micro-autotrophs in all studied samples. However, an unusual culturable pigmented prokaryote was found in both alpine snow and aerosol samples. Analyses of many samples and proper statistical analyses (PCA, RDA- Monte Carlo permutation tests) showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in both microbial community and biotic remnants composition F=9.33, p=0.001. In addition, GLM showed that studied treatments highly significantly differ in numbers of categories of microorganisms and remnants of biological material F=11.45, p=0.00005. The Antarctic aerosol samples were characterised by having red clusters of bacteria, the unusual prokaryote and yeasts. The high mountain snow from the Alps and Andes contained much more culturable heterotrophs. The unusual prokaryote was very abundant, as were coccoid bacteria, red clusters of bacteria, as well as yeasts. The Antarctic ice samples were quite different. These samples had higher numbers of rod bacteria and fungal hyphae. The microbial communities and biological remnants of

  15. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test for filter temperature control... Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 or PM 10-2,5 § 53.57 Test for filter temperature... temperature during a 4-hour period of active sampling as well as during a subsequent 4-hour non-sampling...

  16. Results of Self-Absorption Study on the Versapor 3000 Filters for Radioactive Particulate Air Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew

    2008-08-22

    Since the mid-1980s the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used a value of 0.85 as a correction factor for the self absorption of activity of particulate radioactive air samples. More recently, an effort was made to evaluate the current particulate radioactive air sample filters (Versapor® 3000) used at PNNL for self absorption effects. There were two methods used in the study, 1) to compare the radioactivity concentration by direct gas-flow proportional counting of the filter to the results obtained after acid digestion of the filter and counting again by gas-flow proportional detection and 2) to evaluate sample filters by high resolution visual/infrared microscopy to determine the depth of material loading on or in the filter fiber material. Sixty samples were selected from the archive for acid digestion in the first method and about 30 samples were selected for high resolution visual/infrared microscopy. Mass loading effects were also considered. From the sample filter analysis, large error is associated with the average self absorption factor, however, when the data is compared directly one-to-one, statistically, there appears to be good correlation between the two analytical methods. The mass loading of filters evaluated was <0.2 mg cm-2 and was also compared against other published results. The microscopy analysis shows the sample material remains on the top of the filter paper and does not imbed into the filter media. Results of the microscopy evaluation lead to the conclusion that there is not a mechanism for significant self absorption. The overall conclusion is that self-absorption is not a significant factor in the analysis of filters used at PNNL for radioactive air stack sampling of radionuclide particulates and that an applied correction factor is conservative in determining overall sample activity. A new self absorption factor of 1.0 is recommended.

  17. Water Soluble Organic Nitrogen in atmospheric aerosol samples from urban, sub-urban and pristine areas of Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canelon, R.; Giuliante, A.; Aguiar, G.; Ghneim, T.; Perez, T.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of water soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) were determined in atmospheric total suspended particles (TSP) collected between September of 2005 and May of 2006, in an urban continental (Caracas, 10° 29' 09'' N, 66° 53' 48'' W), an urban coastal (Catia la mar, 10° 35' 47'' N, 67° 01' 45'' W), a sub-urban coastal (Osma, 10° 32' N, 67° 28' W), a suburban continental (Altos de Pipe, 10° 23' 41'' N, 63° 59' 10'' W), a pristine coastal (Isla de Aves, 15° 40' N, 63° 36' W) and a pristine continental (La Gran Sabana National Park, 5° 41' 30'' N, 61° 34' 20'' W) areas of Venezuela. TSP samples were collected using a Hi-Vol airborne particle sampler. TSP were impacted on a fiberglass filter pretreated under 400° C for 4 hours to minimize organic nitrogen contamination. Ultra sound water extractions of the sample filters were performed and their NH4+, NO2- and NO3- concentrations were determined by ion exchange liquid chromatography. The water extracts were UV digested and the nitrogen inorganic ions were analyzed after the UV exposure. WSON concentrations were calculated by the difference between the inorganic nitrogen concentrations before and after UV digestion. Ninety five percent of the aerosol samples collected in the suburban and pristine areas showed a WSON concentration range from 0.03 to 0.6 μg/m3 whereas in urban areas the range was 0.21 to 1.09 μg/m3. These concentration values are on the same order of magnitude than the previously found in other tropical and subtropical areas. The contribution of aerosol WSON to the total soluble nitrogen in the coastal urban, sub-urban and pristine areas ranged from 23 to 67%, while in Caracas was smaller (38±8%, n=5). Therefore, aerosol WSON provides an important source of nitrogen to these pristine and suburban ecosystems, which could potentially have implications on the nutrient cycling. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the aerosol WSON and the water soluble inorganic

  18. A novel method for online analysis of gas and particle composition: description and evaluation of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F. D.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Lutz, A.; Hallquist, M.; Worsnop, D.; Thornton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a novel inlet that allows measurement of both gas and particle molecular composition when coupled to mass spectrometric, chromatographic, or optical sensors: the Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO). The design goals for the FIGAERO are to allow unperturbed observation of ambient air while simultaneously analyzing gases and collecting particulate matter on a Teflon® (hereafter Teflon) filter via an entirely separate sampling port. The filter is analyzed periodically by the same sensor on hourly or faster timescales using temperature-programmed thermal desorption. We assess the performance of the FIGAERO by coupling it to a high-resolution time-of-flight chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) in laboratory chamber studies of α-pinene oxidation and field measurements at a boreal forest location. Low instrument backgrounds give detection limits of ppt or lower for compounds in the gas-phase and in the picogram m-3 range for particle phase compounds. The FIGAERO-HRToF-CIMS provides molecular information about both gases and particle composition on the 1 Hz and hourly timescales, respectively for hundreds of compounds. The FIGAERO thermal desorptions are highly reproducible (better than 10%), allowing a calibrated assessment of the effective volatility of desorbing compounds and the role of thermal decomposition during the desorption process. We show that the often multi-modal desorption thermograms arising from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) provide additional insights into molecular composition and/or particle morphology, and exhibit changes with changes in SOA formation or aging pathways.

  19. Real time infrared aerosol analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Stanley A.; Reedy, Gerald T.; Kumar, Romesh

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for analyzing aerosols in essentially real time includes a virtual impactor which separates coarse particles from fine and ultrafine particles in an aerosol sample. The coarse and ultrafine particles are captured in PTFE filters, and the fine particles impact onto an internal light reflection element. The composition and quantity of the particles on the PTFE filter and on the internal reflection element are measured by alternately passing infrared light through the filter and the internal light reflection element, and analyzing the light through infrared spectrophotometry to identify the particles in the sample.

  20. Evaluation of Ag nanoparticle coated air filter against aerosolized virus: Anti-viral efficiency with dust loading.

    PubMed

    Joe, Yun Haeng; Park, Dae Hoon; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the effect of dust loading on the anti-viral ability of an anti-viral air filter was investigated. Silver nanoparticles approximately 11 nm in diameter were synthesized via a spark discharge generation system and were used as anti-viral agents coated onto a medium air filter. The pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and anti-viral ability of the filter against aerosolized bacteriophage MS2 virus particles were tested with dust loading. The filtration efficiency and pressure drop increased with dust loading, while the anti-viral ability decreased. Theoretical analysis of anti-viral ability with dust loading was carried out using a mathematical model based on that presented by Joe et al. (J. Hazard. Mater.; 280: 356-363, 2014). Our model can be used to compare anti-viral abilities of various anti-viral agents, determine appropriate coating areal density of anti-viral agent on a filter, and predict the life cycle of an anti-viral filter.

  1. An aerosol and gas sampling apparatus for remote observatory use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komhyr, W. D.

    1983-04-01

    An air sampling apparatus is described which standardizes sampling height at a field station at 10 m or more above ground level and which minimizes loss of particles and destruction and contamination of sampled trace atmospheric gases as air is conducted through the apparatus to various monitoring instruments. Basic design features render the apparatus useful for air sampling under widely varying climate conditions, and at station altitudes ranging from sea level to more than 4 km. Four systems have been built, and have been used sucessfully since 1977 at the NOAA Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change program baseline stations at Point Barrow, Alaska; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; American Samoa, South Pacific; and South Pole, Antarctica.

  2. Sampling, characterization, and remote sensing of aerosols formed in the atmospheric hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Pickrell, P.W.

    1984-05-01

    When gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) is released into the atmosphere, it rapidly reacts with ambient moisture to form an aerosol of uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). As part of our Safety Analysis program, we have performed several experimental releases of HF/sub 6/ in contained volumes in order to investigate techniques for sampling and characterizing the aerosol materials. The aggregate particle morphology and size distribution have been found to be dependent upon several conditions, including the temperature of the UF/sub 6/ at the time of its release, the relative humidity of the air into which it is released, and the elapsed time after the release. Aerosol composition and settling rate have been investigated using stationary samplers for the separate collection of UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ and HF and via laser spectroscopic remote sensing (Mie scatter and infrared spectroscopy). 25 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Development of a High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Based on a Confocal Optical Filter for Aerosol Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Hoffman, D. S.; Reagan, J. A.; Carlsten, J.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols are an important constituent in atmospheric composition affecting climate, weather, and air quality. Active remote sensing instruments provide tools for in-situ studies of atmospheric aerosols that can help understand the role of aerosols on the radiative forcing of the climate system. In this paper, the design and initial performance of a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on a unique confocal cavity for optically filtering the aerosol and molecular returns is presented. An injection seeded pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a fundamental and frequency doubled output is used as the laser transmitter for the HSRL. A small portion of fiber coupled injection seeded signal at 1064 nm is split before the laser oscillator and, after modulation using an acousto-optic modulator, is used to produce a discriminating signal for locking a confocal cavity that is resonant at the 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths to the injection seeded source. Light scattered in the atmosphere is collected using a commercial telescope. After the telescope, the 1064 nm light is split from the 532 nm light using a dielectric mirror with the 1064 nm light monitored using a PMT. The 532 nm light is launched into a multimode fiber. The output from the fiber is next incident on a beamsplitter with part of the light sent to a PMT to monitor the total return for the 532 nm channel. The light that passes through the beamsplitter is mode matched into a confocal optical cavity that allows the light scattered by the atmospheric aerosols to be transmitted while the light scattered from the atmospheric molecules is reflected. The transmitted light from the aerosol scattering is incident on a PMT while the reflected molecular signal is incident on a PMT. The transmission of the confocal cavity is monitored before and after the data collection using a continuous wave frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser that is fiber coupled. Data is collected and processed in the following manner. Each of the four voltage

  4. Quick-change filter cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Ortiz, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    A quick-change filter cartridge. In sampling systems for measurement of airborne materials, a filter element is introduced into the sampled airstream such that the aerosol constituents are removed and deposited on the filter. Fragile sampling media often require support in order to prevent rupture during sampling, and careful mounting and sealing to prevent misalignment, tearing, or creasing which would allow the sampled air to bypass the filter. Additionally, handling of filter elements may introduce cross-contamination or exposure of operators to toxic materials. Moreover, it is desirable to enable the preloading of filter media into quick-change cartridges in clean laboratory environments, thereby simplifying and expediting the filter-changing process in the field. The quick-change filter cartridge of the present invention permits the application of a variety of filter media in many types of instruments and may also be used in automated systems. The cartridge includes a base through which a vacuum can be applied to draw air through the filter medium which is located on a porous filter support and held there by means of a cap which forms an airtight seal with the base. The base is also adapted for receiving absorbing media so that both particulates and gas-phase samples may be trapped for investigation, the latter downstream of the aerosol filter.

  5. High Volume Air Sampling for Viral Aerosols: A Comparative Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    low, with the cotton swabbing only recovering 27.7 percent of the BA on the surface (Rose, Jensen, Peterson, Banerjee, & Arduino , 2004). A follow-on...BA were present on the surface (Hodges, Rose, Peterson, Noble-Wang, & Arduino , 2006). These lower sensitivities at low concentrations could be a...monitored during each sample collection period. Ambient pressure data was obtained hourly for Edmonton, AB from the Canadian Weather Service

  6. Single point aerosol sampling: Evaluation of mixing and probe performance in a nuclear stack

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.; Fairchild, C.I.; Wood, G.O.

    1995-02-01

    Alternative Reference Methodologies (ARMs) have been developed for sampling of radionuclides from stacks and ducts that differ from the methods required by the U.S. EPA. The EPA methods are prescriptive in selection of sampling locations and in design of sampling probes whereas the alternative methods are performance driven. Tests were conducted in a stack at Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the efficacy of the ARMs. Coefficients of variation of the velocity tracer gas, and aerosol particle profiles were determined at three sampling locations. Results showed numerical criteria placed upon the coefficients of variation by the ARMs were met at sampling stations located 9 and 14 stack diameters from flow entrance, but not at a location that is 1.5 diameters downstream from the inlet. Experiments were conducted to characterize the transmission of 10 {mu}m aerodynamic equivalent diameter liquid aerosol particles through three types of sampling probes. The transmission ratio (ratio of aerosol concentration at the probe exit plane to the concentration in the free stream) was 107% for a 113 L/min (4-cfm) anisokinetic shrouded probe, but only 20% for an isokinetic probe that follows the EPA requirements. A specially designed isokinetic probe showed a transmission ratio of 63%. The shrouded probe performance would conform to the ARM criteria; however, the isokinetic probes would not.

  7. Results of Self-Absorption Study on the Versapor 3000 Filters for Radioactive Particulate Air Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Barnett, Debra S.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Bliss, Mary; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-02-17

    Since the mid-1980s, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used a value of 0.85 as the correction factor for self absorption of activity for particulate radioactive air samples collected from building exhaust for environmental monitoring. This value accounts for activity that cannot be detected by direct counting of alpha and beta particles. Emissions can be degraded or blocked by filter fibers for particles buried in the filter material or by inactive dust particles collected with the radioactive particles. These filters are used for monitoring air emissions from PNNL stacks for radioactive particles. This paper describes an effort to re-evaluate self-absorption effects in particulate radioactive air sample filters (Versapor® 3000, 47 mm diameter) used at PNNL. There were two methods used to characterize the samples. Sixty samples were selected from the archive for acid digestion to compare the radioactivity measured by direct gas-flow proportional counting of filters to the results obtained after acid digestion of the filter and counting again by gas-flow proportional detection. Thirty different sample filters were selected for visible light microscopy to evaluate filter loading and particulate characteristics. Mass-loading effects were also considered. Filter ratios were calculated by dividing the initial counts by the post-digestion counts with the expectation that post-digestion counts would be higher because digestion would expose radioactivity embedded in the filter in addition to that on top of the filter. Contrary to expectations, the post digestion readings were almost always lower than initial readings and averaged approximately half the initial readings for both alpha and beta activity. Before and after digestion readings appeared to be related to each other, but with a low coefficient of determination (R^2) value. The ratios had a wide range of values indicating that this method did not provide sufficient precision to quantify self

  8. PIXE Analysis of Aerosol and Soil Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Joshua; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of aerosol and soil samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced X-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the aerosol samples near Piseco Lake and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The soil samples were also collected at Piseco Lake and pressed into cylindrical pellets for experimentation. PIXE analysis of the aerosol and soil samples were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. There are higher concentrations of sulfur at smaller particle sizes (0.25-1 μm), suggesting that it could be suspended in the air for days and originate from sources very far away. Other elements with significant concentrations peak at larger particle sizes (1-4 μm) and are found in the soil samples, suggesting that these elements could originate in the soil. The PIXE analysis will be described and the resulting data will be presented.

  9. Determination of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Development of methodology for combined aerosol and vapor sampling.

    PubMed

    Solbu, K; Thorud, S; Hersson, M; Ovrebø, S; Ellingsen, D G; Lundanes, E; Molander, P

    2007-08-17

    Methodology for personal occupational exposure assessment of airborne trialkyl and triaryl organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids by active combined aerosol and vapor sampling at 1.5L/min is presented. Determination of the organophosphates was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Combinations of adsorbents (Anasorb 747, Anasorb CSC, Chromosorb 106, XAD-2 and silica gel) with an upstream cassette with glass fiber or PTFE filters and different desorption/extraction solvents (CS(2), CS(2)-dimethylformamide (50:1, v/v), toluene, dichloromethane, methyl-t-butyl ether and methanol) have been evaluated for optimized combined vapor and aerosol air sampling of the organophosphates tri-isobutyl, tri-n-butyl, triphenyl, tri-o-cresyl, tri-m-cresyl and tri-p-cresyl phosphates. The combination of Chromosorb 106 and 37 mm filter cassette with glass fiber filter and dichloromethane as desorption/extraction solvent was the best combination for mixed phase air sampling of the organophosphates originating from hydraulic fluids. The triaryl phosphates were recovered solely from the filter, while the trialkyl phosphates were recovered from both the filter and the adsorbent. The total sampling efficiency on the combined sampler was in the range 92-101% for the studied organophosphates based on spiking experiments followed by pulling air through the sampler. Recoveries after 28 days storage were 98-102% and 99-101% when stored at 5 and -20 degrees C, respectively. The methodology was further evaluated in an exposure chamber with generated oil aerosol atmospheres with both synthetic and mineral base oils with added organophosphates in various concentrations, yielding total sampling efficiencies in close comparison to the spiking experiments. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by exposure measurements in a mechanical workshop where system suitability tests are performed on different aircraft components in a test bench, displaying tricresyl phosphate

  10. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  11. Physicochemical Characterization of Lake Spray Aerosol Generated from Great Lakes Water Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Axson, J. L.; May, N.; Pratt, K.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking across bodies of water releases particles into the air which can impact climate and human health. Similar to sea spray aerosols formed through marine wave breaking, freshwater lakes generate lake spray aerosol (LSA). LSA can impact climate directly through scattering/absorption and indirectly through cloud nucleation. In addition, these LSA are suggested to impact human health through inhalation of these particles during algal bloom periods characterized by toxic cyanobacteria. Few studies have been conducted to assess the physical and chemical properties of freshwater LSA. Herein, we discuss constructing a LSA generation system and preliminary physical and chemical characterization of aerosol generated from water samples collected at various sites across Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Superior, and Lake Michigan. Information on aerosol size distributions, number concentrations, and chemical composition will be discussed as a function of lake water blue-green algae concentration, dissolved organic carbon concentration, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen concentration. These studies represent a first step towards evaluating the potential for LSA to impact climate and health in the Great Lakes region.

  12. Measurement of Sulfur Isotope Ratios in Micrometer-Sized Aerosol Samples by NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterholler, B.; Hoppe, P.; Foley, S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-12-01

    The isotopic composition of sulfur in the atmosphere is highly variable and source dependent. Sulfur isotopic ratios are a well established tool for identifying sources of sulfur in the environment, estimating emission factors, and tracing the spread of sulfur from anthropogenic point sources in terrestrial ecosystems. Conventional mass spectrometry needs a minimum of 1 micromol of sulfur to perform one analysis. In the case of atmospheric aerosol particles the results of such an analysis averages the isotopic compositions of millions of aerosol particles, and thus normally includes several different types of sulfur aerosol. The new Cameca NanoSIMS 50 ion microprobe technique permits analysis of individual aerosol particles with volumes down to 0.3 cubic micron and a precision for delta34S of 3-10 (2 sigma). As a result, this technique is able to introduce a new scale into the study of the atmospheric sulfur cycle. Linking the chemical, mineralogical, morphological and isotopic information of individual particles will allow a better understanding of external and internal mixing states by analyzing more than one spot on coarse mode particles. Moreover it will improve source identification by complementing the chemical and isotopic information. First samples have been collected from the Sahara desert, an urban site in central Europe, and a costal site in Western Ireland and show the potentials of this new technique.

  13. Development of the sampling and nuclide analysis methods for spent HEPA filter wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Young-Yong Ji; Dae Seok Hong; Il-Sik Kang; Bum-Kyoung Seo; Jong-Sik Shon

    2007-07-01

    Spent filter wastes of about 2,160 units have been stored in the waste storage facility of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute since its operation. These spent filters have generally consisted of a HEPA filter after its filtering of all the contaminants in the gas stream generated during the operation of the HANARO research reactor and the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. At the moment, to secure enough storage space, it is necessary to make a volume reduction of the stored radioactive wastes through a compression treatment or a regulatory clearance. There have been many studies on a treatment and a clearance of the low level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear facilities. These methods are used in view of a reduction of a management cost and disposal cost and the security of free space for a waste storage facility approaching saturation. In order to dispose of the spent filters, it is first necessary to conduct a radionuclide assessment of them. To do that, a sampling procedure should be prepared to obtain a representative sample from a spent filter. As for conducting a nuclide analysis for this representative sample, a corresponding spent filter can be determined as either a regulatory clearance waste or a radioactive waste. (authors)

  14. A Method for Microalgae Proteomics Analysis Based on Modified Filter-Aided Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Cao, Xupeng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Haowei; Xue, Song; Tian, Jing

    2017-04-11

    With the fast development of microalgal biofuel researches, the proteomics studies of microalgae increased quickly. A filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method is widely used proteomics sample preparation method since 2009. Here, a method of microalgae proteomics analysis based on modified filter-aided sample preparation (mFASP) was described to meet the characteristics of microalgae cells and eliminate the error caused by over-alkylation. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model, the prepared sample was tested by standard LC-MS/MS and compared with the previous reports. The results showed mFASP is suitable for most of occasions of microalgae proteomics studies.

  15. Continuous standalone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2012-08-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry highly charged cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm) with minimum losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was > 94% during these five months.

  16. Continuous stand-alone controllable aerosol/cloud droplet dryer for atmospheric sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogren, S.; Frank, G. P.; Berghof, M. I. A.; Martinsson, B. G.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a general-purpose dryer designed for continuous sampling of atmospheric aerosol, where a specified relative humidity (RH) of the sample flow (lower than the atmospheric humidity) is required. It is often prescribed to measure the properties of dried aerosol, for instance for monitoring networks. The specific purpose of our dryer is to dry cloud droplets (maximum diameter approximately 25 μm, highly charged, up to 5 × 102 charges). One criterion is to minimise losses from the droplet size distribution entering the dryer as well as on the residual dry particle size distribution exiting the dryer. This is achieved by using a straight vertical downwards path from the aerosol inlet mounted above the dryer, and removing humidity to a dry, closed loop airflow on the other side of a semi-permeable GORE-TEX membrane (total area 0.134 m2). The water vapour transfer coefficient, k, was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 kg m-2 s-1% RH-1 in the laboratory (temperature 294 K) and is used for design purposes. A net water vapour transfer rate of up to 1.2 × 10-6 kg s-1 was achieved in the field. This corresponds to drying a 5.7 L min-1 (0.35 m3 h-1) aerosol sample flow from 100% RH to 27% RH at 293 K (with a drying air total flow of 8.7 L min-1). The system was used outdoors from 9 May until 20 October 2010, on the mountain Brocken (51.80° N, 10.67° E, 1142 m a.s.l.) in the Harz region in central Germany. Sample air relative humidity of less than 30% was obtained 72% of the time period. The total availability of the measurement system was >94% during these five months.

  17. Particle filtering with path sampling and an application to a bimodal ocean current model

    SciTech Connect

    Weare, Jonathan

    2009-07-01

    This paper introduces a recursive particle filtering algorithm designed to filter high dimensional systems with complicated non-linear and non-Gaussian effects. The method incorporates a parallel marginalization (PMMC) step in conjunction with the hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) scheme to improve samples generated by standard particle filters. Parallel marginalization is an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) strategy that uses lower dimensional approximate marginal distributions of the target distribution to accelerate equilibration. As a validation the algorithm is tested on a 2516 dimensional, bimodal, stochastic model motivated by the Kuroshio current that runs along the Japanese coast. The results of this test indicate that the method is an attractive alternative for problems that require the generality of a particle filter but have been inaccessible due to the limitations of standard particle filtering strategies.

  18. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2009-01-23

    An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha and beta activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha and beta sources, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations. Use of the current algorithm is therefore not recommended for assay applications and so use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha and beta activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 dpm level.

  19. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples in an Urban Area in Upstate NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadareski, Benjamin; Ali, Salina; Yoskowitz, Josh; Vineyard, Michael; Labrake, Scott

    2014-09-01

    Extremely fine particles (PM2.5) are found to penetrate deep into the lungs and hence, are found to have harmful health effects on humans. Atmospheric aerosol samples collected in Schenectady, NY were analyzed for evidence for air pollution; specifically lead pollution over the past 12 months. Air samples were collected on 7 μm Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic size. A 2.2 MeV proton beam impacts the target samples. X-ray intensity versus energy spectra was produced using an Amptek silicon drift detector. Proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to analyze the energy spectra and we determined a range of 16 elements present in the aerosol samples including, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, and Pb. The elemental composition and concentrations of these elements were determined using GUPIX. Many of the elements suggest airborne soils, however we see trace amounts of lead concentrations only at the minimal level of detection around 1 ng / m3. Preliminary results suggest that lead pollution is not significant however; we believe that the trace amounts of lead detected are due to fuel emissions from small aircraft due to the sampling site near an airport. Extremely fine particles (PM2.5) are found to penetrate deep into the lungs and hence, are found to have harmful health effects on humans. Atmospheric aerosol samples collected in Schenectady, NY were analyzed for evidence for air pollution; specifically lead pollution over the past 12 months. Air samples were collected on 7 μm Kapton foils using a nine-stage cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic size. A 2.2 MeV proton beam impacts the target samples. X-ray intensity versus energy spectra was produced using an Amptek silicon drift detector. Proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to analyze the energy spectra and we determined a range of 16 elements present in

  20. Fault Isolation Filter for Networked Control System with Event-Triggered Sampling Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanbin; Sauter, Dominique; Xu, Bugong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the sensor data is transmitted only when the absolute value of difference between the current sensor value and the previously transmitted one is greater than the given threshold value. Based on this send-on-delta scheme which is one of the event-triggered sampling strategies, a modified fault isolation filter for a discrete-time networked control system with multiple faults is then implemented by a particular form of the Kalman filter. The proposed fault isolation filter improves the resource utilization with graceful fault estimation performance degradation. An illustrative example is given to show the efficiency of the proposed method. PMID:22346590

  1. Fault isolation filter for networked control system with event-triggered sampling scheme.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanbin; Sauter, Dominique; Xu, Bugong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the sensor data is transmitted only when the absolute value of difference between the current sensor value and the previously transmitted one is greater than the given threshold value. Based on this send-on-delta scheme which is one of the event-triggered sampling strategies, a modified fault isolation filter for a discrete-time networked control system with multiple faults is then implemented by a particular form of the Kalman filter. The proposed fault isolation filter improves the resource utilization with graceful fault estimation performance degradation. An illustrative example is given to show the efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Submicronic Aerosol Particles Sampled at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (CLACE-4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobéty, B.; Lorenzo, R.

    2007-05-01

    Submicronic aerosol particles were collected in two sampling campaigns during CLACE-4 and -5 ("the Cloud and Aerosol Characterisation Experiment in the Free Troposphere") at the high alpine research station on top of Jungfraujoch (altitude: 3580 m.a.s.l.). The particles were deposited directly on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids placed in a home-made, calibrated thermophoretic sampling device. The samples were taken during periods of clear skies and temperatures below 0°C. Average sampling time was two days. The primary state of the particles was either solid, mixed solid-liquid or completely liquid. EDS spectra of solid particles without visible traces of a liquid coating contain only carbon and oxygen peaks. Mixed solid-fluid particles, however, have either carbon (C), mixed carbon-silicate (CS) or silicate (S) (probably SiO2) nuclei. The condensates remaining after evaporation of the liquid components contain sulfate (sulfur and oxygen peaks in EDS spectra), but no nitrate was found. The fraction > 500 nm is dominated by C and CS particles, the silicate particles have a narrow size distribution around 100 nm and contain, if at all, only faint sulfur peaks in their EDS spectra. The results are qualitatively consistent with analyses of samples collected during the same campaign (Weinbruch et al., 2005), but during mixed cloud events. There seem to be, however a differrence in the amount of particles with sulfate coatings, which is higher for samples taken under clear sky conditions. Weinbruch, S., Ebert, S., Worringen, A., and Brenker (2005), Identification of the ice forming fraction of the atmospheric aerosol in mixed-phase clouds by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Activity report 2005, International Foundation HFSJG.

  3. Improved measurement of carbonaceous aerosol: evaluation of the sampling artifacts and inter-comparison of the thermal-optical analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K. B.; Duan, F. K.; Zheng, M.; Ma, Y. L.; Tan, J. H.; Du, Z. Y.

    2010-09-01

    The sampling artifacts (both positive and negative) and the influence of thermal-optical methods (both charring correction method and the peak inert mode temperature) on the split of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were evaluated in Beijing. The positive sampling artifact constituted 10% and 23% of OC concentration determined by the bare quartz filter during winter and summer, respectively. For summer samples, the adsorbed gaseous organics were found to continuously evolve off the filter during the whole inert mode when analyzed by the IMPROVE-A temperature protocol. This may be due to the oxidation of the adsorbed organics during sampling (reaction artifact) which would increase their thermal stability. The backup quartz approach was evaluated by a denuder-based method for assessing the positive artifact. The quartz-quartz (QBQ) in series method was demonstrated to be reliable, since all of the OC collected by QBQ was from originally gaseous organics. Negative artifact that could be adsorbed by quartz filter was negligible. When the activated carbon impregnated glass fiber (CIG) filter was used as the denuded backup filter, the denuder efficiency for removing gaseous organics that could be adsorbed by the CIG filter was only about 30%. EC values were found to differ by a factor of about two depending on the charring correction method. Influence of the peak inert mode temperature was evaluated based on the summer samples. The EC value was found to continuously decrease with the peak inert mode temperature. Premature evolution of light absorbing carbon began when the peak inert mode temperature was increased from 580 to 650 °C; when further increased to 800 °C, the OC and EC split frequently occurred in the He mode, and the last OC peak was characterized by the overlapping of two separate peaks. The discrepancy between EC values defined by different temperature protocols was larger for Beijing carbonaceous aerosol compared with North America and

  4. Assessment of the Performance of Iodine-Treated Biocidal Filters and Characterization of Virus Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    presumably due to the increased area of air/water interface. Aggregation results in a shielding effect and inert constituents yield an encasement effect ...protective effect of RH was observed. 1 ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF IODINE-TREATED BIOCIDAL FILTERS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRUS...electrets filter minimizes reaeroslization but also makes it difficult to discriminate the antimicrobial effect at the surface. The distribution of

  5. Filter paper saturated by urine sample in metabolic disorders detection by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Blasco, Hélène; Garrigue, Marie-Ange; De Vos, Aymeric; Antar, Catherine; Labarthe, François; Maillot, François; Andres, Christian R; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie

    2010-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy of urine samples is able to diagnose many inborn errors of metabolism (IEM). However, urinary metabolites have a poor stability, requiring special care for routine analysis (storage of urine at -20 or -80 degrees C, fast transport). The aim of our study was to investigate the reliability of dried urine filter paper for urine storage and transport and to evaluate the ability of NMR to detect several IEM using this method. Urine samples from five healthy subjects were analyzed by (1)H NMR following different storage conditions (-20 vs 4 degrees C vs dried on filter paper) and at different time points (24 h, 48 h, 96 h, and 7 days). Urine pattern of fresh urine was considered as a reference. We analyzed the conservation of some amino acids and organic acids using Bland and Altman plot with intraclass correlation coefficient determination. Then, we evaluated the use of filter paper to detect four different IEM (methylmalonic and isovaleric acidurias, ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, and cystinuria). Analysis of urine samples from healthy subjects revealed a high stability of studied molecules (ICC > 0.8) even after 7 days of storage on filter paper. Moreover, an excellent preservation of metabolites specifically accumulated in IEM was observed when analysis of dried urine filter paper was compared to fresh urine (coefficient of variation < 15%). This preliminary study demonstrates that storage of dried urine on filter paper is reliable for (1)H NMR spectroscopy analysis. Preservation of urine molecules over time using that method is convenient for routine clinical practice.

  6. Effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on ultrafine aerosol particles clogging in nanofiber based filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambaer, Wannes; Zatloukal, Martin; Kimmer, Dusan

    2013-04-01

    Realistic SEM image based 3D filter model considering transition/free molecular flow regime, Brownian diffusion, aerodynamic slip, particle-fiber and particle-particle interactions together with a novel Euclidian distance map based methodology for the pressure drop calculation has been utilized for a polyurethane nanofiber based filter prepared via electrospinning process in order to more deeply understand the effect of particle-fiber friction coefficient on filter clogging and basic filter characteristics. Based on the performed theoretical analysis, it has been revealed that the increase in the fiber-particle friction coefficient causes, firstly, more weaker particle penetration in the filter, creation of dense top layers and generation of higher pressure drop (surface filtration) in comparison with lower particle-fiber friction coefficient filter for which deeper particle penetration takes place (depth filtration), secondly, higher filtration efficiency, thirdly, higher quality factor and finally, higher quality factor sensitivity to the increased collected particle mass. Moreover, it has been revealed that even if the particle-fiber friction coefficient is different, the cake morphology is very similar.

  7. Laboratory studies on the retention of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and ammonia on aerosol filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keck, Lothar; Wittmaack, Klaus

    Retention efficiencies of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and ammonia were measured for different filters, with particular emphasis on cellulose (CE) and cellulose acetate-nitrate (CA) materials. Gases were produced either by nebulising aqueous solutions or by a novel technique based on the desorption from ammonium salts deposited on quartz fibre (QF) filters. Efficiencies for pure acidic gases and ammonia on CE and CA ranged from very low (⩽3.6%) to low (˜10% for HNO 3 on CE). In contrast, if acidic gases and ammonia were supplied in equimolar concentrations, they were retained (almost) completely on CE, with high efficiency on CA (60-80% for NH 3+HNO 3; 20-45% for NH 3+HCl), also with high efficiency on glass fibre filter, but with very low efficiency on QF and Teflon (Tf) filters (<1%). For CA, retention efficiencies were found to increase with increasing relative humidity and to decrease with decreasing mean pressure at which the filters were exposed to the gases. Once retained on CA filters, the retained gases may be lost again during subsequent exposure to clean air.

  8. Laboratory and Field Characterizations of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) Collector Module for a Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Vogel, A.; Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jayne, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) collector module is an add-on for Chemical Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CI-TOFMS) instruments. The FIGAERO enables simultaneous real-time chemical analysis of trace gases and particles in ambient air. The collector module described here is modelled after the University of Washington (UW) design of Lopez-Hilfikeret al., 2014. The collector module mounts directly to the front of the CI-TOFMS ion molecule reactor, replacing the standard gas phase inlet. Automated operation follows a two-step sequence alternating between gas and particle sampling. Gas and particle flows are sampled through separate inlet lines. Software provides automated control of the ARI FIGAERO and determines which inlet line is sampled into ion molecule reaction region. While in the gas phase measuring position particles are separately collected on a filter. After sufficient particle collection, heated clean nitrogen is passed over the filter to desorb the particles on the filter. The thermally desorbed material is then measured with the CI-TOFMS. Though conceptually similar, the ARI FIGAERO is mechanically different enough from the UW design that it requires its own performance assessment. Presented here is the characterization of the ARI FIGAERO collector module. The FIGAERO performance is assessed by using laboratory, chamber, and field data collected using iodide as the reagent ion to examine detection sensitivity, quantification limits, and time response. Lopez-Hilfiker et al., "A novel method for online analysis of gas and particle composition: description and evaluation of a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO)", Atmos. Meas. Tech., 7, 983-1001 (2014)

  9. Lined sampling vessel including a filter to separate solids from liquids on exit

    DOEpatents

    Shurtliff, Rodney M.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.

    2001-01-01

    A filtering apparatus has an open canister with an inlet port. A canister lid is provided which includes an outlet port for the passage of fluids from the canister. Liners are also provided which are shaped to fit the interiors of the canister and the lid, with at least the canister liner preferably being flexible. The sample to be filtered is positioned inside the canister liner, with the lid and lid liner being put in place thereafter. A filter element is located between the sample and the outlet port. Seals are formed between the canister liner and lid liner, and around the outlet port to prevent fluid leakage. A pressure differential is created between the canister and the canister liner so that the fluid in the sample is ejected from the outlet port and the canister liner collapses around the retained solids.

  10. Solid versus liquid particle sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers when facing the wind.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Anthony, T Renee; Van Dyke, Michael; Volckens, John

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the facing-the-wind sampling efficiency of three personal aerosol samplers as a function of particle phase (solid versus liquid). Samplers examined were the IOM, Button, and a prototype personal high-flow inhalable sampler head (PHISH). The prototype PHISH was designed to interface with the 37-mm closed-face cassette and provide an inhalable sample at 10 l min(-1) of flow. Increased flow rate increases the amount of mass collected during a typical work shift and helps to ensure that limits of detection are met, particularly for well-controlled but highly toxic species. Two PHISH prototypes were tested: one with a screened inlet and one with a single-pore open-face inlet. Personal aerosol samplers were tested on a bluff-body disc that was rotated along the facing-the-wind axis to reduce spatiotemporal variability associated with sampling supermicron aerosol in low-velocity wind tunnels. When compared to published data for facing-wind aspiration efficiency for a mouth-breathing mannequin, the IOM oversampled relative to mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency for all sizes and particle types (solid and liquid). The sampling efficiency of the Button sampler was closer to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency than the IOM for solid particles, but the screened inlet removed most liquid particles, resulting in a large underestimation compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. The open-face PHISH results showed overestimation for solid particles and underestimation for liquid particles when compared to the mannequin facing-the-wind aspiration efficiency. Substantial (and statistically significant) differences in sampling efficiency were observed between liquid and solid particles, particularly for the Button and screened-PHISH, with a majority of aerosol mass depositing on the screened inlets of these samplers. Our results suggest that large droplets have low penetration efficiencies

  11. Urban air quality assessment using monitoring data of fractionized aerosol samples, chemometrics and meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Galina I; Tsitouridou, Roxani; Tsakovski, Stefan L; Simeonov, Vasil D

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with assessment of urban air by using monitoring data for 10 different aerosol fractions (0.015-16 μm) collected at a typical urban site in City of Thessaloniki, Greece. The data set was subject to multivariate statistical analysis (cluster analysis and principal components analysis) and, additionally, to HYSPLIT back trajectory modeling in order to assess in a better way the impact of the weather conditions on the pollution sources identified. A specific element of the study is the effort to clarify the role of outliers in the data set. The reason for the appearance of outliers is strongly related to the atmospheric condition on the particular sampling days leading to enhanced concentration of pollutants (secondary emissions, sea sprays, road and soil dust, combustion processes) especially for ultra fine and coarse particles. It is also shown that three major sources affect the urban air quality of the location studied-sea sprays, mineral dust and anthropogenic influences (agricultural activity, combustion processes, and industrial sources). The level of impact is related to certain extent to the aerosol fraction size. The assessment of the meteorological conditions leads to defining of four downwind patterns affecting the air quality (Pelagic, Western and Central Europe, Eastern and Northeastern Europe and Africa and Southern Europe). Thus, the present study offers a complete urban air assessment taking into account the weather conditions, pollution sources and aerosol fractioning.

  12. X-ray analysis of aerosol samples from a therapeutic cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alföldy, B.; Török, Sz.; Kocsonya, A.; Szőkefalvi-Nagy, Z.; Balla, Md. I.

    2001-04-01

    Cave therapy is an efficient therapeutic method to cure asthma, the exact healing effect, however, is not clarified, yet. This study is motivated by the basic assumption that aerosols do play the key role in the cave therapy. This study is based on measurements of single aerosol particles originating from a therapeutic cave of Budapest, Hungary (Szemlőhegyi cave). Aerosol particles have been collected in the regions arranged for the therapeutic treatment. Samples were further analysed for chemical and morphological aspects, determining the particle size distribution and classifying them according to elemental composition. Three particle classes have been detected based on major element concentration: alumino-silicate, quartz and calcium carbonate. Calcium ions have well-known physiological influence: anti-spastic, anti-inflammation and excretion reducing effects. Inflammation, accompanying spasm and extreme excretion production cause the smothering stigma, the so-called asthma. Therefore it could be assumed that calcium ions present in high concentration in the cave's atmosphere is the major cause of the healing effect.

