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Sample records for aerosol gas experiment

  1. SAGE II inversion algorithm. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Lenoble, J.; Brogniez, C.; Pruvost, P.

    1989-01-01

    The operational Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II multichannel data inversion algorithm is described. Aerosol and ozone retrievals obtained with the algorithm are discussed. The algorithm is compared to an independently developed algorithm (Lenoble, 1989), showing that the inverted aerosol and ozone profiles from the two algorithms are similar within their respective uncertainties.

  2. Discrimination of cloud and aerosol in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III occultation data.

    PubMed

    Kent, G S; Wang, P H; Skeens, K M

    1997-11-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III, scheduled for a first launch in mid-1998, will be making measurements of the extinction that is due to aerosols and gases at many wavelengths between 385 and 1550 nm. In the troposphere and wintertime polar stratosphere, extinction will also occur because of the presence of cloud along the optical path from the Sun to the satellite instrument. We describe a method for separating the effects of aerosol and cloud using the extinction at 525, 1020, and 1550 nm and present the results of simulation studies. These studies show that the new method will work well under background nonvolcanic aerosol conditions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Under conditions of severe volcanic contamination, the error rate for the separation of aerosol and cloud may rise as high as 30%.

  3. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and III Aerosol Extinction Measurements in the Arctic Middle and Upper Troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treffeisen, R. E.; Thomason, L. W.; Strom, J.; Herber, A. B.; Burton, S. P.; Yamanouchi, T.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, substantial effort has been expended toward understanding the impact of tropospheric aerosols on Arctic climate and chemistry. A significant part of this effort has been the collection and documentation of extensive aerosol physical and optical property data sets. However, the data sets present significant interpretive challenges because of the diverse nature of these measurements. Among the longest continuous records is that by the spaceborne Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II. Although SAGE tropospheric measurements are restricted to the middle and upper troposphere, they may be able to provide significant insight into the nature and variability of tropospheric aerosol, particularly when combined with ground and airborne observations. This paper demonstrates the capacity of aerosol products from SAGE II and its follow-on experiment SAGE III to describe the temporal and vertical variations of Arctic aerosol characteristics. We find that the measurements from both instruments are consistent enough to be combined. Using this combined data set, we detect a clear annual cycle in the aerosol extinction for the middle and upper Arctic troposphere.

  4. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  5. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III - International Space Station: Extending Long-Term Ozone and Aerosol Observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckman, R.; Zawodny, J. M.; Cisewski, M.; Gasbarre, J.; Flittner, D. E.; Hill, C.; Roell, M.; Moore, J. R.; Hernandez, G.; McCormick, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III - International Space Station (SAGE III on ISS) will extend the global measurements of vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gases begun with SAGE I in 1979, enabling the detection of long-term trends. SAGE III on ISS is the fourth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring these constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm, using the heritage occultation technique, utilizing both the sun and the moon. Launch to ISS is planned for early 2015 aboard a Falcon 9 spacecraft. SAGE III will investigate the spatial and temporal variability of the measured species in order to determine their role in climatological processes, biogeochemical cycles, the hydrologic cycle, and atmospheric chemistry. It will characterize tropospheric, as well as stratospheric aerosols and upper tropospheric and stratospheric clouds, and investigate their effects on the Earth's environment including radiative, microphysical, and chemical interactions. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Amongst its key objectives will be to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to reestablish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The ISS is ideal for Earth observing experiments; its mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. In this presentation, we describe the SAGE III on ISS mission, its implementation, current status, and concentrate on its key science objectives.

  6. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  7. On the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Gloria; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Cisewski, Michael S.; Thornton, Brooke M.; Panetta, Andrew D,; Roell, Marilee M.; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on International Space Station (SAGE3/ISS) is anticipated to be delivered to Cape Canaveral in the spring of 2015. This is the fourth generation, fifth instrument, of visible/near-IR solar occultation instruments operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. The instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. The SAGE3/ISS validation program will be based upon internal consistency of the measurements, detailed analysis of the retrieval algorithm, and comparisons with independent correlative measurements. The Instrument Payload (IP), mission architecture, and major challenges are also discussed.

  8. Stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments I and II comparisons with ozonesondes

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, R.E.; Cunnold, D.M.; Chu, W.P.

    1995-05-20

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) I and II are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE II overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in the midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE I overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 {plus_minus} 2% for SAGE II and 8 {plus_minus}3% for SAGE I. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE II, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE I, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and {minus}20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  10. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  11. Initial operation and checkout of stratospheric aerosol gas experiment and Meteor-3M satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Shahid; Makridenko, Leonid; Chu, William P.; Salikhov, Rashid; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.; Trepte, Charles R.; Cisewski, Michael S.

    2003-04-01

    Under a joint agreement between the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) and the Russian Aviation and Space Agency (RASA), the Stratospheric Aerosol Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument was launched in low earth orbit on December 10, 2001 aboard the Russian Meteor-3M(1) satellite from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. SAGE III is a spectrometer that measures attenuated radiation in the 282 nm to 1550 nm wavelength range to obtain the vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, and other chemical species that are critical in studying the trends for the global climate change phenomena. This instrument version is more advanced than any of the previous versions and has more spectral bands, elaborate data gathering and storage, and intelligent terrestrial software. There are a number of Russian scientific instruments aboard the Meteor satellite in addition to the SAGE III instrument. These instruments deal with land imaging and biomass changes, hydro-meteorological monitoring, and helio-geophysical research. This mission was under development for over a period of six years and offered a number of unique technical and program management challenges for both Agencies. SAGE III has a long space heritage, and four earlier versions of this instrument have flown in space for nearly two decades now. In fact, SAGE II, the fourth instrument, is still flying in space on NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and has been providing important atmospheric data over the last 18 years. It has provided vital ozone and aerosol data in the mid latitudes and has contributed vastly in ozone depletion research. Ball Aerospace built the instrument under Langley Research Center's (LaRC) management. This paper presents the process and approach deployed by the SAGE III and the Meteor teams in performing the initial on-orbit checkout. It further documents a number of early science results obtained by deploying low risk, carefully coordinated procedures in resolving the serious operational

  12. Algorithms and sensitivity analyses for stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment II water vapor retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.P.; Thomason, L.W.; Buglia, J.J.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.M. ); Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J.C. ); Rind, D. ); Oltmans, S. )

    1993-03-20

    This paper provides a detailed description of the current operational inversion algorithm for the retrieval of water vapor vertical profiles from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) occultation data at the 0.94-[mu]m wavelength channel. This algorithm is different from the algorithm used for the retrieval of the other species such as aerosol, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide because of the nonlinear relationship between the concentration versus the broad band absorption characteristics of water vapor. Included in the discussion of the retrieval algorithm are problems related to the accuracy of the computational scheme, accuracy of the removal of other interfering species, and the expected uncertainty of the retrieved profile. A comparative analysis on the computational schemes used for the calculation of the water vapor transmission at the 0.94-[mu]m wavelength region is presented. Analyses are also presented on the sensitivity of the retrievals to interferences from the other species which contribute to the total signature as observed at the 0.94-[mu]m wavelength channel on SAGE II instrument. Error analyses of the SAGE II water vapor retrieval is shown, indicating that good quality water vapor data are being produced by the SAGE II measurements. 27 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K.

    2011-08-01

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  14. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratiospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Shiotani, M.; Hasebe, F. |

    1994-07-01

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time.

  15. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratiospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Hasebe, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time.

  16. A study on characterization of stratospheric aerosol and gas parameters with the spacecraft solar occultation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Spacecraft remote sensing of stratospheric aerosol and ozone vertical profiles using the solar occultation experiment has been analyzed. A computer algorithm has been developed in which a two step inversion of the simulated data can be performed. The radiometric data are first inverted into a vertical extinction profile using a linear inversion algorithm. Then the multiwavelength extinction profiles are solved with a nonlinear least square algorithm to produce aerosol and ozone vertical profiles. Examples of inversion results are shown illustrating the resolution and noise sensitivity of the inversion algorithms.

  17. SAGE ground truth plan: Correlative measurements for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) on the AEM-B satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B. (Editor); Cunnold, D. M.; Grams, G. W.; Laver, J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Murcray, D. G.; Pepin, T. J.; Perry, T. W.; Planet, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The ground truth plan is outlined for correlative measurements to validate the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) sensor data. SAGE will fly aboard the Applications Explorer Mission-B satellite scheduled for launch in early 1979 and measure stratospheric vertical profiles of aerosol, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and molecular extinction between 79 N and 79 S. latitude. The plan gives details of the location and times for the simultaneous satellite/correlative measurements for the nominal launch time, the rationale and choice of the correlative sensors, their characteristics and expected accuracies, and the conversion of their data to extinction profiles. In addition, an overview of the SAGE expected instrument performance and data inversion results are presented. Various atmospheric models representative of stratospheric aerosols and ozone are used in the SAGE and correlative sensor analyses.

  18. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III/International Space Station Mission: Science Objectives and Mission Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckman, R.; Zawodny, J. M.; Cisewski, M. S.; Flittner, D. E.; McCormick, M. P.; Gasbarre, J. F.; Damadeo, R. P.; Hill, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III/International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) is a strategic climate continuity mission which was included in NASA's 2010 plan, "Responding to the Challenge of Climate and Environmental Change: NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space." SAGE III/ISS continues the long-term, global measurements of trace gases and aerosols begun in 1979 by SAGE I and continued by SAGE II and SAGE III on Meteor 3M. Using a well characterized occultation technique, the SAGE III instrument's spectrometer will measure vertical profiles of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gases relevant to ozone chemistry. The mission will launch in 2016 aboard a Falcon 9 spacecraft.The primary objective of SAGE III/ISS is to monitor the vertical distribution of aerosols, ozone, and other trace gases in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere to enhance our understanding of ozone recovery and climate change processes in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. SAGE III/ISS will provide data necessary to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, extend the SAGE III aerosol measurement record that is needed by both climate models and ozone models, and gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense community scrutiny for accuracy and stability. SAGE ozone data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol.The ISS inclined orbit of 51.6 degrees is ideal for SAGE III measurements because the orbit permits solar occultation measurement coverage to approximately +/- 70 degrees of latitude. SAGE III/ISS will make measurements using the solar occultation measurement technique, lunar occultation measurement technique, and the limb scattering measurement technique. In this presentation, we describe the SAGE III/ISS mission, its

  20. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments - Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Larsen, J. C.; Rind, D.; Oltmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite sensors of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus-7 LIMS, and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. It was found that, despite differences in the measurement techniques, sampling bias, and observational periods, the three experiments have disclosed a generally consistent pattern of stratospheric water vapor distribution. The only significant difference occurs at high southern altitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements were 2-3 ppmv greater than those of SAGE II and ATMOS.

  1. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  2. Earth Science With the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawodny, Joe; Vernier, Jean-Paul; Thomason, Larry; Roell, Marilee; Pitts, Mike; Moore, Randy; Hill, Charles; Flittner, David; Damadeo, Rob; Cisewski, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Aviation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the ISS in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observation in the second half of this decade. Here we discuss the mission architecture, its implementation, and data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. Though in the visible portion of the spectrum the brightness of the Sun is one million times that of the full Moon, the SAGE III instrument is designed to cover this large dynamic range and also perform lunar occultations on a routine basis to augment the solar products. The standard lunar products were demonstrated during the SAGE III/M3M mission and include ozone, nitrogen dioxide & nitrogen trioxide. The operational flexibility of the SAGE III spectrometer accomplishes

  3. Inference of the aerosol Angstrom coefficient from SAGE short-wavelength data. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenoble, J.; Pruvost, P.

    1983-01-01

    SAGE four-channel transmission profiles are inverted to retrieve the extinction profiles from which the aerosol Angstrom coefficient alpha is obtained. The procedure allows one to check the influence of the NO2 absorption profile, which is small below 25 km. The results compare well with those obtained by a completely different procedure at NASA Langley Research Center, and the main features of the alpha profiles seem to be significant, even considering the rather large error bars. The relation between the retrieved Angstrom coefficient, the particle effective radius and the asymmetry factor is considered.

  4. Comparison of stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment I (SAGE I) and Umkehr ozone profiles including a search for Umkehr aerosol effects

    SciTech Connect

    Newchurch, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    After briefly reviewing ozone depletion predictions from atmospheric models and results from trend analysis of Umkehr data, this paper outlines the Umkehr method for deducing the vertical profile of ozone and reviews the theoretical and empirical studies of the aerosol effect on Umkehr measurements. A brief description of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment I (SAGE I) is followed by a method for approximating the best representation of the conditions over the Umkehr ground site as seen by the SAGE I satellite. Using a spatially weighted average of SAGE I events derived from an autocorrelation analysis, the authors find 337 co-located SAGE I and Umkehr events. The approximate total column ozone measured by SAGE I is 5% higher than that measured by Umkehr on average. Most of this difference resides in Umkehr layer two, three, and four, while layers seven, eight, and nine contain small differences in average ozone content. Intercomparison with four other ozone studies indicates agreement between SAGE I and SBUV in most layers and at most Umkehr stations north of 30/sup 0/. However, significant differences in Umkehr layer eight between SAGE I and SBUV remain. Ozone differences between SAGE I and Umkehr are strong functions of both total column ozone and season in the lower layers but not in the upper layers.

  5. The COSmIC/THS experiment: gas and solid phase studies of Titan aerosol simulants produced at cold temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-OBrien, E. M.; Upton, K.; Beauchamp, J. L.; Salama, F.

    2013-12-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, a complex chemistry between N2 and CH4 occurs at temperatures lower than 200K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature, and in particular to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs), potential precursors to Titan's solid aerosols. In the COSmIC/THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K measured by optical emission spectroscopy). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of trace elements present on Titan. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOF-MS) for the gas phase; Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS), Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Infrared (IR) spectroscopy for the solid phase. Previous TOF-MS mass spectrometry analyses of the gas phase have demonstrated that the COSmIC/THS experiment can be used to study the first and intermediate steps as well as specific chemical pathways of Titan's atmospheric chemistry. The more complex chemistry, observed in the gas phase when adding trace elements to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, has been confirmed by an extensive study of the

  6. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II water vapor observations: Method, validation, and data characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D. ); Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J. ); Chu, W.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L. ); Oltmans, S. ); Lerner, J. )

    1993-03-20

    Water vapor observations obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) solar occulation instrument for the troposphere and stratosphere are presented and compared with correlative in situ measurement techniques and other satellite data. The SAGE II instrument produces water vapor values from cloud top to approximately 1 mbar, except in regions of high aerosol content such as occurs in the low to middle stratosphere after volcanic eruptions. Details of the analysis procedure, instrumental errors, and data characteristics are discussed. Various features of the data set for the first 5 years after launch (1985-1989) are identified. These include an increase in middle and upper tropospheric water vapor during northern hemisphere summer and autumn, thus at times of warmest sea surface temperature; minimum water vapor values of 2.5-3 ppmv in the tropical lower stratosphere, with lower values during northern hemisphere winter and spring; slowly increasing water vapor values with altitude in the stratosphere, reaching 5-6 ppmv or greater near the stratopause; extratropical values with minimum profile amounts occurring above the conventionally defined tropopause; and higher extratropical than tropical water vapor values throughout the stratosphere except in locations of possible polar stratospheric clouds. SAGE II data will be useful for studying individual water vapor profiles, tropospheric response to climate perturbations, tropospheric-stratospheric exchange (due to its inherent high vertical resolution), and stratospheric transports. It should also aid in the preparation, for the first time on a global scale, of climatologies of the stratosphere and the upper level cloud-free troposphere, for use in radiative, dynamical, and chemical studies. 57 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Annual variations of water vapor in the stratosphere and upper troposphere observed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R.; Chu, W.P. ); Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J.C. ); Rind, D. ); Oltmans, S. )

    1993-03-20

    This paper presents a description of the annual variations of water vapor in the stratosphere and the upper troposphere derived from observations of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II). The altitude-time cross sections exhibit annually repeatable patterns in both hemispheres. The appearance of a yearly minimum in water vapor in both hemispheres at approximately the same time supports the idea of a common source(s) for stratospheric dry air. Annual patterns observed at northern mid-latitudes, like the appearance of a hygropause in winter and the weakening and upward shifting of the hygropause from January to May, agree with in situ balloon observations previously obtained over Boulder and Washington, DC. An increase in water vapor with altitude in the tropics is consistent with methane oxidation in the upper stratosphere to lower mesosphere as a source for water vapor. A poleward gradient is also shown as expected based on a Lagrangian mean circulation. A linear regression analysis using SAGE II data from January 1986 to December 1988 shows that little annual variation occurs in the middle and upper stratosphere with the region of large annual variability near the tropopause. The semi-annual variability is relatively marked at altitudes of 24 and 40 km in the tropics. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment, SAGE III on ISS, An Earth Science Mission on the International Space Station, Schedule Risk Analysis, A Project Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonine, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The presentation provides insight into the schedule risk analysis process used by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station Project. The presentation focuses on the schedule risk analysis process highlighting the methods for identification of risk inputs, the inclusion of generic risks identified outside the traditional continuous risk management process, and the development of tailored analysis products used to improve risk informed decision making.

  9. A global aerosol classification algorithm incorporating multiple satellite data sets of aerosol and trace gas abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Beirle, S.; Hörmann, C.; Kaiser, J. W.; Stammes, P.; Tilstra, L. G.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.

    2015-09-01

    Detecting the optical properties of aerosols using passive satellite-borne measurements alone is a difficult task due to the broadband effect of aerosols on the measured spectra and the influences of surface and cloud reflection. We present another approach to determine aerosol type, namely by studying the relationship of aerosol optical depth (AOD) with trace gas abundance, aerosol absorption, and mean aerosol size. Our new Global Aerosol Classification Algorithm, GACA, examines relationships between aerosol properties (AOD and extinction Ångström exponent from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), UV Aerosol Index from the second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment, GOME-2) and trace gas column densities (NO2, HCHO, SO2 from GOME-2, and CO from MOPITT, the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere instrument) on a monthly mean basis. First, aerosol types are separated based on size (Ångström exponent) and absorption (UV Aerosol Index), then the dominating sources are identified based on mean trace gas columns and their correlation with AOD. In this way, global maps of dominant aerosol type and main source type are constructed for each season and compared with maps of aerosol composition from the global MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate) model. Although GACA cannot correctly characterize transported or mixed aerosols, GACA and MACC show good agreement regarding the global seasonal cycle, particularly for urban/industrial aerosols. The seasonal cycles of both aerosol type and source are also studied in more detail for selected 5° × 5° regions. Again, good agreement between GACA and MACC is found for all regions, but some systematic differences become apparent: the variability of aerosol composition (yearly and/or seasonal) is often not well captured by MACC, the amount of mineral dust outside of the dust belt appears to be overestimated, and the abundance of secondary organic aerosols is underestimated in comparison

  10. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments: Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J.C. ); McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R.; Chu, W.P. ); Rind, D. ); Oltmans, S. )

    1993-03-20

    This paper presents a comparison of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite-borne sensors the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS), and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. LIMS obtained data for 7 months between November 1978 and May 1979; ATMOS was carried on Shuttle and observed eight profiles from April 30 to May 6, 1985 at approximately 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S; and, SAGE II continues to make measurements since its launch in October 1984. For both 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S in May, the comparisons between SAGE II and ATMOS show agreement within the estimated combined uncertainty of the two experiments. Several important features identified by LIMS observations have been confirmed by SAGE II: a well-developed hygropause in the lower stratosphere at low- to mid-latitudes, a poleward latitudinal gradient, increasing water vapor mixing ratios with altitude in the tropics, and the transport of dry lower stratospheric water vapor upward and southward in May, and upward and northward in November. A detailed comparative study also indicates that the two previously suggested corrections for LIMS, a correction in tropical lower stratosphere due to a positive temperature bias and the correction above 28 km based on improved emissivities will bring LIMS measurements much closer to those of SAGE II. The only significant difference occurs at high southern latitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements are 2-3 ppmv greater. It should be noted that LIMS observations are from 16 to 50 km, ATMOS from 14 to 86 km, and SAGE II from mid-troposphere to 40 km. With multiyear coverage, SAGE II observations should be useful for studying tropospheric-stratospheric exchange, for stratospheric transport, and for preparing water vapor climatologies for the stratosphere and the upper troposphere. 32 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. An intercomparison of SAGE and SBUV ozone observations for March and April 1979. [stratospheric aerosol and gas experiment solar backscatterd ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Pitts, M. C.; Trepte, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-eight latitudinal cross sections of stratospheric ozone observed by the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) and SBUV (Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet) satellite instruments on the same days in March and April 1979 and at approximately the same latitude are compared. Differences in the zonal-mean mixing ratios are found. At pressures less than 5 mbar, SAGE gives approximately 20 percent larger mixing ratios at tropical latitudes (after a correction has been applied for the expected diurnal variation of ozone). The uncorrelated portion of the SBUV variances are smaller than the SAGE noise variances at altitudes above 10 mbar, which indicates that the SBUV experiment should provide excellent detectability of longitudinal ozone variations.

  12. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-12-31

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  13. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A research program on the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions is proposed. The experiments involve measuring changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol. Aerosols with differing surface properties will be generated by changing the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. Kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modelling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol will be measured, both before and after reaction, using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Information about the detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during the course of the reaction. Studies will focus on the condensation and oxidation of sulfur species (sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide) on water aerosols.

  14. Aerosol effects and corrections in the Halogen Occultation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hervig, Mark E.; Russell, James M., III; Gordley, Larry L.; Daniels, John; Drayson, S. Roland; Park, Jae H.

    1995-01-01

    The eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in June 1991 increased stratospheric aerosol loading by a factor of 30, affecting chemistry, radiative transfer, and remote measurements of the stratosphere. The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument on board Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) makes measurements globally for inferring profiles of NO2, H2O, O3, HF, HCl, CH4, NO, and temperature in addition to aerosol extinction at five wavelengths. Understanding and removing the aerosol extinction is essential for obtaining accurate retrievals from the radiometer channels of NO2, H2O and O3 in the lower stratosphere since these measurements are severely affected by contaminant aerosol absorption. If ignored, aerosol absorption in the radiometer measurements is interpreted as additional absorption by the target gas, resulting in anomalously large mixing ratios. To correct the radiometer measurements for aerosol effects, a retrieved aerosol extinction profile is extrapolated to the radiometer wavelengths and then included as continuum attenuation. The sensitivity of the extrapolation to size distribution and composition is small for certain wavelength combinations, reducing the correction uncertainty. The aerosol corrections extend the usable range of profiles retrieved from the radiometer channels to the tropopause with results that agree well with correlative measurements. In situations of heavy aerosol loading, errors due to aerosol in the retrieved mixing ratios are reduced to values of about 15, 25, and 60% in H2O, O3, and NO2, respectively, levels that are much less than the correction magnitude.

  15. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-03-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013) algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components and their mixing ratios. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data qualitatively by visible analysis of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing global daily gridded satellite data against daily

  16. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  17. Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggiola, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using support from NASA Grant No. NAG 2-963, SRI International successfully completed the project, entitled, 'Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation.' This effort (SRI Project 7383) covered the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a real-time aerosol speciation instrument in NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the Spring 1996 SUbsonic aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission. This final technical report describes the pertinent details of the instrument design, its abilities, its deployment during SUCCESS and the data acquired from the mission, and the post-mission calibration, data reduction, and analysis.

  18. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013), algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun photometer

  19. Evolved gas analysis of secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Williams, E.L. II; Grosjean, E. ); Novakov, T. )

    1994-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosols have been characterized by evolved gas analysis (EGA). Hydrocarbons selected as aerosol precursors were representative of anthropogenic emissions (cyclohexene, cyclopentene, 1-decene and 1-dodecene, n-dodecane, o-xylene, and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and of biogenic emissions (the terpenes [alpha]-pinene, [beta]-pinene and d-limonene and the sesquiterpene trans-caryophyllene). Also analyzed by EGA were samples of secondary, primary (highway tunnel), and ambient (urban) aerosols before and after exposure to ozone and other photochemical oxidants. The major features of the EGA thermograms (amount of CO[sub 2] evolved as a function of temperature) are described. The usefulness and limitations of EGA data for source apportionment of atmospheric particulate carbon are briefly discussed. 28 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. The Hohenpeissenberg aerosol characterization experiment (HAZE2002): Aerosol composition derived from mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Berresheim, H.; Borrmann, S.; Poeschl, U.; Roempp, A.; Schneider, J.

    2003-04-01

    The HAZE Experiment was conducted between 17.05.2002 and 31.05.2002, at the meteorological observatory of the Deutsche Wetterdienst (DWD) at Hohenpeissenberg (47^o48'N,11^o02'E, 985m). The objective was to make essential progress in understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the atmospheric aerosol, in particular relating to the Gas-To-Particle-Conversion and the interaction with meteorological processes. The measurements included online mass spectrometric analysis using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), filter samples with GC analyses of organic compounds, particle size distribution (Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), SMPS, OPC), as well as the total particle concentration (CPC). Additionally, several gas-phase substances were measured (e.g. Benzene, Acetone). The measurements obtained with the AMS show a strong variability of the aerosol composition. The non-refractory aerosol composition was dominated by nitrate, sulphate, and organics, whereas ammonium was surprisingly low. High number concentration of up to 14000 particles/cm^3 were observed. These particles mostly had diameters between 200 nm and 400 nm and were mainly composed of ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate. Various meteorological conditions allowed to study their influence on the aerosol. For example, on rainy days the concentrations of ammonium sulphate particles decreased, whereas the concentrations of ammonium nitrate particles increased.

  1. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  2. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a

  3. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  4. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering. 1992 Annual summary

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1993-01-30

    This study is aimed at characterizing the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions. Changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol are measured with aerosols having different surface properties due to the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. The kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modeling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol is using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during, the course of the reaction. This dynamics information can be used to generate kinetic data for systems which are similar in nature to those studied, but are not amenable to laboratory investigation. We show here that increased MDSRS sensitivity is achieved by using an excitation laser source that has a narrow linewidth and we have been able to detect sulfate anion concentrations much lower than previously reported. We have shown that the linewidth of the MDSRS mode excited in a droplet is limited by the laser linewidth. This is a positive result for it eases our ability to quantify the MDSRS gain equation. This result also suggests that MDSRS signal size should be independent of droplet size, and preliminary experiments confirm this hypothesis.

  5. Characterization of gas-aerosol interaction kinetics using morphology dependent stimulated Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aker, P.M.

    1993-01-30

    This study is aimed at characterizing the influence of aerosol surface structure on the kinetics of gas-aerosol interactions. Changes in gas phase chemical reaction rates as a function of exposure to a specific aerosol are measured with aerosols having different surface properties due to the composition and/or temperature of the material making up the aerosol. The kinetic data generated can be used directly in atmospheric modeling calculations. The surface structure of the aerosol is using morphology-dependent enhancement of simulated Raman scattering (MDSRS). Detailed dynamics of gas-aerosol interactions can be obtained by correlating the change in the reaction rate with change in surface structure and by monitoring the change in aerosol surface structure during, the course of the reaction. This dynamics information can be used to generate kinetic data for systems which are similar in nature to those studied, but are not amenable to laboratory investigation. We show here that increased MDSRS sensitivity is achieved by using an excitation laser source that has a narrow linewidth and we have been able to detect sulfate anion concentrations much lower than previously reported. We have shown that the linewidth of the MDSRS mode excited in a droplet is limited by the laser linewidth. This is a positive result for it eases our ability to quantify the MDSRS gain equation. This result also suggests that MDSRS signal size should be independent of droplet size, and preliminary experiments confirm this hypothesis.

  6. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2007-06-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. The online measurement data and techniques included: size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles by aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS); total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm (CPC, SMPS, OPC); monoterpenes determined by gas chromatography- ion trap mass spectrometry; OH and H2SO4 determined by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS). Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: 11% ammonium, 19% nitrate, 20% sulfate, and 50% organics (OM1). In spite of strongly changing meteorological conditions and absolute concentration levels of particulate matter (3-13 μg m-3 PM1), OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. In contrast, the ratio of nitrate to sulfate was highly dependent on temperature (14-32°C) and relative humidity (20-100%), which could be explained by thermodynamic model calculations of NH3/HNO3/NH4NO3 gas-particle partitioning. From the combination of optical and other sizing techniques (OPC, AMS, SMPS), an average refractive index of 1.40-1.45 was inferred for the measured rural aerosol

  7. Gas uptake and chemical aging of semisolid organic aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Ammann, Markus; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2011-07-01

    Organic substances can adopt an amorphous solid or semisolid state, influencing the rate of heterogeneous reactions and multiphase processes in atmospheric aerosols. Here we demonstrate how molecular diffusion in the condensed phase affects the gas uptake and chemical transformation of semisolid organic particles. Flow tube experiments show that the ozone uptake and oxidative aging of amorphous protein is kinetically limited by bulk diffusion. The reactive gas uptake exhibits a pronounced increase with relative humidity, which can be explained by a decrease of viscosity and increase of diffusivity due to hygroscopic water uptake transforming the amorphous organic matrix from a glassy to a semisolid state (moisture-induced phase transition). The reaction rate depends on the condensed phase diffusion coefficients of both the oxidant and the organic reactant molecules, which can be described by a kinetic multilayer flux model but not by the traditional resistor model approach of multiphase chemistry. The chemical lifetime of reactive compounds in atmospheric particles can increase from seconds to days as the rate of diffusion in semisolid phases can decrease by multiple orders of magnitude in response to low temperature or low relative humidity. The findings demonstrate that the occurrence and properties of amorphous semisolid phases challenge traditional views and require advanced formalisms for the description of organic particle formation and transformation in atmospheric models of aerosol effects on air quality, public health, and climate.

  8. Rural continental aerosol properties and processes observed during the Hohenpeissenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment (HAZE2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, N.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.; Römpp, A.; Moortgat, G.; Franze, T.; Schauer, C.; Pöschl, U.; Plass-Dülmer, C.; Berresheim, H.

    2008-02-01

    Detailed investigations of the chemical and microphysical properties of rural continental aerosols were performed during the HAZE2002 experiment, which was conducted in May 2002 at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeissenberg (DWD) in Southern Germany. Online measurements included: Size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles; total particle number concentrations and size distributions over the diameter range of 3 nm to 9 μm; gas-phase concentration of monoterpenes, CO, O3, OH, and H2SO4. Filter sampling and offline analytical techniques were used to determine: Fine particle mass (PM2.5), organic, elemental and total carbon in PM2.5 (OC2.5, EC2.5, TC2.5), and selected organic compounds (dicarboxylic acids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, proteins). Overall, the non-refractory components of submicron particles detected by aerosol mass spectrometry (PM1, 6.6±5.4 μg m-3, arithmetic mean and standard deviation) accounted for ~62% of PM2.5 determined by filter gravimetry (10.6±4.7 μg m-3). The relative proportions of non-refractory submicron particle components were: (23±39)% ammonium nitrate, (27±23)% ammonium sulfate, and (50±40)% organics (OM1). OM1 was closely correlated with PM1 (r2=0.9) indicating a near-constant ratio of non-refractory organics and inorganics. The average ratio of OM1 to OC2.5 was 2.1±1.4, indicating a high proportion of heteroelements in the organic fraction of the sampled rural aerosol. This is consistent with the high ratio of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) over hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) inferred from the AMS results (4:1), and also with the high abundance of proteins (~3%) indicating a high proportion of primary biological material (~30%) in PM2.5. This finding was confirmed by low abundance of PAHs (<1 ng m-3) and EC (<1 μg m-3) in PM2.5 and detection of several secondary organic aerosol compounds (dicarboxylic acids) and their precursors (monoterpenes). New particle formation was observed almost

  9. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1986-01-01

    A method for separating gaseous samples from a contained atmosphere that includes aerosol particles uses the step of repelling particles from a gas permeable surface or membrane by heating the surface to a temperature greater than that of the surrounding atmosphere. The resulting thermophoretic forces maintain the gas permeable surface clear of aerosol particles. The disclosed apparatus utilizes a downwardly facing heated plate of gas permeable material to combine thermophoretic repulsion and gravity forces to prevent particles of any size from contacting the separating plate surfaces.

  10. The interstellar gas experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Buehler, F.; Eugster, O.

    1992-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils to collect neutral interstellar gas particles. These particles penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. Thus, it is possible to entrap them in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric and perhaps some ambient atmospheric particles. For the entire duration of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. In the mass spectroscopic analysis of the noble gas component of these particles, we have detected the isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22. In the foil analyses carried out so far, we find a distribution of particle arrival directions which shows that a significant part of the trapped particles are indeed interstellar atoms. The analysis needed to subtract the competing fluxes of magnetospheric and atmospheric particles is still in progress.

  11. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and technology to practical systems antennas and bounded wave developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > Khz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  12. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  13. Fire aerosol experiment and comparisons with computer code predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, W. S.; Nichols, B. D.; White, B. W.; Smith, P. R.; Leslie, I. H.; Corkran, J. R.

    1988-08-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, in cooperation with New Mexico State University, has carried on a series of tests to provide experimental data on fire-generated aerosol transport. These data will be used to verify the aerosol transport capabilities of the FIRAC computer code. FIRAC was developed by Los Alamos for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. It is intended to be used by safety analysts to evaluate the effects of hypothetical fires on nuclear plants. One of the most significant aspects of this analysis deals with smoke and radioactive material movement throughout the plant. The tests have been carried out using an industrial furnace that can generate gas temperatures to 300 C. To date, we have used quartz aerosol with a median diameter of about 10 microns as the fire aerosol simulant. We also plan to use fire-generated aerosols of polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). The test variables include two nominal gas flow rates (150 and 300 cu ft/min) and three nominal gas temperatures (ambient, 150 C, and 300 C). The test results are presented in the form of plots of aerosol deposition vs length of duct. In addition, the mass of aerosol caught in a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter during the tests is reported. The tests are simulated with the FIRAC code, and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  14. Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, Chown Chou (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    In response to the National Research Council (NRC) recommendations, the Workshop on Aerosols and Particulates from Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines was organized by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held on July 29-30, 1997 at the Ohio Aerospace Institute in Cleveland, Ohio. The objective is to develop consensus among experts in the field of aerosols from gas turbine combustors and engines as to important issues and venues to be considered. Workshop participants' expertise included engine and aircraft design, combustion processes and kinetics, atmospheric science, fuels, and flight operations and instrumentation.

  15. Gas and aerosol fluxes. [emphasizing sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques to address the global need for accurate distribution and flux determinations of both man made and natural materials which affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the heat budget of the Earth, and the depletion, of stratospheric ozone is considered. Specifically, trace gas fluxes, sea salt aerosol production, and the effect of sea surface microlayer on gas and aerosol fluxes are examined. Volatile sulfur, carbon, nitrogen, and halocarbon compounds are discussed including a statement of the problem associated with each compound or group of compounds, a brief summary of current understanding, and suggestions for needed research.

  16. Tropospheric Trace Gas Interactions with Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.; Maddrea, George L., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are of considerable environmental importance. They modify the radiative budget of Earth by scattering and absorbing radiation, and by providing nuclei for cloud formation. Additionally, they provide surfaces for heterogeneous and multiphase reactions that affect tropospheric chemistry. For example, Dentener and Crutzen (1993) showed that reactions of N2O5 and NO3 with sulfate aerosols may significantly alter the tropospheric concentrations of NO(x), O3, and OH by converting NOx to HNO3 which is rapidly removed by precipitation. Zhang et al. (1994) assumed these same reactions would occur on dust aerosols and showed that dust outbreaks may reduce NO(x) levels by up to 50%. Dentener et al. (1996) studied the possible effect of reactions on dust on sulfate, nitrate, and O3 concentration. Heterogeneous and multiphase reactions on aerosols may also perturb the sulfur cycle the chlorine cycle and the bromine cycle. Because these reactions can release free chlorine and free bromine they might lead to the destruction of ozone in the marine boundary layer that may be important to include in models of tropospheric chemistry. The goal of our proposed work is to examine the role of heterogeneous and multiphase reactions in the tropospheric cycles of reactive nitrogen and sulfur.

  17. 10 CFR 30.20 - Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material... LICENSING OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Exemptions § 30.20 Gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material... distribution gas and aerosol detectors containing byproduct material, any person is exempt from...

  18. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  19. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  20. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia aerosol measurement experiment-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with time of day, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  1. Aged organic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean: the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Mohr, C.; Kostenidou, E.; Lanz, V. A.; Bougiatioti, A.; Decarlo, P. F.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2010-05-01

    Aged organic aerosol (OA) was measured at a remote coastal site on the island of Crete, Greece during the Finokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2008 (FAME-2008), which was part of the EUCAARI intensive campaign of May 2008. The site at Finokalia is influenced by air masses from different source regions, including long-range transport of pollution from continental Europe. A quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS) was employed to measure the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1), and to estimate the extent of oxidation of the organic aerosol. Factor analysis was used to gain insights into the processes and sources affecting the OA composition. The particles were internally mixed and liquid. The largest fraction of the dry NR-PM1 sampled was ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate, followed by organics and a small amount of nitrate. The variability in OA composition could be explained with two factors of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) with differing extents of oxidation but similar volatility. Hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) was not detected. There was no statistically significant diurnal variation in the bulk composition of NR-PM1 such as total sulfate or total organic aerosol concentrations. However, the OA composition exhibited statistically significant diurnal variation with more oxidized OA in the afternoon. The organic aerosol was highly oxidized, regardless of the source region. Total OA concentrations also varied little with source region, suggesting that local sources had only a small effect on OA concentrations measured at Finokalia. The aerosol was transported for about one day before arriving at the site, corresponding to an OH exposure of approximately 4×1011 molecules cm-3 s. The constant extent of oxidation suggests that atmospheric aging results in a highly oxidized OA at these OH exposures, regardless of the aerosol source.

  2. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques In Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo omega (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), determined aerosol omega by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured radiative fluxes; retrievals of omega from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for omega at midvisable wavelengths approx. 550 nm, with omega(sub midvis) greater than or equal to 0.85 and less than or equal to 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of omega could usually be approximated by lognormals in omega(sub max) - omega, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of omega(sub midvis) 0.90 +/- 0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., thermal offsets, unknown gas absorption) The other techniques gave larger values for omega(sub midvis) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of omega(sub midvis) = 0.95 +/- 0.04. Current uncertainties in omega are large in terms of climate effects More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of

  3. Thermophoretic separation of aerosol particles from a sampled gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, A.K.

    1984-09-07

    This disclosure relates to separation of aerosol particles from gas samples withdrawn from within a contained atmosphere, such as containment vessels for nuclear reactors or other process equipment where remote gaseous sampling is required. It is specifically directed to separation of dense aerosols including particles of any size and at high mass loadings and high corrosivity. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract DE-AC06-76FF02170 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Electric Corporation.

  4. Organic compounds present in the natural Amazonian aerosol: Characterization by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bim; Guyon, Pascal; Taylor, Philip E.; Artaxo, Paulo; Maenhaut, Willy; Glovsky, M. Michael; Flagan, Richard C.; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2003-12-01

    As part of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA)-Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (CLAIRE) 2001 campaign in July 2001, separate day and nighttime aerosol samples were collected at a ground-based site in Amazonia, Brazil, in order to examine the composition and temporal variability of the natural "background" aerosol. We used a high-volume sampler to separate the aerosol into fine (aerodynamic diameter, AD < 2.5 μm) and coarse (AD > 2.5 μm) size fractions and quantified a range of organic compounds in methanolic extracts of the samples by a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric technique. The carbon fraction of the compounds could account for an average of 7% of the organic carbon (OC) in both the fine and coarse aerosol fractions. We observed the highest concentrations of sugars, sugar alcohols, and fatty acids in the coarse aerosol samples, which suggests that these compounds are associated with primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) observed in the forest atmosphere. Of these, trehalose, mannitol, arabitol, and the fatty acids were found to be more prevalent at night, coinciding with a nocturnal increase in PBAP in the 2-10 μm size range (predominantly yeasts and other small fungal spores). In contrast, glucose, fructose, and sucrose showed persistently higher daytime concentrations, coinciding with a daytime increase in large fungal spores, fern spores, pollen grains, and, to a lesser extent, plant fragments (generally >20 μm in diameter), probably driven by lowered relative humidity and enhanced wind speeds/convective activity during the day. For the fine aerosol samples a series of dicarboxylic and hydroxyacids were detected with persistently higher daytime concentrations, suggesting that photochemical production of a secondary organic aerosol from biogenic volatile organic compounds may have made a significant contribution to the fine aerosol. Anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan, galactosan), which are

  5. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles; airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouch, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2013-09-01

    The MEGAPOLI experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) giving detailed information of the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of BC, measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), black carbon and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy). Plotting the equivalent ratios for the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) resolved species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in Mexico city, Mexico and in New England, USA. Using the measured VOCs species together with recent organic aerosol formation yields we predicted ~ 50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA

  6. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles: airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouche, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Bourianne, T.; Gomes, L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2014-02-01

    The MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris, using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), giving detailed information on the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of black carbon (BC), measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), BC, and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy)). Plotting the equivalent ratios of different organic aerosol species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in London, Mexico City, and in New England, USA. Using the measured SOA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) species together with organic aerosol formation

  7. Gas chromatographic instrumentation for the analysis of aerosols and gases in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T. W.; Valentin, J. R.; Ohara, B. J.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumentation presently being developed by NASA for the collection and analysis of organic gases and aerosols in Titan's atmosphere is described together with the results of the preliminary experiments. For the aerosols, stepwise pyrolysis was shown to be a suitable method for preparing complex organic material for gas chromatography (GC), and a pyrolysis-gas chromatograph was developed and successfully used to analyze a simulated Titan aerosol. Atmospheric gases will be collected by a low-pressure gas sampling system using large-volume sample loops and analyzed by GC. The results of preliminary studies using a 20 cu cm sampling system and a very sensitive metastable ionization detector showed that hydrocarbon components at the 10 ppb level can be detected. Studies are in progress on shortening the overall analysis time by improving the pyrolysis system, the gas sampling system, and the associated gas chromatograph. Further development of the gas sampling system is planned to ensure rapid collection of samples adequate for analysis by GC over the entire range of pressures to be encountered during the probe's descent.

  8. Enhancement of aerosol responses to changes in emissions over East Asia by gas-oxidant-aerosol coupling and detailed aerosol processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Koike, M.

    2016-06-01

    We quantify the responses of aerosols to changes in emissions (sulfur dioxide, black carbon (BC), primary organic aerosol, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and volatile organic compounds) over East Asia by using simulations including gas-oxidant-aerosol coupling, organic aerosol (OA) formation, and BC aging processes. The responses of aerosols to NOx emissions are complex and are dramatically changed by simulating gas-phase chemistry and aerosol processes online. Reduction of NOx emissions by 50% causes a 30-40% reduction of oxidant (hydroxyl radical and ozone) concentrations and slows the formation of sulfate and OA by 20-30%. Because the response of OA to changes in NOx emissions is sensitive to the treatment of emission and oxidation of semivolatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds, reduction of the uncertainty in these processes is necessary to evaluate gas-oxidant-aerosol coupling accurately. Our simulations also show that the sensitivity of aerosols to changes in emissions is enhanced by 50-100% when OA formation and BC aging processes are resolved in the model. Sensitivity simulations show that the increase of NOx emissions from 1850 to 2000 explains 70% (40%) of the enhancement of aerosol mass concentrations (direct radiative effects) over East Asia during that period through enhancement of oxidant concentrations and that this estimation is sensitive to the representation of OA formation and BC aging processes. Our results demonstrate the importance of simultaneous simulation of gas-oxidant-aerosol coupling and detailed aerosol processes. The impact of NOx emissions on aerosol formation will be a key to formulating effective emission reduction strategies such as BC mitigation and aerosol reduction policies in East Asia.

  9. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  10. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, VR

    2013-12-01

    In general, the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) as well as the and the tropical monsoon climate is influenced by a wide range of factors. Under various climate change scenarios, temperatures over land and into the mid troposphere are expected to increase, intensifying the summer pressure gradient differential between land and ocean and thus strengthening the ISM. However, increasing aerosol concentration, air pollution, and deforestation result in changes to surface albedo and insolation, potentially leading to low monsoon rainfall. Clear evidence points to increasing aerosol concentrations over the Indian subcontinent with time, and several hypotheses regarding the effect on monsoons have been offered. The Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) field study aimed to provide critical data to address these hypotheses and contribute to developing better parameterizations for tropical clouds, convection, and aerosol-cloud interactions. The primary science questions for the mission were as follows:

  11. Gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol emissions: 3. Biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew A.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Hennigan, Christopher J.; Riipinen, Ilona; Lee, Taehyoung; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2013-10-01

    organic aerosol concentrations depend in part on the gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions. Consequently, heating and dilution were used to investigate the volatility of biomass-burning smoke particles from combustion of common North American trees/shrubs/grasses during the third Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment. Fifty to eighty percent of the mass of biomass-burning POA evaporated when isothermally diluted from plume- (~1000 µg m-3) to ambient-like concentrations (~10 µg m-3), while roughly 80% of the POA evaporated upon heating to 100°C in a thermodenuder with a residence time of ~14 sec. Therefore, the majority of the POA emissions were semivolatile. Thermodenuder measurements performed at three different residence times indicated that there were not substantial mass transfer limitations to evaporation (i.e., the mass accommodation coefficient appears to be between 0.1 and 1). An evaporation kinetics model was used to derive volatility distributions and enthalpies of vaporization from the thermodenuder data. A single volatility distribution can be used to represent the measured gas-particle partitioning from the entire set of experiments, including different fuels, organic aerosol concentrations, and thermodenuder residence times. This distribution, derived from the thermodenuder measurements, also predicts the dilution-driven changes in gas-particle partitioning. This volatility distribution and associated emission factors for each fuel studied can be used to update emission inventories and to simulate the gas-particle partitioning of biomass-burning POA emissions in chemical transport models.

  12. Results from simulated upper-plenum aerosol transport and aerosol resuspension experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, A.L.; Pattison, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Recent calculational results published as part of the Battelle-Columbus BMI-2104 source term study indicate that, for some LWR accident sequences, aerosol deposition in the reactor primary coolant system (PCS) can lead to significant reductions in the radionuclide source term. Aerosol transport and deposition in the PCS have been calculated in this study using the TRAP-MELT 2 computer code, which was developed at Battelle-Columbus; the status of validation of the TRAP-MELT 2 code has been described in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report. The objective of the ORNL TRAP-MELT Validation Project, which is sponsored by the Fuel Systems Behavior Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is to conduct simulated reactor-vessel upper-plenum aerosol deposition and transport tests. The results from these tests will be used in the ongoing effort to validate TRAP-MELT 2. The TRAP-MELT Validation Project includes two experimental subtasks. In the Aerosol Transport Tests, aerosol transport in a vertical pipe is being studied; this geometry was chosen to simulate aerosol deposition and transport in the reactor-vessel upper-plenum. To date, four experiments have been performed; the results from these tests are presented in this paper. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M.; Gerber, F.B.

    1995-12-31

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  14. Effect of Tropospheric Aerosols in Satellite-Based Trace Gas Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay; Torres, Omar; Yang, Kai; Vassilkov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Scattering and absorption by tropospheric aerosol particles have an effect on the airmass factor (AMF), a fundamental quantity for trace gas concentration retrieval by inversion of satellite measurements. The interference effect depends on the aerosols micro-physical and optical properties as well as the relative distribution of the tropospheric trace gas and aerosol load. Quantifying the aerosol impact on trace gas retrieval requires a sensitivity study using radiative transfer calculations. In this presentation we will describe a recently initiated effort to characterize the aerosol-related error in trace gas retrievals when the presence of aerosol particles is not accounted in the inversion procedure. A general description of the project will be presented and preliminary results on aerosol effects on SO2 retrieved concentrations will be discussed.

  15. Surface and Column Aerosol Impacts of the United States' Natural Gas Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burney, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper quantifies the air pollution and climate impacts of the natural gas transition over the past decade in the United States. We integrate satellite and ground measurements with chemical transport modeling to understand the impact of of the large-scale shift from coal to natural gas on the quantity and chemical composition of column aerosol and surface particulate matter. We leverage the natural experiment of individual units that changed technologies (a sharp discontinuity) as well as state-level changes from old plants being taken offline and new ones being brought online (a soft discontinuity) and connect technology changes to emissions changes to detected aerosol / particulate matter changes. We use this methodology to estimate the size of the 'sulfate' mask due to coal consumption in the United States and understand more fully the climate implications of energy technology changes.

  16. Analytical pyrolysis experiments of Titan aerosol analogues in preparation for the Cassini Huygens mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrenfreund, P.; Boon, J. J.; Commandeur, J.; Sagan, C.; Thompson, W. R.; Khare, B.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative pyrolysis mass spectrometric data of Titan aerosol analogs, called 'tholins', are presented. The Titan tholins were produced in the laboratory at Cornell by irradiation of simulated Titan atmospheres with high energy electrons in plasma discharge. Mass-spectrometry measurements were performed at FOM of the solid phase of various tholins by Curie-point pyrolysis Gas-Chromatography/Mass-Spectrometry (GCMS) and by temperature resolved in-source Pyrolysis Mass-Spectrometry to reveal the composition and evolution temperature of the dissociation products. The results presented here are used to further define the ACP (Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser)-GCMS experiment and provide a basis for modelling of aerosol composition on Titan and for the iterpretation of Titan atmosphere data from the Huygens probe in the future.

  17. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, V; Subramanian, V; Baskaran, R; Venkatraman, B

    2015-07-01

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging. PMID:26233420

  18. A Robust Computational Method for Coupled Liquid-liquid Phase Separation and Gas-particle Partitioning Predictions of Multicomponent Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Di Stefano, A.

    2014-12-01

    other particle properties, such as the viscosity of aerosol phases. The method has been applied successfully to the calculation of gas-liquid-liquid-solid equilibria used for the prediction of aerosol hygroscopicity (humidity cycles) in comparison to laboratory experiments on aerosol water uptake and phase behaviour.

  19. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  20. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment: Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kotamarthi, VR

    2010-06-21

    The Ganges Valley region is one of the largest and most rapidly developing sections of the Indian subcontinent. The Ganges River, which provides the region with water needed for sustaining life, is fed primarily by snow and rainfall associated with Indian summer monsoons. Impacts of changes in precipitation patterns, temperature, and the flow of the snow-fed rivers can be immense. Recent satellite-based measurements have indicated that the upper Ganges Valley has some of the highest persistently observed aerosol optical depth values. The aerosol layer covers a vast region, extending across the Indo-Gangetic Plain to the Bay of Bengal during the winter and early spring of each year. The persistent winter fog in the region is already a cause of much concern, and several studies have been proposed to understand the economic, scientific, and societal dimensions of this problem. During the INDian Ocean EXperiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from this region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. This is one of the few regions showing a trend toward increasing surface dimming and enhanced mid-tropospheric warming. Increasing air pollution over this region could modify the radiative balance through direct, indirect, and semi-indirect effects associated with aerosols. The consequences of aerosols and associated pollution for surface insolation over the Ganges Valley and monsoons, in particular, are not well understood. The proposed field study is designed for use of (1) the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure relevant radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol optical characteristics over mainland India during an extended period of 9–12 months and (2) the G-1 aircraft and surface sites to measure relevant aerosol chemical, physical, and optical characteristics in the Ganges Valley during a period of 6–12 weeks. The aerosols in this region have complex sources, including burning of coal, biomass, and biofuels; automobile

  1. The Indian ocean experiment: aerosol forcing obtained from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, K.; Ramanathan, V.