  13. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1 h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5–10 μg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m3. The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. PMID:19879288

  14. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction.

  15. Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particles in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere: Microanalysis of Aerosol Impactor Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.

    1999-01-01

    Herein is reported activities to support the characterization of the aerosol in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) collected during the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) missions in 1994. Through a companion proposal, another group was to measure the size distribution of aerosols in the 0.008 to 2 micrometer diameter range and to collect for us impactor samples of particles larger than about 0.02 gm. In the first year, we conducted laboratory studies related to particulate deposition patterns on our collection substrates, and have performed the analysis of many ASHOE/MAESA aerosol samples from 1994 using analytical electron microscopy (AEM). We have been building an "aerosol climatology" with these data that documents the types and relative abundances of particles observed at different latitudes and altitudes. The second year (and non-funded extension periods) saw continued analyses of impactor aerosol samples, including more ASHOE/MAESA samples, some northern hemisphere samples from the NASA Stratospheric Photochemistry Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) program for comparison, and a few aerosol samples from the NASA Stratospheric TRacers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) program. A high-resolution field emission microscope was used for the analysis and re-analysis of a number of samples to determine if this instrument was superior in performance to our conventional electron microscope. In addition, some basic laboratory studies were conducted to determine the minimum detectable and analyzable particle size for different types of aerosols. In all, 61 aerosol samples were analyzed, with a total of over 30,000 individual particle analyses. In all analyzed samples, sulfate particles comprised the major aerosol number fraction. It must be stressed that particles composed of more than one species, for example sulfate and organic carbon, were classified

  16. Atmospheric Sampling of Aerosols to Stratospheric Altitudes using High Altitude Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerde, E. A.; Thomas, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide represents a long-lived atmospheric component relevant to global climate change, it is also understood that many additional contributors influence the overall climate of Earth. Among these, short-lived components are more difficult to incorporate into models due to uncertainties in the abundances of these both spatially and temporally. Possibly the most significant of these short-lived components falls under the heading of “black carbon” (BC). There are numerous overlapping definitions of BC, but it is basically carbonaceous in nature and light absorbing. Due to its potential as a climate forcer, an understanding of the BC population in the atmosphere is critical for modeling of radiative forcing. Prior measurements of atmospheric BC generally consist of airplane- and ground-based sampling, typically below 5000 m and restricted in time and space. Given that BC has a residence time on the order of days, short-term variability is easily missed. Further, since the radiative forcing is a result of BC distributed through the entire atmospheric column, aircraft sampling is by definition incomplete. We are in the process of planning a more comprehensive sampling of the atmosphere for BC using high-altitude balloons. Balloon-borne sampling is a highly reliable means to sample air through the entire troposphere and into the lower stratosphere. Our system will incorporate a balloon and a flight train of two modules. One module will house an atmospheric sampler. This sampler will be single-stage (samples all particle sizes together), and will place particles directly on an SEM sample stub for analysis. The nozzle depositing the sample will be offset from the center of the stub, placing the aerosol particles toward the edge. At various altitudes, the stub will be rotated 45 degrees, providing 6-8 sample “cuts” of particle populations through the atmospheric column. The flights will reach approximately 27 km altitude, above which the balloons

  17. The measurement of 129I in ferromanganese crusts and aerosol samples with AMS at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kejun; Jiang, Shan; He, Ming; Lin, Min; Ouyang, Yinggen; Wu, Shaoyong; Xie, Linbo; Liu, Guangshan; Ji, Lihong; Li, Qi; Wang, Shilian

    2015-06-01

    The determination of long-lived nuclide 129I in terrestrial formations has many important applications. The AMS measurement method of 129I has been set up for many years at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). For further exploring the potential applications of 129I, samples of Deep Sea Ferromanganese Crusts (DSFC) and aerosol were analyzed by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The results show that 129I is not only a good tool for dating, but also an ideal nuclide for nuclear safety monitoring. The newest experimental progress and the main results are detailed in this presentation.

  18. A new cascade impactor for aerosol sampling with subsequent PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maenhaut, W.; Hillamo, R.; Mäkelä, T.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Bergin, M. H.; Davidson, C. I.

    1996-04-01

    A small deposit area low pressure impactor (abbreviated to SDI) has been developed and tested. The device has been designed specifically to collect size-fractionated aerosol samples in remote locations for subsequent chemical analysis by PIXE. The SDI is a 12-stage, multinozzle device, but the deposit for each stage remains confined to an area with diameter less than 8 mm. It operates at a flow rate of 11 L/min and accepts the same, 25 mm diameter substrate rings as the PIXE International cascade impactor. The experimental cut-points for stages 12 through 1 are 8.50, 4.08, 2.68, 1.66, 1.06, 0.796, 0.591, 0.343, 0.231, 0.153, 0.086 and 0.045 μm equivalent aerodynamic diameter. The SDI has been tested in (and employed for) size-fractionated aerosol sampling in the Finnish Arctic and at Summit in Greenland. The data show that the SDI gives results very similar to those obtained with the PIXE International impactor, but with detection limits that are much lower. This suggests that the SDI can be used with shorter sampling times or in areas where concentrations are smaller to obtain reliable size distribution data. The results also suggest that data for a greater number of elements can be obtained with the SDI.

  19. Fabrication of a multi-walled carbon nanotube-deposited glass fiber air filter for the enhancement of nano and submicron aerosol particle filtration and additional antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hong; Yoon, Ki Young; Na, Hyungjoo; Kim, Yang Seon; Hwang, Jungho; Kim, Jongbaeg; Yoon, Young Hun

    2011-09-01

    We grew multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a glass fiber air filter using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) after the filter was catalytically activated with a spark discharge. After the CNT deposition, filtration and antibacterial tests were performed with the filters. Potassium chloride (KCl) particles (<1 μm) were used as the test aerosol particles, and their number concentration was measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Antibacterial tests were performed using the colony counting method, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) was used as the test bacteria. The results showed that the CNT deposition increased the filtration efficiency of nano and submicron-sized particles, but did not increase the pressure drop across the filter. When a pristine glass fiber filter that had no CNTs was used, the particle filtration efficiencies at particle sizes under 30 nm and near 500 nm were 48.5% and 46.8%, respectively. However, the efficiencies increased to 64.3% and 60.2%, respectively, when the CNT-deposited filter was used. The reduction in the number of viable cells was determined by counting the colony forming units (CFU) of each test filter after contact with the cells. The pristine glass fiber filter was used as a control, and 83.7% of the E. coli were inactivated on the CNT-deposited filter.

  20. Size selective isocyanate aerosols personal air sampling using porous plastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanh Huynh, Cong; Duc, Trinh Vu

    2009-02-01

    As part of a European project (SMT4-CT96-2137), various European institutions specialized in occupational hygiene (BGIA, HSL, IOM, INRS, IST, Ambiente e Lavoro) have established a program of scientific collaboration to develop one or more prototypes of European personal samplers for the collection of simultaneous three dust fractions: inhalable, thoracic and respirable. These samplers based on existing sampling heads (IOM, GSP and cassettes) use Polyurethane Plastic Foam (PUF) according to their porosity to support sampling and separator size of the particles. In this study, the authors present an original application of size selective personal air sampling using chemical impregnated PUF to perform isocyanate aerosols capturing and derivatizing in industrial spray-painting shops.

  1. Efficiency of Sampling and Analysis of Asbestos Fibers on Filter Media: Implications for Exposure Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    To measure airborne asbestos and other fibers, an air sample must represent the actual number and size of fibers. Typically, mixed cellulose ester (MCE, 0.45 or 0.8 µm pore size) and to a much lesser extent, capillary-pore polycarbonate (PC, 0.4 µm pore size) membrane filters are...

  2. Evaluation of sampling methods for Bacillus spore-contaminated HVAC filters.

    PubMed

    Calfee, M Worth; Rose, Laura J; Tufts, Jenia; Morse, Stephen; Clayton, Matt; Touati, Abderrahmane; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Slone, Christina; McSweeney, Neal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an extraction-based sampling method to two vacuum-based sampling methods (vacuum sock and 37mm cassette filter) with regards to their ability to recover Bacillus atrophaeus spores (surrogate for Bacillus anthracis) from pleated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters that are typically found in commercial and residential buildings. Electrostatic and mechanical HVAC filters were tested, both without and after loading with dust to 50% of their total holding capacity. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA across material types, presence or absence of dust, and sampling device. The extraction method gave higher relative recoveries than the two vacuum methods evaluated (p≤0.001). On average, recoveries obtained by the vacuum methods were about 30% of those achieved by the extraction method. Relative recoveries between the two vacuum methods were not significantly different (p>0.05). Although extraction methods yielded higher recoveries than vacuum methods, either HVAC filter sampling approach may provide a rapid and inexpensive mechanism for understanding the extent of contamination following a wide-area biological release incident.

  3. Evaluation of sampling methods for Bacillus spore-contaminated HVAC filters

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, M. Worth; Rose, Laura J.; Tufts, Jenia; Morse, Stephen; Clayton, Matt; Touati, Abderrahmane; Griffin-Gatchalian, Nicole; Slone, Christina; McSweeney, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare an extraction-based sampling method to two vacuum-based sampling methods (vacuum sock and 37 mm cassette filter) with regards to their ability to recover Bacillus atrophaeus spores (surrogate for Bacillus anthracis) from pleated heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) filters that are typically found in commercial and residential buildings. Electrostatic and mechanical HVAC filters were tested, both without and after loading with dust to 50% of their total holding capacity. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA across material types, presence or absence of dust, and sampling device. The extraction method gave higher relative recoveries than the two vacuum methods evaluated (p ≤ 0.001). On average, recoveries obtained by the vacuum methods were about 30% of those achieved by the extraction method. Relative recoveries between the two vacuum methods were not significantly different (p > 0.05). Although extraction methods yielded higher recoveries than vacuum methods, either HVAC filter sampling approach may provide a rapid and inexpensive mechanism for understanding the extent of contamination following a wide-area biological release incident. PMID:24184312

  4. 40 CFR 1065.590 - PM sampling media (e.g., filters) preconditioning and tare weighing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... medium (e.g., filter) for buoyancy as described in § 1065.690. These buoyancy-corrected values are.... Correct the mass of the substitution weight for buoyancy if the density of the substitution weight is less... is the unused sample's tare weight without correcting for buoyancy. (8) Repeat these...

  5. Classical sampling theorems in the context of multirate and polyphase digital filter bank structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidyanathan, P. P.; Liu, Vincent C.

    1988-09-01

    The recovery of a signal from so-called generalized samples is a problem of designing appropriate linear filters called reconstruction (or synthesis) filters. This relationship is reviewed and explored. Novel theorems for the subsampling of sequences are derived by direct use of the digital-filter-bank framework. These results are related to the theory of perfect reconstruction im maximally decimated digital-filter-bank systems. One of the theorems pertains to the subsampling of a sequence and its first few differences and its subsequent stable reconstruction at finite cost with no error. The reconstruction filters turn out to be multiplierless and of the FIR (finite impulse response) type. These ideas are extended to the case of two-dimensional signals by use of a Kronecker formalism. The subsampling of bandlimited sequences is also considered. A sequence x(n) with a Fourier transform vanishes for absolute value of omega greater than or equal to L pi/M, where L and M are integers with L less than M, can in principle be represented by reducing the data rate by the amount M/L. The digital polyphase framework is used as a convenient tool for the derivation as well as mechanization of the sampling theorems.

  6. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  7. Dry sampling of gas-phase isocyanates and isocyanate aerosols from thermal degradation of polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Riddar, Jakob B; Karlsson, Daniel; Dahlin, Jakob; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a dry sampler, with an impregnated denuder in series with a glass fibre filter, using di-n-butylamine (DBA) for airborne isocyanates (200ml min(-1)) is investigated and compared with an impinger flask with a glass fibre filter in series (1 l min(-1)). An exposure chamber containing 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), and 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in the concentration range of 5-205 μg m(-3) [0.7-33 p.p.b.; relative humidity (RH) 50%], generated by gas- and liquid-phase permeation, was used for the investigation. The precision for the dry sampling for five series with eight samplers were in the range of 2.0-6.1% with an average of 3.8%. During 120-min sampling (n = 4), no breakthrough was observed when analysing samplers in series. Sixty-four exposed samplers were analysed after storage for 0, 7, 14, and 21 days. No breakdown of isocyanate derivatives was observed. Twenty-eight samplers in groups of eight were collecting isocyanates during 0.5-32h. Virtually linear relationships were obtained with regard to sampling time and collected isocyanates with correlation coefficients in the range of 0.998-0.999 with the intercept close to the origin. Pre- or post-exposure to ambient air did not affect the result. Dry sampling (n = 48) with impinger-filter sampling (n = 48) of thermal decomposition product of polyurethane polymers, at RH 20, 40, 60, and 90%, was compared for 11 isocyanate compounds. The ratio between the different isocyanates collected with dry samplers and impinger-filter samplers was in the range of 0.80-1.14 for RH = 20%, 0.8-1.25 for RH = 40%, 0.76-1.4 for RH = 60%, and 0.72-3.7 for RH = 90%. Taking into account experimental errors, it seems clear that isocyanic acid DBA derivatives are found at higher levels in the dry samples compared with impinger-filter samplers at elevated humidity. The dry sampling using DBA as the reagent enables easy and robust sampling without the need of field

  8. Analytical techniques for ambient sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.A.; Graczyk, D.G.; Kumar, R.; Cunningham, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    Work done to further develop the infrared spectroscopic analytical method for the analysis of atmospheric aerosol particles, as well as some exploratory work on a new procedure for determining proton acidity in aerosol samples is described. Earlier work had led to the successful use of infrared (ir) spectrophotometry for the analysis of nitrate, ammonium, and neutral and acidic sulfates in aerosol samples collected by an impactor on a Mylar-film substrate. In this work, a filter-extraction method was developed to prepare filter-collected aerosol samples for ir analysis. A study was made comparing the ir analytical results on filter-collected samples with impactor-collected samples. Also, the infrared analytical technique was compared in field studies with light-scattering techniques for aerosol analysis. A highly sensitive instrument for aerosol analysis using attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) infrared spectroscopy was designed, built, and tested. This instrument provides a measurement sensitivity much greater (by a factor of 6 for SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) than that obtainable using the KBr-pellet method. This instrument collect size- and time-resolved samples and is potentially capable of providing automated, near real-time aerosol analysis. Exploratory work on a novel approach to the determination of proton acidity in filter- or impactor-collected aerosol samples is also described. In this technique, the acidic sample is reacted with an access of a tagged, vapor-phase base. The unreacted base is flushed off and the amount of the tag retained by the sample is a direct measure of the proton acidity of the sample. The base was tagged with Ge, which can be conveniently determined by the x-ray fluorescence technique.

  9. PIXE Analysis of Atmospheric Aerosol Samples Collected in the Adirondack Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoskowitz, Josh; Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Safiq, Alexandrea; Smith, Jeremy; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We have performed an elemental analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples collected at Piseco Lake in Upstate New York using proton induced x-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE). This work is part of a systematic study of airborne pollution in the Adirondack Mountains. Of particular interest is the sulfur content that can contribute to acid rain, a well-documented problem in the Adirondacks. We used a nine-stage cascade impactor to collect the samples and distribute the particulate matter onto Kapton foils by particle size. The PIXE experiments were performed with 2.2-MeV proton beams from the 1.1-MV pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. X-Ray energy spectra were measured with a silicon drift detector and analyzed with GUPIX software to determine the elemental concentrations of the aerosols. A broad range of elements from silicon to zinc were detected with significant sulfur concentrations measured for particulate matter between 0.25 and 0.5 μm in size. The PIXE analysis will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Detection of signals by the digital integrate-and-dump filter with offset sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Hurd, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    The Integrate and Dump Filter (IDF) is used as a matched filter for the detection of signals in additive white Gaussian noise. The performance of the digital integrate and dump filter is evaluated. The case considered is when symbol times are known and the sampling clock is free running at a constant rate, i.e., the sampling clock is not phase locked to the symbol clock. Degradations in the output signal to noise ratio of the digital implementation due to sampling rate, sampling offset, and finite bandwidth, resulting from the anti-aliasing low pass prefilter, are computed and compared with those of the analog counterpart. It is shown that the digital IDF performs within 0.6 dB of the ideal analog IDF whenever the prefilter bandwidth exceeds four times the symbol rate and when sampling is performed at the Nyquist rate. The loss can be reduced to 0.3 dB by doubling the sampling rate, where 0.2 dB loss results from finite bandwidth and 0.1 dB results from the digital IDF.

  11. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  12. Filter-based measurements of UV-vis mass absorption cross sections of organic carbon aerosol from residential biomass combustion: Preliminary findings and sources of uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Apoorva; Pervez, Shamsh; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.

    2016-10-01

    Combustion of solid biomass fuels is a major source of household energy in developing nations. Black (BC) and organic carbon (OC) aerosols are the major PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 μm) pollutants co-emitted during burning of these fuels. While the optical nature of BC is well characterized, very little is known about the properties of light-absorbing OC (LAOC). Here, we report our preliminary findings on the mass-based optical properties of LAOC emitted from the combustion of four commonly used solid biomass fuels - fuel-wood, agricultural residue, dung-cake, and mixed - in traditional Indian cookstoves. As part of a pilot field study conducted in central India, PM2.5 samples were collected on Teflon filters and analyzed for their absorbance spectra in the 300-900 nm wavelengths at 1 nm resolution using a UV-Visible spectrophotometer equipped with an integrating sphere. The mean mass absorption cross-sections (MAC) of the emitted PM2.5 and OC, at 550 nm, were 0.8 and 0.2 m2 g-1, respectively, each with a factor of ~2.3 uncertainty. The mean absorption Ångström exponent (AǺE) values for PM2.5 were 3±1 between 350 and 550 nm, and 1.2±0.1 between 550 and 880 nm. In the 350-550 nm range, OC had an AǺE of 6.3±1.8. The emitted OC mass, which was on average 25 times of the BC mass, contributed over 50% of the aerosol absorbance at wavelengths smaller than 450 nm. The overall OC contribution to visible solar light (300-900 nm) absorption by the emitted particles was 26-45%. Our results highlight the need to comprehensively and accurately address: (i) the climatic impacts of light absorption by OC from cookstove emissions, and (ii) the uncertainties and biases associated with variability in biomass fuel types and combustion conditions, and filter-based measurement artifacts during determination of MAC values.

  13. Porous filtering media comparison through wet and dry sampling of fixed bed gasification products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allesina, G.; Pedrazzi, S.; Montermini, L.; Giorgini, L.; Bortolani, G.; Tartarini, P.

    2014-11-01

    The syngas produced by fixed bed gasifiers contains high quantities of particulate and tars. This issue, together with its high temperature, avoids its direct exploitation without a proper cleaning and cooling process. In fact, when the syngas produced by gasification is used in an Internal Combustion engine (IC), the higher the content of tars and particulate, the higher the risk to damage the engine is. If these compounds are not properly removed, the engine may fail to run. A way to avoid engine fails is to intensify the maintenance schedule, but these stops will reduce the system profitability. From a clean syngas does not only follow higher performance of the generator, but also less pollutants in the atmosphere. When is not possible to work on the gasification reactions, the filter plays the most important role in the engine safeguard process. This work is aimed at developing and comparing different porous filters for biomass gasifiers power plants. A drum filter was developed and tested filling it with different filtering media available on the market. As a starting point, the filter was implemented in a Power Pallet 10 kW gasifier produced by the California-based company "ALL Power Labs". The original filter was replaced with different porous biomasses, such as woodchips and corn cobs. Finally, a synthetic zeolites medium was tested and compared with the biological media previously used. The Tar Sampling Protocol (TSP) and a modified "dry" method using the Silica Gel material were applied to evaluate the tars, particulate and water amount in the syngas after the filtration process. Advantages and disadvantages of every filtering media chosen were reported and discussed.

  14. Testing of an automated online EA-IRMS method for fast and simultaneous carbon content and stable isotope measurement of aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, István; Gyökös, Brigitta; Túri, Marianna; Futó, István; Filep, Ágnes; Hoffer, András; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive atmospheric studies have demonstrated that carbonaceous aerosol is one of the main components of atmospheric particulate matter over Europe. Various methods, considering optical or thermal properties, have been developed for quantification of the accurate amount of both organic and elemental carbon constituents of atmospheric aerosol. The aim of our work was to develop an alternative fast and easy method for determination of the total carbon content of individual aerosol samples collected on prebaked quartz filters whereby the mass and surface concentration becomes simply computable. We applied the conventional "elemental analyzer (EA) coupled online with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS)" technique which is ubiquitously used in mass spectrometry. Using this technique we are able to measure simultaneously the carbon stable isotope ratio of the samples, as well. During the developing process, we compared the EA-IRMS technique with an off-line catalytic combustion method worked out previously at Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies (HEKAL). We tested the combined online total carbon content and stable isotope ratio measurement both on standard materials and real aerosol samples. Regarding the test results the novel method assures, on the one hand, at least 95% of carbon recovery yield in a broad total carbon mass range (between 100 and 3000 ug) and, on the other hand, a good reproducibility of stable isotope measurements with an uncertainty of ± 0.2 per mill. Comparing the total carbon results obtained by the EA-IRMS and the off-line catalytic combustion method we found a very good correlation (R2=0.94) that proves the applicability of both preparation method. Advantages of the novel method are the fast and simplified sample preparation steps and the fully automated, simultaneous carbon stable isotope ratio measurement processes. Furthermore stable isotope ratio results can effectively be applied in the source apportionment

  15. The Brookhaven National Laboratory filter pack system for collection and determination of air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.F.; Klotz, P.J.; Springston, S.R.; Daum, P.H.

    1995-04-01

    A filter pack system for sampling trace constituents in the atmosphere from aircraft and ground-based measurement platforms has been developed. The system simultaneously and quantitatively collects atmospheric aerosol, nitric acid, and sulfur dioxide using three sequential filter stages. The quartz aerosol filter is routinely analyzed for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and hydrogen ions, and specifically for sulfuric acid. The sodium chloride filter is analyzed for nitrate ion (from collected nitric acid), and the carbonate-glycerine filter for sulfate ion (from collected sulfur dioxide). Details of the procedures used for filter preparation, sampling, extraction and analysis are given.

  16. Aerosol Monitoring during Carbon Nanofiber Production: Mobile Direct-Reading Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M. Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H.

    2010-01-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO2 were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 × 106 cm−3, were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m−3, were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control recommendations

  17. Fungal Spore Concentrations and Ergosterol Content in Aerosol Samples in the Caribbean During African Dust Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Figueroa, G.; Bolaños-Rosero, B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Fungal spores are a major component of primary biogenic aerosol particles that are emitted to the atmosphere, are ubiquitous, and play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere, climate, and public health. Every year, during summer months, African dust (AD) particles are transported to the Caribbean region causing an increase in the concentrations of particulate matter in the atmosphere. AD is one of the most important natural sources of mineral particulate matter at the global scale, and many investigations suggest that it has the ability to transport dust-associated biological particles through long distances. The relationship between AD incursions and the concentration of fungal spores in the Caribbean region is poorly understood. In order to investigate the effects of AD incursions on fungal spore's emissions, fungal spore concentrations were monitored using a Burkard spore trap at the tropical montane cloud forest of Pico del Este at El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico. The presence of AD was supported with satellite images of aerosol optical thickness, and with the results from the air masses backward trajectories calculated with the NOAA HYSPLIT model. Basidiospores and Ascospores comprised the major components of the total spore's concentrations, up to a maximum of 98%, during both AD incursions and background days. A considerably decrease in the concentration of fungal spores during AD events was observed. Ergosterol, biomarker for measuring fungal biomass, concentrations were determined in aerosols that were sampled at a marine site, Cabezas de San Juan Nature Reserve, in Fajardo Puerto Rico, and at an urban site, Facundo Bueso building at the University of Puerto Rico. Additional efforts to understand the relationship between the arrival of AD to the Caribbean and a decrease in spore's concentrations are needed in order to investigate changes in local spore's vs the contribution of long-range spores transported within the AD.

  18. Aerosol monitoring during carbon nanofiber production: mobile direct-reading sampling.

    PubMed

    Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Birch, M Eileen; Dunn, Kevin H

    2010-07-01

    Detailed investigations were conducted at a facility that manufactures and processes carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Presented research summarizes the direct-reading monitoring aspects of the study. A mobile aerosol sampling platform, equipped with an aerosol instrument array, was used to characterize emissions at different locations within the facility. Particle number, respirable mass, active surface area, and photoelectric response were monitored with a condensation particle counter (CPC), a photometer, a diffusion charger, and a photoelectric aerosol sensor, respectively. CO and CO(2) were additionally monitored. Combined simultaneous monitoring of these metrics can be utilized to determine source and relative contribution of airborne particles (CNFs and others) within a workplace. Elevated particle number concentrations, up to 1.15 x 10(6) cm(-3), were found within the facility but were not due to CNFs. Ultrafine particle emissions, released during thermal treatment of CNFs, were primarily responsible. In contrast, transient increases in respirable particle mass concentration, with a maximum of 1.1 mg m(-3), were due to CNF release through uncontrolled transfer and bagging. Of the applied metrics, our findings suggest that particle mass was probably the most useful and practical metric for monitoring CNF emissions in this facility. Through chemical means, CNFs may be selectively distinguished from other workplace contaminants (Birch et al., in preparation), and for direct-reading monitoring applications, the photometer was found to provide a reasonable estimate of respirable CNF mass concentration. Particle size distribution measurements were conducted with an electrical low-pressure impactor and a fast particle size spectrometer. Results suggest that the dominant CNF mode by particle number lies between 200 and 250 nm for both aerodynamic and mobility equivalent diameters. Significant emissions of CO were also evident in this facility. Exposure control

  19. Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 High-Volume Filter Sampling: Atmospheric Particulate Matter of an Amazon Tropical City and its Relationship to Population Health Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Machado, C. M.; Santos, Erickson O.; Fernandes, Karenn S.; Neto, J. L.; Souza, Rodrigo A.

    2016-08-01

    Manaus, the capital of the Brazilian state of Amazonas, is developing very rapidly. Its pollution plume contains aerosols from fossil fuel combustion mainly due to vehicular emission, industrial activity, and a thermal power plant. Soil resuspension is probably a secondary source of atmospheric particles. The plume transports from Manaus to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility ARM site at Manacapuru urban pollutants as well as pollutants from pottery factories along the route of the plume. Considering the effects of particulate matter on health, atmospheric particulate matter was evaluated at this site as part of the ARM Facility’s Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) field campaign. Aerosol or particulate matter (PM) is typically defined by size, with the smaller particles having more health impact. Total suspended particulate (TSP) are particles smaller than 100 μm; particles smaller than 2.5 μm are called PM2.5. In this work, the PM2.5 levels were obtained from March to December of 2015, totaling 34 samples and TSP levels from October to December of 2015, totaling 17 samples. Sampling was conducted with PM2.5 and TSP high-volume samplers using quartz filters (Figure 1). Filters were stored during 24 hours in a room with temperature (21,1ºC) and humidity (44,3 %) control, in order to do gravimetric analyses by weighing before and after sampling. This procedure followed the recommendations of the Brazilian Association for Technical Standards local norm (NBR 9547:1997). Mass concentrations of particulate matter were obtained from the ratio between the weighted sample and the volume of air collected. Defining a relationship between particulate matter (PM2.5 and TSP) and respiratory diseases of the local population is an important goal of this project, since no information exists on that topic.

  20. Determination of UV filters and antimicrobial agents in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Cuderman, Petra; Heath, Ester

    2007-02-01

    Although there is increasing concern about residues from personal care products entering the aquatic environment and their potential to accumulate to levels that pose a health threat to humans and wildlife, we still know little about the extent and magnitude of their presence in the aquatic environment. In this study we describe a procedure for isolation, and subsequent determination, of compounds commonly added to personal care products. The compounds of interest include UV filters with the commercial name Eusolex (homosalate, 4-methylbenzylidenecamphor, benzophenone-3, octocrylene, butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate) and two common anti-microbial agents, clorophene and triclosan. Water samples were filtered, acidified, and extracted by use of solid-phase extraction. Extracted compounds were then derivatised before analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. By use of our method we obtained limits of detection of 13-266 ng L(-1) for UV filters, and 10-186 ng L(-1) for triclosan and clorophene. Recoveries were 82-98% for deionised water and 50-98% for natural water (seawater, pool water, lake water, and river water). Samples collected in Slovenia included seventeen recreational waters (seawater, pool water, lake water, and river water; August 2004) and four wastewaters (January 2005). The most abundant UV filter was benzophenone-3 (11-400 ng L(-1)). Of the two anti-microbial agents studied, trace amounts, only, of triclosan were present in the river Kolpa (68 ng L(-1)) and in an hospital effluent (122 ng L(-1)).

  1. Fixation filter, device for the rapid in situ preservation of particulate samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C. D.; Edgcomb, V. P.; Doherty, K. W.; Engstrom, I.; Shanahan, T.; Pachiadaki, M. G.; Molyneaux, S. J.; Honjo, S.

    2015-02-01

    Niskin bottle rosettes have for years been the workhorse technology for collection of water samples used in biological and chemical oceanography. Studies of marine microbiology and biogeochemical cycling that aim to analyze labile organic molecules including messenger RNA, must take into account factors associated with sampling methodology that obscure an accurate picture of in situ activities/processes. With Niskin sampling, the large and often variable times between sample collection and preservation on deck of a ship, and the sometimes significant physico-chemical changes (e.g., changes in pressure, light, temperature, redox state, etc.) that water samples and organisms are exposed to, are likely to introduce artifacts. These concerns are likely more significant when working with phototrophs, deep-sea microbes, and/or organisms inhabiting low-oxygen or anoxic environments. We report here the development of a new technology for the in situ collection and chemical preservation of particulate microbial samples for a variety of downstream analyses depending on preservative choice by the user. The Fixation Filter Unit, version 3 (FF3) permits filtration of water sample through 47 mm diameter filters of the user's choice and upon completion of filtration, chemically preserves the retained sample within 10's of seconds. The stand-alone devices can be adapted to hydrocasting or mooring-based platforms.

  2. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  3. Low-sensitivity H ∞ filter design for linear delta operator systems with sampling time jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiang-Gui; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2012-04-01

    This article is concerned with the problem of designing H ∞ filters for a class of linear discrete-time systems with low-sensitivity to sampling time jitter via delta operator approach. Delta-domain model is used to avoid the inherent numerical ill-condition resulting from the use of the standard shift-domain model at high sampling rates. Based on projection lemma in combination with the descriptor system approach often used to solve problems related to delay, a novel bounded real lemma with three slack variables for delta operator systems is presented. A sensitivity approach based on this novel lemma is proposed to mitigate the effects of sampling time jitter on system performance. Then, the problem of designing a low-sensitivity filter can be reduced to a convex optimisation problem. An important consideration in the design of correlation filters is the optimal trade-off between the standard H ∞ criterion and the sensitivity of the transfer function with respect to sampling time jitter. Finally, a numerical example demonstrating the validity of the proposed design method is given.

  4. Nonuniform air flow in inlets: the effect on filter deposits in the fiber sampling cassette.

    PubMed

    Baron, P A; Chen, C C; Hemenway, D R; O'Shaughnessy, P

    1994-08-01

    Smoke stream studies were combined with a new technique for visualizing a filter deposit from samples used to monitor asbestos or other fibers. Results clearly show the effect of secondary flow vortices within the sampler under anisoaxial sampling conditions. The vortices observed at low wind velocities occur when the inlet axis is situated at angles between 45 degrees and 180 degrees to the motion of the surrounding air. It is demonstrated that the vortices can create a complex nonuniform pattern in the filter deposit, especially when combined with particle settling or electrostatic interactions between the particles and the sampler. Inertial effects also may play a role in the deposit nonuniformity, as well as causing deposition on the cowl surfaces. Changes in the sampler, such as its placement, may reduce these biases. The effects noted are not likely to occur in all sampling situations, but may explain some reports of high variability on asbestos fiber filter samples. The flow patterns observed in this study are applicable to straight, thin-walled inlets. Although only compact particles were used, the air flow patterns and forces involved will have similar effects on fibers of the same aerodynamic diameter.

  5. Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

  6. Gas phase acid, ammonia and aerosol ionic and trace element concentrations at Cape Verde during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) 2007 intensive sampling period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, R.; Pszenny, A. A. P.; Keene, W. C.; Crete, E.; Deegan, B.; Long, M. S.; Maben, J. R.; Young, A. H.

    2013-07-01

    We report mixing ratios of soluble reactive trace gases sampled with mist chambers and the chemical composition of bulk aerosol and volatile inorganic bromine (Brg) sampled with filter packs during the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe) field campaign at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) on São Vicente island in the tropical North Atlantic in May and June 2007. The gas-phase data include HCl, HNO3, HONO, HCOOH, CH3COOH, NH3, and volatile reactive chlorine other than HCl (Cl*). Aerosol samples were analyzed by neutron activation (Na, Al, Cl, V, Mn, and Br) and ion chromatography (SO42-, Cl-, Br-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca2+). Content and quality of the data, which are available under doi:10.5281/zenodo.6956, are presented and discussed.

  7. Recovery efficiency and limit of detection of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne from environmental surface samples.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Paul A; Beard, Jeremy K; Hein, Misty J; Larsen, Lloyd D; Rose, Laura; Schaefer, Frank W; Noble-Wang, Judith; Hodges, Lisa; Lindquist, H D Alan; Deye, Gregory J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2009-07-01

    After the 2001 anthrax incidents, surface sampling techniques for biological agents were found to be inadequately validated, especially at low surface loadings. We aerosolized Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores within a chamber to achieve very low surface loading (ca. 3, 30, and 200 CFU per 100 cm(2)). Steel and carpet coupons seeded in the chamber were sampled with swab (103 cm(2)) or wipe or vacuum (929 cm(2)) surface sampling methods and analyzed at three laboratories. Agar settle plates (60 cm(2)) were the reference for determining recovery efficiency (RE). The minimum estimated surface concentrations to achieve a 95% response rate based on probit regression were 190, 15, and 44 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling steel surfaces and 40, 9.2, and 28 CFU/100 cm(2) for sampling carpet surfaces with swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively; however, these results should be cautiously interpreted because of high observed variability. Mean REs at the highest surface loading were 5.0%, 18%, and 3.7% on steel and 12%, 23%, and 4.7% on carpet for the swab, wipe, and vacuum methods, respectively. Precision (coefficient of variation) was poor at the lower surface concentrations but improved with increasing surface concentration. The best precision was obtained with wipe samples on carpet, achieving 38% at the highest surface concentration. The wipe sampling method detected B. anthracis at lower estimated surface concentrations and had higher RE and better precision than the other methods. These results may guide investigators to more meaningfully conduct environmental sampling, quantify contamination levels, and conduct risk assessment for humans.

  8. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T.; Walker, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) performance was evaluated to determine if CAMs could detect accidental releases of transuranic radioactivity from the underground repository. Anomalous alpha spectra and poor background subtraction were observed and attributed to salt deposits on the CAM sampling filters. Microscopic examination of salt laden sampling filters revealed that aerosol particles were forming dendritic structures on the surface of the sampling filters. Alpha CAM detection efficiency decreased exponentially as salt deposits increased on the sampling filters, suggesting that sampling-filter salt was performing like a fibrous filter rather than a membrane filter. Aerosol particles appeared to penetrate the sampling-filter salt deposits and alpha particle energy was reduced. These findings indicate that alpha CAMs may not be able to detect acute releases of radioactivity, and consequently CAMs are not used as part of the WIPP dynamic confinement system. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. The effect of sampling rate and anti-aliasing filters on high-frequency response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Goulet, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The most commonly used intensity measure in ground-motion prediction equations is the pseudo-absolute response spectral acceleration (PSA), for response periods from 0.01 to 10 s (or frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz). PSAs are often derived from recorded ground motions, and these motions are usually filtered to remove high and low frequencies before the PSAs are computed. In this article we are only concerned with the removal of high frequencies. In modern digital recordings, this filtering corresponds at least to an anti-aliasing filter applied before conversion to digital values. Additional high-cut filtering is sometimes applied both to digital and to analog records to reduce high-frequency noise. Potential errors on the short-period (high-frequency) response spectral values are expected if the true ground motion has significant energy at frequencies above that of the anti-aliasing filter. This is especially important for areas where the instrumental sample rate and the associated anti-aliasing filter corner frequency (above which significant energy in the time series is removed) are low relative to the frequencies contained in the true ground motions. A ground-motion simulation study was conducted to investigate these effects and to develop guidance for defining the usable bandwidth for high-frequency PSA. The primary conclusion is that if the ratio of the maximum Fourier acceleration spectrum (FAS) to the FAS at a frequency fsaa corresponding to the start of the anti-aliasing filter is more than about 10, then PSA for frequencies above fsaa should be little affected by the recording process, because the ground-motion frequencies that control the response spectra will be less than fsaa . A second topic of this article concerns the resampling of the digital acceleration time series to a higher sample rate often used in the computation of short-period PSA. We confirm previous findings that sinc-function interpolation is preferred to the standard practice of using

  10. Activity measurement of gamma-ray emitters in aerosol filters exposed in Lithuania, in March-April 2011.

    PubMed

    Gudelis, A; Gorina, I; Nedveckaitė, T; Kovař, P; Dryak, P; Suran, J

    2013-11-01

    Two aerosol sampling stations in Lithuania were simultaneously used for assessing consequences of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The maximum activity concentrations of (129 m)Te, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were 0.59 ± 0.06, 3.5 ± 0.3, 0.90 ± 0.08, 0.90 ± 0.07 mBq m(-3) at station #1 in Vilnius, and 0.29 ± 0.03, 1.0 ± 0.1, 0.41 ± 0.04, 0.41 ± 0.0 4 mBq m(-3) at station #2 in northeastern part of Lithuania, respectively.

  11. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Corrigan, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550{degrees}C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations.

  12. Theoretical model for the evaporation loss of PM2.5 during filter sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Sih-Fan; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Wu, Yueh-Chuen; Chen, Chung-Fang

    2015-05-01

    The evaporation losses of PM2.5 particles in eight different size ranges corresponding to the 4th-10th stages and after filter of the MOUDI were calculated theoretically and then integrated to obtain the total PM2.5 evaporation loss. Results show that when PM2.5 particles are nearly neutral with pH in the range of 7-8, the evaporated concentrations predicted by the present model agree well with the experimental data with an average absolute difference of 20.2 ± 11.1%. When PM2.5 aerosols are acidic with pH less than 3.5, additional loss of nitrate and chloride can occur due to chemical interactions between collected particles and strong acids which are not considered in the present model. Under pH neutral conditions, the theoretical model was then used to examine the effect of PM2.5 concentration, gas-to-particle ratio, ambient temperature and relative humidity on the extent of evaporation loss. Results show that evaporated PM2.5 concentration increases with increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity, PM2.5 concentration and gas-to-particle ratio.

  13. First Transmitted Hyperspectral Light Measurements and Cloud Properties from Recent Field Campaign Sampling Clouds Under Biomass Burning Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, S.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Flynn, Connor J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe Shenandoah; Pistone, Kristina Marie Myers; Schmidt, Sebastian; Cochrane, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    We present a first view of data collected during a recent field campaign aimed at measuring biomass burning aerosol above clouds from airborne platforms. The NASA ObseRvations of CLouds above Aerosols and their intEractionS (ORACLES) field campaign recently concluded its first deployment sampling clouds and overlying aerosol layer from the airborne platform NASA P3. We present results from the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR), in conjunction with the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFR). During this deployment, 4STAR sampled transmitted solar light either via direct solar beam measurements and scattered light measurements, enabling the measurement of aerosol optical thickness and the retrieval of information on aerosol particles in addition to overlying cloud properties. We focus on the zenith-viewing scattered light measurements, which are used to retrieve cloud optical thickness, effective radius, and thermodynamic phase of clouds under a biomass burning layer. The biomass burning aerosol layer present above the clouds is the cause of potential bias in retrieved cloud optical depth and effective radius from satellites. We contrast the typical reflection based approach used by satellites to the transmission based approach used by 4STAR during ORACLES for retrieving cloud properties. It is suspected that these differing approaches will yield a change in retrieved properties since light transmitted through clouds is sensitive to a different cloud volume than reflected light at cloud top. We offer a preliminary view of the implications of these differences in sampling volumes to the calculation of cloud radiative effects (CRE).

  14. Use of filter paper blood samples for rabies antibody detection in foxes and raccoon dogs.

    PubMed

    Wasniewski, Marine; Barrat, Jacques; Combes, Benoit; Guiot, Anne Laure; Cliquet, Florence

    2014-08-01

    The effectiveness of oral rabies vaccination in wildlife is usually evaluated by the detection of rabies antibodies. However, the assessment of rabies antibodies has several technical difficulties in the field, such as the collection, storage, transport and titration of blood samples, often of poor quality. The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of collecting blood on a filter paper (FP) coupled with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titration of rabies antibodies in raccoon dogs and red foxes. The FP blood sampling method was found highly specific and repeatable in both species. Overall, results obtained with the FP sampling method were highly concordant with the conventional (venipuncture) sampling methods. Blood eluates from FP samples from foxes and raccoon dogs tested using ELISA showed concordance values of 92% and 95%, respectively, with serum samples tested using the seroneutralisation test and values of 95% and 91%, respectively, when the ELISA was used on both types of sample. The use of FP blood sampling coupled with the titration of rabies antibodies by ELISA provides a reliable alternative to conventional blood sampling and serum testing by seroneutralisation. This simple procedure is particularly attractive and cost-effective for assessing the effectiveness of oral rabies vaccination in field conditions.

  15. Environmental DNA sampling protocol - filtering water to capture DNA from aquatic organisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laramie, Matthew B.; Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Strickler, Katherine M.

    2015-09-29

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis is an effective method of determining the presence of aquatic organisms such as fish, amphibians, and other taxa. This publication is meant to guide researchers and managers in the collection, concentration, and preservation of eDNA samples from lentic and lotic systems. A sampling workflow diagram and three sampling protocols are included as well as a list of suggested supplies. Protocols include filter and pump assembly using: (1) a hand-driven vacuum pump, ideal for sample collection in remote sampling locations where no electricity is available and when equipment weight is a primary concern; (2) a peristaltic pump powered by a rechargeable battery-operated driver/drill, suitable for remote sampling locations when weight consideration is less of a concern; (3) a 120-volt alternating current (AC) powered peristaltic pump suitable for any location where 120-volt AC power is accessible, or for roadside sampling locations. Images and detailed descriptions are provided for each step in the sampling and preservation process.

  16. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates.

  17. Urine sample preparation in 96-well filter plates for quantitative clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Suh, Moo-Jin; Sikorski, Patricia; Kwon, Keehwan; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2014-06-03

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ~10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700-900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics.

  18. Urine Sample Preparation in 96-Well Filter Plates for Quantitative Clinical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ∼10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700–900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics. PMID:24797144

  19. Evaluating the use of PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of nuclear canister filters

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Murray E.

    2014-07-18

    This document details the distinction between using PAO (4 cSt polyalphaoelfin) oil instead of DOP (di-octyl phthalate) oil for measuring the aerosol capture of filters. This document is developed to justify the use of PAO rather than DOP for evaluating the performance of filters in the SAVY 4000 and Hagan containers. The design criteria (Anderson et al, 2012) for purchasing SAVY 4000 containers and the Safety Analysis Report for the SAVY 4000 Container Series specified that the filter must “capture greater than 99.97% of 0.45 μm mean diameter dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosol at the rated flow with a DOP concentration of 65±15 micrograms per liter.”This corresponds to a leakage percent of 0.03% (3.0x10-2). The density of DOP oil is 985 kg/m3 and the density of PAO oil is 819 kg/m3. ATI Test Inc measured the mass mean diameter of aerosol distributions produced by a single Laskin type III-A nozzle operating at a 20 psig air pressure as 0.563 μm for DOP oil and 0.549 μm for PAO oil. (See Appendix A.) For both types of oil in this document, the single fiber method calculated the leakage percent to be 4.4x10-5 for DOP oil and 4.7x10-5 for PAO oil. Although the percent error between these two quantities is 7.7%, these calculated leakage percent values are more than two orders of magnitude less than the criterion specified in the SAVY canister SAR. As a point of reference, the photometer used to measure the SAVY canister filter performance cannot resolve values for the leakage percent below 1.0x10-5. Additionally, over a range of particle sizes from 0.01 μm to 3.0 μm, there was less than 4.0x10-5 error between the calculated filter efficiency for the two types of oil at any particular particle size diameter. In conclusion, the difference between using DOP and PAO for testing SAVY canister filters is of inconsequential concern.

  20. Organic Composition of Size-Segregated Aerosols Sampled During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using non-rotating Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, FL, USA. Daily samples were collected 12 m above ground at a flow rate of 30 lpm throughout the month of May 2002. Aluminum foil discs were used to sample aerosol size fractions with aerodynamic cut diameter of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.17 and 0.093 um. Samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Low detection limits were achieved using a HP Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) and large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolution was obtained using a 60 m long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. A quantification method was built for over 90 organic compounds chosen as source markers including straight/iso/anteiso alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed. Also, results will be compared with samples acquired in different environments including the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, GA, USA.

  1. Comparison of Filters for Concentrating Microbial Indicators and Pathogens in Lake Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Brady, Amie M. G.; Huitger, Carrie; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Ip, Hon S.; Ware, Michael W.; Villegas, Eric N.; Gallardo, Vicente; Lindquist, H. D. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial indicators are used to indicate increased health risk from pathogens and to make beach closure and advisory decisions; however, beaches are seldom monitored for the pathogens themselves. Studies of sources and types of pathogens at beaches are needed to improve estimates of swimming-associated health risks. It would be advantageous and cost-effective, especially for studies conducted on a regional scale, to use a method that can simultaneously filter and concentrate all classes of pathogens from the large volumes of water needed to detect pathogens. In seven recovery experiments, stock cultures of viruses and protozoa were seeded into 10-liter lake water samples, and concentrations of naturally occurring bacterial indicators were used to determine recoveries. For the five filtration methods tested, the highest median recoveries were as follows: glass wool for adenovirus (4.7%); NanoCeram for enterovirus (14.5%) and MS2 coliphage (84%); continuous-flow centrifugation (CFC) plus Virocap (CFC+ViroCap) for Escherichia coli (68.3%) and Cryptosporidium (54%); automatic ultrafiltration (UF) for norovirus GII (2.4%); and dead-end UF for Enterococcus faecalis (80.5%), avian influenza virus (0.02%), and Giardia (57%). In evaluating filter performance in terms of both recovery and variability, the automatic UF resulted in the highest recovery while maintaining low variability for all nine microorganisms. The automatic UF was used to demonstrate that filtration can be scaled up to field deployment and the collection of 200-liter lake water samples. PMID:23263948

  2. Comparison of filters for concentrating microbial indicators and pathogens in lake-water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Huitger, Carrie; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Ip, Hon S.; Ware, Michael W.; Villegas, Eric N.; Gallardo, Vincent; Lindquist, H.D. Alan

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial indicators are used to indicate increased health risk from pathogens and to make beach closure and advisory decisions; however, beaches are seldom monitored for the pathogens themselves. Studies of sources and types of pathogens at beaches are needed to improve estimates of swimming-associated health risks. It would be advantageous and cost-effective, especially for studies conducted on a regional scale, to use a method that can simultaneously filter and concentrate all classes of pathogens from the large volumes of water needed to detect pathogens. In seven recovery experiments, stock cultures of viruses and protozoa were seeded into 10-liter lake water samples, and concentrations of naturally occurring bacterial indicators were used to determine recoveries. For the five filtration methods tested, the highest median recoveries were as follows: glass wool for adenovirus (4.7%); NanoCeram for enterovirus (14.5%) and MS2 coliphage (84%); continuous-flow centrifugation (CFC) plus Virocap (CFC+ViroCap) for Escherichia coli (68.3%) and Cryptosporidium (54%); automatic ultrafiltration (UF) for norovirus GII (2.4%); and dead-end UF for Enterococcus faecalis (80.5%), avian influenza virus (0.02%), and Giardia (57%). In evaluating filter performance in terms of both recovery and variability, the automatic UF resulted in the highest recovery while maintaining low variability for all nine microorganisms. The automatic UF was used to demonstrate that filtration can be scaled up to field deployment and the collection of 200-liter lake water samples.

  3. Radiological background levels found on glass fiber filters used for low-level environmental surveillance air sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Althouse, P. E.

    1998-09-16

    Environmental surveillance of low-level radioactive particles in air requires a thorough understanding of low-level techniques and air sample collection media. High-volume air sampling for radioactive particles around Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) employs glass-fiber filters that are analyzed for gross alpha and gross beta activity and for specific isotopes. This study was conducted to determine the activities of radionuclides contained in blank glass-fiber filters. Data from this study provided a partial explanation of differences between current reported concentrations of radionuclides in air and those reported historically when cellulose filters were used in the LLNL monitoring effort.

  4. A post-beamforming 2-D pseudoinverse filter for coarsely sampled ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S

    2009-09-01

    Beamforming artifacts due to coarse discretization of imaging apertures represent a significant barrier against the use of array probes in high-frequency applications. Nyquist sampling of array apertures dictates center-to-center spacing of lambda/2 for elimination of grating lobes in the array pattern. However, this requirement is hard to achieve using current transducer technologies, even at the lower end of high-frequency ultrasonic imaging (in the range 25-35 MHz). In this paper, we present a new design approach for 2-D regularized pseudoinverse (PIO) filters suitable for restoring imaging contrast in systems employing coarsely sampled arrays. The approach is based on a discretized 2-D imaging model for linear arrays assuming scattering from a Cartesian grid in the imaging field of view (FOV). We show that the discretized imaging operator can be represented with a block Toeplitz matrix with the blocks themselves being Toeplitz. With sufficiently large grid size in the axial and lateral directions, it is possible to replace this Toeplitz-block block Toeplitz (TBBT) operator with its circulant-block block circulant (CBBC) equivalent. This leads to a computationally efficient implementation of the regularized pseudoinverse filtering approach using the 2-D fast Fourier transform (FFT). The derivation of the filtering equation is shown in detail and the regularization procedure is fully described. Using FIELD, we present simulation data to show the 2-D point-spread functions (PSFs) for imaging systems employing linear arrays with fine and coarse sampling of the imaging aperture. PSFs are also computed for a coarsely sampled array with different levels of regularization to demonstrate the tradeoff between contrast and spatial resolution. These results demonstrate the well-behaved nature of the PSF with the variation in a single regularization parameter. Specifically, the 6 dB axial and lateral dimensions of the PSF increase gradually with increasing value of the

  5. Model-Based Estimation of Sampling-Caused Uncertainty in Aerosol Remote Sensing for Climate Research Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geogdzhayev, Igor V.; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, Twan

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of sampling frequency on the global monthly mean aerosol optical thickness (AOT), we use 6 years of geographical coordinates of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) L2 aerosol data, daily global aerosol fields generated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model and the chemical transport models Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport, Spectral Radiationtransport Model for Aerosol Species and Transport Model 5, at a spatial resolution between 1.125 deg × 1.125 deg and 2 deg × 3?: the analysis is restricted to 60 deg S-60 deg N geographical latitude. We found that, in general, the MODIS coverage causes an underestimate of the global mean AOT over the ocean. The long-term mean absolute monthly difference between all and dark target (DT) pixels was 0.01-0.02 over the ocean and 0.03-0.09 over the land, depending on the model dataset. Negative DT biases peak during boreal summers, reaching 0.07-0.12 (30-45% of the global long-term mean AOT). Addition of the Deep Blue pixels tempers the seasonal dependence of the DT biases and reduces the mean AOT difference over land by 0.01-0.02. These results provide a quantitative measure of the effect the pixel exclusion due to cloud contamination, ocean sun-glint and land type has on the MODIS estimates of the global monthly mean AOT. We also simulate global monthly mean AOT estimates from measurements provided by pixel-wide along-track instruments such as the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor and the Cloud-Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization. We estimate the probable range of the global AOT standard error for an along-track sensor to be 0.0005-0.0015 (ocean) and 0.0029-0.01 (land) or 0.5-1.2% and 1.1-4% of the corresponding global means. These estimates represent errors due to sampling only and do not include potential retrieval errors. They are smaller than or comparable to the published estimate of 0.01 as being a climatologically significant

  6. ANALYSIS OF VAPORS FROM METHYLENE CHLORIDE EXTRACTS OF NUCLEAR GRADE HEPA FILTER FIBERGLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    FRYE JM; ANASTOS HL; GUTIERREZ FC

    2012-06-07

    While several organic compounds were detected in the vapor samples used in the reenactment of the preparation of mounts from the extracts of nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air filter fiberglass samples, the most significant species present in the samples were methylene chloride, phenol, phenol-d6, and 2-fluorophenol. These species were all known to be present in the extracts, but were expected to have evaporated during the preparation of the mounts, as the mounts appeared to be dry before any vapor was collected. These species were present at the following percentages of their respective occupational exposure limits: methylene chloride, 2%; phenol, 0.4%; and phenol-d6, 0.6%. However, there is no established limit for 2-fluorophenol. Several other compounds were detected at low levels for which, as in the case of 2-fluorophenol, there are no established permissible exposure limits. These compounds include 2-chlorophenol; N-nitroso-1-propanamine; 2-fluoro-1,1{prime}-biphenyl; 1,2-dihydroacenaphthylene; 2,5-cyclohexadiene-1,4-dione,2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl); trimethyl oxirane; n-propylpropanamine; 2-(Propylamino)ethanol; 4-methoxy-1-butene; 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one; and 3,4-dimethylpyridine. Some of these were among those added as surrogates or spike standards as part ofthe Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc. preparation ofthe extract of the HEPA filter media and are indicated as such in the data tables in Section 2, Results; other compounds found were not previously known to be present. The main inorganic species detected (sulfate, sodium, and sulfur) are also consistent with species added in the preparation of the methylene chloride extract of the high-efficiency particulate air sample.

  7. EVALUATION OF COMPUTER-CONTROLLED SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY APPLIED TO AN AMBIENT URBAN AEROSOL SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Concerns about the environmental and public health effects of particulate matter (PM) have stimulated interest in analytical techniques capable of measuring the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles. Computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSE...

  8. The development of point-of-use water filters as sampling devices in bioforensics: extent of microbial sorption and elution.

    PubMed

    Sedillo, Jennifer L; Quintana, Ayshea; Souza, Kathryn; Oshima, Kevin H; Smith, Geoffrey B

    2008-06-01

    The foundational idea for this project is that household faucet-mounted water filters may be used as bioforensic sampling devices to detect the extent of a potential bioagent release in domestic water supplies. An optimized eluent solution was determined experimentally by quantifying recoveries of microorganisms from point-of-use (POU) drinking water filters. The optimized extraction protocol was then used in mock bioagent release experiments to determine the feasibility of POU filters as bioforensic sampling devices. Bacillus atrophaeus spores, Escherichia coli and PP7 virus were exposed to filters and the number of attached organisms was determined by enumerating the unattached organisms on selective agar media. Subsequently, the filters were eluted and the percent of extracted organisms was determined based on the number of attached organisms. Two popular brands of carbon block filters retained 92%-99% of representative virus, spore and vegetative bacteria. In back-flush elutions of single filters, the most efficient eluent was identified as a combination of 1% peptone and 1% Tween-80, and extraction recovered 25.4% (+/-17.5%) of attached E. coli, 20.4% (+/-3.6%) of B. atrophaeus spores, and 9.4% (+/-5.2%) of PP7 virions (+/- standard deviations). In bioagent release studies in which filters were challenged with 100 agents mL(-1), greater than 99% of the spores were retained by the filters, and the percent of attached spores that were recovered ranged from 10.4% at day 0 to 4.3% five days after the release event (averaged from five separate experiments). In contrast, E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium and PP7 virus were rapidly inactivated in the chlorinated tap water, indicating their improbable survival in chlorinated water supplies. It is therefore concluded that household water filters can be used as microbial sampling devices for bioforensic applications in the event of a bioagent release in domestic drinking water supplies.

  9. Air sampling and determination of vapours and aerosols of bitumen and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Human Bitumen Study.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Dietmar; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Höber, Dieter; Emmel, Christoph; Musanke, Uwe; Rühl, Reinhold; Spickenheuer, Anne; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bramer, Rainer; Seidel, Albrecht; Schilling, Bernd; Heinze, Evelyn; Kendzia, Benjamin; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Welge, Peter; Angerer, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2011-06-01

    The chemical complexity of emissions from bitumen applications is a challenge in the assessment of exposure. Personal sampling of vapours and aerosols of bitumen was organized in 320 bitumen-exposed workers and 69 non-exposed construction workers during 2001-2008. Area sampling was conducted at 44 construction sites. Area and personal sampling of vapours and aerosols of bitumen showed similar concentrations between 5 and 10 mg/m(3), while area sampling yielded higher concentrations above the former occupational exposure limit (OEL) of 10 mg/m(3). The median concentration of personal bitumen exposure was 3.46 mg/m(3) (inter-quartile range 1.80-5.90 mg/m(3)). Only few workers were exposed above the former OEL. The specificity of the method measuring C-H stretch vibration is limited. This accounts for a median background level of 0.20 mg/m³ in non-exposed workers which is likely due to ubiquitous aliphatic hydrocarbons. Further, area measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were taken at 25 construction sites. U.S. EPA PAHs were determined with GC/MS, with the result of a median concentration of 2.47 μg/m(3) at 15 mastic asphalt worksites associated with vapours and aerosols of bitumen, with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.45 (95% CI -0.13 to 0.78). PAH exposure at mastic-asphalt works was higher than at reference worksites (median 0.21 μg/m(3)), but about one order of magnitude lower compared to coke-oven works. For a comparison of concentrations of vapours and aerosols of bitumen and PAHs in asphalt works, differences in sampling and analytical methods must to be taken into account.

  10. Comparison of laser ablation and dried solution aerosol as sampling systems in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coedo, A G; Padilla, I; Dorado, M T

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a study designed to determine the possibility of using a dried aerosol solution for calibration in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The relative sensitivities of tested materials mobilized by laser ablation and by aqueous nebulization were established, and the experimentally determined relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) were used in conjunction with aqueous calibration for the analysis of solid steel samples. To such a purpose a set of CRM carbon steel samples (SS-451/1 to SS-460/1) were sampled into an ICP-MS instrument by solution nebulization using a microconcentric nebulizer with membrane desolvating (D-MCN) and by laser ablation (LA). Both systems were applied with the same ICP-MS operating parameters and the analyte signals were compared. The RSF (desolvated aerosol response/ablated solid response) values were close to 1 for the analytes Cr, Ni, Co, V, and W, about 1.3 for Mo, and 1.7 for As, P, and Mn. Complementary tests were carried out using CRM SS-455/1 as a solid standard for one-point calibration, applying LAMTRACE software for data reduction and quantification. The analytical results are in good agreement with the certified values in all cases, showing that the applicability of dried aerosol solutions is a good alternative calibration system for laser ablation sampling.

  11. Bacterial diversity of autotrophic enriched cultures from remote, glacial Antarctic, Alpine and Andean aerosol, snow and soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2009-01-01

    Four different communities and one culture of autotrophic microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas), in a minimal mineral (oligotrophic) media. Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. Phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed sequences belonging to Proteobacteria Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla to be identified. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the marine Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du Midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteriaclone). The only microorganism identified in the Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. Most of the identified microorganisms had been detected previously in cold environments, marine sediments soils and rocks. Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those identified in this work, in environments very distant and very different from each other.

  12. THE NIST-EPA INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT ON MEASUREMENTS AND STANDARDS IN AEROSOL CARBON: SAMPLING REGIONAL PM 2.5 FOR THE CHEMOMETRIC OPTIMIZATION OF THERMAL-OPTICAL ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from the NIST-EPA Interagency Agreement on Measurements and Standards in Aerosol Carbon: Sampling Regional PM2.5 for the Chemometric Optimization of Thermal-Optical Analysis Study will be presented at the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) 24th Annual Confer...

  13. Sampling and conditioning artifacts of PM2.5 in filter-based samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-Nan; Lin, Sih-Fan; Awasthi, Amit; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Wu, Yueh-Chuen; Chen, Chung-Fang

    2014-03-01

    Field studies were conducted at Taiwan National Chiao-Tung University (NCTU) campus to evaluate the evaporation loss of fine particles (PM2.5) collected by the multi-filter PM10-PM2.5 sampler (MFPPS), which was collocated with a dichotomous sampler (Dichot, Andersen, Model SA-241), a WINS PM2.5 sampler (Thermo, Model 2000-FRM), and a tapered element oscillating microbalance with the filter dynamic measurement system (TEOM-FDMS, Thermo, Model 1405-DF). Porous-metal denuder samplers (PDSs) were installed in sampling channels of the MFPPS to measure the concentration of evaporated ion species. Results showed that the evaporation loss in PM2.5 was severe during sampling, accounting for 5.8-36.0% of the corrected PM2.5 concentration and the percentage increased with decreasing loaded particle mass and increasing filtration velocity. During 24-h sampling, the evaporated NH4+, NO3- and Cl- concentrations accounted for 9.5 ± 6.2, 5.4 ± 3.7, and 2.0 ± 1.3% in corrected PM2.5 concentration, respectively, or 46.4 ± 19.2, 66.9 ± 18.5, and 74.4 ± 14.0% in the concentration of each species, respectively. Due to the evaporation loss, PM2.5 concentrations measured by the WINS, Dichot, and MFPPS were lower than those the TEOM-FDMS by 16.6 ± 9.0, 15.2 ± 10.6 and 12.5 ± 8.8%, respectively. When the MFPPS PM2.5 concentrations were corrected for the evaporated loss determined by the PDS, good agreement with those by the TEOM-FDMS was achieved.

  14. Continuous and real-time bioaerosol monitoring by combined aerosol-to-hydrosol sampling and ATP bioluminescence assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Woon; Kim, Hyeong Rae; Hwang, Jungho

    2016-10-19

    We present a methodology for continuous and real-time bioaerosol monitoring wherein an aerosol-to-hydrosol sampler is integrated with a bioluminescence detector. Laboratory test was conducted by supplying an air flow with entrained test bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis) to the inlet of the sampler. High voltage was applied between the discharge electrode and the ground electrode of the sampler to generate air ions by corona discharge. The bacterial aerosols were charged by the air ions and sampled in a flowing liquid containing both a cell lysis buffer and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence reagents. While the liquid was delivered to the bioluminescence detector, sampled bacteria were dissolved by the cell lysis buffer and ATP was extracted. The ATP was reacted with the ATP bioluminescence reagents, causing light to be emitted. When the concentration of bacteria in the aerosols was varied, the ATP bioluminescence signal in relative light units (RLUs) closely tracked the concentration in particles per unit air volume (# cm(-3)), as measured by an aerosol particle sizer. The total response time required for aerosol sampling and ATP bioluminescence detection increased from 30 s to 2 min for decreasing liquid sampling flow rate from 800 to 200 μLPM, respectively. However, lower concentration of S. epidermidis aerosols was able to be detected with lower liquid sampling flow rate (1 RLU corresponded to 6.5 # cm(-3) of S. epidermidis aerosols at 200 μLPM and 25.5 # cm(-3) at 800 μLPM). After obtaining all data sets of concentration of S. epidermidis aerosols and concentration of S. epidermidis particles collected in the flowing liquid, it was found that with our bioluminescence detector, 1 RLU corresponded to 1.8 × 10(5) (±0.2 × 10(5)) # mL(-1) of S. epidermidis in liquid. After the lab-test with S. epidermidis, our bioaerosol monitoring device was located in the lobby of a building. Air sampling was conducted continuously for 90

  15. Method validation using weighted linear regression models for quantification of UV filters in water samples.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Claudia Pereira; Emídio, Elissandro Soares; de Marchi, Mary Rosa Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of a method consisting of solid-phase extraction followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) filters benzophenone-3, ethylhexyl salicylate, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate and octocrylene. The method validation criteria included evaluation of selectivity, analytical curve, trueness, precision, limits of detection and limits of quantification. The non-weighted linear regression model has traditionally been used for calibration, but it is not necessarily the optimal model in all cases. Because the assumption of homoscedasticity was not met for the analytical data in this work, a weighted least squares linear regression was used for the calibration method. The evaluated analytical parameters were satisfactory for the analytes and showed recoveries at four fortification levels between 62% and 107%, with relative standard deviations less than 14%. The detection limits ranged from 7.6 to 24.1 ng L(-1). The proposed method was used to determine the amount of UV filters in water samples from water treatment plants in Araraquara and Jau in São Paulo, Brazil.

  16. Direct-detection Doppler wind measurements with a Cabannes-Mie lidar: b. Impact of aerosol variation on iodine vapor filter methods.

    PubMed

    She, Chiao-Yao; Yue, Jia; Yan, Zhao-Ai; Hair, Johnathan W; Guo, Jin-Jia; Wu, Song-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Shen

    2007-07-10

    Atmospheric line-of-sight (LOS) wind measurement by means of incoherent Cabannes- Mie lidar with three frequency analyzers, two double-edge Fabry-Perot interferometers, one at 1064 nm (IR-FPI) and another at 355 nm (UV-FPI), as well as an iodine vapor filter (IVF) at 532 nm, utilizing either a single absorption edge, single edge (se-IVF), or both absorption edges, double edge (de-IVF), was considered in a companion paper [Appl. Opt. 46, 4434 (2007)], assuming known atmospheric temperature and aerosol mixing ratio, Rb. The effects of temperature and aerosol variations on the uncertainty of LOS wind measurements are investigated and it is found that while the effect of temperature variation is small, the variation in R(b) can cause significant errors in wind measurements with IVF systems. Thus the means to incorporate a credible determination of R(b) into the wind measurement are presented as well as an assessment of the impact on wind measurement uncertainty. Unlike with IVF methods, researchers can take advantage of design flexibility with FPI methods to desensitize either molecular scattering for IR-FPI or aerosol scattering for UV-FPI. The additional wind measurement uncertainty caused by R(b) variation with FPI methods is thus negligible for these configurations. Assuming 100,000 photons from Cabannes scattering, and accounting for the Rb measurement incorporated into the IVF method in this paper, it is found that the lowest wind uncertainty at low wind speeds in aerosol-free air is still with UV-FPI, ~32% lower than with de-IVF. For 0.050.07, the IR-FPI outperforms all other methods. In addition to LOS wind uncertainty comparison under high wind speed conditions, the need of an appropriate and readily available narrowband filter for operating the wind lidar at visible wavelengths under sunlit condition is discussed; with such a filter the degradation of LOS wind measurement attributable to

  17. Direct-detection Doppler wind measurements with a Cabannes Mie lidar: B. Impact of aerosol variation on iodine vapor filter methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Chiao-Yao; Yue, Jia; Yan, Zhao-Ai; Hair, Johnathan W.; Guo, Jin-Jia; Wu, Song-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Shen

    2007-07-01

    Atmospheric line-of-sight (LOS) wind measurement by means of incoherent Cabannes- Mie lidar with three frequency analyzers, two double-edge Fabry-Perot interferometers, one at 1064 nm (IR-FPI) and another at 355 nm (UV-FPI), as well as an iodine vapor filter (IVF) at 532 nm, utilizing either a single absorption edge, single edge (se-IVF), or both absorption edges, double edge (de-IVF), was considered in a companion paper [Appl. Opt. 46, 4434 (2007)], assuming known atmospheric temperature and aerosol mixing ratio, Rb. The effects of temperature and aerosol variations on the uncertainty of LOS wind measurements are investigated and it is found that while the effect of temperature variation is small, the variation in Rb can cause significant errors in wind measurements with IVF systems. Thus the means to incorporate a credible determination of Rb into the wind measurement are presented as well as an assessment of the impact on wind measurement uncertainty. Unlike with IVF methods, researchers can take advantage of design flexibility with FPI methods to desensitize either molecular scattering for IR-FPI or aerosol scattering for UV-FPI. The additional wind measurement uncertainty caused by Rb variation with FPI methods is thus negligible for these configurations. Assuming 100,000 photons from Cabannes scattering, and accounting for the Rb measurement incorporated into the IVF method in this paper, it is found that the lowest wind uncertainty at low wind speeds in aerosol-free air is still with UV-FPI, ˜32% lower than with de-IVF. For 0.050.07, the IR-FPI outperforms all other methods. In addition to LOS wind uncertainty comparison under high wind speed conditions, the need of an appropriate and readily available narrowband filter for operating the wind lidar at visible wavelengths under sunlit condition is discussed; with such a filter the degradation of LOS wind measurement attributable to clear

  18. XANES Speciation of P in Environmental Samples: An Assessment of Filter Media for on-Site Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Eveborn, D.; Gustafsson, J; Hesterberg, D; Hillier, S

    2009-01-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy is a useful technique for characterization of chemical species of phosphorus in complex environmental samples. To develop and evaluate bed filters as sustainable on-site wastewater treatment solutions, our objective in this study was to determine the chemical forms of accumulated phosphorus in a selection of promising filter materials: Filtralite P, Filtra P, Polonite, Absol, blast furnace slag, and wollastonite. Full-scale operational wastewater-treatment systems were sampled and in addition, filter samples collected from laboratory studies provided access to additional media and complementary samples. Phosphorus species were characterized using phosphorus K-edge XANES spectroscopy, complemented by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). No systematic differences could be seen in the results between laboratory- and full-scale samples. All six filter media contained significant amounts of crystalline calcium phosphates. Some samples also contained amorphous calcium phosphate (>60% of total P in Absol). In Filtralite P and blast furnace slag, more than 35% of the accumulated phosphorus was associated with Fe or Al. Both the power and shortcomings of XANES analysis for characterizing P species in these filter media are discussed.

  19. Can car air filters be useful as a sampling medium for air pollution monitoring purposes?

    PubMed

    Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Birgul, Askin; Ratola, Nuno; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Sweetman, Andy J; Jones, Kevin C

    2012-11-01

    Urban air quality and real human exposure to chemical environmental stressors is an issue of high scientific and political interest. In an effort to find innovative and inexpensive means for air quality monitoring, the ability of car engine air filters (CAFs) to act as efficient samplers collecting street level air, to which people are exposed to, was tested. In particular, in the case of taxis, air filters are replaced after regular distances, the itineraries are almost exclusively urban, cruising mode is similar and, thus, knowledge of the air flow can provide with an integrated city air sample. The present pilot study focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the most important category of organic pollutants associated with traffic emissions. Concentrations of ΣPAHs in CAFs ranged between 650 and 2900 μg CAF(-1), with benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene and indeno[123-cd]pyrene being the most abundant PAHs. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) ranged between 110 and 250 μg CAF(-1), accounting regularly for 5-15% of the total carcinogenic PAHs. The CAF PAH loads were used to derive road-level atmospheric PAH concentrations from a standard formula relating to the CAF air flow. Important parameters/assumptions for these estimates are the cruising speed and the exposure duration of each CAF. Based on information obtained from the garage experts, an average 'sampled air volume' of 48,750 m(3) per CAF was estimated, with uncertainty in this calculation estimated to be about a factor of 4 between the two extreme scenarios. Based on this air volume, ΣPAHs ranged between 13 and 56 ng m(-3) and BaP between 2.1 and 5.0 ng m(-3), suggesting that in-traffic BaP concentrations can be many times higher than the limit values set by the UK (0.25 ng m(-3)) and the European Union (1.0 ng m(-3)), or from active sampling stations normally cited on building roof tops or far from city centres. Notwithstanding the limitations of this approach, the very low cost, the continuous

  20. Assessment of the Building 3430 Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2010-04-13

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Pathway Stack . The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20°, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Pathway stack. Therefore, this new system also meets the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliance to the requirements.

  1. Monte Carlo non-local means: random sampling for large-scale image filtering.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stanley H; Zickler, Todd; Lu, Yue M

    2014-08-01

    We propose a randomized version of the nonlocal means (NLM) algorithm for large-scale image filtering. The new algorithm, called Monte Carlo nonlocal means (MCNLM), speeds up the classical NLM by computing a small subset of image patch distances, which are randomly selected according to a designed sampling pattern. We make two contributions. First, we analyze the performance of the MCNLM algorithm and show that, for large images or large external image databases, the random outcomes of MCNLM are tightly concentrated around the deterministic full NLM result. In particular, our error probability bounds show that, at any given sampling ratio, the probability for MCNLM to have a large deviation from the original NLM solution decays exponentially as the size of the image or database grows. Second, we derive explicit formulas for optimal sampling patterns that minimize the error probability bound by exploiting partial knowledge of the pairwise similarity weights. Numerical experiments show that MCNLM is competitive with other state-of-the-art fast NLM algorithms for single-image denoising. When applied to denoising images using an external database containing ten billion patches, MCNLM returns a randomized solution that is within 0.2 dB of the full NLM solution while reducing the runtime by three orders of magnitude.

  2. Independent Evaluation of Air Filter Media from Chornobyl

    SciTech Connect

    MD Hoover; AF Fencl; GJ Vargo

    1999-12-21

    An independent evaluation was performed to assess the morphology, pressure drop characteristics, alpha spectroscopy characteristics, and collection efficiency of an air sampling filter media and two types of aerosol face masks provided from Chernobyl by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The evaluation included characterizing the filter morphology by scqg electron microscopy; measuring the filter pressure drop as a function of air flowrate; evaluating the spectroscopy characteristics of the filter for alpha-emitting radionuclides by sampling ambient radon progeny aerosols in an Eberline Alpha-6A alpha continuous air monitor; determining the particle collection efficiency of the filter media for 0.3 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter monodisperse particles at 1 and 2 cfm; and comparing the apparent construction, durability, and performance similarities of the filter media to other media commonly used for monitoring airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  3. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular Flow—The average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20°. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5% for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air Velocity—The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ≤ 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3

  4. Aerosol sampling: Comparison of two rotating impactors for field droplet sizing and volumetric measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper compares the collection characteristics of a new rotating impactor for ultra fine aerosols (FLB) with the industry standard (Hock). The volume and droplet size distribution collected by the rotating impactors were measured via spectroscopy and microscopy. The rotary impactors were co-lo...

  5. Sampling and analysis plan for ORNL filter press cake waste from the Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, M.H.; Bayne, C.K.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    This document defines the sampling and analytical procedures needed for the initial characterization of the filter press cake waste from the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is anticipated that revisions to this document will occur as operating experience and sample results suggest appropriate changes be made. Application of this document will be controlled through the ORNL Waste Management and Remedial Action Division. The sampling strategy is designed to ensure that the samples collected present an accurate representation of the waste process stream. Using process knowledge and preliminary radiological activity screens, the filter press cake waste is known to contain radionuclides. Chemical characterization under the premise of this sampling and analysis plan will provide information regarding possible treatments and ultimately, disposal of filter press cake waste at an offsite location. The sampling strategy and analyses requested are based on the K-25 waste acceptance criteria and the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements [2, NVO-325, Rev. 1]. The sampling strategy will demonstrate that for the filter press cake waste there is (1) an absence of RCRA and PCBs wastes, (2) an absence of transuranic (TRU) wastes, and (3) a quantifiable amount of radionuclide activity.

  6. Diversity of bacteria producing pigmented colonies in aerosol, snow and soil samples from remote glacial areas (Antarctica, Alps and Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Toril, E.; Amils, R.; Delmas, R. J.; Petit, J.-R.; Komárek, J.; Elster, J.

    2008-04-01

    Four different communities and one culture of pigmented microbial assemblages were obtained by incubation in mineral medium of samples collected from high elevation snow in the Alps (Mt. Blanc area) and the Andes (Nevado Illimani summit, Bolivia), from Antarctic aerosol (French station Dumont d'Urville) and a maritime Antarctic soil (King George Island, South Shetlands, Uruguay Station Artigas). Molecular analysis of more than 200 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that all cultured cells belong to the Bacteria domain. The phylogenetic comparison with the currently available rDNA database allowed the identification of sequences belonging to Proteobacteria (Alpha-, Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria), Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla. The Andes snow culture was the richest in bacterial diversity (eight microorganisms identified) and the maritime Antarctic soil the poorest (only one). Snow samples from Col du midi (Alps) and the Andes shared the highest number of identified microorganisms (Agrobacterium, Limnobacter, Aquiflexus and two uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clones). These two sampling sites also shared four sequences with the Antarctic aerosol sample (Limnobacter, Pseudonocardia and an uncultured Alphaproteobacteria clone). The only microorganism identified in the maritime Antarctica soil (Brevundimonas sp.) was also detected in the Antarctic aerosol. The two snow samples from the Alps only shared one common microorganism. Most of the identified microorganisms have been detected previously in cold environments (Dietzia kujamenisi, Pseudonocardia Antarctica, Hydrogenophaga palleronii and Brebundimonas sp.), marine sediments (Aquiflexus balticus, Pseudomonas pseudoalkaligenes, Pseudomonas sp. and one uncultured Alphaproteobacteria), and soils and rocks (Pseudonocardia sp., Agrobactrium sp., Limnobacter sp. and two uncultured Alphaproteobacetria clones). Air current dispersal is the best model to explain the presence of very specific microorganisms, like those

  7. Can the use of deactivated glass fibre filters eliminate sorption artefacts associated with active air sampling of perfluorooctanoic acid?

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jana H; Berger, Urs; Cousins, Ian T

    2017-05-01

    Experimental work was undertaken to test whether gaseous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) sorbs to glass fibre filters (GFFs) during air sampling, causing an incorrect measure of the gas-particle equilibrium distribution. Furthermore, tests were performed to investigate whether deactivation by siliconisation prevents sorption of gaseous PFOA to filter materials. An apparatus was constructed to closely simulate a high-volume air sampler, although with additional features allowing introduction of gaseous test compounds into an air stream stripped from particles. The set-up enabled investigation of the sorption of gaseous test compounds to filter media, eliminating any contribution from particles. Experiments were performed under ambient outdoor air conditions at environmentally relevant analyte concentrations. The results demonstrate that gaseous PFOA sorbs to GFFs, but that breakthrough of gaseous PFOA on the GFFs occurs at trace-level loadings. This indicates that during high volume air sampling, filters do not quantitatively capture all the PFOA in the sampled air. Experiments with siliconised GFFs showed that this filter pre-treatment reduced the sorption of gaseous PFOA, but that sorption still occurred at environmentally relevant air concentrations. We conclude that deactivation of GFFs does not allow for the separation of gaseous and particle bound perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) during active air sampling. Consequently, the well-recognised theory that PFCAs do not prevail as gaseous species in the atmosphere may be based on biased measurements. Caution should be taken to ensure that this artefact will not bias the conclusions of future field studies.