    The tropical Indian Ocean provides an ideal and unique natural laboratory to observe and understand the role of anthropogenic aerosols in climate forcing. Since 1996, an international team of American, European and Indian scientists have been collecting aerosol, chemical and radiation data from ships and surface stations, which culminated in a multi-platform field experiment conducted during January to March of 1999. A persistent haze layer that spread over most of the northern Indian Ocean during wintertime was discovered. The layer, a complex mix of organics, black carbon, sulfates, nitrates and other species, subjects the lower atmosphere to a strong radiative heating and a larger reduction in the solar heating of the ocean. We present here the regional distribution of aerosols and the resulting clear sky aerosol radiative forcing at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) observed over the Indian Ocean during the winter months of 1997, 1998 and 1999 based on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimated using NOAA14-AVHRR and the TOA radiation budget data from CERES on board TRMM. Using the ratio of surface to TOA clear sky aerosol radiative forcing observed during the same period over the Indian Ocean island of Kaashidhoo (Satheesh and Ramanathan, 2000), the clear sky aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and the atmosphere are discussed. The regional maps of AVHRR derived AOD show abnormally large aerosol concentration during the winter of 1999 which is about 1.5 to 2 times larger than the AOD during the corresponding period of 1997 and 1998. A large latitudinal gradient in AOD is observed during all the three years of observation, with maximum AOD in the northern hemisphere. The diurnal mean clear sky aerosol forcing at TOA in the northern hemisphere Indian Ocean is in the range of -4 to -16 Wm -2 and had large spatio-temporal variations while in the southern hemisphere Indian Ocean it is in the range of 0 to -6Wm -2. The importance of integrating in-situ data with satellite

  2. The Lampedusa supersite of ChArMex: observing aerosol-radiation interactions and gas phase chemistry in the Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, Paola; di Sarra, Alcide Giorgio

    2014-05-01

    Within the frame of the ADRIMED (Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact in the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region) project of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean experiment (ChArMex), the ENEA Laboratory for Climate Study "Roberto Sarao" (WMO/GAW/NDACC) on the Island of Lampedusa (35°31'N, 12°37°E) has been augmented to one of the supersites of the first phase of the Special Observing Period 1 by the measurements of the in situ properties of aerosols and trace gases by the of the PortablE Gas and Aerosol Sampling Units (PEGASUS) mobile station. The ground-based measurements have been completed by several coordinated overpasses of the ATR-42 and the F20 of SAFIRE. In this paper we present the first highlights of operations, which took place between June 6 and July 8 2013. Insights on the data provide with an unprecedented characterisation of the physico-chemical and properties aerosols and gas phase chemistry on air masses of various origins (pollution, marine, mineral dust, …..). The effect of aerosols on radiation fields is ascertained by coupling ground-based and aircraft measurements during dedicated overpasses providing with measurements of upwelling and downwelling shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes together with the properties of the aerosol load resolved on the column. Coordination with CALIPSO overpasses will also be explored.

  3. Continuation of Lithium Aerosol Injection Experiments on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Kugel, H.; Maingi, R.; Irby, J.; Wang, Z.

    2009-11-01

    During the 2008 run campaign, a Li powder dropper was installed on NSTX that successfully injected up to 35 mg/s of Li aerosol into the SOL. Initial improvements in the plasma performance from these initial experiments warranted the installation of a second Li dropper for the 2009 campaign. Design improvements in the dropper have resulted in accurate control of the flux of Li powder injected. The improved duel-dropper system has injected lithium fluxes of from 30 - 140 mg/s. At the highest flux, plasmas of 950 kA with 6 MW off NBI auxiliary heating have been successfully operated. This flux corresponds to 2.5 x106 - 5.8 x106 aerosol particles/s and is stoichiometrically equivalent 80 - 187 Torr L/s of D2. Operation of the Li dropper and the effects of the Li aerosol on the plasma performance will be discussed.

  4. Complex Aerosol Experiment in Western Siberia (April - October 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Belan, B. D.; Panchenko, M. V.; Romanovskii, O. A.; Sakerin, S. M.; Kabanov, D. M.; Turchinovich, S. A.; Turchinovich, Yu. S.; Eremina, T. A.; Kozlov, V. S.; Terpugova, S. A.; Pol'kin, V. V.; Yausheva, E. P.; Chernov, D. G.; Zuravleva, T. B.; Bedareva, T. V.; Odintsov, S. L.; Burlakov, V. D.; Arshinov, M. Yu.; Ivlev, G. A.; Savkin, D. E.; Fofonov, A. V.; Gladkikh, V. A.; Kamardin, A. P.; Balin, Yu. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Samoilova, S. V.; Antokhin, P. N.; Arshinova, V. G.; Davydov, D. K.; Kozlov, A. V.; Pestunov, D. A.; Rasskazchikova, T. M.; Simonenkov, D. V.; Sklyadneva, T. K.; Tolmachev, G. N.; Belan, S. B.; Shmargunov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The primary project objective was to accomplish the Complex Aerosol Experiment, during which the aerosol properties should be measured in the near-ground layer and free atmosphere. Three measurement cycles were performed during the project implementation: in spring period (April), when the maximum of aerosol generation is observed; in summer (July), when atmospheric boundary layer height and mixing layer height are maximal; and in late summer - early autumn (October), when the secondary particle nucleation period is recorded. Numerical calculations were compared with measurements of fluxes of downward solar radiation. It was shown that the relative differences between model and experimental values of fluxes of direct and total radiation, on the average, do not exceed 1% and 3% respectively.

  5. Measurements of trace gas species and aerosols at three Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Ivlev, Georgii A.; Pestunov, Dmitrii A.; Tolmachev, Gennadii N.; Fofonov, Alexander V.

    2014-05-01

    Siberia is of great importance to understand the climate change due to it covers about 10% of Earth's land surface and it has the largest area to be studied under the Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX). In the overview done by Kulmala et al. (2011) authors arrived at a conclusion that continuous and comprehensive measurements of GHGs and aerosols over Siberia are still lacking. Understanding the importance of this problem, in recent years the Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS established several monitoring stations for continuous measurements of aerosol and trace gas species to fill up this gap. In this paper we present some results of continuous measurements of trace gas species and aerosols carried out at three stations located in West Siberia. The first one is a so-called TOR-station located in the scientific campus of Tomsk (56° 28'41"N, 85° 03'15"E), the second one is the Base Experimental Complex (BEC, 56° 28'49"N, 85° 06'08"E) - in the eastern suburbs of Tomsk, and the third one is Fonovaya Observatory (56° 25'07"N, 84° 04'27"E) - in a rural area 60 km west of Tomsk. All equipment of the stations is fully automated and can be monitored via Internet. Gas analyzers are hourly calibrated against standard gas mixtures, micro-flux gas sources, or gas generators, depending on the instrument type and the gas to be detected. Aerosol measurements carried out continuously from March 2010 enabled a frequency and seasonal dependency of the new particle formation (NPF) events to be revealed. NPF events in Siberia are more often observed during spring (from March to May) and early autumn (secondary frequency peak in September). On average, NPF evens took place on 23-28 % of all days. This work was funded by Presidium of RAS (Program No. 4), Brunch of Geology, Geophysics and Mining Sciences of RAS (Program No. 5), Interdisciplinary integration projects of Siberian Branch of RAS (No. 35, No. 70, No. 131), Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No 14

  6. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived By Diverse Techniques in Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo w (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, TARFOX and ACE-2, determined aerosol w by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured fluxes; retrievals of w from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for w at midvisible wavelengths, with 0.85 less than wmidvis less than 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of w could usually be approximated by lognormals in wmax-w, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of wmidvis of 0.90+/-0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and possible artifacts (e.g., unknown gas absorption). The other techniques gave larger values for wmidvis for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of wmidvis = 0.95+/-0.04, Current uncertainties in vv are large in terms of climate effects. More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of humidification effects on w.

  7. Sensitive glow discharge ion source for aerosol and gas analysis

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-08-14

    A high sensitivity glow discharge ion source system for analyzing particles includes an aerodynamic lens having a plurality of constrictions for receiving an aerosol including at least one analyte particle in a carrier gas and focusing the analyte particles into a collimated particle beam. A separator separates the carrier gas from the analyte particle beam, wherein the analyte particle beam or vapors derived from the analyte particle beam are selectively transmitted out of from the separator. A glow discharge ionization source includes a discharge chamber having an entrance orifice for receiving the analyte particle beam or analyte vapors, and a target electrode and discharge electrode therein. An electric field applied between the target electrode and discharge electrode generates an analyte ion stream from the analyte vapors, which is directed out of the discharge chamber through an exit orifice, such as to a mass spectrometer. High analyte sensitivity is obtained by pumping the discharge chamber exclusively through the exit orifice and the entrance orifice.

  8. Development of an Internet accessible software: optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Kashirskii, D. E.; Egorov, O. V.

    2015-11-01

    A description of an Internet accessible software «Optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media» is represented. The new software is focused on research in the field of direct and inverse problems of optics and spectroscopy of gas-aerosol media.

  9. Development of a supercritical fluid extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the identification of highly polar compounds in secondary organic aerosols formed from biogenic hydrocarbons in smog chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, L; Perraudin, E; Durand-Jolibois, R; Doussin, J F

    2006-11-01

    A new one-step method for the analysis of highly polar components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. This method should lead to a better understanding of SOA formation and evolution since it enables the compounds responsible for SOA formation to be identified. Since it is based on supercritical fluid extraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, it minimizes the analysis time and significantly enhances sensitivity, which makes it suitable for trace-level compounds, which are constituents of SOA. One of the key features of this method is the in situ derivatisation step: an online silylation allowing the measurement of highly polar, polyfunctional compounds, which is a prerequisite for the elucidation of chemical mechanisms. This paper presents the development of this analytical method and highlights its ability to address this major atmospheric issue through the analysis of SOA formed from the ozonolysis of a biogenic hydrocarbon (sabinene). Ozonolysis of sabinene was performed in a 6 m3 Teflon chamber. The aerosol components were derivatised in situ. More than thirty products, such as sabinaketone, sabinic acid and other multifunctional compounds including dicarboxylic acids and oxoacids, were measured. Nine of them were identified and quantified. The sensitivity and the linearity (0.91

  10. Measurement of the emission rate of an aerosol source--comparison of aerosol and gas transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Callé, S; Godinot, S; Régnier, R; Dessagne, J M

    2000-12-01

    A measuring method of the emission rate of an atmospheric pollutant source, based on the use of a tracer gas (helium) and developed in the case of a gaseous source, was tested for an aerosol source. The influence of both particle sedimentation and wall depositions was studied. The transport coefficients of the tracer gas and of alumina particles of various particle sizes (MMAD from 8 to 36 microns) were measured on a vertical axis close to the source, in a 71 m3 room swept by a piston flow. The measurements clearly demonstrated the predominant influence of sedimentation in the case of particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 microns. Particle wall deposition was determined by measuring the gas and particle concentration decay in the ventilated room. To do this, a new tracing method using a fluorescent aerosol was developed. The measured aerosol deposition rates are much higher than those calculated from the formula of Corner for a cubical volume. Aerosol sedimentation and wall deposition are two phenomena limiting the use of a tracer gas to measure the aerosol emission rate. The chemical substances and materials used in work premises are likely to be released into the atmosphere and lead to the formation of pollutants. These emissions stem from either physical or chemical processes (evaporation of a solvent) or from mechanical processes (dispersion of oil droplets at the source of mists).

  11. Aerosol Physical and Chemical Properties Before and After the Manaus Plume in the GoAmazon2014 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Wurm, F.; Holanda, B. A.; Carbone, S.; Arana, A.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Rizzo, L. V.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for at least one year before and after the Manaus plume. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites called T0 are: ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 ecological research site and a third site called EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated right on the opposite side of the Negro River under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind of Manaus. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analyzed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Aerosol absorption is being studied with several aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several

  12. Source term experiments project (STEP): aerosol characterization system

    SciTech Connect

    Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    A series of four experiments is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory's TREAT Reactor. They have been designed to provide some of the necessary data regarding magnitude and release rates of fission products from degraded fuel pins, physical and chemical characteristics of released fission products, and aerosol formation and transport phenomena. These are in-pile experiments, whereby the test fuel is heated by neutron induced fission and subsequent clad oxidation in steam environments that simulate as closely as practical predicted reactor accident conditions. The test sequences cover a range of pressure and fuel heatup rate, and include the effect of Ag/In/Cd control rod material.

  13. Gas-phase removal of biofilms from various surfaces using carbon dioxide aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minju; Hong, Seongkyeol; Kang, Min-Yeong; Lee, Jin-Won; Jang, Jaesung

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the removal of Escherichia coli XL1-blue biofilms using periodic jets of carbon dioxide aerosols (a mixture of solid and gaseous CO(2)) with nitrogen gas. The aerosols were generated by the adiabatic expansion of high-pressure CO(2) gas through a nozzle and used to remove air-dried biofilms. The areas of the biofilms were measured from scanning electron micrographs before and after applying the aerosols. The removal efficiency of the aerosol treatment was measured with various air-drying times of the biofilms before the treatment, surface materials, and durations of CO(2) aerosols in each 8-s aerosol-nitrogen cleaning cycle. Nearly 100% of the fresh biofilms were removed from the various surfaces very reliably within 90 s. This technique can be useful for removing unsaturated biofilms on solid surfaces and has potential applications for cleaning bio-contaminated surfaces.

  14. Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile Aerosol and Trace-Species Emissions (EXCAVATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Branham, H.-S.; Hudgins, C. H.; Plant, J. V.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Miller, T. M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Blake, D. R.; Boudries, H.; Canagaratna, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Experiment to Characterize Aircraft Volatile and Trace Species Emissions (EXCAVATE) was conducted at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in January 2002 and focused upon assaying the production of aerosols and aerosol precursors by a modern commercial aircraft, the Langley B757, during ground-based operation. Remaining uncertainty in the postcombustion fate of jet fuel sulfur contaminants, the need for data to test new theories of particle formation and growth within engine exhaust plumes, and the need for observations to develop air quality models for predicting pollution levels in airport terminal areas were the primary factors motivating the experiment. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) and the Ultra Effect Engine Technology (UEET) Program sponsored the experiment which had the specific objectives of determining ion densities; the fraction of fuel S converted from S(IV) to S(VI); the concentration and speciation of volatile aerosols and black carbon; and gas-phase concentrations of long-chain hydrocarbon and PAH species, all as functions of engine power, fuel composition, and plume age.

  15. Aerosol Optical Properties During The SAMUM-2 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, C.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.; Seefeldner, M.; Gasteiger, J.; Garhammer, M.; Esselborn, M.; Wiegner, M.; Koepke, P.

    2009-03-01

    A field campaign of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM-2) took place in the Cape Verde islands in January-February 2008, to investigate the properties of long-range transported dust over the Atlantic. The Meteorological Institute of the University of Munich deployed a set of active and passive remote sensing instruments: one sun photometer, for the measurement of the direct sun irradiance and sky radiances; a broad-band UV radiometer; and 2 tropospheric lidar systems. The measurements were made in close cooperation with the other participating groups. During the measurement period the aerosol scenario over Cape Verde mostly consisted of a dust layer below 2 km and a smoke layer above 2 km height. The Saharan dust arrived in the site from the NE, whereas the smoke originated in the African equatorial region is transported from the SE. The aerosol load was also very variable over this area, with AOD (500 nm) ranging from 0.04 to 0.74. The optical properties of the layers are shown: extinction and particle depolarization ratio profiles at 3 wavelengths, as well as aerosol optical depth (in the range 340-1550 nm), Ångström exponent, size distribution and single scattering albedo.

  16. The polar ozone and aerosol measurement experiment (POAM II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, R.M.; Shettle, E.P.; Hornstein, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement experiment (POAM II), was launched on the SPOT 3 satellite on 25 September, 1993. POAM II is designed to measure the vertical profiles of the polar ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, atmospheric density and temperature in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. It makes solar occultation measurements in nine channels defined by narrow-band filters. The field of view is 0.01 by 1.2 degrees, with an instantaneous vertical resolution of 0.6 km at the tangent point in the earth`s atmosphere. The SPOT 3 satellite is in a 98.7-degree inclined sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 833 km. From the measured transmissions, it is possible to determine the density profiles of aerosols, O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, and NO{sub 2}. Using the assumption of uniformly mixed oxygen, the authors are also able to determine the temperature. The authors present details of the POAM II instrument design, including the optical configuration, electronics and measurement accuracy. The authors also present preliminary results from the occultation measurements made to date.

  17. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  18. Seawater mesocosm experiments in the Arctic uncover differential transfer of marine bacteria to aerosols.

    PubMed

    Fahlgren, Camilla; Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Zábori, Julia; Lindh, Markus V; Krejci, Radovan; Mårtensson, E Monica; Nilsson, Douglas; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-06-01

    Biogenic aerosols critically control atmospheric processes. However, although bacteria constitute major portions of living matter in seawater, bacterial aerosolization from oceanic surface layers remains poorly understood. We analysed bacterial diversity in seawater and experimentally generated aerosols from three Kongsfjorden sites, Svalbard. Construction of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from paired seawater and aerosol samples resulted in 1294 sequences clustering into 149 bacterial and 34 phytoplankton operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Bacterial communities in aerosols differed greatly from corresponding seawater communities in three out of four experiments. Dominant populations of both seawater and aerosols were Flavobacteriia, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Across the entire dataset, most OTUs from seawater could also be found in aerosols; in each experiment, however, several OTUs were either selectively enriched in aerosols or little aerosolized. Notably, a SAR11 clade OTU was consistently abundant in the seawater, but was recorded in significantly lower proportions in aerosols. A strikingly high proportion of colony-forming bacteria were pigmented in aerosols compared with seawater, suggesting that selection during aerosolization contributes to explaining elevated proportions of pigmented bacteria frequently observed in atmospheric samples. Our findings imply that atmospheric processes could be considerably influenced by spatiotemporal variations in the aerosolization efficiency of different marine bacteria. PMID:25682947

  19. Atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing using Scheimpflug lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a new lidar technique for atmospheric remote sensing based on Scheimpflug principle, which describes the relationship between nonparallel image- and object-planes[1]. When a laser beam is transmitted into the atmosphere, the implication is that the backscattering echo of the entire illuminated probe volume can be in focus simultaneously without diminishing the aperture. The range-resolved backscattering echo can be retrieved by using a tilted line scan or two-dimensional CCD/CMOS camera. Rather than employing nanosecond-pulsed lasers, cascade detectors, and MHz signal sampling, all of high cost and complexity, we have developed a robust and inexpensive atmospheric lidar system based on compact laser diodes and array detectors. We present initial applications of the Scheimpflug lidar for atmospheric aerosol monitoring in bright sunlight, with a 3 W, 808 nm CW laser diode. Kilohertz sampling rates are also achieved with applications for wind speed and entomology [2]. Further, a proof-of-principle demonstration of differential absorption lidar (DIAL) based on the Scheimpflug lidar technique is presented [3]. By utilizing a 30 mW narrow band CW laser diode emitting at around 760 nm, the detailed shape of an oxygen absorption line can be resolved remotely with an integration time of 6 s and measurement cycle of 1 minute during night time. The promising results demonstrated in this work show potential for the Scheimpflug lidar technique for remote atmospheric aerosol and gas sensing, and renews hope for robust and realistic instrumentation for atmospheric lidar sensing. [1] F. Blais, "Review of 20 years of range sensor development," Journal of Electronic Imaging, vol. 13, pp. 231-243, Jan 2004. [2] M. Brydegaard, A. Gebru, and S. Svanberg, "Super resolution laser radar with blinking atmospheric particles - application to interacting flying insects " Progress In Electromagnetics Research, vol. 147, pp. 141-151, 2014. [3] L. Mei and M. Brydegaard

  20. SAGE II aerosol data validation based on retrieved aerosol model size distribution from SAGE II aerosol measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.; Russell, P. B.; Oberbeck, V. R.; Livingston, J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to aerosol correlative measurements experiments for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II, conducted between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative measurements were taken with an impactor/laser probe, a dustsonde, and an airborne 36-cm lidar system. The primary aerosol quantities measured by the ground-based instruments are compared with those calculated from the aerosol size distributions from SAGE II aerosol extinction measurements. Good agreement is found between the two sets of measurements.

  1. Aerosol and cloud chemistry of amines from CCS - reactivity experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Tilgner, Andreas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of power plants using amine scrubbing is a common technology. Therefore, amines can be released during the carbon capture process. To investigate the tropospheric chemical fate of amines from CO2 capturing processes and their oxidation products, the impact of aqueous aerosol particles and cloud droplets on the amine chemistry has been considered. Aqueous phase reactivity experiments of NO3 radicals and ozone with relevant amines and their corresponding nitrosamines were performed. Furthermore, nitrosamine formation and nitrosamine photolysis was investigated during laboratory experiments. These experiments implicated that aqueous phase photolysis can be an effective sink for nitrosamines and that ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines. Multiphase phase oxidation schemes of amines, nitrosamines and amides were developed, coupled to the existing multiphase chemistry mechanism CAPRAM and built into the Lagrangian parcel model SPACCIM using published and newly measured data. As a result, both deliquescent particles and cloud droplets are important compartments for the multiphase processing of amines and their products. Amines can be readily oxidised by OH radicals in the gas and cloud phase during daytime summer conditions. However, amine oxidation is restricted during winter conditions with low photochemical activity leading to long lifetimes of amines. The importance of the gas and aqueous phase depends strongly on the partitioning of the different amines. Furthermore, the simulations revealed that the aqueous formation of nitrosamines in aerosol particles and could droplets is not a relevant process under tropospheric conditions.

  2. Gas-phase products and secondary aerosol yields from the ozonolysis of ten different terpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Anita; Goldstein, Allen H.; Keywood, Melita D.; Gao, Song; Varutbangkul, Varuntida; Bahreini, Roya; Ng, Nga L.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-04-01

    The ozonolyses of six monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, 3-carene, terpinolene, α-terpinene, and myrcene), two sesquiterpenes (α-humulene and β-caryophyllene), and two oxygenated terpenes (methyl chavicol and linalool) were conducted individually in Teflon chambers to examine the gas-phase oxidation product and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields from these reactions. Particle size distribution and number concentration were monitored and allowed for the calculation of the SOA yield from each experiment, which ranged from 1 to 54%. A proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was used to monitor the evolution of gas-phase products, identified by their mass to charge ratio (m/z). Several gas-phase oxidation products, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, acetic acid, and nopinone, were identified and calibrated. Aerosol yields, and the yields of these identified and calibrated oxidation products, as well as many higher m/z oxidation products observed with the PTR-MS, varied significantly between the different parent terpene compounds. The sum of measured oxidation products in the gas and particle phase ranged from 33 to 77% of the carbon in the reacted terpenes, suggesting there are still unmeasured products from these reactions. The observations of the higher molecular weight oxidation product ions provide evidence of previously unreported compounds and their temporal evolution in the smog chamber from multistep oxidation processes. Many of the observed ions, including m/z 111 and 113, have also been observed in ambient air above a Ponderosa pine forest canopy, and our results confirm they are consistent with products from terpene + O3 reactions. Many of these products are stable on the timescale of our experiments and can therefore be monitored in field campaigns as evidence for ozone oxidative chemistry.

  3. Long term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-04-01

    The central region of the Amazonian forest is a pristine region in terms of aerosol and trace gases concentrations. In the wet season, Amazonia is actually one of the cleanest continental region we can observe on Earth. A long term observational program started 20 years ago, and show important features of this pristine region. Several sites were used, between then ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) and ZF2 ecological research site, both 70-150 Km North of Manaus, receiving air masses that traveled over 1500 km of pristine tropical forests. The sites are GAW regional monitoring stations. Aerosol chemical composition (OC/EC and trace elements) is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors). VOCs are measured using PTR-MS, while CO, O3 and CO2 are routinely measured. Aerosol absorption is being studied with AE33 aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using TSI and Ecotech nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizer at each site. Lidars measure the aerosol column up to 12 Km providing the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sun photometers. In the wet season, organic aerosol comprises 75-85% of fine aerosol, and sulfate and nitrate concentrations are very low (1-3 percent). Aerosols are dominated by biogenic primary particles as well as SOA from biogenic precursors. Black carbon in the wet season accounts for 5-9% of fine mode aerosol. Ozone in the wet season peaks at 10-12 ppb at the middle of the day, while carbon monoxide averages at 50-80 ppb. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is a low 0.05 to 0.1 at 550 nm in the wet season. Sahara dust transport events sporadically enhance the concentration of soil dust aerosols and black carbon. In the dry season (August-December), long range transported

  4. Aerosol, Cloud and Trace Gas Observations Derived from Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance and Direct Beam Measurements in Recent Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Flynn, C. J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Schmid, B.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.

    2014-01-01

    The AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) ground-based suite of sunphotometers provides measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), precipitable water and spectral sky radiance, which can be inverted to retrieve aerosol microphysical properties that are critical to assessments of aerosol-climate interactions. Because of data quality criteria and sampling constraints, there are significant limitations to the temporal and spatial coverage of AERONET data and their representativeness for global aerosol conditions. The 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) instrument, jointly developed by NASA Ames and PNNL with NASA Goddard collaboration, combines airborne sun tracking and AERONET-like sky scanning with spectroscopic detection. Being an airborne instrument, 4STAR has the potential to fill gaps in the AERONET data set. Dunagan et al. [2013] present results establishing the performance of the instrument, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and preliminary scientific field data. The 4STAR instrument operated successfully in the SEAC4RS [Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys] experiment in Aug./Sep. 2013 aboard the NASA DC-8 and in the DoE [Department of Energy]-sponsored TCAP [Two Column Aerosol Project, July 2012 & Feb. 2013] experiment aboard the DoE G-1 aircraft (Shinozuka et al., 2013), and acquired a wealth of data in support of mission objectives on all SEAC4RS and TCAP research flights. 4STAR provided direct beam measurements of hyperspectral AOD, columnar trace gas retrievals (H2O, O3, NO2; Segal-Rosenheimer et al., 2014), and the first ever airborne hyperspectral sky radiance scans, which can be inverted to yield the same products as AERONET ground-based observations. In addition, 4STAR measured zenith radiances underneath cloud decks for retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective diameter. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the new

  5. Gas-aerosol cycling of ammonia and nitric acid in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Derksen, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid are present over NW Europe in large abundance. Observations made during the IMPACT measurement campaign (May 2008, Cabauw, The Netherlands) show a pronounced diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate on relatively dry days. Simultaneously, AERONET data show a distinct diurnal cycle in aerosol optical thickness (AOT). We used a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) and a detailed aerosol-cloud column model to help analyse the observations from this period. The study shows that the diurnal cycle in AOT is partly associated with particle number concentration, with distinct peaks in the morning and evening. More important is relative humidity (RH). RH maximizes in the night and early morning, decreases during the morning and increases again in the evening. The particle wet radius, and therefore AOT, changes accordingly. In addition, the RH variability also influences chemistry associated with ammonia and nitric acid (formation of ammonium nitrate, dissolution in aerosol water), resulting in the observed diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate. The additional aerosol matter increases the hygroscopicity of the particles, and this leads to further swelling by water vapor condensation and a further increase of AOT. During the day, as RH decreases and the particles shrink, aerosol ammonium and nitrate are again partly expelled to the gas phase. This behaviour contributes significantly to the observed diurnal cycle in AOT, and it illustrates the complexity of using AOT as a proxy for aerosol concentrations in aerosol climate studies in the case of heavily polluted areas.

  6. A study on the extent of neutralization of sulphate aerosol through laboratory and field experiments using an ATOFMS and a GPIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Rehbein, Peter J. G.; Lee, Colin J.; Evans, Greg J.; Corbin, Joel; Jeong, Cheol-Heon

    2011-11-01

    Extent of neutralization (EoN) of atmospheric aerosol is an important parameter in understanding related nucleation mechanisms, acid-catalyzed reactions and gas-aerosol partitioning. Ion m/ z -195 (HSOHSO4-) detected by the Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) has been used as an indicator of incompletely-neutralized sulphate aerosol, but there are no laboratory data to support this assumption. In this study, experiments using artificially generated sulphuric acid nucleated aerosol and metal sulphate aerosol across a range of EoN found that the peak area ratio and hit ratio of ion m/ z -195 (HSOHSO4-) to ion m/ z -97 (HSO4-) detected by the ATOFMS increased with decreasing EoN. Area ratio and hit ratio are sensitive to EoN at the low and high value zones, respectively. In ambient air measured by the ATOFMS and a Gas Particle Ion Chromatograph (GPIC) in Toronto, Canada, ion m/ z -195 was always detected in ammonium sulphate aerosol, and its hit number and peak area varied widely, regardless of EoN indicated by the equivalent ratio of NH4+ to (SO42-+NO3-). Thus, ion m/ z -195 alone is not an indicator of acidic sulphate aerosol. The combined approach using the ATOFMS and the GPIC found that cloud-processing formed incompletely-neutralized acidic sulphate aerosol in 2 out of 35 days sampled in winter in Toronto, Canada. It is interesting that the two episodes both occurred at night. Formation of incompletely-neutralized acidic sulphate aerosol caused a decrease in the concentration of particulate nitrate. This can be explained by acidic sulphate aerosol reacting with ammonium nitrate, leading to the release of HNO 3 to the gas phase. It was also found that the GPIC results occasionally suffered a positive artifact of NH4+ concentration caused by the clogging-induced high back-pressure in the instrument.

  7. Organic Aerosol Formation in the Humid, Photochemically-Active Southeastern US: SOAS Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Lim, Y. B.; Carlton, A. G.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized low volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, health, and the environment. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols) leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify other precursors that are atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere at Brent, Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Four mist chambers in parallel collected ambient gases in a DI water medium at 20-25 LPM with a 4 hr collection time. Total organic carbon (TOC) values in daily composited samples were 64-180 μM. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments were conducted with these mixtures in a newly designed cuvette chamber to understand the formation of SOA through gas followed by aqueous chemistry. OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were formed in-situ in the chamber, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Precursors and products of these aqueous OH experiments were characterized using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. ESI-MS results from a June 12th, 2013 sample showed precursors to be primarily odd, positive mode ions, indicative of the presence of non-nitrogen containing alcohols, aldehydes, organic peroxides, or epoxides. Products were seen in the negative mode and included organic acid ions like pyruvate

  8. Global Impacts of Gas-Phase Chemistry-Aerosol Interactions on Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.

    2005-01-01

    We present here a first global modeling study on the influence of gas-phase chemistry/aerosol interactions on estimates of anthropogenic forcing by tropospheric O3 and aerosols. Concentrations of gas-phase species and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, secondary organic carbon, sea salt, and mineral dust aerosols in the preindustrial, present-day, and year 2100 (IPCC SRES A2) atmospheres are simulated online in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model II' (GISS GCM II'). With fully coupled chemistry and aerosols, the preindustrial, presentday, and year 2100 global burdens of tropospheric ozone are predicted to be 190, 319, and 519 Tg, respectively. The burdens of sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, and organic carbon are predicted respectively to be 0.32. 0.18, 0.01, 0.33 Tg in preindustrial time, 1.40, 0.48, 0.23, 1.60 Tg in presentday, and 1.37, 1.97, 0.54, 3.31 Tg in year 2100. Anthropogenic O3 is predicted to have a globally and annually averaged present-day forcing of +0.22 W m(sup -2) and year 2100 forcing of +0.57 W m(sup -2) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Net anthropogenic TOA forcing by internally mixed sulfate, nitrate, organic carbon, and black carbon aerosols is estimated to be virtually zero in the present-day and +0.34 W m(sup -2) in year 2100, whereas it is predicted to be -0.39 W m(sup -2) in present-day and -0.61 W m(sup -2) in year 2100 if the aerosols are externally mixed. Heterogeneous reactions are shown to be important in affecting anthropogenic forcing. When reactions of N2O5, NO3, NO2, and HO2 on aerosols are accounted for, TOA anthropogenic O3 forcing is less by 20-45% in present-day and by 20-32% in year 2100 at mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, as compared with values predicted in the absence of heterogeneous gas aerosol reactions. Mineral dust uptake of HNO3 and O3 is shown to have practically no influence on anthropogenic O3 forcing. Heterogeneous reactions of N2Os

  9. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase reaction of catechol with ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, C.; Tomas, A.; Guilloteau, A.; Henry, F.; Ledoux, F.; Visez, N.; Riffault, V.; Wenger, J. C.; Bedjanian, Y.; Foulon, V.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol from the gas-phase reaction of catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) with ozone has been studied in two smog chambers (at the LPCA in France and at the CRAC in Ireland). Aerosol production was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer. The overall organic aerosol yield (Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted catechol concentrations, assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. Analysis of the data clearly shows that Y is a strong function of Mo and that secondary organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial catechol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields ranging from 17% to 86%. The aerosol yields determined in the LPCA and CRAC smog chambers were comparable and were also in accordance with those determined in a previous study performed in EUPHORE (EUropean PHOto REactor, Spain).

  10. Kinetic limitations in gas-particle reactions arising from slow diffusion in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shouming; Shiraiwa, Manabu; McWhinney, Robert D; Pöschl, Ulrich; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for aerosol physical properties, such as phase, morphology and viscosity/ diffusivity, to affect particle reactivity remains highly uncertain. We report here a study of the effect of bulk diffusivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with ozone. The experiments were performed by coating BaP-ammonium sulfate particles with multilayers of SOA formed from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene, and by subsequently investigating the kinetics of BaP loss via reaction with excess ozone using an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). All reactions exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics and are empirically well described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. The results show that under dry conditions (RH < 5%) diffusion through the SOA coating can lead to significant mass transfer constraints on the kinetics, with behavior between that previously observed by our group for solid and liquid organic coats. The reactivity of BaP was enhanced at -50% relative humidity (RH) suggesting that water uptake lowers the viscosity of the SOA, hence lifting the mass transfer constraint to some degree. The kinetics for -70% RH were similar to results obtained without SOA coats, indicating that the SOA had sufficiently low viscosity and was sufficiently liquid-like that reactants could rapidly diffuse through the coat. A kinetic multi-layer model for aerosol surface and bulk chemistry was applied to simulate the kinetics, yielding estimates for the diffusion coefficients (in cm2 s(-1)) for BaP in alpha-pinene SOA of 2 x 10(-14), 8 x 10(-14) and > 1 x 10(-12) for dry (RH < 5%), 50% RH and 70% RH conditions, respectively. These results clearly indicate that slow diffusion of reactants through SOA coats under specific conditions can provide shielding from gas-phase oxidants, enabling the long-range atmospheric transport of

  11. Kinetic limitations in gas-particle reactions arising from slow diffusion in secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shouming; Shiraiwa, Manabu; McWhinney, Robert D; Pöschl, Ulrich; Abbatt, Jonathan P D

    2013-01-01

    The potential for aerosol physical properties, such as phase, morphology and viscosity/ diffusivity, to affect particle reactivity remains highly uncertain. We report here a study of the effect of bulk diffusivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) on the kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction of particle-borne benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) with ozone. The experiments were performed by coating BaP-ammonium sulfate particles with multilayers of SOA formed from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene, and by subsequently investigating the kinetics of BaP loss via reaction with excess ozone using an aerosol flow tube coupled to an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). All reactions exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics and are empirically well described by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) mechanism. The results show that under dry conditions (RH < 5%) diffusion through the SOA coating can lead to significant mass transfer constraints on the kinetics, with behavior between that previously observed by our group for solid and liquid organic coats. The reactivity of BaP was enhanced at -50% relative humidity (RH) suggesting that water uptake lowers the viscosity of the SOA, hence lifting the mass transfer constraint to some degree. The kinetics for -70% RH were similar to results obtained without SOA coats, indicating that the SOA had sufficiently low viscosity and was sufficiently liquid-like that reactants could rapidly diffuse through the coat. A kinetic multi-layer model for aerosol surface and bulk chemistry was applied to simulate the kinetics, yielding estimates for the diffusion coefficients (in cm2 s(-1)) for BaP in alpha-pinene SOA of 2 x 10(-14), 8 x 10(-14) and > 1 x 10(-12) for dry (RH < 5%), 50% RH and 70% RH conditions, respectively. These results clearly indicate that slow diffusion of reactants through SOA coats under specific conditions can provide shielding from gas-phase oxidants, enabling the long-range atmospheric transport of

  12. Quantifying Aerosol Types and Their Impact on Trace Gas Retrievals From Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natraj, V.; Boesch, H.; Yung, Y. L.

    2005-12-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in the retrieval of trace gas abundances from space-borne measurements is the type, amount and vertical distribution of aerosols in the atmosphere. Optical properties were derived for the broad classification of aerosol types investigated by Kahn et al. (2001), taking polarization into account. Examination of the scattering matrix elements resulted in a smaller set of independent aerosol types whose radiative effects were different. Weighting functions were then calculated for each of these types, assuming exponentially tailing aerosol concentration in the troposphere and a Junge distribution for the stratosphere. The different shapes of the weighting functions indicate different amount and distribution of the information content. Implications for trace gas retrievals from satellite-based measurements made by polarization-sensitive instruments (such as those on OMI, GOME, SCIAMACHY and OCO) will be discussed.

  13. Secondary Organic Aerosol formation from the gas-phase ozonolysis of 3-methylcatechol and 4-methylcatechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Foulon, Valentine; Laréal, Michel; Cassez, Andy; Zhao, Weixiong

    2010-05-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation during the ozonolysis of 3-methylcatechol (3-methyl-1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and 4-methylcatechol (3-methyl-1,2-dihydroxybenzene) was investigated using a simulation chamber (8 m3) at atmospheric pressure, room temperature (294 ± 2 K) and low relative humidity (5-10%). The initial mixing ratios were as follows (in ppb): 3-methylcatechol (194-1059), 4-methylcatechol (204-1188) and ozone (93-531). The ozone and methylcatechol concentrations were followed by UV photometry and GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame ionization detector), respectively and the aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer). The SOA yields (Y) were determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (Mo) to the total reacted methylcatechol concentrations assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. The aerosol formation yield increases as the initial methylcatechol concentration increases, and leads to aerosol yields ranging from 32% to 67% and from 30% to 64% for 3-methylcatechol and 4-methylcatechol, respectively. Y is a strong function of Mo and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. These data are comparable to those published in a recent study on secondary organic aerosol formation from catechol ozonolysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first investigation of SOA formation from the ozone reaction with methylcatechols.

  14. [Bronchodilator aerosol propellant interferes with an photoacoustic spectrophotometer respiratory gas analyzer].

    PubMed

    Makino, A; Morimoto, Y; Matsumoto, S; Oka, H; Shimizu, K; Miyauchi, Y

    1998-05-01

    A patient with bronchial asthma was scheduled for an operation under nitrous oxide-isoflurane anesthesia. We monitored isoflurane concentrations continuously using an anesthetic gas analyzer (BK 1304). Upon puffing procaterol hydrochloride aerosol for 4 times, the analyzer showed a rapid increase in end-tidal isoflurane concentration. The BK 1304 uses infrared photoacoustic spectrophotometry and it is susceptible to interferences caused by Freon propellants in bronchodilator aerosols. We should take care in monitoring inhalational anesthetics when using aerosols containing Freon propellants. PMID:9621676

  15. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    PubMed

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels. PMID:22732009

  16. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    PubMed

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels.

  17. Simultaneous stratospheric gas and aerosol retrievals from broadband infrared occultation measurements.

    PubMed

    Oshchepkov, Sergey; Sasano, Yasuhiro; Yokota, Tatsuya; Uemura, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Hisashi; Itou, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2005-08-01

    The inversion method for simultaneous gas (O3, NO2, HNO3, N2O, CH4, H2O, CFC-11, CFC-12, N2O5, and ClONO2) and aerosol retrievals from broadband continuous IR spectra of occultation measurements is described. Both gas and aerosol physical modeling with consideration of the multicomponent character of aerosol and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are used to minimize the difference between measured and modeled transmittance spectra under smoothness constraints imposed on particle-size distributions for each PSC component and positive constraints on all gas and aerosol parameters. The method is tested by numerical simulations in which synthetic occultation measurements inherent to the improved limb atmospheric spectrometer are used. The study reveals that the method has significant advantages over other approaches based on offset or gas-window-channel aerosol correction for accurate gas retrievals and provides additional information on the particle-size composition, volume density, and chemical component character of PSCs.

  18. Atmospheric Oxidation of 1,3-Butadiene: Characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implication for PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas and pa...

  19. Generation and characterization of aerosols and vapors for inhalation experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Tillery, M I; Wood, G O; Ettinger, H J

    1976-01-01

    Control of aerosol and vapor characteristics that affect the toxicity of inhaled contaminants often determines the methods of generating exposure atmospheres. Generation methods for aerosols and vapors are presented. The characteristics of the resulting exposure atmosphere and the limitations of the various generation methods are discussed. Methods and instruments for measuring the airborne contaminant with respect to various charcteristics are also described. PMID:797565

  20. WIPP Gas-Generation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank S. Felicione; Steven M. Frank; Dennis D. Keiser

    2007-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750 ml headspace in each vessel was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure estimated in the repository were it to be inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30°C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generated by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6 1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. Up to 4.2% hydrogen, by volume, was measured. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in vessels containing carbon steel. Visual examination of carbon-steel coupons confirmed the correspondence between the extent of observable corrosion and hydrogen generation. Average corrosion penetration rates

  1. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  2. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  3. Ideal Gas Laws: Experiments for General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments designed to verify the various relationships implicit in the ideal gas equation and shows that the success of the Graham's law effusion experiments can be explained by elementary hydrodynamics. (GS)

  4. Aerosol Effects on Radiation and Climate: Column Closure Experiments with Towers, Aircraft, and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Many theoretical studies have shown that anthropogenic aerosol particles can change the radiation balance in an atmospheric column and might thereby exert a significant effect on the Earth's climate. In particular, recent calculations have shown that sulfate particles from anthropogenic combustion may already exert a cooling influence on the Earth that partially offsets the warming caused by the greenhouse gases from the same combustion. Despite the potential climatic importance of anthropogenic aerosols, simultaneous measurements of anthropogenic aerosol properties and their effect on atmospheric radiation have been very rare. Successful comparisons of measured radiation fields with those calculated from aerosol measurements - now referred to as column closure comparisons - are required to improve the accuracy and credibility of climate predictions. This paper reviews the column closure experiment performed at the Mt. Sutro Tower in San Francisco in 1975, in which elevated radiometers measured the change in Earth-plus-atmosphere albedo caused by an aerosol layer, while a lidar, sunphotometer, nephelometer, and other radiometers measured properties of the responsible aerosol. The time-dependent albedo calculated from the measured aerosol properties agreed with that measured by the tower radiometers. Also presented are designs for future column closure studies using radiometers and aerosol instruments on the ground, aircraft, and satellites. These designs draw upon algorithms and experience developed in the Sutro Tower study, as well as more recent experience with current measurement and analysis capabilities.

  5. Remote Sensing of Spectral Aerosol Properties: A Classroom Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2006-01-01

    Bridging the gap between current research and the classroom is a major challenge to today s instructor, especially in the sciences where progress happens quickly. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Maryland teamed up in designing a graduate class project intended to provide a hands-on introduction to the physical basis for the retrieval of aerosol properties from state-of-the-art MODIS observations. Students learned to recognize spectral signatures of atmospheric aerosols and to perform spectral inversions. They became acquainted with the operational MODIS aerosol retrieval algorithm over oceans, and methods for its evaluation, including comparisons with groundbased AERONET sun-photometer data.

  6. Aerosols: Non-CO2 Non-Greenhouse Non-Gas Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, S. E.

    2005-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols influence Earth's radiation budget and climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation (direct effects) and by modifying the reflectivity and extent of clouds (indirect effects). While aerosol forcing is arguably less important from a policy perspective than greenhouse gas forcing because of the short residence times of these aerosols (about a week) compared to the lifetimes of the well mixed greenhouse gases (decades to centuries), knowledge of aerosol forcing over the industrial period is essential to empirical inference of Earth's climate sensitivity from temperature change over this period and to evaluation of the performance of climate model simulations over this period. Accuracy in global-average forcing by anthropogenic aerosols required for these purposes is estimated to be ~0.5 w m-2 [Schwartz, J. Air Waste Management Assoc. 54, 1351-1359 (2004)]. For an accumulation-mode (radius 50-1000 nm) scattering aerosol above a dark surface the forcing per optical depth (at 550 nm) during daylight hours for cloud-free sky is 50 to 100 W m-2. Such a forcing intensity implies, taking into account 50% nighttime and ~50% cloud cover, that global average optical depth of anthropogenic aerosol must be known to 0.02 - 0.04, an accuracy achievable by careful ground-based measurements, but which would be difficult to achieve globally because of high spatial and temporal variation. Top-of-atmosphere forcing for a given optical depth is sensitive also to single scattering albedo, size distribution (as manifested in asymmetry parameter, backscatter fraction, or Angstrom exponent) and surface reflectance; these sensitivities are examined here. It is necessary as well to determine the fraction of forcing that is due to anthropogenic aerosol. Similar considerations apply to aerosol indirect forcing, which depends to first approximation on the number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei as a function of applied supersaturation, which depends on the

  7. Distinct Patterns of Climate Response to Anthropogenic Aerosol Versus Greenhouse Gas Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, H.; Xie, S. P.; Liu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Patterns of climate response to anthropogenic aerosols and well-mixed greenhouse gas (GHG) changes are investigated using eight models from Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. In the 20th century, the principal climate response patterns show both similarities and differences between aerosol and GHG runs. This paper focuses on distinct patterns of climate response to aerosol and GHG changes, while a recent companion study discussed the similarities. The GHG induced radiative forcing gives rise to amplified warming in the tropical upper troposphere and intensified mid-latitude jets in both hemispheres. However, for the anthropogenic aerosols, they are concentrated in the Northern Hemisphere and the temperature change shows a deep cooling structure in the troposphere around 40°N. Consistent with thermal wind balance, the cooling anchors a westerly acceleration to its south in aerosol runs. The response to aerosol induced inter-hemispheric asymmetry is also interpreted in terms of an anomalous Hadley circulation across the equator. Careful comparison indicates that the aerosol forcing dominates the Northern Hemisphere response in atmospheric circulation and precipitation, including a southward shift of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone, the drying trend over the East Asia monsoon region, the southward shift of the East Asia westerly jet and the North Pacific cooling. The GHG forcing dominates the tropical Pacific rainfall increase mediated by the sea surface temperature pattern. Several climate response pattern indices are evaluated for the relative importance of aerosol and GHG forcing. The aerosol induced inter-hemisphere thermal contrast plays a key role in inducing climate response patterns that are quite different from the results in GHG runs.

  8. Transient Climate Impacts for Scenarios of Aerosol Emissions from Asia: A Story of Coal versus Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandey, B. S.; Cheng, H.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Projections of anthropogenic aerosol emissions are uncertain. In Asia, it is possible that emissions may increase if business continues as usual, with economic growth driving an increase in coal burning. But it is also possible that emissions may decrease rapidly due to the widespread adoption of cleaner technology or a shift towards non-coal fuels, such as natural gas. In this study, the transient climate impacts of three aerosol emissions scenarios are investigated: an RCP4.5 (Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5) control; a scenario with reduced Asian anthropogenic aerosol emissions; and a scenario with enhanced Asian anthropogenic aerosol emissions. A coupled atmosphere-ocean configuration of CESM (Community Earth System Model), including CAM5 (Community Atmosphere Model version 5), is used. Enhanced Asian aerosol emissions are found to delay global mean warming by one decade at the end of the century. Aerosol-induced suppression of the East Asian and South Asian summer monsoon precipitation occurs. The enhanced Asian aerosol emissions also remotely impact precipitation in other parts of the world: over the Sahel, West African monsoon precipitation is suppressed; and over Australia, austral summer monsoon precipitation is enhanced. These remote impacts on precipitation are associated with a southward shift of the ITCZ. The aerosol-induced sea surface temperature (SST) response appears to play an important role in the precipitation changes over South Asia and Australia, but not over East Asia. These results indicate that energy production in Asia, through the consequent aerosol emissions and associated radiative effects, might significantly influence future climate both locally and globally.

  9. Different responses of Sea Surface Temperature in the North Pacific to greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyi; Liu, Qinyu

    2015-12-01

    The responses of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) to greenhouse gas (GHG) and anthropogenic aerosol in the North Pacific are compared based on the historical single and all-forcing simulations with Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3). During 1860-2005, the effect of GHG forcing on the North Pacific SST is opposite to that of the aerosol forcing. Specifically, the aerosol cooling effect exceeds the GHG warming effect in the Kuroshio Extension (KE) region during 1950-2004 in the CM3 single forcing. The mid-latitude response of ocean circulation to the GHG (aerosol) forcing is to enhance (weaken) the Subtropical Gyre. Then the SST warming (cooling) lies on the zonal band of 40°N because of the increased (reduced) KE warm advection effect in the GHG (aerosol) forcing simulations, and the cooling effect to SST will surpass the warming effect in the KE region in the historical all-forcing simulations. Besides, the positive feedback between cold SST and cloud can also strengthen the aerosol cooling effect in the KE region during boreal summer, when the mixed layer depth is shallow. In the GHG (aerosol) forcing simulations, corresponding to warming (cooling) SST in the KE region, the weakened (enhanced) Aleutian Low appears in the Northeast Pacific. Consequently, the SST responses to all-forcing in the historical simulations are similar to the responses to aerosol forcing in sign and spatial pattern, hence the aerosol effect is quite important to the SST cooling in the mid-latitude North Pacific during the past 55 years.

  10. Constraining the volatility distribution and gas-particle partitioning of combustion aerosols using isothermal dilution and thermodenuder measurements.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, Andrew P; Miracolo, Marissa A; Donahue, Niel M; Robinson, Allen L

    2009-07-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from a diesel engine and the combustion of hard- and soft-woods in a stove was investigated by isothermally diluting them in a smog chamber or by passing them through a thermodenuder and measuring the extent of evaporation. The experiments were conducted at atmospherically relevant conditions: low concentrations and small temperature perturbations. The partitioning of the POA emissions from both sources varied continuously with changing concentration and temperature. Although the POA emissions are semivolatile, they do not completely evaporate at typical atmospheric conditions. The overall partitioning characteristics of diesel and wood smoke POA are similar, with wood smoke being somewhat less volatile than the diesel exhaust. The gas-particle partitioning of aerosols formed from flash-vaporized engine lubricating oil was also studied; diesel POA is somewhat more volatile than the oil aerosol. The experimental data from the dilution- and thermodenuder-based techniques were fit using absorptive partitioning theory to derive a volatility distribution of the POA emissions from each source. These distributions are suitable for use in chemical transport models that simulate POA concentrations.

  11. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multi-layer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: (1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), (2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and (3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. These salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar like amorphous phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material accumulates in the particle surface layer upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass transfer limited uptake of condensable organic compounds onto wall deposited particles or directly onto the Teflon chamber walls of smog chambers can have profound influence on the

  12. Tropospheric ozone and aerosols measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic boundary layer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Ozone (O3) and aerosol distributions were measured from an aircraft using a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system as part of the 1988 NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment - Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE-3A) to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during the summer. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere. Several cases of continental polar air masses were examined during the experiment. The aerosol scattering associated with these air masses was very low, and the atmospheric distribution of aerosols was quite homogeneous for those air masses that had been transported over the ice for greater than or = 3 days. The transition in O3 and aerosol distributions from tundra to marine conditions was examined several times. The aerosol data clearly show an abrupt change in aerosol scattering properties within the mixed layer from lower values over the tundra to generally higher values over the water. The distinct differences in the heights of the mixed layers in the two regions was also readily apparent. Several cases of enhanced O3 were observed during ABLE-3 in conjunction with enhanced aerosol scattering in layers in the free atmosphere. Examples are presented of the large scale variations of O3 and aerosols observed with the airborne lidar system from near the surface to above the tropopause over the Arctic during ABLE-3.