  8. Study of filtering Ag liquid sample by chitosan biomembrane using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupiasih, Ni Nyoman; Suyanto, Hery; Sumadiyasa, Made; Purwanto, Christine Prita; Purnomo, Rendra Rustam

    2013-09-01

    The capability of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to resolve filtration process of Ag liquid sample by chitosan biomembrane is demonstrated. The biomembrane was prepared by inversion method used to filter Ag liquid using pressurized technique samples which were then analyzed by monitoring the emission corresponding to Ag (I) at wavelength of 328 nm. The experiment was conducted by varying the laser energy i.e. 80, 120, and 160 mJ, where, subsequently, and its effect on the depth-profile from 20 - 200 μm was characterized by LIBS. The results showed that the physical processes of pressurized filtration led a homogeneous Ag in the membrane from the surface to a depth of 200 μm. The optimum condition was obtained at laser energy of 120 mJ. The adsorption occurred only on the surface of the membrane i.e. 20 μm depth, but there was no inclusion. Improvement of the detection performance of adsorption process was done by heating the dripped membrane at 35 °C and was resulting in increase in emission intensity as expected.

  9. Assessment of the Losses Due to Self Absorption by Mass Loading on Radioactive Particulate Air Stack Sample Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brian M.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2011-01-18

    This report discusses the effect of mass loading of a membrane filter on the self absorption of radioactive particles. A relationship between mass loading and percent loss of activity is presented. Sample filters were collected from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) facilities in order to analyze the current self absorption correction factor of 0.85 that is being used for both alpha and beta particles. Over an eighteen month period from February 2009 to July 2010, 116 samples were collected and analyzed from eight different building stacks in an effort coordinated by the Effluent Management group. Eleven unused filters were also randomly chosen to be analyzed in order to determine background radiation. All of these samples were collected and analyzed in order to evaluate the current correction factor being used.

  10. Regional PIXE facility at Chandigarh (India) and Trace Element Analysis of Aerosol and Bio-medical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, I. M.

    2009-03-01

    A regional Proton induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) facility is newly developed using 3 Mev Proton beam from Variable Energy Cyclotron, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India). A new target chamber has been designed to cater for Proton Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) along with PIXE measurements. The HPGe x-ray detector, the Ge (Li) gamma-ray detector and a silicon surface barrier (SSB) detector can be mounted simultaneously in the chamber for this purpose. A remotely controlled stepper motor is provided to move the target wheel holding 12/24 samples at a time. This facility is now routinely used for the detection of trace elements in the aerosol, medical and forensic science samples. The paper presents the analysis of Aerosol samples collected from highly polluted steel city of Mandi Govindgarh in Punjab state and relatively clean city of Jammu in Jammu & Kashmir region. The results from the analysis of these samples show some basic differences in the trace element profile of the two cities. The paper also describes the trace element analysis of fly ash in the vicinity of Ropar Thermal Power plant in Punjab. The scope of this study was to determine the concentration and composition of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) in the vicinity of coal-fired thermal power plants in India. The data taken for the Bio-medical samples are also discussed.

  11. Integrating silicon nanowire field effect transistor, microfluidics and air sampling techniques for real-time monitoring biological aerosols.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangxia; Tan, Miaomiao; Wang, Zhenxing; Yao, Maosheng; Xu, Zhenqiang; Wu, Yan; Wang, Jindong; Guo, Xuefeng; Zhu, Tong

    2011-09-01

    Numerous threats from biological aerosol exposures, such as those from H1N1 influenza, SARS, bird flu, and bioterrorism activities necessitate the development of a real-time bioaerosol sensing system, which however is a long-standing challenge in the field. Here, we developed a real-time monitoring system for airborne influenza H3N2 viruses by integrating electronically addressable silicon nanowire (SiNW) sensor devices, microfluidics and bioaerosol-to-hydrosol air sampling techniques. When airborne influenza H3N2 virus samples were collected and delivered to antibody-modified SiNW devices, discrete nanowire conductance changes were observed within seconds. In contrast, the conductance levels remained relatively unchanged when indoor air or clean air samples were delivered. A 10-fold increase in virus concentration was found to give rise to about 20-30% increase in the sensor response. The selectivity of the sensing device was successfully demonstrated using H1N1 viruses and house dust allergens. From the simulated aerosol release to the detection, we observed a time scale of 1-2 min. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests revealed that higher virus concentrations in the air samples generally corresponded to higher conductance levels in the SiNW devices. In addition, the display of detection data on remote platforms such as cell phone and computer was also successfully demonstrated with a wireless module. The work here is expected to lead to innovative methods for biological aerosol monitoring, and further improvements in each of the integrated elements could extend the system to real world applications.

  12. Assessment of air sampling methods and size distribution of virus-laden aerosols in outbreaks in swine and poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C; Goyal, Sagar; Olson, Bernard A; Alba, Anna; Davies, Peter R; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2017-03-01

    Swine and poultry viruses, such as porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV), are economically important pathogens that can spread via aerosols. The reliability of methods for quantifying particle-associated viruses as well as the size distribution of aerosolized particles bearing these viruses under field conditions are not well documented. We compared the performance of 2 size-differentiating air samplers in disease outbreaks that occurred in swine and poultry facilities. Both air samplers allowed quantification of particles by size, and measured concentrations of PRRSV, PEDV, and HPAIV stratified by particle size both within and outside swine and poultry facilities. All 3 viruses were detectable in association with aerosolized particles. Proportions of positive sampling events were 69% for PEDV, 61% for HPAIV, and 8% for PRRSV. The highest virus concentrations were found with PEDV, followed by HPAIV and PRRSV. Both air collectors performed equally for the detection of total virus concentration. For all 3 viruses, higher numbers of RNA copies were associated with larger particles; however, a bimodal distribution of particles was observed in the case of PEDV and HPAIV.

  13. ACE-Asia: Size Resolved Sampling of Aerosols on the Ronald H Brown and US Western Receptor Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Cruz, M. P.; Cliff, S. S.; Perry, K. D.; Cahill, T. A.; Bates, T. S.

    2001-12-01

    The ACE (Aerosol Characterization Experiment)-Asia project was pre-dominantly performed during the spring of 2001. In addition to the core Asian sampling sites, we sampled at 4 Western US receptor sites. The receptor sites include, Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, Crater Lake Oregon, Adak Island, Alaska and Rattlesnake Mountain, Washington. A small subset of sites (Rattlesnake Mtn., MLO, and Asian sites) continued during a 6-week intensive summer study. For the spring study, an 8-stage DRUM impactor also sampled aboard the NOAA ship RV Ronald H Brown, and mix of 8- and 3-DRUM impactors were used at the western US receptor sites. The impactors are capable of size-segregated, time-resolved aerosol collection. The size categories for the 8-DRUM are inlet-5.00, 5.00-2.50, 2.50-1.15, 1.15-0.75, 0.75-0.56, 0.56-0.34, 0.34-.026, 0.26-.09 microns and 3-DRUM: 2.50-1.10, 1.10-0.34, 0.34-0.12 microns. These samples were analyzed in 6 hour time bites using synchrotron-XRF for quantitative composition for elements sodium through uranium, when present. A major dust event occurring around April 13 was detected at all receptor sites. Comparisons of key elemental ratios and conservative tracers will be presented.

  14. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  15. An Evaluation of Sharp Cut Cyclones for Sampling Diesel Particulate Matter Aerosol in the Presence of Respirable Dust

    PubMed Central

    Cauda, Emanuele; Sheehan, Maura; Gussman, Robert; Kenny, Lee; Volkwein, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Two prototype cyclones were the subjects of a comparative research campaign with a diesel particulate matter sampler (DPMS) that consists of a respirable cyclone combined with a downstream impactor. The DPMS is currently used in mining environments to separate dust from the diesel particulate matter and to avoid interferences in the analysis of integrated samples and direct-reading monitoring in occupational environments. The sampling characteristics of all three devices were compared using ammonium fluorescein, diesel, and coal dust aerosols. With solid spherical test aerosols at low particle loadings, the aerodynamic size-selection characteristics of all three devices were found to be similar, with 50% penetration efficiencies (d50) close to the design value of 0.8 µm, as required by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration for monitoring occupational exposure to diesel particulate matter in US mining operations. The prototype cyclones were shown to have ‘sharp cut’ size-selection characteristics that equaled or exceeded the sharpness of the DPMS. The penetration of diesel aerosols was optimal for all three samplers, while the results of the tests with coal dust induced the exclusion of one of the prototypes from subsequent testing. The sampling characteristics of the remaining prototype sharp cut cyclone (SCC) and the DPMS were tested with different loading of coal dust. While the characteristics of the SCC remained constant, the deposited respirable coal dust particles altered the size-selection performance of the currently used sampler. This study demonstrates that the SCC performed better overall than the DPMS. PMID:25060240

  16. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  17. Radiological results for samples collected on paired glass- and cellulose-fiber filters at the Sandia complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A.; Shadel, Craig A.

    2016-03-01

    Airborne particulates are collected at U.S. Department of Energy sites that exhibit radiological contamination on the soil surface to help assess the potential for wind to transport radionuclides from the contamination sites. Collecting these samples was originally accomplished by drawing air through a cellulose-fiber filter. These filters were replaced with glass-fiber filters in March 2011. Airborne particulates were collected side by side on the two filter materials between May 2013 and May 2014. Comparisons of the sample mass and the radioactivity determinations for the side-by-side samples were undertaken to determine if the change in the filter medium produced significant results. The differences in the results obtained using the two filter types were assessed visually by evaluating the time series and correlation plots and statistically by conducting a nonparametric matched-pair sign test. Generally, the glass-fiber filters collect larger samples of particulates and produce higher radioactivity values for the gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma spectroscopy analyses. However, the correlation between the radioanalytical results for the glass-fiber filters and the cellulose-fiber filters was not strong enough to generate a linear regression function to estimate the glass-fiber filter sample results from the cellulose-fiber filter sample results.

  18. The stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, J.D.; Schroder, L.J.; Morden-Moore, A. L.; Bowersox, V.C.

    1995-01-01

    Separate experiments by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Illinois State Water Survey Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) independently assessed the stability of hydrogen ion and specific conductance in filtered wet-deposition samples stored at ambient temperatures. The USGS experiment represented a test of sample stability under a diverse range of conditions, whereas the CAL experiment was a controlled test of sample stability. In the experiment by the USGS, a statistically significant (?? = 0.05) relation between [H+] and time was found for the composited filtered, natural, wet-deposition solution when all reported values are included in the analysis. However, if two outlying pH values most likely representing measurement error are excluded from the analysis, the change in [H+] over time was not statistically significant. In the experiment by the CAL, randomly selected samples were reanalyzed between July 1984 and February 1991. The original analysis and reanalysis pairs revealed that [H+] differences, although very small, were statistically different from zero, whereas specific-conductance differences were not. Nevertheless, the results of the CAL reanalysis project indicate there appears to be no consistent, chemically significant degradation in sample integrity with regard to [H+] and specific conductance while samples are stored at room temperature at the CAL. Based on the results of the CAL and USGS studies, short-term (45-60 day) stability of [H+] and specific conductance in natural filtered wet-deposition samples that are shipped and stored unchilled at ambient temperatures was satisfactory.

  19. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  20. Composition and major sources of organic compounds of aerosol particulate matter sampled during the ACE-Asia campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Kobayashi, Minoru; Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Lee, Meehye; Lim, Ho-Jin; Turpin, Barbara J.; Komazaki, Yuichi

    2004-10-01

    The organic compound tracers of atmospheric particulate matter, as well as organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), have been characterized for samples acquired during the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) from Gosan, Jeju Island, Korea, from Sapporo, Japan, and from Chichi-jima Island in the western North Pacific, as well as on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration R/V Ronald H. Brown. Total extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine both polar and aliphatic compounds. Total particles, organic matter, and lipid and saccharide compounds were high during the Asian dust episode (early April 2001) compared to levels at other times. The organic matter can be apportioned to seven emission sources and to significant oxidation-producing secondary products during long-range transport. Terrestrial natural background compounds are vascular plant wax lipids derived from direct emission and as part of desert sand dust. Fossil fuel utilization is obvious and derives from petroleum product and coal combustion emissions. Saccharides are a major polar (water-soluble) carbonaceous fraction derived from soil resuspension (agricultural activities). Biomass-burning smoke is evident in all samples and seasons. It contributes up to 13% of the total compound mass as water-soluble constituents. Burning of refuse is another source of organic particles. Varying levels of marine-derived lipids are superimposed during aerosol transport over the ocean. Secondary oxidation products increase with increasing transport distance and time. The ACE-Asia aerosols are composed not only of desert dust but also of soil dust, smoke from biomass and refuse burning, and emissions from fossil fuel use in urban areas.

  1. Aerosols of Mongolian arid area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golobokova, L.; Marinayte, I.; Zhamsueva, G.

    2012-04-01

    Sampling was performed in July-August 2005-2010 at Station Sain Shand (44°54'N, 110°07'E) in the Gobi desert (1000 m a.s.l.), West Mongolia. Aerosol samples were collected with a high volume sampler PM 10 (Andersen Instruments Inc., USA) onto Whatman-41 filters. The substance was extracted from the filters by de-ionized water. The solution was screened through an acetate-cellulose filter with 0.2 micron pore size. Ions of ammonium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as well as sulphate ions, nitrate ions, hydrocarbonate, chloride ions were determined in the filtrate by means of an atomic adsorption spectrometer Carl Zeiss Jena (Germany), a high performance liquid chromatographer «Milichrome A-02» (Russia), and an ionic chromatographer ICS-3000 (Dionex, USA). The PAH fraction was separated from aerosol samples using hexane extraction at room temperature under UV environment. The extract was concentrated to 0.1-0.2 ml and analysed by a mass-spectrometer "Agilent, GC 6890, MSD 5973 Network". Analysis of concentrations of aerosols components, their correlation ratios, and meteorological modeling show that the main factor affecting chemical composition of aerosols is a flow of contaminants transferred by air masses to the sampling area mainly from the south and south-east, as well as wind conditions of the area, dust storms in particular. Sulphate, nitrate, and ammonium are major ions in aerosol particles at Station Sain Shand. Dust-borne aerosol is known to be a sorbent for both mineral and organic admixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) being among superecotoxicants play an important role among resistant organic substances. PAH concentrations were determined in the samples collected in 2010. All aerosol samples contained dominant PAHs with 5-6 benzene rings ( (benze(k)fluoranthen, benze(b)flouranthen, benze(a)pyren, benze(?)pyren, perylene, benze(g,h,i)perylene, and indene(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene). Their total quantity varied between 42 and 90

  2. Viability of bacteria in unused air filter media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maus, R.; Goppelsröder, A.; Umhauer, H.

    Different experimental techniques were applied to determine the effects of different air filter media on the viability of bacteria. Rinse suspensions of unused filter media were employed in standard inhibition tests to determine the effects of filter ingredients on bacterial growth under ideal nutritional conditions. Furthermore, a new test procedure was proposed and validated to determine the survival of viable microorganisms in fibrous air filters as a function of different parameters. Samples of filter media were challenged with microbial aerosols in an experimental set-up designed for measuring the collection efficiencies of fibrous filters. The loaded filter samples were then challenged with clean air under controlled conditions for a definite time span and numbers of viable microorganisms in the filter media were determined as colony forming units. The filter samples were retrieved from unused filter media usually employed in common air conditioning and ventilation systems. Under ideal nutritional and moisture conditions, growth of investigated microorganisms in nutrient broth and on nutrient agar was not inhibited by the inclusion of filter samples or rinse solutions of different filters in the growth medium with one exception. M. luteus and E. coli collected in air filter media and exposed to low air humidity (RH = 30-60%) showed a decline in their viability as a function of time (within 1 h). The decline rate was dependent on the type of bacteria employed and also the filter material itself.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - BHA GROUP, INC. QG061 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - INSPEC FIBRES 5512BRF FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - AIR PURATOR CORPORATION HUYGLAS 1405M FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - MENARDI-CRISWELL 50-504 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  7. Branchfall as a Demographic Filter for Epiphyte Communities: Lessons from Forest Floor-Based Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento Cabral, Juliano; Petter, Gunnar; Mendieta-Leiva, Glenda; Wagner, Katrin; Zotz, Gerhard; Kreft, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Local variation in the abundance and richness of vascular epiphytes is often attributed to environmental characteristics such as substrate and microclimate. Less is known, however, about the impacts of tree and branch turnover on epiphyte communities. To address this issue, we surveyed branches and epiphytes found on the forest floor in 96 transects in two forests (Atlantic rainforest in Brazil and Caribbean rainforest in Panama). In the Brazilian forest, we additionally distinguished between edge and core study sites. We quantified branch abundance, epiphyte abundance, richness and proportion of adults to investigate the trends of these variables over branch diameter. Branches <2 cm in diameter comprised >90% of all branches on the forest floor. Abundance and richness of fallen epiphytes per transect were highest in the Brazilian core transects and lowest in the Panamanian transects. The majority of epiphytes on the floor (c. 65%) were found attached to branches. At all three study sites, branch abundance and branch diameter were negatively correlated, whereas epiphyte abundance and richness per branch, as well as the proportion of adults were positively correlated with branch diameter. The relationship between branch diameter and absolute epiphyte abundance or richness differed between study sites, which might be explained by differences in forest structure and dynamics. In the Panamanian forest, epiphytes had been previously inventoried, allowing an evaluation of our surveying method by comparing canopy and forest floor samplings. Individuals found on the forest floor corresponded to 13% of all individuals on branches <10 cm in diameter (including crowns), with abundance, richness and composition trends on forest floor reflecting canopy trends. We argue that forest floor surveys provide useful floristic and, most notably, demographic information particularly on epiphytes occurring on the thinnest branches, which are least accessible. Here, branchfall acts as an

  8. Branchfall as a Demographic Filter for Epiphyte Communities: Lessons from Forest Floor-Based Sampling.

    PubMed

    Sarmento Cabral, Juliano; Petter, Gunnar; Mendieta-Leiva, Glenda; Wagner, Katrin; Zotz, Gerhard; Kreft, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Local variation in the abundance and richness of vascular epiphytes is often attributed to environmental characteristics such as substrate and microclimate. Less is known, however, about the impacts of tree and branch turnover on epiphyte communities. To address this issue, we surveyed branches and epiphytes found on the forest floor in 96 transects in two forests (Atlantic rainforest in Brazil and Caribbean rainforest in Panama). In the Brazilian forest, we additionally distinguished between edge and core study sites. We quantified branch abundance, epiphyte abundance, richness and proportion of adults to investigate the trends of these variables over branch diameter. Branches <2 cm in diameter comprised >90% of all branches on the forest floor. Abundance and richness of fallen epiphytes per transect were highest in the Brazilian core transects and lowest in the Panamanian transects. The majority of epiphytes on the floor (c. 65%) were found attached to branches. At all three study sites, branch abundance and branch diameter were negatively correlated, whereas epiphyte abundance and richness per branch, as well as the proportion of adults were positively correlated with branch diameter. The relationship between branch diameter and absolute epiphyte abundance or richness differed between study sites, which might be explained by differences in forest structure and dynamics. In the Panamanian forest, epiphytes had been previously inventoried, allowing an evaluation of our surveying method by comparing canopy and forest floor samplings. Individuals found on the forest floor corresponded to 13% of all individuals on branches <10 cm in diameter (including crowns), with abundance, richness and composition trends on forest floor reflecting canopy trends. We argue that forest floor surveys provide useful floristic and, most notably, demographic information particularly on epiphytes occurring on the thinnest branches, which are least accessible. Here, branchfall acts as an

  9. The upgraded external-beam PIXE/PIGE set-up at LABEC for very fast measurements on aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Giannoni, M.; Mochi, D.; Nava, S.; Carraresi, L.

    2014-01-01

    At the 3 MV Tandetron accelerator of the LABEC laboratory of INFN in Florence, an external beam facility is fully dedicated to measurements of elemental composition of atmospheric aerosol. The experimental set-up hitherto used for this kind of applications has been upgraded with the replacement of a traditional Si(Li) detector for the detection of medium-high Z elements with a silicon drift detector (SDD) with a big active area (80 mm2) and 450 μm thickness, with the aim of obtaining better minimum detection limits (MDL) and reduce measuring times. The Upilex extraction window has been replaced by a more resistant one (Si3N4). A comparison between the old Si(Li) and the new SDD for aerosol samples collected on different substrata like Teflon, Kapton and Nuclepore evidenced the better performances of the SDD. It allows obtaining better results (higher counting statistics, lower MDLs) even in shorter measuring times, thus allowing very fast analysis of both daily and hourly samples.

  10. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples.

  11. A review of atmospheric aerosol measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurry, Peter H.

    Recent developments in atmospheric aerosol measurements are reviewed. The topics included complement those covered in the recent review by Chow (JAWMA 45: 320-382, 1995) which focuses on regulatory compliance measurements and filter measurements of particulate composition. This review focuses on measurements of aerosol integral properties (total number concentration, CCN concentration, optical coefficients, etc.), aerosol physical chemical properties (density, refractive index, equilibrium water content, etc.), measurements of aerosol size distributions, and measurements of size-resolved aerosol composition. Such measurements play an essential role in studies of secondary aerosol formation by atmospheric chemical transformations and enable one to quantify the contributions of various species to effects including light scattering/absorption, health effects, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol measurement evolved from an art to a science in the 1970s following the development of instrumentation to generate monodisperse calibration aerosols of known size, composition, and concentration. While such calibration tools permit precise assessments of instrument responses to known laboratory-generated aerosols, unquantifiable uncertainties remain even when carefully calibrated instruments are used for atmospheric measurements. This is because instrument responses typically depend on aerosol properties including composition, shape, density, etc., which, for atmospheric aerosols, may vary from particle-to-particle and are often unknown. More effort needs to be made to quantify measurement accuracies that can be achieved for realistic atmospheric sampling scenarios. The measurement of organic species in atmospheric particles requires substantial development. Atmospheric aerosols typically include hundreds of organic compounds, and only a small fraction (˜10%) of these can be identified by state-of-the-art analytical methodologies. Even the measurement of the total particulate organic

  12. Models of filter-based particle light absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamasha, Khadeejeh M.

    Light absorption by aerosol is very important in the visible, near UN, and near I.R region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Aerosol particles in the atmosphere have a great influence on the flux of solar energy, and also impact health in a negative sense when they are breathed into lungs. Aerosol absorption measurements are usually performed by filter-based methods that are derived from the change in light transmission through a filter where particles have been deposited. These methods suffer from interference between light-absorbing and light-scattering aerosol components. The Aethalometer is the most commonly used filter-based instrument for aerosol light absorption measurement. This dissertation describes new understanding of aerosol light absorption obtained by the filter method. The theory uses a multiple scattering model for the combination of filter and particle optics. The theory is evaluated using Aethalometer data from laboratory and ambient measurements in comparison with photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption. Two models were developed to calculate aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data, and were compared to the in-situ aerosol light absorption coefficients. The first is an approximate model and the second is a "full" model. In the approximate model two extreme cases of aerosol optics were used to develop a model-based calibration scheme for the 7-wavelength Aethalometer. These cases include those of very strong scattering aerosols (Ammonium sulfate sample) and very absorbing aerosols (kerosene soot sample). The exponential behavior of light absorption in the strong multiple scattering limit is shown to be the square root of the total absorption optical depth rather than linear with optical depth as is commonly assumed with Beer's law. 2-stream radiative transfer theory was used to develop the full model to calculate the aerosol light absorption coefficients from the Aethalometer data. This comprehensive model

  13. Investigation into Alternative Sample Preparation Techniques for the Determination of Heavy Metals in Stationary Source Emission Samples Collected on Quartz Filters

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Sharon L.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring stationary source emissions for heavy metals generally requires the use of quartz filters to collect samples because of the high temperature and high moisture sampling environment. The documentary standard method sample preparation technique in Europe, EN 14385, uses digestion in hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid (HF/HNO3) followed by complexing with boric acid (H3BO3) prior to analysis. However, the use of this method presents a number of problems, including significant instrumental drift during analysis caused by the matrix components, often leading to instrument breakdown and downtime for repairs, as well as posing significant health and safety risks. The aim of this work was to develop an alternative sample preparation technique for emissions samples on quartz filters. The alternative techniques considered were: (i) acid digestion in a fluoroboric acid (HBF4) and HNO3 mixture and (ii) acid extraction in an aqua regia (AR) mixture (HCl and HNO3). Assessment of the effectiveness of these options included determination of interferences and signal drift, as well as validating the different methods by measurement of matrix certified reference materials (CRMs), and comparing the results obtained from real test samples and sample blanks to determine limits of detection. The results showed that the HBF4/HNO3 mixture provides the most viable alternative to the documentary standard preparation technique. PMID:25407906

  14. ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF LOW VOLUME RESIDENTIAL SAMPLES FOR SOURCE APPORTIONMENT IN THE DETROIT EXPOSURE AND AEROSOL RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results for organic speciation analysis for Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on Se...

  15. Characterization of Aerosols Containing Microcystin

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Irvin, C. Mitch; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2007-01-01

    Toxic blooms of cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in both freshwater and brackish water sources throughout the world. One class of cyanobacterial toxins, called microcystins, is cyclic peptides. In addition to ingestion and dermal, inhalation is a likely route of human exposure. A significant increase in reporting of minor symptoms, particularly respiratory symptoms was associated with exposure to higher levels of cyanobacteria during recreational activities. Algae cells, bacteria, and waterborne toxins can be aerosolized by a bubble-bursting process with a wind-driven white-capped wave mechanism. The purposes of this study were to: evaluate sampling and analysis techniques for microcystin aerosol, produce aerosol droplets containing microcystin in the laboratory, and deploy the sampling instruments in field studies. A high-volume impactor and an IOM filter sampler were tried first in the laboratory to collect droplets containing microcystins. Samples were extracted and analyzed for microcystin using an ELISA method. The laboratory study showed that cyanotoxins in water could be transferred to air via a bubble-bursting process. The droplets containing microcystins showed a bimodal size distribution with the mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 1.4 and 27.8 μm. The sampling and analysis methods were successfully used in a pilot field study to measure microcystin aerosol in situ. PMID:18463733

  16. Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), a study was initiated to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this experimental study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. The aerosol sampling system designed for these tests consisted of filter cassettes, cascade impactors, a five-stage cyclone, and a moving filter. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. The aerosol samples were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and in vitro solubility. These data will provide input for use in future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of DU aerosols.

  17. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction.

  18. The room temperature preservation of filtered environmental DNA samples and assimilation into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol DNA extraction

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Mark A; Olds, Brett P; Jerde, Christopher L; McVeigh, Margaret M; Lodge, David M

    2015-01-01

    Current research targeting filtered macrobial environmental DNA (eDNA) often relies upon cold ambient temperatures at various stages, including the transport of water samples from the field to the laboratory and the storage of water and/or filtered samples in the laboratory. This poses practical limitations for field collections in locations where refrigeration and frozen storage is difficult or where samples must be transported long distances for further processing and screening. This study demonstrates the successful preservation of eDNA at room temperature (20 °C) in two lysis buffers, CTAB and Longmire's, over a 2-week period of time. Moreover, the preserved eDNA samples were seamlessly integrated into a phenol–chloroform–isoamyl alcohol (PCI) DNA extraction protocol. The successful application of the eDNA extraction to multiple filter membrane types suggests the methods evaluated here may be broadly applied in future eDNA research. Our results also suggest that for many kinds of studies recently reported on macrobial eDNA, detection probabilities could have been increased, and at a lower cost, by utilizing the Longmire's preservation buffer with a PCI DNA extraction. PMID:24834966

  19. Evaluation of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for Measurement of Silica on Filter Samples of Coal Dust

    PubMed Central

    Stipe, Christopher B.; Miller, Arthur L.; Brown, Jonathan; Guevara, Edward; Cauda, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Airborne silica dust (quartz) is common in coal mines and represents a respiratory hazard that can lead to silicosis, a potentially fatal lung disease. With an eye toward developing a portable monitoring device for rapid analysis of silica dust, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to quantify quartz in coal dust samples collected on filter media. Pure silica (Min-U-Sil™ 5), Georgia kaolin, and Pittsburgh-4 and Illinois-6 coal dusts were deposited separately and at multiple mass loadings onto 37-mm polyvinylchloride (PVC) filters. LIBS-generated silicon emission was monitored at 288.16 nm, and non-silica contributions to that signal from kaolinite were removed by simultaneously detecting aluminum. Measurements of the four samples were used to calculate limits of detection (LOD) for silicon and aluminum of approximately 0.08 µg/cm2 and 0.05 µg/cm2, respectively (corresponding to 0.16 µg/cm2 and 0.20 µg/cm2 for silica and kaolinite, respectively). Relative errors of prediction are around 10%. Results demonstrate that LIBS can dependably quantify silica on filter samples of coal dust and confirm that accurate quantification can be achieved for very lightly loaded samples, which supports the potential application of LIBS for rapid, in-field monitoring. PMID:23146184

  20. Evaluation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for measurement of silica on filter samples of coal dust.

    PubMed

    Stipe, Christopher B; Miller, Arthur L; Brown, Jonathan; Guevara, Edward; Cauda, Emanuele

    2012-11-01

    Airborne silica dust (quartz) is common in coal mines and represents a respiratory hazard that can lead to silicosis, a potentially fatal lung disease. With an eye toward developing a portable monitoring device for rapid analysis of silica dust, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to quantify quartz in coal dust samples collected on filter media. Pure silica (Min-U-Sil™ 5), Georgia kaolin, and Pittsburgh-4 and Illinois-6 coal dusts were deposited separately and at multiple mass loadings onto 37-mm polyvinylchloride (PVC) filters. LIBS-generated silicon emission was monitored at 288.16 nm, and non-silica contributions to that signal from kaolinite were removed by simultaneously detecting aluminum. Measurements of the four samples were used to calculate limits of detection (LOD) for silicon and aluminum of approximately 0.08 μg/cm(2) and 0.05 μg/cm(2), respectively (corresponding to 0.16 μg/cm(2) and 0.20 μg/cm(2) for silica and kaolinite, respectively). Relative errors of prediction are around 10%. Results demonstrate that LIBS can dependably quantify silica on filter samples of coal dust and confirm that accurate quantification can be achieved for very lightly loaded samples, which supports the potential application of LIBS for rapid, in-field monitoring.

  1. Direct trace-elemental analysis of urine samples by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample deposition on clinical filter papers.

    PubMed

    Aramendía, Maite; Rello, Luis; Vanhaecke, Frank; Resano, Martín

    2012-10-16

    Collection of biological fluids on clinical filter papers shows important advantages from a logistic point of view, although analysis of these specimens is far from straightforward. Concerning urine analysis, and particularly when direct trace elemental analysis by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is aimed at, several problems arise, such as lack of sensitivity or different distribution of the analytes on the filter paper, rendering obtaining reliable quantitative results quite difficult. In this paper, a novel approach for urine collection is proposed, which circumvents many of these problems. This methodology consists on the use of precut filter paper discs where large amounts of sample can be retained upon a single deposition. This provides higher amounts of the target analytes and, thus, sufficient sensitivity, and allows addition of an adequate internal standard at the clinical lab prior to analysis, therefore making it suitable for a strategy based on unsupervised sample collection and ulterior analysis at referral centers. On the basis of this sampling methodology, an analytical method was developed for the direct determination of several elements in urine (Be, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Sb, Sn, Tl, Pb, and V) at the low μg L(-1) level by means of LA-ICPMS. The method developed provides good results in terms of accuracy and LODs (≤1 μg L(-1) for most of the analytes tested), with a precision in the range of 15%, fit-for-purpose for clinical control analysis.

  2. Elastic vibrations of a fiber due to impact of an aerosol particle and their influence on the efficiency of fibrous filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyakov, A. L.; Kirsch, A. A.; Kirsch, V. A.

    2011-05-01

    The excitation of sound vibrations of a cylindrical fine fiber due to the impact of a spherical aerosol particle is investigated. The equations describing the dynamics of impact are derived for an arbitrary shooting parameter. The coefficient of restitution is calculated, and its analytical approximation is obtained. It is shown, for the case of long fibers, that the coefficient of restitution depends upon a single parameter λc. The parameter λc depends on the particle radial velocity component near the fiber surface, the mass of the particle, the density of the fiber, the modulus of elasticity, and the geometric parameters of the fiber and the particle. The inertial deposition of submicron aerosol particles on fine fibers in a filter is considered. The efficiency of filtration is studied as a function of the gas flow velocity. The existence of a critical flow velocity U*, below which the losses of particle energy during collision have no effect on the efficiency, is demonstrated. For velocities higher than the critical velocity, the filtration efficiency is dependent on the mechanisms of nonelastic losses of the particle's energy. Its value can be significantly lower than that estimated when particle rebound effects are neglected. After they have rebounded, some particles are not able to attain the initial high velocities in the stream, thus depositing on neighboring fibers. The dynamics of these particles is investigated. For this case, it is shown that the filtration efficiency is dependent on the velocity distribution of the rebounded particles and that it increases with the packing density of fibers. A qualitative difference between the asymptotic behavior of a fiber and that of a flat plate is found long after the initial impulse.

  3. Airborne studies of aerosol emissions from savanna fires in southern Africa: 2. Aerosol chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, M. O.; Andreae, T. W.; Annegarn, H.; Beer, J.; Cachier, H.; Le Canut, P.; Elbert, W.; Maenhaut, W.; Salma, I.; Wienhold, F. G.; Zenker, T.

    1998-12-01

    We investigated smoke emissions from fires in savanna, forest, and agricultural ecosystems by airborne sampling of plumes close to prescribed burns and incidental fires in southern Africa. Aerosol samples were collected on glass fiber filters and on stacked filter units, consisting of a Nuclepore prefilter for particles larger than ˜1-2 μm and a Teflon second filter stage for the submicron fraction. The samples were analyzed for soluble ionic components, organic carbon, and black carbon. Onboard the research aircraft, particle number and volume distributions as a function of size were determined with a laser-optical particle counter and the black carbon content of the aerosol with an aethalometer. We determined the emission ratios (relative to CO2 and CO) and emission factors (relative to the amount of biomass burnt) for the various aerosol constituents. The smoke aerosols were rich in organic and black carbon, the latter representing 10-30% of the aerosol mass. K+ and NH4+ were the dominant cationic species in the smoke of most fires, while Cl- and SO42- were the most important anions. The aerosols were unusually rich in Cl-, probably due to the high Cl content of the semiarid vegetation. Comparison of the element budget of the fuel before and after the fires shows that the fraction of the elements released during combustion is highly variable between elements. In the case of the halogen elements, almost the entire amount released during the fire is present in the aerosol phase, while in the case of C, N, and S, only a small proportion ends up as particulate matter. This suggests that the latter elements are present predominantly as gaseous species in the fresh fire plumes studied here.

  4. Investigation of Total and Hexavalent Chromium in Filtered and Unfiltered Groundwater Samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Fred D; McCleskey, R Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-10-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  5. Investigation of total and hexavalent chromium in filtered and unfiltered groundwater samples at the Tucson International Airport Superfund Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Hermosillo, Edyth

    2016-01-01

    Potential health effects from hexavalent chromium in groundwater have recently become a concern to regulators at the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund site. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey sampled 46 wells in the area to characterize the nature and extent of chromium in groundwater, to understand what proportion of total chromium is in the hexavalent state, and to determine if substantial differences are present between filtered and unfiltered chromium concentrations. Results indicate detectable chromium concentrations in all wells, over 75 % of total chromium is in the hexavalent state in a majority of wells, and filtered and unfiltered results differ substantially in only a few high-turbidity total chromium samples.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, BHA GROUP, INC., QP131 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, POLYMER GROUP, INC., DURAPEX PET FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, TETRATEC PTFE PRODUCTS, TETRATEX 6212 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  9. Analysis of pharmaceutical and other organic wastewater compounds in filtered and unfiltered water samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaugg, Steven D.; Phillips, Patrick J.; Smith, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effects of exposure of stream biota to complex mixtures of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds associated with wastewater requires the development of additional analytical capabilities for these compounds in water samples. Two gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analytical methods used at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) to analyze organic compounds associated with wastewater were adapted to include additional pharmaceutical and other organic compounds beginning in 2009. This report includes a description of method performance for 42 additional compounds for the filtered-water method (hereafter referred to as the filtered method) and 46 additional compounds for the unfiltered-water method (hereafter referred to as the unfiltered method). The method performance for the filtered method described in this report has been published for seven of these compounds; however, the addition of several other compounds to the filtered method and the addition of the compounds to the unfiltered method resulted in the need to document method performance for both of the modified methods. Most of these added compounds are pharmaceuticals or pharmaceutical degradates, although two nonpharmaceutical compounds are included in each method. The main pharmaceutical compound classes added to the two modified methods include muscle relaxants, opiates, analgesics, and sedatives. These types of compounds were added to the original filtered and unfiltered methods largely in response to the tentative identification of a wide range of pharmaceutical and other organic compounds in samples collected from wastewater-treatment plants. Filtered water samples are extracted by vacuum through disposable solid-phase cartridges that contain modified polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin. Unfiltered samples are extracted by using continuous liquid-liquid extraction with dichloromethane. The compounds of interest for filtered and unfiltered sample

  10. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  11. [Comparison of the determination of cyclosporin-A in blood samples collected on filter paper and by the ordinary technique].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, L S; Manrique, R; Sabbaga, E

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring cyclosporin-A (CsA) blood levels is of utmost importance for the rational use of this drug. Although many centers perform transplants, in Brazil there are few laboratories able to measure CsA blood levels. Therefore making blood samples reach the laboratory emerged as a problem. Collection of blood on filter paper has been a technique used for a long time in special cases. PURPOSE--To confirm the usefulness of measuring CsA blood levels in blood samples collected on filter paper and in the usual way. METHOD--We studied twenty renal cadaver kidney recipients who were receiving CsA, azathioprine and prednisone. Ninety five blood samples were collected and divided into two aliquots. One of them was sent routinely to one laboratory to perform whole blood CsA measurements. From the other aliquot, 20 microliters were pipetted on filter paper. When dried they were mailed to the other laboratory, where, after elution, CsA was measured. In both cases radioimmunoassay with polyclonal antibody was used. RESULTS--Linear correlation between both measurements revealed r = 0.81 with no statistical difference. CONCLUSION--The technique showed to be useful in clinical practice. In countries with continental size, as Brazil, it may be very helpful.

  12. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; El Haddad, I.

    2015-08-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make impractical its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, PM10) collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g. AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 μg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon, oxygen containing and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g. filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially-resolved long-term datasets.

  13. Characterization and source apportionment of organic aerosol using offline aerosol mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daellenbach, K. R.; Bozzetti, C.; Křepelová, A.; Canonaco, F.; Wolf, R.; Zotter, P.; Fermo, P.; Crippa, M.; Slowik, J. G.; Sosedova, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, R.-J.; Poulain, L.; Szidat, S.; Baltensperger, U.; El Haddad, I.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Field deployments of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) have significantly advanced real-time measurements and source apportionment of non-refractory particulate matter. However, the cost and complex maintenance requirements of the AMS make its deployment at sufficient sites to determine regional characteristics impractical. Furthermore, the negligible transmission efficiency of the AMS inlet for supermicron particles significantly limits the characterization of their chemical nature and contributing sources. In this study, we utilize the AMS to characterize the water-soluble organic fingerprint of ambient particles collected onto conventional quartz filters, which are routinely sampled at many air quality sites. The method was applied to 256 particulate matter (PM) filter samples (PM1, PM2.5, and PM10, i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1, 2.5, and 10 µm, respectively), collected at 16 urban and rural sites during summer and winter. We show that the results obtained by the present technique compare well with those from co-located online measurements, e.g., AMS or Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). The bulk recoveries of organic aerosol (60-91 %) achieved using this technique, together with low detection limits (0.8 µg of organic aerosol on the analyzed filter fraction) allow its application to environmental samples. We will discuss the recovery variability of individual hydrocarbon ions, ions containing oxygen, and other ions. The performance of such data in source apportionment is assessed in comparison to ACSM data. Recoveries of organic components related to different sources as traffic, wood burning, and secondary organic aerosol are presented. This technique, while subjected to the limitations inherent to filter-based measurements (e.g., filter artifacts and limited time resolution) may be used to enhance the AMS capabilities in measuring size-fractionated, spatially resolved long-term data sets.

  14. Intercomparison of aerosol instruments: number concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, E O; Sinclair, D; Tu, K W; Hinchliffe, L; Franklin, H

    1982-05-01

    An intercomparison of aerosol instruments conducted February 23-27, 1981, at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) focused on five instruments: the Pollak and TSI condensation nucleus counters; the Active Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer (ASAS-X); and two aerosol electrometers. Test aerosols of sodium chloride and ammonium fluorescein generated by nebulization/electrostatic classification were used to obtain 195 lines of comparison data. Concentrations measured by the ASAS-X and the TSI aerosol electrometer averaged respectively 1.388 and 1.581 times that measured by the Pollak. These ratios were very stable during the week and there was little effect of particle size or material. Most other comparisons were equally stable. However, a review of past work at EML and elsewhere led to the disturbing conclusion that these ratios may change from year to year, or from season to season. A filter sample was taken from microscopy, concurrent with readings from the ASAS-X and the TSI condensation nucleus counters. In this sample, the two instruments differed by 20%. Within its 20% uncertainty, the filter result matched both the TSI and ASAS-X readings.

  15. Observations Of Cosmogenic 7Be and 22Na In Aerosol Samples in Northern Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Grinsted, Aslak

    2008-08-01

    Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK monitors the amount of airborne radioactivity with three aerosol samplers in Northern Finland. Naturally occurring radioactive nuclei 7Be and 22Na can be seen. A time series was constructed for both nuclei observed at Rovaniemi (lat 66,3° N long 25,4° E). The most consistent time series was found to be from Ivalo (lat 68,64° N long 27,57° E). The time series of 7Be and 22Na were compared and the ratio was plotted. A time series analysis was performed for Ivalo time series to find periodicities. Two periodicities longer than one year was found 4,3 years and 11 years, also 3 periodicities shorter than one years was found 1,7 months, 4 months and 6 months. The annual average 7Be activities at Rovaniemi and Ivalo were also compared with the annual galactic cosmic ray intensity observed with neutron monitor at Oulu (65.05°N, 25.47°E) by Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory.

  16. Sampling strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of organic aerosol measurements requiring long sample-collection times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, Rob L.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    The composition and properties of atmospheric organic aerosols (OAs) change on timescales of minutes to hours. However, some important OA characterization techniques typically require greater than a few hours of sample-collection time (e.g., Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy). In this study we have performed numerical modeling to investigate and compare sample-collection strategies and post-processing methods for increasing the time resolution of OA measurements requiring long sample-collection times. Specifically, we modeled the measurement of hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) concentrations at a polluted urban site in Mexico City, and investigated how to construct hourly resolved time series from samples collected for 4, 6, and 8 h. We modeled two sampling strategies - sequential and staggered sampling - and a range of post-processing methods including interpolation and deconvolution. The results indicated that relative to the more sophisticated and costly staggered sampling methods, linear interpolation between sequential measurements is a surprisingly effective method for increasing time resolution. Additional error can be added to a time series constructed in this manner if a suboptimal sequential sampling schedule is chosen. Staggering measurements is one way to avoid this effect. There is little to be gained from deconvolving staggered measurements, except at very low values of random measurement error (< 5 %). Assuming 20 % random measurement error, one can expect average recovery errors of 1.33-2.81 µg m-3 when using 4-8 h-long sequential and staggered samples to measure time series of concentration values ranging from 0.13-29.16 µg m-3. For 4 h samples, 19-47 % of this total error can be attributed to the process of increasing time resolution alone, depending on the method used, meaning that measurement precision would only be improved by 0.30-0.75 µg m-3 if samples could be collected over 1 h instead of 4 h. Devising a

  17. Interlaboratory evaluation of trace element determination in workplace air filter samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry†‡

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Stanley A.; Brisson, Michael J.; Howe, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is becoming more widely used for trace elemental analysis in the occupational hygiene field, and consequently new ICP-MS international standard procedures have been promulgated by ASTM International and ISO. However, there is a dearth of interlaboratory performance data for this analytical methodology. In an effort to fill this data void, an interlaboratory evaluation of ICP-MS for determining trace elements in workplace air samples was conducted, towards fulfillment of method validation requirements for international voluntary consensus standard test methods. The study was performed in accordance with applicable statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. The evaluation was carried out using certified 37-mm diameter mixed-cellulose ester (MCE) filters that were fortified with 21 elements of concern in occupational hygiene. Elements were spiked at levels ranging from 0.025 to 10 μg filter−1, with three different filter loadings denoted “Low”, “Medium” and “High”. Participating laboratories were recruited from a pool of over fifty invitees; ultimately twenty laboratories from Europe, North America and Asia submitted results. Triplicates of each certified filter with elemental contents at three different levels, plus media blanks spiked with reagent, were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory. Each participant was also provided a copy of the test method which each participant was asked to follow; spiking levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were requested to prepare the filters by one of three sample preparation procedures, i.e., hotplate digestion, microwave digestion or hot block extraction, which were described in the test method. Participants were then asked to analyze aliquots of the prepared samples by ICP-MS, and to report their data in units of μg filter−1. Most interlaboratory precision estimates were acceptable for medium- and high

  18. A fast image retrieval method based on SVM and imbalanced samples in filtering multimedia message spam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhang; Peng, Zhenming; Peng, Lingbing; Liao, Dongyi; He, Xin

    2011-11-01

    With the swift and violent development of the Multimedia Messaging Service (MMS), it becomes an urgent task to filter the Multimedia Message (MM) spam effectively in real-time. For the fact that most MMs contain images or videos, a method based on retrieving images is given in this paper for filtering MM spam. The detection method used in this paper is a combination of skin-color detection, texture detection, and face detection, and the classifier for this imbalanced problem is a very fast multi-classification combining Support vector machine (SVM) with unilateral binary decision tree. The experiments on 3 test sets show that the proposed method is effective, with the interception rate up to 60% and the average detection time for each image less than 1 second.

  19. Biological Aerosol Test Method and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Decon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    technologies for disinfecting filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) by aerosolizing, sampling, and analyzing viability of A/H5N1 virus on FFRs...personal respiratory protective devices. A component of that effort was to conduct a study of technologies for disinfecting filtering facepiece...flat-fold/three-panel, surgical , N95 respirator that is designed to resist splash and splatter of bodily fluids and infectious materials. These masks

  20. Use of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the automated nondestructive identification of drugs in multicomponent samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, Audrey N; Farquar, George R; Steele, Paul T; Jones, A Daniel; Frank, Matthias

    2009-11-15

    In this work, single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was used to identify the active drug ingredients in samples of multicomponent over-the-counter (OTC) drug tablets with minimal damage to the tablets. OTC drug tablets in various formulations were analyzed including single active ingredient tablets and multi-ingredient tablets. Using a sampling apparatus developed in-house, micrometer-sized particles were simultaneously dislodged from tablets and introduced to the SPAMS, where dual-polarity mass spectra were obtained from individual particles. Active ingredients were identified from the parent ions and fragment ions formed from each sample, and alarm files were developed for each active ingredient, allowing successful automated identification of each compound in a mixture. The alarm algorithm developed for SPAMS correctly identified all drug compounds in all single-ingredient and multi-ingredient tablets studied. A further study demonstrated the ability of this technique to identify the active ingredient in a single tablet analyzed in the presence of several other nonidentical tablets. In situ measurements were also made by sampling directly from a drug sample in its original bottle. A single tablet embedded in 11 identical tablets of different composition was detected in this manner. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability of the SPAMS technique to detect a target drug compound both in complex tablets, i.e., multidrug ingredient tablets, and complex sampling environments, i.e., multitablet sampling sources. The technique is practically nondestructive, leaving the characteristic shape, color, and imprint of a tablet intact for further analysis. Applications of this technique may include forensic and pharmaceutical analysis.

  1. Aerosol measurements at the south pole during 1987. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Bodhaine, B.A.; Harris, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    The Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates an atmospheric monitoring observatory at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The aerosol measurement program consists of the continuous measurement of condensation nuclei (CN) concentration and aerosol scattering extinction coefficient. During 1987, a special aerosol experiment was conducted that included filter samples for subsequent analysis by the proton induced x-ray emission technique, diffusion battery measurements for size information in the sub-0.1 micrometer size range, and aerosol absorption measurements using an aethalometer. Surface and upper air meteorological data were also available. The purpose of the report is to present all of the aerosol data obtained during 1987.

  2. Silicone discs as disposable enrichment probes for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of UV filters in water samples.

    PubMed

    Negreira, N; Rodríguez, I; Rubí, E; Cela, R

    2011-04-01

    This work describes an effective, low solvent consumption and affordable sample preparation approach for the determination of eight UV filters in surface and wastewater samples. It involves sorptive extraction of target analytes in a disposable, technical grade silicone disc (5 mm diameter × 0.6 mm thickness) followed by organic solvent desorption, large volume injection (LVI), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. Final working conditions involved overnight extraction of 100-mL samples, containing 10% of methanol, followed by analytes desorption with 0.2 mL of ethyl acetate. The method provides linear responses between the limits of quantification (from 0.003 to 0.040 ng mL(-1)) and 10 ng mL(-1), an intra-day precision below 13%, and low matrix effects for surface, swimming pool, and treated sewage water samples. Moreover, the extraction yields provided by silicone discs were in excellent agreement with those achieved using polydimethylsiloxane-covered stir bars. Several UV filters were found in surface and sewage water samples, with the maximum concentrations corresponding to octocrylene.

  3. Development of a sampling method for carbonyl compounds released due to the use of electronic cigarettes and quantitation of their conversion from liquid to aerosol.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sang-Hee; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2016-01-15

    In this study, an experimental method for the collection and analysis of carbonyl compounds (CCs) released due to the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes or ECs) was developed and validated through a series of laboratory experiments. As part of this work, the conversion of CCs from a refill solution (e-solution) to aerosol also was investigated based on mass change tracking (MCT) approach. Aerosol samples generated from an e-cigarette were collected manually using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) cartridges at a constant sampling (puffing) velocity of 1 L min(-1) with the following puff conditions: puff duration (2s), interpuff interval (10s), and puff number (5, 10, and 15 times). The MCT approach allowed us to improve the sampling of CCs through critical evaluation of the puff conditions in relation to the consumed quantities of refill solution. The emission concentrations of CCs remained constant when e-cigarettes were sampled at or above 10 puff. Upon aerosolization, the concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde increased 6.23- and 58.4-fold, respectively, relative to their concentrations in e-solution. Furthermore, a number of CCs were found to be present in the aerosol samples which were not detected in the initial e-solution (e.g., acetone, butyraldehyde, and o-tolualdehyde).

  4. [Detection of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in Somoto, Nicaragua, using indirect ELISA and IFI on blood samples on filter paper].

    PubMed

    Palacios, X; Belli, A; Espino, A M

    2000-12-01

    We standardized a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in order to study the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in asymptomatic persons who live in an area of Nicaragua endemic for Chagas' disease. The test was standardized to analyze filter-paper blood samples, which are easy to transport. In the first phase of our investigation, ELISA was used to study 18 samples of total serum and 18 eluates of blood from patients with chronic Chagas' disease; 30 samples of serum and 30 eluates of blood from healthy people, used as negative controls; and 14 samples of serum and 14 eluates of blood from patients with cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis, which were used to study cross-reactions. Both with the total-serum and the blood-eluate samples, the ELISA test provided 100% sensitivity and 90% specificity. Cross-reactions in the patient samples were observed only with visceral leishmaniasis. The second phase of our investigation was a population study that included eight rural communities in the area of Somoto, Nicaragua. Through random sampling, filter-paper blood samples were collected from 2,434 people (1,335 men and 1,099 women) from the communities of Aguas Calientes, El Brocal, La Manzana, Las Playas, Los Canales, Santa Isabel, Santa Rosa, and Santa Teresa. Studied by ELISA and by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), the samples included 260 found seropositive by ELISA (10.7%), of which 207 were positive according to IIF (8.5%). With both techniques, the majority of seropositives were among women, but the difference between men and women was not statistically significant. There was a high level of agreement between the results obtained with the two techniques. There was an upward trend with age, with 5.4% of those found seropositive by ELISA being persons 10 years of age or younger and 42.7% of those found seropositive being older than 50. The vast majority of the individuals analyzed were asymptomatic.

  5. Radial line-scans as representative sampling strategy in dried-droplet laser ablation of liquid samples deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nischkauer, Winfried; Vanhaecke, Frank; Bernacchi, Sébastien; Herwig, Christoph; Limbeck, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Nebulising liquid samples and using the aerosol thus obtained for further analysis is the standard method in many current analytical techniques, also with inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based devices. With such a set-up, quantification via external calibration is usually straightforward for samples with aqueous or close-to-aqueous matrix composition. However, there is a variety of more complex samples. Such samples can be found in medical, biological, technological and industrial contexts and can range from body fluids, like blood or urine, to fuel additives or fermentation broths. Specialized nebulizer systems or careful digestion and dilution are required to tackle such demanding sample matrices. One alternative approach is to convert the liquid into a dried solid and to use laser ablation for sample introduction. Up to now, this approach required the application of internal standards or matrix-adjusted calibration due to matrix effects. In this contribution, we show a way to circumvent these matrix effects while using simple external calibration for quantification. The principle of representative sampling that we propose uses radial line-scans across the dried residue. This compensates for centro-symmetric inhomogeneities typically observed in dried spots. The effectiveness of the proposed sampling strategy is exemplified via the determination of phosphorus in biochemical fermentation media. However, the universal viability of the presented measurement protocol is postulated. Detection limits using laser ablation-ICP-optical emission spectrometry were in the order of 40 μg mL- 1 with a reproducibility of 10 % relative standard deviation (n = 4, concentration = 10 times the quantification limit). The reported sensitivity is fit-for-purpose in the biochemical context described here, but could be improved using ICP-mass spectrometry, if future analytical tasks would require it. Trueness of the proposed method was investigated by cross-validation with

  6. Measurements of Atmospheric Aerosol Vertical Distributions above Svalbard, Norway using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, T. S.; Johnson, J. E.; Stalin, S.; Telg, H.; Murphy, D. M.; Burkhart, J. F.; Quinn, P.; Storvold, R.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol vertical distributions were measured above Svalbard, Norway in April 2015 to investigate the processes controlling aerosol concentrations and radiative effects. The aerosol payload was flown in a NOAA/PMEL MANTA Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) on 9 flights totaling 19 flight hours. Measurements were made of particle number concentration and aerosol light absorption at three wavelengths, similar to those conducted in April 2011 (Bates et al., Atmos. Meas. Tech., 6, 2115-2120, 2013). A filter sample was collected on each flight for analyses of trace elements. Additional measurements in the aerosol payload in 2015 included aerosol size distributions obtained using a Printed Optical Particle Spectrometer (POPS) and aerosol optical depth obtained using a four wavelength miniature Scanning Aerosol Sun Photometer (miniSASP). The data show most of the column aerosol mass and resulting optical depth in the boundary layer but frequent aerosol layers aloft with high particle number concentration (2000 cm-3) and enhanced aerosol light absorption (1 Mm-1). Transport of these aerosol layers was assessed using FLEXPART particle dispersion models. The data contribute to an assessment of sources of BC to the Arctic and potential climate impacts.

  7. Solid-phase extraction and field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis for the analysis of benzophenone UV filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Purrà, Miquel; Cinca, Roser; Legaz, Jessica; Núñez, Oscar

    2014-10-01

    A field-amplified sample injection-capillary zone electrophoresis (FASI-CZE) method for the analysis of benzophenone (BP) UV filters in environmental water samples was developed, allowing the separation of all compounds in less than 8 min. A 9- to 25-fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained with FASI-CZE, achieving limits of detection down to 21-59 μg/L for most of the analyzed BPs, with acceptable run-to-run and day-to-day precisions (relative standard deviations lower than 17%). In order to remove water sample salinity and to enhance FASI sensitivity, an off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using a Strata X polymeric reversed-phase sorbent was used and afforded recoveries up to 72-90% for most BPs. With the combination of off-line SPE and FASI-CZE, limits of detection in the range 0.06-0.6 μg/L in a river water matrix, representing a 2,400- to 6,500-fold enhancement, were obtained. Method performance was evaluated by quantifying a blank river water sample spiked at 1 μg/L. For a 95% confidence level, no statistical differences were observed between found concentrations and spiked concentrations (probability at the confidence level, p value, of 0.60), showing that the proposed off-line SPE-FASI-CZE method is suitable for the analysis of BP UV filters in environmental water samples at low microgram per liter levels. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of BPs in river water samples collected up- and downstream of industrialized and urban areas, and in some drinking water samples.

  8. Calibration of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for the quantitative analysis of solid samples

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, James

    1999-02-12

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has become the method of choice for elemental and isotopic analysis. Several factors contribute to its success. Modern instruments are capable of routine analysis at part per trillion levels with relative detection limits in part per quadrillion levels. Sensitivities in these instruments can be as high as 200 million counts per second per part per million with linear dynamic ranges up to eight orders of magnitude. With standards for only a few elements, rapid semiquantitative analysis of over 70 elements in an individual sample can be performed. Less than 20 years after its inception ICP-MS has shown to be applicable to several areas of science. These include geochemistry, the nuclear industry, environmental chemistry, clinical chemistry, the semiconductor industry, and forensic chemistry. In this introduction, the general attributes of ICP-MS will be discussed in terms of instrumentation and sample introduction. The advantages and disadvantages of current systems are presented. A detailed description of one method of sample introduction, laser ablation, is given. The paper also gives conclusions and suggestions for future work. Chapter 2, Quantitative analysis of solids by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using dried solution aerosols for calibration, has been removed for separate processing.

  9. External calibration strategy for trace element quantification in botanical samples by LA-ICP-MS using filter paper.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Matheus A G; Voss, Mônica; Corazza, Gabriela; Flores, Erico M M; Dressler, Valderi L

    2016-01-28

    The use of reference solutions dispersed on filter paper discs is proposed for the first time as an external calibration strategy for matrix matching and determination of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in plants by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The procedure is based on the use of filter paper discs as support for aqueous reference solutions, which are further evaporated, resulting in solid standards with concentrations up to 250 μg g(-1) of each element. The use of filter paper for calibration is proposed as matrix matched standards due to the similarities of this material with botanical samples, regarding to carbon concentration and its distribution through both matrices. These characteristics allowed the use of (13)C as internal standard (IS) during the analysis by LA-ICP-MS. In this way, parameters as analyte signal normalization with (13)C, carrier gas flow rate, laser energy, spot size, and calibration range were monitored. The calibration procedure using solution deposition on filter paper discs resulted in precision improvement when (13)C was used as IS. The method precision was calculated by the analysis of a certified reference material (CRM) of botanical matrix, considering the RSD obtained for 5 line scans and was lower than 20%. Accuracy of LA-ICP-MS determinations were evaluated by analysis of four CRM pellets of botanical composition, as well as by comparison with results obtained by ICP-MS using solution nebulization after microwave assisted digestion. Plant samples of unknown elemental composition were analyzed by the proposed LA method and good agreement were obtained with results of solution analysis. Limits of detection (LOD) established for LA-ICP-MS were obtained by the ablation of 10 lines on the filter paper disc containing 40 μL of 5% HNO3 (v v(-1)) as calibration blank. Values ranged from 0.05 to 0.81  μg g(-1). Overall, the use of filter paper as support for dried aqueous

  10. Uncertainties in the measurements of water-soluble organic nitrogen in the aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Yamato, Koki

    2016-11-01

    In order to evaluate the positive and negative artifacts in the measurements of the water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON) in the aerosols by filter sampling, comparative experiments between the filter sampling and denuder-filter sampling were conducted during both the warm and cold seasons. The results suggest that the traditional filter sampling underestimates the concentrations of the particulate WSON due to its volatilization loss, but this effect on the ratio of the WSON to the water-soluble total nitrogen (WSTN) was small probably because inorganic nitrogen species were also lost during the filter sampling. Approximately 32.5% of the WSON in the PM2.5 was estimated to be lost during the filter sampling. The denuder-filter sampling also demonstrated the existence of the WSON in the gas phase with approximately quarter concentrations of the WSON in the PM2.5. On the other hand, the filter sampling would overestimate the gaseous WSON concentration due to the loss of the WSON from the aerosol collection filter.

  11. Characterization of radicals and high-molecular weight species from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction and ambient aerosol samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Jelica

    Secondary organic aerosol formed during oxidation of different volatile organic compounds is composed from a number of final and intermediate reaction products. The final products include compounds in both low and high molecular weight range called also oligomer species. These compounds can be highly volatile, as well as being semi- or low-volatility compounds. This study characterized intermediate reactive radical products formed from previously often studied alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. In order to passivate those radical species nitrone spin traps were used. 5,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H-pyrrole-N-oxide (DMPO), and 5-dietoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) traps were able to successfully trap oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals produced from alpha-pinene/ozone reaction. Electrospray ionization (ESI) in negative ion mode with mass spectrometry (MS) detection was used to scan spectra of formed spin trap adducts and the tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) to elucidate its structures as well as structures of captured radicals. The same method was applied to analyze radical species present in ambient PM2.5 samples. Few carbon- (alkyl) and oxygen- (alkoxyl) centered radicals were captured with DMPO and DEPMPO traps. The second part of this study was focused on high molecular weight (high-MW) species formed from the same reaction (alpha-pinene/ozone), but found also in fine particulate matter fractions of ambient samples. LC/MS/MS analysis of dimer species from chamber study revealed fragments that can originate from peroxide structures. Proposed reaction for these peroxide dimer formation is self reaction of two peroxyl radicals, followed by the loss of oxygen molecule. These findings emphasize the role of peroxyl (ROO) radicals in formation of high-MW products and are in line with the high O:C ratio results reported in other studies. Water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) extracts of three size fractions of the ambient aerosol, PM1--2.5, PM0.1--1, and PM<0

  12. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  13. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  14. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  15. 40 CFR 53.57 - Test for filter temperature control during sampling and post-sampling periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... energy distribution and permitted tolerances specified in table E-2 of this subpart. The solar radiation... sequential sample operation. (3) The solar radiant energy source shall be installed in the test chamber such... temperature control system or by the radiant energy from the solar radiation source that may be present...

  16. FIELD EVALUATION OF A SAMPLING APPROACH FOR PM-COARSE AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subsequent to a 1997 revision of the national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM), the US Environmental Protection Agency is investigating the development of sampling methodology for a possible new coarse particle standard. When developed, this me...

  17. Modeling of Aerosols in Post-Combustor Flow Path and Sampling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2006-01-01

    The development and application of a multi-dimensional capability for modeling and simulation of aviation-sourced particle emissions and their precursors are elucidated. Current focus is on the role of the flow and thermal environments. The cases investigated include a film cooled turbine blade, the first-stage of a high-pressure turbine, the sampling probes, the sampling lines, and a pressure reduction chamber.

  18. Airborne Atmospheric Aerosol Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, K.; Park, Y.; Eun, H.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to understand the atmospheric aerosols compositions and size distributions since they greatly affect the environment and human health. Particles in the convection layer have been a great concern in global climate changes. To understand these characteristics satellite, aircraft, and radio sonde measurement methods have usually been used. An aircraft aerosol sampling using a filter and/or impactor was the method commonly used (Jay, 2003). However, the flight speed particle sampling had some technical limitations (Hermann, 2001). Moreover, the flight legal limit, altitude, prohibited airspace, flight time, and cost was another demerit. To overcome some of these restrictions, Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and Recoverable Sonde System(R.S.S.) were developed with a very light optical particle counter (OPC), impactor, and condensation particle counter (CPC). Not only does it collect and measure atmospheric aerosols depending on altitudes, but it also monitors the atmospheric conditions, temperature, humidity, wind velocity, pressure, GPS data, during the measurement (Eun, 2013). In this research, atmospheric aerosol measurement using T.B.P.S. in Ansan area is performed and the measurement results will be presented. The system can also be mounted to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and create an aerial particle concentration map. Finally, we will present measurement data using Tethered Balloon Package System (T.B.P.S.) and R.S.S (Recoverable Sonde System).

  19. Aerosols and Particulates Workshop Sampling Procedures and Venues Working Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pachlhofer, Peter; Howard, Robert

    1999-01-01

    The Sampling Procedures and Venues Workgroup discussed the potential venues available and issues associated with obtaining measurements. Some of the issues included Incoming Air Quality, Sampling Locations, Probes and Sample Systems. The following is a summary of the discussion of the issues and venues. The influence of inlet air to the measurement of exhaust species, especially trace chemical species, must be considered. Analysis procedures for current engine exhaust emissions regulatory measurements require adjustments for air inlet humidity. As a matter of course in scientific investigations, it is recommended that "background" measurements for any species, particulate or chemical, be performed during inlet air flow before initiation of combustion, if possible, and during the engine test period as feasible and practical. For current regulatory measurements, this would be equivalent to setting the "zero" level for conventional gas analyzers. As a minimum, it is recommended that measurements of the humidity and particulates in the incoming air be taken at the start and end of each test run. Additional measurement points taken during the run are desirable if they can be practically obtained. It was felt that the presence of trace gases in the incoming air is not a significant problem. However, investigators should consider the ambient levels and influences of local air pollution for species of interest. Desired measurement locations depend upon the investigation requirements. A complete investigation of phenomenology of particulate formation and growth requires measurements at a number of locations both within the engine and in the exhaust field downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Desirable locations for both extractive and in situ measurements include: (1) Combustion Zone (Multiple axial locations); (2) Combustor Exit (Multiple radial locations for annular combustors); (3) Turbine Stage (Inlet and exit of the stage); (4) Exit Nozzle (Multiple axial locations

  20. A model for transient analysis of a multiple-medium confinement filter system

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Ellison, P.G. ); Leonard, M.T.; Louie, D.L.Y.; Donbroski, E.L.; Wagner, K.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A computational model is described that calculates the transient behavior of aerosol and vapor (adsorption) filter compartments such as those used in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor confinement system. The principal application of the model is in the analysis of confinement response to hypothetical severe (core melt) accidents. Under these conditions, aerosol and radio-iodine deposition on filter compartments may be substantial. Attendant filter degradation mechanisms are modeled. Sample calculations are included to illustrate model performance. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Levels of 25 trace elements in high-volume air filter samples from Seville (2001-2002): Sources, enrichment factors and temporal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enamorado-Báez, S. M.; Gómez-Guzmán, J. M.; Chamizo, E.; Abril, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of trace element concentration in aerosols is of interest for environmental studies and for human health assessment. The temporal variability of total suspended particles (TSP) and its elemental composition in Seville, in SW Spain, is of particular complexity since Atlantic air masses and Saharan Dust Intrusions (SDI) overlap to local natural and anthropogenic sources. This paper is aimed to study the temporal evolution (in a monthly basis) of the concentrations of 25 trace elements, determined by ICP-MS, in high-volume air filter samples from Seville, covering a two-year period: 2001-2002. The mean TSP value for this period was 79.7 μg m- 3 and showed peak values in August 2001 and June 2002, likely related to SDI. Enrichment factors (EF) for Se, Sb and Zn and Pb were above 100, which revealed their anthropogenic sources. The comparison among EF from Seville and Huelva, a highly industrialized city nearby Seville, showed higher levels of anthropogenic elements there than in Seville. Simulations of the transport/dispersion of pollutants starting in Huelva confirm that air pollutants can reach Seville in the course of around 6 hours although they do not contribute significantly to the levels found in this city. A significant temporal correlation was found between elements which have a common source, being crustal (Al, Ti, Be, Co, Cs, Fe, Cr, Mn, U, Sr and Th) or anthropogenic sources (Zn, Pb, Cd). The temporal variations of those crustal elements are similar and related with the TSP levels for both years, with the clearly visible peaks probably related with the Saharan dust intrusion.

  2. Factors to Consider in Designing Aerosol Inlet Systems for Engine Exhaust Plume Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    This document consists of viewgraphs of charts and diagrams of considerations to take when sampling the engine exhaust plume. It includes a chart that compares the emissions from various fuels, a diagram and charts of the various processes and conditions that influence the particulate size and concentration,

  3. Dielectrophoretic separation of biological samples in a 3D filtering chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Xu, Guo Lin; Ong, Poh Lam; Leck, Kwong Joo

    2007-07-01

    A field-flow dielectrophoretic separation method in a 3D filtering chip has been developed in this work. The separation method was possible due to the special configuration of the DEP filtering chip, which has a structure similar to a classical capacitor with two parallel plate electrodes (realized by using a stainless steel mesh) and a dielectric medium (defined by a suspension of 100 µm diameter silica beads in buffer solution). The dielectrophoretic phenomenon is generated by the non-uniformities of the dielectric media, which produce a gradient of the electric field and, as a consequence, a DEP force. If a suspension medium with cells flows through the filter, the DEP force can trap these cells around the contact points between the silica beads (if the cells exhibit positive DEP) or they are repelled into the space between the beads (if the cells exhibit negative DEP). It is shown that for two different cell populations, the frequency of the electric field and permittivity of the media can be tuned in such a way that one population will exhibit positive DEP and the other one negative DEP. The population that expresses negative DEP can be easily flushed out due to the hydrodynamic force which is larger at the center point between the beads. In such a way two cell populations can be separated. The working principle was verified with both live and dead yeast cells. Best results for the separation of viable and nonviable cell populations were achieved at an applied voltage of 150 V in a frequency range between 10 kHz and 20 kHz for flow rates of 0.1 ml min-1 and 0.2 ml min-1. With a few of these devices cascaded in series, higher efficiency could be achieved. As a result, this device and the associated proposed separation method can be very useful tools for bio-pharmaceutical industries since continuous flow separation at relatively high flow rates is both time and cost saving.

  4. Light Absorbing Aerosols in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Kelley, K. L.; Kilaparty, P. S.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The direct effects of aerosol radiative forcing has been identified by the IPCC as a major uncertainty in climate modeling. The DOE Megacity Aerosol Experiment-Mexico City (MAX-Mex), as part of the MILAGRO study in March of 2006, was undertaken to reduce these uncertainties by characterization of the optical, chemical, and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols emitted from this megacity environment. Aerosol samples collected during this study using quartz filters were characterized in the uv-visible-infrared by using surface spectroscopic techniques. These included the use of an integrating sphere approach combined with the use of Kubelka-Munk theory to obtain aerosol absorption spectra. In past work black carbon has been assumed to be the only major absorbing species in atmospheric aerosols with an broad band spectral profile that follows a simple inverse wavelength dependence. Recent work has also identified a number of other absorbing species that can also add to the overall aerosol absorption. These include primary organics from biomass and trash burning and secondary organic aerosols including nitrated PAHs and humic-like substances, or HULIS. By using surface diffuse reflection spectroscopy we have also obtained spectra in the infrared that indicate significant IR absorption in the atmospheric window-region. These data will be presented and compared to spectra of model compounds that allow for evaluation of the potential importance of these species in adding strength to the direct radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64327 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  5. Tea bag filter paper as a novel protective membrane for micro-solid phase extraction of butachlor in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Pelden, Tshering; Thammaknet, Chongdee; Thavarungkul, Panote; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2014-01-01

    An innovative, cost-effective, simple, and environmental friendly tea bag filter paper protected micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE) technique was developed for the first time with the aim to miniaturize and minimize the use of organic solvents for the extraction and determination of butachlor in aqueous samples. The μ-SPE device was produced by packing 3.0 mg of an easily synthesized new sorbent, hydroxyl-functionalized polypyrrole (OH-PPY), inside a small tea bag filter paper sachet (1.0 cm × 0.5 cm) that served as a protective envelope. Both the extraction and desorption procedures were facilitated by sonication. Due to the high porosity and the fast water absorption of the tea bag filter paper, the analyte could easily diffuse through and enhance the interaction with the sorbent. Under the optimized conditions for the GC-ECD and the μ-SPE, the limit of detection (S/N ≥ 3) was 2.0 μg L(-1) while the limit of quantitation (S/N ≥ 10) was 10.0 μg L(-1). The recoveries of the butachlor spiked at 0.050, 0.10, and 0.50 μg mL(-1) ranged from 77.9 ± 3.0 to 112.5 ± 2.9%. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of butachlor in water samples from paddy cultivation sites. The levels found were from non-detectable to 24.71 ± 0.37 μg L(-1).

  6. Anisotropic tubular filtering for automatic detection of acid-fast bacilli in Ziehl-Neelsen stained sputum smear samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Shan-e.-Ahmed; Marjan, M. Q.; Arif, Muhammad; Butt, Farhana; Sultan, Faisal; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the main factors for high workload in pulmonary pathology in developing countries is the relatively large proportion of tuberculosis (TB) cases which can be detected with high throughput using automated approaches. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which appears as thin, rod-shaped acid-fast bacillus (AFB) in Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) stained sputum smear samples. In this paper, we present an algorithm for automatic detection of AFB in digitized images of ZN stained sputum smear samples under a light microscope. A key component of the proposed algorithm is the enhancement of raw input image using a novel anisotropic tubular filter (ATF) which suppresses the background noise while simultaneously enhancing strong anisotropic features of AFBs present in the image. The resulting image is then segmented using color features and candidate AFBs are identified. Finally, a support vector machine classifier using morphological features from candidate AFBs decides whether a given image is AFB positive or not. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed ATF method with two different feature sets by showing that the proposed image analysis pipeline results in higher accuracy and F1-score than the same pipeline with standard median filtering for image enhancement.

  7. Toward accurate molecular identification of species in complex environmental samples: testing the performance of sequence filtering and clustering methods

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jullien M; Brown, Emily A; Chain, Frédéric J J; MacIsaac, Hugh J; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-01-01

    Metabarcoding has the potential to become a rapid, sensitive, and effective approach for identifying species in complex environmental samples. Accurate molecular identification of species depends on the ability to generate operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that correspond to biological species. Due to the sometimes enormous estimates of biodiversity using this method, there is a great need to test the efficacy of data analysis methods used to derive OTUs. Here, we evaluate the performance of various methods for clustering length variable 18S amplicons from complex samples into OTUs using a mock community and a natural community of zooplankton species. We compare analytic procedures consisting of a combination of (1) stringent and relaxed data filtering, (2) singleton sequences included and removed, (3) three commonly used clustering algorithms (mothur, UCLUST, and UPARSE), and (4) three methods of treating alignment gaps when calculating sequence divergence. Depending on the combination of methods used, the number of OTUs varied by nearly two orders of magnitude for the mock community (60–5068 OTUs) and three orders of magnitude for the natural community (22–22191 OTUs). The use of relaxed filtering and the inclusion of singletons greatly inflated OTU numbers without increasing the ability to recover species. Our results also suggest that the method used to treat gaps when calculating sequence divergence can have a great impact on the number of OTUs. Our findings are particularly relevant to studies that cover taxonomically diverse species and employ markers such as rRNA genes in which length variation is extensive. PMID:26078860

  8. Atmospheric aerosol and Doppler lidar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeff; Bowdle, D. A.; Srivastava, V.; Jarzembski, M.; Cutten, D.; Mccaul, E. W., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies were performed of atmospheric aerosol backscatter and atmospheric dynamics with Doppler lidar as a primary tool. Activities include field and laboratory measurement and analysis efforts. The primary focus of activities related to understanding aerosol backscatter is the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) program. GLOBE is a multi-element effort designed toward developing a global aerosol model to describe tropospheric clean background backscatter conditions that Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS) is likely to encounter. Two survey missions were designed and flown in the NASA DC-8 in November 1989 and May to June 1990 over the remote Pacific Ocean, a region where backscatter values are low and where LAWS wind measurements could make a major contribution. The instrument complement consisted of pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) CO2 gas and solid state lidars measuring aerosol backscatter, optical particle counters measuring aerosol concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition, a filter/impactor system collecting aerosol samples for subsequent analysis, and integrating nephelometers measuring visible scattering coefficients. The GLOBE instrument package and survey missions were carefully planned to achieve complementary measurements under clean background backscatter conditions.

  9. Recent Rainfall and Aerosol Chemistry From Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landing, W. M.; Shelley, R.; Kadko, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    This project was devoted to testing the use of Be-7 as a tracer for quantifying trace element fluxes from the atmosphere to the oceans. Rainfall and aerosol samples were collected between June 15, 2011 and July 27, 2013 at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS) located near the eastern end of the island of Bermuda. Collectors were situated near ground level, clear of surrounding vegetation, at a meteorological monitoring station in front of the BIOS laboratory, about 10 m above sea level. This is a Bermuda Air Quality Program site used for ambient air quality monitoring. To quantify the atmospheric deposition of Be-7, plastic buckets were deployed for collection of fallout over ~3 week periods. Wet deposition was collected for trace element analysis using a specially modified "GEOTRACES" N-CON automated wet deposition collector. Aerosol samples were collected with a Tisch TE-5170V-BL high volume aerosol sampler, modified to collect 12 replicate samples on acid-washed 47mm diameter Whatman-41 filters, using procedures identical to those used for the US GEOTRACES aerosol program (Morton et al., 2013). Aerosol and rainfall samples were analyzed for total Na, Mg, Al, P, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr, Cd, Sb, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Pb, Th, and U using ICPMS. Confirming earlier data from Bermuda, strong seasonality in rainfall and aerosol loading and chemistry was observed, particularly for aerosol and rainfall Fe concentrations when Saharan dust arrives in July/August with SE trajectories.

  10. Radial line-scans as representative sampling strategy in dried-droplet laser ablation of liquid samples deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks☆

    PubMed Central

    Nischkauer, Winfried; Vanhaecke, Frank; Bernacchi, Sébastien; Herwig, Christoph; Limbeck, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Nebulising liquid samples and using the aerosol thus obtained for further analysis is the standard method in many current analytical techniques, also with inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based devices. With such a set-up, quantification via external calibration is usually straightforward for samples with aqueous or close-to-aqueous matrix composition. However, there is a variety of more complex samples. Such samples can be found in medical, biological, technological and industrial contexts and can range from body fluids, like blood or urine, to fuel additives or fermentation broths. Specialized nebulizer systems or careful digestion and dilution are required to tackle such demanding sample matrices. One alternative approach is to convert the liquid into a dried solid and to use laser ablation for sample introduction. Up to now, this approach required the application of internal standards or matrix-adjusted calibration due to matrix effects. In this contribution, we show a way to circumvent these matrix effects while using simple external calibration for quantification. The principle of representative sampling that we propose uses radial line-scans across the dried residue. This compensates for centro-symmetric inhomogeneities typically observed in dried spots. The effectiveness of the proposed sampling strategy is exemplified via the determination of phosphorus in biochemical fermentation media. However, the universal viability of the presented measurement protocol is postulated. Detection limits using laser ablation-ICP-optical emission spectrometry were in the order of 40 μg mL− 1 with a reproducibility of 10 % relative standard deviation (n = 4, concentration = 10 times the quantification limit). The reported sensitivity is fit-for-purpose in the biochemical context described here, but could be improved using ICP-mass spectrometry, if future analytical tasks would require it. Trueness of the proposed method was investigated by cross-validation with

  11. Radial line-scans as representative sampling strategy in dried-droplet laser ablation of liquid samples deposited on pre-cut filter paper disks.