  13. Aerodynamic design of gas and aerosol samplers for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Hazen, Nathan L.; Brune, William H.

    1991-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of airborne probes for the capture of air and aerosols is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the key parameters that affect proper sampling, such as inlet-lip design, internal duct components for low pressure drop, and exhaust geometry. Inlet designs that avoid sonic flow conditions on the lip and flow separation in the duct are shown. Cross-stream velocities of aerosols are expressed in terms of droplet density and diameter. Flow curvature, which can cause aerosols to cross streamlines and impact on probe walls, can be minimized by means of a proper inlet shape and proper probe orientation, and by avoiding bends upstream of the test section. A NASA panel code called PMARC was used successfully to compute streamlines around aircraft and probes, as well as to compute to local velocity and pressure distributions in inlets. A NACA 1-series inlet with modified lip radius was used for the airborne capture of stratospheric chlorine monoxide at high altitude and high flight speed. The device has a two-stage inlet that decelerates the inflow with little disturbance to the flow through the test section. Diffuser design, exhaust hood design, valve loss, and corner vane geometry are discussed.

  14. Gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol emissions: (2) diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    May, Andrew A; Presto, Albert A; Hennigan, Christopher J; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Gordon, Timothy D; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-08-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from two medium-duty (MDDV) and three heavy-duty (HDDV) diesel vehicles. Each test was conducted on a chassis dynamometer with the entire exhaust sampled into a constant volume sampler (CVS). The vehicles were operated over a range of driving cycles (transient, high-speed, creep/idle) on different ultralow sulfur diesel fuels with varying aromatic content. Four independent yet complementary approaches were used to investigate POA gas-particle partitioning: artifact correction of quartz filter samples, dilution from the CVS into a portable environmental chamber, heating in a thermodenuder, and thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) analysis of quartz filter samples. During tests of vehicles not equipped with diesel particulate filters (DPF), POA concentrations inside the CVS were a factor of 10 greater than ambient levels, which created large and systematic partitioning biases in the emissions data. For low-emitting DPF-equipped vehicles, as much as 90% of the POA collected on a quartz filter from the CVS were adsorbed vapors. Although the POA emission factors varied by more than an order of magnitude across the set of test vehicles, the measured gas-particle partitioning of all emissions can be predicted using a single volatility distribution derived from TD-GC-MS analysis of quartz filters. This distribution is designed to be applied directly to quartz filter data that are the basis for existing emissions inventories and chemical transport models that have implemented the volatility basis set approach.

  15. Organic aerosol molecular composition and gas-particle partitioning coefficients at a Mediterranean site (Corsica).

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Couvidat, Florian; Rio, Caroline; Fable, Sébastien; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli; Pailly, Olivier; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Chiappini, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Molecular speciation of atmospheric organic matter was investigated during a short summer field campaign performed in a citrus fruit field in northern Corsica (June 2011). Aimed at assessing the performance on the field of newly developed analytical protocols, this work focuses on the molecular composition of both gas and particulate phases and provides an insight into partitioning behavior of the semi-volatile oxygenated fraction. Limonene ozonolysis tracers were specifically searched for, according to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data previously recorded for smog chamber experiments. A screening of other oxygenated species present in the field atmosphere was also performed. About sixty polar molecules were positively or tentatively identified in gas and/or particle phases. These molecules comprise a wide range of branched and linear, mono and di-carbonyls (C3-C7), mono and di-carboxylic acids (C3-C18), and compounds bearing up to three functionalities. Among these compounds, some can be specifically attributed to limonene oxidation and others can be related to α- or β-pinene oxidation. This provides an original snapshot of the organic matter composition at a Mediterranean site in summer. Furthermore, for compounds identified and quantified in both gaseous and particulate phases, an experimental gas/particle partitioning coefficient was determined. Several volatile products, which are not expected in the particulate phase assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, were nonetheless present in significant concentrations. Hypotheses are proposed to explain these observations, such as the possible aerosol viscosity that could hinder the theoretical equilibrium to be rapidly reached.

  16. Organic aerosol molecular composition and gas-particle partitioning coefficients at a Mediterranean site (Corsica).

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Stéphanie; Couvidat, Florian; Rio, Caroline; Fable, Sébastien; Grignion, Guillaume; Savelli; Pailly, Olivier; Leoz-Garziandia, Eva; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Chiappini, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Molecular speciation of atmospheric organic matter was investigated during a short summer field campaign performed in a citrus fruit field in northern Corsica (June 2011). Aimed at assessing the performance on the field of newly developed analytical protocols, this work focuses on the molecular composition of both gas and particulate phases and provides an insight into partitioning behavior of the semi-volatile oxygenated fraction. Limonene ozonolysis tracers were specifically searched for, according to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) data previously recorded for smog chamber experiments. A screening of other oxygenated species present in the field atmosphere was also performed. About sixty polar molecules were positively or tentatively identified in gas and/or particle phases. These molecules comprise a wide range of branched and linear, mono and di-carbonyls (C3-C7), mono and di-carboxylic acids (C3-C18), and compounds bearing up to three functionalities. Among these compounds, some can be specifically attributed to limonene oxidation and others can be related to α- or β-pinene oxidation. This provides an original snapshot of the organic matter composition at a Mediterranean site in summer. Furthermore, for compounds identified and quantified in both gaseous and particulate phases, an experimental gas/particle partitioning coefficient was determined. Several volatile products, which are not expected in the particulate phase assuming thermodynamic equilibrium, were nonetheless present in significant concentrations. Hypotheses are proposed to explain these observations, such as the possible aerosol viscosity that could hinder the theoretical equilibrium to be rapidly reached. PMID:26969549

  17. Novel methods for predicting gas-particle partitioning during the formation of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2014-12-01

    Several methods have been presented in the literature to predict an organic chemical's equilibrium partitioning between the water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) component of aerosol and the gas phase, Ki,WIOM, as a function of temperature. They include (i) polyparameter linear free energy relationships calibrated with empirical aerosol sorption data, as well as (ii) the solvation models implemented in SPARC and (iii) the quantum-chemical software COSMOtherm, which predict solvation equilibria from molecular structure alone. We demonstrate that these methods can be used to predict Ki,WIOM for large numbers of individual molecules implicated in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, including those with multiple functional groups. Although very different in their theoretical foundations, these methods give remarkably consistent results for the products of the reaction of normal alkanes with OH, i.e. their partition coefficients Ki,WIOM generally agree within one order of magnitude over a range of more than ten orders of magnitude. This level of agreement is much better than that achieved by different vapour pressure estimation methods that are more commonly used in the SOA community. Also, in contrast to the agreement between vapour pressure estimates, the agreement between the Ki,WIOM estimates does not deteriorate with increasing number of functional groups. Furthermore, these partitioning coefficients Ki,WIOM predicted SOA mass yields in agreement with those measured in chamber experiments of the oxidation of normal alkanes. If a Ki,WIOM prediction method was based on one or more surrogate molecules representing the solvation properties of the mixed OM phase of SOA, the choice of those molecule(s) was found to have a relatively minor effect on the predicted Ki,WIOM, as long as the molecule(s) are not very polar. This suggests that a single surrogate molecule, such as 1-octanol or a hypothetical SOA structure proposed by Kalberer et al. (2004), may often be

  18. Effect of bronchoconstrictive aerosols on pulmonary gas trapping in the A/J mouse.

    PubMed

    Yiamouyiannis, C A; Stengel, P W; Cockerham, S L; Silbaugh, S A

    1995-10-01

    We exposed A/J mice to several challenge aerosols and measured gas trapped within excised lungs by quantitating their buoyancy in saline (Archimedes' principle). The temporal stability of the excised lung gas volume (ELGV) measurement was also examined. ELGV increased in a dose proportional manner with increasing concentrations of methacholine and reached a maximum of 338 +/- 33% above vehicle-exposed controls. The A/J mice were 100 times more responsive to aerosol methacholine compared to hyporesponsive C3H/HeJ mice. Aerosol challenges of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 mimetic, and serotonin resulted in a 40% and 135% increase in ELGV's versus their controls, respectively. ELGV's were not increased after aerosols of leukotriene C4, histamine, substance P, N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenyl-alanine and platelet activating factor. Both normal (filtered air-exposed) and hyperinflated (methacholine-exposed) excised lungs lost about 10% of their initial volume by 30 min and 40-65% of initial volume by 4 h. Occlusion of the trachea in either group did not affect the total gas lost, suggesting that majority of the gas loss was via transpleural diffusion. We conclude that determination of ELGV in mice, when performed soon after challenge testing, is a simple, rapid and reliable estimate of airway obstruction. PMID:8610213

  19. Supersonic gas shell for puff pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. S., III; Doggett, W. O.; Roth, I.; Stallings, C.

    1982-09-01

    An easy-to-fabricate, conical, annular supersonic nozzle has been developed for use in high-power, puff gas z-pinch experiments. A fast responding conical pressure probe has also been developed as an accurate supersonic gas flow diagnostic for evaluating the transient gas jet formed by the nozzle. Density profile measurements show that the magnitude and radial position of the gas annulus are fairly constant with distance from the nozzle, but the gas density in the center of the annulus increases with distance from the nozzle.

  20. SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM THE OXIDATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE PRESENCE OF DRY SUBMICRON AMMONIUM SULFATE AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine formation of secondary organic aerosols. A smog chamber system was developed for studying gas-aerosol interactions in a dynamic flow reactor. These experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of gas and aerosol phase compounds ...

  1. Asian Monsoon Changes and the Role of Aerosol and Greenhouse Gas Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, M.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in Asian summer (June to August) monsoon in response to aerosol and greenhouse gas forcing are examined using observations and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project - Phase 5 (CMIP5) multi-model, multi-realization ensemble. Results show that during the historical period, CMIP5 models show a predominantly drying trend in Asian monsoon, while in the 21st Century under representative concentration pathway 8.5 (rcp8.5) scenario, monsoon rainfall enhances across the entire Asian domain. The thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms causing the changes are evaluated using the moisture budget analysis. The drying trend in the CMIP5 historical simulations and the wetting trend in the rcp8.5 projections can be explained by the relative importance of dynamical and thermodynamical contributions to the total moisture convergence. While thermodynamic mechanism dominates in the future, the historical rainfall changes are dominated by the changes in circulation. The relative contributions of aerosols and greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the historical monsoon change are further examined using CMIP5 single-forcing simulations. Rainfall reduces under aerosol forcing and increases under greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Aerosol forcing dominates over the greenhouse effect during the historical period, leading to the general drying trend in the all-forcing simulations. While the thermodynamic change of mean moisture convergence in the all-forcing case is dominated by the GHG forcing, the dynamic change in mean moisture convergence in the all-forcing case is dominated by the aerosol forcing. Further analysis using atmospheric GCM with prescribed aerosol and GHG radiative forcing versus those with the prescribed sea surface temperature (SST) warming suggests that the weak circulation changes due to GHG forcing is a result of the cancellation between CO2 radiative forcing and the SST warming, while aerosol radiative effect tends to enhance the circulation response due to SST forcing.

  2. Ozone Observations by the Gas and Aerosol Measurement Sensor during SOLVE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, M. C.; Thomason, L. W.; Zawodny, J. M.; Wenny, B. N.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Yee, J.-H.; Swartz, W. H.; Shetter, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas and Aerosol Measurement Sensor (GAMS) was deployed aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II). GAMS acquired line-of-sight (LOS) direct solar irradiance spectra during the sunlit portions of ten science flights of the DC-8 between 12 January and 4 February 2003. Differential line-of-sight (DLOS) optical depth spectra are produced from the GAMS raw solar irradiance spectra. Then, DLOS ozone number densities are retrieved from the GAMS spectra using a multiple linear regression spectral fitting technique. Both the DLOS optical depth spectra and retrieved ozone data are compared with coincident measurements from two other solar instruments aboard the DC-8 platform to demonstrate the robustness and stability of the GAMS data. The GAMS ozone measurements are then utilized to evaluate the quality of the Wulf band ozone cross sections, a critical component of the SAGE III aerosol, water vapor, and temperature/pressure retrievals. Results suggest the ozone cross section compilation of Shettle and Anderson currently used operationally in SAGE III data processing may be in error by as much as 10-20% in theWulf bands, and their lack of reported temperature dependence is a significant deficiency. A second, more recent, cross section database compiled for the SCIAMACHY satellite mission appears to be of much better quality in the Wulf bands, but still may have errors as large as 5% near the Wulf band absorption peaks, which is slightly larger than their stated uncertainty. Additional laboratory measurements of the Wulf band cross sections should be pursued to further reduce their uncertainty and better quantify their temperature dependence.

  3. A Global Aerosol Model Forecast for the ACE-Asia Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Lucchesi, Robert; Huebert, Barry; Weber, Rodney; Anderson, Tad; Masonis, Sarah; Blomquist, Byron; Bandy, Alan; Thornton, Donald

    2003-01-01

    We present the results of aerosol forecast during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) field experiment in spring 2001, using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model and the meteorological forecast fields from the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). The aerosol model forecast provides direct information on aerosol optical thickness and concentrations, enabling effective flight planning, while feedbacks from measurements constantly evaluate the model, making successful model improvements. We verify the model forecast skill by comparing model predicted total aerosol extinction, dust, sulfate, and SO2 concentrations with those quantities measured by the C-130 aircraft during the ACE-Asia intensive operation period. The GEOS DAS meteorological forecast system shows excellent skills in predicting winds, relative humidity, and temperature for the ACE-Asia experiment area as well as for each individual flight, with skill scores usually above 0.7. The model is also skillful in forecast of pollution aerosols, with most scores above 0.5. The model correctly predicted the dust outbreak events and their trans-Pacific transport, but it constantly missed the high dust concentrations observed in the boundary layer. We attribute this missing dust source to the desertification regions in the Inner Mongolia Province in China, which have developed in recent years but were not included in the model during forecasting. After incorporating the desertification sources, the model is able to reproduce the observed high dust concentrations at low altitudes over the Yellow Sea. Two key elements for a successful aerosol model forecast are correct source locations that determine where the emissions take place, and realistic forecast winds and convection that determine where the aerosols are transported. We demonstrate that our global model can not only account for the large

  4. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cm-3. The photolysis rate of NO2 is adjustable between 0 and 0.49 min-1. At 298 K under dry conditions, the average wall loss rates of NO, NO2 and O3 were measured to be 1.41 × 10-4 min-1, 1.39 × 10-4 min-1 and 1.31 × 10-4 min-1, respectively, and the particle number wall loss rate was measured to be 0.17 h-1. Auxiliary mechanisms of this chamber are determined and included in the Master Chemical Mechanism to evaluate and model propene-NOx-air irradiation experiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high-quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy Sciences (GIG-CAS), smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase chemistry and secondary aerosol formation.

  5. The Influence of Urban Emissions on Background Aerosols and Trace Gases in Amazonia as Seen in the GoAmazon2014/2015 Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Barbosa, H. M.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Rizzo, L. V.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöhlker, C.; Souza, R. A. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/2015 experiment, several aerosol and trace gas monitoring stations are being operated for two years before and after the Manaus urban plume in Central Amazonia. Three sites are being operated in pristine conditions, with atmospheric properties under natural biogenic conditions. These three sites named T0 are ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory), ZF2 and EMBRAPA. After the air masses are exposed to the Manaus plume, one site (called T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 Km downwind. Finally, at about 150 Km downwind of Manaus is the T3 Manacapuru site. Aerosol chemical composition is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as three Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors) instruments. Optical properties were measured with several AE33 aethalometers and MAAP, and multi wavelengths nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizers. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sunphotometers before and after the Manaus plume, as well as several Lidar systems. The three sites before the Manaus plume show remarkable similar variability in aerosol concentrations and optical properties. This pattern is very different at the T2 site, with large aerosol concentrations enhancing aerosol absorption and scattering significantly as a result of the Manaus pollution plume. The aerosol is very oxidized before being exposed to the Manaus plume, and this pattern changes significantly for T2 and T3 sites, with a much higher presence of less oxidized aerosol. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day before Manaus plume is a low 10-12 ppb, value that changes to 50-70 ppb for air masses suffering the influence of Manaus plume. Aerosol size distribution also change significantly, with stronger presence of nucleation mode particles. A detailed comparison of aerosol characteristics and composition for the several sites will be

  6. Evaluation of anthropogenic influence on thermodynamics, gas and aerosol composition of city air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzhegova, Nina; Belan, Boris; Antokhin, Pavel; Zhidovkhin, Evgenii; Ivlev, Georgii; Kozlov, Artem; Fofonov, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    In the last 40-50 years there is a global tendency of urbanisation, which is a consequence of most countries' economical development. Concurrently, the issue of environment's ecological state has become critical. Urban air pollution is among the most important ecological problems nowadays. World Health Organization (WHO) points out certain "classical" polluting agents: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), troposphere ozone (O3) (studied here), as well as lead, carbon dioxide (CO2), aldehydes, soot, benzpyrene and dredges (including dust, haze and smoke) [1]. An evaluation of antropogenic component's weight in the thermodynamical conditions and gas and aerosol composition of a city's atmosphere (by the example of Tomsk) is given in this paper. Tomsk is located at the South of West Siberia and is the administrative center of Tomsk region. The city's area is equal to 294,6 km2. Its population is 512.6 thousands of people. The overall number of registered motor vehicles in the city in 2008 was 131 700. That is, every fourth city inhabitant has a personal car. From 2002 to 2008 the number of motor vehicles in Tomsk has increased by 25 thousands units [2]. This increase consists mostly of passenger cars. There is also a positive trend in fuel consumtion by the city's industries and motor vehicles - from 2004 to 2007 it has increased by 10%. Such a quick rate of transport quantity's increase in the city provides reason to suggest an unfavorable ecological situation in Tomsk. For this study we have used the AKV-2 mobile station designed by the SB RAS Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The station's equipment provides the following measurements [3]: air temperature and humidity; aerosol disperse composition in 15 channels with a particle size range of 0.3-20 µm by use of the Grimm-1.108 aerosol spectrometer; NO, NO2, O3, SO2, CO, CO2 concentration. This paper describes a single experiment conducted in Tomsk. Date of

  7. The effect of interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols on climate simulations over the last millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; LeGrande, A. N.; Healy, R. J.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    Significant computational resources are required for long transient simulations using coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models. Individual simulations from the NINT version of GISS ModelE-R (part of the CMIP5 archive) of the last millennium, from year 850 to 2005, enabled with only 3 water isotopologue tracers, required ~9 months of computational time on the state-of-the-art parallel computing cluster of NCCS. The additional requirements of the full chemistry module would increase this by a factor of ~3. And yet, it is well known that chemistry and aerosols are very important on climate, both regional and global. Therefore, we have designed a set of experiments where the ocean and sea ice boundary conditions of the coupled model, paired with the land surface, greenhouse gases, insolation, and total solar irradiance (TSI) forcing from the PMIP3 protocol are applied to a series of full-chemistry GISS ModelE snap-shots each 50-years through the last millennium. We will present results from atmosphere-only model simulations with the GISS ModelE, which includes interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols at decadal-scale time slices, driven by millennial-length simulations performed with the same model when coupled with an ocean model. The boundary conditions for the transient simulations follow the last millennium coordinated PMIP3 experiment protocol. This experiment directly links in with other pre-industrial experiments being completed as part of IPCC AR5, using the same model and resolution as in GISS IPCC AR5. The impact of the presence of short-lived gases and aerosols on the simulated climate is studied. The role of previously omitted forcing mechanisms will be performed during the whole simulated period. The results presented are the initial runs from a larger set of experiments that will assess the climate impact of changes to dust, sea-salt, and ocean-derived sulfate, biomass burning ozone-precursors and aerosols, organic carbon, wetland methane

  8. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GAS-PHASE AND AEROSOL-BORNE HYDROPEROXIDES IN URBAN AIR. (R827352)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous measurements of hydroperoxides in both the gas- and the aerosol-phase have been made for the first time. In addition, hydroperoxide levels in the ‘coarse’ (>PM2) and ‘fine’ (PM2) aerosol modes have been characteriz...

  9. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  10. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    SciTech Connect

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, Ditte; Rusanen, A.; Boy, Michael; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, Birgitta; Zelenyuk, Alla; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-11

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle- phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2, an aerosol dynamics and particle phase chemistry module (which considers acid catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study: 1) the mass transfer limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), 2) the slow and almost particle size independent evaporation of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, and 3) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers.

  11. Aerosol deposition in the human lung periphery is increased by reduced-density gas breathing.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan B; Prisk, G Kim; Darquenne, Chantal

    2008-06-01

    Aerosol mixing resulting from turbulent flows is thought to be a major mechanism of deposition in the upper respiratory tract (URT). Because turbulence levels are a function of gas density, the use of a low-density carrier gas should reduce deposition in the URT allowing the aerosol to reach more peripheral airways of the lung. We performed aerosol bolus tests on 11 healthy subjects to investigate the effect of reduced gas density on regional aerosol deposition in the human lung. Using both air and heliox (80% helium, 20% oxygen) as carrier gas, boluses of 1 and 2 microm-diameter particles were inhaled to five volumetric lung depths (V(p)) between 150 and 1200 mL during an inspiration from residual volume (RV) to 1 liter above functional residual capacity at a constant flow rate of approximately 0.50 L/sec, which was immediately followed by an expiration to RV at the same flow rate. Aerosol deposition and axial dispersion were calculated from aerosol concentration and flow rate measured at the mouth. For 1 microm-diameter particles, deposition was significantly reduced by 29 +/- 28% (mean +/- SD, p < 0.05) when breathing heliox instead of air at shallow V(p) (150 mL) and significantly increased by 11 +/- 9% at deep V(p) (1200 mL). For 2 microm-diameter particles, deposition was significantly higher at V(p) = 500 mL by 6 +/- 7% and the predicted V(p) to achieve 100% deposition was significantly lower with heliox (834 +/- 146 mL) compared to air (912 +/- 128 mL) (p < 0.05). Despite a decrease in deposition at shallow V(p), there was no change in axial dispersion, suggesting that other factors such as radial turbulent mixing result in decreased aerosol deposition. Our results suggested that heliox reduces upper airway deposition of 1 and 2 microm-diameter particles allowing more particles to penetrate and subsequently deposit in the peripheral lung.

  12. Organic Composition of Size-Segregated Aerosols Sampled During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using non-rotating Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDI) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, FL, USA. Daily samples were collected 12 m above ground at a flow rate of 30 lpm throughout the month of May 2002. Aluminum foil discs were used to sample aerosol size fractions with aerodynamic cut diameter of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.17 and 0.093 um. Samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Low detection limits were achieved using a HP Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) and large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolution was obtained using a 60 m long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. A quantification method was built for over 90 organic compounds chosen as source markers including straight/iso/anteiso alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed. Also, results will be compared with samples acquired in different environments including the 1999 Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, GA, USA.

  13. Effects of ozone and sulfuric acid aerosol on gas trapping in the guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Four groups of 20 guinea pigs were sequentially exposed by inhalation to either air followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by sulfuric acid aerosol, ozone followed by air, or air followed by air to determine whether ozone preexposure sensitizes guinea pigs to the airway constrictive effects of sulfuric acid aerosol. All first exposures to ozone or air were 2 h in duration; all second exposures to sulfuric acid or air were for 1 h. All ozone and sulfuric acid exposures were 0.8 ppm and 12 mg/m3, respectively. Animals were observed for respiratory distress during exposure, and excised lungs were quantitated for trapped gas and wet/dry ratios. None of the guinea pigs developed dyspnea, and wet/dry ratios were not altered. Ozone significantly (p less than 0.05) increased trapped gas volumes, which were 44% (ozone-acid) to 68% (ozone-air) greater than in the air-air group. Trapped gas volume was 23% greater in the ozone-acid group than in the air-acid group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p less than 0.20). Thus, ozone increased gas trapping but did not significantly sensitize guinea pigs to the bronchoconstrictive action of sulfuric acid.

  14. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  15. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment: A New Challenge to Monsoon Climate Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerosol and monsoon related droughts and floods are two of the most serious environmental hazards confronting more than 60% of the population of the world living in the Asian monsoon countries. In recent years, thanks to improved satellite and in-situ observations, and better models, great strides have been made in aerosol, and monsoon research respectively. There is now a growing body of evidence suggesting that interaction of aerosol forcing with water cycle dynamics in monsoon regions may substantially alter the redistribution of energy at the earth surface and in the atmosphere, and therefore significantly impact monsoon rainfall variability and long term trends. In this talk, I will describe issues related to societal needs, scientific background, and challenges in studies of aerosol-water cycle interaction in Asian monsoon regions. As a first step towards addressing these issues, the authors call for an integrated observation and modeling research approach aimed at the interactions between aerosol chemistry and radiative effects and monsoon dynamics of the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system. A Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is proposed for 2007-2011, with an enhanced observation period during 2008-09, encompassing diverse arrays of observations from surface, aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, and satellites of physical and chemical properties of aerosols, long range aerosol transport as well as meteorological and oceanographic parameters in the Indo-Pacific Asian monsoon region. JAMEX will leverage on coordination among many ongoing and planned national programs on aerosols and monsoon research in China, India, Japan, Nepal, Italy, US, as well as international research programs of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  16. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamics and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model suited for detailed studies of aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1 × 1 km2) to regional scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM). The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others well suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The organic mass partitioning was either modeled with a 2-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) or with the traditional two-product model approach. In ADCHEM these models consider the diffusion limited and particle size dependent condensation and evaporation of 110 and 40 different organic compounds respectively. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 61 different species, using 130 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, aerosol dynamic processes, vertical and horizontal mixing, coupled or uncoupled condensation and the secondary organic aerosol formation. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results

  17. Development and evaluation of the aerosol dynamic and gas phase chemistry model ADCHEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Swietlicki, E.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Boy, M.; Kulmala, M.

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a model ideally suited for detailed studies on aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry within urban plumes, from local scale (1×1 km2) to regional or global scale. This article describes and evaluates the trajectory model for Aerosol Dynamics, gas and particle phase CHEMistry and radiative transfer (ADCHEM), which has been developed and used at Lund University since 2007. The model treats both vertical and horizontal dispersion perpendicular to an air mass trajectory (2-space dimensions), which is not treated in Lagrangian box-models (0-space dimensions). The Lagrangian approach enables a more detailed representation of the aerosol dynamics, gas and particle phase chemistry and a finer spatial and temporal resolution compared to that of available regional 3D-CTMs. These features make it among others ideally suited for urban plume studies. The aerosol dynamics model includes Brownian coagulation, dry deposition, wet deposition, in-cloud processing, condensation, evaporation, primary particle emissions and homogeneous nucleation. The gas phase chemistry model calculates the gas phase concentrations of 63 different species, using 119 different chemical reactions. Daily isoprene and monoterpene emissions from European forests were simulated separately with the vegetation model LPJ-GUESS, and included as input to ADCHEM. ADCHEM was used to simulate the ageing of the urban plumes from the city of Malmö in Southern Sweden (280 000 inhabitants). Several sensitivity tests were performed concerning the number of size bins, size structure method, coupled or uncoupled condensation, the volatility basis set (VBS) or traditional 2-product model for secondary organic aerosol formation, different aerosol dynamic processes and vertical and horizontal mixing. The simulations show that the full-stationary size structure gives accurate results with little numerical diffusion when more than 50 size bins are used between 1.5 and 2500 nm

  18. A mobile remote sensing laboratory for water vapor, trace gas, aerosol, and wind speed measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D.; White, W.; Tulloch, W.; DeSlover, D.

    1993-03-19

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a mobile field laboratory for remote measurement of atmospheric processes and observables that are important in global climate change, dispersal of hazardous materials, and atmospheric pollution. Specific observables of interest are water vapor, trace gases, aerosol size and density, wind, and temperature. The goal is to study atmospheric processes continuously for extended periods in remote field locations. This laboratory has just reached field ready status with sensors for aerosol and trace gas measurement based on established techniques. A development program is underway to enhance the sensor suite with several new techniques and instruments that are expected to significantly extend the state of the art in remote trace gas analysis. The new sensors will be incorporated into the lab during the next two years.

  19. Gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) on mixtures of aerosols in a smog chamber.

    PubMed

    Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Jang, Myoseon; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-15

    The partitioning behavior of a set of diverse SOCs on two and three component mixtures of aerosols from different sources was studied using smog chamber experimental data. A set of SOCs of different compound types was introduced into a system containing a mixture of aerosols from two or more sources. Gas and particle samples were taken using a filter-filter-denuder sampling system, and a partitioning coefficient Kp was estimated using Kp = Cp/(CgTSP). Particle size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer and a light scattering detector. Gas and particle samples were analyzed using GCMS. The aerosol composition in the chamber was tracked chemically using a combination of signature compounds and the organic matter mass fraction (f(om)) of the individual aerosol sources. The physical nature of the aerosol mixture in the chamber was determined using particle size distributions, and an aggregate Kp was estimated from theoretically calculated Kp on the individual sources. Model fits for Kp showed that when the mixture involved primary sources of aerosol, the aggregate Kp of the mixture could be successfully modeled as an external mixture of the Kp on the individual aerosols. There were significant differences observed for some SOCs between modeling the system as an external and as an internal mixture. However, when one of the aerosol sources was secondary, the aggregate model Kp required incorporation of the secondary aerosol products on the preexisting aerosol for adequate model fits. Modeling such a system as an external mixture grossly overpredicted the Kp of alkanes in the mixture. Indirect evidence of heterogeneous, acid-catalyzed reactions in the particle phase was also seen, leading to a significant increase in the polarity of the resulting aerosol mix and a resulting decrease in the observed Kp of alkanes in the chamber. The model was partly consistent with this decrease but could not completely explain the reduction in Kp because of

  20. ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L. R.; Prather, K.; Ralph, R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, R.; DeMott, P.; Fairall, C.; Fan, J.; Hagos, S.; Hughes, M.; Long, C.; Rutledge, S.; Waliser, D.; Wang, H.

    2014-09-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Understanding and modeling the fundamental processes that govern the large precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. is a critical test for the ability of climate models to predict the regional water cycle, including floods and droughts. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. Because of the large lower-tropospheric water vapor content, strong atmospheric winds and neutral moist static stability, some ARs can produce heavy precipitation by orographic enhancement during landfall on the U.S. West Coast. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in that region during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes.

  1. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sodium nitrate. The aim of this campaign was to investigate Henry's law constants for different seed aerosols. During the campaign filter samples were taken to investigate the amount of glyoxal in the particle phase. After filter extraction, the analyte was derivatized and measured using UHPLC

  2. Aerosol Properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A Mesoscale Perspective from the TIGERZ Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo \\Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51degN, 80.23deg E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering 50 sq km around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi \\bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to 0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for 10 C20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption.Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA > or = 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area \\averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA 0 had moderate correlation (R(sup 2) = 0.52-69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale \\distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  3. Aerosol properties over the Indo-Gangetic Plain: A mesoscale perspective from the TIGERZ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Tripathi, Sachchida N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Newcomb, W. Wayne; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, Russell R.; Thompson, Anne M.; Mattoo, Shana; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Singh, Remesh P.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-09-01

    High aerosol loading over the northern Indian subcontinent can result in poor air quality leading to human health consequences and climate perturbations. The international 2008 TIGERZ experiment intensive operational period (IOP) was conducted in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) around the industrial city of Kanpur (26.51°N, 80.23°E), India, during the premonsoon (April-June). Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) Sun photometers performed frequent measurements of aerosol properties at temporary sites distributed within an area covering ˜50 km2 around Kanpur to characterize pollution and dust in a region where complex aerosol mixtures and semi-bright surface effects complicate satellite retrieval algorithms. TIGERZ IOP Sun photometers quantified aerosol optical depth (AOD) increases up to ˜0.10 within and downwind of the city, with urban emissions accounting for ˜10-20% of the IGP aerosol loading on deployment days. TIGERZ IOP area-averaged volume size distribution and single scattering albedo retrievals indicated spatially homogeneous, uniformly sized, spectrally absorbing pollution and dust particles. Aerosol absorption and size relationships were used to categorize black carbon and dust as dominant absorbers and to identify a third category in which both black carbon and dust dominate absorption. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD retrievals with the lowest quality assurance (QA ≥ 0) flags were biased high with respect to TIGERZ IOP area-averaged measurements. MODIS AOD retrievals with QA ≥ 0 had moderate correlation (R2 = 0.52-0.69) with the Kanpur AERONET site, whereas retrievals with QA > 0 were limited in number. Mesoscale-distributed Sun photometers quantified temporal and spatial variability of aerosol properties, and these results were used to validate satellite retrievals.

  4. Modelling non-equilibrium secondary organic aerosol formation and evaporation with the aerosol dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry kinetic multilayer model ADCHAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldin, P.; Eriksson, A. C.; Nordin, E. Z.; Hermansson, E.; Mogensen, D.; Rusanen, A.; Boy, M.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Zelenyuk, A.; Pagels, J.

    2014-08-01

    We have developed the novel Aerosol Dynamics, gas- and particle-phase chemistry model for laboratory CHAMber studies (ADCHAM). The model combines the detailed gas-phase Master Chemical Mechanism version 3.2 (MCMv3.2), an aerosol dynamics and particle-phase chemistry module (which considers acid-catalysed oligomerization, heterogeneous oxidation reactions in the particle phase and non-ideal interactions between organic compounds, water and inorganic ions) and a kinetic multilayer module for diffusion-limited transport of compounds between the gas phase, particle surface and particle bulk phase. In this article we describe and use ADCHAM to study (1) the evaporation of liquid dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, (2) the slow and almost particle-size-independent evaporation of α-pinene ozonolysis secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, (3) the mass-transfer-limited uptake of ammonia (NH3) and formation of organic salts between ammonium (NH4+) and carboxylic acids (RCOOH), and (4) the influence of chamber wall effects on the observed SOA formation in smog chambers. ADCHAM is able to capture the observed α-pinene SOA mass increase in the presence of NH3(g). Organic salts of ammonium and carboxylic acids predominantly form during the early stage of SOA formation. In the smog chamber experiments, these salts contribute substantially to the initial growth of the homogeneously nucleated particles. The model simulations of evaporating α-pinene SOA particles support the recent experimental findings that these particles have a semi-solid tar-like amorphous-phase state. ADCHAM is able to reproduce the main features of the observed slow evaporation rates if the concentration of low-volatility and viscous oligomerized SOA material at the particle surface increases upon evaporation. The evaporation rate is mainly governed by the reversible decomposition of oligomers back to monomers. Finally, we demonstrate that the mass-transfer-limited uptake of condensable organic compounds

  5. Interesting Scientific Questions Regarding Interactions in the Gas-aerosol-cloud System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    2002-01-01

    The growth of human population and their use of land, food and energy resources affect the Earth's atmosphere, biosphere and oceans in a complex manner. Many important questions in earth sciences today deal with issues regarding the impact of human activities on our immediate and future environment, ranging in scope from local (i.e. air pollution) to global (i.e. global warming) scale problems. Because the mass of the Earth's atmosphere is negligible compare to that found in the oceans and the biosphere, the atmosphere can respond quickly to natural and/or manmade perturbations. For example, seasonal 'ozone hole' formation in the Antarctic is a result of manmade CFC emissions in just the last 40 years. Also, the observed rise in global temperatures (known as global warming) is linked to a rapid increase in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas concentrations (emitted primarily by combustion processes) over the last century. The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a mixture of gases, aerosol and cloud particles. Natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols affect the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Changes in the chemical and physical makeup of the atmosphere can influence how the Earth will interact with the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing infrared radiation and vise versa. While, some perturbations are short-lived, others are long-lived and can affect the Earth's global climate and chemistry in many decades to come, In order to be able to separate the natural effects from anthropogenic ones, it is essential that we understand the basic physics and chemistry of interactions in the gas-aerosol-cloud system in the Earth's atmosphere. The important physics and chemistry that takes place in the coupled gas-aerosol-cloud system as it relates to aircraft observations are discussed.

  6. An Experiment to Measure Gas Imperfection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskett, W. P.; Matthews, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Background information (theory), apparatus used and procedures required are provided for an experiment which involved the measurement of the deviations of carbon dioxide from perfect gas behavior by means of pressure/volume (pV) measurements at pressures of up to 20 atmospheres at room temperature. (JN)

  7. SAGE II aerosol correlative observations - Profile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborn, M. T.; Rosen, J. M.; Mccormick, M. P.; Wang, Pi-Huan; Livinfston, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of the aerosol extinction measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared with profiles from five correlative experiments between November 1984 and July 1986. The correlative profiles were derived from six-channel dustsonde measurements and two-wavelength lidar backscatter data. The correlation between the dustsonde- and lidar-derived measurements and the SAGE II data is good, validating the SAGE II lower stratospheric aerosol extinction measurements.

  8. Visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park: Properties observed by high resolution gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M. |; Masonjones, M.C.; Masonjones, H.D.; Salmon, L.G.; Cass, G.R.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M.

    1997-02-01

    Fine particle and total airborne particle samples were collected during August 1989 within the Grand Canyon [Indian Gardens (IG)] and on its south rim [Hopi Point (HP)] to define summertime organic aerosol concentration and composition as a function of elevation at Grand Canyon National Park. Inorganic chemical constituents were analyzed also to help place the relative importance of organics in perspective. Fine particle organic aerosols were approximately equal in concentration to sulfate aerosols at both sites. Monthly average mass concentrations for fine aerosol organics ranged from 1.1{mu}gm{sup {minus}3} (IG) to 1.3{mu}gm{sup {minus}3} (HP), while the organic aerosol concentration within total suspended particulate matter samples ranged from 1.9{mu}gm{sup {minus}3} (IG) to 2.1{mu}gm{sup {minus}3} (HP). Aerosol organics that could be evaluated by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) (elutable organics) constituted 27{percent} to 53{percent} of the total organics mass collected as fine or total aerosol. At each site, roughly half of the elutable organics fine aerosol fraction was composed of highly polar organic compounds. Distributions of the elutable organics were compared to Los Angeles fine aerosol samples and to distributions of authentic sources of aerosol organics. It was found that the Grand Canyon organic aerosol during August 1989 did not resemble diluted aged Los Angeles organic aerosol, indicating that most of the organic particulate matter at the Grand Canyon at the time studied originated from other sources.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  9. Chemical Characterization of the Aerosol During the CLAMS Experiment Using Aircraft and Ground Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castanho, A. D.; Martins, J.; Artaxo, P.; Hobbs, P. V.; Remer, L.; Yamasoe, M.; Fattori, A.

    2002-05-01

    During the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment Nuclepore filters were collected in two ground stations and aboard the University of Wasghington's Convair 580 Reserarch Aircraft. The two ground stations were chosen in strategic positions to characterize the chemical composition, the mass concentration, black carbon (BC) content, and the absorption properties of the aerosol particles at the surface level. One of the stations was located at the Cheasapeake lighthouse (25 km from the coast) and the other one was located at the Wallops Island. Aerosol particles where collected in two stages, fine (d<2.5um) and coarse mode (2.5experiment. Airborne samples were also collected on the UW Convair 580 Aircraft. The aircraft samples where used to characterize the elemental composition, mass concentration, BC content, and absorption properties of the aerosol in the atmospheric column in the CLAMS Experiment area. Some of the filters were also submitted to Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis. The particulate matter mass for all the samples were obtained gravimetrically. The concentration of black carbon in the fine filters was optically determined by a broadband reflectance technique. The spectral (from UV to near IR) reflectance in the fine and coarse mode filter were also obtained with a FieldSpec ASD spectrometer. Aerosol elemental characterization (Na through Pb) was obtained by the PIXE (Particle induced X ray emission) analyses of the nuclepore filters. The sources of the aerosol measured at the ground stations were estimated by principal component analyses mainly in the Wallops Island, where a longer time series was collected. One of the main urban components identified in the aerosol during the experiment was sulfate. Black carbon

  10. Design and characterization of a smog chamber for studying gas-phase chemical mechanisms and aerosol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Liu, T.; Bernard, F.; Ding, X.; Wen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; He, Q.; Lü, S.; Chen, J.; Saunders, S.; Yu, J.

    2013-08-01

    We describe here characterization of a new state-of-the-art smog chamber facility for studying atmospheric gas phase and aerosol chemistry. The chamber consists of a 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor suspended in a temperature-controlled enclosure equipped with two banks of black lamps as the light source. Temperature can be set in the range from -10 °C to 40 °C at accuracy of ±1 °C as measured by eight temperature sensors inside the enclosure and one just inside the reactor. Matrix air can be purified with NMHCs < 0.5 ppb, NOx/O3/carbonyls < 1 ppb and particles < 1 cmexperiments. The results indicate that this new smog chamber can provide high quality data for mechanism evaluation. Results of α-pinene dark ozonolysis experiments revealed SOA yields comparable to those from other chamber studies, and the two-product model gives a good fit for the yield data obtained in this work. Characterization experiments demonstrate that our GIG-CAS smog chamber facility can be used to provide valuable data for gas-phase mechanisms and aerosol chemistry.

  11. The application of an improved gas and aerosol collector for ambient air pollutants in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huabin; Zeng, Limin; Zhang, Yuanhang; Hu, Min; Wu, Yusheng

    2016-04-01

    An improved Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC) equipped with a newly designed aerosol collector and a set of dull-polished wet annular denuder (WAD) was developed by Peking University based on a Steam Jet Aerosol Collector (SJAC) sampler. Combined with Ion Chromatography (IC) the new sampler performed well in laboratory tests with high collection efficiencies for SO2 (above 98 %) and particulate sulfate (as high as 99.5 %). An inter-comparison between the GAC-IC system and the filter-pack method was performed and the results indicated that the GAC-IC system could supply reliable particulate sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and ammonium data in field measurement with a much wider range of ambient concentrations. From 2008 to 2015, dozens of big field campaigns (rural and coastal sites) were executed in different parts of China, the GAC-IC system took the chance having its field measurement performance checked repeatedly and provided high quality data in ambient conditions either under high loadings of pollutants or background area. Its measurements were highly correlated with data by other commercial instruments such as the SO2 analyzer, the HONO analyzer, a filter sampler, Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), etc. over a wide range of concentrations and proved particularly useful in future intensive campaigns or long-term monitoring stations to study various environmental issues such as secondary aerosol and haze formation. During these years of applications of GAC-IC in those field campaigns, we found some problems of several instruments running under field environment and some interesting results could also be drew from the large amount of data measured in near 20 provinces of China. Detail results will be demonstrated on the poster afterwards.

  12. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage.

  13. Combination treatment of chlorine dioxide gas and aerosolized sanitizer for inactivating foodborne pathogens on spinach leaves and tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas and aerosolized sanitizer, when applied alone or in combination, on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto spinach leaves and tomato surfaces. Spinach leaves and tomatoes were inoculated with a cocktail of three strains each of the three foodborne pathogens. ClO2 gas (5 or 10 ppmv) and aerosolized peracetic acid (PAA) (80 ppm) were applied alone or in combination for 20 min. Exposure to 10 ppmv of ClO2 gas for 20 min resulted in 3.4, 3.3, and 3.4 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on spinach leaves, respectively. Treatment with 80 ppm of aerosolized PAA for 20 min caused 2.3, 1.9, and 0.8 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) for 20 min caused 5.4, 5.1, and 4.1 log reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes on tomatoes experienced similar reduction patterns to those on spinach leaves. As treatment time increased, most combinations of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA showed additive effects in the inactivation of the three pathogens. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas and aerosolized PAA produced injured cells of three pathogens on spinach leaves while generally did not produce injured cells of these pathogens on tomatoes. Combined treatment of ClO2 gas (10 ppmv) and aerosolized PAA (80 ppm) did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the color and texture of samples during 7 days of storage. PMID:26001524

  14. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment SALTRACE 2013 - Overview and Early Results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Ansmann, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Freudenthaler, V.; Müller, T.; Kandler, K.; Althausen, D.; Busen, R.; Dollner, M.; Dörnbrack, A.; Farrell, D. A.; Gross, S.; Heimerl, K.; Klepel, A.; Kristensen, T. B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Minikin, A.; Prescod, D.; Prospero, J. M.; Rahm, S.; Rapp, M.; Sauer, D. N.; Schaefler, A.; Toledano, C.; Vaughan, M.; Wiegner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important player in the global climate system. In spite of substantial progress in the past decade, many questions in our understanding of the atmospheric and climate effects of mineral dust remain open such as the change of the dust size distribution during transport across the Atlantic Ocean and the associated impact on the radiation budget, the role of wet and dry dust removal mechanisms during transport, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds. To close gaps in our understanding of mineral dust in the climate system, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013. SALTRACE is a German initiative combining ground-based and airborne in-situ and lidar measurements with meteorological data, long-term measurements, satellite remote sensing and modeling. During SALTRACE, the DLR research aircraft Falcon was based on Sal, Cape Verde, between 11 and 17 June, and on Barbados between 18 June and 11 July 2013. The Falcon was equipped with a suite of in-situ instruments for the measurement of microphysical and optical aerosol properties and with a nadir-looking 2-μm wind lidar. Ground-based lidar and in-situ instruments were deployed in Barbados and Puerto Rico. Mineral dust from several dust outbreaks was measured by the Falcon between Senegal and Florida. On the eastern side of the Atlantic, dust plumes extended up to 6 km altitude, while the dust layers in the Caribbean were mainly below 4.5 km. The aerosol optical thickness of the dust outbreaks studied ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 at 500 nm in Barbados. Highlights during SALTRACE included the sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June near Barbados. The event was also captured by the ground-based lidar and in-situ instrumentation. Another highlight was the formation of tropical storm

  15. Expected trace gas and aerosol retrieval accuracy of the Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, U.; Kim, J.; Liu, X.; Lee, K. H.; Chance, K.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The predicted accuracy of the trace gases and aerosol retrievals from the geostationary environment monitoring spectrometer (GEMS) was investigated. The GEMS is one of the first sensors to monitor NO2, SO2, HCHO, O3, and aerosols onboard geostationary earth orbit (GEO) over Asia. Since the GEMS is not launched yet, the simulated measurements and its precision were used in this study. The random and systematic component of the measurement error was estimated based on the instrument design. The atmospheric profiles were obtained from Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) simulations and surface reflectances were obtained from climatology of OMI Lambertian equivalent reflectance. The uncertainties of the GEMS trace gas and aerosol products were estimated based on the OE method using the atmospheric profile and surface reflectance. Most of the estimated uncertainties of NO2, HCHO, stratospheric and total O3 products satisfied the user's requirements with sufficient margin. However, about 26% of the estimated uncertainties of SO2 and about 30% of the estimated uncertainties of tropospheric O3 do not meet the required precision. Particularly the estimated uncertainty of SO2 is high in winter, when the emission is strong in East Asia. Further efforts are necessary in order to improve the retrieval accuracy of SO2 and tropospheric O3 in order to reach the scientific goal of GEMS. Random measurement error of GEMS was important for the NO2, SO2, and HCHO retrieval, while both the random and systematic measurement errors were important for the O3 retrievals. The degree of freedom for signal of tropospheric O3 was 0.8 ± 0.2 and that for stratospheric O3 was 2.9 ± 0.5. The estimated uncertainties of the aerosol retrieval from GEMS measurements were predicted to be lower than the required precision for the SZA range of the trace gas retrievals.

  16. Elemental composition of aerosols in fourteen experiments of the Cloud Condensation Nuclei Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, W. H.; Hucek, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Aeosols were collected with two Ci impactors and analyzed with proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for chemical composition and to detect if contamination was present. One of the impactors sampled the generated aerosols; the other impactor sampled droplets from a diffusion cloud chamber. The purpose of the experiments was to test the feasibility of a study of the transfer of chemical elements from the fine particle sizes to the coarse particle sizes, after CCN are activated and cloud droplets are formed. The data indicated that sulfur-containing aerosols did exhibit the expected transfer.

  17. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  18. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E.; Kmetyk, L.N.

    1994-10-01

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  19. Aerosol and melt chemistry in the ACE molten core-concrete interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Thompson, D.H.; Spencer, B.W.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are discussed from the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) Program on the melt behavior and aerosols released during the interaction of molten reactor core material with concrete. A broad range of parameters were addressed in the experimental program: Seven large-scale tests were performed using four types of concrete (siliceous, limestone/sand, serpentine, and limestone) and a range of metal oxidations for both boiling water and pressurized waster reactor core debris. The release aerosols contained mainly constitutents of the concrete. In the tests with metal and limestone/sand siliceous concrete, silicon compounds comprised 50% or more of the aerosol mass. Releases of uranium and low-volatility fission-product elements were small in all tests. Releases of tellurium and neutron absorber materials (silver, indium, and boron from boron carbide) were high.

  20. Real-time aerosol data assimilation experiments during the 2014 FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ field mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) and Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field missions were conducted over the Front Range of Colorado during July and August, 2014. Prior to, and during this period, much of the continental US were impacted by smoke from Canadian and Pacific Northwest wildfires, including the Front Range. This study assesses the impact of real-time assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrievals from the MODIS instrument on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites within the Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) through comparisons of aerosol predictions with observations for two parallel forecasts that were conducted during FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ, one with and one without MODIS AOD assimilation. Results of these real-time assimilation experiments demonstrate that assimilation of MODIS AOD improves the prediction of large-scale smoke events such as those that occurred during July and August, 2014. These assimilation experiments help to guide the development of future operational aerosol forecasting systems within the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecasting System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) under development at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP).

  1. The influence of fog parameters on aerosol depletion measured in the KAEVER experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Poss, G.; Weber, D.; Fritsche, B.

    1995-12-31

    The release of radioactive aerosols in the environment is one of the most serious hazards in case of an accident in nuclear power plant. Many efforts have been made in the past in numerous experimental programs like NSPP, DEMONA, VANAM, LACE, MARVIKEN, others are still underway to improve the knowledge of the aerosol behavior and depletion in a reactor containment in order to estimate the possible source term and to validate computer codes. In the German single compartment KAEVER facility the influence of size distribution, morphology, composition and solubility on the aerosol behavior is investigated. One of the more specific items is to learn about {open_quotes}wet depletion{close_quotes} means, the aerosol depletion behavior in condensing atmospheres. There are no experiments known where the fog parameters like droplet size distribution, volume concentration, respectively airborne liquid water content have been measured in- and on-line explicitly. To the authors knowledge the use of the Battelle FASP photometer, which was developed especially for this reason, for the first time gives insight in condensation behavior under accident typical thermal hydraulic conditions. It delivers a basis for code validation in terms of a real comparison of measurements and calculations. The paper presents results from {open_quotes}wet depletion{close_quotes} aerosol experiments demonstrating how depletion velocity depends on the fog parameters and where obviously critical fog parameter seem to change the regime from a {open_quotes}pseudo dry depletion{close_quotes} at a relative humidity of 100% but quasi no or very low airborne liquid water content to a real {open_quotes}wet depletion{close_quotes} under the presence of fogs with varying densities. Characteristics are outlined how soluble and insoluble particles as well as aerosol mixtures behave under condensing conditions.

  2. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions: Part 1 - general equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2005-04-01

    formulations. Exemplary practical applications and model calculations illustrating the relevance of the above aspects will be presented in a companion paper (Ammann and Pöschl, 2005). We expect that the presented model framework will serve as a useful tool and basis for experimental and theoretical studies investigating and describing atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions. In particular, it is meant to support the planning and design of laboratory experiments for the elucidation and determination of kinetic parameters; the establishment, evaluation, and quality assurance of comprehensive and self-consistent collections of rate parameters; and the development of detailed master mechanisms for process models and the derivation of simplified but yet realistic parameterizations for atmospheric and climate models.