    PubMed

    Nischkauer, Winfried; Vanhaecke, Frank; Bernacchi, Sébastien; Herwig, Christoph; Limbeck, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Nebulising liquid samples and using the aerosol thus obtained for further analysis is the standard method in many current analytical techniques, also with inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based devices. With such a set-up, quantification via external calibration is usually straightforward for samples with aqueous or close-to-aqueous matrix composition. However, there is a variety of more complex samples. Such samples can be found in medical, biological, technological and industrial contexts and can range from body fluids, like blood or urine, to fuel additives or fermentation broths. Specialized nebulizer systems or careful digestion and dilution are required to tackle such demanding sample matrices. One alternative approach is to convert the liquid into a dried solid and to use laser ablation for sample introduction. Up to now, this approach required the application of internal standards or matrix-adjusted calibration due to matrix effects. In this contribution, we show a way to circumvent these matrix effects while using simple external calibration for quantification. The principle of representative sampling that we propose uses radial line-scans across the dried residue. This compensates for centro-symmetric inhomogeneities typically observed in dried spots. The effectiveness of the proposed sampling strategy is exemplified via the determination of phosphorus in biochemical fermentation media. However, the universal viability of the presented measurement protocol is postulated. Detection limits using laser ablation-ICP-optical emission spectrometry were in the order of 40 μg mL(- 1) with a reproducibility of 10 % relative standard deviation (n = 4, concentration = 10 times the quantification limit). The reported sensitivity is fit-for-purpose in the biochemical context described here, but could be improved using ICP-mass spectrometry, if future analytical tasks would require it. Trueness of the proposed method was investigated by cross-validation with

  12. Composition and Characteristics of Aerosols in the Southern High Plains of Texas (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Thomas E.; Stout, John E.; Peinado, Porfirio

    2009-03-10

    Aerosol samples on polycarbonate filters were collected daily for several years in the Southern High Plains region of western Texas. Selected samples representing a variety of size modes, locations, and air quality conditions were analyzed by PIXE. Silicon and other crustal elements dominated during dust storms and in the coarse mode; sulfur dominated during anthropogenic pollution episodes and in the fine mode. A mixture of both aerosol types was present even during 'clear' conditions. The Al/Si ratio in dust events increases with wind speed. These data provide an initial assessment of aerosol chemistry in the West Texas plains.

  13. Performance testing of HEPA filters: Progress towards a European standard procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Dyment, J.

    1997-08-01

    Proposals for a future European testing procedure for {open_quotes}High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters (HEPA and ULPA){close_quotes} are being developed by CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation). The new standard will be given the status of national standard in participating countries, conflicting national standards being withdrawn. The standard will comprise 5 parts covering the grouping and classification of HEPA and ULPA filters according to their efficiency, fundamental principles of testing, marking etc (in part 1). Part 2 will cover aerosol production, measurement principles, counting equipment and statistics. Parts 3-5 will cover testing flat sheet media, leak testing of filter elements and the efficiency testing of filter elements respectively. The efficiency test methods allow the use of either homogeneous monodisperse or polydisperse aerosols for the determination of particulate filtration efficiencies as a function of particle size. The particle size at which maximum penetration occurs is first determined in flat sheet media tests; tests on filter elements (constructed using the same filter medium) may be carried out using either a homogeneous monodisperse aerosol of the size at which maximum penetration occurs (MPPS) or a polydisperse aerosol whose median size is close to the MPPS. Tests with monodisperse aerosols may be conducted using condensation nucleus counting equipment; tests using polydisperse test aerosols require the use of optical sizing particle counters. When determining the efficiency of filter elements the downstream aerosol concentrations may be determined from air samples obtained using either an overall method (single point sampling after mixing) or a scan method. The scan method also allows {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} efficiency values to be determined. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Determination of malic acid and other C4 dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Andreas; Lammel, Gerhard

    2002-03-01

    An ion chromatographic method was developed which is able to separate five unsubstituted and hydroxy C4 dicarboxylic acids, succinic, malic, tartaric, maleic and fumaric acid, besides the other unsubstituted C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids, oxalic, malonic and glutaric acids, as well as inorganic ions in samples extracted from atmospheric particulate matter. By the application of this method it was found for both rural and urban sites and for various types of air masses that in the summer-time malic acid is the most prominent C4 diacid (64 ng m(-3) by average), exceeding succinic acid concentration (28 ng m(-3) by average) considerably. In winter-time considerably less, a factor of 4-15, C4 acids occurred and succinic acid was more concentrated than malic acid. Tartaric, fumaric and maleic acids were less concentrated (5.1, 5.0 and 4.5 ng m(-3) by average, respectively). Tartaric acid was observed for the first time in ambient air. The results indicate that in particular anthropogenic sources are important for the precursors of succinic, maleic and fumaric acids. Biogenic sources seem to influence the occurrence of malic acid significantly.

  15. Characterizing mineral dusts and other aerosols from the Middle East--Part 1: ambient sampling.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; McDonald, Eric V; Gillies, John A; Jayanty, R K M; Casuccio, Gary; Gertler, Alan W

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program was to provide scientifically founded information on the chemical and physical properties of dust collected over a period of approximately 1 year in Djibouti, Afghanistan (Bagram, Khowst), Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Iraq (Balad, Baghdad, Tallil, Tikrit, Taji, Al Asad), and Kuwait (northern, central, coastal, and southern regions). Three collocated low-volume particulate samplers, one each for the total suspended particulate matter, < 10 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(10)) particulate matter, and < 2.5 micro m in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) particulate matter, were deployed at each of the 15 sites, operating on a '1 in 6' day sampling schedule. Trace-element analysis was performed to measure levels of potentially harmful metals, while major-element and ion-chemistry analyses provided an estimate of mineral components. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to analyze the chemical composition of small individual particles. Secondary electron images provided information on particle size and shape. This study shows the three main air pollutant types to be geological dust, smoke from burn pits, and heavy metal condensates (possibly from metals smelting and battery manufacturing facilities). Non-dust storm events resulted in elevated trace metal concentrations in Baghdad, Balad, and Taji in Iraq. Scanning-electron-microscopy secondary electron images of individual particles revealed no evidence of freshly fractured quartz grains. In all instances, quartz grains had rounded edges and mineral grains were generally coated by clay minerals and iron oxides.

  16. Composition and Characteristics of Aerosols in the Southern High Plains of Texas (USA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol samples on polycarbonate filters were collected daily for several years in the Southern High Plains region of western Texas. Selected samples representing a variety of size modes, locations, and air quality conditions were analyzed by PIXE. Silicon and other crustal elements dominated duri...

  17. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air flow splitting components that may be used in a Class I candidate equivalent method sampler such... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream of... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a...

  18. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air flow splitting components that may be used in a Class I candidate equivalent method sampler such... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream of... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a...

  19. 40 CFR 53.59 - Aerosol transport test for Class I equivalent method samplers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air flow splitting components that may be used in a Class I candidate equivalent method sampler such... candidate samplers in which the aerosol flow path (the flow path through which sample air passes upstream of... through which sample air is flowing during performance of this test. (3) A no-flow filter is a...

  20. An Improved Method to Determine {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi and {sup 210}Po in air Aerosol Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, E. G. San; Bolivar, J. P.; Teran, T.

    2008-08-07

    {sup 222}Rn daughters (e.g. {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Po, {sup 210}Bi) have been widely used to study a variety of atmospheric processes. Many works in literature about {sup 222}Rn daughters do not specify the way by the activities of these radionuclides are calculated. Besides, {sup 210}Po corrections due to the in-growth of {sup 210}Bi, if taken into account, are not indicated. In this work, the increase in uncertainties of radionuclides activities due to delay between air sampling and radionuclides determinations have been evaluated and the influence of neglecting the contribution of {sup 210}Bi in-growth to {sup 210}Po determination has been estimated. The results indicate that, in general, ignoring the {sup 210}Bi in-growth in {sup 210}Po determinations lead to significant differences (could reach until 100%) between the estimation of {sup 210}Po activity and its true value.

  1. On-Site Test of Filters in Nuclear Facilities Using Radioactive Sodium Chloride ((24)Na)-Aerosol and Methyl Iodide ((131)I)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    tested with a 4NaCl-erosol and charcoal filters with 131I of 1 mCi used. Penetrations (1 -Jeffic ency) can be determined with a relative uncertainty...34 4. RESULTS ...................... 6......*............ . . . 38 4.1. Charcoal filters ............ 0.... 6. 60 . ..... ..0. 38 4.2...in the choice of filter- material and filter types to be used in existing charcoal filter- installations. The Air Pollution Laboratory surveyed all the

  2. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  3. Instrumental nuclear activation analysis (INAA) characterization of environmental air filter samples.

    PubMed

    Alemón, Ernesto; Herrera, Luis; Ortiz, Elba; Longoria, L C Luis C

    2004-06-01

    Nuclear techniques have been used in quantitations of environmental pollutants, and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has turned out to be particularly useful in the analysis of airborne suspended particles. This work describes the INAA characterization of the particulate material in the environmental samples obtained in a monitoring campaign in Mexico City's Metropolitan Area. As the types of the irradiation facilities and gamma-ray detection system impose some limitations on the possibilities of INAA analysis, the actual experimental conditions at Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory, where the analysis was performed, had been assessed. The facilities had been found suitable for the analysis of samples from this campaign, in which 22 elements were determined.

  4. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter < 2.5 μm) resolved aerosol samples analysed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie European Union framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the approach used is the simultaneous sampling at two monitoring sites in Barcelona (Spain) during September-October 2010: an urban background site (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non-exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (regional sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types of industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%, percentages presented are average source contributions to the total elemental mass measured). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by very good correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Some important conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both

  5. Aerosol deposition and losses in two alpha air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1985-11-27

    We assessed particle deposition and loss occurring in two alpha-air monitors: an Eberline Alpha-3 Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) and a working-area transuranic aerosol monitor (WOTAMS). We investigated the dependence of particle size on losses in the sampling inlets and the real-time alpha detector areas for both instruments. We determined the uniformity of particle deposition on the filter to ascertain the effectiveness of the detector and collection-filter configuration. Results indicate that particle losses are a strong function of particle size in the CAM unit, with a 44% loss occurring for 6-..mu..m-diameter aerosols and a 0.3% loss for 0.6-..mu..m-diameter aerosols. Losses in the WOTAMS were less than 1% for particle diameters in the 0.6-to-7 ..mu..m range.

  6. Estimating occupancy and abundance of stream amphibians using environmental DNA from filtered water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pilliod, David S.; Goldberg, Caren S.; Arkle, Robert S.; Waits, Lisette P.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) methods for detecting aquatic species are advancing rapidly, but with little evaluation of field protocols or precision of resulting estimates. We compared sampling results from traditional field methods with eDNA methods for two amphibians in 13 streams in central Idaho, USA. We also evaluated three water collection protocols and the influence of sampling location, time of day, and distance from animals on eDNA concentration in the water. We found no difference in detection or amount of eDNA among water collection protocols. eDNA methods had slightly higher detection rates than traditional field methods, particularly when species occurred at low densities. eDNA concentration was positively related to field-measured density, biomass, and proportion of transects occupied. Precision of eDNA-based abundance estimates increased with the amount of eDNA in the water and the number of replicate subsamples collected. eDNA concentration did not vary significantly with sample location in the stream, time of day, or distance downstream from animals. Our results further advance the implementation of eDNA methods for monitoring aquatic vertebrates in stream habitats.

  7. ANALYSIS OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL COMPOUNDS FROM THE PHOTOOXIDATION OF D-LIMONENE IN THE PRESENCE OF NO X AND THEIR DETECTION IN AMBIENT PM 2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photooxidation of a d-limonene/NOx/air mixture was carried out. SOA, generated in a smog chamber, was collected on Zefluor filters. To determine the structural characteristics of the compounds, the filter sample...

  8. Multiresidue determination of UV filters in water samples by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Ventura, Salvatore; Laganà, Aldo

    2014-10-01

    UV filters, contained in sunscreens and other cosmetic products, as well as in some plastics and industrial products, are nowadays considered contaminants of emerging concern because their widespread and increasing use has lead to their presence in the environment. Furthermore, some UV filters are suspected to have endocrine disruption activity. In the present work, we developed an analytical method based on liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of UV filters in tap and lake waters. Sixteen UV filters were extracted from water samples by solid-phase extraction employing graphitized carbon black as adsorbent material. Handling 200 mL of water sample, satisfactory recoveries were obtained for almost all the analytes. The limits of detection and quantification of the method were comparable to those reported in other works, and ranged between 0.7-3.5 and 1.9-11.8 ng/L, respectively; however in our case the number of investigated compounds was larger. The major encountered problem in method development was to identify the background contamination sources and reduce their contribution. UV filters were not detected in tap water samples, whereas the analyses conducted on samples collected from three different lakes showed that the swimming areas are most subject to UV filter contamination.

  9. Image-domain sampling properties of the Hotelling Observer in CT using filtered back-projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2015-03-01

    The Hotelling Observer (HO),1 along with its channelized variants,2 has been proposed for image quality evaluation in x-ray CT.3,4 In this work, we investigate HO performance for a detection task in parallel-beam FBP as a function of two image-domain sampling parameters, namely pixel size and field-of-view. These two parameters are of central importance in adapting HO methods to use in CT, since the large number of pixels in a single image makes direct computation of HO performance for a full image infeasible in most cases. Reduction of the number of image pixels and/or restriction of the image to a region-of-interest (ROI) has the potential to make direct computation of HO statistics feasible in CT, provided that the signal and noise properties lead to redundant information in some regions of the image. For small signals, we hypothesize that reduction of image pixel size and enlargement of the image field-of-view are approximately equivalent means of gaining additional information relevant to a detection task. The rationale for this hypothesis is that the backprojection operation in FBP introduces long range correlations so that, for small signals, the reconstructed signal outside of a small ROI is not linearly independent of the signal within the ROI. In this work, we perform a preliminary investigation of this hypothesis by sweeping these two sampling parameters and computing HO performance for a signal detection task.

  10. Short communication: measurements of methane emissions from feed samples in filter bags or dispersed in the medium in an in vitro gas production system.

    PubMed

    Ramin, M; Krizsan, S J; Jančík, F; Huhtanen, P

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare methane (CH4) emissions from different feeds when incubated within filter bags for in vitro analysis or directly dispersed in the medium in an automated gas in vitro system. Four different concentrates and 4 forages were used in this study. Two lactating Swedish Red cows were used for the collection of rumen fluid. Feed samples were milled to pass a 1.0-mm screen. Aliquots (0.5 g) of samples were weighed directly in the bottles or within the F 0285 filter bags that were placed in the bottles. Gas samples were taken during 24 and 48 h of incubation, and CH4 concentration was determined. The data were analyzed using a general linear model. Feeds differed significantly in CH4 emission both at 24 and at 48 h of incubation. The interaction between feed and method on methane emission in vitro was significant, indicating that the ranking of feeds was not consistent between the methods. Generally, greater amounts of CH4 were emitted from samples directly dispersed in the medium compared with those incubated within the filter bags, which could be a result of lower microbial activity within the filter bags. The ratio of CH4 to total gas was greater when the feeds were incubated within bags compared with samples directly dispersed in the medium. Incubating samples in filter bags during 48 h of incubation cannot be recommended for determination of CH4 emission of feeds in vitro.

  11. Water Soluble Ions in Bulk Aerosol During the WINTER 2015 Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Scheuer, E. M.; Brown, S. S.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Fibiger, D. L.; Guo, H.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; McDuffie, E. E.; Schroder, J. C.; Sullivan, A.; Thornton, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Weber, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected on filters from the NCAR C-130 during the WINTER campaign using an inlet believed to transmit particles up to 4 micron in diameter. Filter integration times were nominally 7 minutes. Aqueous extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for 5 anions and 5 cations, we focus primarily on chloride and nitrate due to their roles coupling chlorine and nitrogen oxide chemistry. Comparison to measurements of submicron aerosol (by PILS and AMS) indicates that there was significant coarse chloride in the boundary layer on all WINTER flights, including the 7 flights over the continent. Significant super micron chloride at altitudes above 2 km was seen in just 3 of the filter samples from the entire mission, all of these were well inland. During the 6 flights over the Atlantic ocean we observed displacement of chloride from the dominant seasalt aerosol at times, but evidence for coarse mode nitrate or sulfate aerosol to explain this is less clear. While coarse aerosol chloride mixing ratios were sufficient to support observed production of nitryl chloride, no correlations between these compounds were observed on any flights. However, nitrate was positively correlated with nitryl chloride, as expected, on all flights when the latter exceeded several 100's of pptv for extended periods. Aerosol nitrate was also positively correlated with dinitrogen pentoxide when mixing ratios of the latter exceeded ~500 pptv for significant portions of a flight. On the WINTER flights in February aerosol nitrate was often more abundant than nitric acid, this was less often the case for the flights in March. This change in partitioning of nitrate between gas and particle phases reflects an increasing trend of nitric acid and a small decrease in abundance of aerosol nitrate through the campaign.

  12. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  13. A Simple and Disposable Sampler for Inhalable Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    L’Orange, Christian; Anderson, Kimberly; Sleeth, Darrah; Anthony, T. Renée; Volckens, John

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art for personal sampling for inhalable aerosol hazards is constrained by issues of sampler cost and complexity; these issues have limited the adoption and use of some samplers by practicing hygienists. Thus, despite the known health effects of inhalable aerosol hazards, personal exposures are routinely assessed for only a small fraction of the at-risk workforce. To address the limitations of current technologies for inhalable aerosol sampling, a disposable inhalable aerosol sampler was developed and evaluated in the laboratory. The new sampler is designed to be less expensive and simpler to use than existing technologies. The sampler incorporates a lightweight internal capsule fused to the sampling filter. This capsule-filter assembly allows for the inclusion of particles deposited on the internal walls and inlet, thus minimizing the need to wash or wipe the interior sampling cassette when conducting gravimetric analyses. Sampling efficiency and wall losses were tested in a low-velocity wind tunnel with particles ranging from 9.5 to 89.5 μm. The results were compared to the proposed low-velocity inhalability criterion as well as published data on the IOM sampler. Filter weight stability and time-to-equilibrium were evaluated as these factors affect the practicality of a design. Preliminary testing of the new sampler showed good agreement with both the IOM and the proposed low-velocity inhalability curve. The capsule and filter assemblies reached equilibrium within 25h of manufacturing when conditioned at elevated temperatures. After reaching equilibrium, the capsule-filter assemblies were stable within 0.01mg. PMID:26467335

  14. A missing source of aerosols in Antarctica - beyond long-range transport, phytoplankton, and photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Michael R.; Kalnajs, Lars E.; Avery, Anita; Goetz, J. Douglas; Davis, Sean M.; DeCarlo, Peter F.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the sources and evolution of aerosols is crucial for constraining the impacts that aerosols have on a global scale. An unanswered question in atmospheric science is the source and evolution of the Antarctic aerosol population. Previous work over the continent has primarily utilized low temporal resolution aerosol filters to answer questions about the chemical composition of Antarctic aerosols. Bulk aerosol sampling has been useful in identifying seasonal cycles in the aerosol populations, especially in populations that have been attributed to Southern Ocean phytoplankton emissions. However, real-time, high-resolution chemical composition data are necessary to identify the mechanisms and exact timing of changes in the Antarctic aerosol. The recent 2ODIAC (2-Season Ozone Depletion and Interaction with Aerosols Campaign) field campaign saw the first ever deployment of a real-time, high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS - soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - or AMS) to the continent. Data obtained from the AMS, and a suite of other aerosol, gas-phase, and meteorological instruments, are presented here. In particular, this paper focuses on the aerosol population over coastal Antarctica and the evolution of that population in austral spring. Results indicate that there exists a sulfate mode in Antarctica that is externally mixed with a mass mode vacuum aerodynamic diameter of 250 nm. Springtime increases in sulfate aerosol are observed and attributed to biogenic sources, in agreement with previous research identifying phytoplankton activity as the source of the aerosol. Furthermore, the total Antarctic aerosol population is shown to undergo three distinct phases during the winter to summer transition. The first phase is dominated by highly aged sulfate particles comprising the majority of the aerosol mass at low wind speed. The second phase, previously unidentified, is the generation of a sub-250 nm aerosol population of unknown composition

  15. Aerosol generation by blower motors as a bias in assessing aerosol penetration into cabin filtration systems.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Collingwood, Scott

    2005-01-01

    In cabin filtration systems, blower motors pressurize a vehicle cabin with clean filtered air and recirculate air through an air-conditioning evaporator coil and a heater core. The exposure reduction offered by these cabins is evaluated by optical particle counters that measure size-dependent aerosol concentration inside and outside the cabin. The ratio of the inside-to-outside concentration is termed penetration. Blower motors use stationary carbon brushes to transmit an electrical current through a rotating armature that abrades the carbon brushes. This creates airborne dust that may affect experimental evaluations of aerosol penetration. To evaluate the magnitude of these dust emissions, blower motors were placed in a test chamber and operated at 12 and 13.5 volts DC. A vacuum cleaner drew 76 m3/hour (45 cfm) of air through HEPA filters, the test chamber, and through a 5 cm diameter pipe. An optical particle counter drew air through an isokinetic sampling probe and measured the size-dependent particle concentrations from 0.3 to 15 microm. The concentration of blower motor aerosol was between 2 x 10(5) and 1.8 x 10(6) particles/m3. Aerosol penetration into three stationary vehicles, two pesticide application vehicles and one tractor were measured at two conditions: low concentration (outside in the winter) and high concentration (inside repair shops and burning incense sticks used as a supplemental aerosol source). For particles smaller than 1 microm, the in-cabin concentrations can be explained by the blower motor emissions. For particles larger than 1 microm, other aerosol sources, such as resuspended dirt, are present. Aerosol generated by the operation of the blower motor and by other sources can bias the exposure reduction measured by optical particle counters.

  16. Evaluation of a simple and cost effective filter paper-based shipping and storage medium for environmental sampling of F-RNA coliphages.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Méndez, A; Chandler, J C; Bisha, B; Coleman, S M; Zhanqiang, S; Gang, Y; Goodridge, L D

    2013-12-01

    Male specific RNA (F-RNA) coliphages are used as indicators of fecal contamination and for source tracking. However, collecting fecal samples for analysis from remote sites is problematic due to the need for an uninterrupted cold chain to guarantee sample suitability for downstream molecular detection of these coliphages. Here, we investigated the feasibility of using filter paper as a collection and storage vehicle for F-RNA coliphages. Various concentrations (10(1) to 10(4)pfu) of two F-RNA coliphages, MS2 and Qβ, were prepared in lambda buffer or a 10% bovine manure slurry, spotted onto filter paper disks, dried, and maintained at 37 °C for up to 37 days. Nucleic acids were extracted from the spotted filter paper disks at 0, 6, 13, and 37 days post inoculation and analyzed by real time RT-PCR. F-RNA coliphages at concentrations of 10(2)pfu/filter paper unit were readily detected, and only a slight decrease in nucleic acid detection was observed over time. Furthermore, the sensitivity of real time RT-PCR detection of the F-RNA coliphage RNA was similar between the developed filter paper sampling methodology and traditional cold storage. These results indicate that filter paper is a suitable storage and transport medium for F-RNA coliphages when refrigeration is not possible.

  17. [Comparison of EC/OC in PM2.5 between filter sampling off-line analysis and in situ on-line measurement].

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Deng, Zhi-qiang; Wang, Yi; Lin, Peng; Zeng, Li-min; Yutaka, Kondo; Zhao, Yong-jing

    2008-12-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in PM2.5 were measured simultaneously at the campus of Peking University from January 2006 to April 2007 by two common used methodologies. One is quartz filter sampling followed by off-line SUNSET Lab EC/OC analyzer and the other is SUNSET in-situ on-line EC/OC analyzer. The comparison shows significant differences on OC measurements between the two methods. The results by filter sampling off-line analysis were as twice high as those by in-situ on-line method. The volatile organic carbons (VOCs) adsorbed by quartz filter led to considerable positive error of OC. The use of parallel plate organic denuder can eliminate such error but cause the evaporation of semi-volatile organic carbon on the filter which induces another negative error of OC, about 10%. The improved method of filter sampling off-line analysis using both parallel plate organic denuder and backup filter has a good agreement with in-situ online measurement.

  18. Isotopic ratios of nitrate in aerosol samples from Mt. Lulin, a high-altitude station in Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Tania; Lin, C. T.; Bhattacharya, S. K.; Mahajan, A. S.; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Lan, Yi-Ping; Hsu, S. C.; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2017-04-01

    The importance of Asian countries towards increase of atmospheric pollutants is being examined critically in recent times. In this context, we carried out analysis of nitrates separated from aerosol samples collected during 2010 from Mt. Lulin (NOAA code: LLN), Taiwan, located at an altitude of 2 862 m above sea level. Large temporal variations are seen in δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O values of the nitrate, with day-to-day variations comparable to the seasonal amplitude. The δ15N values of nitrate are found to be higher in spring months (March-April; -1±3‰) and lower in summer (June-September; -5±3‰). Similarly, the δ18O (69 ± 15‰ versus 32 ± 13‰) and Δ17O (23 ± 5‰ versus 12 ± 4‰) values are higher in spring and lower in summer. The lowest δ18O value observed was 10.8‰. The higher values of δ15N in spring could be attributed to enhanced contribution from fossil fuel combustions, especially burning of coal in nearby Asian countries like China, with the resultant pollutants being brought to the Lulin station by long-range transport. An alternative explanation is the isotopic exchange reaction between N2O5 and HNO3 that elevates the δ15N value in nitrate. The oxygen isotope variability is explained by changes in contribution from two major pathways of nitrate formation from its precursor NOx molecules. During spring time, nitrate formation via the N2O5 pathway is dominant, resulting in higher values of both δ18O and Δ17O. In contrast, during summer, formation involving HO2/RO2 radicals becomes important, producing lower values of δ18O and Δ17O. A chemistry box model was used to study the nitrate formation pathways through oxidation of NO and NO2 via formation of NO2 and NO3-/HNO3. Both the model results and observations suggest that for the formation of NO2 from NO, the pathway via O3 is more active in spring, whereas in summer the pathway via HO2/RO2 radicals predominates. For the subsequent formation of NO3- and HNO3, the OH pathway is more

  19. Chemical Characterization of the Aerosol During the CLAMS Experiment Using Aircraft and Ground Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Remer, L.; Yamasoe, M.; Fattori, A.

    2002-05-01

    During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment Nuclepore filters were collected in two ground stations and aboard the University of Wasghington's Convair 580 Reserarch Aircraft. The two ground stations were chosen in strategic positions to characterize the chemical composition, the mass concentration, black carbon (BC) content, and the absorption properties of the aerosol particles at the surface level. One of the stations was located at the Cheasapeake lighthouse (25 km from the coast) and the other one was located at the Wallops Island. Aerosol particles where collected in two stages, fine (d<2.5um) and coarse mode (2.5filters mounted in stacked filter units (SFU). The filters were integrated for 12 hours continuously separating day and night samples during the experiment. Airborne samples were also collected on the UW Convair 580 Aircraft. The aircraft samples where used to characterize the elemental composition, mass concentration, BC content, and absorption properties of the aerosol in the atmospheric column in the CLAMS Experiment area. Some of the filters were also submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis. The particulate matter mass for all the samples were obtained gravimetrically. The concentration of black carbon in the fine filters was optically determined by a broadband reflectance technique. The spectral (from UV to near IR) reflectance in the fine and coarse mode filter were also obtained with a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer. Aerosol elemental characterization (Na through Pb) was obtained by the PIXE (Particle induced X ray emission) analyses of the nuclepore filters. The sources of the aerosol measured at the ground stations were estimated by principal component analyses mainly in the Wallops Island, where a longer time series was collected. One of the main urban components identified in the aerosol during the experiment was sulfate. Black carbon

  20. Biogenic sulfur emissions and aerosols over the tropical South Atlantic: 3. Atmospheric dimethylsulfide, aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Elbert, Wolfgang; de Mora, Stephen J.

    1995-06-01

    We measured dimethylsulfide in air (DMSa) and the number concentration, size distribution, and chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, including the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), during February-March 1991 over the tropical South Atlantic along 19°S (F/S Meteor, cruise 15/3). Aerosol number/size distributions were determined with a laser-optical particle counter, condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations with a TSI 3020, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with a Hudson-type supersaturation chamber. Aerosol samples were collected on two-stage stacked filters and analyzed by ion chromatography for soluble ion concentrations. Black carbon in aerosols was measured by visible light absorption and used to identify and eliminate periods with anthropogenic pollution from the data set. Meteorological analysis shows that most of the air masses sampled had spent extended periods over remote marine areas in the tropical and subtropical region. DMSa was closely correlated with the sea-to- air DMS flux calculated from DMS concentrations in seawater and meteorological data. Sea salt made the largest contribution to aerosol mass and volume but provided only a small fraction of the aerosol number concentration. The submicron aerosol had a mean composition close to ammonium bisulfate, with the addition of some methanesulfonate. Aerosol (CN and CCN) number and non-sea-salt sulfate concentrations were significantly correlated with DMS concentration and flux. This suggests that DMS oxidation followed by aerosol nucleation and growth in the marine boundary layer is an important, if not dominating, source of CN and possibly CCN. The degree of correlation between DMS and particle concentrations in the marine boundary layer may be strongly influenced by the different time scales of the processes regulating these concentrations. Our results provide strong support for several aspects of the CLAW hypothesis, which proposes the existence of a feedback loop linking DMS

  1. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  2. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (<0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples. These continuous spectra have also been used to obtain the

  3. ATI TDA 5A aerosol generator evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, D.A.

    1998-07-27

    Oil based aerosol ``Smoke`` commonly used for testing the efficiency and penetration of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters (HEPA) and HEPA systems can produce flammability hazards that may not have been previously considered. A combustion incident involving an aerosol generator has caused an investigation into the hazards of the aerosol used to test HEPA systems at Hanford.

  4. A new device for magnetic stirring-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of UV filters in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping-Ping; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2011-02-15

    A new method based on dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the analysis of UV filters. A specially designed flask, which has two narrow open necks with one of them having a capillary tip, was employed to facilitate the DLLME process. By adopting such a device, the extraction and subsequent phase separation were conveniently achieved. A binary solvent system of water sample and low-density extraction solvent (1-octanol) was used for the DLLME and no disperser solvent was involved. The extraction was accelerated by magnetic agitation of the two phases. After extraction, phase separation of the extraction solvent from the aqueous sample was easily achieved by leaving the extraction system statically for a while. No centrifugation step involving in classical DLLME was necessary. The analyte-enriched phase, floating above the sample solution, was elevated and concentrated into the narrow open tip of the flask by adding pure water into it via the other port, which was withdrawn with a microsyringe for the subsequent HPLC analysis. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection for the analytes were in range of 0.2-0.8ngmL(-1) .The linearity ranges were 8-20,000 ng mL(-1) for HB, 7-20,000 ng mL(-1) for DB, 8-10,000 ng mL(-1) for BP and 5-20,000 ng mL(-1) for HMB, respectively. Enrichment factors ranging from 59 to 107 folders were obtained for the analytes. The relative standard deviations (n=3) at a spiked level of 80 ng mL(-1) were between 1.4 and 4.8%. The proposed magnetic stirring-assisted DLLME method was successfully applied to the analysis of lake water samples.

  5. Automated method for simultaneous lead and strontium isotopic analysis applied to rainwater samples and airborne particulate filters (PM10).

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Blanca; Avivar, Jessica; Mola, Montserrat; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor; Leal, Luz O

    2013-09-03

    A new automated, sensitive, and fast system for the simultaneous online isolation and preconcentration of lead and strontium by sorption on a microcolumn packed with Sr-resin using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detector was developed, hyphenating lab-on-valve (LOV) and multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA). Pb and Sr are directly retained on the sorbent column and eluted with a solution of 0.05 mol L(-1) ammonium oxalate. The detection limits achieved were 0.04 ng for lead and 0.03 ng for strontium. Mass calibration curves were used since the proposed system allows the use of different sample volumes for preconcentration. Mass linear working ranges were between 0.13 and 50 ng and 0.1 and 50 ng for lead and strontium, respectively. The repeatability of the method, expressed as RSD, was 2.1% and 2.7% for Pb and Sr, respectively. Environmental samples such as rainwater and airborne particulate (PM10) filters as well as a certified reference material SLRS-4 (river water) were satisfactorily analyzed obtaining recoveries between 90 and 110% for both elements. The main features of the LOV-MSFIA-ICP-MS system proposed are the capability to renew solid phase extraction at will in a fully automated way, the remarkable stability of the column which can be reused up to 160 times, and the potential to perform isotopic analysis.

  6. Comparative measurements of stratospheric particulate content by aircraft and ground-based lidar. [aerosol sampling and scattering data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viezee, W.; Russell, P. B.; Hake, R. D., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The matching method of lidar data analysis is explained, and the results from two flights studying the stratospheric aerosol using lidar techniques are summarized and interpreted. Support is lent to the matching method of lidar data analysis by the results, but it is not yet apparent that the analysis technique leads to acceptable results on all nights in all seasons.

  7. Development of a continuous aerosol mass concentration measurement device.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Thomas, D; Contal, P; Subra, I

    2003-08-01

    A dynamic aerosol mass concentration measurement device has been developed for personal sampling. Its principle consists in sampling the aerosol on a filter and monitoring the change of pressure drop over time (Delta P). Ensuring that the linearity of the Delta P = f(mass of particles per unit area of filter) relationship has been well established, the change of concentration can be deduced. The response of the system was validated in the laboratory with a 3.5 microm alumina aerosol (mass median diameter) generated inside a 1-m(3) ventilated enclosure. As the theory predicted that the mass sensitivity of the system would vary inversely with the square of the particle diameter, only sufficiently fine aerosols were able to be measured. The system was tested in the field in a mechanical workshop in the vicinity of an arc-welding station. The aerosol produced by welding is indeed particularly well-adapted due to the sub-micronic size of the particles. The device developed, despite this limitation, has numerous advantages over other techniques: robustness, compactness, reliability of calibration, and ease of use.

  8. Filter quality of pleated filter cartridges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Wan; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Chiang, Che-Ming; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2008-04-01

    The performance of dust cartridge filters commonly used in dust masks and in room ventilation depends both on the collection efficiency of the filter material and the pressure drop across the filter. Currently, the optimization of filter design is based only on minimizing the pressure drop at a set velocity chosen by the manufacturer. The collection efficiency, an equally important factor, is rarely considered in the optimization process. In this work, a filter quality factor, which combines the collection efficiency and the pressure drop, is used as the optimization criterion for filter evaluation. Most respirator manufacturers pleat the filter to various extents to increase the filtration area in the limit space within the dust cartridge. Six sizes of filter holders were fabricated to hold just one pleat of filter, simulating six different pleat counts, ranging from 0.5 to 3.33 pleats cm(-1). The possible electrostatic charges on the filter were removed by dipping in isopropyl alcohol, and the air velocity is fixed at 100 cm s(-1). Liquid dicotylphthalate particles generated by a constant output atomizer were used as challenge aerosols to minimize particle loading effects. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure the challenge aerosol number concentrations and size distributions upstream and downstream of the pleated filter. The pressure drop across the filter was monitored by using a calibrated pressure transducer. The results showed that the performance of pleated filters depend not only on the size of the particle but also on the pleat count of the pleated filter. Based on filter quality factor, the optimal pleat count (OPC) is always higher than that based on pressure drop by about 0.3-0.5 pleats cm(-1). For example, the OPC is 2.15 pleats cm(-1) from the standpoint of pressure drop, but for the highest filter quality factor, the pleated filter needed to have a pleat count of 2.65 pleats cm(-1) at particle diameter of 122 nm. From the aspect of

  9. Filter extraction and Ames bioassay results for EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) particulate samples. Final report September 1983-May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Warner-Selph, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    This report describes filter extractions and Ames bioassay of filter extracts performed for the Emission Control Technology Division of Environmental Protection Agency. Eight sets of particulate-loaded filters were provided to SwRI by the sponsor. The filters were soxhlet-extracted in methylene chloride, and the extracts were dried and weighed. The organic extracts were analyzed using the Ames bioassay at Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR), formerly Southwest Foundation for Research and Education. The data were analyzed using linear and non-linear regression methods.

  10. ISS Ambient Air Quality: Updated Inventory of Known Aerosol Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft cabin air quality is of fundamental importance to crew health, with concerns encompassing both gaseous contaminants and particulate matter. Little opportunity exists for direct measurement of aerosol concentrations on the International Space Station (ISS), however, an aerosol source model was developed for the purpose of filtration and ventilation systems design. This model has successfully been applied, however, since the initial effort, an increase in the number of crewmembers from 3 to 6 and new processes on board the ISS necessitate an updated aerosol inventory to accurately reflect the current ambient aerosol conditions. Results from recent analyses of dust samples from ISS, combined with a literature review provide new predicted aerosol emission rates in terms of size-segregated mass and number concentration. Some new aerosol sources have been considered and added to the existing array of materials. The goal of this work is to provide updated filtration model inputs which can verify that the current ISS filtration system is adequate and filter lifetime targets are met. This inventory of aerosol sources is applicable to other spacecraft, and becomes more important as NASA considers future long term exploration missions, which will preclude the opportunity for resupply of filtration products.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    to carbonyl- and nitro- functional groups on conjugated and aromatic organic structures (e.g. PAH, and terpene derived products). Using 12-hour fine (0.1-1.0 micron) aerosol samples collected in the field on quartz filters, uv/vis and infrared spectra were obtained in the laboratory using integrating spheres and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, respectively. An inter-comparison of the "real-time" measurements made by the photo-acoustic, aethalometer and MAAP techniques have been described. In addition, the in situ aethalometer (seven-channel) results are compared with continuous integrating sphere uv-visible spectra to examine the angstrom absorption coefficient variance. These results will be briefly overviewed and the specific posters detailing these results will be highlighted highlighted. This work was performed as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City under the support of the Atmospheric Science Program. "This researchwas supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329.

  12. Aerosol iron and aluminum solubility in the northwest Pacific Ocean: Results from the 2002 IOC cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Clifton S.; Landing, William M.; Resing, Joseph A.; Lebon, Geoffrey T.

    2006-04-01

    Dust aerosol samples were collected across the western North Pacific Ocean during May-June 2002. Samples were analyzed for soluble aerosol Fe(II), Fe(II) + Fe(III), and Al as well as major cations and anions. The aerosol samples were leached using a 10 second exposure to either filtered surface seawater or ultrapure deionized water yielding a measure of the "instantaneous" soluble fraction. A variety of analytical methods were employed, including 57Fe isotope dilution high-resolution ICP-MS, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, graphite furnace AAS, ion chromatography, and the FeLume chemiluminescent technique. Fe was found to be more soluble in ultrapure deionized water leaches, especially during periods of higher dust concentrations. Fe solubility averaged 9 ± 8% in ultrapure water leaches and 6 ± 5% in seawater leaches. Significant correlations were found between both soluble aerosol FeT and soluble Fe(II) concentrations and aerosol acidity; however, the percentages of soluble aerosol FeT and Fe(II) did not correlate with aerosol acidity We also did not observe significant correlations between total and soluble aerosol Fe concentrations and the concentrations of either particulate Fe or dissolved Fe in surface waters.