  3. The hydrological assessment of aerosol effects by the idealized airborne cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, B.; Chae, S.; Lee, C.; Choi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The main source of aerosols over East Asia including the Korean Peninsula is the anthropogenic emission of atmospheric pollutants transported from Chinese industrial areas. For this reason, the researches of aerosol effects are very active in East Asian countries. In case of South Korea, aircraft measurement campaigns and airborne cloud seeding experiments for the meteorological and environmental research have been conducted over the local area of Korean Peninsula since the year of 2010. This project is related with the weather modification research to build up strategies for the regulation or enhancement of precipitation and snowpack for a severe drought in South Korea during a winter season. For this study, the aerosol effect on precipitation by the airborne cloud seeding was simulated using WRF-CHEM model with RADM2/MADE,SORGAM modules. Emission data of 10000μg/(m2s) of unspeciated primary PM2.5 were input at 0.5km altitude for aerosol scenario cases which is the height of airborne cloud seeding experiment. For the control run, the original WRF model with no chemistry/aerosol modules was used. Also, the hydrological model, SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, USDA/ARS) is incorporated to evaluate this aerosol effects hydrologically for the enhancement of precipitation or snowfall from the results of WRF-CHEM model. The target area is the Andong dam basin (1,584 km2) which is known as one of the important water resources in southern part of South Korea. The date was chosen based on the conditions of airborne cloud seeding experiment (RH>50%, Low Temp.<-3°C, Wind Speeds<5m/s, etc). During the 24 forecasting hour, the aerosol scenario case showed more amounts of accumulated precipitation (about 12%) than those of control run. According to the analysis of SWAT, the enhancement of precipitation in aerosol scenario cases of WRF-CHEM model could influence the increase of about 1.0×106m3 water resources when we assumed the 10% of effective area over the Andong dam

  4. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1998-01-01

    Three SAGE III instruments are being built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado (USA). SAGE III is a fourth generation instrument that incorporates robust elements of its predecessors [SAM II, SAGE, SAGE II] while incorporating new design elements. The first of these will be launched aboard a Russian Meteor/3M platform in May 1999. SAGE III will add measurements of O2-A band from which density and temperature profiles are retrieved. This feature should improve refraction and Rayleigh computations over earlier. Additionally, the linear array of detectors will permit on-orbit wavelength calibration from observations of the exo-atmospheric solar Fraunhofer spectrum.

  5. Composition of carbonaceous smoke particles from prescribed burning of a Canadian boreal forest: 1. Organic aerosol characterization by gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, M.A.; Laterza, C.; Newman, L.; Daum, P.; Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S.; Winstead, E.L.

    1995-06-01

    In this study we examine the molecular organic constituents (C8 to C40 lipid compounds) collected as smoke particles from a Canadian boreal forest prescribed burn. Of special interest are (1) the molecular identity of polar organic aerosols, and (2) the amount of polar organic matter relative to the total mass of aerosol particulate carbon. Organic extracts of smoke aerosol particles show complex distributions of the lipid compounds when analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The molecular constituents present as smoke aerosol are grouped into non-polar (hydrocarbons) and polar {minus}2 oxygen atoms) subtractions. The dominant chemical species found in the boreal forest smoke aerosol are unaltered resin compounds (C20 terpenes) which are abundant in unburned conifer wood, plus thermally altered wood lignins and other polar aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results show that smoke aerosols contain molecular tracers which are related to the biofuel consumed. These smoke tracers can be related structurally back to the consumed softwood and hardwood vegetation. In addition, combustion of boreal forest materials produces smoke aerosol particles that are both oxygen-rich and chemically complex, yielding a carbonaceous aerosol matrix that is enriched in polar substances. As a consequence, emissions of carbonaceous smoke particles from large-scale combustion of boreal forest land may have a disproportionate effect on regional atmospheric chemistry and on cloud microphysical processes.

  6. The effect of carrier gas contaminants on the charging probability of aerosols under bipolar charging conditions.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Gerhard; Reischl, Georg P

    2012-12-01

    This work concentrates on the experimental determination of the properties of ionic molecular clusters that are produced in the bipolar ionic atmosphere of a radioactivity based (241)Am charger. The main scope of this study was to investigate the dependency of the ions' properties on carrier gas contaminants caused by the evaporation of trace gases from different kinds of frequently encountered tubing materials. A recently developed high resolution mobility spectrometer allows the precise determination of the ions' electrical mobility; an empirical mass-mobility relationship was used to approximate the corresponding ion masses. It was found that impurities in the carrier gas dramatically change the pattern of the ion mobility/size distribution, resulting in very different ion properties that strongly depend on the carrier gas composition. Since the ion properties control the charging process of aerosols, it was further investigated how the different ion properties affect the calculation of the charging probabilities of aerosols. The results show that despite large variations of the ions' properties, only a minor effect on the calculated charging probabilities can be found.

  7. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE 2013) - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Bernadett; Ansmann, Albert; Reitebuch, Oliver; Freudenthaler, Volker; Müller, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Althausen, Dietrich; Chouza, Fernando; Dollner, Maximilian; Farrell, David; Groß, Silke; Heinold, Bernd; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.; Omar, Ali; Prospero, Joseph; Sauer, Daniel; Schäfler, Andreas; Toledano, Carlos; Tegen, Ina

    2015-04-01

    Saharan mineral dust is regularly transported over long distances impacting air quality, health, weather and climate thousands of kilometers downwind of the Sahara. During transport, the properties of mineral dust may be modified thereby changing the associated impact on the radiation budget. Although mineral dust is of key importance for the climate system many questions such as the change of the dust size distribution during long-range transport, the role of wet and dry removal mechanisms, and the complex interaction between mineral dust and clouds remain open. To investigate the aging and modification of Saharan mineral dust during long-range transport across the Atlantic Ocean, the Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment (SALTRACE: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/saltrace) was conducted in June/July 2013. SALTRACE was designed as a closure experiment combining ground-based lidar, in-situ and sun photometer instruments deployed on Cape Verde, Barbados and Puerto Rico, with airborne measurements of the DLR research aircraft Falcon, satellite observations and model simulations. During SALTRACE, mineral dust from five dust outbreaks was studied under different atmospheric conditions and a unique data set on the chemical, microphysical and optical properties of aged mineral dust was gathered. For the first time, Lagrangian sampling of a dust plume in the Cape Verde area on 17 June 2013 which was again measured with the same instrumentation on 21 and 22 June 2013 near Barbados was realized. Further highlights of SALTRACE include the formation and evolution of tropical storm Chantal in a dusty environment and the interaction of dust with mixed-phase clouds. In our presentation, we give an overview of the SALTRACE study, discuss the meteorological situation and the dust transport during SALTRACE and highlight selected results from SALTRACE.

  8. Gas- and aerosol-phase chemistry of nitrogen oxides (NOy) in a pine forest (BEACHON-RoMBAS 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J.; Draper, D.; Zarzana, K. J.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, B.; Wagner, N.; Cohen, R. C.; Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Brune, W. H.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.

    2011-12-01

    Ambient measurements of NOy (NO2, peroxy- and alkyl-nitrates, and the gas/aerosol partitioning of the latter) and Potential Aerosol Mass measurements of NO3-initiated secondary organic aerosol formation in a 16 L flow-through reactor were made during the BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign in U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Observatory, Colorado (July/August 2011). A cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS) is used to monitor NO3 and N2O5 , Thermal Desorption - Laser Induced Fluorescence (TD-LIF) is used to detect the NOy species as NO2; an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) monitors chemical composition of aerosol; Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) monitors the gas-phase organic compounds; and a thermal converter/chemiluminescent NO/NOx/NH3 analyzer monitors gas-phase inorganic nitrogen compounds. In the PAM measurements, a calibrated flow of NO3 is supplied to the reactor from a temperature-controlled N2O5 trap. With this suite of measurements we seek to elucidate the role of nitrate in biogenic SOA formation, as well as the fate of pollution emissions in a forest environment. We observe significant concentrations of ambient alkyl- and peroxynitrates, despite the remote forest location, and find evidence in PAM measurements that formation of these compounds is linked to organic aerosol production.

  9. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  10. Ground-based aerosol characterization during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, J.; Rizzo, L. V.; Morgan, W. T.; Coe, H.; Johnson, B.; Haywood, J.; Longo, K.; Freitas, S.; Andreae, M. O.; Artaxo, P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols at ground level at a site heavily impacted by biomass burning. The site is located near Porto Velho, Rondônia, in the southwestern part of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, and was selected for the deployment of a large suite of instruments, among them an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor. Our measurements were made during the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA) field experiment, which consisted of a combination of aircraft and ground-based measurements over Brazil, aimed to investigate the impacts of biomass burning emissions on climate, air quality, and numerical weather prediction over South America. The campaign took place during the dry season and the transition to the wet season in September/October 2012. During most of the campaign, the site was impacted by regional biomass burning pollution (average CO mixing ratio of 0.6 ppm), occasionally superimposed by intense (up to 2 ppm of CO), freshly emitted biomass burning plumes. Aerosol number concentrations ranged from ~1000 cm-3 to peaks of up to 35 000 cm-3 (during biomass burning (BB) events, corresponding to an average submicron mass mean concentrations of 13.7 μg m-3 and peak concentrations close to 100 μg m-3. Organic aerosol strongly dominated the submicron non-refractory composition, with an average concentration of 11.4 μg m-3. The inorganic species, NH4, SO4, NO3, and Cl, were observed, on average, at concentrations of 0.44, 0.34, 0.19, and 0.01 μg m-3, respectively. Equivalent black carbon (BCe) ranged from 0.2 to 5.5 μg m-3, with an average concentration of 1.3 μg m-3. During BB peaks, organics accounted for over 90% of total mass (submicron non-refractory plus BCe), among the highest values described in the literature. We examined the ageing of biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) using the changes in the H : C and O : C ratios, and found that throughout most of the aerosol processing (O : C &cong

  11. Aerosol hygroscopicity and cloud droplet activation of extracts of filters from biomass burning experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrico, Christian M.; Petters, Markus D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; Engling, Guenter; Malm, William C.

    2008-04-01

    In this laboratory closure study, we compare sub- and supersaturated water uptake properties for aerosol particles possessing a range of hygroscopicity. Measurements for water sub-saturated conditions used a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA). Simultaneously, measurements of particle critical supersaturation were conducted on the same sample stream with a continuous flow cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter. For these experiments, we used filter-collected samples of biomass smoke generated in the combustion of two common wildland fire fuels, western sagebrush and Alaskan duff core. Extractions of separate sections of the filter were performed using two solvents, ultrapure water and methanol. The extracts were subsequently atomized, producing aerosols having a range of hygroscopic responses. HTDMA and CCN measurements were fit to a single-parameter model of water uptake, in which the fit parameter is denoted κ, the hygroscopicity parameter. Here, for the four extracts we observed mean values of the hygroscopicity parameter of 0.06 < κ < 0.30, similar to the range found previously for numerous pure organic compounds. Particles generated from the aqueous extracts of the filters had consistently larger κ than methanol extracts, while western sagebrush extract aerosols κ exceeded those from Alaskan duff core. HTDMA- and CCN-derived values of κ for each experiment agreed within approximately 20%. Applicability of the κ-parameterization to other multicomponent aerosols relevant to the atmosphere remains to be tested.

  12. Gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol emissions: (1) Gasoline vehicle exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew A.; Presto, Albert A.; Hennigan, Christopher J.; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2013-10-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from fifty-one light-duty gasoline vehicles (model years 1987-2012) was investigated at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory. Each vehicle was operated over the cold-start unified cycle on a chassis dynamometer and its emissions were sampled using a constant volume sampler. Four independent yet complementary approaches were used to investigate POA gas-particle partitioning: sampling artifact correction of quartz filter data, dilution from the constant volume sampler into a portable environmental chamber, heating in a thermodenuder, and thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of quartz filter samples. This combination of techniques allowed gas-particle partitioning measurements to be made across a wide range of atmospherically relevant conditions - temperatures of 25-100 °C and organic aerosol concentrations of <1-600 μg m-3. The gas-particle partitioning of the POA emissions varied continuously over this entire range of conditions and essentially none of the POA should be considered non-volatile. Furthermore, for most vehicles, the low levels of dilution used in the constant volume sampler created particle mass concentrations that were greater than a factor of 10 or higher than typical ambient levels. This resulted in large and systematic partitioning biases in the POA emission factors compared to more dilute atmospheric conditions, as the POA emission rates may be over-estimated by nearly a factor of four due to gas-particle partitioning at higher particle mass concentrations. A volatility distribution was derived to quantitatively describe the measured gas-particle partitioning data using absorptive partitioning theory. Although the POA emission factors varied by more than two orders of magnitude across the test fleet, the vehicle-to-vehicle differences in gas-particle partitioning were modest. Therefore, a single volatility distribution

  13. Gas Dynamics, Characterization, and Calibration of Fast Flow Flight Cascade Impactor Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCM) for Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.R.; Thorpe, A. N.; James, C.; Michael, A.; Ware, M.; Senftle, F.; Smith, S.

    1997-01-01

    During recent high altitude flights, we have tested the aerosol section of the fast flow flight cascade impactor quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) on loan to Howard University from NASA. The aerosol mass collected during these flights was disappointingly small. Increasing the flow through the QCM did not correct the problem. It was clear that the instrument was not being operated under proper conditions for aerosol collect ion primarily because the gas dynamics is not well understood. A laboratory study was therefore undertaken using two different fast flow QCM's in an attempt to establish the gas flow characteristics of the aerosol sections and its effect on particle collection, Some tests were made at low temperatures but most of the work reported here was carried out at room temperature. The QCM is a cascade type impactor originally designed by May (1945) and later modified by Anderson (1966) and Mercer et al (1970) for chemical gas analysis. The QCM has been used extensively for collecting and sizing stratospheric aerosol particles. In this paper all flow rates are given or corrected and referred to in terms of air at STP. All of the flow meters were kept at STP. Although there have been several calibration and evaluation studies of moderate flow cascade impactors of less than or equal to 1 L/rein., there is little experimental information on the gas flow characteristics for fast flow rates greater than 1 L/rein.

  14. Dust and polluted aerosol impacts on diazotrophy during a mesocosm experiment in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahav, Eyal; Herut, Barak; Liu, Hongbin; Guo, Cui; Cheung, Isaac; Psarra, Stella; Lagaria, Anna; Tsiola, Anastasia; Tsagaraki, Tanya; Pitta, Paraskevi; Mulholland, Margaret; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric inputs of nutrients via dust and aerosols to the surface ocean layer are considered to contribute greatly to dinitrogen (N2) fixation and to primary productivity. N2 fixation rates in the Mediterranean Sea are typically low and the parameters limiting this process are still unclear. Addition of dust analogs to a mesocosm experiment in the Western Mediterranean Sea (DUNE) enhanced N2 fixation by 3 to 5 fold. However, in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, an area highly exposed to Saharan dust and aerosol, the impact of these inputs on N2 fixation from onboard microcosm experiment are unclear and inconclusive. We examined the influence of Saharan dust (1.6 mg L-1) and polluted aerosol (1 mg L-1) additions on diazotroph populations and N2 fixation rates in nine 3 m3 mesocosms (MESOAQUA project) using the enriched seawater method of 15N uptake. The enrichments induced an immediate 2-4 fold increase in N2 fixation (measured from 6 to 48 h after enrichments). After 4 days, N2 fixation rates returned to their background level and no significant change was observed relative to the control mesocosms. The increase in N2 fixation rates were reflected in the differential composition of diazotrophs. Dust enrichment enhanced the abundance of the filamentous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp., while aerosol addition predominantly enhanced the presence of heterotrophic diazotrophs including Pseudomonas and Desulfovibrio. Our results indicate that sources of nutrients supplied via Saharan dust and polluted aerosol pulses to the stratified surface Eastern Mediterranean waters could increase the contribution of diazotrophs and N2 fixation in these ultraoligotrophic waters and impact productivity and biogeochemical cycling.

  15. Secondary organic aerosol formation from the gas phase reaction of hydroxyl radicals with m-, o- and p-cresol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Françoise; Coeur-Tourneur, Cecile; Ledoux, Frédéric; Tomas, Alexandre; Menu, Dominique

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation during the atmospheric oxidation of cresols was investigated using a large smog chamber (8000 L), at atmospheric pressure, 294±2 K and low relative humidity (6-10%). Cresol oxidation was initiated by irradiation of cresol/CH 3ONO/NO/air mixtures. The cresol loss was measured by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and the temporal evolution of the aerosol was monitored using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The overall organic aerosol yield ( Y) was determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses ( Mo) to the total reacted cresol concentrations assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm -3. Analysis of the data clearly show that Y is a strong function of Mo and that SOA formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. The aerosol formation is affected by the initial cresol concentration, which leads to aerosol yields from 9% to 42%. These results are in good agreement with a recent study performed on SOA formation from the photo-oxidation of o-cresol in a smog chamber. To our knowledge, the present work represents the first investigation of SOA formation from OH reaction with m- and p-cresol.

  16. AATSR Single View Satellite Aerosol Retrievals Over the Persian Gulf During the 2004 United Arabic Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoemaker, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    During the months of August and September 2004 the United Arabic Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) mission took place in the marine and desert region of the United Arabic Emirates. One of the primary goals of the mission was to evaluate and improve scientific based satellite aerosol and ocean retrieval products. Important aspect was the calibration and validation of remote sensing systems in order to gain more insight in space-based retrievals over this part of the region. This paper contributes to part of the space-based mission objectives and governs the retrieval of atmospheric aerosol properties over water through data from the AATSR instrument on board the European ENVISAT satellite. At TNO Defence, Security and Safety the retrieval of aerosol properties from AATSR is performed by means of the dual view algorithm for application over land and the single view algorithm for application over ocean. Both algorithms have been merged into a fast and efficient algorithm that allows for near real-time processing and which is suitable for semi-operational use. Data from retrievals over water have been compared with ground-truth measurements from the AERONET sun photometers present for the three water sites in the Persian Gulf during the campaign. The properties retrieved are a) aerosol optical depth for the visible wavelengths of AATSR and b) the Ångström wavelength coefficient α as an indicator for the size distribution. Different aerosol types have been pre-modeled by means of AERONET phase function information, and saved as look-up tables for the retrieval procedure. By comparing the satellite retrieved information with the ground-truth data for each of the modeled aerosol type more insight in the retrieval procedure and in the aerosol make-up in this region is obtained.

  17. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    -ToF-MS) were used to quantify OA and VOC emissions, respectively. SOA production potential of the different emissions was quantified by introducing them into the PSI mobile smog chamber and a potential aerosol chamber (PAM) where they were photochemically aged. The measurements of primary emissions suggest that the COA factor identified in ambient atmospheric aerosols is mostly related to fat release from frying with vegetable oils or grilling fatty-meats. In contrast, vegetable cooking (boiling and frying) was associated with significant VOC emissions. The VOC emissions from frying consist mainly of aldehydes which are formed through breaking of fatty acids. Gas phase composition, emission factors and SAPP from all these processes will be presented. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation as well as the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n.° 290605 (COFUND: PSI-FELLOW). J. Allan et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 647-668 (2010) X.-F. Huang et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 8933-8945 (2010) Y.-L. Sun et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 1581-1602 (2011)

  18. Raman lidar and sun photometer measurements of aerosols and water vapor during the ARM RCS experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R. A.; Whiteman, D. N.; Melfi, S. H.; Evans, K. D.; Holben, B. N.

    1995-01-01

    The first Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Remote Cloud Study (RCS) Intensive Operations Period (IOP) was held during April 1994 at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. This experiment was conducted to evaluate and calibrate state-of-the-art, ground based remote sensing instruments and to use the data acquired by these instruments to validate retrieval algorithms developed under the ARM program. These activities are part of an overall plan to assess general circulation model (GCM) parameterization research. Since radiation processes are one of the key areas included in this parameterization research, measurements of water vapor and aerosols are required because of the important roles these atmospheric constituents play in radiative transfer. Two instruments were deployed during this IOP to measure water vapor and aerosols and study their relationship. The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) acquired water vapor and aerosol profile data during 15 nights of operations. The lidar acquired vertical profiles as well as nearly horizontal profiles directed near an instrumented 60 meter tower. Aerosol optical thickness, phase function, size distribution, and integrated water vapor were derived from measurements with a multiband automatic sun and sky scanning radiometer deployed at this site.

  19. The Interstellar Gas Experiment: Analysis in progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, F.; Lind, D. L.; Geiss, J.; Eugster, O.

    1993-01-01

    The Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) exposed thin metallic foils aboard the LDEF spacecraft in low Earth orbit in order to collect neutral interstellar particles which penetrate the solar system due to their motion relative to the sun. By mechanical penetration these atoms were imbedded in the collecting foils along with precipitating magnetospheric ions and, possibly, with ambient atmospheric atoms. During the entire LDEF mission, seven of these foils collected particles arriving from seven different directions as seen from the spacecraft. After the foils were returned to Earth, a mass spectrometric analysis of the noble gas component of the trapped particles was begun. The isotopes of He-3, He-4, Ne-20, and Ne-22 were detected. We have given a first account of the experiment. In order to infer the isotopic ratios in the interstellar medium from the concentrations found in the foils, several lines of investigation had to be initiated. The flux of ambient atmospheric noble gas atoms moving toward the foils due to the orbital motion of LDEF was estimated by detailed calculations. Any of these particles which evaded the baffles in the IGE collector could be entrapped in the foils as a background flux. However, the calculations have shown that this flux is negligible, which was the intent of the experiment hardware design. This conclusion is supported by the measurements. However, both the concentration of trapped helium and its impact energy indicate that the flux of magnetospheric ions which was captured was larger than had been expected. In fact, it appears that the magnetospheric particles constitute the largest fraction of the particles in the foils. Since little is known about this particle flux, their presence in the IGE foils appears fortunate. The analysis of these particles provides information about their isotropic composition and average flux.

  20. Using multidimensional gas chromatography to group secondary organic aerosol species by functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Rosa M.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2014-10-01

    A carbon number-functionality grid (CNFG) for a complex mixture of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors and oxidation products was developed from the theoretical retention index diagram of a multidimensional gas chromatographic (GC × 2GC) analysis of a mixture of SOA precursors and derivatized oxidation products. In the GC × 2GC analysis, comprehensive separation of the complex mixture was achieved by diverting the modulated effluent from a polar primary column into 2 polar secondary columns. Column stationary phases spanned the widest range of selectivity of commercially available GC analytic columns. In general, separation of the species by the polar primary column was by the number of carbon atoms in the molecule (when the homologous series of reference compounds was selected to have molecular volumes and functionalities similar to the target analytes) and the polar secondary columns provided additional separation according to functionality. An algebraic transformation of the Abraham solvation parameter model was used to estimate linear retention indices of solutes relative to elution of a homologous series of methyl diesters on the primary and secondary columns to develop the theoretical GC × 2GC retention diagram. Retention indices of many of the oxidation products of SOA precursors were estimated for derivatized forms of the solutes. The GC stationary phases selected for the primary column [(50%-Trifluoropropyl)-methylpolysiloxane] and secondary columns (90% Cyanopropyl Polysilphenylene-siloxane and Polyethylene Glycol in a Sol-Gel matrix) provided a theoretical separation of 33 SOA precursors and 98 derivatized oxidation products into 35 groups by molecular volume and functionality. Comprehensive analysis of extracts of vapor and aerosol samples containing semivolatile SOA precursors and oxidation products, respectively, is best accomplished by (1) separating the complex mixture of the vapor and underivatized aerosol extracts with a (50

  1. Direct containment heating and aerosol generation during high pressure melt ejection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Washington, K.E.; Pilch, M.; Marx, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    Containment loading in the form of increased atmosphere pressure and temperature during a severe reactor accident can result from the expulsion of core debris from the reactor cavity. This increase in the pressure and temperature can be accompanied by an aerosol source term that may have enhanced compositions of the more volatile radionuclide. Large scale experiments have been conducted in the Surtsey facility at Sandia National Laboratories to study the energy exchange processes and the generation of aerosols. Test results are reported here and compared to analytical predictions made by an experiment analysis code and a containment response model. The experiments show that the energy exchange and aerosol generation processes are greatly affected by trapping of the debris on the surfaces of the test chamber. Good agreement is achieved between experimental data and model predictions by incorporating models for debris trapping on surfaces and the formation of the retained material into drops that fall through the chamber at late time. 23 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. First Results From the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.; Atreya, S.; Carignan, G.; Bauer, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens Probe of the Cassini Huygens Mission entered the atmosphere of the moon Titan on January 14,2005. The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and to support the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns. The mass spectrometer employed five electron impact ion sources with available electron energies of either 70 or 25 eV. Three ion sources served as detectors for the GC columns and two were dedicated to direct atmosphere sampling and ACP gas sampling, respectively. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and served to evaporate surface constituents after impact.

  3. Gas Chromatographic Detectors for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Humphry, Donald E.; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ chemical analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. Future missions to Mars', comets, or planetary moons such as Europa, will perform experiments with complex analyses. In addition, instrumentation for such missions must perform under severely restricted conditions with limited resources. To meet these analytical requirements, improved methods and highly sensitive yet smaller instruments must continually be developed with increasingly greater capabilities. We describe here efforts to achieve this objective, for past and future missions, through the development of new or the improvement of existing sensitive, miniaturized gas chromatographic detectors.

  4. Aerosol and gas-phase characteristics in relation to meteorology: Case studies in populated arid settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, Ewan Colin

    Atmospheric aerosols and trace gases are a highly relevant component of the climate system affecting atmospheric radiative transfer and the hydrologic cycle. In arid and semi-arid regions, where cloud cover is often low and precipitation is generally scarce and sporadic, the driving processes accounting for the production, loss and transport of atmospheric constituents are often distinctly different from other climates. In arid regions, the same circulation dynamics that suppress cloud formation can be responsible for creating strong subsidence inversions, which cap atmospheric mixing and trap pollutants close to the surface, often placing populated arid regions high on global rankings of air pollution concerns. In addition, low soil moisture can encourage wind-blown dust emissions, which can be a significant fraction of the total aerosol loading in both coarse and fine modes on a mass basis. Three distinct focus regions are investigated over varying time scales, using a diverse set of techniques, and with wide-ranging primary goals. 1) the Tehran metropolitan area in Iran over a ten-year period from 2000-2009, 2) Tucson, Arizona over 2012-2014 with three intensive monitoring periods during summer 2014 and winter 2015 and 3) the San Joaquin Valley in California during the NASA DISCOVER-AQ campaign during Jan-Feb 2013. However, in all cases, local and regional scale meteorology play a significant role in controlling the spatiotemporal variability in trace gas and aerosol concentrations. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding transport pathways due to the local wind patterns and the importance of key meteorological parameters such as temperature, humidity and solar radiation on controlling production and loss mechanisms. While low in magnitude, the precipitation pattern is still an important sink mechanism that modulates gas phase and particle abundances in all three regions, either through scavenging or by promoting vertical mixing. The reported measurements

  5. Characterization of mineral dust aerosols during the Saharan Dust Experiment (SHADE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon, J.-F.; Tanré, D.; Haywood, J.; Pelon, J.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    2003-04-01

    Aerosols are known to be important in determining the Earth’s radiative balance. Dust aerosols are particularly interesting since, in addition to their scattering and absorbing properties that affect the solar radiation, they also perturb the terrestrial radiation. In addition, recent studies have shown that a significant proportion of mineral dust in the atmosphere may be of anthropogenic origin and therefore they may have an important role in climate change by exerting a significant radiative forcing. The Saharan Dust Experiment was designed to better determine the parameters that are relevant for computing the direct radiative effect of mineral dust. Two aircraft combining in situ measurements and remote sensing instruments were coordinated with satellite overpasses during the experiment which was based in Cape Verde during the period September 20-28, 2000. These in-situ and remotely sensed data provide valuable information on the microphysical, optical properties and radiative effects of a very large mineral dust outbreak with aerosol optical thickness up to 1.5. A new approach based on a synergy between active (lidar) and passive (spaceborne radiometer) remote sensing has been used to investigate the vertical structure of the dust plume. The retrieved profiles of extinction compare well with in situ aircraft measurements. Profiles derived from lidar measurements on September 25 highlight the presence of the so-called Saharan Air Layer, located between 2.2 and 4.5 km. Another dust layer within the sub-Saharan transition layer over the marine boundary layer is also observed. In this second layer, the effective radius of particles is significantly smaller than in the aloft layer. The trajectory analyses and the Total Mapping Ozone Spectrometer Aerosol Index suggest that the aerosols present at 1500m originates from West Mauritania. The higher aerosol layer originates from southern Algeria which confirms the difference of altitude of the dust transport

  6. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  7. Reactions of Volatile Furandiones, Aldehydes and Water Vapor in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and in Gas Chromatography Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, C. A.; Fillo, J. D.; Ries, K. A.; Sanchez, J. T.; de Haan, D. O.

    2004-05-01

    Volatile furandiones and aldehydes are important atmospheric oxidation products of simple aromatic compounds found in gasoline. A mechanism of secondary organic aerosol formation by furandiones was identified using particle chamber observations and FTIR measurements of model condensed phases. Growth of inorganic seed aerosol was monitored by scanning mobility particle sizing in the presence of humidity and high concentrations of 2,5-furandione (maleic anhydride), 3-methyl-2,5-furandione (citraconic anhydride), benzaldehyde, and trans-cinnamaldehyde. Particle growth began when the gas-phase saturation level of each organic compound (relative to its pure liquid) and water vapor, when summed together, reached a threshold near one. This threshold implies that equilibrium is established between the gas phase and a newly formed, mixed condensed phase containing both organic compounds and water. This equilibrium appears to be governed by Raoult's Law, where the vapor pressure of each component is reduced proportionally to its mole fraction in the condensed phase. However, bulk liquid phase experiments showed that these organics are immiscible with water at the mole fractions expected in the particle phase in our chamber experiments. Thus, non-reactive condensation of these compounds into a mixed organic / aqueous phase is ruled out. Instead, we show that reactions between furandiones and water produce unusually strong dicarboxylic acids: cis-methylbutenedioic acid (citraconic acid) and cis-butenedioic acid (maleic acid). Bulk phase pH microprobe and FTIR attenuated total reflectance measurements demonstrated that an aqueous phase is rapidly acidified during exposure to furandiones. In addition, the presence of furandiones also greatly increased benzaldehyde solubility. This solubility increase has two causes. First, the entry of maleate (or methylmaleate) ions into the water layer lowers the polarity of the phase. Second, the increase in acidity may enhance reactivity at

  8. Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Precursors Using Two-Dimensional Gas-Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskamp, M.; Lou, W.; Pankow, J. F.; Harley, P. C.; Turnipseed, A.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) plays a role in both regional and global air quality. However, field and laboratory research indicate that the body of knowledge around the identities, quantities and oxidation processes of these compounds in the ambient atmosphere is still incomplete (e.g., Goldstein & Galbally, 2007; Robinson et al., 2009). VOCs emitted to the atmosphere largely are of biogenic origin (Guenther et al., 2006), and many studies of ambient secondary organic aerosol (SOA) suggest that SOA is largely of biogenic origin (albeit closely connected to anthropogenic activities, e.g., de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Accurate modeling of SOA levels and properties will require a more complete understanding of biogenic VOCs (BOCs) and their atmospheric oxidation products. For example, satellite measurements indicate that biogenic VOC emissions are two to three times greater than levels currently included in models (Heald et al., 2010). Two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) is a powerful analytical technique that shows much promise in advancing the state-of-knowledge regarding BVOCs and their role in SOA formation. In this work, samples were collected during BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere Interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) in July and August of 2011. The field site was a Ponderosa Pine forest near Woodland, CO, inside the Manitou Experimental Forest, which is operated by the US Forest Service. The area is characteristic of the central Rocky Mountains and trace gas monitoring indicates that little anthropogenic pollution is transported from the nearby urban areas (Kim et al. 2010 and references therein). Ambient and enclosure samples were collected on ATD (adsorption/thermal desorption) cartridges and analyzed for BVOCs using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) with time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) and flame ionized detection (FID). Measurements of

  9. Organic peroxides' gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming; Huang, Liubin; Huang, Dao

    2016-02-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, promote secondary organic aerosol (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigated in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydromethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA), and total peroxides (TPOs, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in α-pinene/O3 SOA. Comparing the gas-phase peroxides with the particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than the values from the theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in SOA formation than previously expected. Here, the partitioning coefficients of TPO were determined to be as high as (2-3) × 10-4 m3 µg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water changes the distribution of gaseous peroxides, while it does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or the particle phase. Approx. 18 % of gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially explain the unexpectedly high H2O2 yields under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also preserves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  10. Organic peroxides gas-particle partitioning and rapid heterogeneous decomposition on secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, L. B.; Huang, D.

    2015-10-01

    Organic peroxides, important species in the atmosphere, will promote secondary organic aerosols (SOA) aging, affect HOx radicals cycling, and cause adverse health effects. However, the formation, gas-particle partitioning, and evolution of organic peroxides are extremely complicated and still unclear. In this study, we investigate in the laboratory the production and gas-particle partitioning of peroxides from the ozonolysis of α-pinene, which is one of the major biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere and is an important precursor for SOA at a global scale. We have determined the molar yields of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), peroxyformic acid (PFA), peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and total peroxides (TPO, including unknown peroxides) and the fraction of peroxides in SOA. Comparing the gas-phase and particle-phase peroxides, we find that gas-particle partitioning coefficients of PFA and PAA are 104 times higher than theoretical prediction, indicating that organic peroxides play a more important role in the SOA formation than expected previously. Here, we give the partitioning coefficients of TPO as (2-3) × 10-4 m3μg-1. Even so, more than 80 % of the peroxides formed in the reaction remain in the gas phase. Water does not affect the total amount of peroxides in either the gas or particle phase, but can change the distribution of gaseous peroxides. About 18 % gaseous peroxides undergo rapid heterogeneous decomposition on SOA particles in the presence of water vapor, resulting in the additional production of H2O2. This process can partially interpret the unexpected high H2O2 yield under wet conditions. Transformation of organic peroxides to H2O2 also saves OH in the atmosphere, helping to improve the understanding of OH cycling.

  11. The Landes experiment: Biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of ozone and aerosol particles above a pine forest

    SciTech Connect

    Lamaud, E.; Labatut, A.; Lopez, A.; Fontan, J.; Druilhet, A.; Brunet, Y.

    1994-08-20

    An experiment to measure the transfer of trace gases in the lower atmosphere was performed in the forested area of {open_quotes} Les Landes {close_quotes} in southwestern France. This region is one of the largest remaining forests in western Europe, and consists predominantly of resinous trees (maritime pines). This experiment involved emission measurements of chemically reactive species, measurement methodologies, mechanisms for flux and the influence of these emissions on boundary layer chemistry. This paper presents preliminary results on the dry deposition of ozone and aerosol particles in the boundary layer. 28 refs., 15 figs.

  12. Aerosols, clouds, and precipitation in the North Atlantic trades observed during the Barbados aerosol cloud experiment - Part 1: Distributions and variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunsil; Albrecht, Bruce A.; Feingold, Graham; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Chuang, Patrick; Donaher, Shaunna L.

    2016-07-01

    Shallow marine cumulus clouds are by far the most frequently observed cloud type over the Earth's oceans; but they are poorly understood and have not been investigated as extensively as stratocumulus clouds. This study describes and discusses the properties and variations of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation associated with shallow marine cumulus clouds observed in the North Atlantic trades during a field campaign (Barbados Aerosol Cloud Experiment- BACEX, March-April 2010), which took place off Barbados where African dust periodically affects the region. The principal observing platform was the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter (TO) research aircraft, which was equipped with standard meteorological instruments, a zenith pointing cloud radar and probes that measured aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics.The temporal variation and vertical distribution of aerosols observed from the 15 flights, which included the most intense African dust event during all of 2010 in Barbados, showed a wide range of aerosol conditions. During dusty periods, aerosol concentrations increased substantially in the size range between 0.5 and 10 µm (diameter), particles that are large enough to be effective giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The 10-day back trajectories showed three distinct air masses with distinct vertical structures associated with air masses originating in the Atlantic (typical maritime air mass with relatively low aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer), Africa (Saharan air layer), and mid-latitudes (continental pollution plumes). Despite the large differences in the total mass loading and the origin of the aerosols, the overall shapes of the aerosol particle size distributions were consistent, with the exception of the transition period.The TO was able to sample many clouds at various phases of growth. Maximum cloud depth observed was less than ˜ 3 km, while most clouds were less than 1 km

  13. Gas-grain simulation experiment module conceptual design and gas-grain simulation facility breadboard development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamel, James M.; Petach, Michael; Gat, Nahum; Kropp, Jack; Luong, Christina; Wolff, Michael

    1993-01-01

    This report delineates the Option portion of the Phase A Gas-Grain Simulation Facility study. The conceptual design of a Gas-Grain Simulation Experiment Module (GGSEM) for Space Shuttle Middeck is discussed. In addition, a laboratory breadboard was developed during this study to develop a key function for the GGSEM and the GGSF, specifically, a solid particle cloud generating device. The breadboard design and test results are discussed and recommendations for further studies are included. The GGSEM is intended to fly on board a low earth orbit (LEO), manned platform. It will be used to perform a subset of the experiments planned for the GGSF for Space Station Freedom, as it can partially accommodate a number of the science experiments. The outcome of the experiments performed will provide an increased understanding of the operational requirements for the GGSF. The GGSEM will also act as a platform to accomplish technology development and proof-of-principle experiments for GGSF hardware, and to verify concepts and designs of hardware for GGSF. The GGSEM will allow assembled subsystems to be tested to verify facility level operation. The technology development that can be accommodated by the GGSEM includes: GGSF sample generation techniques, GGSF on-line diagnostics techniques, sample collection techniques, performance of various types of sensors for environmental monitoring, and some off-line diagnostics. Advantages and disadvantages of several LEO platforms available for GGSEM applications are identified and discussed. Several of the anticipated GGSF experiments require the deagglomeration and dispensing of dry solid particles into an experiment chamber. During the GGSF Phase A study, various techniques and devices available for the solid particle aerosol generator were reviewed. As a result of this review, solid particle deagglomeration and dispensing were identified as key undeveloped technologies in the GGSF design. A laboratory breadboard version of a solid

  14. Formation of Secondary Particulate Matter by Reactions of Gas Phase Hexanal with Sulfate Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of secondary particulate matter from the atmospheric oxidation of organic compounds can significantly contribute to the particulate burden, but the formation of organic secondary particulate matter is poorly understood. One way of producing organic secondary particulate matter is the oxidation of hydrocarbons with seven or more carbon atoms to get products with low vapor pressure. However, several recent reports suggest that relatively low molecular weight carbonyls can enter the particle phase by undergoing heterogeneous reactions. This may be a very important mechanism for the formation of organic secondary particulate matter. Atmospheric aldehydes are important carbonyls in the gas phase, which form via the oxidation of hydrocarbons emitted from anthropogenic and biogenic sources. In this poster, we report the results on particle growth by the heterogeneous reactions of hexanal. A 5 L Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is set up to conduct the reactions in the presence of seed aerosol particles of deliquesced ammonia bisulfate. Hexanal is added into CSTR by syringe pump, meanwhile the concentrations of hexanal are monitored with High Pressure Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC 1050). A differential Mobility Analyzer (TSI 3071) set to an appropriate voltage is employed to obtain monodisperse aerosols, and another DMA associated with a Condensation Nuclear Counter (TSI 7610) is used to measure the secondary particle size distribution by the reaction in CSTR. This permits the sensitive determination of particle growth due to the heterogeneous reaction, very little growth occurs when hexanal added alone. Results for the simultaneous addition of hexanal and alcohols will also be presented.

  15. Aerosol Radiative Effects: Expected Variations in Optical Depth Spectra and Climate Forcing, with Implications for Closure Experiment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Stowe, L. L.; Hobbs, P. V.; Podolske, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We examine measurement strategies for reducing uncertainties in aerosol direct radiative forcing by focused experiments that combine surface, air, and space measurements. Particularly emphasized are closure experiments, which test the degree of agreement among different measurements and calculations of aerosol properties and radiative effects. By combining results from previous measurements of large-scale smokes, volcanic aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols with models of aerosol evolution, we estimate the spatial and temporal variability in optical depth spectra to be expected in the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, planned for summer 1996 off the Eastern U.S. seaboard). In particular, we examine the expected changes in the wavelength dependence of optical depth as particles evolve through nucleation, growth by condensation and coagulation, and removal via sedimentation. We then calculate the expected radiative climate forcing (i.e. change in net radiative flux) for typical expected aerosols and measurement conditions (e.g. solar elevations, surface albedos, radiometer altitudes). These calculations use new expressions for flux and albedo changes, which account not only for aerosol absorption, but also for instantaneous solar elevation angles and the dependence of surface albedo on solar elevation. These factors, which are usually ignored or averaged in calculations of global aerosol effects, can have a strong influence on fluxes measured in closure experiments, and hence must be accounted for in calculations if closure is to be convincingly tested. We compare the expected measurement signal to measurement uncertainties expected for various techniques in various conditions. Thereby we derive recommendations for measurement strategies that combine surface, airborne, and spaceborne measurements.

  16. Inference of stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from SAGE II satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Fuller, W. H.; Yue, G. K.; Swissler, T. J.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for inferring stratospheric aerosol composition and size distribution from the water vapor concentration and aerosol extinction measurements obtained in the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the associated temperature from the NMC. The aerosols are assumed to be sulfuric acid-water droplets. A modified Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to determine model size distribution parameters based on the SAGE II multiwavelength aerosol extinctions. It is found that the best aerosol size information is contained in the aerosol radius range between about 0.25 and 0.80 micron.

  17. MODELING AEROSOL FORMATION FROM ALPHA-PINENE + NOX IN THE PRESENCE OF NATURAL SUNLIGHT USING GAS PHASE KINETICS AND GAS-PARTICLE PARTITIONING THEORY. (R826771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic mechanism was used to link and model the gas-phase reactions and
    aerosol accumulation resulting from src="/ncer/pubs/images/alpha.gif">-pinene reactions in the presence of sunlight,
    ozone (O3), and oxides of nitrogen
    (NO

  18. A "Greenhouse Gas" Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Elaine; Paul, Melissa; Como, Charles; Barat, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This experiment and analysis offer an effective experience in greenhouse gas reduction. Ammoniated water is flowed counter-current to a simulated flue gas of air and CO2 in a packed column. The gaseous CO2 concentrations are measured with an on-line, non- dispersive, infrared analyzer. Column operating parameters include total gas flux, dissolved…

  19. The effects of bronchodilator-inhaler aerosol propellants on respiratory gas monitors.

    PubMed

    Elliot, W R; Raemer, D B; Goldman, D B; Philip, J H

    1991-04-01

    Spurious readings from a mass spectrometer have been reported following the administration of aerosol bronchodilators. We quantified the response of various respiratory gas analyzers to the aerosol propellant of albuterol inhalant (Proventil). The mass spectrometer systems tested, two Advantage systems, a SARA system, and a Model 6000 Ohmeda system, all displayed artifactual readings in response to the albuterol propellant. Each metered dose of the Proventil brand of albuterol contains 4 ml of Freon 11 (trichloromonofluoromethane) and 11 ml of Freon 12 (dichlorodifluoromethane). The concentration of propellant was expressed in doses/L, where each liter of gas contains 0.4 vol % of Freon 11 and 1.1 vol % of Freon 12 per dose. In proportion to the concentration of albuterol propellant, the two Advantage systems showed substantial readings of isoflurane (%) when no isoflurane was present (13% and 16% per dose/L) and reduced readings of enflurane (-8% and -10% per dose/L) and carbon dioxide (CO2) (-3 and +5 mm Hg per dose/L). The SARA system showed substantial CO2 readings when no CO2 was present (5 mm Hg per dose/L) and displayed small enflurane readings (0.1% per dose/L) when no enflurane was present. The Model 6000 unit showed CO2 readings when no CO2 was present (5 mm Hg per dose/L). Neither the Raman spectrometer, the infrared spectrometers, nor the piezoadsorptive analyzer we tested showed an artifactual effect of albuterol propellant on any of its readings. Simulation and clinical tests demonstrated that a single dose of albuterol propellant into a breathing circuit at the onset of inspiration resulted in concentrations of 0.8 and 0.3 dose/L, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1906529

  20. Comparison of In Situ Aerosol Data from the ACE-Asia 2001 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Pietras, C.; Miller, M. A.; Reynolds, R. M.; Frouin, R.; Quinn, P. K.; Deschamps, P. Y.; Werdell, P. J.; Fargion, G. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) is an international, multidisciplinary project to further knowledge about atmospheric aerosols. ACE-Asia included an intensive field measurement campaign during the spring of 2001 off the coasts of China, Japan and Korea. The Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) Project participated in the ACE-Asia cruise of the R/V Ronald H. Brown, which departed from Hawaii on 2001/03/15, sailed west to the Sea of Japan, and finished in Yokosuka, Japan on 2001/04/19. The SIMBIOS Project compares and merges data projects from multiple ocean color missions. As In Situ data are essential for merger and comparison of satellite ocean color measurements, the Project is interested in instrumentation devopment and data base building. The SeaWiFS Bio-optical Archive and Storage System (SeaBASS) is the database used and maintained by the SIMBIOS project. The ACE-Asia cruise was an excellent opportunity to compare data from a variety of maritime sun photometers, as several aerosol conditions were experienced. These included low Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) maritime conditions near Hawaii and extremely high AOT dust conditions in the Sea of Japan. Concurrant measurements were made with the PREDE POM-01 Mark II radiometer, a Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD, a Laboratorie d'Optique Atmosphérique (LOA) SIMBAD-a, two Solar Light, Inc. Microtops II's, and Brookhaven National Laboratory's Fast Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (FRSR). In addition, a Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) was deployed that provides vertical aerosol distributions. Data were processed utilizing new algorithms to screen errors due to improper pointing at the sun, a problem previously recognized for the Microtops II. Comparisons of AOT at 500nm and Angstrom Exponent were made for all the instruments. The hand held, direct solar sun photometers (Microtops II, SIMBAD and SIMBADa

  1. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10

    -cost extension period) of our grant, we extended our studies to perform experiments on the controlled production and characterization of secondary organic aerosol.

  2. On measurements of aerosol-gas composition of the atmosphere during two expeditions in 2013 along the Northern Sea Route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakerin, S. M.; Bobrikov, A. A.; Bukin, O. A.; Golobokova, L. P.; Pol'kin, Vas. V.; Pol'kin, Vik. V.; Shmirko, K. A.; Kabanov, D. M.; Khodzher, T. V.; Onischuk, N. A.; Pavlov, A. N.; Potemkin, V. L.; Radionov, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    We presented the results of expedition measurements of the set of physical-chemical characteristics of atmospheric aerosol in areas of the Arctic and Far East seas, performed onboard RV Akademik Fedorov (17 August-22 September 2013) and RV Professor Khljustin (24 July-7 September 2013). The specific features of spatial distribution and time variations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) of the atmosphere in the wavelength range of 0.34-2.14 μm and boundary layer height, aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations, and disperse and chemical composition of aerosol are discussed. Over the Arctic Ocean (on the route of RV Akademik Fedorov) there is a decrease in aerosol and black carbon concentrations in a northeastern direction: higher values were observed in the region of Spitsbergen and near the Kola Peninsula; and minimum values were observed at northern margins of the Laptev Sea. Average AOD (0.5 μm) values in this remote region were 0.03; the aerosol and black carbon mass concentrations were 875 and 22 ng m-3, respectively. The spatial distributions of most aerosol characteristics over Far East seas show their latitudinal decrease in the northern direction. On transit of RV Professor Khljustin from the Japan Sea to the Chukchi Sea, the aerosol number concentration decreased on average from 23.7 to 2.5 cm-3, the black carbon mass concentration decreased from 150 to 50 ng m-3, and AOD decreased from 0.19 to 0.03. We analyzed the variations in the boundary layer height, measured by ship-based lidar: the average value was 520 m, and the maximal value was 1200 m. In latitudinal distribution of the boundary layer height, there is a characteristic minimum at a latitude of ~ 55° N. For water basins of eight seas, we present the chemical compositions of the water-soluble aerosol fraction (ions, elements) and small gas-phase species, as well as estimates of their vertical fluxes. It is shown that substances are mainly (75-89 %) supplied from the atmosphere to the sea

  3. Assessment of aerosol optical property and radiative effect for the layer decoupling cases over the northern South China Sea during the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Shantanu Kumar; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lolli, Simone; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Chung-Te; Chantara, Somporn; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The aerosol radiative effect can be modulated by the vertical distribution and optical properties of aerosols, particularly when aerosol layers are decoupled. Direct aerosol radiative effects over the northern South China Sea (SCS) were assessed by incorporating an observed data set of aerosol optical properties obtained from the Seven South East Asian Studies (7-SEAS)/Dongsha Experiment into a radiative transfer model. Aerosol optical properties for a two-layer structure of aerosol transport were estimated. In the radiative transfer calculations, aerosol variability (i.e., diversity of source region, aerosol type, and vertical distribution) for the complex aerosol environment was also carefully quantified. The column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm was 0.1-0.3 for near-surface aerosols and increased 1-5 times in presence of upper layer biomass-burning aerosols. A case study showed the strong aerosol absorption (single-scattering albedo (ω) ≈ 0.92 at 440 nm wavelength) exhibited by the upper layer when associated with predominantly biomass-burning aerosols, and the ω (≈0.95) of near-surface aerosols was greater than that of the upper layer aerosols because of the presence of mixed type aerosols. The presence of upper level aerosol transport could enhance the radiative efficiency at the surface (i.e., cooling) and lower atmosphere (i.e., heating) by up to -13.7 and +9.6 W m-2 per AOD, respectively. Such enhancement could potentially modify atmospheric stability, can influence atmospheric circulation, as well as the hydrological cycle over the tropical and low-latitude marginal northern SCS.

  4. MELCOR 1.8.1 assessment: PNL Ice Condenser Aerosol Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    The MELCOR code was used to simulate PNL`s Ice Condenser Experiments 11-6 and 16-11. In these experiments, ZnS was injected into a mixing chamber, and the combined steam/air/aerosol mixture flowed into an ice condenser which was l4.7m tall. Experiment 11-6 was a low flow test; Experiment l6-1l was a high flow test. Temperatures in the ice condenser region and particle retention were measured in these tests. MELCOR predictions compared very well to the experimental data. The MELCOR calculations were also compared to CONTAIN code calculations for the same tests. A number of sensitivity studies were performed. It as found that simulation time step, aerosol parameters such as the number of MAEROS components and sections used and the particle density, and ice condenser parameters such as the energy capacity of the ice, ice heat transfer coefficient multiplier, and ice heat structure characteristic length all could affect the results. Thermal/hydraulic parameters such as control volume equilibrium assumptions, flow loss coefficients, and the bubble rise model were found to affect the results less significantly. MELCOR results were not machine dependent for this problem.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)

    DOE Data Explorer

    In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

  6. Influence of oxygen addition to the carrier gas on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements on aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, N.; Migliorini, F.; Dondè, R.; Maffi, S.; De Iuliis, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectrosopy is implemented on aerosol particles for absolute concentration analysis. The aim of this work is the investigation of the effect of the bath gas used for nebulizing the aerosol. Nitrogen, air, and 50% O2 in N2 mixture have been chosen as carrier gasses in order to analyze the effect of oxygen addition to the gas. LIBS measurements have been carried out on aerosol particles produced from CuCl2 2H2O solutions, and the 324.7 nm Cu line is considered. As a first analysis, plasma parameters, such as temperature and electron density, have been evaluated changing the carrier gas. Measurements to derive the LIBS calibration curve of the 324.7 nm Cu line are carried out in air and in N2. The significant difference in the slope of the resulting calibration curves has to be attributed to the oxygen addition to the bath gas. To explore such behavior, time-resolved measurements of the Cu line and peak/base ratio have been performed. The presence of two competitive effects have been observed that becomes significant increasing the amount of oxygen in the carrier gas. One is the oxygen-quenching effect, already observed in the literature, and the other one is the enhancement of the Cu LIBS signal, expecially at short delay times. These effects have been observed also at other Cu lines and changing the analyte source. The results are presented and widely discussed.