  13. Diurnal Variation and Spatial Distribution Effects on Sulfur Speciation in Aerosol Samples as Assessed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES)

    PubMed Central

    Pongpiachan, Siwatt; Thumanu, Kanjana; Na Pattalung, Warangkana; Hirunyatrakul, Phoosak; Kittikoon, Itthipon; Ho, Kin Fai; Cao, Junji

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on providing new results relating to the impacts of Diurnal variation, Vertical distribution, and Emission source on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of aerosol samples. All aerosol samples used in the diurnal variation experiment were preserved using anoxic preservation stainless cylinders (APSCs) and pressure-controlled glove boxes (PCGBs), which were specially designed to prevent oxidation of the sulfur states in PM10. Further investigation of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra revealed that PM10 samples were dominated by S(VI), even when preserved in anoxic conditions. The “Emission source effect” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 was examined by comparing sulfur K-edge XANES spectra collected from various emission sources in southern Thailand, while “Vertical distribution effects” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 were made with samples collected from three different altitudes from rooftops of the highest buildings in three major cities in Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that neither “Emission source” nor “Vertical distribution” appreciably contribute to the characteristic fingerprint of sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum in PM10. PMID:22988545

  14. Development, evaluation and comparison of two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde vapors and condensation aerosols in air† ‡

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in air have been developed, evaluated and compared (1) a reagent-coated solid sorbent HPLC-UV method and (2) an impinger-fluorescence method. In the first method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L min−1 with a sampler containing 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). After sampling, excess DNPH in ethyl acetate is added to the sampler prior to storage for 68 hours. The OPA-DNPH derivative is eluted with 4.0 mL of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for measurement by HPLC with a UV detector set at 3S5 nm. The estimated detection limit is 0.016 µg per sample or 0.067 µg m−3 (0.012 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of vapor spikes at levels of 1.2 to 6.2 µg were 96 to 101%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapor and condensation aerosols were 97 to 100%. In the second method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L mm−1 with a midget impinger containing 10 mL of DMSO solution containing N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. The fluorescence reading is taken 80 min after the completion of air sampling. Since the time of taking the fluorescence reading is critical, the reading is taken with a portable fluorometer. The estimated detection limit is 0.024 µg per sample or 0.1 µg m−3 (0.018 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of OPA vapor spikes at levels of 1.4 to 5.0 µg per sample were 97 to 105%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapors and condensation aerosols were 95 to 99%. The collection efficiency for a mixture of vapor and condensation aerosol was 99.4%. The two methods were compared side-by-side in a generation system constructed for producing controlled atmospheres of OPA vapor in air. Average air concentrations of OPA vapor found by both methods agreed within ±10%. PMID:26346658

  15. Carbon Isotopic Measurements and Aerosol Optical Determinations during CARES: Indications of the Importance of Background Biogenic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Begum, M.; Sturchio, N. C.; Guilderson, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    High volume size-fractionated aerosol samples were obtained in Cool, CA during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June of 2010. This site was chosen to study the regional impacts of carbonaceous aerosols originating from the Sacramento area. Samples were collected for 6 to 24 hour time periods on quartz fiber filters by using slotted impactors to allow for collection of sample size cuts above and below one micron. Both total carbon content and carbon isotopic composition, including 13C/12C and 14C, were determined on the samples. In addition, Ångstrom absorption exponents (AAEs) were determined for the region of 300-900 nm on the sub-micron size cut by using state of the art diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectroscopy with integrating sphere technology. The overall carbonaceous aerosol loadings were found to be quite low and relatively constant during the study, suggesting that most of the aerosols at the site were locally formed background aerosols. The 14C data is consistent with a substantial fraction (~80 %) being from modern carbon sources and 13C/12C results indicate that the carbon source was from C-3 plants. This is consistent with a significant fraction of the aerosols in the area arising from secondary formation from biogenic precursor emissions from trees, most likely mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results are compared to past results obtained in Mexico City and discussed in terms of the potential importance of biogenic emissions to UV absorbing aerosols as these are anticipated to increase with climate change. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328 and Grant No. DE-FG02-07-ER64329 as part of the Atmospheric Systems Research program.

  16. Chemical characterization and physico-chemical properties of aerosols at Villum Research Station, Greenland during spring 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasius, M.; Iversen, L. S.; Svendsen, S. B.; Hansen, A. M. K.; Nielsen, I. E.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Zhang, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Skov, H.; Massling, A.; Bilde, M.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of aerosols on the radiation balance and climate are of special concern in Arctic areas, which have experienced warming at twice the rate of the global average. As future scenarios include increased emissions of air pollution, including sulfate aerosols, from ship traffic and oil exploration in the Arctic, there is an urgent need to obtain the fundamental scientific knowledge to accurately assess the consequences of pollutants to environment and climate. In this work, we studied the chemistry of aerosols at the new Villum Research Station (81°36' N, 16°40' W) in north-east Greenland during the "inauguration campaign" in spring 2015. The chemical composition of sub-micrometer Arctic aerosols was investigated using a Soot Particle Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-ToF-AMS). Aerosol samples were also collected on filters using both a high-volume sampler and a low-volume sampler equipped with a denuder for organic gases. Chemical analyses of filter samples include determination of inorganic anions and cations using ion-chromatography, and analysis of carboxylic acids and organosulfates of anthropogenic and biogenic origin using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Previous studies found that organosulfates constitute a surprisingly high fraction of organic aerosols during the Arctic Haze period in winter and spring. Investigation of organic molecular tracers provides useful information on aerosol sources and atmospheric processes. The physico-chemical properties of Arctic aerosols are also under investigation. These measurements include particle number size distribution, water activity and surface tension of aerosol samples in order to deduct information on their hygroscopicity and cloud-forming potential. The results of this study are relevant to understanding aerosol sources and processes as well as climate effects in the Arctic, especially during the Arctic haze

  17. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Patricia A; Pullin, Michael J; Cabaniss, Stephen E; Zhou, Qunhui; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, Ksenija; Aiken, George R

    2002-05-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (rho), absorbance at 280 nm normalized to moles C (epsilon280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO > XAD-8 > RFW > XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between

  18. A comparison of surface water natural organic matter in raw filtered water samples, XAD, and reverse osmosis isolates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurice, P.A.; Pullin, M.J.; Cabaniss, S.E.; Zhou, Q.; Namjesnik-Dejanovic, K.; Aiken, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    This research compared raw filtered waters (RFWs), XAD resin isolates (XAD-8 and XAD-4), and reverse osmosis (RO) isolates of several surface water samples from McDonalds Branch, a small freshwater fen in the New Jersey Pine Barrens (USA). RO and XAD-8 are two of the most common techniques used to isolate natural organic matter (NOM) for studies of composition and reactivity; therefore, it is important to understand how the isolates differ from bulk (unisolated) samples and from one another. Although, any comparison between the isolation methods needs to consider that XAD-8 is specifically designed to isolate the humic fraction, whereas RO concentrates a broad range of organic matter and is not specific to humics. The comparison included for all samples: weight average molecular weight (Mw), number average molecular weight (Mn), polydispersity (??), absorbance at 280nm normalized to moles C (??280) (RFW and isolates); and for isolates only: elemental analysis, % carbon distribution by 13C NMR, and aqueous FTIR spectra. As expected, RO isolation gave higher yield of NOM than XAD-8, but also higher ash content, especially Si and S. Mw decreased in the order: RO>XAD-8>RFW>XAD-4. The Mw differences of isolates compared with RFW may be due to selective isolation (fractionation), or possibly in the case of RO to condensation or coagulation during isolation. 13C NMR results were roughly similar for the two methods, but the XAD-8 isolate was slightly higher in 'aromatic' C and the RO isolate was slightly higher in heteroaliphatic and carbonyl C. Infrared spectra indicated a higher carboxyl content for the XAD-8 isolates and a higher ester:carboxyl ratio for the RO isolates. The spectroscopic data thus are consistent with selective isolation of more hydrophobic compounds by XAD-8, and also with potential ester hydrolysis during that process, although further study is needed to determine whether ester hydrolysis does indeed occur. Researchers choosing between XAD and RO

  19. Proton induced γ-ray emission yields for the analysis of light elements in aerosol samples in an external beam set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Portarena, S.

    2010-05-01

    The PIXE technique is a reliable tool for the characterisation of thin aerosol samples, but it can underestimate the lightest measurable elements, like Na, Mg, Al, Si and P, owing to the absorption of their X-rays inside the sample. The PIGE technique is a valid help to determine corrections for such effect: in order to perform PIGE measurements relative to thin reference standards in an external beam set-up, we measured, at the external beam facility of the Tandetron accelerator of the LABEC laboratory in Florence, the γ-ray yields as a function of the proton beam energy for the reactions 19F(p,p'γ) 19F ( Eγ = 110 and 197 keV), 23Na(p,p'γ) 23Na ( Eγ = 440 keV) and 27Al(p,p'γ) 27Al ( Eγ = 843 and 1013 keV), in the proton energy range from 3 to 5 MeV. The measured yields are shown, and the determined most suitable energies for performing PIGE quantification of Na and Al are reported, together with the corresponding minimum detection limits (MDLs). The results of some test on PIGE accuracy and an evaluation of self-absorption effects in PIXE measurements on thin aerosol samples are also presented.

  20. Huygens Probe Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, M.; Cabane, J.-F.; Brun, G.; Niemann, S.; Way, H.; Riedler, W.; Steller, M.; Raulin, F.; Coscia, D.

    2002-07-01

    ACP's main objective is the chemical analysis of the aerosols in Titan's atmosphere. For this purpose, it will sample the aerosols during descent and prepare the collected matter (by evaporation, pyrolysis and gas products transfer) for analysis by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS). A sampling system is required for sampling the aerosols in the 135-32 km and 22-17 km altitude regions of Titan's atmosphere. A pump unit is used to force the gas flow through a filter. In its sampling position, the filter front face extends a few mm beyond the inlet tube. The oven is a pyrolysis furnace where a heating element can heat the filter and hence the sampled aerosols to 250°C or 600°C. The oven contains the filter, which has a thimble-like shape (height 28 mm). For transferring effluent gas and pyrolysis products to GCMS, the carrier gas is a labeled nitrogen 15N2, to avoid unwanted secondary reactions with Titan's atmospheric nitrogen. Aeraulic tests under cold temperature conditions were conducted by using a cold gas test system developed by ONERA. The objective of the test was to demonstrate the functional ability of the instrument during the descent of the probe and to understand its thermal behavior, that is to test the performance of all its components, pump unit and mechanisms. In order to validate ACP's scientific performance, pyrolysis tests were conducted at LISA on solid phase material synthesized from experimental simulation. The chromatogram obtained by GCMS analysis shows many organic compounds. Some GC peaks appear clearly from the total mass spectra, with specific ions well identified thanks to the very high sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. The program selected for calibrating the flight model is directly linked to the GCMS calibration plan. In order not to pollute the two flight models with products of solid samples such as tholins, we excluded any direct pyrolysis tests through the ACP oven during the first phase of the

  1. Huygens Probe Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, G.; Cabane, M.; Brun, J.-F.; Niemann, H.; Way, S.; Riedler, W.; Steller, M.; Raulin, F.; Coscia, D.

    2002-07-01

    ACP's main objective is the chemical analysis of the aerosols in Titan's atmosphere. For this purpose, it will sample the aerosols during descent and prepare the collected matter (by evaporation, pyrolysis and gas products transfer) for analysis by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS). A sampling system is required for sampling the aerosols in the 135'32 km and 22'17 km altitude regions of Titan's atmosphere. A pump unit is used to force the gas flow through a filter. In its sampling position, the filter front face extends a few mm beyond the inlet tube. The oven is a pyrolysis furnace where a heating element can heat the filter and hence the sampled aerosols to 250 °C or 600 °C. The oven contains the filter, which has a thimble-like shape (height 28 mm). For transferring effluent gas and pyrolysis products to GCMS, the carrier gas is a labeled nitrogen 15N2, to avoid unwanted secondary reactions with Titan's atmospheric nitrogen. Aeraulic tests under cold temperature conditions were conducted by using a cold gas test system developed by ONERA. The objective of the test was to demonstrate the functional ability of the instrument during the descent of the probe and to understand its thermal behavior, that is to test the performance of all its components, pump unit and mechanisms. In order to validate ACP's scientific performance, pyrolysis tests were conducted at LISA on solid phase material synthesized from experimental simulation. The chromatogram obtained by GCMS analysis shows many organic compounds. Some GC peaks appear clearly from the total mass spectra, with specific ions well identified thanks to the very high sensitivity of the mass spectrometer. The program selected for calibrating the flight model is directly linked to the GCMS calibration plan. In order not to pollute the two flight models with products of solid samples such as tholins, we excluded any direct pyrolysis tests through the ACP oven during the first phase of the

  2. NASA GES DISC Level 2 Aerosol Analysis and Visualization Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Jennifer; Petrenko, Maksym; Ichoku, Charles; Yang, Wenli; Johnson, James; Zhao, Peisheng; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Overview of NASA GES DISC Level 2 aerosol analysis and visualization services: DQViz (Data Quality Visualization)MAPSS (Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System), and MAPSS_Explorer (Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System Explorer).

  3. Investigation of dry powder inhaler (DPI) resistance and aerosol dispersion timing on emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle sizing by multistage cascade impactor when sampled volume is reduced from compendial value of 4 L.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Hlack; Arp, Jan; Chambers, Frank; Copley, Mark; Glaab, Volker; Hammond, Mark; Solomon, Derek; Bradford, Kerry; Russell, Theresa; Sizer, Yvonne; Nichols, Steven C; Roberts, Daryl L; Shelton, Christopher; Greguletz, Roland; Mitchell, Jolyon P

    2014-10-01

    Compendial methods determining dry powder inhaler (DPI)-emitted aerosol aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) collect a 4-L air sample containing the aerosol bolus, where the flow, which propagates through the cascade impactor (CI) measurement system from the vacuum source, is used to actuate the inhaler. A previous article described outcomes with two CIs (Andersen eight-stage cascade impactor (ACI) and Next-Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI)) when the air sample volume was ≤4 L with moderate-resistance DPIs. This article extends that work, examining the hypothesis that DPI flow resistance may be a factor in determining outcomes. APSD measurements were made using the same CI systems with inhalers representing low and high flow resistance extremes (Cyclohaler® and HandiHaler® DPIs, respectively). The ratio of sample volume to internal dead space (normalized volume (V*)) was varied from 0.25 to 1.98 (NGI) and from 0.43 to 3.46 (ACI). Inhaler resistance was a contributing factor to the rate of bolus transfer; the higher resistance DPI completing bolus relocation to the NGI pre-separator via the inlet when V* was as small as 0.25, whereas only ca. 50% of the bolus mass was collected at this condition with the Cyclohaler® DPI. Size fractionation of the bolus from either DPI was completed within the ACI at smaller values of V* than within the NGI. Bolus transfer from the Cyclohaler® capsule and from the HandiHaler® to the ACI system were unaffected by the different flow rise time observed in the two different flow controller systems, and the effects the ACI-based on APSD measurements were marginal.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - BASF CORPORATION AX/BA-14/9-SAXP FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC. L4347 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - ALBANY INTERNATIONAL CORP. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES PRIMATEX PLUS I FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  7. Carbon isotope based aerosol source apportionment in Eastern European city Vilnius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Sapolaite, Justina; Garbariene, Inga; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Pocevicius, Matas; Krikscikas, Laurynas; Jacevicius, Sarunas; Plukis, Arturas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-04-01

    We present carbonaceous aerosol source apportionment results in Eastern European city Vilnius (capital of Lithuania) using stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) and radiocarbon (14C) methods. The aerosol sampling campaigns were performed in 2014-2016 winter seasons in Vilnius. PM1 particles were collected on quartz fiber filters using high volume sampler, while PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles were collected using low volume and MOUDI 128 cascade impactor respectively. δ13C values were measured with EA-IRMS system while radiocarbon analysis was performed using Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometer (SSAMS). For the AMS analysis, filters (or aluminium foils from cascade impactor) were graphitized using Automated Graphitization Equipment. It was estimated that dominant carbonaceous aerosol source in Vilnius was of biogenic/biomass origin (60-90 %). Fossil fuel sources accounted for up to 23 % of total carbon fraction. Combining stable carbon and radiocarbon isotope analysis we were able to quantify the amount of coal derived aerosol particles. The contribution of coal burning emissions were up to 14 %. We will present the applicability of dual carbon (13C and 14C) isotope ratio method for the aerosol source apportionment in different regions of Europe, also the perspectives of using MOUDI cascade impactors to make source apportionment in size segregated aerosol particles.

  8. Physical and chemical properties of aerosols at a coastal site Paposo (Chile) during VOCALS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordova, A. M.; Chand, D.; Wood, R.; Wallace, D.; Hegg, D. A.; Shaw, G. E.; Krejci, R.; Fochesatto, G. J.; Gallardo, L.

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) Regional Experiment (REx) and associated modeling program is an improved understanding of aerosol indirect effects over the southeast Pacific (SEP). Details on the program are available online at www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/. To this end, detailed aerosol physical and chemical measurements were made during REx at a coastal land site at Paposo (25o 0.4' S, 70o 27.011' W, 690 masl) in northern Chile, a site ideally positioned for studying continental aerosol sources advecting over the SEP. We present initial analysis of data from Paposo. Detailed measurements of aerosol properties were made from mid October to mid November 2008. Observations from optical particle counters (OPC), nephelometers, aethalometer, scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and the chemical analysis of the submicron aerosols samples collected on teflon filters are being used in this study. Large variations in aerosols parameters were observed which corresponded with changes in meteorology, as determined using trajectory analysis. Ion Chromatograph (IC) analysis of submicron aerosol samples shows that about 41% of submicron mass is sulfate. The light scattering coefficient shows a strong non-linear correlation with aerosol size observed using an OPC. Detailed results will be presented in the AGU meeting.

  9. Overview of aerosol properties associated with air masses sampled by the ATR-42 during the EUCAARI campaign (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, S.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Burkhart, J. F.; Stohl, A.; Gomes, L.; Quennehen, B.; Roberts, G.; Weigel, R.; Roger, J. C.; Villani, P.; Pichon, J. M.; Bourrianne, T.; Laj, P.

    2012-04-01

    Within the frame of the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) project the Météo-France aircraft ATR-42 performed 22 research flights, over central Europe and the North Sea during the intensive observation period in May 2008. For the campaign, the ATR-42 was equipped in order to study aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, as well as cloud microphysics. During the campaign, continental air masses from Eastern and Western Europe were encountered, along with polar and Scandinavian air masses. For the 22 research flights, retroplume analyses along the flight tracks were performed with FLEXPART in order to classify air masses into five sectors of origin which allows for a qualitative evaluation of emission influence on the respective air parcel. In the polluted boundary layer (BL), typical concentrations of particles with diameters larger than 10 nm (N10) are of the order of 5000-6000 cm-3, whereas N10 concentrations of clean air masses were lower than 1300 cm-3. The detection of the largest particle number concentrations occurred in air masses coming from Polar and Scandinavian regions for which an elevated number of nucleation mode (25-28 nm) particles was observed and attributed to new particle formation over open sea. In the free troposphere (FT), typical observed N10 are of the order of 900 cm-3 in polluted air masses and 400-600 cm-3 in clean air masses, respectively. In both layers, the chemical composition of submicron aerosol particles is dominated by organic matter and nitrate in polluted air masses, while, sulphate and ammonium followed by organics dominate the submicron aerosols in clean air masses. The highest CCN/CN ratios were observed within the polar air masses while the CCN concentration values are the highest within the polluted air masses. Within the five air mass sectors defined and the two layers (BL and FT), observations have been distinguished into anticyclonic (first half of May 2008) and cyclonic

  10. Determination of the passing efficiency for aerosol chemical species through a typical aircraft-mounted, diffuser-type aerosol inlet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.; Norton, Richard B.

    1998-04-01

    To assess the particle transmission efficiency of a conventional aircraft-mounted, diffuser-type inlet (CI), a new design inlet containing an internal filter basket assembly (aerosol filter inlet, or AFI) was constructed. All interior surfaces of the AFI were covered with filter material, and air was actively pulled through these filter walls during aerosol sampling. The AFI was demonstrated in the laboratory to trap nearly all particles entering its nozzle orifice, so it was considered usable as a baseline to judge the performance of other inlets. Wind tunnel studies were conducted at three different wind velocities that approximated typical research aircraft speeds. As wind velocity increased, particle transmission through the CI relative to the AFI decreased, as evidenced by chemical analysis of the filter deposits. Aircraft studies of the two inlets showed that particle transmission varied significantly with the measured species. Typical coarse-particle species such as Ca++, Mg++, Na+ and K+ showed 50-90% mass losses through a conventional diffuser-type inlet/curved intake tube system. Predominantly fine particle species such as SO4= and NH4+ passed the CI system with much higher efficiencies, with aerosol mass losses of 0-26% for most flights. Since the AFI traps nearly all particles aspirated into its nozzle orifice, these values indicate that on average, 80-90% of the SO4= and NH4+ aerosol mass passes through the CI and curved intake tube during airborne sampling. This finding suggests that the capability to sample fine (i.e., submicrometer) aerosols from aircraft is perhaps not as bad as has been previously reported, given that adequate attention is paid to inlet design, location, and orientation issues.

  11. Intercomparison of measurement methods for black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Jennings, S. G.; Larson, S. M.; Dillner, A.; Cachier, H.; Galambos, Z.; Rouc, A.; Spain, T. G.

    In this study, two method intercomparisons were performed. One thermal and two optical methods for the measurement of black carbon (BC) were applied to laboratory generated aerosols containing only BC. For the optical measurements, an aethalometer (Hansen et al., 1984. Science of Total Environment 36, 191-196) and an integrating sphere technique (Hitzenberger et al., 1996b. Journal of Geophysical Research 101, D14, 19 601-19 606) were used. The thermal method was described by Cachier et al. (1989a. Tellus 41B, 379-390). In an additional comparison, the integrating sphere was compared to a thermal optical technique (Birch and Cary, 1996. Aerosol Science Technology 25, 221-241) on ambient aerosol samples. The absorption coefficients were obtained from transmission measurements on filter samples for both the aethalometer and the integrating sphere. The BC mass concentration for the aethalometer was derived from this absorption measurement. The BC mass concentration for the integrating sphere, however, was obtained using an independent calibration curve. The agreement between the absorption coefficient σa obtained for the BC test aerosol on parallel filters with the aethalometer and the integrating sphere was satisfactory. The slope of the regression lines depended on filter type. A comparison between BC mass concentrations, however, showed that the aethalometer values were only 23% of those obtained by the integrating sphere technique indicating that for pure BC aerosols, the standard aethalometer calibration should not be used. Compared to the thermal method, the integrating sphere gave an overestimation of the BC mass concentrations by 21%. For the ambient samples, the integrating sphere and the thermal optical methods for BC mass concentration determination showed agreement within 5% of the 1 : 1 line, although the data were not so well correlated.

  12. Construction of a portable sample preparation device with a magnetic poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith as the extraction medium and its application in the enrichment of UV filters in water samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xu, Li; Yu, Qiong-Wei; Shi, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    A portable sample preparation device with a magnetic polymer monolith as the extraction medium was constructed. The monolith was synthesized by polymerizing methacrylic acid and ethylene dimethacrylate around a cylindrical magnet. In this way, the monolith with a magnetic core could be readily attached to the extraction device by magnetism. The constructed device was evaluated for the enrichment of UV filters in water samples, followed by high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis. The extraction efficiency for the targets was satisfactory with no matrix interference. Good linearities were obtained for the UV filters with the correlation coefficients >0.9986. The limits of detection and quantification for the UV filters were 0.3-0.8 and 1.0-2.4 ng/mL, respectively. The recoveries of the UV filters from the spiked water samples at the concentration of 100 ng/mL were 95.3-101.7%, with relative standard deviations <10%. Accordingly, the proposed portable device was demonstrated to be suitable for on-site simultaneous sampling, purification, and preconcentration within a single step.

  13. Investigation of atmospheric aerosols and gases at an East China Station. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Parungo, F.; Nagamoto, C.; Kopcewicz, B.; Li, X.; Yang, D.

    1993-04-01

    From August to October of 1991, when the West Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM-west) airborne expedition was conducted, ground-level measurements of gases and aerosols were carried out at Lin-an station near the east coast of China. Meteorological parameters such as temperature, pressure, humidity, solar radiation, wind direction, and wind speed were recorded continuously. Concentrations of SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2], O[sub 3], and black carbon were monitored in situ intermittently. Aerosol samples were collected and later analyzed in laboratories. A transmission electron microscope was used to analyze particle concentration, morphology, and size distribution. Elemental compositions of aerosol samples, collected on filters, were determined with an neutron activation analyzer and with a proton induced x-ray energy spectrometer. The water soluble portions of the aerosols were analyzed by ion chromatography.

  14. Development of a method for the determination of UV filters in water samples using stir bar sorptive extraction and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rodil, Rosario; Moeder, Monika

    2008-02-01

    Stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) in combination with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) was applied for the determination of 9 UV filters in water samples. The stir bar coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was added to 20 mL of water sample at pH 2 (10% MeOH) and stirred at 1000 rpm for 180 min. Then, the stir bar was subjected to TD-GC-MS. The desorption conditions (desorption temperature and desorption time) and SBSE parameters (ionic strength, pH, presence of organic solvent and time) were optimised using a full factorial design and a Box-Behnken design, respectively. The method shows good linearity (correlation coefficients >0.994) and reproducibility (RSD<16%). The extraction efficiencies were above 63% for all the compounds. Detection limits were between 0.2 and 63 ng/L. The developed method offers the ability to detect several UV filters at ultra-low concentration levels with only 20 mL of sample volume. The effectiveness of the method was tested by analysing real samples such as lake water, river water and treated wastewater. The application of the method allowed reporting the levels of UV filters in environmental water samples.

  15. Long-term AOD timeseries by Precision Filter Radiometer and assessment of radiative forcing due to the aerosol direct effect at four sites in Switzerland over the last two decades.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Giovanni; Vuilleumier, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In association with the WMO GAW Precision Filter Radiometer network, MeteoSwiss operates four automatic stations measuring the direct solar irradiance in 16 narrow spectral bands within the range 305-1024 nm since 1998. The four sites are (i) Payerne (timeseries 2002-2016), characterized by rural environment (Swiss plateau), (ii) Davos (timeseries 1998-2016), characterized by alpine environment, (iii) Jungfraujoch (timeseries 1999-2016), characterized by alpine environment and partial free tropospheric conditions (mainly in winter, Hermann et al, 2015), and (iv) Locarno-Monti (timeseries 2001-2016), characterized by semi-alpine and urban environment (southern side of the Swiss-Italian Alps). WE present the long-term, almost uninterrupted, timeseries of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in the spectral range 368-1024 nm that has been calculated for each of the four sites along the last two decades. Additionally, we present a study of the trends over almost twenty years of the AOD at different wavelengths. Based on the simulations of the LibRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations (Meyer and Kylling, 2005) and on the PFR-based timeseries of AOD it has been possible to assess the radiative forcing due to the direct effect of aerosols over Switzerland since 1998.

  16. Aerosol Generation by Modern Flush Toilets.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Lynch, Robert; Marshall, Charles; Mead, Kenneth; Hirst, Deborah

    A microbe-contaminated toilet will produce bioaerosols when flushed. We assessed toilet plume aerosol from high efficiency (HET), pressure-assisted high efficiency (PAT), and flushometer (FOM) toilets with similar bowl water and flush volumes. Total and droplet nuclei "bioaerosols" were assessed. Monodisperse 0.25-1.9- μ m fluorescent microspheres served as microbe surrogates in separate trials in a mockup 5 m(3) water closet (WC). Bowl water seeding was approximately 10(12) particles/mL. Droplet nuclei were sampled onto 0.2- μ m pore size mixed cellulose ester filters beginning 15 min after the flush using open-face cassettes mounted on the WC walls. Pre- and postflush bowl water concentrations were measured. Filter particle counts were analyzed via fluorescent microscopy. Bowl headspace droplet count size distributions were bimodal and similar for all toilet types and flush conditions, with 95% of droplets <2μm diameter and>99%<5μ m. Up to 145,000 droplets were produced per flush, with the high-energy flushometer producing over three times as many as the lower energy PAT and over 12 times as many as the lowest energy HET despite similar flush volumes. The mean numbers of fluorescent droplet nuclei particles aerosolized and remaining airborne also increased with flush energy. Fluorescent droplet nuclei per flush decreased with increasing particle size. These findings suggest two concurrent aerosolization mechanisms-splashing for large droplets and bubble bursting for the fine droplets that form droplet nuclei.

  17. Investigation of the tracers for plastic-enriched waste burning aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhanshu; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Gupta, Prabhat K.; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2015-05-01

    To better identify the tracers for open-waste burning (OWB) aerosols, we have conducted aerosol sampling at 2 landfill sites, i.e., Okhla and Bhalswa in New Delhi. The metals such as, As, Cd, Sb and Sn, which have been observed almost negligible in remote aerosols, are found abundantly in these OWB aerosol samples (n = 26), i.e., 60 ± 65, 41 ± 53, 537 ± 847 and 1325 ± 1218 ng m-3, respectively. Samples (n = 20) collected at urban locations in New Delhi, i.e., at Employees' State Insurance (ESI) hospital and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) also show high abundances of these metals in the particles. Filter samples are also analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids (C2-C12) and related compounds (oxocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls). Terephthalic acid (tPh) was found to account for more than 77% of total diacids determined in OWB aerosols. However, such a high abundance of tPh is not observed in aerosols collected at urban sites. Instead, phthalic acid (Ph) was found as the third/fourth most abundant diacid (∼3%) following C2 (>70%) and C4 (>12%) in these waste burning influenced urban aerosols. A possible secondary formation pathway of Ph by photo-degradation of phthalate ester (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) in plastic-waste burning aerosol is suggested. Ionic composition of OWB aerosols showed that Cl- is the most abundant ion (40 ± 8% of total ions determined). The correlation studies of the potential metals with the organic tracers of garbage burning, i.e., phthalic, isophthalic and terephthalic acids show that especially Sn can be used as marker for tracing the plastic-enriched waste burning aerosols.

  18. Measurement and analysis of aerosol and black carbon in the southwestern United States and Panama and their dependence on air mass origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, C.; Sheahan, J. N.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Brien, P.; Hinds, B. D.; Martinez-Twary, E.; Hansen, A. D. A.; White, C.; Garvey, D. M.; Pinnick, R. G.

    2004-07-01

    Total aerosol mass loading, aerosol absorption, and black carbon (BC) content were determined from aerosol collected on 598 quartz fiber filters at a remote, semiarid site near Orogrande, New Mexico from December 1989 to October 1995. Aerosol mass was determined by weighing filters before and after exposure, and aerosol absorption was determined by measuring the visible light transmitted through loaded filter samples and converting these measurements to aerosol absorption. BC content was determined by measuring visible light transmitted through filter samples before and after firing and converting the absorption to BC mass, assuming a BC absorption cross section of 19 m2/g in the fiber filter medium. Two analyses were then performed on each of the logged variables: an autoregressive integrating moving average (ARIMA) analysis and a decomposition analysis using an autoregressive model to accommodate first-order autocorrelation. The two analyses reveal that BC mass has no statistically significant seasonal dependence at the 5% level of significance but only random fluctuations varying around an average annual value that has a long-term decreasing trend (from 0.16 to 0.11 μg/m3 during 1990-1995). Aerosol absorption, which is dominated by BC, also displays random fluctuations about an average value, and decreases from 1.9 Mm-1 to 1.3 Mm-1 during the same period. Unlike BC, aerosol mass at the Orogrande site displays distinctly different character. The analyses reveal a pronounced seasonal dependence, but no long-term trend for aerosol mass. The seasonal indices resulting from the autoregression analysis have a minimum in January (-0.78) and maximum in June (+0.58). The geometric mean value over the 1990-1995 period for aerosol mass is 16.0 μg/m3. Since BC aerosol at the Orogrande site is a product of long-range atmospheric transport, a back trajectory analysis of air masses was conducted. Back trajectory analyses indicate that air masses traversing high population

  19. Comparison between the ASSET EZ4 NCO and Impinger Sampling Devices for Aerosol Sampling of 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate in Spray Foam Application.

    PubMed

    Puscasu, Silvia; Aubin, Simon; Cloutier, Yves; Sarazin, Philippe; Van Tra, Huu; Gagné, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) aerosol exposure evaluation in spray foam insulation application is known to be a challenge. Current available techniques are either not user-friendly or are inaccurate or are not validated for this application. A new sampler has recently been developed to address the user-friendliness issues with other samplers: the ASSET EZ4-NCO, but the use of this sampler in spray foam insulation applications has not been demonstrated or validated. Because of this, the current work was undertaken to provide a comparison of the ASSET sampler with an impinger method, considered to be the best available method in the context of spray foam insulation, and hence the pertinence of comparing this sampler to an impinger method, considered to be the best available method for measuring MDI monomer and oligomers for this particular application. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for MDI monomer and oligomer analysis was implemented based on the Supelco literature. It allows the analysis of MDI-dibutylamine (DBA) and MDI 3-ring-DBA with a minimum reported value of 5ng ml(-1), a dynamic range of 5-140ng ml(-1), precision <15% and accuracy >80%. This method was used to quantify MDI aerosols collected with the ASSET sampler in an MDI spray foam environment in parallel with the toluene/MOPIP impinger reference method. The ASSET sampler significantly underestimated the levels of MDI monomer and oligomers when compared to the reference method. The estimated bias was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI] 54-89%) for the monomer and 96% (95% CI 76-115%) for the oligomers. These results demonstrate the importance of evaluating each new sampler for each isocyanate application prior to a formal worker exposure evaluation.

  20. Microbial validation of vent filters.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J H; Frieben, W R

    1984-08-01

    The Upjohn Company uses filtration to remove microorganisms and particulates from air and other gases which may come in contact with sterile products. To validate the microbial retentivity of these filters, they were challenged with an aerosol of Bacillus subtilis var niger spores. An aerosol challenge was used because it more closely simulated the use for which these filters were designed. The test apparatus was constructed of autoclavable components using a jet-type nebulizer and heated air mixing tube. Characterization of the aerosol particle size distribution with a particle size analyzer demonstrated that 80% of the particles had a diameter of x 3.0 times;m and that the particles had a mean mass diameter of 1.9 times;m with a geometric standard deviation of 1.8 times;m. Studies conducted with aerosols of Bacillus subtilis var niger spores demonstrated that the test apparatus could recover ca. 50% of the spores that were aerosolized. Hydrophobic filters from various manufactures were challenged with an aerosol of at least 10(8) spores of Bacillus subtilis. All filters tested could retain at least 10(9) spores when physical integrity of the filter was verfield.

  1. Enhanced aerodynamic reach of vapor and aerosol sampling for real-time mass spectrometric detection using Venturi-assisted entrainment and ionization.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Staymates, Matthew

    2017-03-08

    Venturi-assisted ENTrainment and Ionization (VENTI) was developed, demonstrating efficient entrainment, collection, and transport of remotely sampled vapors, aerosols, and dust particulate for real-time mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Integrating the Venturi and Coandă effects at multiple locations generated flow and analyte transport from non-proximate locations and more importantly enhanced the aerodynamic reach at the point of collection. Transport through remote sampling probes up to 2.5 m in length was achieved with residence times on the order of 10(-2) s to 10(-1) s and Reynolds numbers on the order of 10(3) to 10(4). The Venturi-assisted entrainment successfully enhanced vapor collection and detection by greater than an order of magnitude at 20 cm stand-off (limit of simple suction). This enhancement is imperative, as simple suction restricts sampling to the immediate vicinity, requiring close proximity to the vapor source. In addition, the overall aerodynamic reach distance was increased by approximately 3-fold over simple suction under the investigated conditions. Enhanced aerodynamic reach was corroborated and observed with laser-light sheet flow visualization and schlieren imaging. Coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), the detection of a range of volatile chemical vapors; explosive vapors; explosive, narcotic, and mustard gas surrogate (methyl salicylate) aerosols; and explosive dust particulate was demonstrated. Continuous real-time Venturi-assisted monitoring of a large room (approximately 90 m(2) area, 570 m(3) volume) was demonstrated for a 60-min period without the remote sampling probe, exhibiting detection of chemical vapors and methyl salicylate at approximately 3 m stand-off distances within 2 min of exposure.

  2. Use of "Parasep filter fecal concentrator tubes" for the detection of intestinal parasites in stool samples under routine conditions.

    PubMed

    Zeeshan, Mohammad; Zafar, Afia; Saeed, Zeb; Irfan, Seema; Sobani, Zain A; Shakoor, Sadia; Beg, Mohammad Asim

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic gastrointestinal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world, with stool microscopy being the mainstay of diagnostic practice. Both direct microscopy and concentration techniques can be utilized; direct microscopy may be time consuming and tedious; however clinical laboratories in developing countries lack trained staff who can effectively use concentration methods. In our practice we used the Parasep O and P filter concentrator tubes (manufactured by DiaSys Ltd, Berkshire, England. Product Code 146000) along with direct microscopic techniques and found that Parasep filters enhanced the ability to detect intestinal parasites that would have been missed on routine microscopy. We found the Parasep filter concentration method to be easy, cost-effective and reliable for routine stool examinations.

  3. Use Of Cosmogenic 35S To Trace The Uptake Process Of SO2 In Aerosols In The Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramian, A.; Corbin, A.

    2008-12-01

    Environmental issues, such as acid rain and global warming, are linked to increased sulfur emissions and sulfate production in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and can reduce the greenhouse effect by the indirect effect. Our understanding of the chemical and photochemical processes that govern the chemical transformations and transport of sulfur compounds in the atmosphere is still incomplete due to the complex, multivalent nature of sulfur and uncertainties in aerosol chemistry and transport (particularly trans-oceanic). We explore the use of cosmogenically produced 35S (half-life~87 days) to trace the uptake of SO2 gas into aerosols, as a function of aerosol size, in two different environments by simultaneously collecting and measuring [35SO42- ]and [35SO2]. These measurements can in turn be used to understand the time scales of SO2 oxidation to SO42-, aerosol 'age' and boundary layer dynamics. Aerosol samples are collected on glass fiber filters twice a week at Scripps Institute of Oceanography Pier in La Jolla, CA and the San Fernando Valley, CA for a 21-day period. SO2 (g) was collected on KOH impregnated filters placed after a 4-stage aerosol filter stack. We present preliminary results for both fine and coarse aerosol sulfate [35SO4] as well as [35SO2]. These measurements were done using low-noise liquid scintillation spectroscopy. By measuring the activity of each sample repeatedly over a period of 100 days, the exponential decay of 35S was observed, confirming the identity of the radioactive signal. The coastal and inland measurements are compared and implications for the atmospheric chemistry of SO2 and SO4 are discussed. Finally, we assess the potential of using [35SO4]/[nss-SO4] as a tracer of primary sulfate and trans-oceanic transport by coupling the measurements of the cation (Na+, Ca2+, K+, Mg2+, NH4+) and anion (Cl, NO3, SO4) concentrations in the aerosols.

  4. Semi-continuous sampling of health relevant atmospheric particle subfractions for chemical speciation using a rotating drum impactor in series with sequential filter sampler.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengxia; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Karg, Erwin; Cyrys, Josef; Gu, Jianwei; Orasche, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Peters, Annette; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    To achieve unattended continuous long-term (eg., 1 week) sampling of size-segregated 24-h ambient particulate matter (PM), a sampling strategy of a modified 3-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI) in series with a sequential filter sampler was introduced and verified in a field campaign. Before the field sampling, lab experiment was conducted to test the collection efficiency of the third stage of the RDI using the quartz-fiber filter (QFF) as the substrate. The measured value is 0.36 μm, which is larger than the nominal value 0.1 μm. A fast direct analysis of organic species in all size fractions (<0.36, 0.36-1, 1-2.4, and 2.4-10 μm) of 24-h ambient samples was done using in situ derivatization thermal desorption gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IDTD-GC-TOFMS). A few secondary originated polar markers (dicarboxylic acids, cis-pinonic acid, etc.) were introduced and evaluated using this method for the first time and quantified simultaneously with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the filter samples (<0.36 μm). For the other RDI strip samples (0.36-1, 1-2.4, and 2.4-10 μm), PAH and levoglucosan were quantified. The comparability of two such sampler sets was verified with respect to the PM collection profile of the two RDIs as well as measured concentration of chemical compounds in each sampled size fraction, so that a future epidemiological study on the relationship between the finest PM/its chemical composition and health outcome could be carried out through parallel sampling at two sites. The internal correlations between the size-segregated organic compounds are discussed. Besides, the correlations between the size-segregated organic species and size-segregated particulate number concentration (PNC) as well as meteorological parameter are discussed as well.

  5. A filter paper-based microdevice for low-cost, rapid, and automated DNA extraction and amplification from diverse sample types.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wupeng; Zhuang, Bin; Zhang, Pengfei; Han, Junping; Li, Cai-Xia; Liu, Peng

    2014-10-07

    A plastic microfluidic device that integrates a filter disc as a DNA capture phase was successfully developed for low-cost, rapid and automated DNA extraction and PCR amplification from various raw samples. The microdevice was constructed by sandwiching a piece of Fusion 5 filter, as well as a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) membrane, between two PMMA (poly(methyl methacrylate)) layers. An automated DNA extraction from 1 μL of human whole blood can be finished on the chip in 7 minutes by sequentially aspirating NaOH, HCl, and water through the filter. The filter disc containing extracted DNA was then taken out directly for PCR. On-chip DNA purification from 0.25-1 μL of human whole blood yielded 8.1-21.8 ng of DNA, higher than those obtained using QIAamp® DNA Micro kits. To realize DNA extraction from raw samples, an additional sample loading chamber containing a filter net with an 80 μm mesh size was designed in front of the extraction chamber to accommodate sample materials. Real-world samples, including whole blood, dried blood stains on Whatman® 903 paper, dried blood stains on FTA™ cards, buccal swabs, saliva, and cigarette butts, can all be processed in the system in 8 minutes. In addition, multiplex amplification of 15 STR (short tandem repeat) loci and Sanger-based DNA sequencing of the 520 bp GJB2 gene were accomplished from the filters that contained extracted DNA from blood. To further prove the feasibility of integrating this extraction method with downstream analyses, "in situ" PCR amplifications were successfully performed in the DNA extraction chamber following DNA purification from blood and blood stains without DNA elution. Using a modified protocol to bond the PDMS and PMMA, our plastic PDMS devices withstood the PCR process without any leakage. This study represents a significant step towards the practical application of on-chip DNA extraction methods, as well as the development of fully integrated genetic analytical systems.

  6. Performance of personal inhalable aerosol samplers in very slowly moving air when facing the aerosol source.

    PubMed

    Witschger, O; Grinshpun, S A; Fauvel, S; Basso, G

    2004-06-01

    While personal aerosol samplers have been characterized primarily based on wind tunnel tests conducted at relatively high wind speeds, modern indoor occupational environments are usually represented by very slow moving air. Recent surveys suggest that elevated levels of occupational exposure to inhalable airborne particles are typically observed when the worker, operating in the vicinity of the dust source, faces the source. Thus, the first objective of this study was to design and test a new, low cost experimental protocol for measuring the sampling efficiency of personal inhalable aerosol samplers in the vicinity of the aerosol source when the samplers operate in very slowly moving air. In this system, an aerosol generator, which is located in the centre of a room-sized non-ventilated chamber, continuously rotates and omnidirectionally disperses test particles of a specific size. The test and reference samplers are equally distributed around the source at the same distance from the centre and operate in parallel (in most of our experiments, the total number of simultaneously operating samplers was 15). Radial aerosol transport is driven by turbulent diffusion and some natural convection. For each specific particle size and the sampler, the aerosol mass concentration is measured by weighing the collection filter. The second objective was to utilize the new protocol to evaluate three widely used aerosol samplers: the IOM Personal Inhalable Sampler, the Button Personal Inhalable Aerosol Sampler and the 25 mm Millipore filter holder (closed-face C25 cassette). The sampling efficiencies of each instrument were measured with six particle fractions, ranging from 6.9 to 76.9 micro m in their mass median aerodynamic diameter. The Button Sampler efficiency data demonstrated a good agreement with the standard inhalable convention and especially with the low air movement inhalabilty curve. The 25 mm filter holder was found to considerably under-sample the particles larger

  7. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-15

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  8. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident. PMID:27301319

  9. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  10. Aerosol formation in basaltic lava fountaining: Eyjafjallajökull volcano, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Martin, Robert S.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2012-10-01

    A short-lived episode of basaltic lava fountaining at Eyjafjallajökull volcano (March - April 2010) produced a low-altitude, ash-poor plume. We measured the composition of aerosol particles (sampled using a cascade impactor and filter packs), gases (sampled using filter packs), and volatile species scavenged by scoria and external water in order to investigate the formation and speciation of near-source aerosol (<2 min from emission). Samples were analyzed for volatile species (S, Cl and F) and metals (Na, K, Ca and Mg). The aerosol mass showed two unusual features: the prevalent size mode was finer than typically found in volcanic plumes (˜0.2μm, compared to >0.4 μm), and its composition was dominated by chloride rather than sulfate. We used two thermodynamic equilibrium models (E-AIM and HSC Chemistry v5.1) to show that the formation of particulate Cl- by condensation of HCl gas is more responsive to changes in ambient temperature than the oxidation of SO2 to SO42-, so that a low SO42-/Cl- ratio in aerosol particles is characteristic of volcanic emissions in cold climates. Field measurements suggested that the efficiency of SO2 to SO42- conversion inside the vent increased with lower explosivity. Volatiles adsorbed on the surface of scoria had significantly higher SO42-/halogen molar ratios than the aerosol samples. Several potential explanations for these differences are discussed.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, BWF AMERICA, INC., GRADE 700 MPS POLYESTER FELT FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory, through its Environmental Technology Verification Program, evaluated the performance of a bag house filtration product for use controlling PM2.5. The product was BWF America, Inc., filter fabric Grade 700 Polyester Felt. All tes...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC., L4427 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, BWF AMERICA, INC. GRADE 700 MPS POLYESTER FELT FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size for particles equal to or smaller than...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, W.L. GORE & ASSOCIATES, INC. LYSB3 FILTER SAMPLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size for particles equal to or smaller than...

  15. Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhanshu

    2012-07-01

    {Identifying Metals as Marker for Waste Burning Aerosol Particles in New Delhi } Tracing of aerosol sources is an important task helpful for making control strategy, and for climate change study. However, it is a difficult job as aerosols have several sources, involve in complex atmospheric processing, degradation and removal processes. Several approaches have been used for this task, e.g., models, which are based on the input of chemical species; stable- and radio-isotope compositions of certain species; chemical markers in which trace metals are the better options because they persist in atmosphere until the life of a particle. For example, K and Hg are used for biomass and coal burning tracings, respectively. Open waste burning has recently been believed to be a considerable source of aerosols in several mega cities in India and China. To better understand this source contribution in New Delhi aerosols, we have conducted aerosol sampling at a landfill site (Okhla), and in proximity (within 1 km distance) of this site. Aerosol filter samples were acid digested in microwave digestion system and analyzed using inductively coupled plasma -- high resolution mass spectrometry (ICP-HRMS) for getting metal signatures in particles. The metals, e.g., Sn, Sb and As those are found almost negligible in remote aerosols, are maximized in these waste burning aerosols. Sample collected in other location of New Delhi also shows the considerable presence of these metals in particles. Preliminary studies of isotopic ratios of these metals suggested that these metals, especially Sn can be used as marker for tracing the open waste burning sources of aerosols in New Delhi.

  16. Comparison of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in aerosol samples collected in Xi'an, China during haze and clean periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Wang, Gehui; Zhou, Bianhong; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Jianjun; Cao, Junji; Xiao, Shun

    2013-12-01

    PM10 aerosols from Xi'an, a mega city of China in winter and summer, 2009 were measured for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) (i.e., dicarboxylic acids (DCA), keto-carboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls), water-soluble organic (WSOC) and inorganic carbon (WSIC), elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Molecular compositions of SOA on haze and clean days in both seasons were compared to investigate their sources and formation mechanisms. DCA in the samples were 1843 ± 810 ng m-3 in winter and 1259 ± 781 ng m-3 in summer, respectively, which is similar and even higher than those measured in 2003. Oxalic acid (C2, 1162 ± 570 ng m-3 in winter and 1907 ± 707 ng m-3 in summer) is the predominant species of DCA, followed by t-phthalic (tPh) in winter and phthalic (Ph) in summer. Such a molecular composition is different from those in other Asian cities where succinic acid (C4) or malonic acid (C3) is the second highest species, which is mostly due to significant emissions from household combustion of coal and open burning of waste material in Xi'an. Mass ratios of C2/diacids, diacids/WSOC, WSOC/OC and individual diacid-C/WSOC are higher on the haze days than on the clean days in both seasons, suggesting an enhanced SOA production under the haze condition. We also found that the haze samples are acidic while the clean samples are almost neutral. Such a difference in particle acidity is consistent with the enhanced SOA production, because acid-catalysis is an important aqueous-phase formation pathway of SOA. Gly/mGly mass ratio showed higher values on haze days than on clean day in both seasons. We comprehensively investigated the ratio in literature and found a consistent pattern. Based on our observation results and those documented data we proposed for the first time that concentration ratio of Gly/mGly can be taken as an indicator of aerosol ageing.

  17. Evaluation of permanently charged electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.; Bergman, W.

    1982-10-18

    These studies showed that loading the permanently charged filters with captured aerosols will lead to a neutralization of the filter charge. The transfer from the captured aerosol to the fiber surface and the subsequent neutralization of fiber charge. The increased efficiency is due to the additional mechanical capture by the particle deposits. The minimum efficiency obtained during the loading of solid aerosols is determined by the aerosol charge, with highly charged aerosols producing a lower minimum. Permanently charged filters lose their fiber charge when exposed to organic solvents or ionic water solutions. The fiber charge neutralization was minimized by coating the charged fibers with a polymer. Several different coating techniques were examined. Unfortunately, preventing the neutralization of fiber charge is not sufficient to prevent a deterioration of filter efficiency.

  18. Comparison of three different sample preparation procedures for the determination of traffic-related elements in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Ivan N B; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R; de Andrade, Jailson B; Smichowski, Patricia; Shaltout, Abdallah A; Colares, Lígia; Carasek, Eduardo

    2012-01-15

    Three different procedures for sample preparation have been compared for the determination of Cu, Mo and Sb in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). Direct solid sample analysis of the ground filters was compared with microwave-assisted acid leaching with aqua regia and ultrasound-assisted extraction also using aqua regia. The main absorption line at 324.754 nm or the secondary line at 216.509 nm was used for the determination of Cu, depending on the analyte content in the samples. The primary absorption line at 313.259 nm was used for Mo and the secondary line at 212.739 nm for Sb determination. The limits of detection (LOD, 3σ) found for the direct solid sampling method, based on ten atomizations of an unused filter were 15 μg g(-1) for all three analytes, corresponding to 40 ng m(-3) for a typical air volume of 1,440 m(3) collected over a period of 24h. The LOD for the other two methods were less than a factor of two inferior, but the total time required for an analysis was significantly longer. The repeatability of the measurements was between 3 and 9% (n=5), and the results obtained with the three methods did not show any significant difference. The ratio between the three analytes on the filters from areas of intense traffic was found to be around Cu:Mo:Sb≈4:1:1.4, which suggests that the source of all three elements is brake linings, i.e., related to automobile traffic. When the ratio deviated significantly from the above values, the source of contamination was assumed to be of different origin.

  19. Analysis of anions in ambient aerosols by microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; MacDonald, David A; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Hering, Susanne V; Collett, Jeffrey L; Henry, Charles S

    2006-11-01

    We describe a microchip capillary electrophoresis method for the analysis of nitrate and sulfate in ambient aerosols. Investigating the chemical composition of ambient aerosol particles is essential for understanding their sources and effects. Significant progress has been made towards developing mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for rapid qualitative analysis of aerosols. Alternative methods for rapid quantification of selected high abundance compounds are needed to augment the capacity for widespread routine analysis. Such methods could provide much higher temporal and spatial resolution than can be achieved currently. Inorganic anions comprise a large percentage of particulate mass, with nitrate and sulfate among the most abundant species. While ion chromatography has proven very useful for analyzing extracts of time-integrated ambient aerosol samples collected on filters and for semi-continuous, on-line particle composition measurements, there is a growing need for development of new compact, inexpensive approaches to routine on-line aerosol ion analysis for deployment in spatially dense, atmospheric measurement networks. Microchip capillary electrophoresis provides the necessary speed and portability to address this need. In this report, on-column contact conductivity detection is used with hydrodynamic injection to create a simple microchip instrument for analysis of nitrate and sulfate. On-column contact conductivity detection was achieved using a Pd decoupler placed upstream from the working electrodes. Microchips containing two Au or Pd working electrodes showed a good linear range (5-500 microM) and low limits-of-detection for sulfate and nitrate, with Au providing the lowest detection limits (1 microM) for both ions. The completed microchip system was used to analyze ambient aerosol filter samples. Nitrate and sulfate concentrations measured by the microchip matched the concentrations measured by ion chromatography.

  20. Application of CE with novel dynamic coatings and field-amplified sample injection to the sensitive determination of isomeric benzoic acids in atmospheric aerosols and vehicular emission.

    PubMed

    Dabek-Zlotorzynska, Ewa; Piechowski, Maria

    2007-10-01

    A simple and reliable CE method with direct UV detection has been developed to separate eight isomeric benzoic acids in atmospheric aerosols and vehicular emission without complex sample pretreatment. Optimal electrophoretic conditions, with migration times under 5 min, were obtained by using a 50 mM acetate buffer (pH 4.7) containing a dynamic surface coating EOTrol LN (0.005% w/v). The separations were carried out in a cathode to anode direction (-30 kV) allowing the low cathodal EOF ( approximately 1 x 10(-9) m(2)V(-1)s(-1)) to extend the effective separation by slowing the movement of the studied aromatic acids. Moreover, the sensitivity of the method at 200 nm was enhanced by using a field-amplified sample injection (FASI) with electrokinetic (EK) sample injection (-2 kV, 60 s). Prior to sample injection, a short water plug (3 s at 0.5 psi) was introduced. Under these conditions, the method was capable of detecting the analytes in deionized water with LODs (S/N = 3) as low as 0.1 microg/L for most of the studied acids. In the presence of 10 mg/L of sulphate (added to simulate a sample matrix), LODs ranged from 0.26 to 0.62 microg/L. The validation of the method has proven an excellent separation performance and accuracy for the determination of isomeric benzoic acids in the studied matrices.

  1. Determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter collected on glass fiber filters using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and direct solid sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Rennan G. O.; Vignola, Fabíola; Castilho, Ivan N. B.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; Welz, Bernhard; Vale, Maria Goreti R.; Smichowski, Patricia; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.; Becker-Ross, Helmut

    2011-05-01

    A study has been undertaken to assess the capability of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of mercury in airborne particulate matter (APM) collected on glass fiber filters using direct solid sampling. The main Hg absorption line at 253.652 nm was used for all determinations. The certified reference material NIST SRM 1648 (Urban Particulate Matter) was used to check the accuracy of the method, and good agreement was obtained between published and determined values. The characteristic mass was 22 pg Hg. The limit of detection (3σ), based on ten atomizations of an unexposed filter, was 40 ng g - 1 , corresponding to 0.12 ng m - 3 in the air for a typical air volume of 1440 m 3 collected within 24 h. The limit of quantification was 150 ng g -1, equivalent to 0.41 ng m -3 in the air. The repeatability of measurements was better than 17% RSD (n = 5). Mercury concentrations found in filter samples loaded with APM collected in Buenos Aires, Argentina, were between < 40 ng g -1 and 381 ± 24 ng g -1. These values correspond to a mercury concentration in the air between < 0.12 ng m -3 and 1.47 ± 0.09 ng m -3. The proposed procedure was found to be simple, fast and reliable, and suitable as a screening procedure for the determination of mercury in APM samples.

  2. Filter measurements of chemical composition during the airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandrud, B. W.; Sperry, P. D.; Sanford, L.

    1988-01-01

    During the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment campaign, a filter sampler was flown to measure the bulk composition of aerosol and gas phases. The background sulfate aerosol was measured in regions inside and outside of the chemically perturbed region (CPR) of the polar vortex. The mass ratio of sulfate outside to inside was 2.8. This is indicative of a cleansing mechanism effecting the CPR or of a different air mass inside versus outside. The absolute value of the sulfate mixing ratio shows that the background aerosol has not been influenced by recent volcanic eruptions. The sulfate measured on the ferry flight returning to NASA Ames shows a decrease towards the equator with increasing concentrations in the northern hemisphere. Nitrate in the aerosol phase was observed on two flights. The largest amount of nitrate measured in the aerosol was 44 percent of the total amount of nitrate observed. Other samples on the same flights show no nitrate in the aerosol phase. The presence of nitrate in the aerosol is correlated with the coldest temperatures observed on a given flight. Total nitrate (aerosol plus acidic vapor nitrate) concentrations were observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude north and south of the equator. Total nitrate was lower inside the CPR than outside. Chloride and flouride were not detected in the aerosol phase. From the concentrations of acidic chloride vapor, the ratio of acidic vapor Cl to acidic vapor F and a summing of the individual chloride containing species to yield a total chloride concentration, there is a suggestion that some of the air sampled was dechlorinated. Acidic vapor phase fluoride was observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude both north and south of the equator. The acidic vapor phase fluoride was the only compound measured with the filter technique that exhibited larger concentrations inside the CPR than outside.

  3. Aerosol Radiative Effects observed on the Coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango peninsula) during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeller, R.; Yabe, T.; Tohno, S.; Kasahara, M.

    2001-12-01

    The characterization of the optical properties of the atmospheric aerosol as well as its size-resolved chemical composition is on of the main objectives of ACE-Asia. This is necessary to constrain the radiative forcing by the Asian aerosol, which will become more important as emissions in this area are predicted to increase dramatically. We set up a monitoring station on the coast of the Japanese Sea (Tango Peninsula, Kyoto Prefecture) for the measurements of aerosol optical and chemical properties as well as sky radiation during ACE-Asia in spring 2001. The instrumentation at Tango includes a 3-wavelenght nephelometer (TSI 3563), an OPC (RION KC-01D), a pyrheliometer (EKO MS-53), a 5-wavelength sunphotometer (EKO MS-110A), and a pyranometer (EKO MS-801). The sunphotometer also has a near infrared channel (938 nm) for evaluations of precipitable water; visible channels are used to retrieve aerosol optical depth and Ångström exponents. Filter sampling is performed collocated to the optical measurements for subsequent analysis of elemental and ionic composition of the aerosol. Filters are also analyzed by the integrating plate method for measurements of aerosol absorption coefficients. Size-resolved chemical composition obtained from low-pressure impactor samples are used to calculate aerosol optical properties and compare them to directly measured optical properties. Quality checked parameters are henceforth input into a radiative transfer model (MODTRAN 4.0) to calculate the radiative forcing of the aerosol. This enables us to evaluate which chemical species control the optical properties and radiative forcing of the aerosol. We also compare the radiative impact of clear days with days with heavy dust loadings. >http://aerosol.energy.kyoto- u.ac.jp/~hoeller/ACEmineyama.html

  4. Evaluation of Trapper-Collected Nobuto Filter-Paper Blood Samples for Distemper and Parvovirus Antibody Detection in Coyotes (Canis latrans) and Raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Kamps, Amanda J; Dubay, Shelli A; Langenberg, Julie; Maes, Roger K

    2015-07-01

    Blood samples are often collected from free-ranging wildlife for antibody detection. However, filter-paper (FP) strips are more cost efficient and easy to collect and store. We evaluated trapper-collected FP strips and body-cavity blood for canine distemper (CDV) and parvovirus (CPV-2) antibody detection in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans). From 2008 to 2010, licensed trappers near Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin, US collected paired samples from harvested animals. Canine distemper antibodies were detected using virus neutralization and parvovirus antibodies were detected using hemagglutination inhibition. Titers ≥ 1:32 for CDV and ≥ 1:25 for CPV-2 were considered evidence of exposure. Using Cohen's kappa test of agreement, FP strip titers agreed with sera for CDV in coyotes (n = 28, K = 0.772) and raccoons (n = 29, K = 0.858) and for CPV-2 in coyotes (n = 40, K = 0.775) and raccoons (n = 70, K = 0.646). However, raccoons determined to be exposed to CPV-2 from sera were unexposed by FP strips in 35% of the samples. Titer results may be affected by quality and volume of blood samples, interval between collection and processing, small sample sizes, and diagnostic testing procedures. Filter-paper strips can be useful for detecting CDV and CPV-2 exposure in coyotes and raccoons with correct field sample collection and appropriate diagnostic testing procedures.

  5. The influence of salt aerosol on alpha radiation detection by WIPP continuous air monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, W.T.; Walker, B.A.

    1996-01-01

    Alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) will be used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to measure airborne transuranic radioactivity that might be present in air exhaust or in work-place areas. WIPP CAMs are important to health and safety because they are used to alert workers to airborne radioactivity, to actuate air-effluent filtration systems, and to detect airborne radioactivity so that the radioactivity can be confined in a limited area. In 1993, the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) reported that CAM operational performance was affected by salt aerosol, and subsequently, the WIPP CAM design and usage were modified. In this report, operational data and current theories on aerosol collection were reviewed to determine CAM quantitative performance limitations. Since 1993, the overall CAM performance appears to have improved, but anomalous alpha spectra are present when sampling-filter salt deposits are at normal to high levels. This report shows that sampling-filter salt deposits directly affect radon-thoron daughter alpha spectra and overall monitor efficiency. Previously it was assumed that aerosol was mechanically collected on the surface of CAM sampling filters, but this review suggests that electrostatic and other particle collection mechanisms are more important than previously thought. The mechanism of sampling-filter particle collection is critical to measurement of acute releases of radioactivity. 41 refs.

  6. Summary of meeting on disposal of LET&D HEPA filters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-21

    This report is a compilation of correspondence between Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company and the US EPA over a period of time from 1988 to 1992 (most from 1991-92) regarding waste management compliance with EPA regulations. Typical subjects include: compliance with satellite accumulation requirements; usage of ``Sure Shot`` containers in place of aerosol cans; notice of upcoming recyclable battery shipments; disposition of batteries; HEPA filter leach sampling and permit impacts; functional and operation requirements for the spent filter handling system; summary of meeting on disposal of LET and D HEPA filters; solvent substitution database report; and mercury vapor light analytical testing.

  7. Application of high-performance anion-exchange chromatography-pulsed amperometric detection for measuring carbohydrates in routine daily filter samples collected by a national network: 2. Examination of sugar alcohols/polyols, sugars, and anhydrosugars in the upper Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, A. P.; Frank, N.; Kenski, D. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2011-04-01

    Carbohydrate measurements of ambient samples can provide insights into the biogenic fraction of the organic carbon (OC) aerosol. However, lack of measurement on a routine basis limits data analysis. In a companion paper, 1 year of archived 1-in-6 day FRM (Federal Reference Monitor) filter samples from the PM2.5 NAAQS compliance monitoring network collected at 10 sites in the upper Midwest were analyzed using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection to determine the regional impact of biomass burning. Along with levoglucosan, 13 other carbohydrates were simultaneously measured, including two more anhydrosugars (mannosan and galactosan), five sugars (arabinose, galactose, glucose, mannose, xylose), and six sugar alcohols/polyols (glycerol, methyltetrols, threitol/erythritol, xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol). This paper focuses on the results from these carbohydrates in order to investigate their sources and trends both spatially and temporally. Mannosan, galactosan, arabinose, xylose, and threitol/erythritol all correlated with levoglucosan (R2 from 0.43 to 0.97), suggesting biomass burning as their main source. Glucose and mannitol exhibited higher concentrations in summer and at more southern sites, likely due to vegetation differences at the sites. Using mannitol, the contribution of spores to OC was found to be <1%. Methyltetrols were highly correlated with water-soluble OC (R2 from 0.63 to 0.95) and in higher concentrations at more eastern sites. This spatial pattern is possibly due to these sites being downwind of the high isoprene emission zones that occur in the western part of the Midwest from oak forests in the Ozarks and spruce forests in the northern lake states.

  8. State estimation in large-scale open channel networks using sequential Monte Carlo methods: Optimal sampling importance resampling and implicit particle filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Barrau, Axel; Bayen, Alexandre M.

    2013-06-01

    This article investigates the performance of Monte Carlo-based estimation methods for estimation of flow state in large-scale open channel networks. After constructing a state space model of the flow based on the Saint-Venant equations, we implement the optimal sampling importance resampling filter to perform state estimation in a case in which measurements are available at every time step. Considering a case in which measurements become available intermittently, a random-map implementation of the implicit particle filter is applied to estimate the state trajectory in the interval between the measurements. Finally, some heuristics are proposed, which are shown to improve the estimation results and lower the computational cost. In the first heuristics, considering the case in which measurements are available at every time step, we apply the implicit particle filter over time intervals of a desired size while incorporating all the available measurements over the corresponding time interval. As a second heuristic method, we introduce a maximum a posteriori (MAP) method, which does not require sampling. It will be seen, through implementation, that the MAP method provides more accurate results in the case of our application while having a smaller computational cost. All estimation methods are tested on a network of 19 tidally forced subchannels and 1 reservoir, Clifton Court Forebay, in Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta in California, and numerical results are presented.

  9. Interlaboratory evaluation of a standardized inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for the determination of trace beryllium in air filter samples.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Kevin; Brisson, Michael J; Howe, Alan M; Bartley, David L

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative interlaboratory evaluation of a newly standardized inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method for determining trace beryllium in workplace air samples was carried out toward fulfillment of method validation requirements for ASTM International voluntary consensus standard test methods. The interlaboratory study (ILS) was performed in accordance with an applicable ASTM International standard practice, ASTM E691, which describes statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. Uncertainty was also estimated in accordance with ASTM D7440, which applies the International Organization for Standardization Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement to air quality measurements. Performance evaluation materials (PEMs) used consisted of 37 mm diameter mixed cellulose ester filters that were spiked with beryllium at levels of 0.025 (low loading), 0.5 (medium loading), and 10 (high loading) microg Be/filter; these spiked filters were prepared by a contract laboratory. Participating laboratories were recruited from a pool of over 50 invitees; ultimately, 20 laboratories from Europe, North America, and Asia submitted ILS results. Triplicates of each PEM (blanks plus the three different loading levels) were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory, along with a copy of the draft standard test method that each participant was asked to follow; spiking levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were requested to prepare the PEMs by one of three sample preparation procedures (hotplate or microwave digestion or hotblock extraction) that were described in the draft standard. Participants were then asked to analyze aliquots of the prepared samples by ICP-MS and to report their data in units of mu g Be/filter sample. Interlaboratory precision estimates from participating laboratories, computed in accordance with ASTM E691, were 0.165, 0.108, and 0.151 (relative standard deviation) for the PEMs spiked at 0.025, 0

  10. Molecular Characterization of Free Tropospheric Aerosol Collected at the Pico Mountain Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzepina, K.; Mazzoleni, C.; Fialho, P. J.; China, S.; Zhang, B.; Owen, R. C.; Helmig, D.; Jacques, H.; Kumar, S.; Perlinger, J. A.; Kramer, L. J.; Dziobak, M.; Ampadu, M.; Olsen, S. C.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Mazzoleni, L. R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric aerosol was sampled at the Pico Mountain Observatory (38°28'15''N, 28°24'14''W; 2225 m amsl) on Pico Island of the Azores archipelago in the North Atlantic ~3900 km east and downwind of North America. Filter-collected aerosol during summer 2012 was analyzed for organic and elemental carbon, and inorganic ions. The average ambient concentration of aerosol was 0.9 μg m-3. Organic aerosol contributed the majority of mass (57%), followed by sulfate (21%) and nitrate (17%). Filter-collected aerosol was positively correlated with continuous aerosol measurements of black carbon, light scattering and number concentration. Water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC) from 9/24 and 9/25 aerosol samples collected during a pollution event were analyzed using ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR MS. FLEXPART retroplume analysis shows the air masses were very aged (> 12 days). About 4000 molecular formulas were assigned to each of the mass spectra between m/z 100-1000. The majority of the assigned molecular formulas have unsaturated structures with CHO and CHNO elemental compositions. WSOC have an average O/C ratio of ~0.45, relatively low compared to O/C ratios of other aged aerosol which might be the result of evaporation and fragmentation during long-range transport. The increase in aerosol loading during 9/24 was linked to biomass burning emissions from North America by FLEXPART retroplumes and MODIS fire counts. This was confirmed with WSOC biomass burning markers and with the morphology and mixing state of particles as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of markers characteristic of aqueous-phase reactions of biomass burning phenolic species suggests that the aerosol collected at Pico had undergone cloud processing. The air masses on 9/25 were more aged (~15 days) and influenced by marine emissions, as indicated by organosulfates and species characteristic for marine aerosol (e.g. fatty acids). The change in air masses for

  11. Comparison of membrane filtration rates and hydrophobic grid membrane filter coliform and Escherichia coli counts in food suspensions using paddle-type and pulsifier sample preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, A N; Hearn, E M; Kovacs-Nolan, J

    2000-01-01

    Food suspensions prepared by Pulsifier contained less debris and filtered 1.3x to 12x faster through hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) than those prepared by Stomacher 400. Coliform and Escherichia coli counts made by an HGMF method yielded 84 and 36 paired samples, respectively, positive by both suspending methods. Overall counts of pulsificates and stomachates did not differ significantly for either analysis, though coliform counts by Pulsifier were significantly higher in mushrooms and significantly lower in ground pork (P = 0.05). Regression equations for log10 counts of coliform and E. coli by Pulsifier and Stomacher were: Pulsifier = 0.12 + 0.97 x Stomacher, and Pulsifier = 0.01 + 1.01 x Stomacher, respectively.

  12. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  13. Vertical profiles of aerosol and black carbon in the Arctic: a seasonal phenomenology along 2 years (2011-2012) of field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Luca; Cappelletti, David; Busetto, Maurizio; Mazzola, Mauro; Lupi, Angelo; Lanconelli, Christian; Becagli, Silvia; Traversi, Rita; Caiazzo, Laura; Giardi, Fabio; Moroni, Beatrice; Crocchianti, Stefano; Fierz, Martin; Močnik, Griša; Sangiorgi, Giorgia; Perrone, Maria G.; Maturilli, Marion; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto; Bolzacchini, Ezio

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a systematic study of vertical profiles of aerosol number size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations conducted in the Arctic, over Ny-Ålesund (Svalbard). The campaign lasted 2 years (2011-2012) and resulted in 200 vertical profiles measured by means of a tethered balloon (up to 1200 m a.g.l.) during the spring and summer seasons. In addition, chemical analysis of filter samples, aerosol size distribution and a full set of meteorological parameters were determined at ground. The collected experimental data allowed a classification of the vertical profiles into different typologies, which allowed us to describe the seasonal phenomenology of vertical aerosol properties in the Arctic. During spring, four main types of profiles were found and their behavior was related to the main aerosol and atmospheric dynamics occurring at the measuring site. Background conditions generated homogenous profiles. Transport events caused an increase of aerosol concentration with altitude. High Arctic haze pollution trapped below thermal inversions promoted a decrease of aerosol concentration with altitude. Finally, ground-based plumes of locally formed secondary aerosol determined profiles with decreasing aerosol concentration located at different altitude as a function of size. During the summer season, the impact from shipping caused aerosol and BC pollution plumes to be constrained close to the ground, indicating that increasing shipping emissions in the Arctic could bring anthropogenic aerosol and BC in the Arctic summer, affecting the climate.

  14. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  15. Laboratory and field investigation of the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto quartz filters

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Novakov, T.

    2000-07-01

    A common method for measuring the mass of organic carbon in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz filter and subsequent thermal analysis. If unaccounted for, the adsorption of organic gases onto quartz filters will lead to the overestimation of aerosol organic carbon concentrations (positive artifact). A recommended method of correction for the positive artifact involves sampling with a backup filter. Placed behind either the primary quartz filter, or behind a Teflon filter and collected in parallel with the primary quartz filter, the carbon content of the quartz backup filter is a measure of the adsorbed organic material on the primary quartz filter. In this paper, we illustrate the application of this technique to samples collected in Berkeley, California. While the tandem quartz filter method can be successfully applied to correct for the positive artifact, we discuss two cases when this method will fail. We have found that the capacity for adsorption of organic gases is not uniform for all filters. Instead, filters manufactured by the same company, but having different lot numbers, exhibit variable adsorption capacity. Thus, a filter pair composed of filters from different lots may lead to significant under- or overestimation of particulate organic carbon concentration. Additionally, we have observed that the tandem filter method under-corrects for the positive artifact if the sampling time is short (few hours). Laboratory experiments with vapors of single organic compounds corroborate results based on ambient samples. The evolution of adsorbed organic gases, particularly polar compounds, during thermal analysis indicates that a single compound may experience two distinct adsorbent-adsorbate binding energies. Adsorbed gases may co-evolve with particles at temperatures in excess of 250-degree C.

  16. Laboratory and field investigation of the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto quartz filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Novakov, T.

    A common method for measuring the mass of organic carbon in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz filter and subsequent thermal analysis. If unaccounted for, the adsorption of organic gases onto quartz filters will lead to the overestimation of aerosol organic carbon concentrations (positive artifact). A recommended method of correction for the positive artifact involves sampling with a backup filter. Placed behind either the primary quartz filter, or behind a Teflon filter and collected in parallel with the primary quartz filter, the carbon content of the quartz backup filter is a measure of the adsorbed organic material on the primary quartz filter. In this paper, we illustrate the application of this technique to samples collected in Berkeley, California. While the tandem quartz filter method can be successfully applied to correct for the positive artifact, we discuss two cases when this method will fail. We have found that the capacity for adsorption of organic gases is not uniform for all filters. Instead, filters manufactured by the same company, but having different lot numbers, exhibit variable adsorption capacity. Thus, a filter pair composed of filters from different lots may lead to significant under- or overestimation of particulate organic carbon concentration. Additionally, we have observed that the tandem filter method under-corrects for the positive artifact if the sampling time is short (few hours). Laboratory experiments with vapors of single organic compounds corroborate results based on ambient samples. The evolution of adsorbed organic gases, particularly polar compounds, during thermal analysis indicates that a single compound may experience two distinct adsorbent-adsorbate binding energies. Adsorbed gases may co-evolve with particles at temperatures in excess of 250°C.

  17. A CAM (continuous air monitor) sampler for collecting and assessing alpha-emitting aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Bethel, E.L.; Ortiz, C.A.; Stanke, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    A new continuous air monitor (CAM) sampler for assessing alpha-emitting transuranic aerosol particles has been developed. The system has been designed to permit collection of particles that can potentially penetrate into the thoracic region of the human respiratory system. Wind tunnel testing of the sampler has been used to characterize the penetration of aerosol to the collection filter. Results show that greater than or equal to 50% of 10-micrograms aerodynamic equivalent diameter (AED) particles are collected by the filter at wind speeds of 0.3 to 2 m s-1 and at sampling flow rates of 28 to 113 L min-1 (1 to 4 cfm). The deposition of 10-microns AED particles takes place primarily in the center of the filter, where the counting efficiency of the detector is highest.

  18. Mount Saint Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Fong, W.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  19. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  20. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K.G.; Ferry, G.V.; Hayes, D.M.

    1982-09-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mt. St. Helens. Analysis of samples show that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  1. Airborne influenza virus detection with four aerosol samplers using molecular and infectivity assays: considerations for a new infectious virus aerosol sampler

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, P.; McDevitt, J. J.; Houseman, E. A.; Milton, D. K.

    2013-01-01

    As a first step in conducting studies of airborne influenza transmission, we compared the collection performance of an SKC Biosampler, a compact cascade impactor (CCI), Teflon filters, and gelatin filters by collecting aerosolized influenza virus in a one-pass aerosol chamber. Influenza virus infectivity was determined using a fluorescent focus assay and influenza virus nucleic acid (originating from viable and non-viable viruses) was measured using quantitative PCR. The results showed that the SKC Biosampler recovered and preserved influenza virus infectivity much better than the other samplers – the CCI, Teflon, and gelatin filters recovered only 7–22% of infectious viruses compared with the Biosampler. Total virus collection was not significantly different among the SKC Biosampler, the gelatin, and Teflon filters, but was significantly lower in the CCI. Results from this study show that a new sampler is needed for virus aerosol sampling, as commercially available samplers do not efficiently collect and conserve virus infectivity. Applications for a new sampler include studies of airborne disease transmission and bioterrorism monitoring. Design parameters for a new sampler include high collection efficiency for fine particles and liquid sampling media to preserve infectivity. PMID:19689447

  2. Analyses of turbulent flow fields and aerosol dynamics of diesel engine exhaust inside two dilution sampling tunnels using the CTAG model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Jason; Yang, Bo; Lipsky, Eric M; Robinson, Allen L; Zhang, K Max

    2013-01-15

    Experimental results from laboratory emission testing have indicated that particulate emission measurements are sensitive to the dilution process of exhaust using fabricated dilution systems. In this paper, we first categorize the dilution parameters into two groups: (1) aerodynamics (e.g., mixing types, mixing enhancers, dilution ratios, residence time); and (2) mixture properties (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, particle size distributions of both raw exhaust and dilution gas). Then we employ the Comprehensive Turbulent Aerosol Dynamics and Gas Chemistry (CTAG) model to investigate the effects of those parameters on a set of particulate emission measurements comparing two dilution tunnels, i.e., a T-mixing lab dilution tunnel and a portable field dilution tunnel with a type of coaxial mixing. The turbulent flow fields and aerosol dynamics of particles are simulated inside two dilution tunnels. Particle size distributions under various dilution conditions predicted by CTAG are evaluated against the experimental data. It is found that in the area adjacent to the injection of exhaust, turbulence plays a crucial role in mixing the exhaust with the dilution air, and the strength of nucleation dominates the level of particle number concentrations. Further downstream, nucleation terminates and the growth of particles by condensation and coagulation continues. Sensitivity studies reveal that a potential unifying parameter for aerodynamics, i.e., the dilution rate of exhaust, plays an important role in new particle formation. The T-mixing lab tunnel tends to favor the nucleation due to a larger dilution rate of the exhaust than the coaxial mixing field tunnel. Our study indicates that numerical simulation tools can be potentially utilized to develop strategies to reduce the uncertainties associated with dilution samplings of emission sources.

  3. Satellite and correlative measurements of the stratospheric aerosol. III - Comparison of measurements by SAM II, SAGE, dustsondes, filters, impactors and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Swissler, T. J.; Rosen, J. M.; Hofmann, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The SAM II and SAGE satellite sensors, dustsondes, impactors, a filter collector and an airborne lidar were used in a large satellite validation experiment on July 16-19, 1979, at Poker Flat, Alaska. Independent measurements of extinction profiles by SAM II and SAGE are noted to agree with each other and with those derived from the other instruments (within combined uncertainties). The wire impactor-derived results, while also consistent with the others, are coarse due to the relatively large uncertainties in impactor-derived mass, extinction, and number of particles/unit volume whose radius is greater than x microns.

  4. METHODS OF CALCULATINAG LUNG DELIVERY AND DEPOSITION OF AEROSOL PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory


    Lung deposition of aerosol is measured by a variety of methods. Total lung deposition can be measured by monitoring inhaled and exhaled aerosols in situ by laser photometry or by collecting the aerosols on filters. The measurements can be performed accurately for stable monod...

  5. Cross-institute evaluations of inhibitor-resistant PCR reagents for direct testing of aerosol and blood samples containing biological warfare agent DNA.

    PubMed

    Minogue, Timothy D; Rachwal, Phillip A; Trombley Hall, Adrienne; Koehler, Jeffery W; Weller, Simon A