  7. Kinetic model framework for aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions - Part 1: General equations, parameters, and terminology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöschl, U.; Rudich, Y.; Ammann, M.

    2007-12-01

    of intermediate species, sequential processes, and surface layers; and full compatibility with traditional resistor model formulations. The outlined double-layer surface concept and formalisms represent a minimum of model complexity required for a consistent description of the non-linear concentration and time dependences observed in experimental studies of atmospheric multiphase processes (competitive co-adsorption and surface saturation effects, etc.). Exemplary practical applications and model calculations illustrating the relevance of the above aspects are presented in a companion paper (Ammann and Pöschl, 2007). We expect that the presented model framework will serve as a useful tool and basis for experimental and theoretical studies investigating and describing atmospheric aerosol and cloud surface chemistry and gas-particle interactions. It shall help to end the "Babylonian confusion" that seems to inhibit scientific progress in the understanding of heterogeneous chemical reactions and other multiphase processes in aerosols and clouds. In particular, it shall support the planning and design of laboratory experiments for the elucidation and determination of fundamental kinetic parameters; the establishment, evaluation, and quality assurance of comprehensive and self-consistent collections of rate parameters; and the development of detailed master mechanisms for process models and derivation of simplified but yet realistic parameterizations for atmospheric and climate models.

  8. Computation of Phase Equilibria, State Diagrams and Gas/Particle Partitioning of Mixed Organic-Inorganic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of organic-inorganic aerosols is linked to several processes and specific topics in the field of atmospheric aerosol science. Photochemical oxidation of organics in the gas phase lowers the volatility of semi-volatile compounds and contributes to the particulate matter by gas/particle partitioning. Heterogeneous chemistry and changes in the ambient relative humidity influence the aerosol composition as well. Molecular interactions between condensed phase species show typically non-ideal thermodynamic behavior. Liquid-liquid phase separations into a mainly polar, aqueous and a less polar, organic phase may considerably influence the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile organics and inorganics (Erdakos and Pankow, 2004; Chang and Pankow, 2006). Moreover, the phases present in the aerosol particles feed back on the heterogeneous, multi-phase chemistry, influence the scattering and absorption of radiation and affect the CCN ability of the particles. Non-ideal thermodynamic behavior in mixtures is usually described by an expression for the excess Gibbs energy, enabling the calculation of activity coefficients. We use the group-contribution model AIOMFAC (Zuend et al., 2008) to calculate activity coefficients, chemical potentials and the total Gibbs energy of mixed organic-inorganic systems. This thermodynamic model was combined with a robust global optimization module to compute potential liquid-liquid (LLE) and vapor-liquid-liquid equilibria (VLLE) as a function of particle composition at room temperature. And related to that, the gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile components. Furthermore, we compute the thermodynamic stability (spinodal limits) of single-phase solutions, which provides information on the process type and kinetics of a phase separation. References Chang, E. I. and Pankow, J. F.: Prediction of activity coefficients in liquid aerosol particles containing organic compounds, dissolved inorganic salts, and water - Part

  9. Regional comparison of technetium-99m DTPA aerosol and radioactive gas ventilation (xenon and krypton) studies in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanna, L.; Alderson, P.O.; Waxman, A.D.; Berman, D.S.; Brachman, M.B.; Kroop, S.A.; Goldsmith, M.; Tanasescu, D.E.

    1986-09-01

    The regional distribution of (99mTc)DTPA aerosol was compared with that of /sup 133/Xe (n = 30) and krypton (n = 24) in a group of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. All patients had an aerosol study using a recently available commercial generator system, a ventilation study with one of the gases, and perfusion imaging. Regional information was assessed visually on xenon, krypton, and aerosol studies independently by considering each lung as three equal-sized zones. In addition, gas ventilation findings peripheral to regions of aerosol turbulence (hot spots) were evaluated. Only 64% of the zones were in complete agreement on xenon and aerosol. Most of the discordance between xenon and aerosol was accounted for by minor degrees of /sup 133/Xe washout retention in zones that appeared normal in the aerosol study. An agreement rate of 85% was noted between 81mKr and aerosol regionally. The regions of discordance between aerosol and gas studies, however, usually were associated with unimpressive perfusion defects that did not change the scintigraphic probability for pulmonary embolism in any patient. Regarding zones of aerosol hyperdeposition, 76% had associated washout abnormalities on xenon; however, there was no correlation between the presence of these abnormalities or perfusion abnormalities. The results confirm the high sensitivity of /sup 133/Xe washout imaging, but suggest that radioaerosol imaging will detect most parenchymal abnormalities associated with perfusion defects of significance.

  10. Development, Application, and Transition of Aerosol and Trace Gas Products Derived from Next-Generation Satellite Observations to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Naeger, Aaron; Zavodsky, Bradley; McGrath, Kevin; LaFontaine, Frank

    2016-01-01

    NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has a history of successfully transitioning unique observations and research capabilities to the operational weather community to improve short-term forecasts. SPoRTstrives to bridge the gap between research and operations by maintaining interactive partnerships with end users to develop products that match specific forecast challenges, provide training, and assess the products in the operational environment. This presentation focuses on recent product development, application, and transition of aerosol and trace gas products to operations for specific forecasting applications. Recent activities relating to the SPoRT ozone products, aerosol optical depth composite product, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol index products are discussed.

  11. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  12. Gas/particle partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids with terrestrial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2009-11-15

    Experimentally determined gas/particle partitioning constants, K(ip), using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) are presented for perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), covering a diverse set of terrestrial aerosols over an ambient range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The results are compared to estimated K(ip) values using a recently developed model that has been validated for diverse neutral and ionizable organic compounds. The modeling results consistently underestimate the experimental results. This is likely due to additional partition mechanisms unique for surfactants not being accounted for in the model, namely aggregate formation and water surface adsorption. These processes likely also biased the IGC K(ip) measurements compared to ambient PFCA concentrations. Nevertheless, both the experimental and modeling results indicate that partitioning to terrestrial particles in ambient atmospheres is negligible, though sorption to condensed water can be substantial. This favors rain sequestration as a more important atmospheric removal mechanism than dry particle sequestration. PFCAs found on particle filters during ambient sampling are thus accountable to vapor-phase PFCAs or aqueous-phase PFCAs sorbing directly to the filters, or the trapping of perfluorocarboxylate-salt particles. Further work on understanding the partitioning and speciation of PFCAs in atmospheric water droplets is needed to further quantify and understand their atmospheric behavior. To aid in this, a general RH dependent K(ip) model for surfactants is presented.

  13. Modeling Gas-phase Glyoxal and Associated Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in a Megacity using WRF/Chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Hodzic, A.; Barth, M. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Ervens, B.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) as one of a major fine particulate matter in the atmosphere plays an important role in air pollution, human health, and climate forcing. OA is composed of directly emitted primary organic aerosol and chemically produced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Despite much recent progress in understanding SOA formation, current air quality models cannot explain the magnitude and growth of atmospheric SOA, due to high uncertainties in sources, properties, and chemical reactions of precursors and formation pathways of SOA. Recent laboratory and modeling studies showed that glyoxal may serve as an important SOA precursor in the condensed solution of inorganic or organic aerosol particles (e.g., ammonium sulfate, fulvic acid, and amino acids). In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF/Chem) is modified to account for the latest observed gas-phase yields of glyoxal from various volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the associated SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase. The SOA formation in the aqueous aerosol phase is implemented using two approaches. In the first approach, two simplified parameterizations are used to represent the lumped particle-phase chemical processes under dark conditions and photochemical surface uptake. In the second approach, more detailed kinetic glyoxal reactions such as reversible glyoxal uptake, dimer formation of glyoxal, and oligomerization are treated and resolved explicitly. The updated WRF/Chem is assessed over the Mexico City and the surrounding region during March 2006 using the MILAGRO campaign data. Various observations such as organic matter from Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and VOCs from Proton-transfer Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry were compared. The preliminary results showed that the addition of the SOA formation from glyoxal in aqueous particles brings SOA predictions into a better agreement with field observations, in particular in presence of high relative humidity

  14. THE EFFECT OF METASTABLE EQUILIBRIUM STATES ON THE PARTITIONING OF NITRATE BETWEEN THE GAS AND AEROSOL PHASES. (R826371C005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the aid of three atmospheric aerosol equilibrium models, we quantify the effect of metastable equilibrium states (efflorescence branch) in comparison to stable (deliquescence branch) on the partitioning of total nitrate between the gas and aerosol phases. On average, effl...

  15. SPEAM-II experiment for the measurement of stratospheric NO2, O3 and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, C. T.; Mcarthur, L. J. B.; Kerr, J. B.; Wardle, D. I.; Tarasick, D.; Midwinter, C.

    1994-01-01

    Following the success of the Sunphotometer Earth Atmosphere Measurement (SPEAM-I) experiment, a more involved experiment was developed to fly as part of the second set of Canadian Experiments (CANEX-2) which will fly on the US Space Shuttle in the fall of 1992. The instrument complement includes an IBM-PC compatible control computer, a hand-held diode array spectrophotometer, and an interference-filter, limb imaging radiometer for the measurement of the atmospheric airglow. The hand-held spectrometer will measure nitrogen dioxide, ozone and aerosols. The limb imaging radiometer will observe emissions from the O2(1 DELTA) and O2(1 SIGMA) airglow bands. Only the spectrophotometer will be discussed here.

  16. Airborne measurements of black carbon aerosol over the Southeastern U.S. during the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.; Watts, L.; Holloway, J.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Liao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) field campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the Southeastern U.S. in June and July of 2013. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and aerosols on the formation of haze and anomalous climate cooling in the region. During SAS, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass and microphysical properties. BC aerosol is emitted into the atmosphere from biomass burning (BB) and incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuel. Hence, BC sources are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity. BC aerosol is currently the second largest anthropogenic climate forcing agent after CO2(g), and its climate impacts, which depend on vertical burden and internal mixing, are not fully understood. In the Southeast, BC aerosol is expected to provide surface area for the condensation of semi-volatile products of VOC oxidation and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Hence, BC is expected to impact the haze formation and regional climate. In this work we present an overview of BC measurements during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, the NOAA contribution to SAS. Geographical variations in mass mixing ratios, mass size distributions, and mixing state of BC over the Southeast U.S. are discussed. Relationships of BC with carbon monoxide (CO), acetonitrile (ACN) and other trace gases are used to investigate the impacts of urban, BB, natural gas development, and power plant emissions on the distribution and properties of BC aerosol in the region. Among studied urban centers, St. Louis and Atlanta were determined to be the largest source regions of BC. A clear weekend effect in BC mass mixing ratios and microphysical properties was observed in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Compared to BB and urban centers, power plants and natural gas developments

  17. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high

  18. Analysis of shipboard aerosol optical thickness measurements from multiple sunphotometers aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark A.; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Frouin, Robert; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Reynolds, R. Michael; Pietras, Christophe; Fargion, Giulietta; Quinn, Patricia; Thieuleux, François

    2005-06-01

    Marine sunphotometer measurements collected aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment - Asia (ACE-Asia) are used to evaluate the ability of complementary instrumentation to obtain the best possible estimates of aerosol optical thickness and Ångstrom exponent from ships at sea. A wide range of aerosol conditions, including clean maritime conditions and highly polluted coastal environments, were encountered during the ACE-Asia cruise. The results of this study suggest that shipboard hand-held sunphotometers and fast-rotating shadow-band radiometers (FRSRs) yield similar measurements and uncertainties if proper measurement protocols are used and if the instruments are properly calibrated. The automated FRSR has significantly better temporal resolution (2 min) than the hand-held sunphotometers when standard measurement protocols are used, so it more faithfully represents the variability of the local aerosol structure in polluted regions. Conversely, results suggest that the hand-held sunphotometers may perform better in clean, maritime air masses for unknown reasons. Results also show that the statistical distribution of the Ångstrom exponent measurements is different when the distributions from hand-held sunphotometers are compared with those from the FRSR and that the differences may arise from a combination of factors.

  19. Measurement of Gas and Aerosol Phase Absorption Spectra across the Visible and Near-IR Using Supercontinuum Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a method to measure the absorption spectra of gas and aerosol species across the visible and near-IR (500 to 840 nm) using a photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer and a pulsed supercontinuum laser source. Measurements of gas phase absorption spectra were demonstrated using H2O(g) as a function of relative humidity (RH). The measured absorption intensities and peak shapes were able to be quantified and compared to spectra calculated using the 2012 High Resolution Transmission (HITRAN2012) database. Size and mass selected nigrosin aerosol was used to measure absorption spectra across the visible and near-IR. Spectra were measured as a function of aerosol size/mass and show good agreement to Mie theory calculations. Lastly, we measured the broadband absorption spectrum of flame generated soot aerosol at 5% and 70% RH. For the high RH case, we are able to quantifiably separate the soot and water absorption contributions. For soot, we observe an enhancement in the mass specific absorption cross section ranging from 1.5 at 500 nm (p < 0.01) to 1.2 at 840 nm (p < 0.2) and a concomitant increase in the absorption Ångström exponent from 1.2 ± 0.4 (5% RH) to 1.6 ± 0.3 (70% RH). PMID:26098142

  20. Time-resolved inorganic chemical composition of fine aerosol and associated precursor gases over an urban environment in western India: Gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, A. K.; Rengarajan, R.

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic ionic constituents (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3- and SO42-) of PM2.5 and associated trace gases (NH3, HNO3 and HCl) were measured simultaneously by Ambient Ion Monitor - Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) system with a time resolution of one hour at an urban location in semi-arid region of western India during summer and winter. The average NH3, HNO3 and HCl concentrations were 11.6 ± 5.0, 2.9 ± 0.8 and 0.15 μg m-3, respectively, during winter. During summer, NH3 and HNO3 concentrations were of similar magnitude, whereas HCl concentration was less than ∼0.03 μg m-3. NH3 concentration exhibited a distinct diurnal variation during both seasons. However, HNO3 did not show a specific diurnal trend during the observation period in both seasons. The data obtained were used to study gas-aerosol equilibrium characteristics using a thermodynamic equilibrium model, ISORROPIA II. The results suggest that NH3 exists in equilibrium between measured fine-mode particle and gas phase with a systematic bias of ∼14%, whereas HCl and HNO3 deviate significantly from the modelled data. These observations have implications on thermodynamic equilibrium assumptions used for estimating various aerosol parameters such as liquid water content, pH, etc., thus causing significant bias in chemical transport model results over the study region.

  1. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  2. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  3. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  4. Videos of Experiments from ORNL Gas Hydrate Research

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gas hydrate research performed by the Environmental Sciences Division utilizes the ORNL Seafloor Process Simulator, the Parr Vessel, the Sapphire Cell, a fiber optic distributed sensing system, and Raman spectroscopy. The group studies carbon sequestration in the ocean, desalination, gas hydrates in the solar system, and nucleation and dissociation kinetics. The videos available at the gas hydrates website are very short clips from experiments.

  5. Introduction and Overview of the AMazonian Aerosol characteriZation Experiment (AMAZE-08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Artaxo, P.; Team, A.

    2008-12-01

    The main objectives of AMAZE-08 were to understand the sources and regulators of organic particle mass in a pristine continental environment and the connections between particle chemistry and particle optical and hygroscopic properties. The AMAZE-08 tower measurements were conducted between February 7 and March 14, 2008 during the wet reason. The site was 60 km NNW of Manaus and located within a mostly pristine rainforest. The winds were predominantly from the ENE across 1600 km of mostly undeveloped forest. The site was mostly free of anthropogenic influences and allowed the study of pristine biological aerosol particles, although there were several episodes of long-range transport from Europe and Africa and more infrequent regional transport from Manaus and northerly biomass burning. Particle instrumentation included two high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) with thermodenuder, two cloud condensation nuclei counters (CCNC), a continuous flow diffusion chamber (CFDC) for ice nuclei measurements, three optical particle counters (OPC), an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) for measurement of biologically active particles, two tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOM), two scanning mobility particle sizers (SMPS), two multiwavelength nephelometers, three condensation particle counters (CPC), a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), an athelometer, coarse- and fine-mode filters for elemental and ion analysis as well as particle imaging, an AERONET sun photometer including photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and LIDAR system. Gas instrumentation included a proton-transfer mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), gas adsorption cartridge for off-line chromatographic analysis, and measurement of O3, CO, CO2, NO, and NOx. This talk will present an overview of AMAZE-08 and will highlight selected results.

  6. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates particulate-phase sulfate and ammonium. In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics for sulfate, ammonium, nitrate, sodium, and chloride have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Compared to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and thus could improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing, SWCF) on the global scale. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry could further improve the prediction of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD on the global scale. IMN can improve the prediction of secondary PM2

  7. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  8. The Cloud Aerosol Interactions and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX): overview and prominent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, J. R.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Konwar, M.; Deshpande, C. G.; Morwal, S. B.; Padma Kumari, B.; Joshi, R. R.; Pandithurai, G.; Bhalwankar, R. V.; Mujumdar, V. R.; Goswami, B.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2009-12-01

    “Cloud-Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX)”, an Indian national program, funded by Ministry of Earth Sciences, (MoES), Govt. of India is being conducted by Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune during the period 2009-2012. CAIPEEX has two phases. Phase I is devoted for intensive cloud and aerosol observations over different parts of India using an instrumented aircraft. Phase II is devoted for randomized precipitation enhancement experiment. The phase I is being carried out during the period May-September 2009. The main scientific objectives of Phase I are : To measure background concentrations of aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) during pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons over different parts of the country. Measurements of the associated differences in convective cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. The important preliminary results from the observational studies are: 1) During the pre-monsoon thick layer of brown haze extends to height of about 5-6 km at the foothills of the Himalaya, but does not normally spill over into the Tibetan Plateau. 2) The deep clouds that form in this layer are typically triggered at the slopes of the Himalaya. The clouds are super-continental microphysically, which means that the cloud drops are very small and prevent any warm rain. However, much ice is formed quickly, probably due to the ice nucleating activity of the aerosols. 3) In the pre-monsoon phase over central and southern India the clouds have similar nature as described for the foothills of the Himalaya, but with lower bases. Still, warm rain is substantially suppressed. During the monsoon, the clouds in the Bangalore-Hyderabad rain shadow area lose quickly their ability to produce warm rain with the increasing levels of CCN eastward away from the west coast. 4) A major finding was the dominance of thick haze in the Arabian Sea during the SW monsoon. It appears to be mostly of Arabian and

  9. Primary gas- and particle-phase emissions and secondary organic aerosol production from gasoline and diesel off-road engines.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Timothy D; Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Zhang, Mang; Jathar, Shantanu H; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Massetti, John; Truong, Tin; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Maddox, Christine; Rieger, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M Matti; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-12-17

    Dilution and smog chamber experiments were performed to characterize the primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gasoline and diesel small off-road engines (SOREs). These engines are high emitters of primary gas- and particle-phase pollutants relative to their fuel consumption. Two- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs emit much more (up to 3 orders of magnitude more) nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs), primary PM and organic carbon than newer on-road gasoline vehicles (per kg of fuel burned). The primary emissions from a diesel transportation refrigeration unit were similar to those of older, uncontrolled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles (e.g., premodel year 2007 heavy-duty diesel trucks). Two-strokes emitted the largest fractional (and absolute) amount of SOA precursors compared to diesel and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs; however, 35-80% of the NMOG emissions from the engines could not be speciated using traditional gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. After 3 h of photo-oxidation in a smog chamber, dilute emissions from both 2- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs produced large amounts of semivolatile SOA. The effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to estimated mass of reacted precursors) was 2-4% for 2- and 4-stroke SOREs, which is comparable to yields from dilute exhaust from older passenger cars and unburned gasoline. This suggests that much of the SOA production was due to unburned fuel and/or lubrication oil. The total PM contribution of different mobile source categories to the ambient PM burden was calculated by combining primary emission, SOA production and fuel consumption data. Relative to their fuel consumption, SOREs are disproportionately high total PM sources; however, the vastly greater fuel consumption of on-road vehicles renders them (on-road vehicles) the dominant mobile source of ambient PM in the Los Angeles area.

  10. Improvement and further development in CESM/CAM5: gas-phase chemistry and inorganic aerosol treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry and subsequent gas-to-particle conversion processes such as new particle formation, condensation, and thermodynamic partitioning have large impacts on air quality, climate, and public health through influencing the amounts and distributions of gaseous precursors and secondary aerosols. Their roles in global air quality and climate are examined in this work using the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM1.0.5) with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5.1) (referred to as CESM1.0.5/CAM5.1). CAM5.1 includes a simple chemistry that is coupled with a 7-mode prognostic Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). MAM7 includes classical homogenous nucleation (binary and ternary) and activation nucleation (empirical first-order power law) parameterizations, and a highly-simplified inorganic aerosol thermodynamics treatment that only simulates sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+). In this work, a new gas-phase chemistry mechanism based on the 2005 Carbon Bond Mechanism for Global Extension (CB05_GE) and several advanced inorganic aerosol treatments for condensation of volatile species, ion-mediated nucleation (IMN), and explicit inorganic aerosol thermodynamics have been incorporated into CESM/CAM5.1-MAM7. Comparing to the simple gas-phase chemistry, CB05_GE can predict many more gaseous species, and improve model performance for PM2.5, PM10, PM2.5 components, and some PM gaseous precursors such as SO2 and NH3 in several regions, as well as aerosol optical depth (AOD) and cloud properties (e.g., cloud fraction (CF), cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), and shortwave cloud forcing (SWCF)) on globe. The modified condensation and aqueous-phase chemistry further improves the predictions of additional variables such as HNO3, NO2, and O3 in some regions, and new particle formation rate (J) and AOD over globe. IMN can improve the predictions of secondary PM2.5 components, PM2.5, and PM10 over Europe, as well as AOD and CDNC over globe. The explicit

  11. Chemical analysis of aerosol in the Venusian cloud layer by reaction gas chromatography on board the Vega landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, B. G.; Drozdov, Y. V.; Melnikov, V. V.; Rotin, V. A.; Khokhlov, V. N.; Bondarev, V. B.; Dolnikov, G. G.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Nenarokov, D. F.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment on sulfuric acid aerosol determination in the Venusian cloud layer on board the Vega landers is described. An average content of sulfuric acid of approximately 1 mg/cu m was found for the samples taken from the atmosphere at heights from 63 to 48 km and analyzed with the SIGMA-3 chromatograph. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) was revealed in the gaseous sample at the height of 48 km. From the experimental results and blank run measurements, a suggestion is made that the Venusian cloud layer aerosol consists of more complicated particles than the sulfuric acid water solution does.

  12. Aerosol and trace gas vehicle emission factors measured in a tunnel using an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer and other on-line instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Roberto; Prevot, Andre S. H.; DeCarlo, Peter F.; Heringa, Maarten F.; Richter, Rene; Weingartner, Ernest; Baltensperger, Urs

    2011-04-01

    In this study we present measurements of gas and aerosol phase composition for a mixed vehicle fleet in the Gubrist tunnel (Switzerland) in June 2008. PM 1 composition measurements were made with a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). Gas-phase measurements of CO, CO 2, NO x and total hydrocarbons (THC) were performed with standard instrumentation. Weekdays had a characteristic diurnal pattern with 2 peaks in concentrations for all traffic related species corresponding to high vehicle density (˜300 ± 30 vehicles per 5 min) in the morning rush hour between 06:00 and 09:00 and in the afternoon rush hours from approximately 15:30 to 18:30. The emission factors (EF) of OA were heavily influenced by the OA mass loading. To exclude this partitioning effect, only organic aerosol mass concentrations from 60 μg m -3 to 90 μg m -3 were considered and for these conditions the EF(OA) value for HDV was 33.7 ± 2.3 mg km -1 for a temperature inside the tunnel of 20-25 °C. This value is not directly applicable to ambient conditions because it is derived from OA mass concentrations that are roughly a factor of 10 higher than typical ambient concentrations. An even higher EF(OA) HDV value of 47.4 ± 1.6 mg km -1 was obtained when the linear fit was applied to all data points including OA concentrations up to 120 μg m -3. Similar to the increasing EF, the OA/BC ratio in the tunnel was also affected by the organic loading and it increased by a factor of ˜3 over the OA range 10-120 μg m -3. This means that also the OA emission factors at ambient concentrations of around 5-10 μg m -3 would be 2-3 times lower than the emission factor given above. For OA concentrations lower than 40 μg m -3 the OA/BC mass ratio was below 1, while at an OA concentration of 100-120 μg m -3 the OA/BC ratio was ˜1.5. The AMS mass spectra (MS) acquired in the tunnel were highly correlated with the primary organic aerosol

  13. Sudden changes in aerosol and gas concentrations in the central Arctic marine boundary layer: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigg, E. Keith; Leck, Caroline; Nilsson, E. Douglas

    2001-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol number size distributions and concentrations of the precursor gases dimethyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia were made within the pack ice region of the central Arctic Ocean during July and August 1996 from the icebreaker Oden. Changes in concentration, sometimes exceeding the entire seasonal variation, often occurred within an hour and attempts to find the reasons for them are described. Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration in Aitken and accumulation mode particles obtained on helicopter flights revealed intense concentration gradients in the lowest 1000 m. Those below 100 m were common. Concentrations of accumulation mode particles were usually greater near the surface than at 100 m. Four representative case studies for which vertical aerosol profiles were obtained are presented. Observations of rapid large changes in near-surface concentration of aerosols in different size ranges are compared with the vertical profiles, meteorological information, and acoustic or optical remote sensing to infer processes causing the changes. Comparison of simultaneous variations in aerosols and precursor gas concentrations are used to define the vertical profiles of the gases. It was found that dimethyl sulfide and ammonia concentrations usually must have been strongly depleted near the surface relative to concentrations at about 100 m. Sulfur dioxide profiles appeared to be more complex. Turbulence or vertical air motions initiated by atmospheric wave motions trapped within the stable boundary layer appeared to be directly responsible for many of the sudden concentration changes, through interaction with concentration gradients close to the surface. The presence of low-level jets also had direct or indirect influences on mixing in the lowest few hundred meters. The extent to which aerosols measured near the surface can determine the microphysics of central Arctic marine boundary layer clouds is examined.

  14. Inversion of solar extinction data from the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (ASTP/SAM) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    The inversion methods are reported that have been used to determine the vertical profile of the extinction coefficient due to the stratospheric aerosols from data measured during the ASTP/SAM solar occultation experiment. Inversion methods include the onion skin peel technique and methods of solving the Fredholm equation for the problem subject to smoothing constraints. The latter of these approaches involves a double inversion scheme. Comparisons are made between the inverted results from the SAM experiment and near simultaneous measurements made by lidar and balloon born dustsonde. The results are used to demonstrate the assumptions required to perform the inversions for aerosols.

  15. Airborne Trace Gas and Aerosol Measurements in Several Shale Gas Basins during the SONGNEX (Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus) Campaign 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Trainer, M.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Oil and natural gas from tight sand and shale formations has increased strongly over the last decade. This increased production has been associated with emissions of methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and other trace gases to the atmosphere, which are concerns for air quality, climate and air toxics. The NOAA Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) aircraft campaign took place in 2015, when the NOAA WP-3 aircraft conducted 20 research flights between March 19 and April 27, 2015 in the following shale gas regions: Denver-Julesberg, Uintah, Upper Green River, San Juan, Bakken, Barnett, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Woodford, and Permian. The NOAA P3 was equipped with an extensive set of gas phase measurements, including instruments for methane, ethane, CO, CO2, a new H3O+CIMS, canister and cartridge samples for VOCs, HCHO, glyoxal, HNO3, NH3, NOx, NOy, PANs, ozone, and SO2. Aerosol number and size distributions were also measured. This presentation will focus on an overview of all the measurements onboard the NOAA WP-3 aircraft and discuss the differences between the shale gas regions. Due to a drop in oil prices, drilling for oil decreased in the months prior to the mission, but nevertheless the production of oil and natural gas were near the all-time high. Many of the shale gas basins investigated during SONGNEX have quite different characteristics. For example, the Permian Basin is a well-established field, whereas the Eagle Ford and the Bakken saw an almost exponential increase in production over the last few years. The basins differ by the relative amounts of natural gas versus oil that is being produced. Previous work had shown a large variability in methane emissions relative to the production (leak rate) between different basins. By including more and qualitatively different basins during SONGNEX, the study has provided an extensive data set to address how emissions depend on raw gas composition, extraction techniques and regulation. The influence of these

  16. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    2000-01-24

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through June 1999. A decontamination factor for the RMCS exhauster filter housing is calculated based on operation data.

  17. Linking variations in sea spray aerosol particle hygroscopicity to composition during two microcosm experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, Sara D.; Cornwell, Gavin C.; Helgestad, Taylor M.; Moore, Kathryn A.; Lee, Christopher; Novak, Gordon A.; Sultana, Camille M.; Wang, Xiaofei; Bertram, Timothy H.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2016-07-01

    The extent to which water uptake influences the light scattering ability of marine sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles depends critically on SSA chemical composition. The organic fraction of SSA can increase during phytoplankton blooms, decreasing the salt content and therefore the hygroscopicity of the particles. In this study, subsaturated hygroscopic growth factors at 85 % relative humidity (GF(85 %)) of predominately submicron SSA particles were quantified during two induced phytoplankton blooms in marine aerosol reference tanks (MARTs). One MART was illuminated with fluorescent lights and the other was illuminated with sunlight, referred to as the "indoor" and "outdoor" MARTs, respectively. Optically weighted GF(85 %) values for SSA particles were derived from measurements of light scattering and particle size distributions. The mean optically weighted SSA diameters were 530 and 570 nm for the indoor and outdoor MARTs, respectively. The GF(85 %) measurements were made concurrently with online particle composition measurements, including bulk composition (using an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer) and single particle (using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer) measurement, and a variety of water-composition measurements. During both microcosm experiments, the observed optically weighted GF(85 %) values were depressed substantially relative to pure inorganic sea salt by 5 to 15 %. There was also a time lag between GF(85 %) depression and the peak chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations by either 1 (indoor MART) or 3-to-6 (outdoor MART) days. The fraction of organic matter in the SSA particles generally increased after the Chl a peaked, also with a time lag, and ranged from about 0.25 to 0.5 by volume. The observed depression in the GF(85 %) values (relative to pure sea salt) is consistent with the large observed volume fractions of non-refractory organic matter (NR-OM) comprising the SSA. The GF(85 %) values exhibited a reasonable negative

  18. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  19. Lidar Observations of Tropospheric Aerosols Over Northeastern South Africa During the ARREX and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the ARREX-1999 and SAFARI-2000 Dry Season experiments a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The Mar was collocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI-2000 the processed Mar data yields a daytime time-series of layer mean/derived aerosol optical properties, including extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profile. Combined with 523 run aerosol optical depth and spectral Angstrom exponent calculations from available CIMEL sun-photometer data and normalized broadband flux measurements the temporal evolution of the near surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For the densest smoke/haze events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is found to be between 60-80/sr, and corresponding Angstrom exponent calculations near and above 1.75. The optical characteristics of an evolving smoke event from SAFARI-2000 are extensively detailed. The advecting smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers, causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of its occurrence. Surface broadband flux forcing due to the smoke is calculated, as is the evolution in the vertical aerosol extinction profile as measured by the Han Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol during ARREX-1999 are presented and discussed. The lack of corroborating observations the following year makes these observation; both unique and noteworthy in the scope of regional aerosol transport over southern Africa.

  20. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  1. Simulating gas and aerosol concentrations in the Paris area using different land surface models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Morille, Yoann; Haeffelin, Martial

    2010-05-01

    Regional air quality forecasting depends on the performance of weather forecast models used to drive chemistry-transport models. The widely used Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model provides a few land surface schemes (LSMs) to compute heat and moisture fluxes over land surface. The LSMs differ in complexity and approaches used. We performed WRF simulations for 15 and 5 km resolution nested domains over the North of France and Paris, respectively, for summer 2008. We used the four LSMs provided with WRF: 6-layer Rapid Update Cycle (RUC), 5-layer thermal diffusion, 2-layer Pleim-Xiu scheme (together with the Pleim-Xiu surface layer and the ACM boundary layer models), and 4-layer Noah scheme. The SIRTA atmospheric observatory located in Paris area provides in situ data of measurements for a number of meteorological parameters, as well as vertical profiles measured by a lidar. The simulation results were compared to the SIRTA measurement data. In order to quantify possible impacts of the LSMs to simulated gas and aerosol concentrations in the Paris region, we use a chemistry-transport model CHIMERE forced by the corresponding WRF meteorological fields. Implications for the regional air quality forecasting will be discussed.

  2. The VOCALS Regional Experiment: Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions in Marine Boundary Layer Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, R.

    2012-12-01

    Robert Wood, C.S. Bretherton, C. R. Mechoso, R. A. Weller, B. J. Huebert, H. Coe, B. A. Albrecht, P. H. Daum, D. Leon, A. Clarke, P. Zuidema, C. W. Fairall, G. Allen, S. deSzoeke, G. Feingold, J. Kazil, S. Yuter, R. George, A. Berner, C. Terai, G. Painter, H. Wang, M. Wyant, D. Mechem The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) is an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific (SEP), a region dominated by strong coastal upwelling, extensive cold SSTs, and home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northen Chile. A central theme of VOCALS-REx is the improved understanding of links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties. In this presentation, we will present a synthesis of results from VOCALS-REx focusing on the following questions: (a) how are aerosols, clouds and precipitation inter-related in the SEP region? (b) what microphysical-macrophysical interactions are necessary for the formation and maintenance of open cells? (c) how do cloud and MBL properties change across the strong microphysical gradients from the South American coast to the remote ocean?

  3. Transport of Aerosols from Asia and Their Radiative Effects Over the Western Pacific: A 3-D Model Study for ACE-Asia Experiment During Spring 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Flatau, Piotr; Anderson, Tad; Masonis, Sarah; Russell, Phil; Schmid, Beat; Livingston, John; Redemann, Jens; Kahn, Ralph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) took place in Spring 2001 in the East Asia-West Pacific Ocean. During the ACE-Asia intensive field operation period, high concentrations of dust and anthropogenic aerosols were observed over the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, which were transported out from the Asian continent, with the plume often extending to 6-8 km altitude. The multi-component aerosols originated from Asia are expected to exert a significant radiative forcing over the Pacific region. We present here results from the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model of aerosol transport and radiative forcing in the context of ACE-Asia. The model calculated aerosol concentrations, extinctions, optical thickness, size distributions, and vertical profiles are compared with the aircraft and ship measurements, and the distributions of aerosols are compared with satellite data. The model will be used to understand the origins of the aerosols observed in ACE-Asia, estimate the contributions from anthropogenic and natural aerosols to the total aerosol optical thickness, investigate the effects of humidification and clouds on aerosol properties, and assess the radiative forcing of Asian aerosols over the Pacific region and in the northern hemisphere.

  4. Aerosol ultraviolet absorption experiment (2002 to 2004), part 2: absorption optical thickness, refractive index, and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Herman, Jay R.; Slusser, James R.; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Labow, Gordon J.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Eck, Tom; Doubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent N.

    2005-04-01

    Compared to the visible spectral region, very little is known about aerosol absorption in the UV. Without such information it is impossible to quantify the causes of the observed discrepancy between modeled and measured UV irradiances and photolysis rates. We report results of a 17-month aerosol column absorption monitoring experiment conducted in Greenbelt, Maryland, where the imaginary part of effective refractive index k was inferred from the measurements of direct and diffuse atmospheric transmittances by a UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer [UV-MFRSR, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Network]. Colocated ancillary measurements of aerosol effective particle size distribution and refractive index in the visible wavelengths [by CIMEL sun-sky radiometers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)], column ozone, surface pressure, and albedo constrain the forward radiative transfer model input, so that a unique solution for k is obtained independently in each UV-MFRSR spectral channel. Inferred values of k are systematically larger in the UV than in the visible wavelengths. The inferred k values enable calculation of the single scattering albedo ω, which is compared with AERONET inversions in the visible wavelengths. On cloud-free days with high aerosol loadings [τext(440)>0.4], ω is systematically lower at 368 nm (<ω368>=0.94) than at 440 nm (<ω440>=0.96), however, the mean ω differences (0.02) are within expected uncertainties of ω retrievals (~0.03). The inferred ω is even lower at shorter UV wavelengths (<ω325>~<ω332>=0.92), which might suggest the presence of selectively UV absorbing aerosols. We also find that decreases with decrease in aerosol loading. This could be due to real changes in the average aerosol composition between summer and winter months at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site.

  5. Preface to special section on East Asian Studies of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanqing; Chen, H.; Cribb, M.; Dickerson, R.; Holben, B.; Li, C.; Lu, D.; Luo, Y.; Maring, H.; Shi, G.; Tsay, S.-C.; Wang, P.; Wang, Y.; Xia, X.; Zheng, Y.; Yuan, T.; Zhao, F.

    2007-11-01

    Papers published in this special section report findings from the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE). They are concerned with (1) the temporal and spatial distributions of aerosol loading and precursor gases, (2) aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), (3) aerosol direct radiative effects, (4) validation of satellite products, (5) transport mechanisms, and (6) the effects of air pollution on ecosystems. Aerosol loading is heaviest in mideastern China with a mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.5 and increasing to 0.7 around major cities that reduced daily mean surface solar radiation by ˜30-40 W m-2, but barely changed solar reflection at the top of the atmosphere. Aerosol loading, particle size and composition vary considerably with location and season. The MODIS AOD data from Collection 5 (C5) agree much better with ground data than earlier releases, but considerable discrepancies still exist because of treatments of aerosol SSA and surface albedo. Four methods are proposed/adopted to derive the SSA by means of remote sensing and in situ observation, which varies drastically with time and space. The nationwide means of AOD, Ångström exponent, and SSA (0.5 μm) in China are 0.69 ± 0.17, 1.06 ± 0.26, and 0.89 ± 0.04, respectively. Measurements of trace gases reveal substantial uncertainties in emission inventories. An analysis of aircraft measurements revealed that dry convection is an important mechanism uplifting pollutants over northern China. Model simulations of nitrogen deposition and impact of ozone pollution on net primary productivity indicate an increasing threat of air pollution on the ecosystem.

  6. Near-highway aerosol and gas-phase measurements in a high-diesel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWitt, H. L.; Hellebust, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Polo, L.; Jacob, V.; Buisson, C.; Charron, A.; André, M.; Pasquier, A.; Besombes, J. L.; Jaffrezo, J. L.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N.

    2015-04-01

    Diesel-powered passenger cars currently outnumber gasoline-powered cars in many countries, particularly in Europe. In France, diesel cars represented 61% of light duty vehicles in 2011 and this percentage is still increasing (French Environment and Energy Management Agency, ADEME). As part of the September 2011 joint PM-DRIVE (Particulate Matter - DiRect and Indirect on-road Vehicular Emissions) and MOCOPO (Measuring and mOdeling traffic COngestion and POllution) field campaign, the concentration and high-resolution chemical composition of aerosols and volatile organic carbon species were measured adjacent to a major urban highway south of Grenoble, France. Alongside these atmospheric measurements, detailed traffic data were collected from nearby traffic cameras and loop detectors, which allowed the vehicle type, traffic concentration, and traffic speed to be quantified. Six aerosol age and source profiles were resolved using the positive matrix factorization model on real-time high-resolution aerosol mass spectra. These six aerosol source/age categories included a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) commonly associated with primary vehicular emissions, a nitrogen-containing aerosol with a diurnal pattern similar to that of HOA, oxidized organic aerosol (OOA), and biomass burning aerosol. While quantitatively separating the influence of diesel from that of gasoline proved impossible, a low HOA : black carbon ratio, similar to that measured in other high-diesel environments, and high levels of NOx, also indicative of diesel emissions, were observed. Although the measurement site was located next to a large source of primary emissions, which are typically found to have low oxygen incorporation, OOA was found to comprise the majority of the measured organic aerosol, and isotopic analysis showed that the measured OOA contained mainly modern carbon, not fossil-derived carbon. Thus, even in this heavily vehicular-emission-impacted environment, photochemical processes

  7. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  8. Top-down constraints to aerosol emissions from open biomass burning: the role of gas-particle partitioning and secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Petetin, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Open biomass burning (BB), including wildfires and controlled burns in agriculture and foresty, is known to provide an important contribution to organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) emissions on the global scale. However, quantitative estimates of BB aerosol emissions and their effects on climate and environment remain rather uncertain. A useful way to constrain the OA&BC emissions involves using atmospheric measurements in the framework of the inverse modeling approach. In such an approach, the relationship between the emissions and the measurements is simulated by a chemistry transport model; this means that top-down estimates may be sensitive to possible model uncertainties. As a result of assimilation of satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, several recent studies (e.g. [1,2]) indicated that aerosol emissions provided by bottom-up emission inventories may be strongly underestimated relative to emissions of gaseous species (such as CO). Meanwhile, it was earlier shown (e.g. [3]) that the relationship between primary organic aerosol emissions and aerosol concentration in the atmosphere can be significantly affected by gas-particle partitioning and oxidation of lower-volatility organic emissions; these processes are usually not taken into account in typical chemistry transport models. The main goal of this study was to examine to what degree the discrepancy between the OA&BC/CO emission ratios predicted by the bottom-up inventories and derived from satellite observations can be associated with the mentioned processes and explained in the framework of the volatility basis set approach (VBS) [3] to OA modelling. To achieve this goal, a VBS scheme, which was recently implemented in the CHIMERE chemistry transport model (CTM), was first modified to account for OA emissions from biomass burning. An ensemble of simulations with the CHIMERE CTM was then performed for the case of the 2010 mega-fire event in European Russia [4]; each of the simulations

  9. Microanalysis of the aerosol collected over south-central New Mexico during the alive field experiment, May-December 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Patrick J.; Schnell, Russel C.; Kahl, Jonathan D.; Boatman, Joe F.; Garvey, Dennis M.

    Thirty-eight size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in the lower troposphere over the high desert of south-central New Mexico, using cascade impactors mounted onboard two research aircraft. Four of these samples were collected in early May, sixteen in mid-July, and the remaining ones in December 1989, during three segments of the ALIVE field initiative. Analytical electron microscope analyses of aerosol deposits and individual particles from these samples were performed to physically and chemically characterize the major particulate species present in the aerosol. Air-mass trajectories arriving at the sampling area in the May program were quite different from those calculated for the July period. In general, the May trajectories showed strong westerly winds, while the July winds were weaker and southerly, consistently passing over or very near the border cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Aerosol samples collected during the May period were predominantly fine (0.1-0.5 μm dia.), liquid H 2SO 4 droplets. Samples from the July experiment were comprised mostly of fine, solid (NH 4) 2SO 4 or mostly neutralized sulfate particles. In both sampling periods, numerous other particle classes were observed, including many types with probable terrestrial or anthropogenic sources. The numbers of these particles, however, were small when compared with the sulfates. Composite particle types, including sulfate/crustal and sulfate/carbonaceous, were also found to be present. The major differences in aerosol composition between the May and July samples (i.e. the extensive neutralization of sulfates in the July samples) can be explained by considering the different aerosol transport pathways and the proximity of the July aerosol to the El Paso/Juarez urban plume. Winds during the December experiment were quite variable, and may have contributed to the widely varying aerosol compositions observed in these samples. When the aircraft sampled the El Paso

  10. Micropulse lidar observations of tropospheric aerosols over northeastern South Africa during the ARREX and SAFARI 2000 dry season experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Ji, Qiang; Tsay, Si-Chee; Piketh, Stuart J.; Barenbrug, Marguerite; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-07-01

    During the Aerosol Recirculation and Rainfall Experiment (ARREX 1999) and Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dry season experiments, a micropulse lidar (523 nm) instrument was operated at the Skukuza Airport in northeastern South Africa. The lidar was colocated with a diverse array of passive radiometric equipment. For SAFARI 2000, a daytime time series of layer mean aerosol optical properties, including layer mean extinction-to-backscatter ratios and vertical extinction cross-section profiles are derived from the synthesis of the lidar data and aerosol optical depths from available AERONET Sun photometer data. Combined with derived spectral Angstrom exponents, normalized broadband flux measurements, and calculated air mass back-trajectories, the temporal evolution of the surface aerosol layer optical properties is analyzed for climatological trends. For dense biomass smoke events the extinction-to-backscatter ratio is between 50 and 90 sr, and corresponding spectral Angstrom exponent values are between 1.50 and 2.00. Observations of an advecting smoke event during SAFARI 2000 are shown. The smoke was embedded within two distinct stratified thermodynamic layers causing the particulate mass to advect over the instrument array in an incoherent manner on the afternoon of 1 September 2000. Significant surface broadband flux forcing of over -50 W/m2 was measured in this event. The evolution of the vertical aerosol extinction profile is profiled using the lidar data. Finally, observations of persistent elevated aerosol layers during ARREX 1999 are presented and discussed. Back-trajectory analyses combined with lidar and Sun photometer measurements indicate the likelihood for these aerosols being the result of long-range particulate transport from the southern and central South America.

  11. Aerosol and gas re-distribution by shallow cumulus clouds: An investigation using airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschuetz, Anna; Sorooshian, Armin; Ervens, Barbara; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Feingold, Graham; Murphy, Shane M.; de Gouw, Joost; Warneke, Carsten; Jonsson, Haflidi H.

    2012-09-01

    Aircraft measurements during the 2006 Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study (GoMACCS) are used to examine the influence of shallow cumulus clouds on vertical profiles of aerosol chemical composition, size distributions, and secondary aerosol precursor gases. The data show signatures of convective transport of particles, gases and moisture from near the surface to higher altitudes, and of aqueous-phase production of aerosol mass (sulfate and organics) in cloud droplets and aerosol water. In cloudy conditions, the average aerosol volume concentration at an altitude of 2850 m, above typical cloud top levels, was found to be 34% of that at 450 m; for clear conditions, the same ratio was 13%. Both organic and sulfate mass fractions were on average constant with altitude (around 50%); however, the ratio of oxalate to organic mass increased with altitude (from 1% at 450 m to almost 9% at 3450 m), indicative of the influence of in-cloud production on the vertical abundance and characteristics of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. A new metric termed "residual cloud fraction" is introduced as a way of quantifying the "cloud processing history" of an air parcel. Results of a parcel model simulating aqueous phase production of sulfate and organics reproduce observed trends and point at a potentially important role of SOA production, especially oligomers, in deliquesced aerosols. The observations emphasize the importance of shallow cumulus clouds in altering the vertical distribution of aerosol properties that influence both their direct and indirect effect on climate.

  12. Evaluation of Meso-NH and WRF/CHEM simulated gas and aerosol chemistry over Europe based on hourly observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Barbet, C.; Leriche, M.; Deguillaume, L.; Mari, C.; Chaumerliac, N.; Bègue, N.; Tulet, P.; Gazen, D.; Escobar, J.

    2016-07-01

    Gas chemistry and aerosol chemistry of 10 km-resolution mesoscale models Meso-NH and WRF/CHEM were evaluated on three cases over Europe. These one-day duration cases were selected from Freney et al. (2011) and occurred on contrasted meteorological conditions and at different seasons: a cyclonic circulation with a well-marked frontal zone on winter, an anti-cyclonic situation with local storm precipitations on summer and a cold front in the northwest of Europe associated to a convergence of air masses over eastern Europe and conflicting air masses over Spain and France on autumn. To assess the performance of the two models, surface hourly databases from observation stations over Europe were used, together with airborne measurements. For both models, the meteorological fields were in good agreement with the measurements for the three days. Winds presented the largest normalised mean bias integrated over all European stations for both models. Daily gas chemistry was reproduced with normalised mean biases between - 14 and 11%, a level of accuracy that is acceptable for policy support. The two models' performances were degraded during night-time quite likely due to the constant primary species emissions. The PM2.5 bulk mass concentration was overestimated by Meso-NH over Europe and slightly underestimated by WRF/CHEM. The absence of wet deposition in the models partly explains the local discrepancies with the observations. More locally, the systematic low mixing ratio of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase simulated by WRF/CHEM at three stations was correlated with the underestimation of OM (organic matter) mass in the aerosol phase. Moreover, this mass of OM was mainly composed of anthropogenic POAs (primary organic aerosols) in WRF/CHEM, suggesting a missing source for SOAs (secondary organic aerosols) mass in WRF/CHEM aerosol parameterisation. The contribution of OM was well simulated by Meso-NH, with a higher contribution for the summer case. For Meso

  13. "Virtual injector" flow tube method for measuring relative rates kinetics of gas-phase and aerosol species.

    PubMed

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2012-06-28

    A new method for measuring gas-phase and aerosol reaction kinetics is described in which the gas flow, itself, acts as a "virtual injector" continuously increasing the contact time in analogy to conventional movable-injector kinetics techniques. In this method a laser is directed down the length of a flow tube, instantly initiating reaction by photodissociation of a precursor species at every point throughout the flow tube. Key tropospheric reactants such as OH, Cl, NO(3), and O(3) can be generated with nearly uniform concentrations along the length of the flow tube in this manner using 355 nm radiation from the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. As the flow travels down the flow tube, both the gas-phase and particle-phase species react with the photogenerated radicals or O(3) for increasingly longer time before exiting and being detected. The advantages of this method are that (1) any wall loss of gas-phase and particle species is automatically accounted for, (2) the reactions are conducted under nearly pseudo-first-order conditions, (3) the progress of the reaction is followed as a continuous function of reaction time instead of reactant concentration, (4) data collection is quick with an entire decay trace being collected in as little as 1 min, (5) relative rates of several species can be measured simultaneously, and (6) bimolecular rate constants at least as small as k = 10(-17) (cm(3)/molecule)/s, or aerosol uptake coefficients at least as small as γ = 10(-4), can be measured. Using the virtual injector technique with an aerosol chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) as a detector, examples of gas-phase relative rates and uptake by oleic acid particles are given for OH, Cl, NO(3), and O(3) reactions with most agreeing to within 20% of published values, where available.

  14. Air pollution from gas flaring: new emission factor estimates and detection in a West African aerosol remote-sensing climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie, Rob; Fawole, Olusegun Gabriel; Levine, James; Cai, Xiaoming

    2016-04-01

    Gas flaring, the disposal of gas through stacks in an open-air flame, is a common feature in the processing of crude oil, especially in oil-rich regions of the world. Gas flaring is a prominent source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), CO, CO2, nitrogen oxides (NOx), SO2 (in "sour" gas only), and soot (black carbon), as well as the release of locally significant amounts of heat. The rates of emission of these pollutants from gas flaring depend on a number of factors including, but not limited to, fuel composition and quantity, stack geometry, flame/combustion characteristics, and prevailing meteorological conditions. Here, we derive new estimated emission factors (EFs) for carbon-containing pollutants (excluding PAH). The air pollution dispersion model, ADMS5, is used to simulate the dispersion of the pollutants from flaring stacks in the Niger delta. A seasonal variation of the dispersion pattern of the pollutant within a year is studied in relation to the movements of the West Africa Monsoon (WAM) and other prevailing meteorological factors. Further, we have clustered AERONET aerosol signals using trajectory analysis to identify dominant aerosol sources at the Ilorin site in West Africa (4.34 oE, 8.32 oN). A 10-year trajectory-based analysis was undertaken (2005-2015, excluding 2010). Of particular interest are air masses that have passed through the gas flaring region in the Niger Delta area en-route the AERONET site. 7-day back trajectories were calculated using the UK Universities Global Atmospheric Modelling Programme (UGAMP) trajectory model which is driven by analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). From the back-trajectory calculations, dominant sources are identified, using literature classifications: desert dust (DD); Biomass burning (BB); and Urban-Industrial (UI). We use a combination of synoptic trajectories and aerosol optical properties to distinguish a fourth source

  15. Atmospheric oxidation of 1,3-butadiene: characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implications for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Docherty, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Kleindienst, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas- and particle-phase products. The chemical composition of the gas phase and SOA was analyzed using derivative-based methods (BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, or DNPH) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the derivative compounds. The analysis showed the occurrence of more than 60 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phases, of which 31 organic monomers were tentatively identified. The major identified products include glyceric acid, d-threitol, erythritol, d-threonic acid, meso-threonic acid, erythrose, malic acid, tartaric acid, and carbonyls including glycolaldehyde, glyoxal, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, and peroxyacryloyl nitrate (APAN). Some of these were detected in ambient PM2.5 samples, and could potentially serve as organic markers of 13BD. Furthermore, a series of oligoesters were detected and found to be produced through chemical reactions occurring in the aerosol phase between compounds bearing alcoholic groups and compounds bearing acidic groups. SOA was analyzed for organic mass to organic carbon (OM /OC) ratio, effective enthalpy of vaporization (Δ Hvapeff), and aerosol yield. The average OM /OC ratio and SOA density were 2.7 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.05, respectively. The average Δ Hvapeff was -26.08 ± 1.46 kJ mol-1, a value lower than that of isoprene SOA. The average laboratory SOA yield measured in this study at aerosol mass concentrations between 22.5 and 140.2 μg m-3 was 0.025 ± 0.011, a value consistent with the literature (0.021-0.178). While the focus of this study has been examination of the particle-phase measurements, the gas-phase photooxidation products have also been

  16. Top-down constraints to aerosol emissions from open biomass burning: the role of gas-particle partitioning and secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Petetin, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Open biomass burning (BB), including wildfires and controlled burns in agriculture and foresty, is known to provide an important contribution to organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC) emissions on the global scale. However, quantitative estimates of BB aerosol emissions and their effects on climate and environment remain rather uncertain. A useful way to constrain the OA&BC emissions involves using atmospheric measurements in the framework of the inverse modeling approach. In such an approach, the relationship between the emissions and the measurements is simulated by a chemistry transport model; this means that top-down estimates may be sensitive to possible model uncertainties. As a result of assimilation of satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, several recent studies (e.g. [1,2]) indicated that aerosol emissions provided by bottom-up emission inventories may be strongly underestimated relative to emissions of gaseous species (such as CO). Meanwhile, it was earlier shown (e.g. [3]) that the relationship between primary organic aerosol emissions and aerosol concentration in the atmosphere can be significantly affected by gas-particle partitioning and oxidation of lower-volatility organic emissions; these processes are usually not taken into account in typical chemistry transport models. The main goal of this study was to examine to what degree the discrepancy between the OA&BC/CO emission ratios predicted by the bottom-up inventories and derived from satellite observations can be associated with the mentioned processes and explained in the framework of the volatility basis set approach (VBS) [3] to OA modelling. To achieve this goal, a VBS scheme, which was recently implemented in the CHIMERE chemistry transport model (CTM), was first modified to account for OA emissions from biomass burning. An ensemble of simulations with the CHIMERE CTM was then performed for the case of the 2010 mega-fire event in European Russia [4]; each of the simulations

  17. A model for the natural and anthropogenic aerosols over the tropical Indian Ocean derived from Indian Ocean Experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S. K.; Ramanathan, V.; Li-Jones, Xu; Lobert, J. M.; Podgorny, I. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Holben, B. N.; Loeb, N. G.

    1999-11-01

    The physical, chemical and radiative properties of aerosols are investigated over the tropical Indian Ocean during the first field phase (FFP) of the international Indian Ocean Experiment. The FFP was conducted during February 20 to March 31, 1998. The results shown here are from the Kaashidhoo Climate Observatory (KCO), a new surface observatory established on the tiny island of Kaashidhoo (4.965°N, 73.466°E) in the Republic of Maldives. From simultaneous measurements of aerosol physical, chemical, and radiative properties and the vertical structure from lidar, we have developed an aerosol model which, in conjunction with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model, successfully explains (within a few percent) the observed solar radiative fluxes at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere. This agreement demonstrates the fundamental importance of measuring aerosol physical and chemical properties for modeling radiative fluxes. KCO, during the northeast monsoon period considered here, is downwind of the Indian subcontinent and undergoes variations in the aerosol visible optical depth τν from ˜0.1 to 0.4, with a monthly mean of ˜0.2. Lidar data suggest that the aerosol is confined largely to the first 3 kms. Sulfate and ammonium contribute ˜29% to τν; sea-salt and nitrate contributes ˜17%; mineral dust contributes ˜15%; and the inferred soot, organics, and fly ash contribute 11%, 20%, and 8% respectively. We estimate that anthropogenic sources may contribute as much as 65% to the observed τν. We consider both an externally and an internally mixed aerosol model with very little difference between the two in the computed radiative forcing. The observed scattering coefficients are in the upper range of those reported for other oceanic regions, the single-scattering albedos are as low as 0.9, and the Angstrom wavelength exponents of ˜1.2 indicate the abundance of submicron aerosols. In summary, the data and the model confirm the large impact of

  18. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; Denjean, C.; Brogniez, G.; di Sarra, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, T.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Waquet, F.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2016-01-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Impact on the regional climate in the MEDiterranean region (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental setup also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote-sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modeling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to producing high

  19. Seasonal variations in Titan's stratosphere observed with Cassini/CIRS: temperature, trace molecular gas and aerosol mixing ratio profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bézard, B.; Anderson, C.; Teanby, N.; Lebonnois, S.; Rannou, P.; de Kok, R.; T. CIRS Team

    2013-09-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. [1]) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g., [2], [3], [4], [5]). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limbgeometry datasets acquired in 2010, 2011 and 2012 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ...) and aerosol abundances.

  20. Greenhouse gas aerosols and pollutants over Siberia: the YAK-AEROSIB French Russian Joint International Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Jean-Daniel; Belan, Boris D.; Ancellet, Gérard; Nédélec, Philippe; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Pruvost, Arnaud; Berchet, Antoine; Arzoumanian, Emmanuel; Pison, Isabelle; Ciais, Philippe; Law, Kathy

    2014-05-01

    Despite the unique scientific value of better knowing atmospheric composition over Siberia, regional observations of the tropospheric composition over this region are still lacking. Large local anthropogenic emissions, strong ecosystem gas exchange across the vast forest expanse, and processes feeding back to global climate such as wetlands CH4 emissions, seabed hydrates destabilization and degrading permafrost make this region particularly crucial to investigate. We aim at addressing this need in the YAK-AEROSIB program by collecting high-precision in-situ measurements of the vertical distribution of CO2, CH4, CO, O3, black carbon and ultrafine particles distribution in the Siberian troposphere, as well as other parameters including aerosol lidar profiles, on a pan-Siberian aircraft transect. Campaigns are performed almost annually since 2006 until now on this regular route, while special campaigns are occasionnally arranged to sample the troposphere elsewere (e.g. Russian Arctic coast). We show the background tropospheric composition obtained from these surveys, the variability and the impact of large-scale transport of anthropogenic emissions from Europe and Asia, as well as the impact of biomass burning plumes both from local wildfires (2012) and from remote sources elsewhere in Asia. Long range transport of anthropogenic emissions is shown to have a discernible impact on O3 distribution, although its lower-tropospheric variability is largely driven by surface deposition. Regional sources and sinks drive the lower troposphere CO2 and CH4 concentrations. Recent efforts aim at better understanding the respective role of CH4 emission processes (including methanogenesis in wetlands and emissions by wildfires) in driving its large scale atmospheric variability over the region. Generally, the YAK AEROSIB provide unique observations over Siberia, documenting both direct impact of regional sources and aged air masses experiencing long range transport toward the high

  1. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  2. A Theoretical Study on Gas-Phase Coating of Aerosol Particles

    PubMed

    Jain; Fotou; Kodas

    1997-01-01

    In situ coating of aerosol particles by gas-phase and surface reaction in a flow reactor is modeled accounting for scavenging (capture of small particles by large particles) and simultaneous surface reaction along with the finite sintering rate of the scavenged particles. A log-normal size distribution is assumed for the host and coating particles to describe coagulation and a monodisperse size distribution is used for the coating particles to describe sintering. As an example, coating of titania particles with silica in a continuous flow hot-wall reactor was modeled. High temperatures, low reactant concentrations, and large host particle surface areas favored smoother coatings in the parameter range: temperature 1700-1800 K, host particle number concentration 1 x 10(5)-1 x 10(7) #/cm3, average host particle size 1 &mgr;m, inlet coating reactant concentration (SiCl4) 2 x 10(-7)-2 x 10(-10) mol/cm3, and various surface reaction rates. The fraction of silica deposited on the TiO2 particles decreased by more than seven times with a hundredfold increase in SiCl4 inlet concentration because of the resulted increase in the average SiO2 particle size under the assumed coating conditions. Increasing the TiO2 particle number concentration resulted in higher scavenging efficiency of SiO2. In the TiO2/SiO2 system it is likely that surface reaction as well as scavenging play important roles in the coating process. The results agree qualitatively with experimental observations of TiO2 particles coated in situ with silica.

  3. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    DOE PAGES

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; et al

    2016-07-25

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS–MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI–IMS–MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambientmore » field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS–MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS–MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS–MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS–MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of

  5. Gas-particle partitioning of organic acids during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS): measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Khan, M. A. H.; Holzinger, R.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Thornton, J. A.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Gas-Particle partitioning measurements of organic acids were carried out during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS, June-July 2013) at the Centerville, AL Supersite in the Southeast US, a region with significant isoprene and terpene emissions. Organic acid measurements were made with a Chemical Ionization High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsols (FIGAERO) and acetate (CH3COO-) as the reagent ion. We investigate both individual species and bulk organic acids and partitioning to organic and water phases in the aerosol. Measured partitioning is compared to data from three other instruments that can also quantify gas-particle partitioning with high time resolution: another HRToF-CIMS using iodide (I-) as the reagent ion to ionize acids and other highly oxidized compounds, a Semivolatile Thermal Desorption Aerosol GC/MS (SV-TAG), and a Thermal Desorption Proton Transfer Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TD-PTRMS The partitioning measurements for three of the instruments are generally consistent, with results in the same range for most species and following similar temporal trends and diurnal cycles. The TD-PTRMS measures on average ½ the partitioning to the particle phase of the acetate CIMS. Both the measurements and the model of partitioning to the organic phase respond quickly to temperature, and the model agrees with the measured partitioning within the error of the measurement for multiple compounds, although many compounds do not match the modeled partitioning, especially at lower m/z. This discrepancy may be due to thermal decomposition of larger molecules into smaller ones when heated.

  6. Field detection of bacillus spore aerosols with stand-alone pyrolysis-gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, A.; Maswadeh, Waleed M.; Parsons, John A.; Tripathi, Ashish; Meuzelaar, Henk L. C.; Dworzanski, Jacek P.; Kim, Man-Goo

    1999-12-01

    A commercially available, hand-held chemical vapor detector was modified to detect Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis var. globigii spores (BG) in outdoor field scenarios. An Airborne Vapor Monitor (AVM) ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) vapor detector was interfaced to a biological sample processing and transfer introduction system. The biological sample processing was accomplished by quartz tube pyrolysis (Py), and the resultant vapor was transferred by gas chromatography (GC) to the IMS detector. The Py-GC/IMS system can be described as a hyphenated device where two analytical dimensions, in series, allow the separation and isolation of individual components from the pyrolytic decomposition of biological analytes. Gram positive spores such as BG contain 5 - 15% by weight of dipicolinic acid (DPA), and picolinic acid is a pyrolysis product of DPA. Picolinic acid has a high proton affinity, and it is detected in a sensitive fashion by the atmospheric pressure-based IMS device. Picolinic acid occupies a unique region in the GC/IMS data domain with respect to other bacterial pyrolysis products. A 1000 to 1, air-to-air, aerosol concentrator was interfaced to the Py-GC/IMS instrument, and the system was placed in an open-air, Western United States desert environment. The system was tested with BG spore aerosol releases, and the instrument was remotely operated during a trial. A Met-One aerosol particle counter was placed next to the Py-GC/IMS so as to obtain a real-time record of the ambient and bacterial aerosol challenges. The presence/absence of an aerosol event, determined by an aerosol particle counter and a slit sampler-agar plate system, was compared to the presence/absence of a picolinic acid response in a GC/IMS data window at selected times in a trial with respect to a BG challenge. In the 21 BG trials, the Py-GC/IMS instrument experienced two true negatives, no false positives, and the instrument developed a software failure in one trial. The remaining 18 trials

  7. Ozone and aerosol distributions measured by airborne lidar during the 1988 Arctic Boundary Layer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Kooi, Susan A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to O3 and aerosol distributions measured from an aircraft using a DIAL system in order to study the sources and sinks of gases and aerosols over the tundra regions of Alaska during summer 1988. The tropospheric O3 budget over the Arctic was found to be strongly influenced by stratospheric intrusions. Regions of low aerosol scattering and enhanced O3 mixing ratios were usually correlated with descending air from the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere.

  8. Retrieval of composition and size distribution of stratospheric aerosols with the SAGE II satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1986-01-01

    The SAGE II satellite system was launched on October 5, 1984. It has seven radiometric channels and is beginning to provide water vapor, NO2, and O3 concentration profiles and aerosol extinction profiles at a minimum of three wavelengths. A simple, fast and operational method of retrieving characteristics of stratospheric aerosols from the water vapor and three-wavelength aerosol extinction profiles is proposed. Some examples are given to show the practicality of the scheme. Possible sources of error for the retrieved values and the limitation of the proposed method are discussed. This method may also prove applicable to the study of aerosol characteristics in other multispectral extinction measurements.

  9. Developments and plans for new drifting balloon experiments in the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx) project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, François; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, Marc; Thouret, Valérie; Attié, Jean-Luc

    ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a new integrated project which aims at an assessment of the present state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean basin, of its impacts on air quality, regional climate and marine biogeochemistry, and of their evolution in a regional context of intense climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressure. The Mediterranean is indeed characterized by a long dry and sunny season with high concentrations of aerosols and gaseous pollutants such as ozone. ChArMEx plans large international coordinated field campaigns with surface stations and airborne platforms including drifting balloons for studying the ageing of continental air masses transported over the basin. We are willing to deploy two types of balloons: (i) The Aeroclipper is a low altitude streamlined balloon drifting at 50 m over the sea surface and equipped with a cable and a guide-rope in contact with the surface ocean. It moves on a quasi-Lagrangian trajectory depending on the surface wind and marine current. Its instru-mentation is distributed on one atmospheric gondola and one oceanic gondola with the aim to measure surface physical parameters (air and sea surface temperatures, wind, pressure and humidity) in order to derive turbulent fluxes of moisture, heat and momentum. (ii) The BPCL is a long duration super-pressure balloon designed to drift in the atmospheric boundary layer. It moves on a quasi-Lagrangian trajectory at an adjustable constant atmo-spheric density level which altitude ranges between a few hundreds of m and about 3 km. Its instrumentation includes air pressure, temperature and humidity. Both balloon types are equipped with a positioning system and a data transmission system. In addition we are developing new small instruments to be integrated in the payload of these two balloon types. This includes radiation sensors to measure visible and infrared fluxes, an optical particle counter

  10. Response of North Pacific eastern subtropical mode water to greenhouse gas versus aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Yiyong

    2016-04-01

    Mode water is a distinct water mass characterized by a near vertical homogeneous layer or low potential vorticity, and is considered essential for understanding ocean climate variability. Based on the output of GFDL CM3, this study investigates the response of eastern subtropical mode water (ESTMW) in the North Pacific to two different single forcings: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosol. Under GHG forcing, ESTMW is produced on lighter isopycnal surfaces and is decreased in volume. Under aerosol forcing, in sharp contrast, it is produced on denser isopycnal surfaces and is increased in volume. The main reason for the opposite response is because surface ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux change over the ESTMW formation region shoals the mixed layer and thus weakens the lateral induction under GHG forcing, but deepens the mixed layer and thus strengthens the lateral induction under aerosol forcing. In addition, local wind changes are also favorable to the opposite response of ESTMW production to GHG versus aerosol.

  11. CALIPSO Observations of Volcanic Aerosol in the Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.; Pitts, Michael C.

    2008-01-01

    In the stratosphere, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) has observed the presence of aerosol plumes associated with the eruptions several volcanoes including Montserrat (May 2006), Chaiten (May 2008), and Kasatochi (August 2008). While the dense ash plumes from these eruptions dissipate relatively quickly, CALIPSO continued to detect an enhanced aerosol layer from the Montserrat eruption from the initial observations in June 2006 well into 2008. Solar occultation missions were uniquely capable of monitoring stratospheric aerosol. However, since the end of long-lived instruments like the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II), there has been no clear space-based successor instrument. A number of active instruments, some employing new techniques, are being evaluated as candidate sources of stratospheric aerosol data. Herein, we examine suitability of the CALIPSO 532-nm aerosol backscatter coefficient measurements.

  12. ABOVE03, The 2003 AIRS BBAERI Ocean Validation Experiment: AIRS Validation and Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, W. W.; Hoff, R.; Strow, L. L.; Desouza-Machado, S.; Lightner, K.; McCourt, M. L.; Maddy, E.; Kolb, N.; McCann, K.; Comer, J.; Russo, F.; Rutledge, C. K.

    2003-12-01

    From May 28 to July 9, 2003, a complementary set of instruments was deployed to the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Chesapeake Light lighthouse platform to provide correlative measurements characterizing the atmosphere and sea surface over the ocean for validation of NASA's Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) onboard the Aqua satellite. Located 25 km due east of Virginia Beach, VA, Chesapeake Light offers a relatively convenient site for measurements over the ocean while being far enough offshore for water only AIRS fields of view. In addition to the UMBC Baltimore Bomem Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (BBAERI), the UMBC Elastic Lidar Facility (ELF), and Vaisala RS-90 rawinsondes used during ABOVE02, we deployed in situ O3 and CO gas analyzers and during the first three weeks, flew 18 ozonesondes in collaboration with Dr. Mike Newchurch, UAH. A total of 140 Vaisala RS-90 radiosondes were launched covering 61 Aqua and 12 Terra overpasses. Preliminary comparisons of ABOVE03 data products to AIRS observations and retrievals will be presented. Particular attention will be paid to both AIRS and ground-based aerosol observations.

  13. Proper battery system design for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calogero, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help the GAS experimenter to design a battery system that meets mission success requirements while at the same time reducing the hazards associated with the battery system. Lead-acid, silver-zinc and alkaline chemistry batteries will be discussed. Lithium batteries will be briefly discussed with emphasis on back-up power supply capabilities. The hazards associated with different battery configurations will be discussed along with the controls necessary to make the battery system two-fault tolerant.

  14. Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) gas cell life test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, E. M.; Thompson, R. E.; Harvey, G. A.; Park, J. H.; Richardson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) will use gas filter correlation radiometry to measure the atmospheric concentration profiles of HCl, HF, NO, and CH4 from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The need to contain the gases for the gas filter measurements has resulted in the development of gas cells and the need for a life test program to demonstrate that the gas cells will perform their functions for extended periods (several years) of time. This report describes the tests in the life test program, the test apparatus used, and the analysis techniques developed. The report also presents data obtained during the first 14 months of the test program.

  15. The FLAME Deluge: organic aerosol emission ratios from combustion chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolleys, Matthew; Coe, Hugh; McFiggans, Gordon; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Sullivan, Amy; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Collett, Jeff

    2014-05-01

    A high level of variability has been identified amongst organic aerosol (OA) emission ratios (ER) from biomass burning (BB) under ambient conditions. However, it is difficult to assess the influences of potential drivers for this variability, given the wide range of conditions associated with wildfire measurements. Chamber experiments performed under controlled conditions provide a means of examining the effects of different fuel types and combustion conditions on OA emissions from biomass fuels. ERs have been characterised for 67 burns during the second Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment (FLAME II), involving 19 different species from 6 fuel types widely consumed in BB events in the US each year. Average normalised dOA/dCO ratios show a high degree of variability, both between and within different fuel types and species, typically exceeding variability between separate plumes in ambient measurements. Relationships with source conditions were found to be complex, with little consistent influence from fuel properties and combustion conditions for the entire range of experiments. No strong correlation across all fires was observed between dOA/dCO and modified combustion efficiency (MCE), which is used as an indicator of the proportional contributions of flaming and smouldering combustion phases throughout each burn. However, a negative correlation exists between dOA/dCO and MCE for some coniferous species, most notably Douglas fir, for which there is also an apparent influence from fuel moisture content. Significant contrasts were also identified between combustion emissions from different fuel components of additional coniferous species. Changes in fire efficiency were also shown to dramatically alter emissions for fires with very similar initial conditions. Although the relationship with MCE is variable between species, there is greater consistency with the level of oxygenation in OA. The ratio of the m/z 44 fragment to total OA mass concentration (f44) as

  16. Picosecond High Pressure Gas Switch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cravey, W.R.; Freytag, E.K.; Goerz, D.A.; Poulsen, P.; Pincosy, P.A.

    1993-08-01

    A high Pressure Gas Switch has been developed and tested at LLNL. Risetimes on the order of 200 picoseconds have been observed at 1 kHz prf and 1 atmosphere pressures. Calculations show that switching closure times on the order of tens of picoseconds can be achieved at higher pressures and electric fields. A voltage hold-off of 1 MV/cm has been measured at 10 atmospheres and several MV/cm appears possible with the HPGS. With such high electric field levels, energy storage of tens of Joules in a reasonably sized package is achievable. Initial HPGS performance has been characterized using the WASP pulse generator at LLNL. A detailed description of the switch used for initial testing is given. Switch recovery times of 1-ms have been measured at 1 atmosphere. Data on the switching uniformity, voltage hold-off recovery, and pulse repeatability, is presented. In addition, a physics switch model is described and results are compared with experimental data. Modifications made to the WASP HV pulser in order to drive the HPGS will also be discussed. Recovery times of less than 1 ms were recorded without gas flow in the switch chambers. Low pressure synthetic air was used as the switch dielectric. Longer recovery times were required when it was necessary to over-voltage the switch.

  17. A Comprehensive Archive of Aerosol and Trace Gas Spatial Distributions for Model and Satellite Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Meland, B. S.; Axisa, D.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Denver Aerosol Group has assembled measured aerosol size distributions, gaseous concentrations, and atmospheric state variables covering a 30 year time period into one comprehensive archive. Measurements were made during the period 1987-2013 and include data from a total of 21 NASA field campaigns. Measurements were taken from the ground to over 21 km in altitude, from 72 S Latitude to 90 N latitude on over 300 individual flights on NASA Research Aircraft. Aerosol measurements were made with the University of Denver's Nucleation-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer (NMASS), Focused Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer, and/or a low-pressure Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) depending on the specific campaign. The science payloads varied with the campaign objectives, but the aerosol data were invariably acquired in conjunction with measurements by other investigators placing them in the context of atmospheric composition. The archive includes location and time of the measurements along with the tropopause heights and selected atmospheric composition and state data such as ambient temperatures and pressures, abundances of ozone, N2O, oxides of nitrogen, water vapor, CO2 etc. The data archive is stored in NetCDF format and includes all relevant metadata for measured quantities. This archive will be hosted by NASA and will be available to the public for model validation. The data includes indexing by scientific campaign, date, and spatial coordinates. This will facilitate comparisons across the available range of times, locations and related measurements. This data set has been used for validation of satellite remote sensing data. Coincident measurements of aerosol size distributions were used to calculate extinction profiles which were compared to those retrieved with the SAGE II satellite. Agreement between extinctions derived from the in situ size measurements and those provided by SAGE II was good for the 452, 525, and 1020 nm wavelength channels, but poor for

  18. Atmospheric oxidation of 1,3-butadiene: characterization of gas and aerosol reaction products and implication for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Docherty, K.; Offenberg, J. H.; Kleindienst, T. E.

    2014-06-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated by irradiating 1,3-butadiene (13BD) in the presence of H2O2 or NOx. Experiments were conducted in a smog chamber operated in either flow or batch mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas- and particle-phase products. The chemical composition of the gas phase and SOA was analyzed using derivative-based methods (BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, or DNPH) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of the derivative compounds. The analysis showed the occurrence of more than 60 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phases, of which 31 organic monomers were tentatively identified. The major identified products include glyceric acid, d-threitol, erythritol, d-threonic acid, meso-threonic acid, erythrose, malic acid, tartaric acid, and carbonyls including glycolaldehyde, glyoxal, acrolein, malonaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, and peroxyacryloyl nitrate (APAN). Some of these were detected in ambient PM2.5 samples and could potentially serve as organic markers of 1,3-butadiene (13BD). Furthermore, a series of oligoesters were detected and found to be produced from esterification reactions among compounds bearing alcoholic groups and compounds bearing acidic groups. Time profiles are provided for selected compounds. SOA was analyzed for organic mass to organic carbon (OM / OC) ratio, effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), and aerosol yield. The average OM / OC ratio and SOA density were 2.7 ± 0.09 and 1.2 ± 0.05, respectively. The average ΔHvapeff was 26.1 ± 1.5 kJ mol-1, a value lower than that of isoprene SOA. The average laboratory SOA yield measured in this study at aerosol mass concentrations between 22.5 and 140.2 μg m-3 was 0.025 ± 0.011, a value consistent with the literature (0.021-0.178). While the focus of this study has been examination of the particle-phase measurements, the gas

  19. Water uptake by organic aerosol and its influence on gas/particle partitioning of secondary organic aerosol in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu H.; Mahmud, Abdullah; Barsanti, Kelley C.; Asher, William E.; Pankow, James F.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) is at least partly hygroscopic, i.e., water partitions into the organic phase to a degree determined by the relative humidity (RH), the organic chemical composition, and the particle size. This organic-phase water increases the aerosol mass and provides a larger absorbing matrix while decreasing its mean molecular weight, which can encourage additional condensation of semi-volatile organic compounds. Most regional and global atmospheric models account for water uptake by inorganic salts but do not explicitly account for organic-phase water and its subsequent impact on gas/particle partitioning of semi-volatile OA. In this work, we incorporated the organic-phase water model described by Pankow et al. (2015) into the UCD/CIT air quality model to simulate water uptake by OA and assessed its influence on total OA mass concentrations. The model was run for one summer month over two distinct regions: South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) surrounding Los Angeles, California and the eastern United States (US). In SoCAB where the OA was dominated by non-hygroscopic primary OA (POA), there was very little organic-phase water uptake (0.1-0.2 μg m-3) and consequently very little enhancement (or growth) in total OA concentrations (OA + organic-phase water): a 3% increase in total OA mass was predicted for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity. In contrast, in the eastern US where secondary OA (SOA) from biogenic sources dominated the OA, substantial organic-phase water uptake and enhancement in total OA concentrations was predicted, even in urban locations. On average, the model predicted a 20% growth in total OA mass for a 0.1 increase in relative humidity; the growth was equivalent to a 250 nm particle with a hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 0.15. Further, for the same relative humidity, the exact extent of organic-phase water uptake and total OA enhancement was found to be dependent on the particle mixing state. When the source-oriented mixing state of aerosols

  20. Tropospheric water vapor and aerosol measurements obtained during LASE validation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Browell, E.V.; Ismail, S.; Hall, W.M.; Moore, A.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system flown on the NASA ER-2 aircraft to remotely measure distributions of tropospheric water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. LASE was developed at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to demonstrate autonomous operation of a DIAL system from a high-altitude aircraft as an important step towards developing a spaceborne DIAL system. LASE uses a double pulsed Ti:sapphire laser operating in the 815-nm absorption band of water vapor to generate the on- and off-line DIAL laser pulses. The system has two avalanche photodiode detectors and three signal digitizers to preserve the lidar backscatter signals over a large dynamic range. In September 1995, LASE completed a comprehensive validation program at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. The system was flown on the ER-2 during ten flights for a total of 60 hours. LASE measurements of tropospheric water vapor were compared with other remote and in situ measurements of water vapor from the ground and from aircraft which underflew the ER-2. Besides making intercomparisons with a number of water vapor sensors, this experiment incorporated a number of case studies related to atmospheric events including flights over and around Hurricane Luis over the Atlantic ocean, sea breeze development along the east coast of Virginia, and stratosphere-troposphere exchange. This paper presents data taken during this field experiment that demonstrate the accuracy of LASE for tropospheric water vapor measurements. The paper also discusses results from several of the atmospheric case studies conducted during this experiment and the potential future uses of LASE.

  1. Predicting the aerosol performance of dry powder inhalation formulations by interparticulate interaction analysis using inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tong, Henry H Y; Shekunov, Boris Y; York, Peter; Chow, Albert H L

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) in discriminating the differences in surface energy between salmeterol xinafoate (SX) powders prepared by conventional sequential batch crystallization and micronization and by supercritical fluid crystallization. In the present study, solubility parameters derived from IGC analysis at infinite dilution (zero coverage) were further utilized to evaluate the influence of solid-solid interactions on the in vitro aerosol performance of these SX samples, with or without the inclusion of a lactose carrier. To this end, the strength of cohesive SX-SX interactions and that of adhesive SX-lactose interactions were computed for the samples from the corresponding solubility parameters, and their fine particle fractions determined using a multi-stage liquid impinger. It was found that the aerosol performance of SX could be substantially improved by the addition of lactose carrier only if the adhesive SX-lactose interactions were stronger than the cohesive SX-SX interactions. The difference in strength between these two forms of interactions also displayed a significant correlation with the increase in fine particle fraction after the addition of lactose carrier. These results suggest that IGC-based interparticulate interaction measurements may serve as a useful means for predicting the aerosol performance of dry powder inhalation formulations.

  2. Aerosol and nucleation research in support of NASA cloud physics experiments in space. [ice nuclei generator for the atmospheric cloud physics laboratory on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vali, G.; Rogers, D.; Gordon, G.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Reischel, M.; Black, R.

    1978-01-01

    Tasks performed in the development of an ice nucleus generator which, within the facility concept of the ACPL, would provide a test aerosol suitable for a large number and variety of potential experiments are described. The impact of Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory scientific functional requirements on ice nuclei generation and characterization subsystems was established. Potential aerosol generating systems were evaluated with special emphasis on reliability, repeatability and general suitability for application in Spacelab. Possible contamination problems associated with aerosol generation techniques were examined. The ice nucleating abilities of candidate test aerosols were examined and the possible impact of impurities on the nucleating abilities of those aerosols were assessed as well as the relative merits of various methods of aerosol size and number density measurements.

  3. Interpretation of FRESCO cloud retrievals in case of absorbing aerosol events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tilstra, L. G.; de Graaf, M.; Stammes, P.

    2012-10-01

    Cloud and aerosol information is needed in trace gas retrievals from satellite measurements. The Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band (FRESCO) cloud algorithm employs reflectance spectra of the O2 A band around 760 nm to derive cloud pressure and effective cloud fraction. In general, clouds contribute more to the O2 A band reflectance than aerosols. Therefore, the FRESCO algorithm does not correct for aerosol effects in the retrievals and attributes the retrieved cloud information entirely to the presence of clouds, and not to aerosols. For events with high aerosol loading, aerosols may have a dominant effect, especially for almost cloud free scenes. We have analysed FRESCO cloud data and Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) data from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2) instrument on the Metop-A satellite for events with typical absorbing aerosol types, such as volcanic ash, desert dust and smoke. We find that the FRESCO effective cloud fractions are correlated with the AAI data for these absorbing aerosol events and that the FRESCO cloud pressure contains information on aerosol layer pressure. For cloud free scenes, the derived FRESCO cloud pressure is close to the aerosol layer pressure, especially for optically thick aerosol layers. For cloudy scenes, if the strongly absorbing aerosols are located above the clouds, then the retrieved FRESCO cloud pressure may represent the height of the aerosol layer rather than the height of the clouds. Combining FRESCO and AAI data, an estimate for the aerosol layer pressure can be given.

  4. Overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment/Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ChArMEx/ADRIMED) summer 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, M.; Dulac, F.; Formenti, P.; Nabat, P.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Pelon, J.; Ancellet, G.; Tanré, D.; Parol, F.; di Sarra, A.; Alados, L.; Arndt, J.; Auriol, F.; Blarel, L.; Bourrianne, T.; Brogniez, G.; Chazette, P.; Chevaillier, S.; Claeys, M.; D'Anna, B.; Denjean, C.; Derimian, Y.; Desboeufs, K.; Di Iorio, T.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand, P.; Féron, A.; Freney, E.; Gaimoz, C.; Goloub, P.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Grand, N.; Hamonou, E.; Jankowiak, I.; Jeannot, M.; Léon, J.-F.; Maillé, M.; Mailler, S.; Meloni, D.; Menut, L.; Momboisse, G.; Nicolas, J.; Podvin, J.; Pont, V.; Rea, G.; Renard, J.-B.; Roblou, L.; Schepanski, K.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Sellegri, K.; Sicard, M.; Solmon, F.; Somot, S.; Torres, B.; Totems, J.; Triquet, S.; Verdier, N.; Verwaerde, C.; Wenger, J.; Zapf, P.

    2015-07-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a collaborative research program federating international activities to investigate Mediterranean regional chemistry-climate interactions. A special observing period (SOP-1a) including intensive airborne measurements was performed in the framework of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing on the Mediterranean Climate (ADRIMED) project during the Mediterranean dry season over the western and central Mediterranean basins, with a focus on aerosol-radiation measurements and their modeling. The SOP-1a took place from 11 June to 5 July 2013. Airborne measurements were made by both the ATR-42 and F-20 French research aircraft operated from Sardinia (Italy) and instrumented for in situ and remote-sensing measurements, respectively, and by sounding and drifting balloons, launched in Minorca. The experimental set-up also involved several ground-based measurement sites on islands including two ground-based reference stations in Corsica and Lampedusa and secondary monitoring sites in Minorca and Sicily. Additional measurements including lidar profiling were also performed on alert during aircraft operations at EARLINET/ACTRIS stations at Granada and Barcelona in Spain, and in southern Italy. Remote sensing aerosol products from satellites (MSG/SEVIRI, MODIS) and from the AERONET/PHOTONS network were also used. Dedicated meso-scale and regional modelling experiments were performed in relation to this observational effort. We provide here an overview of the different surface and aircraft observations deployed during the ChArMEx/ADRIMED period and of associated modeling studies together with an analysis of the synoptic conditions that determined the aerosol emission and transport. Meteorological conditions observed during this campaign (moderate temperatures and southern flows) were not favorable to produce high level of atmospheric pollutants nor

  5. Real life experience with multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters

    SciTech Connect

    Sakariassen, R.

    1996-12-31

    Multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters are to be considered as newcomers among flow meters for large, high pressure gas flows. Although the advantages of this type of meters are many and obvious, the metering community is still hesitating to go for it mainly because of lack of experience. The objective of this paper is to present the experience of Statoil after more than six years experience with multipath ultrasonic gas flow meters. Their experience includes laboratory testing and operation in the field for a variety of designs and dimensions. This paper presents the accuracy achieved by such meters including comparison between ultrasonic meters and orifice metering systems in operation, the unique possibilities that this type of meter offers for on-line verification of performance and installation effects. Of particular interest should be noted that in the vicinity of low-noise control valves, such meters could stop functioning completely if no precautions are taken.

  6. Aerosol characteristics over Bay of Bengal during winter: Results from W-ICARB experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, P. R.; Manchanda, R. K.; Shankarnarayan, Sreenivasan; Babu, S. Suresh; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    The measurements of aerosol physical optical properties were carried out over placeBay of Bengal (BoB) during the period 27 December 2008--30 January 2009 as part of Winter Integrated Campaign on Aerosols, Gases and Radiation Budget (W-ICARB). The aerosol number size distribution at the surface was found to be bi-modal in the 72% of the cases with mode radius for the submicron aerosol of 0.13±0.01 μ m and 0.72±0.10μ m for the super-micron aerosol and the highest NT (350-550 cm{-3}), AOD500 (0.7}) and α 380-870 values were observed in western and northern BoB with lower values in the southern and parts of central BoB. The eastern part of BoB which was investigated for the first time showed concurrently high values of NT (200 and 300 cm-3), AOD500 (0.39±0.07) and α 380-870 (1.27±0.09). The aerosol types are examined using a classification scheme based on the relationship between aerosol load (AOD500) and particle size (α 380-870). The classification scheme indicated an extremely large fraction of fine-mode aerosols in turbid atmospheres, which is even larger than 90% in the western part of BoB and approaches 100% over eastern BoB. Furthermore, there is also an evidence of aerosol-size growth under more turbid conditions indicative of coagulation and/or humidification over specific BoB regions. The altitude variation of aerosol number density made for the first time over five different locations in BoB is found to be nearly steady at all locations within the convective boundary layer (up to 400 m), while above the aerosol concentration is found to decrease except for far east BoB. Examination of the air-mass back trajectories and the aerosol size distribution indicates that the aerosols advected from continental country-regionIndia have a pronounced natural (coarse mode) component, while those originating from placeEast Asia are in general accumulation origin.

  7. An overview of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, François

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr) is a French initiative of the MISTRALS meta-programme (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales, http://www.mistrals-home.org). It federates a great number of national and international cooperative research actions aiming at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The target is short-lived particulate and gaseous tropospheric trace species which are the cause of poor air quality events, have two-way interactions with climate, or impact the marine biogeochemistry, in a context of strong regional anthropogenic and climatic pressures. The six ChArMEx work packages include Emissions, Chemical processes and ageing, Transport processes and air quality, Aerosol-radiation-climate interactions, Deposition, and Present and future variability and trends. For several years, efforts have been deployed in several countries to develop (i) a network of relevant stations for atmospheric chemistry at background sites on islands and continental coasts around the basin and (ii) several intensive field campaigns including the operation of surface supersites and various instrumented mobile platforms (large and ultra-light aircraft, sounding and drifting balloons, ZeroCO2 sailboat). This presentation is an attempt to provide an overview of the various experimental, remote sensing and modelling efforts produced and to highlight major findings, by referencing more detailed ChArMEx presentations given in this conference and recently published or submitted papers. During the first phase of the project experimental efforts have been mainly concentrated on the western basin. Plans for the 2nd phase of ChArMEx, more dedicated towards the eastern basin, will also be given. In particular we plan to develop monitoring activities at

  8. SAGE II aerosol data validation and initial data use - An introduction and overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    The process of validating data from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II and the initial use of the validated data are reviewed. The instruments developed for the SAGE II, the influence of the eruption of El Chichon on the global stratospheric aerosol, and various data validation experiments are discussed. Consideration is given to methods for deriving aerosol physical and optical properties from SAGE II extinction data and for inferring particle size distribution moments from SAGE II spectral extinction values.

  9. Comparison of cloud residual and background aerosol particle composition during the hill cap cloud experiment HCCT 2010 in Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.; Mertes, S.; van Pinxteren, D.; Klimach, T.; Herrmann, H.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of cloud residual and background aerosol particles as well as aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia (HCCT) experiment in September and October 2010 on the mountain site Schmücke (938m a.s.l.) in Germany. Background aerosol particles were sampled by an interstitial inlet whereas cloud droplets from orographic clouds were collected by a counter flow virtual impactor (CVI). Chemical composition analysis and sizing of the particles was done by single particle mass spectrometry using the bipolar Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA, particle diameter range 150 nm - 900 nm; Brands et al., 2011) and by two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (C-ToF, HR-ToF). Supplementary, the particle size distribution was measured with an optical particle counter (OPC, size range 0.25 μm - 32 μm). During the field campaign about 21000 positive and negative single particle mass spectra could be obtained from cloud residual particles and about 239000 from background aerosol particles. The data were clustered by means of the fuzzy c-means algorithm. The resulting clusters consisting of mass spectra with similar fragmentation patterns were, dependent on presence and combination of peaks, assigned to certain particle types. For both sampled particle types a large portion is internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate. This might be an explanation, why a comparison of the composition shows a higher fraction of soot particles and amine-containing particles among cloud residuals. Furthermore cloud residuals show a decreased fraction of particles being internally mixed only with nitrate (10%) compared to background aerosol particles (19%) of the same air masses, whereas the fraction of particles containing both nitrate and sulfate increases from 39% to 63% indicating cloud processing by uptake and oxidation of SO2 (Harris et al, 2013). Brands, M., Kamphus, M., Böttger, T., Schneider

  10. From Clusters to Atmospheric Aerosol Particles: Nucleation in the CLOUD Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    Globally, a significant source of cloud condensation nuclei for cloud formation is thought to originate from new particle formation (aerosol nucleation). Despite extensive research, many questions remain about the dominant nucleation mechanisms. Specifically, a quantitative understanding of the dependence of the nucleation rate on the concentration of the nucleating substances such as gaseous sulfuric acid, ammonia, water vapor and others has not been reached. This is of relevance for climate as the atmospheric concentrations of sulfuric acid, ammonia and other nucleating agents are strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. By providing extremely well controlled and essentially contaminant free conditions in the CLOUD chamber, we were able to show that indeed sulfuric acid is an important component for such new particle formation, however, for the typical temperatures encountered in the planetary boundary layer the concentrations of sulfuric acid are not high enough to explain the atmospheric observations. Moreover, the effect of ammonia, amines and oxidized organic molecules on the nucleation rate of sulfuric acid has been investigated in CLOUD so far. Recent developments in instrument technology such as the Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer have allowed us to investigate the chemical composition of charged as well as neutral clusters during such nucleation experiments. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) collaboration consists of 20 institutions from Europe and the United States and is funded by national funding institutions as well as the EU training network CLOUD-TRAIN (http://www.cloud-train.eu/).

  11. Gas and water recycling system for IOC vivarium experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, K.; Otsubo, K.

    1986-01-01

    Water and gas recycling units designed as one of the common experiment support system for the life science experiment facilities used in the Japanese Experiment Module are discussed. These units will save transportation and operation costs for the life science experiments in the space station. These units are also designed to have interfaces so simple that the connection to another life science experiment facilities such as the Research Animal Holding Facility developed by the Rockheed Missiles and Space Company can be easily done with small modification.

  12. Application of mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements for the investigation of megacity air pollution emissions: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meleux, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-01-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission development and the impact outside the source region, mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the Paris metropolitan area between 1 July and 31 July 2009 (summer conditions) and 15 January and 15 February 2010 (winter conditions) in the framework of the European Union FP7 MEGAPOLI project. Two mobile laboratories, MoLa and MOSQUITA, were deployed, and here an overview of these measurements and an investigation of the applicability of such measurements for the analysis of megacity emissions are presented. Both laboratories measured physical and chemical properties of fine and ultrafine aerosol particles as well as gas phase constituents of relevance for urban pollution scenarios. The applied measurement strategies include cross-section measurements for the investigation of plume structure and quasi-Lagrangian measurements axially along the flow of the city's pollution plume to study plume aging processes. Results of intercomparison measurements between the two mobile laboratories represent the adopted data quality assurance procedures. Most of the compared measurement devices show sufficient agreement for combined data analysis. For the removal of data contaminated by local pollution emissions a video tape analysis method was applied. Analysis tools like positive matrix factorization and peak integration by key analysis applied to high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer data are used for in-depth data analysis of the organic particulate matter. Several examples, including a combination of MoLa and MOSQUITA measurements on a cross section through the Paris emission plume, are provided to demonstrate how such mobile measurements can be used to investigate the emissions of a megacity. A critical discussion of advantages and limitations of mobile measurements for the investigation of megacity emissions completes this work.

  13. Application of mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements for the investigation of megacity air pollution emissions: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meleux, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-08-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission development and impact outside the source region mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the Paris metropolitan area between 1 July and 31 July 2009 (summer conditions) and 15 January and 15 February 2010 (winter conditions) in the framework of the European Union FP7 MEGAPOLI project. Two mobile laboratories, MoLa and MOSQUITA, were deployed, and here an overview of these measurements and an investigation of the applicability of such measurements for the analysis of megacity emissions are presented. Both laboratories measured physical and chemical properties of fine and ultrafine aerosol particles as well as gas phase constituents of relevance for urban pollution scenarios. The applied measurement strategies include cross section measurements for the investigation of plume structure and quasi-Lagrangian measurements radially away from the city center to study plume aging processes. Results of intercomparison measurements between the two mobile laboratories represent the adopted data quality assurance procedures. Most of the compared measurement devices show sufficient agreement for combined data analysis. For the removal of data contaminated by local pollution emissions a video tape analysis method was applied. Analysis tools like positive matrix factorization and peak integration by key analysis applied to high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer data are used for in-depth data analysis of the organic particulate matter. Several examples, including a combination of MoLa and MOSQUITA measurements on a cross section through the Paris emission plume are provided to demonstrate how such mobile measurements can be used to investigate the emissions of a megacity. A critical discussion of advantages and limitations of mobile measurements for the investigation of megacity emissions completes this work.

  14. Overview of Asian Biomass Burning and Dust Aerosols Measured during the Dongsha Experiment in the Spring of 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, N.; Tsay, S.; Wang, S.; Sheu, G.; Chi, K.; Lee, C.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    The international campaign of Dongsha Experiment was conducted in the northern SE Asian region during March-May 2010. It is a pre-study of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7SEAS) which seeks to perform interdisciplinary research in the field of aerosol-meteorology and climate interaction in the Southeast Asian region, particularly for the impact of biomass burning on cloud, atmospheric radiation, hydrological cycle, and regional climate. Participating countries include Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam, and USA (NASA, NRL, and NOAA). The main goals of Dongsha Experiment are (1) to develop the Dongsha Island (about 2 km2, 20°42'52" N, 116°43'51" E) in the South China Sea as an atmospheric observing platform of atmospheric chemistry, radiation and meteorological parameters, and (2) to characterize the chemical and physical properties of biomass burning aerosols in the northern SE Asian region. A monitoring network for ground-based measurements includes the Lulin Atmospheric Background Station (2,862 m MSL) in central Taiwan, Hen-Chun (coastal) in the very southern tip of Taiwan, Dongsha Island in South China Sea, Da Nang (near coastal region) in central Vietnam, and Chiang Mai (about 1,400 m, MSL) in northern Thailand. Besides, the Mobile Air Quality Station of Taiwan EPA and NASA/COMMIT were shipped to Dongsha Island for continuous measurements of CO, SO2, NOx, O3, and PM10, and aerosol optical and vertical profiles. Two Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) for aerosol chemistry were conducted during 14-30 March and 10-20 April 2010, respectively. Ten aerosol samplers were deployed for each station for characterizing the compositions of PM2.5/PM10 (some for TSP) including water-soluble ions, metal elements, BC/OC, Hg and dioxins. Sampling tubes of VOCs were also deployed. Concurrent measurements with IOP-1, Taiwanese R/V also made a mission to South China Sea during 14-19 March. Enhanced sounding at Dongsha Island was

  15. The evaluation of a shuttle borne lidar experiment to measure the global distribution of aerosols and their effect on the atmospheric heat budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipley, S. T.; Joseph, J. H.; Trauger, J. T.; Guetter, P. J.; Eloranta, E. W.; Lawler, J. E.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Odell, A. P.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A shuttle-borne lidar system is described, which will provide basic data about aerosol distributions for developing climatological models. Topics discussed include: (1) present knowledge of the physical characteristics of desert aerosols and the absorption characteristics of atmospheric gas, (2) radiative heating computations, and (3) general circulation models. The characteristics of a shuttle-borne radar are presented along with some laboratory studies which identify schemes that permit the implementation of a high spectral resolution lidar system.

  16. Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

    1995-05-01

    The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

  17. Organic Composition of PM2.5 and Size-Segregated Aerosols During the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE), Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, R. T.; Zika, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    Aerosol samples were collected for the analysis of organic source markers using a Tisch Environmental PM2.5 high volume sampler and two Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactors (MOUDIs) as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Tampa, Florida. PM2.5 samples were collected at ground level on quartz fiber filters (QFF) while size-segregated samples were collected 12 meter above ground level on aluminum foil discs. MOUDIs with aerodynamic cut diameters of 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32 and 0.17 um were used. Samples were collected on a 24 hour schedule. The collected samples were solvent extracted using a mixture of dichloromethane/acetone/hexane, concentrated and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) operated in single ion mode. PM2.5 extracts were analyzed using conventional splitless low volume injections (1 ul). Size-segregated aerosol extracts were analyzed using a Hewlett-Packard Programmable Temperature Vaporizing inlet (PTV) combined with large volume injections (80ul). Excellent chromatographic resolutions were obtained with either a 30 or 60 meter long RTX-5MS, 0.25 mm I.D. column. Target compounds were chosen to cover the range of potential sources and included alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Investigation of potential aerosol sources for different particle sizes using known organic markers and source profiles will be presented. Relationship between the collected PM2.5 and size-segregated samples will be studied. Size distributions of carbon preference indices (CPI), percent wax n-alkanes (%WNA) and concentration of selected compounds will be discussed.

  18. Particle Morphology and Size Results from the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Greenberg, Paul S.; Fischer, David; Meyer, Marit; Mulholland, George; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Bryg, Victoria; Cleary, Thomas; Yang, Jiann

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from the Reflight of the Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment (SAME-2) which was conducted during Expedition 24 (July-September 2010). The reflight experiment built upon the results of the original flight during Expedition 15 by adding diagnostic measurements and expanding the test matrix. Five different materials representative of those found in spacecraft (Teflon, Kapton, cotton, silicone rubber and Pyrell) were heated to temperatures below the ignition point with conditions controlled to provide repeatable sample surface temperatures and air flow. The air flow past the sample during the heating period ranged from quiescent to 8 cm/s. The smoke was initially collected in an aging chamber to simulate the transport time from the smoke source to the detector. This effective transport time was varied by holding the smoke in the aging chamber for times ranging from 11 to 1800 s. Smoke particle samples were collected on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids for post-flight analysis. The TEM grids were analyzed to observe the particle morphology and size parameters. The diagnostics included a prototype two-moment smoke detector and three different measures of moments of the particle size distribution. These moment diagnostics were used to determine the particle number concentration (zeroth moment), the diameter concentration (first moment), and the mass concentration (third moment). These statistics were combined to determine the diameter of average mass and the count mean diameter and, by assuming a log-normal distribution, the geometric mean diameter and the geometric standard deviations can also be calculated. Overall the majority of the average smoke particle sizes were found to be in the 200 nm to 400 nm range with the quiescent cases producing some cases with substantially larger particles.

  19. Validation studies using multiwavelength Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) observations of stratospheric aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massie, Steven T.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Bailey, Paul L.; Lyjak, Lawrence V.; Craig, Cheryl A.; Cavanaugh, Charles P.; Mergenthaler, John L.; Roche, Aidan E.; Kumer, John B.; Lambert, Alyn; Grainger, Roy G.; Rodgers, Clive D.; Taylor, Frederic W.; Russell, James M.; Park, Jae H.; Deshler, Terry; Hervig, Mark E.; Fishbein, Evan F.; Waters, Joe W.; Lahoz, William A.

    1996-04-01

    Validation studies of multiwavelength Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) observations of stratospheric aerosol are discussed. An error analysis of the CLAES aerosol extinction data is presented. Aerosol extinction precision values are estimated at latitudes and times at which consecutive Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) orbits overlap. Comparisons of CLAES aerosol data with theoretical Mie calculations, based upon in situ particle size measurements at Laramie, Wyoming, are presented. CLAES aerosol data are also compared to scaled aerosol extinction measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II) and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiments. Observed and calculated extinction spectra, from CLAES, Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS), and Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) data, are compared. CLAES extinction data have precisions between 10 and 25%, instrumental biases near 30%, and accuracies between 33 and 43%.

  20. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray F06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray F06 The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows a single experiment canister housing mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep peripheral tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The rectangular opening in the upper right corner of the experiment baseplate provide the mounting for the ground support equipment test connector. The white grid voltage connector box, mounted on the side of the canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the grid voltage box beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  1. Trace Gas/Aerosol Boundary Concentrations and their Impacts on Continental-scale AQMEII Modelling Domains

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over twenty modeling groups are participating in the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) in which a variety of mesoscale photochemical and aerosol air quality modeling systems are being applied to continental-scale domains in North America and Europe fo...

  2. LASE measurements of water vapor and aerosol profiles during the Plains Elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Ferrare, R. A.; Kooi, S. A.; Butler, C. F.; Notari, A.; Hair, J. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Ismail, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Plains Elevated Convection At Night (PECAN) field experiment, which was conducted during June-July 2015 over the central and southern plains. LASE is an active remote sensor that employs the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique to measure range resolved profiles of water vapor and aerosols above and below the aircraft. The DC-8 conducted nine local science flights from June 30- July 14 where LASE sampled water vapor and aerosol fields in support of the PECAN primary science objectives relating to better understanding nocturnal Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs), Convective Initiation (CI), the Low Level Jet (LLJ), bores, and to compare different airborne and ground based measurements. LASE observed large spatial and temporal variability in water vapor and aerosol distributions in advance of nocturnal MCSs, across bores resulting from MCS outflow boundaries, and across the LLJ associated with the development of MCSs and CI. An overview of the LASE data collected during the PECAN field experiment will be presented where emphasis will be placed on variability of water vapor profiles in the vicinity of severe storms and intense convection in the central and southern plains. Preliminary comparisons show good agreement between coincident LASE and radiosonde water vapor profiles. In addition, an advanced water vapor DIAL system being developed at NASA Langley will be discussed.

  3. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, WIlliam K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Paczj?c region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  4. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Pacific region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  5. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Interstellar Gas Experiment on the LDEF. The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep end tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to a wire mesh grid located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the grid voltage box and for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the power supply located beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  6. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Interstellar Gas Experiment on the LDEF. The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep end tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the grid voltage box and for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the power supply located beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  7. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Huisman, Andrew J.; Ammann, Markus; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Koop, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass-transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterized by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different data sets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed. Reference: Berkemeier, T., Huisman, A. J., Ammann, M., Shiraiwa, M

  8. A diagnostic stratospheric aerosol size distribution inferred from SAGE II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, Larry W.

    1991-01-01

    An aerosol size distribution model for the stratosphere is inferred based on 5 years of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements of multispectral aerosol and water vapor extinction. The SAGE II aerosol and water vapor extinction data strongly suggest that there is a critical particle radius below which there is a relatively weak dependence of particle number density with size and above which there are few, if any, particles. A segmented power law model, as a simple representation of this dependence, is used in theoretical calculations and intercomparisons with a variety of aerosol measurements including dustsondes, longwave lidar, and wire impactors and shows a consistently good agreement.

  9. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-12-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission plume characteristics mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the greater Paris region in July 2009 and January-February 2010 within the EU FP7 MEGAPOLI project (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation). The deployed instruments measured physical and chemical properties of sub-micron aerosol particles, gas phase constituents of relevance for urban air pollution studies and meteorological parameters. The emission plume was identified based on fresh pollutant (e.g., particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, CO2 and NOx) concentration changes in combination with wind direction data. The classification into megacity influenced and background air masses allowed a characterization of the emission plume during summer and winter environmental conditions. On average, a clear increase of fresh pollutant concentrations in plume compared to background air masses was found for both seasons. For example, an average increase of 190% (+ 8.8 ng m-3) in summer and of 130% (+ 18.1 ng m-3) in winter was found for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plume air masses. The aerosol particle size distribution in plume air masses was influenced by nucleation and growth due to coagulation and condensation in summer, while in winter only the latter process (i.e., particle growth) seemed to be initiated by urban pollution. The observed distribution of fresh pollutants in the emission plume - its cross sectional Gaussian-like profile and the exponential decrease of pollutant concentrations with increasing distance to the megacity - are in agreement with model results. Differences between model and measurements were found for plume center location, plume width and axial plume extent. In general, dilution was identified as the dominant process determining the axial variations within the Paris

  10. Megacity emission plume characteristics in summer and winter investigated by mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements: the Paris metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Drewnick, F.; Zhang, Q. J.; Freutel, F.; Beekmann, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    For the investigation of megacity emission plume characteristics mobile aerosol and trace gas measurements were carried out in the greater Paris region in July 2009 and January/February 2010 within the EU FP7 MEGAPOLI project. The deployed instruments measured physical and chemical properties of sub-micron aerosol particles, gas phase constituents of relevance for urban air pollution studies and meteorological parameters. The emission plume was identified based on fresh pollutant (e.g. particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, CO2 and NOx) concentration changes in combination with wind direction data. The classification into megacity influenced and background air masses allowed a characterization of the emission plume during summer and winter environmental conditions. On average, a clear increase of fresh pollutant concentrations in plume compared to background air masses was found for both seasons. For example, an average increase of 190% (+8.8 ng m-3) in summer and of 130% (+18.1 ng m-3) in winter was found for particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in plume air masses. The aerosol particle size distribution in plume air masses was influenced by nucleation and growth due to coagulation and condensation in summer, while in winter only the second process seemed to be initiated by urban pollution. The observed distribution of fresh pollutants in the emission plume - its cross sectional Gaussian-like profile and the exponential decrease of pollutant concentrations with increasing distance to the megacity - are in agreement with model results. Differences between model and measurements were found for plume center location, plume width and axial plume extent. In general, dilution was identified as the dominant process determining the axial variations within the Paris emission plume. For in-depth analysis of transformation processes occurring in the advected plume, simultaneous measurements at a suburban measurement site and a stationary

  11. Impact of wildfire emissions on trace gas and aerosol concentration measured at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, A.; Chi, X.; Winderlich, J.; Birmili, W.; Lavrič, J. V.; Andreae, M. O.

    2012-04-01

    Boreal wildfires are large sources of reactive trace gases and aerosols to the atmosphere, accounting for 20% of carbon emissions from global biomass burning. Siberian wildfires are a major extratropical source of carbon monoxide (CO), as well as a significant source of black carbon, smoke aerosols, and other climate-relevant atmospheric gas/particle species. Smoke particles released by Siberian wildfires could be tracked thousands of kilometers downwind in the entire Northern Hemisphere, perturbing regional to global radiation budgets by influencing light scattering and cloud microphysical processes. The boreal regions of the Northern Hemisphere are expected to experience the largest temperature increases, which will likely increase the severity and frequency of fires. Consequently, long-term continuous trace gas and aerosol measurements in central Siberia are vital for assessing the atmospheric impact of Siberian boreal fires on regional to global air quality and climate. Since 2006, the Zotino Tall Tower Facility (ZOTTO; www.zottoproject.org), a unique international research platform for large-scale climatic observations, is operational about 20 km west of the Yenisei river (60.8°N; 89.35°E). A 300 m-tall tower allows regular probing of the mixed part of the boundary layer, which is only moderately influenced by diurnal variations of local surface fluxes and thus, in comparison with surface layer, representative for a larger region. Our investigation of the wildfires' impact on surface air composition in Central Siberia is based on four years of CO/CO2/CH4 and aerosol particle mass data measured at 300 m a.g.l.. Episodes of atmospheric transport from wildfires upwind of the measurements site are identified based on ensembles of HYSPLIT backward trajectories and MODIS active fire products. The emission factors are calculated using the Carbon Mass Balance method. In an effort to simplify combustion to its most fundamental principles, the combustion efficiency

  12. Titan's Organic Aerosols : Molecular Composition And Structure Inferred From Systematic Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Buch, Arnaud; Carrasco, Nathalie; Gautier, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In spite of numerous studies carried out to characterize the chemical composition of laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), their molecular composition as well as their structuration are still little known. If Pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about this composition, the highly disparate results obtained show that they can be attributed to the analytical conditions used, to differences in the nature of the analogues studied, or both. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholins molecular composition, we led a systematic analysis of these materials by pyr-GCMS, exploring the analytical parameters to estimate the biases this technique can induce. With this aim, we used the PAMPRE experiment, a capacitively coupled RF cold plasma reactor (Szopa et al. 2006), to synthetize tholins with 2%, 5% and 10% of CH4 in N2. The three samples were systematically pyrolyzed in the temperature range 200-600°C with a 100°C step. The evolved gases were then injected into a GC-MS device for molecular identification. This systematic pyr-GC-MS analysis had two major objectives: (i) optimizing all the analytical parameters for the detection of a wide range of compounds and thus a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio on the tholins molecular structure. About a hundred of molecules have been identified in the pyrolysis products. Although an identical major pattern of nitriles and ethylene appears clearly for the three samples, some discriminant signatures were highlighted. The samples mainly differ by the number of released compounds. The results show especially an increase in the hydrocarbonaceous chains when the CH4 ratio increases. At the opposite, the formation of poly-nitrogenous compounds seems to be easier for lower CH4 ratios. We also performed a semi-quantitative study on the best represented chemical family in

  13. Carbonaceous aerosols over the Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX): Chemical characterization, optical properties, and probable sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Gabriel, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Novakov, T.; Ogren, J.; Sheridan, P.; Streets, D. G.

    2002-10-01

    We measured carbonaceous material and water-soluble ionic species in the fine fraction (Dp < 1.3 μm) of aerosol samples collected on NCAR's C-130 aircraft during the intensive field phase (February-March 1999) of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX). Polluted layers were present over most of the study region north of the equator at altitudes up to 3.2 km. The estimated aerosol mass (sum of carbonaceous and soluble ionic aerosol components) of fine-mode particles in these layers was 15.3 ± 7.9 μg m-3. The major components were particulate organic matter (POM, 35%), SO42- (34%), black carbon (BC, 14%), and NH4+ (11%). The main difference between the composition of the marine boundary layer (MBL, 0 to ˜1.2 km), and the overlying residual continental boundary layer (1.2 to ˜3.2 km) was a higher abundance of SO42- relative to POM in the MBL, probably due to a faster conversion of SO2 into SO42- in the MBL. Our results show that carbon is a major, and sometimes dominant, contributor to the aerosol mass and that its contribution increases with altitude. Low variability was observed in the optical properties of the aerosol in the two layers. Regression analysis of the absorption coefficient at 565 nm on BC mass (BC < 4.0 μg C m-3) yielded a specific absorption cross section of 8.1 ± 0.7 m2 g-1 for the whole period. The unusually high fraction of BC and the good correlation between the absorption coefficient and BC suggest that BC was responsible for the strong light absorption observed for the polluted layers during INDOEX. High correlation between BC and total carbon (TC) (r2 = 0.86) suggest that TC is predominantly of primary origin. Good correlations were also found between the scattering coefficient at 550 nm and the estimated aerosol mass for the fine fraction. These yielded a specific scattering cross section of 4.9 ± 0.4 m2 g-1. The observed BC/TC, BC/OC, SO42-/BC, and K+/BC ratios were fairly constant throughout the period. These ratios suggest that between

  14. The post-pinatubo evolution of stratospheric aerosol surface area density as inferred from SAGE 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Thomason, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Following the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June of 1991, the aerosol mass loading of the stratosphere increased from -1 Mt to approximately 30 Mt. This change in aerosol loading was responsible for numerous radiative and chemical changes observed within the stratosphere. As a result, the ability to quantify aerosol properties on a global basis during this period is important. Aerosol surface area density is a critical parameter in governing the rates of heterogeneous reactions, such as ClONO2 plus H2O yields HNO3 plus HOCl, which influence the stratospheric abundance of ozone. Following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE 2) indicated that the stratospheric aerosol surface area density increased by as much as a factor of 100. Using SAGE 2 multi-wavelength aerosol extinction data, aerosol surface area density as well as mass are derived for the period following the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo through the present.

  15. An Overview of Regional Experiments on Biomass Burning Aerosols and Related Pollutants in Southeast Asia: From BASE-ASIA and the Dongsha Experiment to 7-SEAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Neng-Huei; Tsay, Si-Chee; Maring, Hal B.; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Sheu, Guey-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Chi, Kai Hsien; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Fu, Joshua S.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Lee, Chung-Te; Wang, Lin-Chi; Wang, Jia-Lin; Hsu, Christina N.; Sayer, Andrew M.; Holben, Brent N.; Chu, Yu-Chi; Nguyen, Xuan Anh; Sopajaree, Khajornsak; Chen, Shui-Jen; Cheng, Man-Ting; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Peng, Chi-Ming; Schnell, Russell C.; Conway, Tom; Chang, Chang-Tang; Lin, Kuen-Song; Tsai, Ying I.; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Liu, Jyh-Jian; Chang, Wei-Li; Huang, Shih-Jen; Lin, Tang-Huang; Liu, Gin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    By modulating the Earth-atmosphere energy, hydrological and biogeochemical cycles, and affecting regional-to-global weather and climate, biomass burning is recognized as one of the major factors affecting the global carbon cycle. However, few comprehensive and wide-ranging experiments have been conducted to characterize biomass-burning pollutants in Southeast Asia (SEA) or assess their regional impact on meteorology, the hydrological cycle, the radiative budget, or climate change. Recently, BASEASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South-East Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment) and the 7-SEAS (7- South-East Asian Studies) Dongsha Experiment were conducted during the spring seasons of 2006 and 2010 in northern SEA, respectively, to characterize the chemical, physical, and radiative properties of biomass-burning emissions near the source regions, and assess their effects. This paper provides an overview of results from these two campaigns and related studies collected in this special issue, entitled Observation, modeling and impact studies of biomass burning and pollution in the SE Asian Environment. This volume includes 28 papers, which provide a synopsis of the experiments, regional weatherclimate, chemical characterization of biomass-burning aerosols and related pollutants in source and sink regions, the spatial distribution of air toxics (atmospheric mercury and dioxins) in source and remote areas, a characterization of aerosol physical, optical, and radiative properties, as well as modeling and impact studies. These studies, taken together, provide the first relatively complete dataset of aerosol chemistry and physical observations conducted in the sourcesink region in the northern SEA, with particular emphasis on the marine boundary layer and lower free troposphere (LFT). The data, analysis and modeling included in these papers advance our present knowledge of source characterization of biomass-burning pollutants near the source regions as well as the physical and

  16. Operating Experience Review of the INL HTE Gas Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    L. C. Cadwallader; K. G. DeWall

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored at hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. Some simple statistics are given for the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  17. Kinetic regimes and limiting cases of gas uptake and heterogeneous reactions in atmospheric aerosols and clouds: a general classification scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkemeier, T.; Huisman, A. J.; Ammann, M.; Shiraiwa, M.; Koop, T.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-07-01

    Heterogeneous reactions are important to atmospheric chemistry and are therefore an area of intense research. In multiphase systems such as aerosols and clouds, chemical reactions are usually strongly coupled to a complex sequence of mass transport processes and results are often not easy to interpret. Here we present a systematic classification scheme for gas uptake by aerosol or cloud particles which distinguishes two major regimes: a reaction-diffusion regime and a mass transfer regime. Each of these regimes includes four distinct limiting cases, characterised by a dominant reaction location (surface or bulk) and a single rate-limiting process: chemical reaction, bulk diffusion, gas-phase diffusion or mass accommodation. The conceptual framework enables efficient comparison of different studies and reaction systems, going beyond the scope of previous classification schemes by explicitly resolving interfacial transport processes and surface reactions limited by mass transfer from the gas phase. The use of kinetic multi-layer models instead of resistor model approaches increases the flexibility and enables a broader treatment of the subject, including cases which do not fit into the strict limiting cases typical of most resistor model formulations. The relative importance of different kinetic parameters such as diffusion, reaction rate and accommodation coefficients in this system is evaluated by a quantitative global sensitivity analysis. We outline the characteristic features of each limiting case and discuss the potential relevance of different regimes and limiting cases for various reaction systems. In particular, the classification scheme is applied to three different datasets for the benchmark system of oleic acid reacting with ozone in order to demonstrate utility and highlight potential issues. In light of these results, future directions of research needed to elucidate the multiphase chemical kinetics in this and other reaction systems are discussed.

  18. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-07-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modelling in order to ultimately identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Results show that "model" biogenic oxidative systems can be successfully separated and classified according to their oxidation products. Furthermore, a holistic view of results obtained across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidised gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i

  19. Enthalpy of Vaporization by Gas Chromatography: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Herbert R.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to measure the enthalpy of vaporization of volatile compounds like methylene chloride, carbon tetrachloride, and others by using gas chromatography. This physical property was measured using a very tiny quantity of sample revealing that it is possible to measure the enthalpies of two or more compounds at the same time.

  20. MELCOR aerosol transport module modification for NSSR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, B.J.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes modifications of the MELCOR computer code aerosol transport module that will increase the accuracy of calculations for safety analysis of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The modifications generalize aerosol deposition models to consider gases other than air, add specialized models for aerosol deposition during high speed gas flows in ducts, and add models for resuspension of aerosols that are entrained in coolants when these coolants flash. Particular attention has been paid to the adhesion of aerosol particles once they are transported to duct walls. The results of calculations with the modified models have been successfully compared to data from Light Water Reactor Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) conducted by an international consortium at Hanford, Washington.

  1. SAGE Aerosol Measurements. Volume 2: 1 January - 31 December 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1986-01-01

    The stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) satellite system, launched on February 18, 1979, provides profiles of aerosol extinction at wavelengths of 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ozone concentration, and nitrogen dioxide concentration. Data taken during sunset events in the form of zonal averages and seasonal averages of the aerosol extinction at 1.00 and 0.45 micron, ratios of the aerosol extinction to the molecular extinction at 1.00 micron, and ratios of the aerosol extinction at 0.45 micron to the aerosol extinction at 1.00 micron are presented. The averages for l980 are shown in tables and in profile and contour plots (as a function of altitude and latitude). In addition, temperature data provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the time and location of each SAGE measurement are averaged and shown in a similar format.

  2. Discrimination of water, ice and aerosols by light polarisation in the CLOUD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Fuchs, C.; Järvinen, E.; Ignatius, K.; Höppel, N. F.; Dias, A.; Heinritzi, M.; Simon, M.; Tröstl, J.; Wagner, A. C.; Wagner, R.; Williamson, C.; Yan, C.; Bianchi, F.; Connolly, P. J.; Dorsey, J. R.; Duplissy, J.; Ehrhart, S.; Frege, C.; Gordon, H.; Hoyle, C. R.; Kristensen, T. B.; Steiner, G.; Donahue, N. M.; Flagan, R.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kirkby, J.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Stratmann, F.; Tomé, A.

    2015-11-01

    Cloud microphysical processes involving the ice phase in tropospheric clouds are among the major uncertainties in cloud formation, weather and General Circulation Models (GCMs). The simultaneous detection of aerosol particles, liquid droplets, and ice crystals, especially in the small cloud-particle size range below 50 μm, remains challenging in mixed phase, often unstable ice-water phase environments. The Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer with Polarisation (CASPOL) is an airborne instrument that has the ability to detect such small cloud particles and measure their effects on the backscatter polarisation state. Here we operate the versatile Cosmics-Leaving-OUtdoor-Droplets (CLOUD) chamber facility at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) to produce controlled mixed phase and other clouds by adiabatic expansions in an ultraclean environment, and use the CASPOL to discriminate between different aerosols, water and ice particles. In this paper, optical property measurements of mixed phase clouds and viscous Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) are presented. We report observations of significant liquid - viscous SOA particle polarisation transitions under dry conditions using CASPOL. Cluster analysis techniques were subsequently used to classify different types of particles according to their polarisation ratios during phase transition. A classification map is presented for water droplets, organic aerosol (e.g., SOA and oxalic acid), crystalline substances such as ammonium sulphate, and volcanic ash. Finally, we discuss the benefits and limitations of this classification approach for atmospherically relevant concentration and mixtures with respect to the CLOUD 8-9 campaigns and its potential contribution to Tropical Troposphere Layer (TTL) analysis.

  3. Gas-phase photoacoustic determination of the total carbon content of aerosol deposits.

    PubMed

    Pleil, J D; Russwurm, G M; McClenny, W A

    1982-01-01

    A prototype system was constructed to determine the total carbon content of ambient aerosols trapped on quartz fiber filters. The measurement technique is based on carbon combustion to CO(2), cryogenic precon-centration, and subsequent photoacoustic monitoring of produced CO(2). A common sample set was independently analyzed by two established combustion method instruments and the photoacoustic system. Statistical comparison of data showed good agreement with accepted carbon values indicating feasibility for photoacoustic application to routine carbon analysis. PMID:20372416

  4. Study of a CCP RF Dusty Plasma for the Production of Titan's Aerosols Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Alcouffe, G.; Cernogora, G.; Ouni, F.; Correia, J. J.; Cavarroc, M.; Boufendi, L.; Szopa, C.

    2008-09-07

    The CCP-RF discharge PAMPRE experiment produces analogues of Titan's aerosols. Here are presented the plasma characteristics as a function of gas mixtures and dust formation. Electronic density, optical emission spectroscopy, and self-bias voltage measurements are presented.

  5. Thermal Extraction–Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry with Heart-Cutting for Nitrogen Heterocyclics in Biomass Burning Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thermal extraction-two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TE-GC-MS) method (with heart-cutting) is developed for quantitatively assessing nitrogen (N-bearing organic species (e.g., pyrrole, pyridine, nitriles, and amines) in aerosols emitted from agricultural fir...

  6. Nitrogen dioxide observations from the Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument: Retrieval algorithm and measurements during DISCOVER-AQ Texas 2013

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Geostationary Trace gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument is a test bed for upcoming air quality satellite instruments that will measure backscattered ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared light from geostationary orbit. GeoTASO flew on the NASA F...

  7. Seasonal Variations in Titan's Stratosphere Observed with Cassini/CIRS: Temperature, Trace Molecular Gas and Aerosol Mixing Ratio Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Anderson, C. M.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N.

    2012-01-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. Lebonnois et al., 2012) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g. Achterberg et al., 2011, Coustenis et al., 2010, Teanby et al., 2008, Vinatier et al., 2010). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired in 2010 and 2011 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ..) and aerosol abundances.

  8. Gas/aerosol-ash interaction in volcanic plumes: New insights from surface analyses of fine ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmelle, Pierre; Lambert, Mathieu; Dufrêne, Yves; Gerin, Patrick; Óskarsson, Niels

    2007-07-01

    The reactions occurring between gases/aerosols and silicate ash particles in volcanic eruption plumes remain poorly understood, despite the fact that they are at the origin of a range of volcanic, environmental, atmospheric and health effects. In this study, we apply X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a surface-sensitive technique, to determine the chemical composition of the near-surface region (2-10 nm) of nine ash samples collected from eight volcanoes. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image the nanometer-scale surface structure of individual ash particles isolated from three samples. We demonstrate that rapid acid dissolution of ash occurs within eruption plumes. This process is favoured by the presence of fluoride and is believed to supply the cations involved in the deposition of sulphate and halide salts onto ash. AFM imaging also has permitted the detection of extremely thin (< 10 nm) coatings on the surface of ash. This material is probably composed of soluble sulphate and halide salts mixed with sparingly soluble fluoride compounds. The surface approach developed here offers promising aspects for better appraising the role of gas/aerosol-ash interaction in dictating the ability of ash to act as sinks for various volcanic and atmospheric chemical species as well as sources for others.

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of methoxyphenols involved as atmospheric secondary organic aerosol precursors: Gas-phase vibrational cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, A.; Coeur, C.; Mouret, G.; Ahmad, W.; Tomas, A.; Pirali, O.

    2016-08-01

    Methoxyphenols are emitted in the atmosphere from biomass burning and recent works have shown the potential role of these oxygenated aromatic species in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. IR spectroscopic data that would enable their remote measurement in the atmosphere remain scarce in the literature. Room temperature Far-IR cross-sections of 4 methoxyphenols (2-methoxyphenol or guaiacol, 3-methoxyphenol, 4-methoxyphenol and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol or syringol) have been determined using the THz synchrotron radiation available at SOLEIL. Mid- and near-IR regions have also been investigated with a conventional Fourier transform IR setup and allowed to provide a set of vibrational cross-sections of the studied methoxyphenols. Finally, gas-phase cross sections of two nitroguaiacol isomers (4-nitroguaiacol and 5-nitroguaiacol), two intermediate products involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosols have been measured in the mid- and near-IR with a heated multi-pass cell. Harmonic and anharmonic density functional theory calculations were carried out for all the studied compounds and allowed a full assignment of the recorded rovibrational bands.

  10. Stratospheric Aerosol Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf, F.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosols affect the atmospheric energy balance by scattering and absorbing solar and terrestrial radiation. They also can alter stratospheric chemical cycles by catalyzing heterogeneous reactions which markedly perturb odd nitrogen, chlorine and ozone levels. Aerosol measurements by satellites began in NASA in 1975 with the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) program, to be followed by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) starting in 1979. Both programs employ the solar occultation, or Earth limb extinction, techniques. Major results of these activities include the discovery of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in both hemispheres in winter, illustrations of the impacts of major (El Chichon 1982 and Pinatubo 1991) eruptions, and detection of a negative global trend in lower stratospheric/upper tropospheric aerosol extinction. This latter result can be considered a triumph of successful worldwide sulfur emission controls. The SAGE record will be continued and improved by SAGE III, currently scheduled for multiple launches beginning in 2000 as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). The satellite program has been supplemented by in situ measurements aboard the ER-2 (20 km ceiling) since 1974, and from the DC-8 (13 km ceiling) aircraft beginning in 1989. Collection by wire impactors and subsequent electron microscopic and X-ray energy-dispersive analyses, and optical particle spectrometry have been the principle techniques. Major findings are: (1) The stratospheric background aerosol consists of dilute sulfuric acid droplets of around 0.1 micrometer modal diameter at concentration of tens to hundreds of monograms per cubic meter; (2) Soot from aircraft amounts to a fraction of one percent of the background total aerosol; (3) Volcanic eruptions perturb the sulfuric acid, but not the soot, aerosol abundance by several orders of magnitude; (4) PSCs contain nitric acid at temperatures below 195K, supporting chemical hypotheses

  11. Experiments probing the influence of air exchange rates on secondary organic aerosols derived from indoor chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Shields, Helen C.

    Reactions between ozone and terpenes have been shown to increase the concentrations of submicron particles in indoor settings. The present study was designed to examine the influence of air exchange rates on the concentrations of these secondary organic aerosols as well as on the evolution of their particle size distributions. The experiments were performed in a manipulated office setting containing a constant source of d-limonene and an ozone generator that was remotely turned "on" or "off" at 6 h intervals. The particle number concentrations were monitored using an optical particle counter with eight-channels ranging from 0.1-0.2 to>2.0 μm diameter. The air exchange rates during the experiments were either high (working hours) or low (non-working hours) and ranged from 1.6 to>12 h -1, with intermediate exchange rates. Given the emission rates of ozone and d-limonene used in these studies, at an air exchange rate of 1.6 h -1 particle number concentration in the 0.1-0.2 μm size-range peaked 1.2 h after the ozone generator was switched on. In the ensuing 4.8 h particle counts increased in successive size-ranges up to the 0.5-0.7 μm diameter range. At higher air exchange rates, the resulting concentrations of total particles and particle mass (calculated from particle counts) were smaller, and at exchange rates exceeding 12 h -1, no excess particle formation was detectable with the instrument used in this study. Particle size evolved through accretion and, in some cases, coagulation. There was evidence for coagulation among particles in the smallest size-range at low air exchange rates (high particle concentrations) but no evidence of coagulation was apparent at higher air exchange rates (lower particle concentrations). At higher air exchange rates the particle count or size distributions were shifted towards smaller particle diameters and less time was required to achieve the maximum concentration in each of the size-ranges where discernable particle growth

  12. Flowing gas, non-nuclear experiments on the gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Cooper, C. G.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Variations in cavity wall and injection configurations of the gas core reactor were aimed at establishing flow patterns that give a maximum of the nuclear criticality eigenvalue. Correlation with the nuclear effect was made using multigroup diffusion theory normalized by previous benchmark critical experiments. Air was used to simulate the hydrogen propellant in the flow tests, and smoked air, argon, or Freon to simulate the central nuclear fuel gas. Tests were run both in the down-firing and upfiring directions. Results showed that acceptable flow patterns with volume fraction for the simulated nuclear fuel gas and high flow rate ratios of propellant to fuel can be obtained. Using a point injector for the fuel, good flow patterns are obtained by directing the outer gas at high velocity long the cavity wall, using louvered injection schemes. Recirculation patterns were needed to stabilize the heavy central gas when different gases are used.

  13. Generation of Mie size microdroplet aerosols with applications in laser-driven fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, A P; Semonin, O; Bruce, S; Chan, C; Maindi, M; Donnelly, T D; Maurer, M; Bang, W; Churina, I; Osterholz, J; Kim, I; Bernstein, A C; Ditmire, T

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a tunable source of Mie scale microdroplet aerosols that can be used for the generation of energetic ions. To demonstrate this potential, a terawatt Ti:Al2O3 laser focused to 2 x 10(19) W/cm2 was used to irradiate heavy water (D2O) aerosols composed of micron-scale droplets. Energetic deuterium ions, which were generated in the laser-droplet interaction, produced deuterium-deuterium fusion with approximately 2 x 10(3) fusion neutrons measured per joule of incident laser energy. PMID:19566203

  14. Aerosol composition, chemistry, and source characterization during the 2008 VOCALS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Hubbe, J.; Alexander, L.; Brioude, J.; Spak, S.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P.

    2010-03-15

    Chemical composition of fine aerosol particles over the northern Chilean coastal waters was determined onboard the U.S. DOE G-1 aircraft during the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field campaign between October 16 and November 15, 2008. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and total organics (Org) were determined using an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, and SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, Na+, Cl-, CH3SO3-, Mg2+, Ca2+, and K+ were determined using a particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique. The results show the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non- sea-salt SO42- followed by Na+, Cl-, Org, NO3-, and NH4+, in decreasing importance; CH3SO3-, Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their respective limits of detection. The SO42- aerosols were strongly acidic as the equivalent NH4+ to SO42- ratio was only {approx}0.25 on average. NaCl particles, presumably of sea-salt origin, showed chloride deficits but retained Cl- typically more than half the equivalency of Na+, and are externally mixed with the acidic sulfate aerosols. Nitrate was observed only on sea-salt particles, consistent with adsorption of HNO3 on sea-salt aerosols, responsible for the Cl- deficit. Dust particles appeared to play a minor role, judging from the small volume differences between that derived from the observed mass concentrations and that calculated based on particle size distributions. Because SO42- concentrations were substantial ({approx}0.5 - {approx}3 {micro}g/m3) with a strong gradient (highest near the shore), and the ocean-emitted dimethylsulfide and its unique oxidation product, CH3SO3-, were very low (i.e., {le} 40 parts per trillion and <0.05 {micro}g/m3, respectively), the observed SO42- aerosols are believed to be primarily of terrestrial origin. Back trajectory calculations indicate sulfur emissions from smelters and power plants along coastal regions of Peru and Chile are the main sources of these SO4- aerosols. However, compared to observations, model

  15. Mapping gas-phase organic reactivity and concomitant secondary organic aerosol formation: chemometric dimension reduction techniques for the deconvolution of complex atmospheric datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, K. P.; Monks, P. S.; Smallbone, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Alfarra, M. R.; Rickard, A. R.; McFiggans, G. B.; Jenkin, M. E.; Bloss, W. J.; Ryan, A. C.; Hewitt, C. N.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Highly non-linear dynamical systems, such as those found in atmospheric chemistry, necessitate hierarchical approaches to both experiment and modeling in order, ultimately, to identify and achieve fundamental process-understanding in the full open system. Atmospheric simulation chambers comprise an intermediate in complexity, between a classical laboratory experiment and the full, ambient system. As such, they can generate large volumes of difficult-to-interpret data. Here we describe and implement a chemometric dimension reduction methodology for the deconvolution and interpretation of complex gas- and particle-phase composition spectra. The methodology comprises principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and positive least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). These methods are, for the first time, applied to simultaneous gas- and particle-phase composition data obtained from a comprehensive series of environmental simulation chamber experiments focused on biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) photooxidation and associated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We primarily investigated the biogenic SOA precursors isoprene, α-pinene, limonene, myrcene, linalool and β-caryophyllene. The chemometric analysis is used to classify the oxidation systems and resultant SOA according to the controlling chemistry and the products formed. Furthermore, a holistic view of results across both the gas- and particle-phases shows the different SOA formation chemistry, initiating in the gas-phase, proceeding to govern the differences between the various BVOC SOA compositions. The results obtained are used to describe the particle composition in the context of the oxidized gas-phase matrix. An extension of the technique, which incorporates into the statistical models data from anthropogenic (i.e. toluene) oxidation and "more realistic" plant mesocosm systems, demonstrates that such an ensemble of chemometric mapping has the potential to be

  16. Rapid Formation of Molecular Bromine from Deliquesced NaBr Aerosol in the Presence of Ozone and UV Light

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of gas-phase bromine from aqueous sodium bromide aerosols is investigated through a combination of chamber experiments and chemical kinetics modeling. Experiments show that Br2(g) is produced rapidly from deliquesced NaBr aerosols in the presence of OH radicals prod...

  17. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions. PMID:24601011

  18. Measuring the emission rate of an aerosol source placed in a ventilated room using a tracer gas: influence of particle wall deposition.

    PubMed

    Bémer, D; Lecler, M T; Régnier, R; Hecht, G; Gerber, J M

    2002-04-01

    A method to measure the emission rate of an airborne pollutant source using a tracer gas was tested in the case of an aerosol source. The influence of particle deposition on the walls of a test room of 72 m3 was studied. The deposition rate of an aerosol of MgCl2 was determined by means of two methods: one based on measuring the aerosol concentration decay inside the ventilated room, the other based on calculation of the material mass balance. The concentration decay was monitored by optical counting and the aerosol mass concentration determined by means of sampling on a filter and analysis of the mass deposited by atomic absorption spectrometry. Four series of measurements were carried out. The curve giving the deposition rate according to the particle aerodynamic diameter (d(ae)) was established and shows deposition rates higher than those predicted using the model of Corner. The decay method gives the best results. The study carried out has shown that the phenomenon of deposition has little effect on the measurement of the aerosol source emission rate using a tracer gas for particles of aerodynamic diameter < 5 microm (underestimation < 25%). For particles of a greater diameter, wall deposition is an extremely limiting factor for the method, the influence of which can, however, be limited by using a test booth of small volume and keeping the sampling duration as short as possible.

  19. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray E12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray E12 The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep peripheral tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage connector box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the grid voltage box beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  20. Gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the national ignition facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Goldman, S. R.; Grimm, B. M.; Hegelich, B. M.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Lanier, N. E.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D. M.; Swift, D. C.; Workman, J. B.; Alvarez, Sharon; Bower, Dan.; Braun, Dave.; Campbell, K.; DeWald, E.; Glenzer, S.; Holder, J.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kimbrough, Joe; Kirkwood, Robert; Landen, O. L.; Mccarville, Tom; Macgowan, B.; Mackinnon, A.; Niemann, C.; Schein, J.; Schneider, M; Watts, Phil; Young, Ben-li 194154; Young B.

    2004-01-01

    The summary of this paper is: (1) We have fielded on NIF a gas-filled hohlraum designed for future ignition experiments; (2) Wall-motion measurements are consistent with LASNEX simulations; (3) LPI back-scattering results have confounded expectations - (a) Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) dominates Raman (SRS) for any gas-fill species, (b) Measured SBS time-averaged reflectivity values are high, peak values are even higher, (c) SRS and SBS peak while laser-pulse is rising; and (4) Plasma conditions at the onset of high back-scattering yield high SBS convective linear gain - Wavelengths of the back-scattered light is predicted by linear theory.

  1. Characterization of Custom-Designed Charge-Coupled Devices for Applications to Gas and Aerosol Monitoring Sensorcraft Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, M. Nurul; Farnsworth, Glenn R.; Garcia, Christopher S.; Zawodny, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    Custom-designed charge-coupled devices (CCD) for Gas and Aerosols Monitoring Sensorcraft instrument were developed. These custom-designed CCD devices are linear arrays with pixel format of 512x1 elements and pixel size of 10x200 sq m. These devices were characterized at NASA Langley Research Center to achieve a full well capacity as high as 6,000,000 e-. This met the aircraft flight mission requirements in terms of signal-to-noise performance and maximum dynamic range. Characterization and analysis of the electrical and optical properties of the CCDs were carried out at room temperature. This includes measurements of photon transfer curves, gain coefficient histograms, read noise, and spectral response. Test results obtained on these devices successfully demonstrated the objectives of the aircraft flight mission. In this paper, we describe the characterization results and also discuss their applications to future mission.

  2. Toward a Combined SAGE II-HALOE Aerosol Climatology: An Evaluation of HALOE Version 19 Stratospheric Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomason, L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aerosol extinction coefficient data is evaluated in the low aerosol loading period after 1996 as the first necessary step in a process that will eventually allow the production of a combined HALOE/SAGE II (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) aerosol climatology of derived aerosol products including surface area density. Based on these analyses, it is demonstrated that HALOE's 3.46 microns is of good quality above 19 km and suitable for scientific applications above that altitude. However, it is increasingly suspect at lower altitudes and should not be used below 17 km under any circumstances after 1996. The 3.40 microns is biased by about 10% throughout the lower stratosphere due to the failure to clear NO2 but otherwise appears to be a high quality product down to 15 km. The 2.45 and 5.26 micron aerosol extinction coefficient measurements are clearly biased and should not be used for scientific applications after the most intense parts of the Pinatubo period. Many of the issues in the aerosol data appear to be related to either the failure to clear some interfering gas species or doing so poorly. For instance, it is clear that the 3.40micronaerosol extinction coefficient measurements can be improved through the inclusion of an NO2 correction and could, in fact, end up as the highest quality overall HALOE aerosol extinction coefficient measurement. It also appears that the 2.45 and 5.26 micron channels may be improved by updating the Upper Atmosphere Pilot Database which is used as a resource for the removal of gas species otherwise not available from direct HALOE measurements. Finally, a simple model to demonstrate the promise of mixed visible/infrared aerosol extinction coefficient ensembles for the retrieval of bulk aerosol properties demonstrates that a combined HALOE/SAGE II aerosol climatology is feasible and may represent a substantial improvement over independently derived data sets.

  3. Gas-grain simulation facility: Aerosol and particle research in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Greenwald, Ken (Editor); Rogers, C. Fred (Editor); Stratton, David M. (Editor); Simmons, Brenda (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    This document reports on the proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) Science Workshop which was co-hosted by NASA Ames Research Center and Desert Research Institute, University of Nevada System, and held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 4-6, 1992. The intent of the workshop was to bring together the science community of potential GGSF experimenters, Science Working Group and staff members, and the Phase A contractor to review the Phase A design with the science participants and to facilitate communication between the science community and the hardware developers. The purpose of this report is to document the information disseminated at the workshop, to record the participants' review of the Phase A GGSF design concept and the current science and technical requirements for the Facility, and to respond to any questions or concerns that were raised at the Workshop. Recommendations for the future based on numerous discussions with the participants are documented, as well as science presentations and poster sessions that were given at the Workshop and a summary of 21 candidate experiments.

  4. Experiments on gas-ash separation processes in volcanic umbrella plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holasek, Rick E.; Woods, Andrew W.; Self, Stephen

    1996-03-01

    We present a series of analogue laboratory experiments which simulate the separation of ash and gas and the formation of secondary intrusions from finite volcanic umbrella plumes. We examined the lateral spreading of mixtures of freshwater and particles released into a laboratory tank containing a uniformly stratified aqueous solution. For times smaller than the sedimentation time of particles through the intrusion, the current remains coherent and intrudes laterally. As some of the particles settle into the underlying ambient fluid, a layer of particle-depleted fluid develops below the upper surface of the current and the density of the residual fluid is reduced. Over longer times, the intrusion ceases to be coherent, with small fingers of relatively buoyant, particle-depleted fluid rising from the upper part of the intrusion into the overlying fluid. Meanwhile, the lateral motion of the injected solution induces a return flow in the ambient fluid which sweeps some of the particles sedimenting from the lower surface of the intrusion inwards. As a result, relatively dense particle-laden fluid collects below the intrusion and then sinks into the underlying fluid. Eventually this fluid reaches a new neutral buoyancy height, where it intrudes to form a second laterally spreading current below the original intrusion. The process then repeats to form further weaker intrusions below. These results of the separation of the ash and volcanic gas in an umbrella plume are consistent with field observations at Sakurajima volcano where positively charged plumes, thought to consist of volcanic gas, have been observed above negatively charged plumes of ash. This work also suggests that volcanic aerosols may form up to a kilometer above the original injection height of the ash. In a strong wind shear, this could result in very different trajectories of the ash and gas and so be important for evaluating the impact of ash plumes on both aviation safety and volcanic aerosol formation

  5. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, S.; Demick-Monelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of mlz from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  6. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, H.; Atreya, S.; Demick-Montelara, J.; Haberman, J.; Harpold, D.; Kasprzak, W.; Owen, T.; Raaen, E.; Way, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer was one of six instruments on the Cassini-Huygens Probe mission to Titan. The GCMS measured in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and served as the detector for the pyrolization products for the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be N2 and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3x10(exp -5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8x10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below 10(exp -8) mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3x10(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the

  7. Radial diffusion and penetration of gas molecules and aerosol particles through laminar flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes are essential tools for many applications in analytical and physical chemistry and engineering. We derive a new method for determining radial diffusion effects and the penetration or transmission of gas molecules and aerosol particles through cylindrical tubes under laminar flow conditions using explicit analytical equations. In contrast to the traditional Brown method [Brown, R. L. J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U. S.) 1978, 83, 1-8] and CKD method (Cooney, D. O.; Kim, S. S.; Davis, E. J. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1974, 29, 1731-1738), the new approximation developed in this study (known as the KPS method) does not require interpolation or numerical techniques. The KPS method agrees well with the CKD method under all experimental conditions and also with the Brown method at low Sherwood numbers. At high Sherwood numbers corresponding to high uptake on the wall, flow entry effects become relevant and are considered in the KPS and CKD methods but not in the Brown method. The practical applicability of the KPS method is demonstrated by analysis of measurement data from experimental studies of rapid OH, intermediate NO3, and slow O3 uptake on various organic substrates. The KPS method also allows determination of the penetration of aerosol particles through a tube, using a single equation to cover both the limiting cases of high and low deposition described by Gormley and Kennedy (Proc. R. Ir. Acad., Sect. A. 1949, 52A, 163-169). We demonstrate that the treatment of gas and particle diffusion converges in the KPS method, thus facilitating prediction of diffusional loss and penetration of gases and particles, analysis of chemical kinetics data, and design of fluid reactors, denuders, and sampling lines. PMID:25744622

  8. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  9. Aerosol ultraviolet absorption experiment (2002 to 2004), part 1: ultraviolet multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer calibration and intercomparison with CIMEL sunphotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Herman, Jay R.; Slusser, James R.; Labow, Gordon J.; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Janson, George T.; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent N.

    2005-04-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of UV irradiance from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data are frequently overestimated compared to ground-based measurements because of the presence of undetected absorbing aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. To reduce these uncertainties, an aerosol UV absorption closure experiment has been conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) site in Greenbelt, Maryland, using 17 months of data from a shadowband radiometer [UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV-MFRSR), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Network] colocated with a group of three sun-sky CIMEL radiometers [rotating reference instruments of the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)]. We describe an improved UV-MFRSR on-site calibration method augmented by AERONET-CIMEL measurements of aerosol extinction optical thickness (τa) interpolated or extrapolated to the UV-MFRSR wavelengths and measurement intervals. The estimated τa is used as input to a UV-MFRSR spectral-band model, along with independent column ozone and surface pressure measurements, to estimate zero air mass voltages V0 in three longer wavelength UV-MFRSR channels (325, 332, 368 nm). Daily mean , estimates and standard deviations are obtained for cloud-free conditions and compared with the on-site UV-MFRSR Langley plot calibration method. By repeating the calibrations on clear days, relatively good stability (+/-2% in ) is found in summer, with larger relative changes in fall-winter seasons.

  10. Quantitative Laboratory Experiments on Contact Freezing and Secondary Ice Production induced by Aerosol- Cloud Droplet Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisner, T.; Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Pander, T.; Handmann, P.

    2014-12-01

    We report on laboratory experiments on contact freezing probabilities and secondary ice processes accompanying the contact- or immersion freezing of cloud droplets. The freezing of individual, electrodynamically levitated cloud droplets was initiated by contacting them with ice nuclei or by immersed ice nuclei. The freezing process itself and secondary ice formation by either splintering of the freezing droplet or the ejection of gas bubble membranes has been observed and analyzed by high speed light microscopy. In our contribution, we classify these processes and quantify their temperature dependent probability as a function of the mode of freezing and the presence of immersed particles. Contact freezing probabilities have been calculated from the measured freezing rates and contact rates, the latter being determined offline by counting the number of scavenged particles under and environmental scanning electron microscope.

  11. The new Mediterranean background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica: A long term Observatory component of the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) is a French initiative supported by the MISTRALS program (Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales, http://www.mistrals-home.org). It aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The major stake is an understanding of the future of the Mediterranean region in a context of strong regional anthropogenic and climatic pressures. The target of ChArMEx is short-lived particulate and gaseous tropospheric trace species which are the cause of poor air quality events, have two-way interactions with climate, or impact the marine biogeochemistry. In order to fulfill these objectives, important efforts have been put in 2012 in order to implement the infrastructure and instrumentation for a fully equipped background monitoring station at Ersa, Cape Corsica, a key location at the crossroads of dusty southerly air masses and polluted outflows from the European continent. The observations at this station began in June 2012 (in the context of the EMEP / ACTRIS / PEGASOS / ChArMEx campaigns). A broad spectrum of aerosol properties is also measured at the station, from the chemical composition (off-line daily filter sampling in PM2.5/PM10, on-line Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor), ground optical properties (extinction/absorption/light scattering coeff. with 1-? CAPS PMex monitor, 7-? Aethalometer, 3-? Nephelometer), integrated and vertically resolved optical properties (4-? Cimel sunphotometer and LIDAR, respective), size distribution properties (N-AIS, SMPS, APS, and OPS instruments), mass (PM1/PM10 by TEOM/TEOM-FDMS), hygroscopicity (CCN), as well as total insoluble deposition. So far, real-time measurement of reactive gases (O3, CO, NO, NO2), and off-line VOC measurements (cylinders, cartridges) are also

  12. Large gradients in aerosol induced atmospheric heating rate over oceanic regions around India: Results from the ICARB Experiment of ISRO-GBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S. Suresh; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; K, Satheesh S.

    The importance of aerosol absorption and the resulting heating of the lower atmosphere over south Asia are being increasingly investigated in the context of regional and global climate implications. Even though significant abundance of absorbing aerosols has been measured over the oceanic regions around India, studies addressing its spatial and vertical distributions and radiative impacts are sparse. Most of the regional-climate impacts assessments are mainly based on the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) data or using the chemical transport model simulations. In the backdrop of the regional climate implications of absorbing aerosols, exten-sive, spatially resolved measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were made onboard research ship and aircraft during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) as a part of ISRO -Geosphere Biosphere Program. Aerosol parameters within the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), free troposphere and in the entire column clearly depict large gradient along the latitudes and longitudes. Using these concurrent measurements of the aerosol properties, atmospheric radiative forcing and heating rates were estimated for a spatial resolution of 1 by 1. The spatial distribution of aerosol heating rate showed very high ( 0.5 K day per day) values over the northern Bay of Bengal and very low (¡ 0.1 K per day) values over the southeastern Arabian Sea. Similarly, aircraft measurements also showed an increase in the amplitude and strength of the elevated aerosol layers from south to north direction. Very high values of heating rate above the MABL modifies the thermody-namics structure of the atmosphere, which influence the stability of the lower troposphere and thus the hydrological cycle over the region. These gradients in atmospheric heating induced by aerosols will significantly influence the synoptic circulations over the regions when the winds are in transition from northeasterly to southwesterly

  13. Experiences from Occupational Exposure Limits Set on Aerosols Containing Allergenic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Gunnar D.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits (OELs) together with determined airborne exposures are used in risk assessment based managements of occupational exposures to prevent occupational diseases. In most countries, OELs have only been set for few protein-containing aerosols causing IgE-mediated allergies. They comprise aerosols of flour dust, grain dust, wood dust, natural rubber latex, and the subtilisins, which are proteolytic enzymes. These aerosols show dose-dependent effects and levels have been established, where nearly all workers may be exposed without adverse health effects, which are required for setting OELs. Our aim is to analyse prerequisites for setting OELs for the allergenic protein-containing aerosols. Opposite to the key effect of toxicological reactions, two thresholds, one for the sensitization phase and one for elicitation of IgE-mediated symptoms in sensitized individuals, are used in the OEL settings. For example, this was the case for flour dust, where OELs were based on dust levels due to linearity between flour dust and its allergen levels. The critical effects for flour and grain dust OELs were different, which indicates that conclusion by analogy (read-across) must be scientifically well founded. Except for subtilisins, no OEL have been set for other industrial enzymes, where many of which are high volume chemicals. For several of these, OELs have been proposed in the scientific literature during the last two decades. It is apparent that the scientific methodology is available for setting OELs for proteins and protein-containing aerosols where the critical effect is IgE sensitization and IgE-mediated airway diseases. PMID:22843406

  14. Titan's organic aerosols: Molecular composition and structure of laboratory analogues inferred from pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisson, Marietta; Szopa, Cyril; Carrasco, Nathalie; Buch, Arnaud; Gautier, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Analogues of Titan's aerosols are of primary interest in the understanding of Titan's atmospheric chemistry and climate, and in the development of in situ instrumentation for future space missions. Numerous studies have been carried out to characterize laboratory analogues of Titan aerosols (tholins), but their molecular composition and structure are still poorly known. If pyrolysis gas chromatography mass spectrometry (pyr-GCMS) has been used for years to give clues about their chemical composition, highly disparate results were obtained with this technique. They can be attributed to the variety of analytical conditions used for pyr-GCMS analyses, and/or to differences in the nature of the analogues analyzed, that were produced with different laboratory set-ups under various operating conditions. In order to have a better description of Titan's tholin's molecular composition by pyr-GCMS, we carried out a systematic study with two major objectives: (i) exploring the pyr-GCMS analytical parameters to find the optimal ones for the detection of a wide range of chemical products allowing a characterization of the tholins composition as comprehensive as possible, and (ii) highlighting the role of the CH4 ratio in the gaseous reactive medium on the tholin's molecular structure. We used a radio-frequency plasma discharge to synthetize tholins with different concentrations of CH4 diluted in N2. The samples were pyrolyzed at temperatures covering the 200-700°C range. The extracted gases were then analyzed by GCMS for their molecular identification. The optimal pyrolysis temperature for characterizing the molecular composition of our tholins by GCMS analysis is found to be 600°C. This temperature choice results from the best compromise between the number of compounds released, the quality of the signal and the appearance of pyrolysis artifacts. About a hundred molecules are identified as pyrolysates. A common major chromatographic pattern appears clearly for all the

  15. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media.

    PubMed

    Hall, R; Murdoch, L; Falta, R; Looney, B; Riha, B

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  16. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.; Murdoch, L.; Falta, R.; Looney, B.; Riha, B.

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2 m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  17. Project Explorer GAS #007: Marshall Amateur Radio Club Experiment (MARCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stluka, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    Polls were taken at the Project Explorer meetings regarding flying without the radio experiment transmitting. The radio downlinks require extra coordination and are sensitive to certain payloads. The poll results were unanimous. The radio downlinks are vital in providing data on the health and status of the total experiments package, in real time, during the flight. The amateur radio operators, prepared to receive the downlinks and OSCAR-10 relays, revealed that there was enormous interest throughout the world, to participate. This sets the stage for the reflight opportunities which the GAS program has provided. Major activities, pertinent to the STS-41G flight preparations by the GAS #007 team and support group, are listed.

  18. Multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) of gas and aerosol distributions.

    PubMed

    Sinreich, R; Friess, U; Wagner, T; Platt, U

    2005-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a relatively simple algorithm, which converts a set of slant column density measurements of oxygen dimers (O4) and NO2 at several different elevation angles to determine the atmospheric aerosol extinction and the absolute concentration and mixing ratio of NO2 within the atmospheric boundary layer. In addition the height of the atmospheric boundary layer can usually be derived, also the technique can be readily extended to determine the concentration of several other trace gases including SO2, CH2O, or glyoxal. The algorithm is based on precise radiation transport modelling determination, taking into account the actual aerosol scenario as determined from the O4 measurements. The required hardware is simple encompassing essentially a miniature spectrometer, a small telescope, a pointing mechanism, and a Personal Computer (PC). Effectively the technique combines the simplicity of a passive MAX-DOAS observation with the capability of a much more complex active DOAS instrument to determine path-averaged, absolutely calibrated mixing ratios of atmospheric trace gases at relatively high accuracy.

  19. Multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) of gas and aerosol distributions.

    PubMed

    Sinreich, R; Friess, U; Wagner, T; Platt, U

    2005-01-01

    We present and demonstrate a relatively simple algorithm, which converts a set of slant column density measurements of oxygen dimers (O4) and NO2 at several different elevation angles to determine the atmospheric aerosol extinction and the absolute concentration and mixing ratio of NO2 within the atmospheric boundary layer. In addition the height of the atmospheric boundary layer can usually be derived, also the technique can be readily extended to determine the concentration of several other trace gases including SO2, CH2O, or glyoxal. The algorithm is based on precise radiation transport modelling determination, taking into account the actual aerosol scenario as determined from the O4 measurements. The required hardware is simple encompassing essentially a miniature spectrometer, a small telescope, a pointing mechanism, and a Personal Computer (PC). Effectively the technique combines the simplicity of a passive MAX-DOAS observation with the capability of a much more complex active DOAS instrument to determine path-averaged, absolutely calibrated mixing ratios of atmospheric trace gases at relatively high accuracy. PMID:16161782

  20. Complete Cycle Experiments Using the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey D.; Plantak, Mateja

    2014-10-01

    The ability of our society to make informed energy-usage decisions in the future depends partly on current science and engineering students retaining a deep understanding of the thermodynamics of heat engines. Teacher imaginations and equipment budgets can both be taxed in the effort to engage students in hands-on heat engine activities. The experiments described in this paper, carried out using the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus1 (AGLA), quantitatively explore popular complete cycle heat engine processes.

  1. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K; Veisz, L

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  2. Operating experience review of an INL gas monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee C.; DeWall, K. G.; Herring, J. S.

    2015-03-12

    This article describes the operations of several types of gas monitors in use at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Electrolysis Experiment (HTE) laboratory. The gases monitored in the lab room are hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and oxygen. The operating time, calibration, and both actual and unwanted alarms are described. The calibration session time durations are described. In addition, some simple calculations are given to estimate the reliability of these monitors and the results are compared to operating experiences of other types of monitors.

  3. Airborne Trace Gas Mapping During the GOSAT-COMEX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, D. M.; Leifer, I.; Buckland, K. N.; Johnson, P. D.; Van Damme, M.; Pierre-Francois, C.; Clarisse, L.

    2015-12-01

    The GOSAT-COMEX-IASI (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite - CO2 and Methane EXperiment - Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer) experiment acquired data on 24-27 April 2015 with two aircraft, a mobile ground-based sampling suite, and the GOSAT and IASI platforms. Collections comprised the Kern Front and Kern River oil fields north of Bakersfield, Calif. and the Chino stockyard complex in the eastern Los Angeles Basin. The nested-grid experiment examined the convergence of multiple approaches to total trace gas flux estimation from the experimental area on multiple length-scales, which entailed the integrated analysis of ground-based, airborne, and space-based measurements. Airborne remote sensing was employed to map the spatial distribution of discrete emission sites - crucial information to understanding their relative aggregate contribution to the overall flux estimation. This contribution discusses the methodology in the context of the airborne GHG source mapping component of the GOSAT-COMEX experiment and its application to satellite validation.

  4. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  5. Chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol constituents from isoprene ozonolysis in the presence of acidic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Matthieu; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Zhang, Zhenfa; Gold, Avram; Surratt, Jason D.

    2016-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted into Earth's atmosphere and is predominantly derived from terrestrial vegetation. Prior studies have focused largely on the hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and have demonstrated that highly oxidized compounds, such as isoprene-derived epoxides, enhance the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through heterogeneous (multiphase) reactions on acidified sulfate aerosol. However, studies on the impact of acidified sulfate aerosol on SOA formation from isoprene ozonolysis are lacking and the current work systematically examines this reaction. SOA was generated in an indoor smog chamber from isoprene ozonolysis under dark conditions in the presence of non-acidified or acidified sulfate seed aerosol. The effect of OH radicals on SOA chemical composition was investigated using diethyl ether as an OH radical scavenger. Aerosols were collected and chemically characterized by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-HR-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron impact ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS). Analysis revealed the formation of highly oxidized compounds, including organosulfates (OSs) and 2-methylterols, which were significantly enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol. OSs identified in the chamber experiments were also observed and quantified in summertime fine aerosol collected from two rural locations in the southeastern United States during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS).

  6. Results from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) Experiment on the Cassini-Huygens Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.

    2006-01-01

    The GCMS was part of the instrument complement on the Cassini-Huygens Probe to measure in situ the chemical composition of the atmosphere during the probe descent and coupled with the Aerosol Collector Pyrolyser (ACP) experiment by serving as detector for the pyrolization products to determine the composition of the aerosol particles. The GCMS employed a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system and a gas sampling system providing continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. The GCMS collected data from an altitude of 146 km to ground impact. The Probe and the GCMS survived impact and collected data for 1 hour and 9 minutes on the surface. Mass spectra were collected during descent and on the ground over a range of m/z from 2 to 141. The major constituents of the lower atmosphere were confirmed to be NP and CH4. The methane mole fraction was uniform in the stratosphere. It increased below the tropopause, at about 32 km altitude, monotonically toward the surface, reaching a plateau at about 8 km at a level near saturation. After surface impact a steep increase of the methane signal was observed, suggesting evaporation of surface condensed methane due to heating by the GCMS sample inlet heater. The measured mole fraction of Ar-40 is 4.3 x 10(exp-5) and of Ar-36 is 2.8 x 10(exp -7). The other primordial noble gases were below mole fraction. The isotope ratios of C-12/C-13 determined from methane measurements are 82.3 and of N-14/N-15 determined from molecular nitrogen are 183. The D/H isotope ratio determined from the H2 and HD measurements is 2.3 x l0(exp -4). Carbon dioxide, ethane, acetylene and cyanogen were detected evaporating from the surface in addition to methane.

  7. Rate constant and secondary organic aerosol yields for the gas-phase reaction of hydroxyl radicals with syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Seydi, Abdoulaie

    2012-08-01

    Syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) is a potential marker compound for wood smoke emissions in the atmosphere. To investigate the atmospheric reactivity of this compound, the rate constant for its reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) has been determined in a simulation chamber (8 m3) at 294 ± 2 K, atmospheric pressure and low relative humidity (2-4%) using the relative rate method. The syringol and reference compound concentrations were followed by GC/FID (Gas chromatography/Flame Ionization Detection). The determined rate constant (in units of cm3 molecule-1 s-1) is ksyringol = (9.66 ± 1.11) × 10-11. The calculated atmospheric lifetime for syringol is 1.8 h, indicating that it is too reactive to be used as a tracer for wood smoke emissions. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH reaction with syringol was also investigated. The initial mixing ratios for syringol were in the range 495-3557 μg m-3. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer). The SOA yields (Y) were determined as the ratio of the suspended aerosol mass corrected for wall losses (M0) to the total reacted syringol concentration assuming a particle density of 1.4 g cm-3. The aerosol formation yield increases as the initial syringol concentration increases, and leads to aerosol yields ranging from 0.10 to 0.36. Y is a strong function of M0 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. To our knowledge, this work represents the first investigation of the rate constant and SOA formation for the reaction of syringol with OH radicals. The atmospheric implications of this reaction are also discussed.

  8. Evidence for an unrecognized secondary anthropogenic source of organosulfates and sulfonates: gas-phase oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of sulfate aerosol.

    PubMed

    Riva, Matthieu; Tomaz, Sophie; Cui, Tianqu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Perraudin, Emilie; Gold, Avram; Stone, Elizabeth A; Villenave, Eric; Surratt, Jason D

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, formation of aromatic organosulfates (OSs) from the photo-oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated. Naphthalene (NAP) and 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MeNAP), two of the most abundant gas-phase PAHs and thought to represent "missing" sources of urban SOA, were photochemically oxidized in an outdoor smog chamber facility in the presence of nonacidified and acidified sulfate seed aerosol. Effects of seed aerosol composition, acidity and relative humidity on OS formation were examined. Chemical characterization of SOA extracts by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed the formation of OSs and sulfonates from photo-oxidation in the presence of sulfate seed aerosol. Many of the organosulfur compounds identified in the smog chamber extracts were also measured in urban fine aerosol collected at Lahore, Pakistan, and Pasadena, USA, demonstrating that PAH photo-oxidation in the presence of sulfate aerosol is a hitherto unrecognized source of anthropogenic secondary organosulfur compounds, and providing new PAH SOA tracers. PMID:25879928

  9. Large outdoor chamber experiments and computer simulations: (I) Secondary organic aerosol formation from the oxidation of a mixture of d-limonene and α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qianfeng; Hu, Di; Leungsakul, Sirakarn; Kamens, Richard M.

    This work merges kinetic models for α-pinene and d-limonene which were individually developed to predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from these compounds. Three major changes in the d-limonene and α-pinene combined mechanism were made. First, radical-radical reactions were integrated so that radicals formed from both individual mechanisms all reacted with each other. Second, all SOA model species from both compounds were used to calculate semi-volatile partitioning for new semi-volatiles formed in the gas phase. Third particle phase reactions for particle phase α-pinene and d-limonene aldehydes, carboxylic acids, etc. were integrated. Experiments with mixtures of α-pinene and d-limonene, nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), and diurnal natural sunlight were carried out in a dual 270 m 3 outdoor Teflon film chamber located in Pittsboro, NC. The model closely simulated the behavior and timing for α-pinene, d-limonene, NO, NO 2, O 3 and SOA. Model sensitivities were tested with respect to effects of d-limonene/α-pinene ratios, initial hydrocarbon to NO x (HC 0/NO x) ratios, temperature, and light intensity. The results showed that SOA yield ( YSOA) was very sensitive to initial d-limonene/α-pinene ratio and temperature. The model was also used to simulate remote atmospheric SOA conditions that hypothetically could result from diurnal emissions of α-pinene, d-limonene and NO x. We observed that the volatility of the simulated SOA material on the aging aerosol decreased with time, and this was consistent with chamber observations. Of additional importance was that our simulation did not show a loss of SOA during the daytime and this was consistent with observed measurements.

  10. Proposed gas release experiment on the argos satellite. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Murad, E.; Pike, C.P.

    1992-01-29

    We propose to release xenon and carbon dioxide gases from nozzles on the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) satellite orbiting with a velocity of about 7.4 km/s at an altitude of about 800 km. The releases will be conducted mostly in darkness over the Maui telescope site. The vector sum of the satellite and gas velocities will exceed the velocity requirement for the critical ionization velocity (CIV) process of xenon. It is feasible that the xenon gas will achieve critical velocity ionization. Associative ionization and collisional stripping will not occur for the xenon gas and there is no photo-ionization in darkness; ionization processes competing with CIV are absent. Neutral density, ambient magnetic field, and seed ionization effects on the xenon gas CIV will be discussed. Unlike xenon, carbon dioxide will not undergo CIV because of its higher velocity requirement. However, it is feasible that carbon dioxide colliding with the atmospheric species will form excited CO and OH molecules, which will radiate subsequently. Optical, IR, and UV observations on the satellite and at Maui will provide diagnostic measurements for the experiment.

  11. Kr gas puff implosion experiments on the Z generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampleford, David; Jennings, Christopher; Hansen, Stephanie; Harvey-Thompson, Adam; Rochau, Gregory; Lamppa, Derek; Jones, Brent; Dasgupta, Arati; Giuliani, John; Thornhill, J. Ward

    2015-11-01

    We discuss experiments imploding large diameter Kr gas puffs on the Z generator. Thermalization of kinetic energy leads to high pinch temperatures; the plasma conditions achieved are conducive to 13-keV K-shell emission from Kr. By tailoring the density profile and designing experiments using hydrodynamic gas flow modeling coupled to MHD modeling we are able to implode these gas puffs at high velocities (> 100cm / μs) from 12-cm initial diameters to a tight (~ 1 mm diameter) uniform stagnated pinch. Data indicates that changes to the initial density profile affect the implosion stability and significantly affect the radiated output, with the most stable implosion radiating ~ 8 kJ at >10 keV, the majority of which is radiated in the Kr He α line. In this poster we will compare an extensive suite of yield, spectral, imaging and pulse shape diagnostics to MHD modeling, and discuss the plasma conditions inferred from comparing data to atomic modeling. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Synthesis of Trace Gas and Aerosol Observations and Evaluation of Modelled Short-lived Climate Pollutants Across the Pan-Eurasian High Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, S.; Nieminen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Model calculations suggest that changes in short-lived climate pollutants (SLCPs) such as ozone and aerosol may have contributed significantly to rapid Arctic warming over the past century. Arctic tropospheric budgets of SLCPs are impacted by long-range transport of trace gases and aerosols from Europe, Asia and N. America, but also by local sources such as gas flaring, shipping and boreal fires. Recently, the POLARCAT Model Intercomparison Project (POLMIP) showed that significant model biases persist through the depth of the European and North American high latitude troposphere in modelled trace-gas abundances. Evaluation of models over the Siberian high latitudes is challenging due to a severe paucity of available observations, despite the potential importance of this region as a route for European pollution export to the Arctic. Despite the existence of a number of limited datasets, which could be used for model evaluation in this region, until now no effort has been made to synthesise and exploit these observations to evaluate modelled abundances of SLCPs such as tropospheric ozone & aerosol. In this presentation, we will show evaluation of simulated aerosol, tropospheric ozone, and precursor species in several global chemical transport models, using a synthesis of available surface, aircraft and satellite observations over the high latitude pan-Eurasian region. We use models and observations to investigate source regions contributing to remote Siberian SLCP abundances over the annual cycle, and show substantial biases in simulated aerosol and trace gas concentrations that are consistent across a suite of different models. These comparisons constitute the first multi-model evaluation of tropospheric composition in the pan-Eurasin region using observations from across the broad region. Finally, we use the model simulations to determine optimum locations for the development of future monitoring activities in high latitude Eurasia with an aim of better

  13. ALEGRA modeling of gas puff Z-pinch experiments at the ZR facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, P. L.; Flicker, Dawn G.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Kueny, Christopher Shane; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2010-11-01

    Gas puff z-pinch experiments have been proposed for the refurbished Z (ZR) facility for CY2011. Previous gas puff experiments [Coverdale et. al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056309, 2007] on pre-refurbishment Z established a world record for laboratory fusion neutron yield. New experiments would establish ZR gas puff capability for x-ray and neutron production and could surpass previous yields. We present validation of ALEGRA simulations against previous Z experiments including X-ray and neutron yield, modeling of gas puff implosion dynamics for new gas puff nozzle designs, and predictions of X-ray and neutron yields for the proposed gas puff experiments.

  14. Anthropogenic Aerosol Dimming Over Oceans: A Regional Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2015-12-01

    The role of anthropogenic aerosols in shaping 20th century SSTs through alteration of surface solar radiation (SSR) is still subject to debate. Identifying and quantifying the relationship between aerosol-induced changes in SSR and the corresponding SST response is difficult due to the masking effect of numerous feedback mechanisms and general variability of the atmosphere-ocean system. We therefore analysed potential anthropogenic aerosol effects on SST with a cascade of experiments of increasing complexity: From atmosphere-only over mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments, to fully coupled transient ocean-atmosphere simulations, with and without greenhouse gases and / or aerosols, using the general circulation model ECHAM with explicit aerosol representation. We find anthropogenic aerosols to be crucial to obtain realistic SSR and SST patterns, although co-location of changes in individual variables (aerosol optical depth, SSR, SST) is weak. The effect of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the MLO simulations is essentially additive on global and regional scales, an assumption frequently made in the literature. With atmosphere-only simulations we identified regions most prone to anthropogenic aerosol dimming throughout the 20th century using a strict criterion. From MLO equilibria representative of different decades throughout the 20th century, we identified ocean regions, whose SSTs are most sensitive to changing anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The surface temperature response patterns in our MLO simulations are more sensitive towards the choice of prescribed deep-ocean heat flux if anthropogenic aerosols were included as compared to greenhouse gas only simulations. This implies that ocean dynamics might mask some of the response and cautions against the use of just one set of deep-ocean heat fluxes in MLO studies. Our results corroborate not only the relevance of anthropogenic aerosols for SST responses, but also highlight the complexity and non-locality of the

  15. ASGAMAGE, the Air-Sea Gas Exchange/MAGE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oost, Wiebe; Jacobs, Cor; Kohsiek, Wim; Goossens, Guus; van der Horn, Jaap; Sprung, Detlev; Rapsomanikis, Spyros; Kenntner, Thomas; Reiner, Thomas; Bowyer, Peter; Larsen, Søren; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Kunz, Gerard; Hall, Alan; Liss, Peter; Malin, Gill; Upstill-Goddard, Rob; Woolf, David; Graham, Angus; Nightingale, Phil; Fairall, Chris; Hare, Jeff; Dissly, Richard; Tans, Pieter; Anderson, Bob; Smith, Stu

    The ASGAMAGE project addressed the problem of the large discrepancy between the chemistry based and micrometeorological methods and aimed to determine any geophysical parameters apart from the wind speed that affect air-sea gas exchange in an effort to reduce the uncertainty in the global carbon balance. Experiments were performed in the spring and fall of 1996 at and near a research platform off the Dutch coast and two surface layer models were developed for the gas exchange process. The results gave a reduction of the difference between the two types of methods from an order of magnitude to a factor of two as well as indications for the causes of the remaining difference.

  16. Measurements for the JASPER Program fission gas plenum experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1987-06-01

    The Fission Gas Plenum Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tower Shielding Facility during FY 1987 to: provide data for verification of the assumptions and calculational methods used to determine the neutron leakage from the plenum, and provide an uncertainty evaluation associated with the calculations. The Tower Shielding Reactor source was modified to represent the neutron spectrum leaving a typical liquid-metal-cooled reactor core along its axis. The experimental configurations resulted from the insertion of either a homogeneous or homogeneous-heterogeneous gas plenum combination into the iris of a concrete slab, with the only variable being the thickness of the plenum. Integral neutron fluxes were measured behind each of the configurations at specified locations, and neutron spectra were obtained behind selected mockups. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form. This experiment is the second in a series of six experiments to be performed as part of a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The research program is intended to provide support for the development of advanced sodium-cooled reactors.

  17. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    1999-08-31

    This document presents information on aerosol formation in tank head spaces during rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) from November 1994 through April 1999 in single shell waste tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. The average tank head space mass concentration during RMCS has been 2.1E-5 g waste/m{sup 3}. The average mass of suspended solids present in a tank head space during RMCS has been 5.6E-2 g waste. The mass of waste sent to an exhauster during RMCS has averaged 5.3E-1 g waste per RMCS core and 8.3E-2 g waste per RMCS segment.

  18. Ocean Observatory Gas Hydrates Experiments on the Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, Martin; Heesemann, Martin; Mihaly, Steve; Kelley, Deborah; Moran, Kate; Philip, Brendan; Römer, Miriam; Riedel, Michael; Solomon, Evan; Thomsen, Laurenz; Purser, Autun

    2016-04-01

    Ocean Networks Canada's (ONC's) NEPTUNE observatory and the Ocean Observatories Initiative's (OOI's) Cabled Array installations enable long-term gas hydrate experiments on the Cascadia Margin offshore Vancouver Island and Washington and Oregon State. The great advantage of cabled ocean networks in providing power and high bandwidth internet access to the seafloor on a permanent basis is allowing constant monitoring and interacting with experiments hundreds of kilometres away from shore throughout the year. Many different gas hydrate related experiments are installed at three various hydrate nodes, Clayoquot Slope and Barkley Canyon offshore Vancouver Island and Southern Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. As an example, a seafloor crawler called Wally is operated from Bremen in Germany by Jacobs University, carrying out measurements by moving around the Barkley hydrate mounds on a daily basis, determining for instance the speed of dynamic changes of the benthic communities. In another example, several years of hourly sonar data show gas bubbles rising from the seafloor near the Bullseye Vent with varying intensities, allowing statistically sound correlations with other seafloor parameters such as ground shaking, temperature and pressure variations and currents, where tidal pressure appearing as the main driver. The Southern Hydrate Ridge is now equipped with the world's first long-term seafloor mass spectrometer, co-located with a camera and lights, hydrophone, current meters, pressure sensor, autonomous OSMO and fluid samplers, and is surrounded by a seismometer array for local seismicity. The data are freely available through open access data portals at: http://dmas.uvic.ca/home and https://ooinet.oceanobservatories.org/

  19. Preliminary Experiments Using a Passive Detector for Measuring Indoor 220Rn Progeny Concentrations with an Aerosol Chamber.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Kranrod, Chutima; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes preliminary experiments using a passive detector for integrating measurements of indoor thoron (²²⁰Rn) progeny concentrations with an aerosol chamber. A solid state nuclear detector (CR-39) covered with a thin aluminum-vaporized polyethylene plate (Mylar film) was used to detect only alpha particles emitted from ²¹²Po due to ²²⁰Rn progeny deposited on the detector surfaces. The initial experiment showed that Mylar film with area density of more than 5 mg cm⁻² was suitable to cut off completely alpha particles of 7.7 MeV from ²¹⁴Po of ²²²Rn progeny decay. In the experiment using the passive detector, it was observed that the net track density increased linearly with an increase of time-integrating ²²⁰Rn progeny concentration. As a result of dividing deposition rates by atom concentrations, the deposition velocity was given as 0.023 cm s⁻¹ for total ²²⁰Rn progeny. The model estimates of deposition velocities were 0.330 cm s⁻¹ for unattached ²²⁰Rn progeny and 0.0011 cm s⁻¹ for aerosol-attached ²²⁰Rn progeny using Lai-Nazaroff formulae. These deposition velocities were in the same range with the results reported in the literature. It was also found that the exposure experiments showed little influence of vertical profiles and surface orientations of the passive detector in the chamber on the detection responses, which was in good agreement with that in the model estimates. Furthermore, it was inferred that the main uncertainty of the passive detector was inhomogeneous deposition of Rn progeny onto its detection surfaces.

  20. Implementation of Single-Shot Ellipsometry on Gas Gun Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Sean; Ao, Tommy; Bernstein, Aaron; Davis, Jean-Paul; Ditmire, Todd; Dolan, Daniel; Lin, Jung-Fu; Seagle, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We have built and implemented a time-resolved ellipsometry diagnostic for dynamic testing at Sandia National Laboratories. This diagnostic measures refractive index of a sample under dynamic conditions with a time resolution of a few nanoseconds. We show and discuss results from our first dynamic experiments on a gas gun. Future work will study geophysical materials under relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-0376 A.

  1. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    2015-03-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5-10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  2. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, Alan

    2015-03-30

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, conducting climate model experiments with standard stratospheric aerosol injection scenarios, has found that insolation reduction could keep the global average temperature constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform; the tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without geoengineering. If geoengineering were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5–10 times the rates from gradual global warming. The prospect of geoengineering working may reduce the current drive toward reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and there are concerns about commercial or military control. Because geoengineering cannot safely address climate change, global efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt are crucial to address anthropogenic global warming.

  3. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-15

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  4. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident. PMID:27301319

  5. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident. PMID:27301319

  6. Dynamic terahertz spectroscopy of gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosol under atmospheric pressure using fibre-based asynchronous-optical-sampling terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Da; Nakamura, Shota; Abdelsalam, Dahi Ghareab; Minamikawa, Takeo; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Hindle, Francis; Yasui, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy is a promising method for analysing polar gas molecules mixed with unwanted aerosols due to its ability to obtain spectral fingerprints of rotational transition and immunity to aerosol scattering. In this article, dynamic THz spectroscopy of acetonitrile (CH3CN) gas was performed in the presence of smoke under the atmospheric pressure using a fibre-based, asynchronous-optical-sampling THz time-domain spectrometer. To match THz spectral signatures of gas molecules at atmospheric pressure, the spectral resolution was optimized to 1 GHz with a measurement rate of 1 Hz. The spectral overlapping of closely packed absorption lines significantly boosted the detection limit to 200 ppm when considering all the spectral contributions of the numerous absorption lines from 0.2 THz to 1 THz. Temporal changes of the CH3CN gas concentration were monitored under the smoky condition at the atmospheric pressure during volatilization of CH3CN droplets and the following diffusion of the volatilized CH3CN gas without the influence of scattering or absorption by the smoke. This system will be a powerful tool for real-time monitoring of target gases in practical applications of gas analysis in the atmospheric pressure, such as combustion processes or fire accident.

  7. 2D and 3D Eulerian Simulations of the Dynamics and Gas and Aerosol Chemistry of a Young Biomass Burning Smoke Plume from a Savannah Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth of aerosol particles and production of ozone in young smoke plumes is the result of a complex interaction between the mean flow in the smoke plume, turbulent diffusion, gas-phase oxidation, coagulation, and mass transfer between phases. Models allow us to separate the effects of these processes and predict their impact on the global environment. We present the results of two and three-dimensional Eulerian simulations of the dynamics and chemistry of the smoke plume formed by the Timbavati savannah fire studied during SAFARI 2000 (Hobbs et al., 2003, JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JD002352). The dynamical model is an extension of an Eulerian cloud-resolving model that has previously been used to study the role of deep convective clouds on tropospheric chemistry (Wang and Prinn, 2000, JGR, 105(D17) 22,269-22,297). The model includes a source of sensible heat, gases, and particles at the surface to simulate the savannah fire. The new gas and aerosol chemistry model includes heterogeneous chemistry, kinetic mass transfer, coagulation and the formation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol. Photolysis rates are calculated based on the solution of the radiative transfer equation within the plume, including the scattering and absorption of radiation by the smoke aerosols. Our preliminary 2D Eulerian results using standard chemistry and UV fluxes show that the model can simulate the lower but not the higher levels of O3 observed. Also, the simulated 2D O3 field shows a wave-like pattern in the downwind direction, even though the emissions from the fire are held constant. This suggests that plume heterogeneity in the downwind direction may account for some of the observed variability in O3. We will present results of runs incorporating higher resolution calculation of photolysis rates, heterogeneous HONO formation, and gas phase reactions involving the uncharacterized organic compounds observed in the gas phase of the Timbavati plume in order to better simulate these

  8. SAGE II aerosol validation - Selected altitude measurements, including particle micromeasurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.; Russell, Philip B.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Ferry, Guy V.; Livingston, John M.; Rosen, James N.; Osborn, Mary T.; Kritz, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    The validity of particulate extinction coefficients derived from limb path solar radiance measurements obtained during the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II is tested. The SAGE II measurements are compared with correlative aerosol measurements taken during January 1985, August 1985, and July 1986 with impactors, laser spectrometers, and filter samplers on a U-2 aircraft, an upward pointing lidar on a P-3 aircraft, and balloon-borne optical particle counters. The data for July 29, 1986 are discussed in detail. The aerosol measurements taken on this day at an altitude of 20.5 km produce particulate extinction values which validate the SAGE II values for similar wavelengths.

  9. Preliminary Observations of organic gas-particle partitioning from biomass combustion smoke using an aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Collett, J. L.; Sullivan, A. P.; Carrico, C. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Malm, W. C.; Lincoln, E.; Wold, C. E.; Hao, W.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play important roles in adverse health effects, indirect and direct forcing of Earth’s climate, and visibility degradation. Biomass burning emissions from wild and prescribed fires can make a significant contribution to ambient aerosol mass in many locations and seasons. In order to better understand the chemical properties of particles produced by combustion of wild land fuels, an experiment was conducted in 2009 at the U.S. Forest Service/United States Department of Agriculture (USFS/USDA) Fire Science Laboratory (FSL) located in Missoula, Montana, to measure volatility of open biomass burning emissions for a variety of fuel types. Both isothermal and temperature-dependent volatilization were studied, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) coupled with thermal denuder. Small quantities (200-800g) of various fuel types, primarily from the U.S., were burned in a large combustion chamber and diluted in two stages in continuous-flow residence chambers. The partitioning of particulate organic mass concentrations by the HR-ToF-AMS was evaluated for each fuel type using nominal dilution ratios characterized both by measuring flow rates in continuous-flow residence chambers and from the concentrations of several conserved tracers. The volatility of biomass burning smoke was found to vary across fuel types. Up to ~60% volatile loss of organic matter was observed as a result of dilution for some smoke samples (e.g., Lodgepole pine and Ponderosa pine). We will investigate relationships between volatility and several parameters such as the absolute mass concentration and chemical composition. We will also examine the behavior of biomass burning tracers, such as AMS m/z 60, under dilution conditions. Previous studies (e.g. Lee et al., AS&T 2010 and Aiken et al., ACP 2009) have observed a strong relationship between OA and AMS m/z 60 in fresh biomass burning smoke. We will examine whether this relationship is altered

  10. Submicron Organic Aerosol Function Groups during the International Chemistry Experiment in the Arctic LOwer Troposphere (ICEALOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L. M.; Shaw, P. M.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol organic mass (OM) components are expected to have significant direct and indirect impacts on Arctic climate, especially during springtime Arctic haze. The chemical and physical properties of OM in Arctic aerosol remain largely unconstrained. The R/V Knorr traveled between Iceland and the Barents Sea during the ice-free months of March and April of 2008 and collected submicron particles on teflon filters for Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify organic functional groups. Time series and composition are presented along with air mass back trajectories to indicate source regions. Early findings identify alcohols, alkanes, and carboxylic acids, with smaller amounts of amines, aromatics, alkenes and carbonyls. These data show the important contributions of organic oxygen and nitrogen in the Arctic region. Single particle analysis by Near-edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) Scanning Transmission X- ray Microscopy (STXM) provides additional information about the distribution and morphology of the types of organic particles. Comparison to collocated simultaneous measurements by other techniques showed good agreement for OM and oxygenated organic fractions.

  11. Morphological characterization of soot aerosol particles during LACIS Experiment in November (LExNo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, A.; Wennrich, C.; Stratmann, F.; Wex, H.; Henning, S.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Schneider, J.; Walter, S.; Lieberwirth, I.

    2010-06-01

    Combined mobility and aerodynamic measurements were used to characterize the morphology of soot particles in an experimental campaign on the hygroscopic growth and activation of an artificial biomass burning aerosol. A custom-made, single-stage low-pressure impactor and two aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) operating in the free molecular regime were used to measure the vacuum aerodynamic diameter of mobility-selected artificial soot particles that were produced in a spark discharge generator and then modified by condensation of ammonium hydrogen sulfate or levoglucosan as a coating to change their hydroscopic activity. Transmission electron microscope images revealed a relationship between the electrical mobility diameter and the diameter of the enveloping sphere, thus enabling evaluation of the effective density of soot agglomerates. A fractal description of the morphology of the soot aggregates allowed for evaluation of the average mass of the hygroscopic material per particle. The average mass of the hygroscopic material per particle was also measured directly with the two AMS instruments, and the agreement between the two methods was found satisfactory. This tandem approach allows detection of small changes in the particle effective density and morphology caused by condensation of organic material.

  12. Horizontal variability of aerosol optical depth observed during the ARCTAS airborne experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.

    2011-08-01

    We present statistics on the horizontal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) directly measured from the NASA P-3 aircraft. Our measurements during two contrasting phases (in Alaska and Canada) of the ARCTAS mission arguably constrain the variability in most aerosol environments common over the globe. In the Canada phase, which features local emissions, 499 nm AOD has a median relative standard deviation (stdrel, med) of 19 % and 9 % and an autocorrelation (r) of 0.37 and 0.71 over 20 km and 6 km horizontal segments, respectively. In the Alaska phase, which features long-range transport, the variability is considerably lower (stdrel, med = 3 %, r = 0.92 even over 35.2 km). Compared to the magnitude of AOD, its wavelength dependence varies less in the Canada phase, more in the Alaska phase. We translate these findings from straight-line flight tracks into grid boxes and points, to help interpretation and design of satellite remote sensing, suborbital observations and transport modeling.

  13. Horizontal variability of aerosol optical depth observed during the ARCTAS airborne experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, Y.; Redemann, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present statistics on the horizontal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) directly measured from the NASA P-3 aircraft. Our measurements during two contrasting phases (in Alaska and Canada) of the ARCTAS mission arguably constrain the variability in most aerosol environments common over the globe. In the Canada phase, which features local emissions, 499 nm AOD has a median relative standard deviation (stdrel,med) of 19 % and 9 % and an autocorrelation (r) of 0.37 and 0.71 over 20 km and 6 km horizontal segments, respectively. In the Alaska phase, which features long-range transport, the variability is considerably lower (stdrel,med = 3 %, r = 0.92 even over 35.2 km). Compared to the magnitude of AOD, its wavelength dependence varies less in the Canada phase, more in the Alaska phase. We translate these findings from straight-line flight tracks into grid boxes and points, to help interpretation and design of satellite remote sensing, suborbital observations and transport modeling.

  14. Aerosol and Trace Gas Sources in Northern China: Changes in Concentrations Before and After the Official "Heating Season" Help Characterize Emissions From Coal-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Marufu, L. T.; Dickerson, R. R.; Li, Z.; Stehr, J. W.; Chen, H.; Wang, P.

    2006-05-01

    In March 2005, as a part of the project EAST-AIRE (East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: An International Regional Experiment), in-situ measurements of trace gases and aerosol optical properties were made at Xianghe, a rural surface site about 70 km east-southeast, generally downwind, of Beijing metropolitan area. CO, SO2, NO/NOy, O3, aerosol absorption coefficient, and aerosol scattering coefficients were determined simultaneously using the University of Maryland light aircraft instrument package. Pollutant ratios have been calculated to characterize the emission sources around the site. A dramatic drop in the NOy/CO ratio found around March 13/14 suggesting a sudden shutoff of a large fraction of the high- temperature combustion sources in the region. This observed change in concentrations occurred simultaneously with the transition from "heating season" to "non-heating season" in Northern China. Over the course of just a few days (around March 15), all boilers used to provide heat for cities and towns in this region are shut down in accordance with a governmental guideline. Most of these boilers operate with coal, and by using ratios of NOy/CO, SO2/CO, aerosol scattering/CO, and aerosol absorption/CO during and after the "heating season", emissions from these small to medium sized coal-fired boilers can be characterized. Results indicate that these residential and small-scale industrial heaters are a major source of NOy and SO2. Besides elevating the regional atmospheric pollutant level, the trace gases and aerosols emitted also have potential effects in other aspects such as the biogeochemical cycle of N and the agricultural production in this region.

  15. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  16. Capillary pumped loop GAS and Hitchhiker flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, J.; Kroliczek, E. J.; Butler, D.; Schweickart, R. B.; Mcintosh, R.

    1986-01-01

    Flight experiments of a capillary pumped loop (CPL) aboard the Space Shuttle on both the Get Away Special (GAS) and Hitchhiker-G (H/H-G) carriers are described. These tests have shown that a two-phase heat transfer loop utilizing a wicking material as the system pumping mechanism can operate successfully in a zero-g environment. The CPL operating modes demonstrated were start-up, heat load sharing/natural priming, liquid inventory and temperature control via the reservoir, dryout recovery, and isolation of a single pump deprime. Also investigated were high and low power limits, and inlet subcooling requirements. In these CPL flight experiments, successful system operation was demonstrated at input power levels up to 560 watts and inlet subcooling below 2 C.

  17. CELSS experiment model and design concept of gas recycle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.; Kanda, S.

    1986-01-01

    In order to prolong the duration of manned missions around the Earth and to expand the human existing region from the Earth to other planets such as a Lunar Base or a manned Mars flight mission, the controlled ecological life support system (CELSS) becomes an essential factor of the future technology to be developed through utilization of space station. The preliminary system engineering and integration efforts regarding CELSS have been carried out by the Japanese CELSS concept study group for clarifying the feasibility of hardware development for Space station experiments and for getting the time phased mission sets after FY 1992. The results of these studies are briefly summarized and the design and utilization methods of a Gas Recycle System for CELSS experiments are discussed.

  18. The technical basis for air pathway assessment of resuspended radioactive aerosols: LLNL experiences at seven sites around the world

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.

    1993-09-01

    There is a large uncertainty in quantifying the inhalation pathway and the aerosol emission rate in human health assessments of radioactive-contamination sites. The need for site-specific assessments led to formation of our team of specialists at LLNL, who have participated in numerous field campaigns around the world. Our goal was to obtain all the information necessary for determining potential human exposures and to estimate source terms for turbulent transport of the emissions during both normal and disturbed soil conditions. That is, measurements were made of the key variables to quantify the suspended aerosols at the actual contamination sites, but different scenarios for habitation, site management, and site cleanup were included. The most notable locations of these site-investigations were the Marshall Islands (Bikini, Enewetak, and Rongelap), Nevada Test Site (GMX, Little Feller, Palanquin, and Plutonium Valley), Tonopah (Nevada--site of Roller Coaster), Savannah River Lab (South Carolina--H-Area site), Johnston Island (cleanup of rocket-impact site), Chernobyl (Ukraine--grass field end sandy beach sites near Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4), and Palomares (Spain--site of aircraft accident). This discussion will review the variables quantified, methods developed, general results, uncertainty of estimations, and recommendations for future research that are a result of our experience in these field studies.

  19. Constraining Aerosol Optical Models Using Ground-Based, Collocated Particle Size and Mass Measurements in Variable Air Mass Regimes During the 7-SEAS/Dongsha Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Shaun W.; Hansell, Richard A.; Chow, Judith C.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Ji, Qiang; Li, Can; Watson, John G.; Khlystov, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    During the spring of 2010, NASA Goddard's COMMIT ground-based mobile laboratory was stationed on Dongsha Island off the southwest coast of Taiwan, in preparation for the upcoming 2012 7-SEAS field campaign. The measurement period offered a unique opportunity for conducting detailed investigations of the optical properties of aerosols associated with different air mass regimes including background maritime and those contaminated by anthropogenic air pollution and mineral dust. What appears to be the first time for this region, a shortwave optical closure experiment for both scattering and absorption was attempted over a 12-day period during which aerosols exhibited the most change. Constraints to the optical model included combined SMPS and APS number concentration data for a continuum of fine and coarse-mode particle sizes up to PM2.5. We also take advantage of an IMPROVE chemical sampler to help constrain aerosol composition and mass partitioning of key elemental species including sea-salt, particulate organic matter, soil, non sea-salt sulphate, nitrate, and elemental carbon. Our results demonstrate that the observed aerosol scattering and absorption for these diverse air masses are reasonably captured by the model, where peak aerosol events and transitions between key aerosols types are evident. Signatures of heavy polluted aerosol composed mostly of ammonium and non sea-salt sulphate mixed with some dust with transitions to background sea-salt conditions are apparent in the absorption data, which is particularly reassuring owing to the large variability in the imaginary component of the refractive indices. Extinctive features at significantly smaller time scales than the one-day sample period of IMPROVE are more difficult to reproduce, as this requires further knowledge concerning the source apportionment of major chemical components in the model. Consistency between the measured and modeled optical parameters serves as an important link for advancing remote

  20. Origin of surface and columnar Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) aerosols using source- and region-tagged emissions transport in a general circulation model - article no. D24211

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2008-12-15

    We study the relative influence of aerosols emitted from different sectors and geographical regions on aerosol loading in south Asia. Sectors contributing aerosol emissions include biofuel and fossil fuel combustion, open biomass burning, and natural sources. Geographical regions include India, southeast Asia, east Asia, Africa-west Asia, and the rest of the world. Simulations of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), from January to March 1999, are made in the general circulation model of Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD-ZT GCM) with emissions tagged by sector and geographical region. Anthropogenic emissions dominate (54-88%) the predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) over all the receptor regions. Among the anthropogenic sectors, fossil fuel combustion has the largest overall influence on aerosol loading, primarily sulfate, with emissions from India (50-80%) and rest of the world significantly influencing surface concentrations and AOD. Biofuel combustion has a significant influence on both the surface and columnar black carbon (BC) in particular over the Indian subcontinent and Bay of Bengal with emissions largely from the Indian region (60-80%). Open biomass burning emissions influence organic matter (OM) significantly, and arise largely from Africa-west Asia. The emissions from Africa-west Asia affect the carbonaceous aerosols AOD in all receptor regions, with their largest influence (AOD-BC: 60%; and AOD-OM: 70%) over the Arabian Sea. Among Indian regions, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is the largest contributor to anthropogenic surface mass concentrations and AOD over the Bay of Bengal and India. Dust aerosols are contributed mainly through the long-range transport from Africa-west Asia over the receptor regions. Overall, the model estimates significant intercontinental incursion of aerosol, for example, BC, OM, and dust from Africa-west Asia and sulfate from distant regions (rest of the world) into the INDOEX domain.

  1. Stratospheric ozone variations in the equatorial region as seen in Stratospheric and Gas Experiment data

    SciTech Connect

    Masato Shiotani; Fumio Hasebe

    1994-07-20

    An analysis is made of equatorial ozone variations for 5 years, 1984-1989, using the ozone profile data derived from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument. Attention is focused on the annual cycle and also on interannual variability, particularly the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variations in the lower stratosphere, where the largest contribution to total column ozone takes place. The annual variation in zonal mean total ozone around the equator is composed of symmetric and asymmetric modes with respect to the equator, with maximum contributions being around 19 km for the symmetric mode and around 25 km for the asymmetric mode. The persistent zonal wavenumber 1 structure observed by the total ozone mapping spectrometer over the equator is almost missing in the SAGE-derived column amounts integrated in the stratosphere, suggesting a significant contribution from tropospheric ozone. Interannual variations in the equatorial ozone are dominated by the QBO above 20 km and the ENSO-related variation below 20 km. The ozone QBO is characterized by zonally uniform phase changes in association with the zonal wind QBO in the equatorial lower stratosphere. The ENSO-related ozone variation consists of both the east-west vacillation and the zonally uniform phase variation. During the El Nino event, the east-west contrast with positive (negative) deviations in the eastern (western) hemisphere is conspicuous, while the decreasing tendency of the zonal mean values is maximum at the same time. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  2. Atmospheric reactivity of hydroxyl radicals with guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), a biomass burning emitted compound: Secondary organic aerosol formation and gas-phase oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauraguais, Amélie; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Cassez, Andy; Deboudt, Karine; Fourmentin, Marc; Choël, Marie

    2014-04-01

    Methoxyphenols are low molecular weight semi-volatile polar aromatic compounds produced from the pyrolysis of wood lignin. The reaction of guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) with hydroxyl radicals has been studied in the LPCA simulation chamber at (294 ± 2) K, atmospheric pressure, low relative humidity (RH < 1%) and under high-NOx conditions using CH3ONO as OH source. The aerosol production was monitored using a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer); the SOA yields were in the range from 0.003 to 0.87 and the organic aerosol formation can be expressed by a one-product gas/particle partitioning absorption model. Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM) Electron Microscopy observations were performed to characterize the physical state of SOA produced from the OH reaction with guaiacol; they display both liquid and solid particles (in an amorphous state). GC-FID (Gas Chromatography - Flame Ionization Detection) and GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry) analysis show the formation of nitroguaiacol isomers as main oxidation products in the gas- and aerosol-phases. In the gas-phase, the formation yields were (10 ± 2) % for 4-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-4-nitrobenzene; 4-NG) and (6 ± 2) % for 3- or 6-nitroguaiacol (1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-3-nitrobenzene or 1-hydroxy-2-methoxy-6-nitrobenzene; 3/6-NG; the standards are not commercially available so both isomers cannot be distinguished) whereas in SOA their yield were much lower (≤0.1%). To our knowledge, this work represents the first identification of nitroguaiacols as gaseous oxidation products of the OH reaction with guaiacol. As the reactivity of nitroguaiacols with atmospheric oxidants is probably low, we suggest using them as biomass burning emission gas tracers. The atmospheric implications of the guaiacol + OH reaction are also discussed.

  3. A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H.; Erikson, L. E.; Lemut, A.; and others

    2013-04-19

    New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

  4. The VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment (VORTEX) GAS project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilen, Sven G.; Langenderfer, Lynn S.; Jardon, Rebecca D.; Cutlip, Hansford H.; Kazerooni, Alexander C.; Thweatt, Amber L.; Lester, Joseph L.; Bernal, Luis P.

    1995-01-01

    Get Away Special (GAS) payload G-093, also called VORTEX (VOrtex Ring Transit EXperiment), is an investigation of the propagation of a vortex ring through a liquid-gas interface in microgravity. This process results in the formation of one or more liquid droplets similar to earth based liquid atomization systems. In the absence of gravity, surface tension effects dominate the drop formation process. The Shuttle's microgravity environment allows the study of the same fluid atomization processes as using a larger drop size than is possible on Earth. This enables detailed experimental studies of the complex flow processes encountered in liquid atomization systems. With VORTEX, deformations in both the vortex ring and the fluid surface will be measured closely for the first time in a parameters range that accurately resembles liquid atomization. The experimental apparatus will record images of the interactions for analysis after the payload has been returned to earth. The current design of the VORTEX payload consists of a fluid test cell with a vortex ring generator, digital imaging system, laser illumination system, computer based controller, batteries for payload power, and an array of housekeeping and payload monitoring sensors. It is a self-contained experiment and will be flown on board the Space Shuttle in a 5 cubic feet GAS canister. The VORTEX Project is entirely run by students at the University of Michigan but is overseen by a faculty advisor acting as the payload customer and the contact person with NASA. This paper summarizes both the technical and programmatic aspects of the VORTEX Project.

  5. Automation of experiments at Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Approaches to solving the problems of automation of basic processes in long-term experiments in heavy ion beams of the Dubna Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS) facility are considered. Approaches in the field of spectrometry, both of rare α decays of superheavy nuclei and those for constructing monitoring systems to provide accident-free experiment running with highly radioactive targets and recording basic parameters of experiment, are described. The specific features of Double Side Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are considered, special attention is paid to the role of boundary effects of neighboring p-n transitions in the "active correlations" method. An example of an off-beam experiment attempting to observe Zeno effect is briefly considered. Basic examples for nuclear reactions of complete fusion at 48Ca ion beams of U-400 cyclotron (LNR, JINR) are given. A scenario of development of the "active correlations" method for the case of very high intensity beams of heavy ions at promising accelerators of LNR, JINR, is presented.

  6. Mechanisms for the formation of secondary organic aerosol components from the gas-phase ozonolysis of alpha-pinene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Russell, Andrew T; Marston, George

    2008-08-01

    Gas-phase ozonolysis of alpha-pinene was studied in static chamber experiments under 'OH-free' conditions. A range of multifunctional products-in particular low-volatility carboxylic acids-were identified in the condensed phase using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry after derivatisation. The dependence of product yields on reaction conditions (humidity, choice of OH radical scavengers, added Criegee intermediate scavengers, NO(2)etc.) was investigated to probe the mechanisms of formation of these products; additional information was obtained by studying the ozonolysis of an enal and an enone derived from alpha-pinene. On the basis of experimental findings, previously suggested mechanisms were evaluated and detailed gas-phase mechanisms were developed to explain the observed product formation. Atmospheric implications of this work are discussed.

  7. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  8. Airborne Lidar measurements of aerosols, mixed layer heights, and ozone during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS summer field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Shipley, S. T.; Butler, C. F.; Ismail, S.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed summary of the NASA Ultraviolet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) data archive obtained during the EPA Persistent Elevated Pollution Episode/Northeast Regional Oxidant Study (PEPE/NEROS) Summer Field Experiment Program (July through August 1980) is presented. The UV dial data set consists of remote measurements of mixed layer heights, aerosol backscatter cross sections, and sequential ozone profiles taken during 14 long-range flights onboard the NASA Wallops Flight Center Electra aircraft. These data are presented in graphic and tabular form, and they have been submitted to the PEPE/NEROS data archive on digital magnetic tape. The derivation of mixing heights and ozone profiles from UV Dial signals is discussed, and detailed intercomparisons with measurements obtained by in situ sensors are presented.

  9. Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

  10. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling systems: laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; Chauvin, Nicolas; Decarpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSSs) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) used in eddy covariance measurements.

    In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete setup was tested. The main results are as follows. - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - Conversely, no impact of the tested filters on cut-off frequency was found, GSSs with and without filters presenting similar cut-off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut-off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found to be noteworthy.

  11. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  12. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling system : laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; De Carpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick; Chauvin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSS) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGA) used in eddy covariance measurements. In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete set-up was tested. The main results are that: - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - On the contrary, no impact of the tested filters on cut off frequency was found, GSS with and without filters presenting similar cut off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found noteworthy.

  13. Mass spectrometry of interfacial layers during fast aqueous aerosol/ozone gas reactions of atmospheric interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, S.; Vecitis, C. D.; Cheng, J.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Colussi, A. J.

    2008-04-01

    The oxidations of sulfite and iodide in the interfacial layers of aqueous microdroplets exposed to O 3(g) for 1 ms are investigated by online mass spectrometry of the electrostatically ejected anions. S(IV) oxidation losses in Na 2SO 3 microdroplets are proportional to [S(IV)] [O 3(g)] up to ˜90% conversion. I - is more abundant than HSO3- in the interfacial layers of equimolar (Na 2SO 3 + NaI) microdroplets and ˜3 times more reactive than HSO3- toward O 3(aq) in bulk solution, but it is converted withminimalloss to I3- and IO3- plus a persistent ISO3- intermediate. These observations reveal unanticipated interfacial gradients, reactivity patterns and transport phenomena that had not been taken into account in previous treatments of fast gas-liquid reactions.

  14. Note: A combined aerodynamic lens/ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiment for the on-stream investigation of aerosol surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mysak, Erin R.; Starr, David E.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2010-01-15

    We discuss a new approach for the measurement of the surfaces of free aerosol particles with diameters from 50 to 1000 nm. Particles in this size range have significant influence on the heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere and affect human health. Interfacing an aerodynamic lens to an ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectrometer permits measurement of the surface chemical composition of unsupported aerosol particles in real time. We discuss the basic considerations for the design of such an instrument, its current limitations and potentials for improvement. Results from a proof-of-principle experiment on silicon oxide particles with average diameters of 270 nm are shown.

  15. Airborne LIDAR Measurements of Water Vapor, Ozone, Clouds, and Aerosols in the Tropics Near Central America During the TC4 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kooi, Susan; Fenn, Marta; Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard; Hair, John; Browell, Edward; Notari, Anthony; Butler, Carolyn; Burton, Sharon; Simpson, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Large scale distributions of ozone, water vapor, aerosols, and clouds were measured throughout the troposphere by two NASA Langley lidar systems on board the NASA DC-8 aircraft as part of the Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4) over Central and South America and adjacent oceans in the summer of 2007. Special emphasis was placed on the sampling of convective outflow and transport, sub-visible cirrus clouds, boundary layer aerosols, Saharan dust, volcanic emissions, and urban and biomass burning plumes. This paper presents preliminary results from this campaign, and demonstrates the value of coordinated measurements by the two lidar systems.